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Sample records for laser deposited chalcogenide

  1. Photonic bandgap amorphous chalcogenide thin films with multilayered structure grown by pulsed laser deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shao-qian; Němec, Petre; Nazabal, Virginie; Jin, Yu-qi

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous chalcogenide thin films were fabricated by the pulsed laser deposition technique. Thereafter, the stacks of multilayered thin films for reflectors and microcavity were designed for telecommunication wavelength. The prepared multilayered thin films for reflectors show good compatibility. The microcavity structure consists of Ge25Ga5Sb10S65 (doped with Er3+) spacer layer surrounded by two 5-layer As40Se60/Ge25Sb5S70 reflectors. Scanning/transmission electron microscopy results show good periodicity, great adherence and smooth interfaces between the alternating dielectric layers, which confirms a suitable compatibility between different materials. The results demonstrate that the chalcogenides can be used for preparing vertical Bragg reflectors and microcavity with high quality.

  2. Interface control by homoepitaxial growth in pulsed laser deposited iron chalcogenide thin films

    PubMed Central

    Molatta, Sebastian; Haindl, Silvia; Trommler, Sascha; Schulze, Michael; Wurmehl, Sabine; Hühne, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Thin film growth of iron chalcogenides by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is still a delicate issue in terms of simultaneous control of stoichiometry, texture, substrate/film interface properties, and superconducting properties. The high volatility of the constituents sharply limits optimal deposition temperatures to a narrow window and mainly challenges reproducibility for vacuum based methods. In this work we demonstrate the beneficial introduction of a semiconducting FeSe1−xTex seed layer for subsequent homoepitaxial growth of superconducting FeSe1−xTex thin film on MgO substrates. MgO is one of the most favorable substrates used in superconducting thin film applications, but the controlled growth of iron chalcogenide thin films on MgO has not yet been optimized and is the least understood. The large mismatch between the lattice constants of MgO and FeSe1−xTex of about 11% results in thin films with a mixed texture, that prevents further accurate investigations of a correlation between structural and electrical properties of FeSe1−xTex. Here we present an effective way to significantly improve epitaxial growth of superconducting FeSe1−xTex thin films with reproducible high critical temperatures (≥17 K) at reduced deposition temperatures (200 °C–320 °C) on MgO using PLD. This offers a broad scope of various applications. PMID:26548645

  3. Interface control by homoepitaxial growth in pulsed laser deposited iron chalcogenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molatta, Sebastian; Haindl, Silvia; Trommler, Sascha; Schulze, Michael; Wurmehl, Sabine; Hühne, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    Thin film growth of iron chalcogenides by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is still a delicate issue in terms of simultaneous control of stoichiometry, texture, substrate/film interface properties, and superconducting properties. The high volatility of the constituents sharply limits optimal deposition temperatures to a narrow window and mainly challenges reproducibility for vacuum based methods. In this work we demonstrate the beneficial introduction of a semiconducting FeSe1-xTex seed layer for subsequent homoepitaxial growth of superconducting FeSe1-xTex thin film on MgO substrates. MgO is one of the most favorable substrates used in superconducting thin film applications, but the controlled growth of iron chalcogenide thin films on MgO has not yet been optimized and is the least understood. The large mismatch between the lattice constants of MgO and FeSe1-xTex of about 11% results in thin films with a mixed texture, that prevents further accurate investigations of a correlation between structural and electrical properties of FeSe1-xTex. Here we present an effective way to significantly improve epitaxial growth of superconducting FeSe1-xTex thin films with reproducible high critical temperatures (≥17 K) at reduced deposition temperatures (200 °C-320 °C) on MgO using PLD. This offers a broad scope of various applications.

  4. Growth Mechanisms and Structural Properties of Lead Chalcogenide Films Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virt, I. S.; Rudyi, I. O.; Lopatynskyi, I. Ye.; Dubov, Yu.; Tur, Y.; Lusakowska, E.; Luka, G.

    2016-09-01

    Three lead chalcogenide films, PbTe, PbSe, and PbS, with a high structural quality were grown by pulsed lased deposition (PLD). The films were grown on single crystal substrates (Si, KCl, Al2O3) and on Si covered with a Si3N4 buffer layer. The Si3N4 layer latter facilitated the lead chalcogenide layer nucleation during the first growth stages and resulted in a more homogeneous surface morphology and a lower surface roughness. The surface geometry (roughness) of the films grown on Si3N4 was studied by means of the power spectral density analysis. Different growth modes, ranging from plasma plume condensation to bulk diffusion, resulting in observed film morphologies were identified. The investigations were complemented by electrical characterization of the chalcogenide films.

  5. Atomic layer deposition of quaternary chalcogenides

    DOEpatents

    Thimsen, Elijah J; Riha, Shannon C; Martinson, Alex B.F.; Elam, Jeffrey W; Pellin, Michael J

    2014-06-03

    Methods and systems are provided for synthesis and deposition of chalcogenides (including Cu.sub.2ZnSnS.sub.4). Binary compounds, such as metal sulfides, can be deposited by alternating exposures of the substrate to a metal cation precursor and a chalcogen anion precursor with purge steps between.

  6. Solution synthesis of mixed-metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and spray deposition of precursor films

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.

    2000-01-01

    A colloidal suspension comprising metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is made by reacting a metal salt with a chalcogenide salt in an organic solvent to precipitate a metal chalcogenide, recovering the metal chalcogenide, and admixing the metal chalcogenide with a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is spray deposited onto a substrate to produce a semiconductor precursor film which is substantially free of impurities.

  7. Mode-locked fiber laser based on chalcogenide microwires.

    PubMed

    Al-Kadry, Alaa; El Amraoui, Mohammed; Messaddeq, Younès; Rochette, Martin

    2015-09-15

    We report the first mode-locked fiber laser using a chalcogenide microwire as the nonlinear medium. The laser is passively mode-locked with nonlinear polarization rotation and can be adjusted for the emission of solitons or noise-like pulses. The use of the microwire leads to a mode-locking threshold at the microwatt level and shortens the cavity length by 4 orders of magnitude with respect to other lasers of its kind. The controlled birefringence of the microwire, combined with a linear polarizer in the cavity, enables multiwavelength laser operation with tunable central wavelength, switchable wavelength separation, and a variable number of laser wavelengths. PMID:26371923

  8. Mode-locked fiber laser based on chalcogenide microwires.

    PubMed

    Al-Kadry, Alaa; El Amraoui, Mohammed; Messaddeq, Younès; Rochette, Martin

    2015-09-15

    We report the first mode-locked fiber laser using a chalcogenide microwire as the nonlinear medium. The laser is passively mode-locked with nonlinear polarization rotation and can be adjusted for the emission of solitons or noise-like pulses. The use of the microwire leads to a mode-locking threshold at the microwatt level and shortens the cavity length by 4 orders of magnitude with respect to other lasers of its kind. The controlled birefringence of the microwire, combined with a linear polarizer in the cavity, enables multiwavelength laser operation with tunable central wavelength, switchable wavelength separation, and a variable number of laser wavelengths.

  9. Laser annealing and defect study of chalcogenide photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Ashish

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe), CuZnSn(S,Se)4(CZTSSe), etc., are the potential chalcogenide semiconductors being investigated for next-generation thin film photovoltaics (TFPV). While the champion cell efficiency of CIGSe has exceeded 20%, CZTSSe has crossed the 10% mark. This work investigates the effect of laser annealing on CISe films, and compares the electrical characteristics of CIGSe (chalcopyrite) and CZTSe (kesterite) solar cells. Chapter 1 through 3 provide a background on semiconductors and TFPV, properties of chalcopyrite and kesterite materials, and their characterization using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and thermal admittance spectroscopy (TAS). Chapter 4 investigates electrochemical deposition (nonvacuum synthesis) of CISe followed by continuous wave laser annealing (CWLA) using a 1064 nm laser. It is found that CWLA at ≈ 50 W/cm2 results in structural changes without melting and dewetting of the films. While Cu-poor samples show about 40% reduction in the full width at half maximum of the respective x-ray diffraction peaks, identically treated Cu-rich samples register more than 80% reduction. This study demonstrates that an entirely solid-phase laser annealing path exists for chalcopyrite phase formation and crystallization. Chapter 5 investigates the changes in defect populations after pulse laser annealing in submelting regime of electrochemically deposited and furnace annealed CISe films. DLTS on Schottky diodes reveal that the ionization energy of the dominant majority carrier defect state changes nonmonotonically from 215+/-10 meV for the reference sample, to 330+/-10 meV for samples irradiated at 20 and 30 mJ/cm2, and then back to 215+/-10 meV for samples irradiated at 40 mJ/cm2. A hypothesis involving competing processes of diffusion of Cu and laser-induced generation of In vacancies may explain this behavior. Chapter 6 compares the electrical characteristics of chalcopyrite and kesterite materials. Experiments reveal CZTSe cell has an

  10. Spectral diagnostics of laser erosion plasma of mercury chalcogenide targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyarchuk, B. K.; Popovych, D. I.; Savchuk, V. K.; Savitsky, V. G.

    1995-11-01

    The article sets out to investigate spatial-time and spectral characteristics of laser erosive vapor-plasma torch (EVT), formed at the vaporization of mercury chalcogenines targets. Its influence on the synthesis processes of HgTe and CdHgTe layers, condensed in mercury vapor, is described. It is shown that the laser radiation flux density and Hg vapor pressure in the reaction chamber are dominating factors which determine the character of gas-dynamic spread and EVT composition of mercury chalcogenides targets.

  11. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  12. Optical properties change in laser-induced Te/As2Se3 chalcogenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Mukta; Naik, Ramakanta

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, we report the change in optical parameters due to the deposition and photo-induced diffusion of Te layer into the chalcogenide As2Se3 film. The photo-diffusion creates a solid solution of As-Se-Te which has potential application in optical devices. The Te/As2Se3 bilayer films prepared by thermal evaporation technique were studied by various experimental techniques. The photo-diffusion of Te into As2Se3 matrix was done by 532-nm laser irradiation. The structure of the As2Se3, as-prepared and irradiated Te/As2Se3 films was studied by X-ray diffraction which were amorphous in nature. The presence of all the elements was checked by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and the optical transmission spectra were recorded by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The optical band gap is reduced by the deposition and diffusion of Te into As2Se3 film which is due to the increase in density of defect states in the gap region. The transmission is decreased, whereas the absorption efficiency is increased with the increase in disorderness. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy carried out on these films gives information about the bonding change due to the photo-diffusion process. Therefore, this is an important result which will open up new directions for the application of this material in semiconducting devices.

  13. Laser assisted deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of laser-based processing techniques to solar cell metallization are discussed. Laser-assisted thermal or photolytic maskless deposition from organometallic vapors or solutions may provide a viable alternative to photovoltaic metallization systems currently in use. High power, defocused excimer lasers may be used in conjunction with masks as an alternative to direct laser writing to provide higher throughput. Repeated pulsing with excimer lasers may eliminate the need for secondary plating techniques for metal film buildup. A comparison between the thermal and photochemical deposition processes is made.

  14. Low threshold fiber taper coupled rare earth ion-doped chalcogenide microsphere laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao-Ran; Dai, Shi-Xun; Zhang, Qing-Yuan; Shen, Xiang; Wang, Xun-Si; Zhang, Pei-Qing; Lu, Lai-Wei; Wu, Yue-Hao; Lv, She-Qin

    2015-04-01

    We report the applications of a low-cost and environmentally friendly chalcogenide glass, 75GeS2-15Ga2S3-10CsI, in building active microsphere laser oscillators. A silica fiber taper is used as the coupling mechanism. With an 808-nm laser diode as a pump source, we show that a high-Q (˜ 6×104) laser mode could be obtained from a 75-μm diameter microsphere that is coupled with a 1.77-μm waist-diameter fiber taper. The threshold of the incident pump power is 1.39 mW, which is considerably lower than those of previously reported free-space coupled chalcogenide microsphere lasers. We also note an apparent enhancement in laser power generated from this chalcogenide microsphere laser. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61177087 and 61435009), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB722703), the Program for Innovative Research Team of Ningbo City, China (Grant No. 2009B21007) , the K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University, the Open Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices (South China University of Technology), China (Grant No. 2014-skllmd-01), and the Natural Science Foundation of Ningbo City, China (Grant No. 2014A610125).

  15. Low-phonon-frequency chalcogenide crystalline hosts for rare earth lasers operating beyond three microns

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Nostrand, Michael C.; Krupke, William F.; Schunemann, Peter G.

    2000-01-01

    The invention comprises a RE-doped MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 crystalline gain medium, where M includes a divalent ion such as Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Pb, Eu, or Yb; A is selected from trivalent ions including Al, Ga, and In; X is one of the chalcogenide ions S, Se, and Te; and RE represents the trivalent rare earth ions. The MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 gain medium can be employed in a laser oscillator or a laser amplifier. Possible pump sources include diode lasers, as well as other laser pump sources. The laser wavelengths generated are greater than 3 microns, as becomes possible because of the low phonon frequency of this host medium. The invention may be used to seed optical devices such as optical parametric oscillators and other lasers.

  16. Estimating optical feedback from a chalcogenide fiber in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumpertz, L.; Caillaud, C.; Gilles, C.; Ferré, S.; Schires, K.; Brilland, L.; Troles, J.; Carras, M.; Grillot, F.

    2016-10-01

    The amount of optical feedback originating from a chalcogenide fiber used to couple light from a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser is evaluated experimentally. Threshold reduction measurements on the fibered laser, combined with an analytical study of a rate equations model of the laser under optical feedback, allow estimating the feedback strength between 11% and 15% depending on the fiber cleavage quality. While this remains below the frontier of the chaotic regime, it is sufficient to deeply modify the optical spectrum of a quantum cascade laser. Hence for applications such as gas spectroscopy, where the shape of the optical spectrum is of prime importance, the use of mid-infrared optical isolators may be necessary for fibered quantum cascade lasers to be fully exploited.

  17. Laser processing for thin film chalcogenide photovoltaics: a review and prospectus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonds, Brian J.; Meadows, Helene J.; Misra, Sudhajit; Ferekides, Christos; Dale, Phillip J.; Scarpulla, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    We review prior and on-going works in using laser annealing (LA) techniques in the development of chalcogenide-based [CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)S] solar cells. LA can achieve unique processing regimes as the wavelength and pulse duration can be chosen to selectively heat particular layers of a thin film solar cell or even particular regions within a single layer. Pulsed LA, in particular, can achieve non-steady-state conditions that allow for stoichiometry control by preferential evaporation, which has been utilized in CdTe solar cells to create Ohmic back contacts. Pulsed lasers have also been used with Cu(In,Ga)S to improve device performance by surface-defect annealing as well as bulk deep-defect annealing. Continuous-wave LA shows promise for use as a replacement for furnace annealing as it almost instantaneously supplies heat to the absorbing film without wasting time or energy to bring the much thicker substrate to temperature. Optimizing and utilizing such a technology would allow production lines to increase throughput and thus manufacturing capacity. Lasers have also been used to create potentially low-cost chalcogenide thin films from precursors, which is also reviewed.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of micro-structures created by direct laser writing in multi-layered chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Casey M.; Grabill, Chris N.; Gleason, Benn; Richardson, Gerald D.; Lewis, Anna M.; Vyas, Aadit; Rivero-Baleine, Clara; Richardson, Kathleen A.; Pogrebnyakov, Alexej; Mayer, Theresa S.; Kuebler, Stephen M.

    2015-03-01

    Arsenic trisulfide (As2S3) is a chalcogenide (ChG) material with excellent infrared (IR) transparency (620 nm to 11 μm), low phonon energies, and large nonlinear refractive indices. These properties directly relate to commercial and industrial applications including sensors, photonic waveguides, and acousto-optics. Multi-photon exposure can be used to photopattern thermally deposited As2S3 ChG glassy films of molecular clusters. Immersing the photo-patterned cross-linked material into a polar-solvent removes the unexposed material leaving behind a structure that is a negative-tone replica of the photo-pattern. Nano-structure arrays that were photo-patterned in single-layered As2S3 films through multi-photon direct laser writing (DLW) resulted in the production of nano-beads as a consequence of a standing wave effect. To overcome this effect, an anti-reflective (AR) layer of arsenic triselenide (As2Se3) was thermally deposited between the silicon substrate and the As2S3 layer, creating a multi-layered film. The chemical composition of the unexposed and photo-exposed multi-layered film was examined through Raman spectroscopy. Nano-structure arrays were photopatterned in the multi-layered film and the resulting structure, morphology, and chemical composition were characterized, compared to results from the single-layered film, and correlated with the conditions of the thermal deposition, patterned irradiation, and etch processing.

  19. Electrospray deposition of chalcogenide glass films for gradient refractive index and quantum dot incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Spencer

    Chalcogenide glasses (ChGs) are well-known for their optical properties, making them ideal candidates for emerging applications of mid-infrared microphotonic devices, such as lab-on-a-chip chemical sensing devices, which currently demand additional flexibility in processing and materials available to realize new device designs. Solution-derived processing of ChG films, initially developed in the 1980s by Chern and Lauks, has consisted mainly of spin-coating and offers unique advantages over the more traditional physical vapor deposition techniques. In the present effort, the nanoparticles of interest are luminescent quantum dots (QDs), which can be used as an on-chip source of light for a planar chemical sensing device. Prior efforts of QD incorporation have exposed limitations of spin-coating of ChG solutions, namely QD aggregation and material waste, along with incompatibility with larger scale manufacturing methods such roll-to-roll processing. This dissertation has evaluated electrospray (ES) as an alternative method of solution-derived chalcogenide glass film deposition. While employed in other materials systems, deposition of optical quality ChG films via electrospray has not been previously attempted, nor have parameters until now, been defined. This study has defined pre-cursor solution chemistry, electrospray jet process parameters required for formation of stable films, annealing protocols and resulting film attributes, yielding important correlations needed to realize high optical quality films. Electrosprayed films attributes were compared to those seen for spin coating and trade-offs in processing route and resulting quality, were identified. Optical properties of importance to device applications were defined, including surface roughness, refractive index, and infrared transmission. The use of a serpentine path of the spray over the substrate was demonstrated to obtain uniform thickness, blanket films, and demonstrates process compatibility with roll

  20. Direct femtosecond laser writing of buried infrared waveguides in chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Coq, D.; Bychkov, E.; Masselin, P.

    2016-02-01

    Direct laser writing technique is now widely used in particular in glass, to produce both passive and active photonic devices. This technique offers a real scientific opportunity to generate three-dimensional optical components and since chalcogenide glasses possess transparency properties from the visible up to mid-infrared range, they are of great interest. Moreover, they also have high optical non-linearity and high photo-sensitivity that make easy the inscription of refractive index modification. The understanding of the fundamental and physical processes induced by the laser pulses is the key to well-control the laser writing and consequently to realize integrated photonic devices. In this paper, we will focus on two different ways allowing infrared buried waveguide to be obtained. The first part will be devoted to a very original writing process based on a helical translation of the sample through the laser beam. In the second part, we will report on another original method based on both a filamentation phenomenon and a point by point technique. Finally, we will demonstrate that these two writing techniques are suitable for the design of single mode waveguide for wavelength ranging from the visible up to the infrared but also to fabricate optical components.

  1. Electrospray Deposition of Uniform Thickness Ge23Sb7S70 and As40S60 Chalcogenide Glass Films.

    PubMed

    Novak, Spencer; Lin, Pao-Tai; Li, Cheng; Borodinov, Nikolay; Han, Zhaohong; Monmeyran, Corentin; Patel, Neil; Du, Qingyang; Malinowski, Marcin; Fathpour, Sasan; Lumdee, Chatdanai; Xu, Chi; Kik, Pieter G; Deng, Weiwei; Hu, Juejun; Agarwal, Anuradha; Luzinov, Igor; Richardson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Solution-based electrospray film deposition, which is compatible with continuous, roll-to-roll processing, is applied to chalcogenide glasses. Two chalcogenide compositions are demonstrated: Ge23Sb7S70 and As40S60, which have both been studied extensively for planar mid-infrared (mid-IR) microphotonic devices. In this approach, uniform thickness films are fabricated through the use of computer numerical controlled (CNC) motion. Chalcogenide glass (ChG) is written over the substrate by a single nozzle along a serpentine path. Films were subjected to a series of heat treatments between 100 °C and 200 °C under vacuum to drive off residual solvent and densify the films. Based on transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and surface roughness measurements, both compositions were found to be suitable for the fabrication of planar devices operating in the mid-IR region. Residual solvent removal was found to be much quicker for the As40S60 film as compared to Ge23Sb7S70. Based on the advantages of electrospray, direct printing of a gradient refractive index (GRIN) mid-IR transparent coating is envisioned, given the difference in refractive index of the two compositions in this study. PMID:27583775

  2. Dy{sup 3+}-doped Ga–Sb–S chalcogenide glasses for mid-infrared lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Mingjie; Yang, Anping; Peng, Yuefeng; Zhang, Bin; Ren, He; Guo, Wei; Yang, Yan; Zhai, Chengcheng; Wang, Yuwei; Yang, Zhiyong; Tang, Dingyuan

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Novel Ga–Sb–S chalcogenide glasses doped with Dy{sup 3+} ions were synthesized. • The glasses show good thermal stability and excellent infrared transparency. • The glasses show low phonon energy and intense mid-infrared emissions. • The mid-infrared emissions have high quantum efficiency. • The mid-infrared emissions have large stimulated emission cross sections. - Abstract: Novel Ga–Sb–S chalcogenide glasses doped with different amount of Dy{sup 3+} ions were prepared. Their thermal stability, optical properties, and mid-infrared (MIR) emission properties were investigated. The glasses show good thermal stability, excellent infrared transparency, very low phonon energy (∼306 cm{sup −1}), and intense emissions centered at 2.95, 3.59, 4.17 and 4.40 μm. Three Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters (Ω{sub 2} = 8.51 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}, Ω{sub 4} = 2.09 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}, and Ω{sub 6} = 1.60 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}) are obtained, and the related radiative transition properties are evaluated. The high quantum efficiencies and large stimulated emission cross sections of the MIR emissions (88.10% and 1.11 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2} for 2.95 μm emission, 75.90% and 0.38 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2} for 4.40 μm emission, respectively) in the Dy{sup 3+}-doped Ga–Sb–S glasses make them promising gain materials for the MIR lasers.

  3. Nanostructured Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} chalcogenide films produced by laser electrodispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Yavsin, D. A. Kozhevin, V. M.; Gurevich, S. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Melekh, B. T.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Pevtsov, A. B.

    2014-12-15

    Amorphous nanostructured films of a complex chalcogenide (Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}) are produced by laser electrodispersion and their structural and electrical properties are studied. It is found that the characteristic size of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanoparticles in the structure of the films is 1.5–5 nm.

  4. Photosensitivity study of GeS2 chalcogenide glass under femtosecond laser pulses irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayiriveetil, Arunbabu; Sabapathy, Tamilarasan; Kar, Ajoy K.; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2015-07-01

    The present study discusses the photosensitivity of GeS2 chalcogenide glass in response to irradiation with femtosecond pulses at 1047 nm. Bulk GeS2 glasses are prepared by conventional melt quenching technique and the amorphous nature of the glass is confirmed using X-ray diffraction. Ultrafast laser inscription technique is used to fabricate the straight channel waveguides in the glass. Single scan and multi scan waveguides are inscribed in GeS2 glasses of length 0.65 cm using a master oscillator power amplifier Yb doped fiber laser (IMRA μjewel D400) with different pulse energy and translation speed. Diameters of the inscribed waveguides are measured and its dependence on the inscription parameters such as translation speed and pulse energy is studied. Butt coupling method is used to characterize the loss measurement of the inscribed optical waveguides. The mode field image of the waveguides is captured using CCD camera and compared with the mode field image of a standard SMF-28 fibers.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  6. High power broadband mid-infrared supercontinuum fiber laser using a novel chalcogenide AsSe2 photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diouf, Mbaye; Ben Salem, Amine; Cherif, Rim; Wague, Ahmadou; Zghal, Mourad

    2016-05-01

    A high power supercontinuum (SC) based on a new type of chalcogenide AsSe2 material for broadband mid-infrared light source is numerically reported. Ultra-broadband coherent mid-IR SC generation with more than 3 octave-spanning from 1.7 to 14 μm in a novel design of chalcogenide AsSe2 photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge and aiming to properly model the nonlinear propagation, an accurate fit of the Raman response function and the corresponding Raman gain of the novel AsSe2 chalcogenide glass are proposed numerically for the first time. The obtained SC is generated by pumping at 3.9 μm in the anomalous dispersion regime in only 8 mm long fiber. Our study shows that the initially generated SC from 150 fs pulse duration with 8.8 kW peak power exhibits high power proportion of more than 80% for wavelengths beyond 3 μm which is very promising for designing high power SC fiber laser sources in the mid-IR atmospheric windows and the molecular fingerprint region.

  7. Fabrication of ultrafast laser written low-loss waveguides in flexible As₂S₃ chalcogenide glass tape.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Jerome; Ledemi, Yannick; Loranger, Sébastien; Iezzi, Victor Lambin; Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Parent, Francois; Morency, Steeve; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-01-15

    As2S3 glass has a unique combination of optical properties, such as wide transparency in the infrared region and a high nonlinear coefficient. Recently, intense research has been conducted to improve photonic devices using thin materials. In this Letter, highly uniform rectangular single-index and 2 dB/m loss step-index optical tapes have been drawn by the crucible technique. Low-loss (<0.15  dB/cm) single-mode waveguides in chalcogenide glass tapes have been fabricated using femtosecond laser writing. Optical backscatter reflectometry has been used to study the origin of the optical losses. A detailed study of the laser writing process in thin glass is also presented to facilitate a repeatable waveguide inscription recipe. PMID:26766674

  8. Recent progress in pulsed laser deposition of iron based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haindl, Silvia; Molatta, Sebastian; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is the most commonly used deposition technique for Fe-based superconductor thin films today. The number of grown compounds using PLD is still quite limited to so-called 11 compounds (FeTe x S y , FeSe1‑x Te x ) and 122 compounds (primarily Co- and P-substituted BaFe2As2). Especially in the growth of Fe-chalcogenides, PLD is challenged by the strong volatility of the elements and their non-negligible vapour pressure. In addition, in situ PLD of the high-temperature superconducting F-doped iron oxypnictides seemed to be feasible only under reactive deposition and stayed disregarded for some time. Here, we summarise the progress that was recently made in the growth of Fe-based superconducting thin films towards an improved control of thin film stoichiometry and the in situ growth of F-doped iron oxypnictides. The presented new ideas deviate from the standard approach of an adjustment of target composition. We first focus on the growth of FeSe1‑x Te x films, where the introduction of a buffer layer of same composition decreased surface roughness and allowed epitaxial film growth at reduced deposition temperatures with enhanced reproducibility. Second, we illustrate how F-doping in iron oxypnictide thin films can be obtained during in situ PLD using a diffusive reaction between substrate and the growing film.

  9. Recent progress in pulsed laser deposition of iron based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haindl, Silvia; Molatta, Sebastian; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is the most commonly used deposition technique for Fe-based superconductor thin films today. The number of grown compounds using PLD is still quite limited to so-called 11 compounds (FeTe x S y , FeSe1-x Te x ) and 122 compounds (primarily Co- and P-substituted BaFe2As2). Especially in the growth of Fe-chalcogenides, PLD is challenged by the strong volatility of the elements and their non-negligible vapour pressure. In addition, in situ PLD of the high-temperature superconducting F-doped iron oxypnictides seemed to be feasible only under reactive deposition and stayed disregarded for some time. Here, we summarise the progress that was recently made in the growth of Fe-based superconducting thin films towards an improved control of thin film stoichiometry and the in situ growth of F-doped iron oxypnictides. The presented new ideas deviate from the standard approach of an adjustment of target composition. We first focus on the growth of FeSe1-x Te x films, where the introduction of a buffer layer of same composition decreased surface roughness and allowed epitaxial film growth at reduced deposition temperatures with enhanced reproducibility. Second, we illustrate how F-doping in iron oxypnictide thin films can be obtained during in situ PLD using a diffusive reaction between substrate and the growing film.

  10. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  11. Laser Induced Chemical Liquid Phase Deposition (LCLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Nanai, Laszlo; Balint, Agneta M.

    2012-08-17

    Laser induced chemical deposition (LCLD) of metals onto different substrates attracts growing attention during the last decade. Deposition of metals onto the surface of dielectrics and semiconductors with help of laser beam allows the creation of conducting metal of very complex architecture even in 3D. In the processes examined the deposition occurs from solutions containing metal ions and reducing agents. The deposition happens in the region of surface irradiated by laser beam (micro reactors). Physics -chemical reactions driven by laser beam will be discussed for different metal-substrate systems. The electrical, optical, mechanical properties of created interfaces will be demonstrated also including some practical-industrial applications.

  12. Role of boundary layer diffusion in vapor deposition growth of chalcogenide nanosheets: the case of GeS.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Huang, Liang; Snigdha, Gayatri Pongur; Yu, Yifei; Cao, Linyou

    2012-10-23

    We report a synthesis of single-crystalline two-dimensional GeS nanosheets using vapor deposition processes and show that the growth behavior of the nanosheet is substantially different from those of other nanomaterials and thin films grown by vapor depositions. The nanosheet growth is subject to strong influences of the diffusion of source materials through the boundary layer of gas flows. This boundary layer diffusion is found to be the rate-determining step of the growth under typical experimental conditions, evidenced by a substantial dependence of the nanosheet's size on diffusion fluxes. We also find that high-quality GeS nanosheets can grow only in the diffusion-limited regime, as the crystalline quality substantially deteriorates when the rate-determining step is changed away from the boundary layer diffusion. We establish a simple model to analyze the diffusion dynamics in experiments. Our analysis uncovers an intuitive correlation of diffusion flux with the partial pressure of source materials, the flow rate of carrier gas, and the total pressure in the synthetic setup. The observed significant role of boundary layer diffusions in the growth is unique for nanosheets. It may be correlated with the high growth rate of GeS nanosheets, ~3-5 μm/min, which is 1 order of magnitude higher than other nanomaterials (such as nanowires) and thin films. This fundamental understanding of the effect of boundary layer diffusions may generally apply to other chalcogenide nanosheets that can grow rapidly. It can provide useful guidance for the development of general paradigms to control the synthesis of nanosheets.

  13. Low-loss, robust fusion splicing of silica to chalcogenide fiber for integrated mid-infrared laser technology development.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Rajesh; Gattass, Rafael R; Nguyen, Vinh; Chin, Geoff; Gibson, Dan; Kim, Woohong; Shaw, L Brandon; Sanghera, Jasbinder S

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a low-loss, repeatable, and robust splice between single-mode silica fiber and single-mode chalcogenide (CHG) fiber. These splices are particularly difficult to create because of the significant difference in the two fibers' glass transition temperatures (∼1000°C) as well as the large difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the fibers (∼20×10(-6)/°C). With 90% light coupled through the silica-CHG fiber splice, predominantly in the fundamental circular-symmetric mode, into the core of the CHG fiber and with 0.5 dB of splice loss measured around the wavelength of 2.5 μm, after correcting only for the Fresnel loss, the silica-CHG splice offers excellent beam quality and coupling efficiency. The tensile strength of the splice is greater than 12 kpsi, and the laser damage threshold is greater than 2 W (CW) and was limited by the available laser pump power. We also utilized this splicing technique to demonstrate 2 to 4.5 μm ultrabroadband supercontinuum generation in a monolithic all-fiber system comprising a CHG fiber and a high peak power 2 μm pulsed Raman-shifted thulium fiber laser. This is a major development toward compact form factor commercial applications of soft-glass mid-IR fibers. PMID:26512522

  14. Low-loss, robust fusion splicing of silica to chalcogenide fiber for integrated mid-infrared laser technology development.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Rajesh; Gattass, Rafael R; Nguyen, Vinh; Chin, Geoff; Gibson, Dan; Kim, Woohong; Shaw, L Brandon; Sanghera, Jasbinder S

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a low-loss, repeatable, and robust splice between single-mode silica fiber and single-mode chalcogenide (CHG) fiber. These splices are particularly difficult to create because of the significant difference in the two fibers' glass transition temperatures (∼1000°C) as well as the large difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the fibers (∼20×10(-6)/°C). With 90% light coupled through the silica-CHG fiber splice, predominantly in the fundamental circular-symmetric mode, into the core of the CHG fiber and with 0.5 dB of splice loss measured around the wavelength of 2.5 μm, after correcting only for the Fresnel loss, the silica-CHG splice offers excellent beam quality and coupling efficiency. The tensile strength of the splice is greater than 12 kpsi, and the laser damage threshold is greater than 2 W (CW) and was limited by the available laser pump power. We also utilized this splicing technique to demonstrate 2 to 4.5 μm ultrabroadband supercontinuum generation in a monolithic all-fiber system comprising a CHG fiber and a high peak power 2 μm pulsed Raman-shifted thulium fiber laser. This is a major development toward compact form factor commercial applications of soft-glass mid-IR fibers.

  15. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Photoinduced absorption in chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomar', V. V.

    1990-08-01

    A dependence of the absorption coefficient on the optical radiation intensity in the range 10 - 5 - 1 W/cm2 was observed for chalcogenide glasses at a photon energy less than the band gap of the material. The absorption coefficient depended on the irradiation time. In the case of arsenic sulfide in the range 1.6-1.7 eV an absorption peak was observed at intensities of the order of 10 - 3 W/cm2. In this part of the spectrum the absorption probably involved metastable As-As, S-Se, and Se-Se "defect" bonds and was similar to the photoinduced degradation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  16. Simulation of an erbium-doped chalcogenide micro-disk mid-infrared laser source.

    PubMed

    Al Tal, Faleh; Dimas, Clara; Hu, Juejun; Agarwal, Anu; Kimerling, Lionel C

    2011-06-20

    The feasibility of mid-infrared (MIR) lasing in erbium-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide (GLS) micro-disks was examined. Lasing condition at 4.5 µm signal using 800 nm pump source was simulated using rate equations, mode propagation and transfer matrix formulation. Cavity quality (Q) factors of 1.48 × 10(4) and 1.53 × 10(6) were assumed at the pump and signal wavelengths, respectively, based on state-of-the-art chalcogenide micro-disk resonator parameters. With an 80 µm disk diameter and an active erbium concentration of 2.8 × 10(20) cm(-3), lasing was shown to be possible with a maximum slope efficiency of 1.26 × 10(-4) and associated pump threshold of 0.5 mW.

  17. Nonequilibrium Interlayer Transport in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Eres, Gyula; Larson, Ben C; Rouleau, Christopher M; Zschack, P.; Lowndes, Douglas H

    2006-01-01

    We use time-resolved surface x-ray diffraction measurements with microsecond range resolution to study the growth kinetics of pulsed laser deposited SrTiO3. Time-dependent surface coverages corresponding to single laser shots were determined directly from crystal truncation rod intensity transients. Analysis of surface coverage evolution shows that extremely fast nonequilibrium interlayer transport, which occurs concurrently with the arrival of the laser plume, dominates the deposition process. A much smaller fraction of material, which is governed by the dwell time between successive laser shots, is transferred by slow, thermally driven interlayer transport processes.

  18. Combinatorial Chemical Bath Deposition of CdS Contacts for Chalcogenide Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Mokurala, Krishnaiah; Baranowski, Lauryn L; de Souza Lucas, Francisco W; Siol, Sebastian; van Hest, Maikel F A M; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bhargava, Parag; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-09-12

    Contact layers play an important role in thin film solar cells, but new material development and optimization of its thickness is usually a long and tedious process. A high-throughput experimental approach has been used to accelerate the rate of research in photovoltaic (PV) light absorbers and transparent conductive electrodes, however the combinatorial research on contact layers is less common. Here, we report on the chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS thin films by combinatorial dip coating technique and apply these contact layers to Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) light absorbers in PV devices. Combinatorial thickness steps of CdS thin films were achieved by removal of the substrate from the chemical bath, at regular intervals of time, and in equal distance increments. The trends in the photoconversion efficiency and in the spectral response of the PV devices as a function of thickness of CdS contacts were explained with the help of optical and morphological characterization of the CdS thin films. The maximum PV efficiency achieved for the combinatorial dip-coating CBD was similar to that for the PV devices processed using conventional CBD. The results of this study lead to the conclusion that combinatorial dip-coating can be used to accelerate the optimization of PV device performance of CdS and other candidate contact layers for a wide range of emerging absorbers. PMID:27479495

  19. Combinatorial Chemical Bath Deposition of CdS Contacts for Chalcogenide Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Mokurala, Krishnaiah; Baranowski, Lauryn L; de Souza Lucas, Francisco W; Siol, Sebastian; van Hest, Maikel F A M; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bhargava, Parag; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-09-12

    Contact layers play an important role in thin film solar cells, but new material development and optimization of its thickness is usually a long and tedious process. A high-throughput experimental approach has been used to accelerate the rate of research in photovoltaic (PV) light absorbers and transparent conductive electrodes, however the combinatorial research on contact layers is less common. Here, we report on the chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS thin films by combinatorial dip coating technique and apply these contact layers to Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) light absorbers in PV devices. Combinatorial thickness steps of CdS thin films were achieved by removal of the substrate from the chemical bath, at regular intervals of time, and in equal distance increments. The trends in the photoconversion efficiency and in the spectral response of the PV devices as a function of thickness of CdS contacts were explained with the help of optical and morphological characterization of the CdS thin films. The maximum PV efficiency achieved for the combinatorial dip-coating CBD was similar to that for the PV devices processed using conventional CBD. The results of this study lead to the conclusion that combinatorial dip-coating can be used to accelerate the optimization of PV device performance of CdS and other candidate contact layers for a wide range of emerging absorbers.

  20. Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Banks, Paul S.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2002-01-01

    Short pulse PLD is a viable technique of producing high quality films with properties very close to that of crystalline diamond. The plasma generated using femtosecond lasers is composed of single atom ions with no clusters producing films with high Sp.sup.3 /Sp.sup.2 ratios. Using a high average power femtosecond laser system, the present invention dramatically increases deposition rates to up to 25 .mu.m/hr (which exceeds many CVD processes) while growing particulate-free films. In the present invention, deposition rates is a function of laser wavelength, laser fluence, laser spot size, and target/substrate separation. The relevant laser parameters are shown to ensure particulate-free growth, and characterizations of the films grown are made using several diagnostic techniques including electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Hydrazine-Free Solution-Deposited CuIn(S,Se)2 Solar Cells by Spray Deposition of Metal Chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Arnou, Panagiota; van Hest, Maikel F A M; Cooper, Carl S; Malkov, Andrei V; Walls, John M; Bowers, Jake W

    2016-05-18

    Solution processing of semiconductors, such as CuInSe2 and its alloys (CIGS), can significantly reduce the manufacturing costs of thin film solar cells. Despite the recent success of solution deposition approaches for CIGS, toxic reagents such as hydrazine are usually involved, which introduce health and safety concerns. Here, we present a simple and safer methodology for the preparation of high-quality CuIn(S, Se)2 absorbers from metal sulfide solutions in a diamine/dithiol mixture. The solutions are sprayed in air, using a chromatography atomizer, followed by a postdeposition selenization step. Two different selenization methods are explored resulting in power conversion efficiencies of up to 8%. PMID:27135679

  2. Apparatus for laser assisted thin film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; McLean, W. II

    1996-02-13

    A pulsed laser deposition apparatus uses fiber optics to deliver visible output beams. One or more optical fibers are coupled to one or more laser sources, and delivers visible output beams to a single chamber, to multiple targets in the chamber or to multiple chambers. The laser can run uninterrupted if one of the deposition chambers ceases to operate because other chambers can continue their laser deposition processes. The laser source can be positioned at a remote location relative to the deposition chamber. The use of fiber optics permits multi-plexing. A pulsed visible laser beam is directed at a generally non-perpendicular angle upon the target in the chamber, generating a plume of ions and energetic neutral species. A portion of the plume is deposited on a substrate as a thin film. A pulsed visible output beam with a high pulse repetition frequency is used. The high pulse repetition frequency is greater than 500 Hz, and more preferably, greater than about 1000 Hz. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) is one of the thin films produced using the apparatus. 9 figs.

  3. Apparatus for laser assisted thin film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; McLean, II, William

    1996-01-01

    A pulsed laser deposition apparatus uses fiber optics to deliver visible output beams. One or more optical fibers are coupled to one or more laser sources, and delivers visible output beams to a single chamber, to multiple targets in the chamber or to multiple chambers. The laser can run uninterrupted if one of the deposition chambers ceases to operate because other chambers can continue their laser deposition processes. The laser source can be positioned at a remote location relative to the deposition chamber. The use of fiber optics permits multi-plexing. A pulsed visible laser beam is directed at a generally non-perpendicular angle upon the target in the chamber, generating a plume of ions and energetic neutral species. A portion of the plume is deposited on a substrate as a thin film. A pulsed visible output beam with a high pulse repetition frequency is used. The high pulse repetition frequency is greater than 500 Hz, and more preferably, greater than about 1000 Hz. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) is one of the thin films produced using the apparatus.

  4. Swift and heavy ion implanted chalcogenide laser glass waveguides and their different refractive index distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Feng; Narusawa, Tadashi; Zheng Jie

    2011-02-10

    Planar waveguides have been fabricated in Nd- or Ho-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide laser glasses by 60 MeV Ar or 20 MeV N ion implantation. The refractive index profiles were reconstructed based on the results of prism coupling. The Ar implanted waveguides exhibit an approximate steplike distribution, while the N implanted ones show a ''well + barrier'' type. This difference can be attributed to the much lower dose of Ar ions. After annealing, the N implanted waveguides can support two modes at 1539 nm and have low propagation loss, which makes them candidates for novel waveguide lasers.

  5. Mirrorlike pulsed laser deposited tungsten thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Mostako, A. T. T.; Khare, Alika; Rao, C. V. S.

    2011-01-15

    Mirrorlike tungsten thin films on stainless steel substrate deposited via pulsed laser deposition technique in vacuum (10{sup -5} Torr) is reported, which may find direct application as first mirror in fusion devices. The crystal structure of tungsten film is analyzed using x-ray diffraction pattern, surface morphology of the tungsten films is studied with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The film composition is identified using energy dispersive x-ray. The specular and diffuse reflectivities with respect to stainless steel substrate of the tungsten films are recorded with FTIR spectra. The thickness and the optical quality of pulsed laser deposition deposited films are tested via interferometric technique. The reflectivity is approaching about that of the bulk for the tungsten film of thickness {approx}782 nm.

  6. Mirrorlike pulsed laser deposited tungsten thin film.

    PubMed

    Mostako, A T T; Rao, C V S; Khare, Alika

    2011-01-01

    Mirrorlike tungsten thin films on stainless steel substrate deposited via pulsed laser deposition technique in vacuum (10(-5) Torr) is reported, which may find direct application as first mirror in fusion devices. The crystal structure of tungsten film is analyzed using x-ray diffraction pattern, surface morphology of the tungsten films is studied with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The film composition is identified using energy dispersive x-ray. The specular and diffuse reflectivities with respect to stainless steel substrate of the tungsten films are recorded with FTIR spectra. The thickness and the optical quality of pulsed laser deposition deposited films are tested via interferometric technique. The reflectivity is approaching about that of the bulk for the tungsten film of thickness ∼782 nm. PMID:21280810

  7. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  8. Chalcogenide-tellurite composite microstructured optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, T.; Duan, Z.; Kawashima, H.; Yan, X.; Suzuki, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Misumi, Takashi; Ohishi, Y.

    2012-02-01

    We report on fabrication a composite microstructured optical fibre composed of highly nonlinear chalcogenide Ge-Ga- Sb-S glass core and tellurite TeO2-ZnO-Li20-Bi2O3 glass clad. We aimed at obtaining more flattened chromatic dispersion for pumping chalcogenide glass based optical fibre by a pulse laser at current telecommunication wavelengths, i.e. λ = 1.35 - 1.7 μm, which is difficult to achieve by using a single material chalcogenide fibers due to their high refractive index (n > 2.1). A fibre design exploiting a composite of two glasses and one ring of the air holes brings similar options for tuning the fibre dispersion such as use of complex multi rings of air-holes approach. A good choice of glasses, allows for fabricating a composite chalcogenide-tellurite optical fibre benefiting from high nonlinearity of chalcogenide core glass but exploiting a tellurite glass technology and fibre drawing. In the paper, we discuss some aspects of CMOF design concerning current chalcogenide and tellurite glass choice. Also, we show the supercontinuum spectra recorded from current chalcogenide-tellurite CMOF pumped with a custom made femtosecond fibre laser at λ = 1.55 μm with the pulse duration of 400 fs.

  9. Nanosecond laser ablation for pulsed laser deposition of yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sucharita

    2013-09-01

    A thermal model to describe high-power nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of yttria (Y2O3) has been developed. This model simulates ablation of material occurring primarily through vaporization and also accounts for attenuation of the incident laser beam in the evolving vapor plume. Theoretical estimates of process features such as time evolution of target temperature distribution, melt depth and ablation rate and their dependence on laser parameters particularly for laser fluences in the range of 6 to 30 J/cm2 are investigated. Calculated maximum surface temperatures when compared with the estimated critical temperature for yttria indicate absence of explosive boiling at typical laser fluxes of 10 to 30 J/cm2. Material ejection in large fragments associated with explosive boiling of the target needs to be avoided when depositing thin films via the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique as it leads to coatings with high residual porosity and poor compaction restricting the protective quality of such corrosion-resistant yttria coatings. Our model calculations facilitate proper selection of laser parameters to be employed for deposition of PLD yttria corrosion-resistive coatings. Such coatings have been found to be highly effective in handling and containment of liquid uranium.

  10. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Photoresponsive Two-Dimensional GaSe Nanosheet Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Gresback, Ryan G; Tian, Mengkun; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Ivanov, Ilia N; Xiao, Kai; McGuire, Michael A; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B

    2014-01-01

    Here we explore pulsed laser deposition (PLD), a well known and versatile synthesis method principally used for epitaxial oxide thin film growth, for the synthesis of functional metal chalcogenide (GaSe) nanosheet networks by stoichiometric transfer of laser vaporized material from bulk GaSe targets in Ar background gas. Uniform coverage of interconnected, crystalline, few-layer, photoresponsive GaSe nanosheets in both in-plane and out-of-plane orientations were achieved under different ablation plume conditions over ~1.5 cm2 areas. Plume propagation was characterized by in situ ICCD-imaging. High (1 Torr) Ar background gas pressures were found to be crucial for the stoichiometric growth of GaSe nanosheet networks. Individual 1-3 layer GaSe triangular nanosheets of ~ 200 nm domain size were formed within 30 laser pulses, coalescing to form nanosheet networks in as few as 100 laser pulses. The thickness of the deposited networks increased linearly with pulse number, adding layers in a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode while maintaining a surface roughness of 2 GaSe layers for increasing overall thickness. Field effect transistors using these interconnected crystalline GaSe networks showed p-type semiconducting characteristics with mobilities reaching as high as 0.1 cm2V-1s-1. Spectrally-resolved photoresponsivities and external quantum efficiencies ranged from 0.4 AW-1 and 100% at 700 nm, to 1.4 AW-1 and 600 % at 240 nm, respectively. Pulsed laser deposition under these conditions appears to provide a versatile and rapid approach to stoichiometrically transfer and deposit photoresponsive networks of 2D nanosheets with digital thickness control and substrate-scale uniformity for a variety of applications.

  11. Second-order susceptibility spectra for δ-BiB3O6 polymer nanocomposites deposited on the chalcogenide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kityk, I. V.; Chrunik, M.; Majchrowski, A.; Guidi, Mariangela Cestelli; Angelucci, Marco; Kamel, Gihan; Fedorchuk, A. O.; Pępczyńska, M.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.; Parasyuk, O.; Bolesta, I. M.; Kowerdziej, R.

    2015-07-01

    The optimized conditions for the enhancement of the second harmonic generation in the composites of the orthorhombic δ-BiB3O6:Pr3+ nanoparticles embedded in polyvinyl alcohol films and deposited on the AgGaGe2Se6, AgGaGe2.7Si0.3Se8 (90 mol.% AgGaGe3Se8 - 10 mol.% AgGaSi3Se8), and AgGaGe3Se8:Cu substrates were established. The highest second-order susceptibility was achieved during the Ag-Ga-Ge-Se crystalline substrates photo-illumination by nanosecond laser pulses of about 2900 nm wavelength. The effect was found to be completely reversible after the interruption of the photo-inducing stimulation. Complementary studies of Atomic Force Microscopy, AFM, X-ray Diffraction, XRD, and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and DFT simulations of spectral dependences of the corresponding second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, were performed.

  12. Second-order susceptibility spectra for δ-BiB₃O₆ polymer nanocomposites deposited on the chalcogenide crystals.

    PubMed

    Kityk, I V; Chrunik, M; Majchrowski, A; Guidi, Mariangela Cestelli; Angelucci, Marco; Kamel, Gihan; Fedorchuk, A O; Pępczyńska, M; Jaroszewicz, L R; Parasyuk, O; Bolesta, I M; Kowerdziej, R

    2015-07-01

    The optimized conditions for the enhancement of the second harmonic generation in the composites of the orthorhombic δ-BiB3O6:Pr(3+) nanoparticles embedded in polyvinyl alcohol films and deposited on the AgGaGe2Se6, AgGaGe2.7Si0.3Se8 (90 mol.% AgGaGe3Se8 - 10 mol.% AgGaSi3Se8), and AgGaGe3Se8:Cu substrates were established. The highest second-order susceptibility was achieved during the Ag-Ga-Ge-Se crystalline substrates photo-illumination by nanosecond laser pulses of about 2900 nm wavelength. The effect was found to be completely reversible after the interruption of the photo-inducing stimulation. Complementary studies of Atomic Force Microscopy, AFM, X-ray Diffraction, XRD, and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and DFT simulations of spectral dependences of the corresponding second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, were performed.

  13. How metallic is the binding state of indium hosted by excess-metal chalcogenides in ore deposits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondina Figueiredo, Maria; Pena Silva, Teresa; Oliveira, Daniel; Rosa, Diogo

    2010-05-01

    Discovered in 1863, indium is nowadays a strategic scarce metal used both in classical technologic fields (like low melting-temperature alloys and solders) and in innovative nano-technologies to produce "high-tech devices" by means of new materials, namely liquid crystal displays (LCDs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and the recently introduced transparent flexible thin-films manufactured with ionic amorphous oxide semiconductors (IAOS). Indium is a typical chalcophile element, seldom forming specific minerals and occurring mainly dispersed within polymetallic sulphides, particularly with excess metal ions [1]. The average content of indium in the Earth's crust is very low but a further increase in its demand is still expected in the next years, thus focusing a special interest in uncovering new exploitation sites through promising polymetallic sulphide ores - e.g., the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) [2] - and in improving recycling technologies. Indium recovery stands mostly on zinc extraction from sphalerite, the natural cubic sulphide which is the prototype of so-called "tetrahedral sulphides" where metal ions fill half of the available tetrahedral sites within the cubic closest packing of sulphur anions where the double of unfilled interstices are available for further in-filling. It is worth remarking that such packing array is particularly suitable for accommodating polymetallic cations by filling closely located interstitial sites [3] as happens in excess-metal tetrahedral sulphides - e.g. bornite, ideally Cu5FeS4, recognized as an In-carrying mineral [4]. Studying the tendency towards In-In interactions able of leading to the formation of polycations would efficiently contribute to understand indium crystal chemistry and the metal binding state in natural chalcogenides. Accordingly, an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) study at In L3-edge was undertaken using the instrumental set-up of ID21 beamline at the ESRF (European Synchrotron

  14. Apparatus and method for laser deposition of durable coatings

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, J.T.; Vanier, P.; Barletta, R.E.

    1995-08-15

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for depositing durable coatings onto the surface of a substrate without heating the entire substrate to high temperatures by using lasers to heat the substrate and dissociate a deposition gas. The apparatus comprises a deposition chamber for enclosing the substrate upon which a coating is to be deposited, gas delivery means for directing a flow of deposition gas on the substrate, a first laser for heating the substrate, and a second laser for irradiating the deposition gas to dissociate the gas. The method includes placing a substrate within a vacuum deposition chamber and directing a flow of deposition gas on the substrate. Then the substrate is heated with a first laser while the deposition gas is irradiated with a second laser to dissociate the deposition gas. 1 fig.

  15. 25 years of pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Michael; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    It is our pleasure to introduce this special issue appearing on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is today one of the most versatile growth techniques for oxide thin films and nanostructures. Ever since its invention, PLD has revolutionized the research on advanced functional oxides due to its ability to yield high-quality thin films, multilayers and heterostructures of a variety of multi-element material systems with rather simple technical means. We appreciate that the use of lasers to deposit films via ablation (now termed PLD) has been known since the 1960s after the invention of the first ruby laser. However, in the first two decades, PLD was something of a 'sleeping beauty' with only a few publications per year, as shown below. This state of hibernation ended abruptly with the advent of high T c superconductor research when scientists needed to grow high-quality thin films of multi-component high T c oxide systems. When most of the conventional growth techniques failed, the invention of PLD by T (Venky) Venkatesan clearly demonstrated that the newly discovered high-T c superconductor, YBa2Cu3O7-δ , could be stoichiometrically deposited as a high-quality nm-thin film with PLD [1]. As a remarkable highlight of this special issue, Venkatesan gives us his very personal reminiscence on these particularly innovative years of PLD beginning in 1986 [2]. After Venky's first paper [1], the importance of this invention was realized worldwide and the number of publications on PLD increased exponentially, as shown in figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Published items per year with title or topic PLD. Data from Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge in September 2013. After publication of Venky's famous paper in 1987 [1], the story of PLD's success began with a sudden jump in the number of publications, about 25 years ago. A first PLD textbook covering its basic understanding was soon published, in 1994, by Chrisey and Hubler [3]. Within a

  16. Excimer laser deposition of hydroxyapatite thin films.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Qian, F; Nagabushnam, V; Damodaran, R; Moudgil, B M

    1994-06-01

    We have demonstrated a new and simple in situ method to fabricate adherent and dense hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings at relatively low deposition temperatures (500-600 degrees C). Under optimum processing conditions, the HA coatings possess a nominal Ca:P ratio of 1.65 and exhibit a fully crystalline single-phase structure. This deposition technique is based on the application of a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength lambda = 248 nm, pulse duration tau = 25 x 10(-9) s) to ablate a dense stoichiometric HA target. The HA target was prepared by standard ceramic coprecipitation techniques followed by cold pressing and further sintering at 1200 degrees C in air. High substrate temperatures (> or = 600 degrees C) during film deposition led to phosphorus deficient coatings because of re-evaporation of phosphorus during the deposition process. The stabilization of various calcium and phosphorus phases in the film was controlled by a number of process parameters such as substrate temperature, chamber pressure and presence of water vapour in the chamber. This is particularly advantageous for production of HA coatings, since it is known that HA decomposes at high temperatures due to the uncertainty in the starting material stoichiometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were employed to determine the structure-processing relationships. Qualitative scratch measurements were conducted to determine the adhesion strength of the films.

  17. Study of Third-Order Optical Nonlinearities of Se-Sn (Bi,Te) Quaternary Chalcogenide Thin Films Using Ti: Sapphire Laser in Femtosecond Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Preeti; Sharma, Ambika

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the present research work is to study the nonlinear optical properties of quaternary Se-Sn (Bi,Te) chalcogenide thin films. A Z-scan technique utilizing 800 nm femtosecond laser source has been used for the determination of the nonlinear refractive index (n 2), two-photon absorption coefficient (β 2) and third-order susceptibility (χ (3)). In the measurement of n 2, an aperture is placed in the far field before the detector (closed aperture), while for the measurement of β 2, entire transmitted light is collected by the detector without an aperture (open aperture). Self-focusing has been observed in closed aperture transmission spectra. The appearance of the peak after the valley in this spectrum reflects the positive nonlinear refractive index. The calculated value of n 2 of the studied thin films varies from 1.06 × 10-12 cm2/W to 0.88 × 10-12 cm2/W. The compound-dependent behavior of n 2 is explained in this paper. We have also compared the experimental values of n 2 with the theoretically determined values, other compounds of chalcogenide glass and pure silica. The n 2 of the investigated thin films is found to be 3200 times higher than pure silica. The results of the open aperture Z-scan revealed that the value of β 2 of the studied compound is in the order of 10-8 cm/W. The behavior of two-photon absorption is described by means of the optical band gap (E g) of the studied compound. The variation in the figure-of-merit from 0.32 to 1.4 with varying Sn content is also reported in this paper. The higher value of nonlinearity makes this material advantageous for optical fibers, waveguides and optical limiting devices.

  18. Laser induced optical bleaching in Ge{sub 12}Sb{sub 25}S{sub 63} chalcogenide thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Ramakanta; Jena, S.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2015-06-24

    Photo induced effects of Ge{sub 12}Sb{sub 25}S{sub 63} films illuminated with 532 nm laser light is investigated from transmission spectra measured by FTIR spectroscopy. The material exhibit photo bleaching (PB) when exposed to band gap laser for a prolonged time in vacuum. The PB is ascribed to structural changes inside the film as well as surface photo oxidation. The amorphous nature of thin films was detected by X-ray diffraction. The chemical composition of the deposited thin films was examined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX). The refractive indices of the films were obtained from the transmission spectra based on inverse synthesis method, and the optical band gaps were derived from optical absorption spectra using the Tauc plot. The dispersion of the refractive index is discussed in terms of the single-oscillator Wemple–DiDomenico model. It was found that, the mechanism of the optical absorption follows the rule of the allowed non-direct transition. Raman spectra analysis also supports the optical changes.

  19. 25 years of pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Michael; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    It is our pleasure to introduce this special issue appearing on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is today one of the most versatile growth techniques for oxide thin films and nanostructures. Ever since its invention, PLD has revolutionized the research on advanced functional oxides due to its ability to yield high-quality thin films, multilayers and heterostructures of a variety of multi-element material systems with rather simple technical means. We appreciate that the use of lasers to deposit films via ablation (now termed PLD) has been known since the 1960s after the invention of the first ruby laser. However, in the first two decades, PLD was something of a 'sleeping beauty' with only a few publications per year, as shown below. This state of hibernation ended abruptly with the advent of high T c superconductor research when scientists needed to grow high-quality thin films of multi-component high T c oxide systems. When most of the conventional growth techniques failed, the invention of PLD by T (Venky) Venkatesan clearly demonstrated that the newly discovered high-T c superconductor, YBa2Cu3O7-δ , could be stoichiometrically deposited as a high-quality nm-thin film with PLD [1]. As a remarkable highlight of this special issue, Venkatesan gives us his very personal reminiscence on these particularly innovative years of PLD beginning in 1986 [2]. After Venky's first paper [1], the importance of this invention was realized worldwide and the number of publications on PLD increased exponentially, as shown in figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Published items per year with title or topic PLD. Data from Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge in September 2013. After publication of Venky's famous paper in 1987 [1], the story of PLD's success began with a sudden jump in the number of publications, about 25 years ago. A first PLD textbook covering its basic understanding was soon published, in 1994, by Chrisey and Hubler [3]. Within a

  20. Chalcogenide glasses and structures for quantum sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Martinez, James E.; Riley, Brian J.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Schultz, John F.; Manijeh Razeghi, Gail J. Brown

    2004-08-01

    Chalcogenide glasses are formed by combining chalcogen elements with IV-V elements. Among the family of glasses, As2S3, and As2Se3 are important infrared (IR) transparent materials for a variety of applications such as IR sensors, waveguides, and photonic crystals. With the promise of accessibility to any wavelengths between 3.5 and 16 ?m using tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) and chalcogenides with IR properties that can be tuned, ultra-sensitive chemical sensing in mid-wave IR region is within reach now. PNNL has been developing QCLs, chalcogenides, and all other components for an integrated approach to chemical sensing. Significant progress has been made in glass formation and fabrication of different structures at PNNL. Three different glass-forming systems, As-S, As-S-Se, and As-S-Ag have been examined for this application. Purification of constituents from contaminants and thermal history are two major issues in obtaining defect-free glasses. We have shown how the optical properties can be systematically modified by changing the chemistry in As-S-Se system. Different fabrication techniques need to be employed for different geometries and structures. We have successfully fabricated periodic arrays and straight waveguides using laser-writing and characterized the structures. Wet-chemical lithography has been extended to chalcogenides and challenges identified. We have also demonstrated holographic recording or diffraction gratings in chalcogenides.

  1. Stabilizing laser energy density on a target during pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Dowden, Paul C.; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-05-31

    A process for stabilizing laser energy density on a target surface during pulsed laser deposition of thin films controls the focused laser spot on the target. The process involves imaging an image-aperture positioned in the beamline. This eliminates changes in the beam dimensions of the laser. A continuously variable attenuator located in between the output of the laser and the imaged image-aperture adjusts the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a "constant voltage" mode. The process provides reproducibility and controllability for deposition of electronic thin films by pulsed laser deposition.

  2. Digital transfer growth of patterned 2D metal chalcogenides by confined nanoparticle evaporation.

    PubMed

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Rouleau, Christopher M; Puretzky, Alexander A; McGuire, Michael A; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Xiao, Kai; Eres, Gyula; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B

    2014-11-25

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor-phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a method to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (∼100 μm lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.

  3. Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Xiao, Kai; Eres, Gyula; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B.

    2014-10-19

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a new route to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (~ 100 m lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This novel PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area, metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.

  4. Nanosecond laser-induced phase transitions in pulsed laser deposition-deposited GeTe films

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xinxing Thelander, Erik; Lorenz, Pierre; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Decker, Ulrich; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-10-07

    Phase transformations between amorphous and crystalline states induced by irradiation of pulsed laser deposition grown GeTe thin films with nanosecond laser pulses at 248 nm and pulse duration of 20 ns are studied. Structural and optical properties of the Ge-Te phase-change films were studied by X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity measurements as a function of the number of laser pulses between 0 and 30 pulses and of the laser fluence up to 195 mJ/cm². A reversible phase transition by using pulse numbers ≥ 5 at a fluence above the threshold fluence between 11 and 14 mJ/cm² for crystallization and single pulses at a fluence between 162 and 182 mJ/cm² for amorphization could be proved. For laser fluences from 36 up to 130 mJ/cm², a high optical contrast of 14.7% between the amorphous and crystalline state is measured. A simple model is used that allows the discussion on the distribution of temperature in dependency on the laser fluence.

  5. Thermoinduced laser-assisted deposition of molybdenum from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemirovsky, Vladimir V.; Logunov, Lev S.; Zhigley, Elvira S.; Baranauskaite, Valeriia

    2015-05-01

    Local molybdenum deposit obtainment is promising for micro thermocouples creation on dielectric surfaces. This paper is dedicated to development of method of laser-induced molybdenum deposition from water-based solution of inorganic salt on Sitall st-50 and glass dielectric substrates, as well as research of solution composition, pH and substrate optical properties influence on result of laser-induced molybdenum deposition from solution. It was shown that depending on dielectric substrate type, as a result of laser-induced deposition metallic molybdenum or molybdenum dioxide deposit forms: molybdenum dioxide deposits in case of optically clear substrate and metallic molybdenum deposits in case of opaque glass-ceramics. While modelling interim case via using clouded glass, mixture of molybdenum and its oxide was successfully obtained.

  6. Pulsed laser ablation and deposition of niobium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansone, M.; De Bonis, A.; Santagata, A.; Rau, J. V.; Galasso, A.; Teghil, R.

    2016-06-01

    NbC crystalline films have been deposited in vacuum by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition technique. The films have been characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and by X-ray diffraction. To clarify the ablation-deposition mechanism, the plasma produced by the ablation process has been characterized by optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging. A comparison of the results with those obtained by ns pulsed deposition of the same target has been carried out.

  7. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  8. Surface enhanced infrared absorption by nanoantenna on chalcogenide glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verger, Frédéric; Colas, Florent; Sire, Olivier; Shen, Hong; Rinnert, Emmanuel; Boukerma, Kada; Nazabal, Virgine; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Bureau, Bruno; Toury, Timothée; de la Chapelle, Marc Lamy; Compère, Chantal

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, nanowires have been proven efficient to enhanced IR absorption of molecules and opened prospects of new ultrasensitive IR sensors. The development of integrated components requires the use of special IR glasses such as chalcogenide or silver halide glasses. In this study, we report the fabrication of a surface enhanced IR absorption substrate composed of nanowires deposited onto a chalcogenide glass slide. It enabled us to detect 4-nitrophenol at the femtomolar level and enhancement factor close to 106 was calculated.

  9. ARPES studies on FeTe1-x Se x iron chalcogenides epitaxial thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Davide; Moreschini, Luca; Chang, Young Jun; Walter, Andrew; Bostwick, Aaron; di Castro, Daniele; Tebano, Antonello; Medaglia, Pier Gianni; Bellingeri, Emilio; Pallecchi, Ilaria; Ferdeghini, Carlo; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Rotenberg, Eli

    2011-03-01

    The physics of iron-based chalcogenides raises fundamental questions on the interplay of magnetic order and electron pairing at the origin of the superconducting state. We have performed angle-resolved photemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on high-quality epitaxial thin films of FeTe 1-x Se x , grown by in situ pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on beamline 7.0.1 at the ALS. Specifically, we are able to show the evolution of the band structure as a function of x. We discuss our experimental results in comparison to the available theoretical band calculations.

  10. Innovations in laser cladding and direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, Frank; Nowotny, Steffen; Leyens, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    The present paper reviews recent progress in productivity, precision and quality of laser-based cladding and additive layer manufacturing. Recently, we have demonstrated the great benefits obtained from induction assisted laser cladding. This novel hybrid technology combines high deposition rates with excellent cladding properties. Laser-based direct metal deposition is a novel concept for the fabrication of components and repair as well as geometrical surface modifications. Newly developed nozzle design allows focused powder spots to generate wall thicknesses of about 30 μm. An in-depth understanding of the processes and the resulting materials properties is key for the development of technically viable and economically reasonable customized solutions.

  11. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of anatase thin films on textile substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, André; Kunz, Clemens; Gräf, Stephan; Müller, Frank A.

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a highly versatile tool to prepare functional thin film coatings. In our study we utilised a Q-switched CO2 laser with a pulse duration τ ≈ 300 ns, a laser wavelength λ = 10.59 μm, a repetition frequency frep = 800 Hz and a peak power Ppeak = 15 kW to deposit crystalline anatase thin films on carbon fibre fabrics. For this purpose, preparatory experiments were performed on silicon substrates to optimise the anatase deposition conditions including the influence of different substrate temperatures and oxygen partial pressures. Processing parameters were then transferred to deposit anatase on carbon fibres. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analyses, Raman spectroscopy and tactile profilometry were used to characterise the samples and to reveal the formation of phase pure anatase without the occurrence of a secondary rutile phase. Methanol conversion test were used to prove the photocatalytic activity of the coated carbon fibres.

  13. Laser deposition of multiwalled titanium oxide microtubes

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, A A; Arakelyan, Sergei M; Kutrovskaya, S V; Kucherik, A O; Prokoshev, V G

    2010-09-10

    We propose approaches to producing micro- and nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces via exposure to cw laser radiation and repetitive laser pulses. By varying the experimental geometry (angle of incidence, substrate-target separation and other parameters), various structures can be obtained. Titanium oxide tubes grown in a nonuniform magnetic field are up to 1 {mu}m in diameter and up to 500 {mu}m in length. Such structures can be used in catalytic filtration and as multiwalled structures similar to superlattices. (laser technologies)

  14. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2015-12-01

    Niobium nitride (NbNx) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbNx films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ˜40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbNx films from mixed β-Nb2N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb2N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbNx deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbNx films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbNx film morphology and phase.

  16. Direct laser powder deposition - 'State of the Art'

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, J.W.

    1999-11-01

    Recent developments on Laser Cladding and Rapid Prototyping have led to Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) technologies that produce net shape metal components by laser fusion of metal powder alloys. These processes are known by various names such as Directed Light Fabrication (DLF{trademark}), Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS{trademark}), and Direct Metal Deposition (DMD{trademark}) to name a few. These types of processes can be referred to as direct laser powder deposition (DLPD). DLPD involves fusing metal alloy powders in the focal point of a laser (or lasers) that is (are) being controlled by Computer Aided Design-Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. DLPD technology has the capability to produce fully dense components with little need for subsequent processing. Research and development of DLPD is being conducted throughout the world. The list of facilities conducting work in this area continues to grow (over 25 identified in North America alone). Selective Laser Sintering (SLS{trademark}) is another type of SFF technology based on laser fusion of powder. The SLS technology was developed as a rapid prototyping technique, whereas DLPD is an extension of the laser cladding technology. Most of the effort in SLS has been directed towards plastics and ceramics. In SLS, the powder is pre-placed by rolling out a layer for each laser pass. The computer control selects where in the layer the powder will be sintered by the laser. Sequential layers are sintered similarly forming a shape. In DLPD, powder is fed directly into a molten metal pool formed at the focal point of the laser where it is melted. As the laser moves on the material it rapidly resolidifies to form a shape. This talk elaborates on the state of these developments.

  17. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronne, Antonio; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Depero, Laura E.; Fanelli, Esther; Federici, Stefania; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  18. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, S.; Klopf, J. M.; Schriver, K. E.; Park, H. K.; Kelley, M. J.; Haglund, R. F.

    2014-03-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C-H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C-H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  19. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Senthil R.; Klopf, John M.; Schriver, Kenneth E.; Park, HyeKyoung; Kelley, Michael J.; Haglund, Jr., Richard F.

    2013-08-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C–H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C–H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  20. Nonlinear optical localization in embedded chalcogenide waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingshan; Huang, Sheng; Wang, Qingqing; Chen, Kevin P.; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-05-15

    We report the nonlinear optical localization in an embedded waveguide array fabricated in chalcogenide glass. The array, which consists of seven waveguides with circularly symmetric cross sections, is realized by ultrafast laser writing. Light propagation in the chalcogenide waveguide array is studied with near infrared laser pulses centered at 1040 nm. The peak intensity required for nonlinear localization for the 1-cm long waveguide array was 35.1 GW/cm{sup 2}, using 10-nJ pulses with 300-fs pulse width, which is 70 times lower than that reported in fused silica waveguide arrays and with over 7 times shorter interaction distance. Results reported in this paper demonstrated that ultrafast laser writing is a viable tool to produce 3D all-optical switching waveguide circuits in chalcogenide glass.

  1. Pulsed-laser deposition of oxides over large areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, James A.; Van Hook, H. J.

    1991-03-01

    Due to its short wavelength and high peak power the excimer laser has become the de facto choice for Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) of ceramic superconductors as well as other complex chemical compounds. This paper will describe a unique excimer-based laser deposition system which is capable of producing thin films of a variety of oxide compounds or other materials over large areas (up to 46 cm2). Well over a dozen chemical compounds have been deposited with this system for a wide variety of electronic applications. Also the PLD technique has been adapted to grow thin films on the internal surface of cored cylindrical substrates in order to form resonant microwave cavity structures. The uniformity morphology and electrical properties of films grown on both planar and cylindrical substrates will be discussed.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition: the road to hybrid nanocomposites coatings and novel pulsed laser adaptive technique.

    PubMed

    Serbezov, Valery

    2013-01-01

    The applications of Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for producing nanoparticles, nanostructures and nanocomposites coatings based on recently developed laser ablating techniques and their convergence are being reviewed. The problems of in situ synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposites coatings by these techniques are being discussed. The novel modification of PLD called Pulsed Laser Adaptive Deposition (PLAD) technique is presented. The in situ synthesized inorganic/organic nanocomposites coatings from Magnesium (Mg) alloy/Rhodamine B and Mg alloy/ Desoximetasone by PLAD are described. The trends, applications and future development of discussed patented methods based on the laser ablating technologies for producing hybrid nanocomposite coatings have also been discussed in this review.

  3. Fabrication of alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel', V M; Bukin, V V; Garnov, Sergei V; Bagdasarov, V Kh; Denisov, N N; Garanin, Sergey G; Terekhin, V A; Trutnev, Yurii A

    2012-12-31

    A technique has been proposed for the fabrication of atmospheric corrosion resistant alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition. We produced photocathodes with a highly homogeneous photoemissive layer well-adherent to the substrate. The photocathodes were mounted in a vacuum photodiode, and a tungsten grid was used as an anode. Using pulsed UV lasers, we carried out experiments aimed at evaluating the quantum efficiency of the photocathodes. With a dc voltage applied between the photocathode and anode grid, we measured a shunt signal proportional to the total charge emitted by the cathode exposed to UV laser light. The proposed deposition technique enables one to produce photocathodes with photoemissive layers highly uniform in quantum efficiency, which is its main advantage over thin film growth by resistive evaporation. (laser technologies)

  4. Pulsed Laser Deposition of High Temperature Protonic Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred W.; Berger, M. H.; Sayir, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to fabricate nanostructured BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3- sigma) films. Protonic conduction of fabricated BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films was compared to sintered BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma). Sintered samples and laser targets were prepared by sintering BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) powders derived by solid state synthesis. Films 1 to 8 micron thick were deposited by KrF excimer laser on porous Al2O3 substrates. Thin films were fabricated at deposition temperatures of 700 to 950 C at O2 pressures up to 200 mTorr using laser pulse energies of 0.45 - 0.95 J. Fabricated films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Single phase BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films with a columnar growth morphology are observed with preferred crystal growth along the [100] or [001] direction. Results indicate [100] growth dependence upon laser pulse energy. Electrical conductivity of bulk samples produced by solid state sintering and thin film samples were measured over a temperature range of 100 C to 900 C. Electrical conduction behavior was dependent upon film deposition temperature. Maximum conductivity occurs at deposition temperature of 900 oC; the electrical conductivity exceeds the sintered specimen. All other deposited films exhibit a lower electrical conductivity than the sintered specimen. Activation energy for electrical conduction showed dependence upon deposition temperature, it varied

  5. Microstructures of laser deposited 304L austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    2000-05-22

    Laser deposits fabricated from two different compositions of 304L stainless steel powder were characterized to determine the nature of the solidification and solid state transformations. One of the goals of this work was to determine to what extent novel microstructure consisting of single-phase austenite could be achieved with the thermal conditions of the LENS [Laser Engineered Net Shape] process. Although ferrite-free deposits were not obtained, structures with very low ferrite content were achieved. It appeared that, with slight changes in alloy composition, this goal could be met via two different solidification and transformation mechanisms.

  6. UV laser deposition of metal films by photogenerated free radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. K.; Mantei, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    A novel photochemical method for liquid-phase deposition of metal films is described. In the liquid phase deposition scheme, a metal containing compound and a metal-metal bonded carbonyl complex are dissolved together in a polar solvent and the mixture is irradiated using a UV laser. The optical arrangement consists of a HeCd laser which provides 7 mW of power at a wavelength of 325 nm in the TEM(OO) mode. The beam is attenuated and may be expanded to a diameter of 5-20 mm. Experiments with photochemical deposition of silver films onto glass and quartz substrates are described in detail. Mass spectrometric analysis of deposited silver films indicated a deposition rate of about 1 A/s at incident power levels of 0.01 W/sq cm. UV laser-induced copper and palladium films have also been obtained. A black and white photograph showing the silver Van Der Pauw pattern of a solution-deposited film is provided.

  7. Chromium carbide thin films deposited by ultra-short pulse laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teghil, R.; Santagata, A.; De Bonis, A.; Galasso, A.; Villani, P.

    2009-06-01

    Pulsed laser deposition performed by a laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs has been used to deposit films from a Cr 3C 2 target. Due to the different processes involved in the laser ablation when it is performed by an ultra-short pulse source instead of a conventional short pulse one, it has been possible to obtain in vacuum films containing only one type of carbide, Cr 3C 2, as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. On the other hand, Cr 3C 2 is not the only component of the films, since a large amount of amorphous carbon is also present. The films, deposited at room temperature, are amorphous and seem to be formed by the coalescence of a large number of particles with nanometric size. The film composition can be explained in terms of thermal evaporation from particles ejected from the target.

  8. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition of ruthenium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai Keat, Lee

    Ruthenium (Ru) is one of the noble air-stable transition metals, which has excellent thermal chemical stability, low electrical resistivity, and relatively high work function near the valence band edge of Si. Recently, Ru has been introduced into the semiconductor industries as a result of the interesting chemical, physical, and electrical properties it possessed. So far, investigations of ruthenium films have been centered on material properties of Ru layers, growth using direct current/radiofrequency (DC/RF) magnetron sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition. However, comparatively little work has been carried out using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. In this research work, the growth of Ru film using PLD was investigated. The Ru films were deposited on silicon (Si) substrates employing 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser source. Laser fluence ranged from 2 to 8 J/cm2 was employed, with deposition duration from 5 to 180 minutes under high vacuum condition. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was employed to study the species and purity of the plasma during the deposition. It was observed that intensity of the Ru species spectra increased with increasing laser fluence and more prominent after laser fluence of 4 J/cm2. No impurities were observed. Film thicknesses ranging from 15 to 280 nm were obtained. As the deposition duration and the laser fluence increased, the thickness of the deposited Ru films increased. It is observed that there was a critical deposition duration value, and this value increases as the laser fluence increased. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra showed Ru with crystalline orientation of (101), (100), and (002) peaks. The XRD results revealed an enhanced diffraction peak when film thickness increased, under all laser fluences. Grain sizes were deduced from the XRD data by using the Scherrer's formula and the values fall in the range of 20 to 35 nm for the film thickness covering from 50 nm to 250 nm. Besides, the electrical properties of

  9. Laser-induced copper deposition with weak reducing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemirovsky, V. A.; Fateev, S. A.; Logunov, L. S.; Tumkin, I. I.; Safonov, S. V.; Khairullina, E. M.

    2013-11-01

    The study showed that organic alcohols with 1,2,3,5,6 hydroxyl groups can be used as reducing agents for laser-induced copper deposition from solutions (LCLD).Multiatomic alcohols, sorbitol, xylitol, and glycerol, are shown to be effective reducing agents for performing LCLD at glass-ceramic surfaces. High-conductivity copper tracks with good topology were synthesized.

  10. Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Xiao, Kai; Eres, Gyula; et al

    2014-10-19

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a new route to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate bymore » pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (~ 100 m lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This novel PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area, metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.« less

  11. Chalcogenide glass nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Bradley R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; MacIsaac, Brett D.; Sundaram, S. Kamakshi

    2007-05-01

    Chalcogenide nanowires and other micro-and nano scale structures are grown on a preselected portion of on a substrate. They are amorphous and of uniform composition and can be grown by a sublimation-condensation process onto the surface of an amorphous substrate. Among other uses, these structures can be used as coatings on optical fibers, as coatings on implants, as wispering galleries, in electrochemical devices, and in nanolasers.

  12. Properties of zirconia thin films deposited by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Cancea, V. N.; Filipescu, M.; Colceag, D.; Dinescu, M.; Mustaciosu, C.

    2013-11-13

    Zirconia thin films have been deposited by laser ablation of a ceramic ZrO{sub 2} target in vacuum or in oxygen background at 0.01 mbar. The laser beam generated by an ArF laser (λ=193 nm, ν=40 Hz) has been focalized on the target through a spherical lens at an incident angle of 45°. The laser fluence has been established to a value from 2.0 to 3.4 Jcm{sup −2}. A silicon (100) substrate has been placed parallel to the target, at a distance of 4 cm, and subsequently has been heated to temperatures ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. Thin films morphology has been characterized by atomic force microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Biocompatibility of these thin films has been assessed by studying the cell attachment of L929 mouse fibroblasts.

  13. Coating Layer Characterization of Laser Deposited AlSi Coating over Laser Weld Bead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hongping; Van Gelder, Aldo

    Corrosion protection of steel components is an important topic in automotive industry. Laser beam welding makes a narrow weld bead, thus minimizing the damage to the original coating on the steel material. However, the weld bead loses its original coating and is vulnerable to corrosive attack. It was demonstrated in this study that laser beam generated AlSi coating is an effective way to apply a protective coating on the weld bead. Coatings with different thickness and topography have been deposited under different laser power and processing speed. The microstructure of the as-deposited coating and its evolution after heat treatment has been studied. EDS was employed to analyze the distribution of chemical compositions of the laser generated coatings. Several metallic compounds of Al and iron have been identified. It was found that the type of metallic compounds can be influenced by the laser processing parameters.

  14. Drastic deviations from stoichiometry transfer during pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Arne; Eberl, Christian; Schlenkrich, Susanne; Schlenkrich, Felix; Döring, Florian; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    In common, one of the most characteristic properties of pulsed laser deposition is the stoichiometry transfer between target and substrate, which has been used heavily for many complex systems. In this paper we show that it is yet possible to obtain drastic deviations from stoichiometry transfer in a binary system by just varying the fluence during laser deposition. In the W-Cu system, the W concentration of films grown from a composite W60Cu40 target (60 wt% W) was indeed continuously changed over an unprecedented large range of 0-70 wt% W. Close to the deposition threshold, pure Cu films are formed due to the much higher vapor pressure of Cu. At higher laser fluences, more and more W-rich W-Cu alloy samples are obtained, since ion implantation and intermixing processes occur. These alloys can reach W contents even higher than that of the target because of enhanced resputtering and reflection of the lighter Cu atoms at the film surface. Stoichiometric films with 60 wt% of W are only obtained at laser fluences around 2.7 J/cm2, when the strong Cu evaporation from the target and reflection and resputtering effects of Cu at the film surface are in balance.

  15. Deposition of fibrous nanostructure by ultrafast laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, K.

    2010-05-01

    This research work demonstrated that laser-induced reverse transfer (LIRT) can be used for controllable site-specific deposition of fibrous nanostructure. The LIRT method makes it possible to generate and deposit the fibrous nanostructure of a wide variety of materials on a transparent acceptor in a single-step process at an ambient condition. The deposition of fibrous nanostructures was conducted using ultrafast laser ablation of silicon and aluminum targets placed behind a glass acceptor. Femtosecond laser pulses pass through the transparent acceptor and hit the bulk donor. Consequently a mass quantity of nanoparticles ablates from the donor and then aggregates and forms a porous fibrous nanostructure on the transparent acceptor. Our experiments demonstrated that the gap between the target and the glass acceptor was critical in the formation and accumulation of nanofibers and it determines the density of the formed nanostructure. The formation mechanism of the nanostructures can be explained by the well-established theory of vapor condensation within the plume induced by ultrafast laser ablation. Experimental results also show that the length of the nanostructure can be controlled by the gap between the target and glass acceptor. Lastly, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis shows the oxygen concentration in the nanofibrous structure which is associated with oxidation of ablated material at ambient atmosphere.

  16. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of laser deposited advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistla, Harihar Rakshit

    Additive manufacturing in the form of laser deposition is a unique way to manufacture near net shape metallic components from advanced materials. Rapid solidification facilitates the extension of solid solubility, compositional flexibility and decrease in micro-segregation in the melt among other advantages. The current work investigates the employment of laser deposition to fabricate the following: 1. Functionally gradient materials: This allows grading dissimilar materials compositionally to tailor specific properties of both these materials into a single component. Specific compositions of the candidate materials (SS 316, Inconel 625 and Ti64) were blended and deposited to study the brittle intermetallics reported in these systems. 2. High entropy alloys: These are multi- component alloys with equiatomic compositions of 5 or more elements. The ratio of Al to Ni was decreased to observe the transition of solid solution from a BCC to an FCC crystal structure in the AlFeCoCrNi system. 3. Structurally amorphous alloys: Zr-based metallic glasses have been reported to have high glass forming ability. These alloys have been laser deposited so as to rapidly cool them from the melt into an amorphous state. Microstructural analysis and X-ray diffraction were used to study the phase formation, and hardness was measured to estimate the mechanical properties.

  17. Experimental study of porosity reduction in high deposition-rate Laser Material Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chongliang; Gasser, Andres; Schopphoven, Thomas; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2015-12-01

    For several years, the interest in Additive Manufacturing (AM) is continuously expanding, owing to the paradigm shift that new production processes, such as Laser Material Deposition (LMD), provide over conventional manufacturing technologies. With LMD, three-dimensional, complex components out of a wide range of materials can be manufactured consecutively layer-by-layer. Despite the technological advantages of the LMD process, currently achieved deposition-rates of approx. 0.5 kg/h for Inconel 718 (IN 718) remain a major concern in regards to processing times and economic feasibility. Moreover, processing conditions need to be chosen carefully or else material defects can be systematically formed either at the interface separating two adjacent clad layers, at the bonding zone or within the bulk of the layer. In this respect, the effects of powder humidity, laser power, nominal powder particle size, powder morphology and shielding gas flow rate on the porosity in laser deposited single tracks at an increased deposition-rate of approx. 2 kg/h was investigated through experiments. Based on experimental results, several approaches of reducing porosity in high deposition-rate LMD are proposed in this paper.

  18. Matrix shaped pulsed laser deposition: New approach to large area and homogeneous deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkan, C. K.; May, A.; Hammadeh, M.; Abdul-Khaliq, H.; Aktas, O. C.

    2014-05-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is one of the well-established physical vapor deposition methods used for synthesis of ultra-thin layers. Especially PLD is suitable for the preparation of thin films of complex alloys and ceramics where the conservation of the stoichiometry is critical. Beside several advantages of PLD, inhomogeneity in thickness limits use of PLD in some applications. There are several approaches such as rotation of the substrate or scanning of the laser beam over the target to achieve homogenous layers. On the other hand movement and transition create further complexity in process parameters. Here we present a new approach which we call Matrix Shaped PLD to control the thickness and homogeneity of deposited layers precisely. This new approach is based on shaping of the incoming laser beam by a microlens array and a Fourier lens. The beam is split into much smaller multi-beam array over the target and this leads to a homogenous plasma formation. The uniform intensity distribution over the target yields a very uniform deposit on the substrate. This approach is used to deposit carbide and oxide thin films for biomedical applications. As a case study coating of a stent which has a complex geometry is presented briefly.

  19. Laser deposition, heat-treatment, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avasarala, Chandana

    The present research seeks to characterization of an additively manufactured and heattreated Ti-xMn gradient alloy, a binary system that has largely been unexplored. In order to rapidly assess this binary system, compositionally graded Ti-xMn (0 rapidly assess this binary system, compositionally graded Ti-xMn (0Laser Engineered Net Shaping) and were subsequently heat-treated and characterized using a wide range of techniques. Microstructural changes with respect to the change in thermal treatments, hardness and chemical composition were observed and will be presented. These include assessments of both continuous cooling, leading to observations of both equilibrium and metastable phases, including the titanium martensites, and to direct aging studies looking for composition regimes that produce highly refined alpha precipitates -- a subject of great interest given recent understandings of non-classical nucleation and growth mechanisms. The samples were characterized using SEM, EDS, TEM, and XRD and the properties probed using a Vickers Microhardness tester.

  20. Advanced laser diagnostics for diamond deposition research

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, C.H.; Owano, T.G.; Wahl, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using thermal plasmas is attractive for diamond synthesis applications due to the inherently high reactant densities and throughput, but the associated high gas-phase collision rates in the boundary layer above the substrate produce steep thermal and species gradients which can drive the complex plasma chemistry away from optimal conditions. To understand and control these environments, accurate measurements of temperature and species concentrations within the reacting boundary layer are needed. This is challenging in atmospheric pressure reactors due to the highly luminous environment, steep thermal and species gradients, and small spatial scales. The applicability of degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) as a spectroscopic probe of atmospheric pressure reacting plasmas has been investigated. This powerful, nonlinear technique has been applied to the measurement of temperature and radical species concentrations in the boundary layer of a diamond growth substrate immersed in a flowing atmospheric pressure plasma. In-situ measurements of CH and C{sub 2} radicals have been performed to determine spatially resolved profiles of vibrational temperature, rotational temperature, and species concentration. Results of these measurements are compared with the predictions of a detailed numerical simulation.

  1. Photonic crystal fibers based on chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J. L.; Troles, J.; Brilland, L.; Coulombier, Q.; Chartier, T.

    2010-10-01

    Chalcogenide glasses are known for their large transparency in the mid-infrared and their high refractive index (>2). They present also a high non-linear coefficient (n2), 100 to 1000 times larger than for silica, depending on the composition. An original way to obtain single-mode fibers is to design microstructured optical fibers (MOFs). These fibers present unique optical properties thanks to the high degree of freedom in the design of their geometrical structure. A classical method to realize MOFs is the stack-and-draw technique. However, with chalcogenide glasses, that technique induces optical losses at the interfaces in the stack of capillaries. In consequence, we have developed a new casting method to fabricate the chalcogenide preform. This method permits to obtain optical losses around 1 dB/m at 1.55 μm and 0.3 dB/m in the mid-IR region. Various chalcogenide microstructured fibers working in the IR range were prepared in order to take advantage of the non-linear properties of these glasses and of the original MOF properties. For example, fibers with small effective mode area (Aeff < 10 μm2) have been realized to exacerbate the non-linear optical properties. Such fibers will find applications for signal regeneration in telecom, and for the generation of supercontinuum sources. On the contrary, for military applications in the 3-5 and 8-12 μm windows, large effective mode area and single mode fibers have been designed to permit the propagation of high-power gaussian laser beams.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of CdWO4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodu, M.; Avarmaa, T.; Jaaniso, R.; Leemets, K.; Mändar, H.; Nagirnyi, V.

    2016-10-01

    Thin CdWO4 films were produced on various substrates by pulsed laser deposition. A method of producing transparent films of high structural and optical quality on MgO substrate was developed. It is based on deposition of an amorphous film from a non-stoichiometric CdWO4-CdO target and a consequent crystallization of the film in oxygen atmosphere at 750 °C. The quality of the films produced was verified by x-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, scanning electron microscopy, Raman and optical spectroscopy.

  3. Vacuum arc deposition as a complementary technology to laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vershinin, N. F.; Glebovsky, V. G.; Straumal, B. B.; Gust, W.; Brongersma, H.

    1997-02-01

    Vacuum arc deposition unifies the advantages of laser ablation and magnetron sputtering. The evaporation of the target in the arc discharge permits to deposit the refractory materials with a high rate. The evaporation products are highly ionized and the possibility exists to control the discharge with a magnetic field. The deposition rate, Rd, of Mo films produced by vacuum arc deposition on Cu and silica glass substrates has been studied. The target of purified Mo has been made by high-vacuum electron beam melting. Rd depends critically on the angle between the substrate and the cathode surfaces being maximal when they are parallel. The adhesion of the Mo coating to Cu is much higher than to silica glass substrate. Rd as high as 15 nm/s has been reached. Rd increases with increasing deposition power. It decreases with increasing distance from the cathode slower than in the case of magnetron sputtering. The microparticles forming by the vacuum arc evaporation incorporate in the layer during the deposition procedure increasing the deposition rate.

  4. Understanding the deposition mechanism of pulsed laser deposited B-C films using dual-targets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song; He, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chuanbin; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Lu, Wenzhong

    2014-04-21

    Boron carbide thin films with stoichiometry (boron-carbon atomic ratio) range of 0.1 ∼ 8.9 were fabricated via pulsed laser deposition by using boron-carbon dual-targets. However, this experimental data on stoichiometry were smaller than the computer simulation values. The discrepancy was investigated by studies on composition and microstructure of the thin films and targets by scanning electron microscopy, excitation laser Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicate that the boron liquid droplets were formed by phase explosion after laser irradiation on boron sector. Part of the boron droplets would be lost via ejection in the direction of laser beam, which is tilted 45° to the surface of substrate.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition and characterization of cellulase thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicco, N.; Morone, A.; Verrastro, M.; Viggiano, V.

    2013-08-01

    Thin films of cellulase were obtained by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on an appropriate substrate. Glycoside hydrolase cellulase has received our attention because it emerges among the antifouling enzymes (enzymes being able to remove and prevent the formation of micro-organism biofilms) used in industry and medicine field. Pressed cellulase pellets, used as target material, were ablated with pulses of a Nd-YAG laser working at wavelength of 532 nm. In this work, we evaluated the impact of PLD technique both on molecular structure and hydrolytic activity of cellulase. Characteristic chemical bonds and morphology of deposited layers were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and SEM respectively. The hydrolytic activity of cellulase thin films was detected by a colorimetric assay.

  6. Gold coating of micromechanical DNA biosensors by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollar, Esther; Sanz, Mikel; Esteves, Carina; Martínez, Nicolás F.; Ahumada, Óscar; Castillejo, Marta

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we describe the gold-coating of silicon microcantilever sensors by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and their performance as DNA biosensors. To test optimum deposition conditions for coating the sensors, silicon substrates were gold coated by PLD using the fifth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (213 nm, pulse duration 15 ns). The gold deposits were characterized by atomic force microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The adequate conditions were selected for coating the sensors with a 20 nm thick gold layer and subsequently functionalized with a self-assembled monolayer of thiolated DNA. To verify PLD as a tool for gold coating of biomechanical sensors, they were characterized by using a scanning laser analyzer platform. Characterization consisted in the measurement of the differential stress of the cantilevers upon hydration forces before and after functionalization with a double-stranded DNA monolayer. The measurements showed that the sensor surface stress induced by the adsorption of water molecules is approximately seven times higher than that of functionalized sensors gold coated by thermal evaporation. These results indicate that gold coating by PLD could be an advantageous method to enhance the response of biomechanical sensors based on gold-thiol chemistry.

  7. thin films by an hybrid deposition configuration: pulsed laser deposition and thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Alarcón, L.; Solís-Casados, D. A.; Perez-Alvarez, J.; Romero, S.; Morales-Mendez, J. G.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work was to report the application of an hybrid deposition configuration to deposit Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films modified with different amounts of bismuth (Bi:TiO2). The samples were synthesized combining a TiO2 laser ablation plasma with a flux of vapor of bismuth produced by thermal evaporation. By varying the deposition rate of Bi it was possible to control the amount of Bi incorporated in the film and consequently the film properties. A detailed compositional, structural, and optical characterization by XPS, RBS, Raman spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectrometry techniques is discussed. Photocatalytic response of the deposited thin films was studied through the degradation of a malachite green solution.

  8. Effects of Laser Wavelength and Fluence in Pulsed Laser Deposition of Ge Films

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Seong Shan; Reenaas, Turid Worren; Siew, Wee Ong; Tou, Teck Yong; Ladam, Cecile

    2011-03-30

    Nanosecond lasers with ultra-violet, visible and infrared wavelengths: KrF (248 nm, 25 ns) and Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm, 5 ns) were used to ablate polycrystalline Ge target and deposit Ge films in vacuum (<10-6 Torr). Time-integrated optical emission spectra were obtained for laser fluence from 0.5-10 J/cm{sup 2}. Neutrals and ionized Ge species in the plasma plume were detected by optical emission spectroscopy. Ge neutrals dominated the plasma plume at low laser fluence while Ge{sup +} ions above some threshold fluence. The deposited amorphous thin-film samples consisted of particulates of size from nano to micron. The relation of the film properties and plume species at different laser fluence and wavelengths were discussed.

  9. Chalcogenide glass-based three-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigel, A.; Kotler, Z.; Sfez, B.; Arsh, A.; Klebanov, M.; Lyubin, V.

    2000-11-01

    AsSeTe chalcogenide glasses are materials that are photosensitive and have a large refractive index. These properties make these glasses particularly suitable for the fabrication of photonic crystals. We present a way to build three-dimensional photonic structures from chalcogenide glasses using vapor deposition and direct holographic writing. We show that this technique is intrinsically self-aligned, providing a simple way to build layer-by-layer photonic crystals and a four-layer structure demonstrating the principle of the technique.

  10. Detection of defects in laser powder deposition (LPD) components by pulsed laser transient thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santospirito, S. P.; Słyk, Kamil; Luo, Bin; Łopatka, Rafał; Gilmour, Oliver; Rudlin, John

    2013-05-01

    Detection of defects in Laser Powder Deposition (LPD) produced components has been achieved by laser thermography. An automatic in-process NDT defect detection software system has been developed for the analysis of laser thermography to automatically detect, reliably measure and then sentence defects in individual beads of LPD components. A deposition path profile definition has been introduced so all laser powder deposition beads can be modeled, and the inspection system has been developed to automatically generate an optimized inspection plan in which sampling images follow the deposition track, and automatically control and communicate with robot-arms, the source laser and cameras to implement image acquisition. Algorithms were developed so that the defect sizes can be correctly evaluated and these have been confirmed using test samples. Individual inspection images can also be stitched together for a single bead, a layer of beads or multiple layers of beads so that defects can be mapped through the additive process. A mathematical model was built up to analyze and evaluate the movement of heat throughout the inspection bead. Inspection processes were developed and positional and temporal gradient algorithms have been used to measure the flaw sizes. Defect analysis is then performed to determine if the defect(s) can be further classified (crack, lack of fusion, porosity) and the sentencing engine then compares the most significant defect or group of defects against the acceptance criteria - independent of human decisions. Testing on manufactured defects from the EC funded INTRAPID project has successful detected and correctly sentenced all samples.

  11. Thermochromic VO2 on Zinnwaldite Mica by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathevula, L.; Ngom, B. D.; Kotsedi, L.; Sechogela, P.; Doyle, T. B.; Ghouti, M.; Maaza, M.

    2014-09-01

    VO2 thin films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition on Zinnwaldite Mica substrates. The crystal structure, chemical composition, morphology were determined and the semiconductor/metal transition (SMT) properties of the deposited films were investigated. Without any post annealing, the films exhibit a textured nature with a VO2 (0 1 1) preferred crystallographic orientation and an elevated thermal variation of the electric resistance ratio RS/RM through the SMT at T ≈ 68 °C of the order of 104 and a narrow ∼7 °C hysteresis. In addition, the growth of the VO2 crystallites seem to be governed likely by a Volmer-Weber or Stranski-Krastanov mechanisms and certainly not a Frank-van Der Merwe process.

  12. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of a polyimide precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, N. L.; Schriver, K. E.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2007-04-01

    Poly(amic acid) (PAA), a precursor to polyimide, was successfully deposited on substrates without reaching curing temperature, by resonant infrared pulsed laser ablation. The PAA was prepared by dissolving pyromellitic dianhydride and 4, 4' oxidianiline in the polar solvent Nmethyl pyrrolidinone (NMP). The PAA was deposited in droplet-like morphologies when ablation occurred in air, and in string-like moieties in the case of ablation in vacuum. In the as-deposited condition, the PAA was easily removed by washing with NMP; however, once cured thermally for thirty minutes, the PAA hardened, indicating the expected thermosetting property. Plume shadowgraphy showed very clear contrasts in the ablation mechanism between ablation of the solvent alone and the ablation of the PAA, even at low concentrations. A Wavelength dependence in plume velocity was also observed.

  13. Laser/Plasma/Chemical-Vapor Deposition Of Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George C.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed process for deposition of diamond films includes combination of plasma induced in hydrocarbon feed gas by microwave radiation and irradiation of plasma and substrate by lasers. Deposition of graphite suppressed. Reaction chamber irradiated at wavelength favoring polymerization of CH2 radical into powders filtered out of gas. CH3 radicals, having desired sp3 configuration, remains in gas to serve as precursors for deposition. Feed gas selected to favor formation of CH3 radicals; candidates include CH4, C2H4, C2H2, and C2H6. Plasma produced by applying sufficient power at frequency of 2.45 GHz and adjusting density of gas to obtain electron kinetic energies around 100 eV in low-pressure, low-temperature regime.

  14. Chalcogenide phase-change thin films used as grayscale photolithography materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Jingsong; Fan, Yongtao

    2014-03-10

    Chalcogenide phase-change thin films are used in many fields, such as optical information storage and solid-state memory. In this work, we present another application of chalcogenide phase-change thin films, i.e., as grayscale photolithgraphy materials. The grayscale patterns can be directly inscribed on the chalcogenide phase-change thin films by a single process through direct laser writing method. In grayscale photolithography, the laser pulse can induce the formation of bump structure, and the bump height and size can be precisely controlled by changing laser energy. Bumps with different height and size present different optical reflection and transmission spectra, leading to the different gray levels. For example, the continuous-tone grayscale images of lifelike bird and cat are successfully inscribed onto Sb(2)Te(3) chalcogenide phase-change thin films using a home-built laser direct writer, where the expression and appearance of the lifelike bird and cat are fully presented. This work provides a way to fabricate complicated grayscale patterns using laser-induced bump structures onto chalcogenide phase-change thin films, different from current techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography. The ability to form grayscale patterns of chalcogenide phase-change thin films reveals many potential applications in high-resolution optical images for micro/nano image storage, microartworks, and grayscale photomasks.

  15. Chalcogenide phase-change thin films used as grayscale photolithography materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Jingsong; Fan, Yongtao

    2014-03-10

    Chalcogenide phase-change thin films are used in many fields, such as optical information storage and solid-state memory. In this work, we present another application of chalcogenide phase-change thin films, i.e., as grayscale photolithgraphy materials. The grayscale patterns can be directly inscribed on the chalcogenide phase-change thin films by a single process through direct laser writing method. In grayscale photolithography, the laser pulse can induce the formation of bump structure, and the bump height and size can be precisely controlled by changing laser energy. Bumps with different height and size present different optical reflection and transmission spectra, leading to the different gray levels. For example, the continuous-tone grayscale images of lifelike bird and cat are successfully inscribed onto Sb(2)Te(3) chalcogenide phase-change thin films using a home-built laser direct writer, where the expression and appearance of the lifelike bird and cat are fully presented. This work provides a way to fabricate complicated grayscale patterns using laser-induced bump structures onto chalcogenide phase-change thin films, different from current techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography. The ability to form grayscale patterns of chalcogenide phase-change thin films reveals many potential applications in high-resolution optical images for micro/nano image storage, microartworks, and grayscale photomasks. PMID:24663836

  16. Chalcogenide three-dimensional photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigel, A. I.; Kotler, Zvi; Sfez, Bruno; Arsh, A.; Klebanov, Matvei; Lyubin, Victor

    2001-05-01

    AsSeTe/AsSe chalcogenide glasses are photosensitive materials with large refractive index. These properties make these glasses suitable for the fabrication of photonic crystals, waveguide components and MOEMS. We present in this article fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, composed from AsSeTe and air, with sub-micron feature size. The method of fabrication is relatively simple and cheap using only vapor deposition and optical holographic lithography. The interferometric alignment allows to eliminate requirement for a mask aligner.

  17. Cation Engineering of Cu-ferrite Films Deposited by Alternating Target Laser Ablation Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,A.; Chen, Z.; Islam, S.; Vittoria, C.; Harris, V.

    2008-01-01

    Epitaxial copper ferrite thin films were deposited on MgO substrates by the alternating target laser ablation deposition method. A series of films was studied to explore the impact of oxygen operating pressure, substrate temperature, and the ratio of laser shots incident on each target upon the magnetic, structural, and atomic structural properties. The highest saturation magnetization, 2800?G, was achieved at a 90?mTorr oxygen pressure and at 650? C for the substrate temperature. This value is 65% higher than the room temperature magnetization for bulk equilibrium samples. The inversion parameter was measured by extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The sample having the highest saturation magnetization had a corresponding inversion parameter (percentage of Cu ion octahedral site occupancy) of 51.5% compared with the bulk value of 85%.

  18. Ion-assisted deposition processes for precision and laser optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Henrik; Gross, Tobias; Lappschies, Marc; Ristau, Detlev

    2004-02-01

    As a consequence of the ever increasing application field of modern optical technologies, new demands for the optimization of deposition processes for high quality optical coatings with increased environmental stability and power handling capability are imposed on thin film manufacturers. Starting from this challenge, the presented work is focused on the development of an ion assisted deposition (IAD) process using a cold cathode ion source. Especially in the mid infrared wavelength region (MIR) with its water absorption bands, the ion assisted deposition process leads to many practical advantages, e.g. for medical laser applications. In the present study, a cold cathode ion source was operated with pure oxygen for the deposition of different oxide materials. Besides the determination of the optical properties, the characterization of the thin films included the first application of an in situ optical broadband monitoring system during the IAD process. The produced single layers and MIR coatings are thermally stable, shift-free, and exhibit lower absorption compared to conventionally deposited coatings. In contrast to the conventional coatings, also no vacuum-to-air shift is observed for the realized MIR coatings. Therefore, the stable and reproducible IAD process in combination with the new process control strategies using the broadband transmittance measurements on the moving substrates allows an advanced process control and a precise determination of the layer thickness.

  19. Direct laser deposition of nanostructured tungsten oxide for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla-Papavlu, Alexandra; Filipescu, Mihaela; Schneider, Christof W.; Antohe, Stefan; Ossi, Paolo M.; Radnóczi, György; Dinescu, Maria; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured tungsten trioxide (WO3) thin films are deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and radio-frequency (RF) assisted PLD onto interdigitated sensor structures. Structural characterization by x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy shows the WO3 films are polycrystalline, with a pure monoclinic phase for the PLD grown films. The as-fabricated WO3 sensors are tested for ammonia (NH3) detection, by measuring the electrical response to NH3 at different temperatures. Sensors based on WO3 deposited by RF-PLD do not show any response to NH3. In contrast, sensors fabricated by PLD operating at 100 °C and 200 °C show a slow recovery time whilst at 300 °C, these sensors are highly sensitive in the low ppm range with a recovery time in the range of a few seconds. The microstructure of the films is suggested to explain their excellent electrical response. Columnar WO3 thin films are obtained by both deposition methods. However, the WO3 films grown by PLD are porous, (which may allow NH3 molecules to diffuse through the film) whereas RF-PLD films are dense. Our results highlight that WO3 thin films deposited by PLD can be applied for the fabrication of gas sensors with a performance level required for industrial applications.

  20. Electron microscopy study of direct laser deposited IN718

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, R.G.; Huang, Z.W.; Li, H.Y.; Mitchell, I.; Baxter, G.; Bowen, P.

    2015-08-15

    The microstructure of direct laser deposited (DLD) IN718 has been investigated in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the dendrite core microstructure can be linked to the cooling rate experienced during the deposition. A ~ 100 μm wide δ partially dissolved region in the IN718 substrate was observed close to the substrate/deposit boundary. In the deposited IN718, γ/Laves eutectic constituent is the predominant minor microconstituent. Irregular and regular (small) (Nb,Ti)C carbides and a mixture of the carbides and Laves were observed. Most M{sub 3}B{sub 2} borides were nucleated around a (Nb,Ti)C carbide. Needles of δ phase precipitated from the Laves phase were also observed. A complex constituent (of Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″, and γ matrix) is reported in IN718 for the first time. The formation of α-Cr particles could be related to Cr rejection during the formation and growth of Cr-depleted δ phase. - Highlights: • Secondary phases in IN718 deposits were identified using electron diffraction and EDS. • MC, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, γ/Laves eutectic and γ/NbC/Laves eutectic were observed. • Needle-like δ phases were precipitated from the Laves phase. • A complex constituent (Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″ and γ) was reported for the first time.

  1. Two powder stream diagnostics for laser deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Schanwald, L.P.

    1995-12-31

    The velocity, density, and mass flow of particles suspended in a subsonic gas stream are important aspects of plasma spray and laser deposition processes. This paper will focus on two optical diagnostic techniques applied to the metal powder streams out of a powder feeder and into a new nozzle developed specifically for such applications. An important characteristic of the new powder nozzle is that it produces a very small column (approximately I mm diameter) of powder which can be used for small focus laser deposition and cladding processes. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied to the nozzle`s output to better understand the kinetic parameters (velocity and spatial density) of exiting particles. Optical scattering of the powder stream was used to measure the total mass flow into the nozzle. Different light scattering detector scenarios applied to the input powder stream were used to identify signals useful for mass flow feedback control. Both of these techniques have the advantages of being fast, noninvasive diagnostics of the powder flow characteristics, and with a well established theoretical framework. Together, or individually, these diagnostics can provide real-time control or post-process analysis of the powder stream.

  2. Vitroceramic interface deposited on titanium substrate by pulsed laser deposition method.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Georgeta; Miu, Dana; Dogaru, Ionut; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Busuioc, Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method was used to obtain biovitroceramic thin film coatings on titanium substrates. The composition of the targets was selected from SiO2-CaO-P2O5-(CaF2) systems and the corresponding masses were prepared using the sol-gel method. The depositions were performed in oxygen atmosphere (100mTorr), while the substrates were heated at 400°C. The PLD deposited films were analysed through different experimental techniques: X-ray diffraction, scanning (SEM, EDX) and transmission (HRTEM, SAED) electron microscopy and infra-red spectroscopy coupled with optical microscopy. They were also biologically tested by in vitro cell culture and the contact angle was determined. The bioevaluation results indicate a high biocompatibilty of the obtained materials, demonstrating their potential use for biomedical applications. PMID:26546909

  3. Vitroceramic interface deposited on titanium substrate by pulsed laser deposition method.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Georgeta; Miu, Dana; Dogaru, Ionut; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Busuioc, Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method was used to obtain biovitroceramic thin film coatings on titanium substrates. The composition of the targets was selected from SiO2-CaO-P2O5-(CaF2) systems and the corresponding masses were prepared using the sol-gel method. The depositions were performed in oxygen atmosphere (100mTorr), while the substrates were heated at 400°C. The PLD deposited films were analysed through different experimental techniques: X-ray diffraction, scanning (SEM, EDX) and transmission (HRTEM, SAED) electron microscopy and infra-red spectroscopy coupled with optical microscopy. They were also biologically tested by in vitro cell culture and the contact angle was determined. The bioevaluation results indicate a high biocompatibilty of the obtained materials, demonstrating their potential use for biomedical applications.

  4. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume.

  5. Superhydrophobicity of polytetrafluoroethylene thin film fabricated by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, H. Y.; Wong, M. H.; Wong, Y. W.; Wong, K. H.

    2007-09-01

    Superhydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin films were obtained by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique carried out with KrF excimer laser ( λ = 248 nm) of about 1 J/cm 2 at a pressure of 1.33 Pa. The samples exhibit high water contact angle of about 170° and the sliding angle smaller than 2°. From studying the surface morphology of the prepared films, it is believed that the nano-scale surface roughness has enhanced the hydrophobic property of the PTFE. The increase of trapping air and reducing liquid-solid contact area due to the rough surface, as suggested by the Cassie-Baxter's model, should be responsible for superhydrophobicity of the PLD prepared films. This study thus provides a convenient one-step method without using wet-process to produce a superhydrophobic surface with good self-cleaning properties.

  6. Study of liquid deposition during laser printing of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duocastella, M.; Patrascioiu, A.; Dinca, V.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.

    2011-04-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique which can be used to successfully print various complex and sensitive materials with a high degree of spatial resolution. However, the optimization of its performances requires a deep understanding of the LIFT dynamics. Such understanding should allow correlating the phenomena underlying the liquid transfer process with the morphology of the obtained deposits. To this end, in this work it is presented a study related to two aspects: first, the correlation of the morphological characteristics of the transferred droplets with the variation of the film thickness combined with laser fluence; and second, a correlation of the dependences observed with the dynamics of the transfer process. The work is focused on the understanding of the observed dependences for which the information provided by time-resolved analysis on liquid transfer dynamics has proved to be crucial.

  7. Formation of ultrasmooth thin silver films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, I. A.; Garaeva, M. Ya.; Mamichev, D. A. Grishchenko, Yu. V.; Zanaveskin, M. L.

    2013-09-15

    Ultrasmooth thin silver films have been formed on a quartz substrate with a buffer yttrium oxide layer by pulsed laser deposition. The dependence of the surface morphology of the film on the gas (N{sub 2}) pressure in the working chamber and laser pulse energy is investigated. It is found that the conditions of film growth are optimal at a gas pressure of 10{sup -2} Torr and lowest pulse energy. The silver films formed under these conditions on a quartz substrate with an initial surface roughness of 0.3 nm had a surface roughness of 0.36 nm. These films can be used as a basis for various optoelectronics and nanoplasmonics elements.

  8. Fabrication of planar photonic crystals in chalcogenide glass film by maskless projection lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peiqing; Zhang, Qian; Zeng, Jianghui; Han, Jintao; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Jiao, Qing; Wu, Yuehao; Dai, Shixun

    2016-09-01

    Ge20Sb15Se65 chalcogenide glass films were deposited and patterned using maskless projection lithography to create photonic crystal structures. This lithography technology, which is based on a digital micro-mirror device, is demonstrated as a powerful and low-cost tool to produce arbitrary intensity distributions to fabricate photonic devices. Direct photolithography in resist-free chalcogenide films was first studied, and results indicate that the quality of the products is insufficient. High-quality photonic crystals with sub-micrometer size were finally obtained in chalcogenide films with photoresist by maskless projection lithography and inductively coupled plasma technology.

  9. Inorganic-organic thin implant coatings deposited by lasers.

    PubMed

    Sima, Felix; Davidson, Patricia M; Dentzer, Joseph; Gadiou, Roger; Pauthe, Emmanuel; Gallet, Olivier; Mihailescu, Ion N; Anselme, Karine

    2015-01-14

    The lifetime of bone implants inside the human body is directly related to their osseointegration. Ideally, future materials should be inspired by human tissues and provide the material structure-function relationship from which synthetic advanced biomimetic materials capable of replacing, repairing, or regenerating human tissues can be produced. This work describes the development of biomimetic thin coatings on titanium implants to improve implant osseointegration. The assembly of an inorganic-organic biomimetic structure by UV laser pulses is reported. The structure consists of a hydroxyapatite (HA) film grown onto a titanium substrate by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) and activated by a top fibronectin (FN) coating deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A pulsed KrF* laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) was employed at fluences of 7 and 0.7J/cm(2) for HA and FN transfer, respectively. Films approximately 1500 and 450 nm thick were obtained for HA and FN, respectively. A new cryogenic temperature-programmed desorption mass spectrometry analysis method was employed to accurately measure the quantity of immobilized protein. We determined that less than 7 μg FN per cm(2) HA surface is adequate to improve adhesion, spreading, and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells. We believe that the proposed fabrication method opens the door to combining and immobilizing two or more inorganic and organic materials on a solid substrate in a well-defined manner. The flexibility of this method enables the synthesis of new hybrid materials by simply tailoring the irradiation conditions according to the thermo-physical properties of the starting materials.

  10. Inorganic-organic thin implant coatings deposited by lasers.

    PubMed

    Sima, Felix; Davidson, Patricia M; Dentzer, Joseph; Gadiou, Roger; Pauthe, Emmanuel; Gallet, Olivier; Mihailescu, Ion N; Anselme, Karine

    2015-01-14

    The lifetime of bone implants inside the human body is directly related to their osseointegration. Ideally, future materials should be inspired by human tissues and provide the material structure-function relationship from which synthetic advanced biomimetic materials capable of replacing, repairing, or regenerating human tissues can be produced. This work describes the development of biomimetic thin coatings on titanium implants to improve implant osseointegration. The assembly of an inorganic-organic biomimetic structure by UV laser pulses is reported. The structure consists of a hydroxyapatite (HA) film grown onto a titanium substrate by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) and activated by a top fibronectin (FN) coating deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A pulsed KrF* laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) was employed at fluences of 7 and 0.7J/cm(2) for HA and FN transfer, respectively. Films approximately 1500 and 450 nm thick were obtained for HA and FN, respectively. A new cryogenic temperature-programmed desorption mass spectrometry analysis method was employed to accurately measure the quantity of immobilized protein. We determined that less than 7 μg FN per cm(2) HA surface is adequate to improve adhesion, spreading, and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells. We believe that the proposed fabrication method opens the door to combining and immobilizing two or more inorganic and organic materials on a solid substrate in a well-defined manner. The flexibility of this method enables the synthesis of new hybrid materials by simply tailoring the irradiation conditions according to the thermo-physical properties of the starting materials. PMID:25485841

  11. Laser deposition of large-area thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzanyan, A S; Petrosyan, V A; Pilosyan, S Kh; Nesterov, V M

    2011-03-31

    A new method for fabricating large-area thin films of uniform thickness on a rotating substrate is proposed. Its distinctive features are (i) the presence of a diaphragm, partially transmitting the evaporated material, between the target and substrate and (ii) the translatory motion of the rotating substrate with respect to the target at a certain velocity. The method proposed makes it possible to obtain thin films of uniform thickness on substrates with sizes limited by only the deposition chamber size. The method is experimentally verified by depositing thin CuO films on silicon substrates placed over the radius of a disk 300 mm in diameter. The deviation of the film thickness from the average value does not exceed {+-}3% throughout the entire radius, which confirms good prospects of this method for microelectronics, optical industry, and other modern technologies. (laser technology)

  12. Nanostructured films of Boron suboxide by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shengwen; Wang, Guanghou; Yin, Shuangye; Zhang, Yunxiang; Liu, Zhiguo

    2000-04-01

    We have prepared nanofilms of boron suboxide by the method of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) for the first time. Boron powder with purity of 99%+ was mixed with B 2O 3. The mixture was milled and then pressed into a pellet which was heated at 1200°C for one day. The heated pellet was used as the target for the experiment of PLD in preparing nanocluster-based films. Structural studies indicate that nanofilms contain the crystallized nanoclusters of B 6O with six-fold symmetry and icosahedron-like structure, which is the result of long range order packing.

  13. Pulsed laser deposition of ITO thin films and their characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, D. A. Lotin, A. A.; Novodvorsky, O. A.; Lebedev, F. V.; Khramova, O. D.; Petuhov, I. A.; Putilin, Ph. N.; Shatohin, A. N.; Rumyanzeva, M. N.; Gaskov, A. M.

    2012-03-15

    The indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films are grown on quartz glass substrates by the pulsed laser deposition method. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of ITO films are studied as a function of the substrate temperature, the oxygen pressure in the vacuum chamber, and the Sn concentration in the target. The transmittance of grown ITO films in the visible spectral region exceeds 85%. The minimum value of resistivity 1.79 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} {Omega} cm has been achieved in the ITO films with content of Sn 5 at %.

  14. Defects in zinc oxide grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Francis C. C.; Wang, Zilan; Ping Ho, Lok; Younas, M.; Anwand, W.; Wagner, A.; Su, S. C.; Shan, C. X.

    2016-01-01

    ZnO films are grown on c-plane sapphire using the pulsed laser deposition method. Systematic studies on the effects of annealing are performed to understand the thermal evolutions of the defects in the films. Particular attention is paid to the discussions of the ZnO/sapphire interface thermal stability, the Zn-vacancy related defects having different microstructures, the origins of the green luminescence (∼2.4-2.5 eV) and the near band edge (NBE) emission at 3.23 eV.

  15. Space processing of chalcogenide glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, D. C.; Ali, M. I.

    1977-01-01

    The manner in which the weightless, containerless nature of in-space processing can be successfully utilized to improve the quality of infrared transmitting chalcogenide glasses is determined. The technique of space processing chalcogenide glass was developed, and the process and equipment necessary to do so was defined. Earthbound processing experiments with As2S3 and G28Sb12Se60 glasses were experimented with. Incorporated into these experiments is the use of an acoustic levitation device.

  16. Electrochromic lithium nickel oxide thin film by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, S.J.; Rottkay, K. von; Rubin, M.

    1996-10-01

    * Thin films of lithium nickel oxide were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) from targets of pressed LiNiO{sub 2} powder with layered structure. The composition, structure and surface air sensitivity of these films were analyzed using a variety of techniques, such as nuclear reaction analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Optical properties were measured using a combination of variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and IP spectroradiometry. Crystalline structure, surface morphology and chemical composition of Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}O thin films depend strongly on deposition oxygen pressure, temperature as well as substrate target distance. The films produced at temperatures lower than 600 degrees C spontaneously absorb CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at their surface once they are exposed to the air. The films deposited at 600 degrees C proved to be stable in air over a long period. Even when deposited at room temperature the PLD films are denser and more stable than sputtered films. RBS determined that the best electrochromic films had the stoichiometric composition L{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}O when deposited at 60 mTorr O{sub 2} pressure. Electrochemical tests show that the films exhibit excellent reversibility in the range 1.0 V to 3.4 V versus lithium and long cyclic life stability in a liquid electrolyte half cell. Electrochemical formatting which is used to develop electrochromism in other films and nickel oxide films is not needed for these stoichiometric films. The optical transmission range is almost 70% at 550 nm for 120 nm thick films.

  17. Dual laser deposition of Ti:DLC composite for implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Zemek, Josef; Kocourek, Tomáš; Remsa, Jan; Mikšovský, Jan; Písařík, Petr; Jurek, Karel; Tolde, Zdeněk; Trávníčková, Martina; Vandrovcová, Marta; Filová, Elena

    2016-10-01

    Ti-doped hydrogen free diamond-like carbon (DLC) layers of dopation up to ~25 at.% were prepared by dual beam pulsed laser deposition (PLD) using two excimer lasers. The arrangement allows continuous fine tuning of dopant concentration on a large scale and deposition flexibility. The layers were prepared on Si(1 0 0) and Ti6Al4V substrates at room temperature. The surface morphology, mechanical properties, bonds, composition, morphology of human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells, their metabolic activity and production of osteocalcin, a marker of osteogenic cells’ differentiation were tested. The films’ composition changed after x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface cleaning by argon clusters. Adhesion moved with Ti dopation from 4 N (DLC film) to 11 N (25 at.% of Ti in DLC). Creation of TiC was observed for higher Ti dopation. The contact angle and surface free energy stayed unchanged for higher Ti dopation. Saos-2 cells had the highest metabolic activity/viability on DLC with 10 at.% of Ti and on control polystyrene dishes on days 1 and 3. The Ti dopation improved the formation of vinculin-containing focal adhesion plaques in Saos-2 cells. Immunofluorescence staining revealed similar production of osteocalcin in cells on all tested samples.

  18. Calcium phosphate thin film processing by pulsed laser deposition and in situ assisted ultraviolet pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Nelea, V; Pelletier, H; Iliescu, M; Werckmann, J; Craciun, V; Mihailescu, I N; Ristoscu, C; Ghica, C

    2002-12-01

    Calcium orthophosphates (CaP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were intensively studied in order to design and develop a new generation of bioactive and osteoconductive bone prostheses. The main drawback now in the CaP and HA thin films processing persists in their poor mechanical characteristics, namely hardness, tensile and cohesive strength, and adherence to the metallic substrate. We report here a critical comparison between the microstructure and mechanical properties of HA and CaP thin films grown by two methods. The films were grown by KrF* pulsed laser deposition (PLD) or KrF* pulsed laser deposition assisted by in situ ultraviolet radiation emitted by a low pressure Hg lamp (UV-assisted PLD). The PLD films were deposited at room temperature, in vacuum on Ti-5Al-2.5Fe alloy substrate previously coated with a TiN buffer layer. After deposition the films were annealed in ambient air at 500-600 degrees C. The UV-assisted PLD films were grown in (10(-2)-10(-1) Pa) oxygen directly on Ti-5Al-2.5Fe substrates heated at 500-600 degrees C. The films grown by classical PLD are crystalline and stoichiometric. The films grown by UV-assisted PLD were crystalline and exhibit the best mechanical characteristics with values of hardness and Young modulus of 6-7 and 150-170 GPa, respectively, which are unusually high for the calcium phosphate ceramics. To the difference of PLD films, in the case of UV-assisted PLD, the GIXRD spectra show the decomposition of HA in Ca(2)P(2)O(7), Ca(2)P(2)O(9) and CaO. The UV lamp radiation enhanced the gas reactivity and atoms mobility during processing, increasing the tensile strength of the film, while the HA structure was destroyed.

  19. Mid-infrared characterization of solution-processed As2S3 chalcogenide glass waveguides.

    PubMed

    Tsay, Candice; Mujagić, Elvis; Madsen, Christi K; Gmachl, Claire F; Arnold, Craig B

    2010-07-19

    An etch-free and cost-effective deposition and patterning method to fabricate mid-infrared chalcogenide glass waveguides for chemical sensing applications is introduced. As(2)S(3) raised strip optical waveguides are produced by casting a liquid solution of As(2)S(3) glass in capillary channel molds formed by soft lithography. Mid-IR transmission is characterized by coupling the output of a quantum cascade (QC) laser (lambda = 4.8 microm) into the 40 microm wide by 10 microm thick multi-mode waveguides. Loss as low as 4.5 dB/cm is achieved using suitable substrate materials and post-processing. Optical absorption and surface roughness measurements indicate that the solution-processed films are of sufficient quality for optical devices and are promising for further development of waveguide-based mid-IR elements.

  20. Laser energy deposition and its dynamic uniformity for direct-drive capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wu, SiZhong; Zheng, WuDi

    2015-04-15

    The total laser energy deposition of multi-laser-beam irradiation is not only associated with the dynamic behavior of capsule but also the time-dependent angular distribution of the energy deposition of each beam around its axis. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition does not linearly respond to the dynamic behavior of laser irradiation. The laser energy deposition uniformity determines the symmetry of implosion. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition non-uniformity in OMEGA for laser with square beam shape intensity profile is investigated. In the case of smaller laser spot, the initial non-uniformity caused by laser beam overlap is very high. The shell asymmetry caused by the high initial laser irradiation non-uniformity is estimated by the extent of distortion of shock front which is not as severe as expected before the shock driven by main pulse arrives. This suggests that the large initial non-uniformity due to smaller laser spot is one of the elements that seed disturbance before the main pulse. The rms of laser energy deposition during the main pulse remains above 2%. Since the intensity of main driving pulse usually is several times higher than that of picket pulses, the non-uniformity in main pulse period may jeopardize the symmetrical implosion. When dynamic behavior of capsule is considered, the influence of beam pointing error, the target positioning error, and beam-to-beam power unbalance is quite different for the case of static capsule.

  1. Recent Advances in Pulsed Laser Deposition of Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1997-03-01

    While pulsed laser deposition became popular with the emergance of high temperature superconductors the technique has been rapidly deployed in the development of a number of other oxide materials such as ferroelectric titanates, colossal magneto-resistive manganites, electro-optic tantalates and niobates(Pulsed Laser Deposition of Thin Films, eds. D.B. Chrisey and G.K. Hubler, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1994.). Most recently this technique has also been used succesfully for the fabrication of a variety of semiconductor materials such as sulfides and nitrides with the Group II and Group III cationic species respectively. Details on the fabrication of a hetero-epitaxial family of AlN (Eg = 6.2 eV), GaN (Eg = 3.6 eV) and TiN (metallic with ρ = 14 μΩ-cm) on sapphire substrates will be discussed. Interesting results in the integration of oxides both as buffer layers for improved epitaxy on sapphire as well as conducting layers for both Ohmic and Schottky contacts on the nitrides will be discussed. Some recent details on the elimination of particles in the fabricated films by the use of off-axis deposition and by the use of a shadow mask and scalling issues will be elaborated on. Work in collaboration with R. Ramesh, R. P. Sharma, M. Rajeswari, Z. W. Dong, Z. Trajanovic, V. Talyanski, R. D. Vispute, L. Salamanca-Riba, (UMD); K. Jones, M. Wood, R. Lareau (ARL-SEDD, Fort Monmouth); M. Spenser (Howard U); S. M. Green, S. Harshavardhan and A. Pique (Neocera, Inc.).

  2. The structure of deposited metal clusters generated by laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, P.; Brandstättner, M.; Ding, A.

    1991-09-01

    Metal clusters have been produced using a laser evaporation source. A Nd-YAG laser beam focused onto a solid silver rod was used to evaporate the material, which was then cooled to form clusters with the help of a pulsed high pressure He beam. TOF mass spectra of these clusters reveal a strong occurrence of small and medium sized clusters ( n<100). Clusters were also deposited onto grid supported thin layers of carbon-films which were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Very high resolution pictures of these grids were used to analyze the size distribution and the structure of the deposited clusters. The diffraction pattern caused by crystalline structure of the clusters reveals 3-and 5-fold symmetries as well as fcc bulk structure. This can be explained in terms of icosahedron and cuboctahedron type clusters deposited on the surface of the carbon layer. There is strong evidence that part of these cluster geometries had already been formed before the depostion process. The non-linear dependence of the cluster size and the cluster density on the generating conditions is discussed. Therefore the samples were observed in HREM in the stable DEEKO 100 microscope of the Fritz-Haber-Institut operating at 100 KV with the spherical aberration c S =0.5 mm. The quality of the pictures was improved by using the conditions of minimum phase contrast hollow cone illumination. This procedure led to a minimum of phase contrast artefacts. Among the well-crystallized particles were a great amount of five- and three-fold symmetries, icosahedra and cuboctahedra respectively. The largest clusters with five- and three-fold symmetries have been found with diameters of 7 nm; the smallest particles displaying the same undistorted symmetries were of about 2 mm. Even smaller ones with strong distortions could be observed although their classification is difficult. The quality of the images was improved by applying Fourier filtering techniques.

  3. Direct deposition of YBCO on polished Ag substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Li, M.; Koritala, R. E.; Fisher, B. L.; Dorris, S. E.; Maroni, V. A.; Miller, D. J.; Balachandran, U.

    2002-09-01

    YBCO thin films were directly deposited on mechanically polished nontextured silver (Ag) substrates at elevated temperature by pulsed laser deposition with various inclination angles of 35°, 55°, and 72°. Strong fiber texture, with the c-axis parallel to the substrate normal was detected by X-ray diffraction pole figure analysis. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy images revealed that a few a-axis-oriented grains were dispersed on the top surface of the YBCO films. Transmission electron microscopy revealed dense amorphous layer at the interface between the YBCO film and the Ag substrate. Energy dispersive spectrum analysis indicates that the YBCO film deposited on the Ag substrate is slightly Cu-deficient. A YBCO film deposited at 755 °C and an inclination angle of 55° exhibited Tc=90 K. Transport critical current density measured by the four-probe method at 77 K in self-field was ≈2.7×10 5 A/cm 2. This work demonstrated a simple and inexpensive method to fabricate YBCO-coated conductors with high critical current density.

  4. Deposition of polyimide precursor by resonant infrared laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, N. L.; Gies, A. P.; Schriver, K. E.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2007-11-01

    We report the successful deposition of a polyimide precursor using resonant infrared laser ablation (RIR-LA). A solution of poly(amic acid) (PAA) dissolved in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), the melt processable precursor to polyimide, was frozen in liquid nitrogen for use as an ablation target in a high-vacuum chamber. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine that the local chemical structure remained unaltered. Gel permeation chromatography demonstrated that the transferred PAA retained its molecular weight, showing that RIR-LA is able to transfer the polymer intact, with no detectable chain fragmentation. These results are in stark contrast to UV-processing which degrades the polymer. After deposition the PAA may be removed with a suitable solvent; however, once the material has undergone cyclodehydration it forms an impenetrable three-dimensional network associated with thermosetting polymers. The transfer of uncured PAA precursor supports the hypothesis that RIR-LA is intrinsically a low temperature process, because the PAA is transferred without reaching the curing temperature. The RIR-LA also effectively removes the solvent NMP from the PAA, during both the ablation and deposition phases; this is a necessary step in generating PI films.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured indium-tin-oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Thian Kok; Nee, Chen Hon; Yap, Seong Shan; Siew, Wee Ong; Sáfran, György; Yap, Yoke Kin; Tou, Teck Yong

    2010-08-01

    Effects of O2, N2, Ar and He on the formation of micro- and nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were investigated in pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition on glass substrate. For O2 and Ar, ITO resistivity of <= 4 × 10-4 Ωcm and optical transmittance of > 90% were obtained with substrate temperature of 250 °C. For N2 and He, low ITO resisitivity could be obtained but with poor optical transmittance. SEM images show nano-structured ITO thin films for all gases, where dense, larger and highly oriented, microcrystalline structures were obtained for deposition in O2 and He, as revealed from the XRD lines. EDX results indicated the inclusion of Ar and N2 at the expense of reduced tin (Sn) content. When the ITO films were applied for fabrication of organic light emitting devices (OLED), only those deposited in Ar and O2 produced comparable performance to single-layer OLED fabricated on the commercial ITO.

  6. Impact of laser power density on tribological properties of Pulsed Laser Deposited DLC films

    SciTech Connect

    Gayathri, S.; Sridharan, M. E-mail: m.sridharan@ece.sastra.edu; Kumar, N.; Krishnan, R. E-mail: m.sridharan@ece.sastra.edu; AmirthaPandian, S.; Ravindran, T. R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2013-12-15

    Fabrication of wear resistant and low friction carbon films on the engineered substrates is considered as a challenging task for expanding the applications of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. In this paper, pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique is used to deposit DLC films on two different types of technologically important class of substrates such as silicon and AISI 304 stainless steel. Laser power density is one of the important parameter used to tailor the fraction of sp{sup 2} bonded amorphous carbon (a-C) and tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) made by sp{sup 3} domain in the DLC film. The I(D)/I(G) ratio decreases with the increasing laser power density which is associated with decrease in fraction of a-C/ta-C ratio. The fraction of these chemical components is quantitatively analyzed by EELS which is well supported to the data obtained from the Raman spectroscopy. Tribological properties of the DLC are associated with chemical structure of the film. However, the super low value of friction coefficient 0.003 is obtained when the film is predominantly constituted by a-C and sp{sup 2} fraction which is embedded within the clusters of ta-C. Such a particular film with super low friction coefficient is measured while it was deposited on steel at low laser power density of 2 GW/cm{sup 2}. The super low friction mechanism is explained by low sliding resistance of a-C/sp{sup 2} and ta-C clusters. Combination of excellent physical and mechanical properties of wear resistance and super low friction coefficient of DLC films is desirable for engineering applications. Moreover, the high friction coefficient of DLC films deposited at 9GW/cm{sup 2} is related to widening of the intergrain distance caused by transformation from sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3} hybridized structure.

  7. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Simulation of Chromium Atom Deposition Pattern in a Gaussain Laser Standing Wave with Different Laser Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Tao; Zhu, Bao-Hua

    2009-07-01

    One-dimensional deposition of a neutral chromium atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field is discussed by using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The deposition pattern of neutral chromium atoms in a laser standing wave with different laser power is discussed and the simulation result shows that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a nanometer stripe is 115 nm and the contrast is 2.5:1 with laser power 3.93 mW; the FWHM is 0.8 nm and the contrast is 27:1 with laser power 16 mW, the optimal laser power; but with laser power increasing to 50 mW, the nanometer structure forms multi-crests and the quality worsens quickly with increasing laser power.

  8. Electrical properties of DLC- (n, p)-Si heterojunctions fabricated by ion-assisted plasma-enhanced deposition and pulsed laser deposition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panosyan, Zhosef R.; Voskanyan, Serjik S.; Yengibaryan, Yerem V.; Avjyan, Karapet E.; Khachatryan, Ashot M.; Matevosyan, Lenrik A.

    2010-10-01

    Electrical characteristics of DLC- (n, p)-Si heterojunctions fabricated by ion-assisted plasma-enhanced deposition and pulsed laser deposition methods were investigated. The mechanisms of carrier flow across the fabricated junctions were analyzed. Keywords: ion-assisted plasma-enhanced deposition, pulsed laser deposition, DLC- (n, p)-Si heterojunctions, currentvoltage & capacitance- voltage characteristics.

  9. Tailoring chromatic dispersion in chalcogenide-tellurite microstructured optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, Tomas; Duan, Zhongchao; Kawashima, Hiroyasu; Cheng, Tonglei; Suzuki, Takenobu; Matsumoto, Morio; Misumi, Takashi; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2014-08-01

    We report fabrication of a highly nonlinear hybrid microstructured optical fiber composed of chalcogenide glass core and tellurite glass cladding. The flattened chromatic dispersion can be achieved in such an optical fiber with near zero dispersion wavelength at telecommunication wavelengths λ = 1.35-1.7 μm, which cannot be achieved in chalcogenide glass optical fibers due to their high refractive index, i.e. n > 2.1. We demonstrate a hybrid 4-air hole chalcogenide-tellurite optical fiber (Δn = 0.25) with flattened chromatic dispersion around λ = 1.55 μm. In optimized 12-air hole optical fiber composed of the same glasses, the chromatic dispersion values were achieved between -20 and 32 ps/nm/km in a broad wavelength range of 1.5-3.8 μm providing the fiber with extremely high nonlinear coefficient 86,000 km-1W-1. Hybrid chalcogenide/tellurite fibers pumped with the near infrared lasers give good promise for broadband optical amplification, wavelength conversion, and supercontinuum generation in the near- to mid-infrared region.

  10. Processing Parameters Optimization for Material Deposition Efficiency in Laser Metal Deposited Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahamood, Rasheedat M.; Akinlabi, Esther T.

    2016-03-01

    Ti6Al4V is an important Titanium alloy that is mostly used in many applications such as: aerospace, petrochemical and medicine. The excellent corrosion resistance property, the high strength to weight ratio and the retention of properties at high temperature makes them to be favoured in most applications. The high cost of Titanium and its alloys makes their use to be prohibitive in some applications. Ti6Al4V can be cladded on a less expensive material such as steel, thereby reducing cost and providing excellent properties. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process, an additive manufacturing process is capable of producing complex part directly from the 3-D CAD model of the part and it also has the capability of handling multiple materials. Processing parameters play an important role in LMD process and in order to achieve desired results at a minimum cost, then the processing parameters need to be properly controlled. This paper investigates the role of processing parameters: laser power, scanning speed, powder flow rate and gas flow rate, on the material utilization efficiency in laser metal deposited Ti6Al4V. A two-level full factorial design of experiment was used in this investigation, to be able to understand the processing parameters that are most significant as well as the interactions among these processing parameters. Four process parameters were used, each with upper and lower settings which results in a combination of sixteen experiments. The laser power settings used was 1.8 and 3 kW, the scanning speed was 0.05 and 0.1 m/s, the powder flow rate was 2 and 4 g/min and the gas flow rate was 2 and 4 l/min. The experiments were designed and analyzed using Design Expert 8 software. The software was used to generate the optimized process parameters which were found to be laser power of 3.2 kW, scanning speed of 0.06 m/s, powder flow rate of 2 g/min and gas flow rate of 3 l/min.

  11. Heteroepitaxial Growth of NSMO on Silicon by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kolagani, R; Friedrich, S

    2008-06-25

    The following is the optimized pulsed laser deposition (PLD) procedure by which we prepared the final samples that were sent to LLNL. These samples are epitaxial multilayer structures of Si/YSZ/CeO/NSMO, where the abbreviations are explained in the following table. In this heterostructure, YSZ serves as a buffer layer to prevent deleterious chemical reactions, and also serves to de-oxygenate the amorphous SiO{sub 2} layer to generate a crystalline template for epitaxy. CeO and BTO serve as template layers to minimize the effects of thermal and lattice mismatch strains, respectively. More details on the buffer and template layer scheme are included in the manuscript [Yong et al., 2008] attached to this report.

  12. Epitaxial Electronic Oxides on Semiconductors Using Pulsed-Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, D.P.; Budai, J.D.; Chisholm, M.F.

    1999-12-01

    We describe the growth and properties of epitaxial (OO1) CeO{sub 2} on a (001) Ge surface using a hydrogen-assisted pulsed-laser deposition method. Hydrogen gas is introduced during film growth to eliminate the presence of the GeOs from the semiconductor surface during the initial nucleation of the metal oxide film. The hydrogen partial pressure and substrate temperature are selected to be sufficiently high such that the germanium native oxides are thermodynamically unstable. The Gibbs free energy of CeO{sub 2} is larger in magnitude than that of the Ge native oxides, making it more favorable for the metal oxide to reside at the interface in comparison to the native Ge oxides. By satisfying these criteria. the metal oxide/semiconductor interface is shown to be atomically abrupt with no native oxide present. Preliminary structural and electrical properties are reported.

  13. Pulsed laser deposition of Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ianno, N. J.; Liou, S. H.; Woollam, John A.; Thompson, D.; Johs, B.

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition is a technique commonly used to deposit high quality thin films of high temperature superconductors. This paper discusses the results obtained when this technique is applied to the deposition of Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O thin films using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm and an excimer laser operating at 248 nm. Films with onset temperatures of 125 K and zero resistance temperatures of 110 K deposited on (100) oriented MgO from a composite Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3Ox target were obtained at both wavelengths upon appropriate post deposition annealing. Films deposited at 532 nm exhibit a rough surface, while those deposited at 248 nm are smooth and homogeneous. Upon annealing, films deposited at both wavelengths are single phase Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3Ox.

  14. Femtosecond pulsed laser deposition of amorphous, ultrahard boride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Michael; Molian, Pal

    2004-05-01

    Amorphous thin films (300-500 nm) of ultrahard AlMgB10 with oxygen and carbon impurities were grown on Si (100) substrates at 300 K using a solid target of AlMgB14 containing a spinel phase (MgAl2O4) and using a 120 fs pulsed, 800 nm wavelength Ti:sapphire laser. The films were subsequently annealed in argon gas up to 1373 K for 2 h. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the particulate formation, atomic force microscopy was employed to characterize the film surface topography, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to determine the microstructure, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to examine the film composition, and nanoindentation was employed to study the hardness of thin films. The as-deposited and postannealed films (up to 1273 K) had a stochiometry of AlMgB10 with a significant amount of oxygen and carbon impurities and exhibited amorphous structures for a maximum hardness of 40+/-3 GPa. However, postannealing at higher temperatures led to crystallization and transformation of the film to SiB6 with a substantial loss in hardness. Results are also compared with our previous study on 23 ns, 248 nm wavelength (KrF excimer) pulsed laser deposition of AlMgB14 reported in this journal [Y. Tian, A. Constant, C. C. H. Lo, J. W. Anderegg, A. M. Russell, J. E. Snyder, and P. A. Molian, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 21, 1055 (2003)]. .

  15. Space processing of chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, D. C.; Ali, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    Chalcogenide glasses are discussed as good infrared transmitters, possessing the strength, corrosion resistance, and scale-up potential necessary for large 10.6-micron windows. The disadvantage of earth-produced chalcogenide glasses is shown to be an infrared absorption coefficient which is unacceptably high relative to alkali halides. This coefficient is traced to optical nonhomogeneities resulting from environmental and container contamination. Space processing is considered as a means of improving the infrared transmission quality of chalcogenides and of eliminating the following problems: optical inhomogeneities caused by thermal currents and density fluctuation in the l-g earth environment; contamination from the earth-melting crucible by oxygen and other elements deleterious to infrared transmission; and, heterogeneous nucleation at the earth-melting crucible-glass interface.

  16. Properties of pulsed laser deposited fluorinated hydroxyapatite films on titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, J.V.; Smirnov, V.V.; Laureti, S.; Generosi, A.; Varvaro, G.; Fosca, M.; Ferro, D.; Cesaro, S. Nunziante; Albertini, V. Rossi; Barinov, S.M.

    2010-09-15

    Fluorinated hydroxyapatite coated titanium was investigated for application as implant coating for bone substitute materials in orthopaedics and dentistry. Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for films preparation. Fluorinated hydroxyapatite target composition, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}F{sub 1.37}(OH){sub 0.63}, was maintained at 2 J/cm{sup 2} of laser fluence and 500-600 {sup o}C of the substrate temperature. Prepared films had a compact microstructure, composed of spherical micrometric-size aggregates. The average surface roughness resulted to be of 3 nm for the film grown at 500 {sup o}C and of 10 nm for that grown at 600 {sup o}C, showing that the temperature increase did not favour the growth of a more fine granulated surface. The films were polycrystalline with no preferential growth orientation. The films grown at 500-600 {sup o}C were about 8 {mu}m thick and possessed a hardness of 12-13 GPa. Lower or higher substrate temperature provides the possibility to obtain coatings with different fine texture and roughness, thus tayloring them for various applications.

  17. Stoichiometric transfer in pulsed laser deposition of hydroxylapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, J. L.; Mayor, M. B.; Pou, J.; León, B.; Pérez-Amor, M.

    2000-02-01

    Hydroxylapatite (HA, Ca 10(PO 4) 6(OH) 2) is a calcium phosphate used as coating for dental and orthopaedical implants because its composition and structure is similar to the mineral part of bone. As an alternative to traditional plasma sprayed coating technique, pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been applied due to its ability to reproduce complex stoichiometries. A hydroxylapatite target was ablated with an ArF laser in a water vapor atmosphere to investigate in which range of fluences the stoichiometric transfer to a titanium substrate is possible. The Ca/P ratio of the coatings was measured by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), while their OH - and CO 32- content was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The irradiated target surface was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the ablation rate measured with a profilometer. While at higher fluences all the target material is congruently ablated and stoichiometry is transferred to the coatings, at lower fluences (<1.2 J cm -2) preferential ablation of Ca and strong out-difussion of CO 32- impurity as CO 2 takes place at the target. The incongruent melting of the hydroxylapatite target at low fluences provokes its enrichment in Ca. The higher Ca concentrations arriving to the substrate, together with the higher CO 2 partial pressure, yields enhanced substitution of PO 43- by CO 32- and increasing of the Ca/P ratio at the coating.

  18. Chalcogenide and germanium hybrid optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogburn, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    When choosing a material to design infrared optics, an optical designer has to decide which material properties are most important to what they are trying to achieve. Factors include; cost, optical performance, index of material, sensor format, manufacturability, mechanical mounting and others. This paper will present an optical design that is made for a 640×480, 17μm sensor and is athermalized by using the material properties of chalcogenide glass and Germanium (Ge). The optical design will be a 3-element, f1.0 optic with an EFL of 20mm at 10μm. It consists of two Ge spherical lenses and a middle chalcogenide aspheric element. By using Ge and chalcogenide, this design utilizes the high index of Ge and combines it with the lower dn/dt of chalcogenide glass to provide an athermalized design without the use of additional electro-optical compensation inside the assembly. This study will start from the optical design process and explain the mechanical and optical properties of the design, then show the manufacturing process of molding an aspheric chalcogenide element. After the three elements are manufactured, they will be assembled and tested throughout the temperature range of -40 to 85°C to compare optical performance to design expectations. Ultimately, this paper will show that a high performance, athermalized optical assembly is possible to manufacture at a lower cost with the use of combining different infrared materials that allow for spherical Ge lenses and only one aspherical chalcogenide element which can be produced in higher volumes at lower costs through glass molding technology.

  19. Laser-guided direct writing: a novel method to deposit biomolecules for biosensors arrays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juntao; Grant, Sheila A; Pastel, Robert L

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a potential biomolecular patterning method, laser-guided direct writing guidance (LGDW), which may be utilized to deposit organic and bioactive particles for biosensor arrays. The instrumentation and operation of the LGDW system is introduced and the system settings used to achieve deposition are reported. The biomolecule, avidin, was deposited onto a substrate using LGDW to evaluate the possible damage from the laser on the biomolecules. The functionality of avidin after laser-based guidance was examined by exposing the deposited avidin molecules to its ligand, biotin. The results show some avidin retained its affinity to biotin after LGDW demonstrating little damage to the biomolecules.

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  1. Novel doped hydroxyapatite thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duta, L.; Oktar, F. N.; Stan, G. E.; Popescu-Pelin, G.; Serban, N.; Luculescu, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of novel ovine and bovine derived hydroxyapatite thin films on titanium substrates by pulsed laser deposition for a new generation of implants. The calcination treatment applied to produce the hydroxyapatite powders from ovine/bovine bones was intended to induce crystallization and to prohibit the transmission of diseases. The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Pull-off adherence and profilometry measurements were also carried out. X-ray diffraction ascertained the polycrystalline hydroxyapatite nature of the powders and films. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy evidenced the vibrational bands characteristic to a hydroxyapatite material slightly carbonated. The micrographs of the films showed a uniform distribution of spheroidal particulates with a mean diameter of ∼2 μm. Pull-off measurements demonstrated excellent bonding strength values between the hydroxyapatite films and the titanium substrates. Because of their physical-chemical properties and low cost fabrication from renewable resources, we think that these new coating materials could be considered as a prospective competitor to synthetic hydroxyapatite used for implantology applications.

  2. Electrical and optical properties of vanadium dioxide containing gold nanoparticles deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlianges, J.-C.; Leroy, J.; Crunteanu, A.; Mayet, R.; Carles, P.; Champeaux, C.

    2012-09-01

    Nanostructured vanadium dioxide is one of the most interesting and studied member of the vanadates family performing a reversible transition from an insulating state to a metallic state associated with a structural transition when heated above a temperature of 68 °C. On the other hand, noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) support localized surface plasmon resonance which causes selective absorption bands in the visible and near-IR regions. The purpose of this letter is to study structural, optical, and electrical properties of vanadium dioxide thin films containing gold nanoparticles synthetized using pulsed laser deposition process. Thus, we have performed x-ray diffraction, optical transmission, and four point probe electrical measurements to investigate the nanocomposite properties versus its temperature. Interestingly, we have observed switching behavior for VO2 film containing gold NPs with a resistivity contrast of four orders of magnitude and a decrease of its transition temperature.

  3. Space processing of chalcogenide glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Schramm, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technique of space processing for chalcogenide glass, and to define the process and equipment necessary. In the course of this program, successful long term levitation of objects in a 1-g environment was achieved. Glass beads 4 mm diameter were containerless melted and fused together.

  4. Hydrodynamic Instability in High-speed Direct Laser Deposition for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeny; Klimova, Olga; Babkin, Konstantin

    High speed direct laser deposition, when product forms from metal powder, transferred by gas-powder jet, supplied coaxially or non-coaxially to focused laser beam, in one of most prospective additive technologies for production parts for aircraft engines. The limit of process productivity is connected with development of hydrodynamic instability of the melt pool in conditions of high power laser action and material supply by gas-powder jet. Theoretical analysis and experiments allowed clarified a physical nature of instability appearance, determine a stability conditions and invent a methods which allow avoid instability in deposition process. Nozzles for direct laser deposition, designed with consideration of stability conditions, allow get a level of process productivity more then 2 kg/h. The developed technology of deposition and technological equipment, based on high power fiber laser, has been used for manufacturing of parts for "high temperature" unit of aircraft engine.

  5. The Effect Of Neutron Attenuation On Power Deposition In Nuclear Pumped 3He-Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, Füsun

    2007-04-01

    Nuclear-pumped lasers (NPLs) are driven by the products of nuclear reactions and directly convert the nuclear energy to directed optical energy. Pumping gas lasers by nuclear reaction products has the advantage of depositing large energies per reaction. The need for high laser power output implies high operating pressure. In the case of volumetric excitation by 3He(n, p)3H reactions, however, operation at high pressure (more than a few atm) causes excessive neutron attenuation in the 3He gas. This fact adversely effects on energy deposition and, hence, laser output power and beam quality. Here, spatial and temporal variations of neutron flux inside a closed 3He -filled cylindrical laser tube have been numerically calculated for various tube radii and operating pressures by using a previously reported dynamic model for energy deposition. Calculations are made by using ITU TRIGA Mark II Reactor as the neutron source. The effects of neutron attenuation on power deposition are examined.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of organic semiconductor rubrene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grochowska, K.; Majumdar, S.; Laukkanen, P.; Majumdar, H. S.; Sawczak, M.; Śliwiński, G.

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique is applied to produce organic semiconductor (OS) rubrene thin film for spintronics applications. The use of organic material for spintronics is motivated by the advantages such as long spin diffusion length due to low spin-orbit and hyperfine coupling1,2, chemical tuning of electronic functionality, easy structural modifications, ability of self-assembly and mechanical flexibility3 etc. However, a major drawback of OS is its low mobility compared to inorganic semiconductors. The PLD growth of rubrene aims on fabricating OS films under more controlled environment to achieve higher crystalline order to improve its mobility and spin coherence length. Among organic materials, rubrene reveals the highest hole mobility - up to 40 cm2/(V•s) and can be exploited in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) or field-effect transistors (OFETs) 4. In this work the rubrene thin films are produced from hardened pellets in vacuum using Nd:YAG pulsed laser operated at 1064 nm, 2 Hz and energy fluence around 0.2 J/cm2. For the reference rubrene samples on SiO2 glass the AFM data reveal continuous 5-7 nm thick films. The amorphous structures are confirmed by XRD measurements and also Raman spectra which show signatures of both tetracene and phenyl bands and a broadband at 1373 cm-1. The obtained results indicate that continuous, defect-free rubrene films can be prepared by means of PLD for investigation of the spin polarization properties of organic-inorganic hybrids. Further studies are on the way to improve crystalline qualities of the rubrene films for less grain boundary related defects and improved mobility and spin diffusion length.

  7. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  8. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some lossmore » of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  9. Inert Gas Enhanced Laser-Assisted Purification of Platinum Electron-Beam-Induced Deposits.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D

    2015-09-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar-H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. A sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  10. Coherent mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in all-solid chalcogenide microstructured fibers with all-normal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lai; Cheng, Tonglei; Nagasaka, Kenshiro; Tong, Hoangtuan; Qin, Guanshi; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2016-01-15

    We report the coherent mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in an all-solid chalcogenide microstructured fiber with all-normal dispersion. The chalcogenide microstructured fiber is a four-hole structure with core material of AsSe2 and air holes that are replaced by As2S5 glass rods. Coherent mid-infrared supercontinuum light extended to 3.3 μm is generated in a 2 cm long chalcogenide microstructured fiber pumped by a 2.7 μm laser. PMID:26766722

  11. Pulsed laser deposition and characterizations of pyrochlore iridate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Matthew; Aviles-Acosta, Jaime; Xie, Yuantao; Zhu, Wenka; Li, Zhen; Chen, Aiping; Li, Nan; Tao, Chenggang; Jia, Quanxi; Heremans, J. J.; Zhang, S. X.

    Pyrochlore iridates have attracted growing interest in recent years because of their potential to realize novel topological phases. While most of the previous studies have focused on polycrystalline and single crystalline bulk samples, epitaxial thin films offer a unique platform for controllable tuning of material parameters such as oxygen stoichiometry and elastic strain to achieve new electronic states. In this talk, we will present the growth and characterizations of epitaxial thin films of pyrochlore Y2Ir2O7 and Bi2Ir2O7 that are predicted to host topologically non-trivial states. The iridate thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition at different conditions, and a narrow window for epitaxial growth was determined. Characterizations of crystalline structures were performed using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy to establish a growth parameter-structure phase diagram. The compositions of thin films were determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the surface morphologies were characterized using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Magneto-transport studies indicate a strong dependence of transport properties on the oxygen stoichiometry and the film thickness.

  12. Method for controlling energy density for reliable pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dowden, P. C. E-mail: qxjia@lanl.gov; Bi, Z.; Jia, Q. X. E-mail: qxjia@lanl.gov

    2014-02-15

    We have established a methodology to stabilize the laser energy density on a target surface in pulsed laser deposition of thin films. To control the focused laser spot on a target, we have imaged a defined aperture in the beamline (so called image-focus) instead of focusing the beam on a target based on a simple “lens-focus.” To control the laser energy density on a target, we have introduced a continuously variable attenuator between the output of the laser and the imaged aperture to manipulate the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a “constant voltage” mode to eliminate changes in the lasers’ beam dimensions. This methodology leads to much better controllability/reproducibility for reliable pulsed laser deposition of high performance electronic thin films.

  13. Nano structured physical vapor deposited coatings by means of picosecond laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Bobzin, K; Bagcivan, N; Ewering, M; Gillner, A; Beckemper, S; Hartmann, C; Theiss, S

    2011-10-01

    Molding of nano structures by injection molding leads to special requirements for the tools e.g., wear resistance and as low as possible release forces of the molded components. On the other hand it is not allowed to affect the replication precision. Physical vapor deposition is one of the promising technologies for applying coatings with adapted properties like high hardness, low roughness, low Young's modulus and less adhesion to the plastics melt. Although physical vapor deposition technology allows the deposition of films on micro structures without changing the structure significantly, film deposition on nano structures and small micro structures leads to a relevant change in surface topography. For this reason direct structuring of physical vapor deposition coatings might be beneficial. In this paper structuring was done using a picoseconds ultraviolet laser, Lumera Laser "Rapid," with a master oscillator power amplifier system at 355 nm. Two different coatings were deposited by magnetron sputter ion plating physical vapor deposition technology for laser structuring tests ((Cr, Al)N, (Cr, Al,Si)N). After deposition, the coatings were analyzed by common techniques regarding hardness, Young's modulus and morphology. The structures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show a high potential for laser structuring of coatings deposited via physical vapor deposition. Linear structures with sizes between 400 nm and 10microm were realized.

  14. Ferromagnets based on diamond-like semiconductors GaSb, InSb, Ge, and Si supersaturated with manganese or iron impurities during laser-plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, E. S. Podol'skii, V. V.; Lesnikov, V. P.; Sapozhnikov, M. V.; Druzhnov, D. M.; Gusev, S. N.; Gribkov, B. A.; Filatov, D. O.; Stepanova, Yu. S.; Levchuk, S. A.

    2008-01-15

    Properties of thin (30-100 nm) layers of diluted magnetic semiconductors based on diamond-like compounds III-V (InSb and GaSb) and elemental semiconductors Ge and Si doped with 3d impurities of manganese and iron up to 15% were measured and discussed. The layers were grown by laser-plasma deposition onto heated single-crystal gallium arsenide or sapphire substrates. The ferromagnetism of layers with the Curie temperature up to 500 K appeared in observations of the ferromagnetic resonance, anomalous Hall effect, and magneto-optic Kerr effect. The carrier mobility of diluted magnetic semiconductors is a hundred times larger than that of the previously known highest temperature magnetic semiconductors, i.e., copper and chromium chalcogenides. The difference between changes in the magnetization with temperature in diluted semiconductors based on III-V, Ge, and Si was discussed. A complex structure of the ferromagnetic resonance spectrum in Si:Mn/GaAs was observed. The results of magnetic-force microscopy showed a weak correlation between the surface relief and magnetic inhomogeneity, which suggests that the ferromagnetism is caused by the 3d-impurity solid solution, rather than ferromagnetic phase inclusions.

  15. Deposition of hydroxyapatite thin films by Nd:YAG laser ablation: a microstructural study

    SciTech Connect

    Nistor, L.C.; Ghica, C.; Teodorescu, V.S.; Nistor, S.V. . E-mail: snistor@alpha1.infim.ro; Dinescu, M.; Matei, D.; Frangis, N.; Vouroutzis, N.; Liutas, C.

    2004-11-02

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) thin films has been successfully deposited by Nd:YAG laser ablation at {lambda} = 532 nm. The morphology and microstructure of the deposited layers was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM). Polycrystalline HA films were directly obtained with the substrate at 300 deg. C and without introducing water vapors in the deposition chamber. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements show that the oxygen stoichiometry in the HA films is also maintained. Depositions performed at {lambda} = 335 nm laser wavelength and 300 deg. C substrate temperature resulted in polycrystalline layers of mixed composition of HA and tricalciumphosphate (TCP)

  16. Process for ion-assisted laser deposition of biaxially textured layer on substrate

    DOEpatents

    Russo, Richard E.; Reade, Ronald P.; Garrison, Stephen M.; Berdahl, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A process for depositing a biaxially aligned intermediate layer over a non-single crystal substrate is disclosed which permits the subsequent deposition thereon of a biaxially oriented superconducting film. The process comprises depositing on a substrate by laser ablation a material capable of being biaxially oriented and also capable of inhibiting the migration of substrate materials through the intermediate layer into such a superconducting film, while simultaneously bombarding the substrate with an ion beam. In a preferred embodiment, the deposition is carried out in the same chamber used to subsequently deposit a superconducting film over the intermediate layer. In a further aspect of the invention, the deposition of the superconducting layer over the biaxially oriented intermediate layer is also carried out by laser ablation with optional additional bombardment of the coated substrate with an ion beam during the deposition of the superconducting film.

  17. Process for ion-assisted laser deposition of biaxially textured layer on substrate

    DOEpatents

    Russo, R.E.; Reade, R.P.; Garrison, S.M.; Berdahl, P.

    1995-07-11

    A process for depositing a biaxially aligned intermediate layer over a non-single crystal substrate is disclosed which permits the subsequent deposition thereon of a biaxially oriented superconducting film. The process comprises depositing on a substrate by laser ablation a material capable of being biaxially oriented and also capable of inhibiting the migration of substrate materials through the intermediate layer into such a superconducting film, while simultaneously bombarding the substrate with an ion beam. In a preferred embodiment, the deposition is carried out in the same chamber used to subsequently deposit a superconducting film over the intermediate layer. In a further aspect of the invention, the deposition of the superconducting layer over the biaxially oriented intermediate layer is also carried out by laser ablation with optional additional bombardment of the coated substrate with an ion beam during the deposition of the superconducting film. 8 figs.

  18. Laser-induced deposition of nanostructured copper microwires on surfaces of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumkin, Ilia I.; Panov, Maxim S.; Shishkova, Ekaterina V.; Bal'makov, Michail D.

    2015-05-01

    Microelectronics industry is growing fast and the rate of new devices' development increases every year. Therefore, methods for simple and high-precision metal coating on dielectrics are needed. Existing methods do not allow performing the high-precision metal deposition without using photomasks, while making photomask for each prototype is long and expensive process. One of the methods of maskless metal deposition is laser-induced chemical liquid-phase deposition (LCLD). In this work we show the effect of substrate surface type on a result of LCLD. Deposited copper structures were characterized by SEM, EDX and impedance spectroscopy. The results show that laser-induced copper deposition is highly affected by the surface being homogeneous or composite material. It was found that the deposits with low resistivity and high quality metal localization mostly appear on the two-phase surfaces. In contrast, deposits on one-phase surfaces exhibited poor topology of copper material.

  19. Deposition of biopolymer thin films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Mihaiescu, D.; Socol, G.; Stamatin, I.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Chrisey, D. B.

    We report on the successful deposition of high quality type I fibrilar collagen thin films by Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Thin films deposition was performed in a N2 ambient (20 Pa) using a KrF* laser source (λ=248 nm,τ>=20 ns) operated at a repetition rate of 3 Hz, the incident laser energy at a value within the range (20-35)mJ , and the laser spot area was (3.5-18.5)+/-0.1 mm2. The collagen films were deposited on double face polished <100> single crystalline Si wafers and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that our thin films are composed of collagen, with no impurities and the roughness can be controlled by the deposition conditions.

  20. Numerical Laser Energy Deposition on Supersonic Cavity Flow and Sensor Placement Strategies to Control the Flow

    PubMed Central

    Aradag, Selin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the impact of laser energy deposition on pressure oscillations and relative sound pressure levels (SPL) in an open supersonic cavity flow is investigated. Laser energy with a magnitude of 100 mJ is deposited on the flow just above the cavity leading edge and up to 7 dB of reduction is obtained in the SPL values along the cavity back wall. Additionally, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method is applied to the x-velocity data obtained as a result of computational fluid dynamics simulations of the flow with laser energy deposition. Laser is numerically modeled using a spherically symmetric temperature distribution. By using the POD results, the effects of laser energy on the flow mechanism are presented. A one-dimensional POD methodology is applied to the surface pressure data to obtain critical locations for the placement of sensors for real time flow control applications. PMID:24363612

  1. Numerical laser energy deposition on supersonic cavity flow and sensor placement strategies to control the flow.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Aradag, Selin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the impact of laser energy deposition on pressure oscillations and relative sound pressure levels (SPL) in an open supersonic cavity flow is investigated. Laser energy with a magnitude of 100 mJ is deposited on the flow just above the cavity leading edge and up to 7 dB of reduction is obtained in the SPL values along the cavity back wall. Additionally, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method is applied to the x-velocity data obtained as a result of computational fluid dynamics simulations of the flow with laser energy deposition. Laser is numerically modeled using a spherically symmetric temperature distribution. By using the POD results, the effects of laser energy on the flow mechanism are presented. A one-dimensional POD methodology is applied to the surface pressure data to obtain critical locations for the placement of sensors for real time flow control applications. PMID:24363612

  2. Modeling of plume dynamics in laser ablation processes for thin film deposition of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The transport dynamics of laser-ablated neutral/plasma plumes are of significant interest for film growth by pulsed-laser deposition of materials since the magnitude and kinetic energy of the species arriving at the deposition substrate are key processing parameters. Dynamical calculations of plume propagation in vacuum and in background gas have been performed using particle-in-cell hydrodynamics, continuum gas dynamics, and scattering models. Results from these calculations are presented and compared with experimental observations.

  3. Deposition and modification of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Branch, D.; Vanier, P.E.; Barletta, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000{degrees}C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing, involved the use of a CO{sub 2} laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl{sub 5} gas near the substrate. Results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  4. Deposition and modification of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Branch, D.; Vanier, P.E.; Barletta, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000[degrees]C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing, involved the use of a CO[sub 2] laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl[sub 5] gas near the substrate. Results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  5. Pulsed-Laser Deposition of Electronic Oxides: Superconductor and Semiconductor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, D.P.; Park, C.; Lee, Y.E.; Budai, J.D.; Chisholm, M.F.; Verebelyi, D.T.; Christen, D.K.; Kroeger, D.M.

    2000-01-24

    Over the past decade, pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) has proven to be one of the most versatile and effective methods for obtaining high-quality electronic oxide thin-film materials. Much of this success can be attributed to its initial use in depositing high temperature superconducting materials. However, pulsed-laser deposition is now a leading research tool in the development of various electronic oxide thin-film technologies, In this paper, recent progress in the deposition of oxide materials on dissimilar materials for both superconductor and semiconductor applications is discussed. Recent developments in the synthesis of superconducting wires via epitaxial growth of superconducting oxides on biaxially textured metal tapes is described. In addition, efforts to integrate high-k dielectric oxides on semiconductor surfaces using pulsed-laser deposition are highlighted.

  6. Phonon dynamics of neptunium chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aynyas, Mahendra; Rukmangad, Aditi; Arya, Balwant S.; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2012-06-01

    We have performed phonon calculations of Neptunium Chalcogenides (NpX) (X= S, Se, Te) based on breathing shell model (BSM) which includes breathing motion of electron of the Np-atoms due to f-d hybridization. The model predicts that the short range breathing phenomenon play a dominant role in the phonon properties. We also report, for the first time specific heat for these compounds.

  7. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  8. Laser assisted modification and chemical metallization of electron-beam deposited ceria thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumov, E.; Starbov, N.; Starbova, K.; Perea, A.; Solis, J.

    2009-11-01

    Excimer laser processing is applied for tailoring the surface morphology and phase composition of CeO 2 ceramic thin films. E-beam evaporation technique is used to deposit samples on stainless steel and silicate glass substrates. The films are then irradiated with ArF* excimer laser pulses under different exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy, optical spectrophotometry, X-ray diffractometry and EDS microanalysis are used to characterize the non-irradiated and laser-processed films. Upon UV laser exposure there is large increase of the surface roughness that is accompanied by photo-darkening and ceria reduction. It is shown that the laser induced changes in the CeO 2 films facilitate the deposition of metal nano-aggregates in a commercial copper electroless plating bath. The significance of laser modification as a novel approach for the production of CeO 2 based thin film catalysts is discussed.

  9. Submicron sculpturing on chalcogenide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Raphi; Feigel, A. I.; Veinguer, Maya; Sfez, Bruno G.; Klebanov, Matvei; Arsh, A.; Lyubin, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic based chalcogenide glasses present several advantages for nano-structured optical devices in the infrared. First they possess a good transparency in this optical window, second their amorphous nature is ideal for coating based applications or for hybrid integration, third their photo-structural transformation properties give the possibility of creating high-resolution patterns on films and finally their high index make them particularly suitable for the fabrication of photonic crystal devices. We have demonstrated the fabrication of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (wood-pile) photonic crystal structures for typically 500 nm period structures using interferometric lithography to create the periodic pattern. We show here different techniques in order to obtain specific patterns on the chalcogenide glass using a combination of illumination, etching and redeposition techniques. Moreover, in order to create very steep contrast, we have used the fact that silver ions can freely propagate in the glass under light action, providing a very effective contrast between illuminated and non-illuminated regions. 130 nm patterns with a 500 nm periodicity have been obtained using silver doping of chalcogenide glasses. We will finally show different examples of pattern sculpturing using different illumination and film preparation conditions.

  10. Experiment of Flow Control Using Laser Energy Deposition Around High Speed Propulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, HyoungJin; Jeung, InSeuck; Lee, SangHun; Kim, Seihwan

    2011-11-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine the effect of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser energy deposition on the shock structures in supersonic/hypersonic flow and quiescent air. The effect of the laser energy and pressure in the blast wave generation were also investigated. As a result, the strength of plasma and blast wave becomes stronger as pressure or laser energy increase. And the breakdown threshold of air by laser energy deposition is 0.015 bar at 508 mJ laser energy, the blast wave threshold generation in air by laser energy deposition is 0.100 bar at same laser energy. As qualitative analysis, schlieren images are also obtained. After the series of experiments, the effect of laser energy deposition (LED) on high speed flow around the shock—shock interaction created by a wedge and blunt body. By LED, the structure of shock—shock interaction was collapsed momentary and the pressure of the stagnation point was fluctuated while interference of wave.

  11. Analysis and removal of ITER relevant materials and deposits by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qingmei; Huber, Alexander; Philipps, Volker; Sergienko, Gennady; Gierse, Niels; Mertens, Philippe; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of the deposition of eroded wall material on the plasma-facing materials in fusion devices is one of the crucial issues to maintain the plasma performance and to fulfill safety requirements with respect to tritium retention by co-deposition. Laser ablation with minimal damage to the plasma facing material is a promising method for in situ monitoring and removal of the deposition, especially for plasma-shadowed areas which are difficult to reach by other cleaning methods like plasma discharge. It requires the information of ablation process and the ablation threshold for quantitative analysis and effective removal of the different deposits. This paper presents systemic laboratory experimental analysis of the behavior of the ITER relevant materials, graphite, tungsten, aluminum (as a substitution of beryllium) and mixed deposits ablated by a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) with different energy densities (1-27 J/cm2, power density 0.3-3.9 GW/cm2). The mixed deposits consisted of W-Al-C layer were deposited on W substrate by magnetron sputtering and arc plasma deposition. The aim was to select the proper parameters for the quantitative analysis and for laser removal of the deposits by investigating the ablation efficiency and ablation threshold for the bulk materials and deposits. The comparison of the ablation and saturation energy thresholds for pure and mixed materials shows that the ablation threshold of the mixed layer depends on the concentration of the components. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of the elemental composition of deposits and then we select the laser parameters for the layer removal. Comparison of quantitative analysis results from laboratory to that from TEXTOR shows reasonable agreements. The dependence of the spectra on plasma parameters and ambient gas pressure is investigated.

  12. Inverse opal photonic crystal of chalcogenide glass by solution processing.

    PubMed

    Kohoutek, Tomas; Orava, Jiri; Sawada, Tsutomu; Fudouzi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-15

    Chalcogenide opal and inverse opal photonic crystals were successfully fabricated by low-cost and low-temperature solution-based process, which is well developed in polymer films processing. Highly ordered silica colloidal crystal films were successfully infilled with nano-colloidal solution of the high refractive index As(30)S(70) chalcogenide glass by using spin-coating method. The silica/As-S opal film was etched in HF acid to dissolve the silica opal template and fabricate the inverse opal As-S photonic crystal. Both, the infilled silica/As-S opal film (Δn ~ 0.84 near λ=770 nm) and the inverse opal As-S photonic structure (Δn ~ 1.26 near λ=660 nm) had significantly enhanced reflectivity values and wider photonic bandgaps in comparison with the silica opal film template (Δn ~ 0.434 near λ=600 nm). The key aspects of opal film preparation by spin-coating of nano-colloidal chalcogenide glass solution are discussed. The solution fabricated "inorganic polymer" opal and the inverse opal structures exceed photonic properties of silica or any organic polymer opal film. The fabricated photonic structures are proposed for designing novel flexible colloidal crystal laser devices, photonic waveguides and chemical sensors.

  13. Laser Plasma Vapour Deposition Of Photoconducting And High Tc Superconducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Mihai A.; Apostol, Ileana; Mihailescu, Ion N.; Botila, T.; Pentia, E.; Ciurea, M. L.; Dinescu, M.; Jaklovsky, J.; Aldica, Gheorghe V.; Miu, L.; Rusu, C.; Hening, Al. A.; Mihai, S.; Constantin, C.; Stoica, Mihaela; Pausescu, P.; Cruceanu, Eugen; Pompe, Wolfgang; Wuensch, R.; Richter, Asta; Scheibe, H. J.

    1989-05-01

    Device quality PbS photoconducting films were obtained by laser plasma vapour deposition on special glass substrates at room temperature and their structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction. High Tc superconducting films of composition Dy0.2Y0.8Ba2Cu3O~7 and YBa2Cu3O~7 were deposited on sapphire substrate. It was shown for laser deposited YBa2Cu3O~7 that a buffer layer of the same composition predeposited by rf sputtering allows for getting high quality superconducting films.

  14. Dynamically controlled deposition of colloidal nanoparticle suspension in evaporating drops using laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Ta, V D; Carter, R M; Esenturk, E; Connaughton, C; Wasley, T J; Li, J; Kay, R W; Stringer, J; Smith, P J; Shephard, J D

    2016-05-18

    Dynamic control of the distribution of polystyrene suspended nanoparticles in evaporating droplets is investigated using a 2.9 μm high power laser. Under laser radiation a droplet is locally heated and fluid flows are induced that overcome the capillary flow, and thus a reversal of the coffee-stain effect is observed. Suspension particles are accumulated in a localised area, one order of magnitude smaller than the original droplet size. By scanning the laser beam over the droplet, particles can be deposited in an arbitrary pattern. This finding raises the possibility for direct laser writing of suspended particles through a liquid layer. Furthermore, a highly uniform coating is possible by manipulating the laser beam diameter and exposure time. The effect is expected to be universally applicable to aqueous solutions independent of solutes (either particles or molecules) and deposited substrates.

  15. Dynamically controlled deposition of colloidal nanoparticle suspension in evaporating drops using laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Ta, V D; Carter, R M; Esenturk, E; Connaughton, C; Wasley, T J; Li, J; Kay, R W; Stringer, J; Smith, P J; Shephard, J D

    2016-05-18

    Dynamic control of the distribution of polystyrene suspended nanoparticles in evaporating droplets is investigated using a 2.9 μm high power laser. Under laser radiation a droplet is locally heated and fluid flows are induced that overcome the capillary flow, and thus a reversal of the coffee-stain effect is observed. Suspension particles are accumulated in a localised area, one order of magnitude smaller than the original droplet size. By scanning the laser beam over the droplet, particles can be deposited in an arbitrary pattern. This finding raises the possibility for direct laser writing of suspended particles through a liquid layer. Furthermore, a highly uniform coating is possible by manipulating the laser beam diameter and exposure time. The effect is expected to be universally applicable to aqueous solutions independent of solutes (either particles or molecules) and deposited substrates. PMID:27094902

  16. Biomolecular papain thin films grown by matrix assisted and conventional pulsed laser deposition: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    György, E.; Pérez del Pino, A.; Sauthier, G.; Figueras, A.

    2009-12-01

    Biomolecular papain thin films were grown both by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques with the aid of an UV KrF∗ (λ =248 nm, τFWHM≅20 ns) excimer laser source. For the MAPLE experiments the targets submitted to laser radiation consisted on frozen composites obtained by dissolving the biomaterial powder in distilled water at 10 wt % concentration. Conventional pressed biomaterial powder targets were used in the PLD experiments. The surface morphology of the obtained thin films was studied by atomic force microscopy and their structure and composition were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The possible physical mechanisms implied in the ablation processes of the two techniques, under comparable experimental conditions were identified. The results showed that the growth mode, surface morphology as well as structure of the deposited biomaterial thin films are determined both by the incident laser fluence value as well as target preparation procedure.

  17. Characterization Of Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Si Thin Films Deposited Via Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Manyala, N.; Ngom, Balla; Kana-Kana, J. B.; Bucher, Remy; Maaza, M.; Di Tusa, J. F.

    2008-09-23

    We report on the structural and morphological characterization of B20 cubic structure Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Si thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition for the concentration range 0{<=}x{<=}0.3 deposited on Si (111) substrate. The x-ray diffraction, Rutherford back scattering (RBS), Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the films show that all the films are single phase B20 cubic structure with concentrations close to expected values, very smooth and dense with surface roughness less than 0.8 nm.

  18. The influence of laser and powder defocusing characteristics on the surface quality in laser direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Gangxian; Li, Dichen; Zhang, Anfeng; Pi, Gang; Tang, Yiping

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the influencing rules of the variations of powder and laser defocusing distance on surface quality and obtain the smooth surface of parts in laser direct metal deposition, the thin-walled metal parts were fabricated under three different powder defocusing distances and three different laser defocusing distances conditions. The experimental results show that a high surface quality can be obtained with the powder focussed below the substrate and laser focussed above the substrate process, and the variation in which the powder focus moves from above to below the melt pool plays a leading role and the variation in which the laser focus moves from above to below the melt pool plays a supplementary role in the influence on the surface quality. To explain the experimental results, a simple model of the track height is established.

  19. Study of titania nanorod films deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation as a function of laser fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricato, A. P.; Belviso, M. R.; Catalano, M.; Cesaria, M.; Cozzoli, P. D.; Luches, A.; Manera, M. G.; Martino, M.; Rella, R.; Taurino, A.

    2011-11-01

    Chemically synthesized brookite titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorods with average diameter and length dimensions of 3-4 nm and 35-50 nm, respectively, were deposited by the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation technique. A toluene nanorod solution was frozen at the liquid-nitrogen temperature and irradiated with a KrF excimer laser ( λ=248 nm, τ=20 ns) at the repetition rate of 10 Hz, at different fluences (25 to 350 mJ/cm2). The deposited films were structurally characterized by high-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy. <100> single-crystal Si wafers and carbon-coated Cu grids were used as substrates. Structural analyses evidenced the occurrence of brookite-phase crystalline nanospheres coexisting with individually distinguishable TiO2 nanorods in the films deposited at fluences varying from 50 to 350 mJ/cm2. Nanostructured TiO2 films comprising only nanorods were deposited by lowering the laser fluence to 25 mJ/cm2. The observed shape and phase transitions of the nanorods are discussed taking into account the laser-induced heating effects, reduced melting temperature and size-dependent thermodynamic stability of nanoscale TiO2.

  20. Fabrication of multi-layered polymer LEDs by resonant infrared pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. L.; Park, H. K.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2007-09-01

    Multi-layered polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) have been fabricated in a vacuum environment by resonant infrared pulsed-laser deposition of the polymer layers. The light emitter used was poly[2-methoxy-5-(2- ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), and in some cases a layer of the hole-transport polymer poly(3,4 etylenedioxythiophene:polystyrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) was also laser deposited, resulting in a device structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/MEH-PPV/Al. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed that neither of the laser-deposited polymers was significantly altered by the deposition process. Laser-fabricated devices displayed electroluminescent spectra similar to those of conventional spin-coated devices, but the differences in electrical characteristics and device efficiency were substantial. These discrepancies can probably be attributed to surface roughness of the deposited polymer layers. With the appropriate refinement of the deposition protocols, however, we believe that this process can be improved to a level that is suitable for routine fabrication of organic electronic components.

  1. Grain growth of Ni-based superalloy IN718 coating fabricated by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaocheng; Yang, Li; Dai, Jun; Huang, Zedong; Meng, Tao

    2016-06-01

    The pulsed laser deposited Ni-based superalloy coating was fabricated with successive 12 layers using single tracks. The microstructure of the deposited coating was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The grain growth and the grain boundary misorientation were investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), the precipitation phase was determined by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results showed that the dendrites were the most common microstructure in the coating, and the dendritic growth orientation was paralleled to the direction of the laser deposition. The dendrite got coarser and its space was increased with increasing laser deposited layers. Most grains grew along the preferential grain orientation <001> and formed anisotropy with grain boundaries misorientation angle about 2° in the pulsed laser deposited coating. The grain size along the texture orientation was 3-10 times larger than that in the transverse orientation. The cross section microhardness of the coating ranged between 240-280 HV, and decreased along the depositional direction due to the reasons of the variation of eutectic morphology, grain size distribution, grain misorientation and a small amounts of strengthening phase precipitation.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition and in vitro characteristics of triphasic - HASi composition on titanium.

    PubMed

    Palangadan, Rajesh; Sukumaran, Anil; Fernandez, Francis B; John, Annie; Varma, Harikrishna

    2014-02-01

    Pulsed laser deposition was used to deposit bioactive triphasic glass-ceramic composition (HASi) over titanium substrate using dense HASi target. Bioactive glass compositions are considered the most useful synthetic materials for immediate bone attachment because of its bioresorption, osteoconduction and osteointegration characteristics under in vivo conditions. The disadvantage of its brittleness associated with bioactive glass-ceramics has prompted its coating over metallic implants for the combination of duo mechanical and bioactive properties. The hard HASi target was able to undergo laser ablation under ambient gas pressure without bulk erosion of the target. Laser deposition was found to be efficient in depositing triphasic composition for immediate bone integration. The target and deposits were analyzed for the phase, composition and microstructural characteristics by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Simultaneously, the adherent nature and mechanical behaviour of deposits were confirmed by scratch test and micro-indentation methods. Further, the in vitro dissolution and bioactivity were assessed by soaking in simulated body fluid followed by elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. The deposits were found to be cell-friendly, which was indicated by the phenomenology of stem cells under in vitro conditions.

  3. High rate, large area laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition of nickel from nickel carbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paserin, Vlad

    High-power diode lasers (HPDL) are being increasingly used in industrial applications. Deposition of nickel from nickel carbonyl (Ni(CO)4 ) precursor by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied with emphasis on achieving high deposition rates. An HPDL system was used to provide a novel energy source facilitating a simple and compact design of the energy delivery system. Nickel deposits on complex, 3-dimensional polyurethane foam substrates were prepared and characterized. The resulting "nickel foam" represents a novel material of high porosity (>95% by volume) finding uses, among others, in the production of rechargeable battery and fuel cell electrodes and as a specialty high-temperature filtration medium. Deposition rates up to ˜19 mum/min were achieved by optimizing the gas precursor flow pattern and energy delivery to the substrate surface using a 480W diode laser. Factors affecting the transition from purely heterogeneous decomposition to a combined hetero- and homogeneous decomposition of nickel carbonyl were studied. High quality, uniform 3-D deposits produced at a rate more than ten times higher than in commercial processes were obtained by careful balance of mass transport (gas flow) and energy delivery (laser power). Cross-flow of the gases through the porous substrate was found to be essential in facilitating mass transport and for obtaining uniform deposits at high rates. When controlling the process in a transient regime (near the onset of homogenous decomposition), unique morphology features formed as part of the deposits, including textured surface with pyramid-shape crystallites, spherical and non-spherical particles and filaments. Operating the laser in a pulsed mode produced smooth, nano-crystalline deposits with sub-100 nm grains. The effect of H2S, a commonly used additive in nickel carbonyl CVD, was studied using both polyurethane and nickel foam substrates. H2S was shown to improve the substrate coverage and deposit

  4. Nano-machining of biosensor electrodes through gold nanoparticles deposition produced by femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Ventura, B.; Funari, R.; Anoop, K. K.; Amoruso, S.; Ausanio, G.; Gesuele, F.; Velotta, R.; Altucci, C.

    2015-06-01

    We report an application of femtosecond laser ablation to improve the sensitivity of biosensors based on a quartz crystal microbalance device. The nanoparticles produced by irradiating a gold target with 527-nm, 300-fs laser pulses, in high vacuum, are directly deposited on the quartz crystal microbalance electrode. Different gold electrodes are fabricated by varying the deposition time, thus addressing how the nanoparticles surface coverage influences the sensor response. The modified biosensor is tested by weighting immobilized IgG antibody from goat and its analyte (IgG from mouse), and the results are compared with a standard electrode. A substantial increase of biosensor sensitivity is achieved, thus demonstrating that femtosecond laser ablation and deposition is a viable physical method to improve the biosensor sensitivity by means of nanostructured electrodes.

  5. Removal of the deposition on JT-60 tile by nano-sec pulsed-laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, K.; Sakawa, Y.; Tanabe, T.; Watanabe, D.; Shibahara, T.; Masaki, K.

    2010-10-01

    To clarify the property of tritium removal from carbon codeposition by using pulsed-laser induced desorption, hydrogen removal from co-deposits on JT-60 divertor tile using a fourth-harmonic emission (266 nm) of a nano-sec Nd:YAG laser was demonstrated. The threshold laser fluence for ablation was ˜0.3 J/cm 2, which was slightly higher compared to that of the pico-sec laser irradiation. The energy absorption coefficient for the nano-sec laser, which was obtained by fitting the removal rate by so-called Beer's law, was larger than the pico-sec laser. Since the time constant of thermal wave propagation into the target is of the order of nano-sec, such differences between nano- and pico-sec lasers could be attributed to thermal effects. The ablation threshold of the deposited layer was lower than that of a pure graphite, which could be attributed to the difference of thermal conductivity between deposited layer and pure graphite. The removal rate of the nano-sec laser was higher than that of pico-sec laser in the fluence range of >˜0.5 J/cm 2. On the other hand, the production ratio [hydrocarbon species]/[H 2] continuously increased with the laser fluence, and no significant ionization of carbon was observed in this fluence range. This indicated that the fluence range in this study was "weak"-ablation range, which was still not sufficient to minimize the hydrocarbon production.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition to synthesize the bridge structure of artificial nacre: Comparison of nano- and femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Melaibari, Ammar A.; Molian, Pal

    2012-11-15

    Nature offers inspiration to new adaptive technologies that allow us to build amazing shapes and structures such as nacre using synthetic materials. Consequently, we have designed a pulsed laser ablation manufacturing process involving thin film deposition and micro-machining to create hard/soft layered 'brick-bridge-mortar' nacre of AlMgB{sub 14} (hard phase) with Ti (soft phase). In this paper, we report pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to mimic brick and bridge structures of natural nacre in AlMgB{sub 14}. Particulate formation inherent in PLD is exploited to develop the bridge structure. Mechanical behavior analysis of the AlMgB{sub 14}/Ti system revealed that the brick is to be 250 nm thick, 9 {mu}m lateral dimensions while the bridge (particle) is to have a diameter of 500 nm for a performance equivalent to natural nacre. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) pulsed lasers were employed for PLD in an iterative approach that involves varying pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and target-to-substrate distance to achieve the desired brick and bridge characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical profilometer were used to evaluate the film thickness, particle size and density, stoichiometry, and surface roughness of thin films. Results indicated that both ns-pulsed and fs-pulsed lasers produce the desired nacre features. However, each laser may be chosen for different reasons: fs-pulsed laser is preferred for much shorter deposition time, better stoichiometry, uniform-sized particles, and uniform film thickness, while ns-pulsed laser is favored for industrial acceptance, reliability, ease of handling, and low cost.

  7. Pulsed laser deposition to synthesize the bridge structure of artificial nacre: Comparison of nano- and femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melaibari, Ammar A.; Molian, Pal

    2012-11-01

    Nature offers inspiration to new adaptive technologies that allow us to build amazing shapes and structures such as nacre using synthetic materials. Consequently, we have designed a pulsed laser ablation manufacturing process involving thin film deposition and micro-machining to create hard/soft layered "brick-bridge-mortar" nacre of AlMgB14 (hard phase) with Ti (soft phase). In this paper, we report pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to mimic brick and bridge structures of natural nacre in AlMgB14. Particulate formation inherent in PLD is exploited to develop the bridge structure. Mechanical behavior analysis of the AlMgB14/Ti system revealed that the brick is to be 250 nm thick, 9 μm lateral dimensions while the bridge (particle) is to have a diameter of 500 nm for a performance equivalent to natural nacre. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) pulsed lasers were employed for PLD in an iterative approach that involves varying pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and target-to-substrate distance to achieve the desired brick and bridge characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical profilometer were used to evaluate the film thickness, particle size and density, stoichiometry, and surface roughness of thin films. Results indicated that both ns-pulsed and fs-pulsed lasers produce the desired nacre features. However, each laser may be chosen for different reasons: fs-pulsed laser is preferred for much shorter deposition time, better stoichiometry, uniform-sized particles, and uniform film thickness, while ns-pulsed laser is favored for industrial acceptance, reliability, ease of handling, and low cost.

  8. Space processing of chalcogenide glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, M. A.; Larsen, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The manner in which the weightless, containerless nature of in-space processing can be successfully utilized to improve the quality of infrared transmitting chalcogenide glasses was investigated. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Laboratory experiments have established the techniques, processes and equipment necessary for the production of high purity chalcogenide glasses. (2) Processing techniques have been successfully adopted for Ge28Sb12Se60 glass in a 1-g environment. (3) The Ge28Sb12Se60 glasses that have been processed have optical transmission around 63% (5 mm thick). (4) Laboratory experiments have established that the use of precursor materials in powdered form increases the oxygen contamination of the processed glass. This indicates that high purity precursor materials in bar or pellet form should be used. (5) Modifications were made on the MSFC acoustic levitator in an attempt to improve levitation stability during long-time experiments. Room temperature experiments on As2S3 glasses and high temperature experiments on polystyrene were conducted.

  9. Pulsed laser deposition of Al-doped ZnO films on glass and polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kwan Chu; Lee, Yen Sian; Yap, Seong Ling; Kok, Soon Yie; Nee, Chen Hon; Siew, Wee Ong; Tou, Teck Yong; Yap, Seong Shan

    2014-01-01

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films were deposited on glass and polycarbonate (PC) at room temperature by using pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm. AZO thin films were obtained for both substrates at laser fluences from 2 to 5 J/cm2 in O2 partial pressure of 2.1 Pa. The effects of laser fluence on the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the films were investigated. The films with lowest resistivity and highest transmittance have been obtained at 2 J/cm2. The resistivities were 2.29×10-3 Ω cm for AZO on glass and 1.49×10-3 Ω cm for AZO on PC. With increasing laser fluence, the deposited films have lower crystallinity, higher resistivity, and smaller optical bandgap.

  10. High-speed deposition of titanium carbide coatings by laser-assisted metal–organic CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yansheng; Tu, Rong; Goto, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A semiconductor laser was first used to prepare wide-area LCVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. • The effect of laser power for the deposition of TiC{sub x} coatings was discussed. • TiC{sub x} coatings showed a columnar cross section and a dense surface texture. • TiC{sub x} coatings had a 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous reports. • This study gives the possibility of LCVD applying on the preparation of TiC{sub x} coating. - Abstract: A semiconductor laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of titanium carbide (TiC{sub x}) coatings on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate using tetrakis (diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as source materials were investigated. The influences of laser power (P{sub L}) and pre-heating temperature (T{sub pre}) on the microstructure and deposition rate of TiC{sub x} coatings were examined. Single phase of TiC{sub x} coatings were obtained at P{sub L} = 100–200 W. TiC{sub x} coatings had a cauliflower-like surface and columnar cross section. TiC{sub x} coatings in the present study had the highest R{sub dep} (54 μm/h) at a relative low T{sub dep} than those of conventional CVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. The highest volume deposition rate (V{sub dep}) of TiC{sub x} coatings was about 4.7 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which had 3–10{sup 5} times larger deposition area and 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous LCVD using CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG and argon ion laser.

  11. Photoemission Studies of Metallic Photocathodes Prepared by Pulsed Laser Ablation Deposition Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fasano, V.; Lorusso, A.; Perrone, A.; De Rosa, H.; Cultrera, L.

    2010-11-10

    We present the results of our investigation on metallic films as suitable photocathodes for the production of intense electron beams in RF photoinjector guns. Pulsed laser ablation deposition technique was used for growing Mg and Y thin films onto Si and Cu substrates in high vacuum and at room temperature.Different diagnostic methods were used to characterize the thin films deposited on Si with the aim to optimize the deposition process. Photoelectron performances were investigated on samples deposited on Cu substrate in an ultra high vacuum photodiode chamber at 10{sup -7} Pa. Relatively high quantum efficiencies have been obtained for the deposited films, comparable to those of corresponding bulks. Samples could stay for several months in humid open air before being tested in a photodiode cell. The deposition process and the role of the photocathode surface contamination and its influence on the photoelectron performances are presented and discussed.

  12. Cubic AlN thin film formation on quartz substrate by pulse laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biju, Zheng; Wen, Hu

    2016-06-01

    Cubic AlN thin films were obtained on quartz substrate by pulse laser deposition in a nitrogen reactive atmosphere. A Nd-YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm was used as the laser source. In order to study the influence of the process parameters on the deposited AlN film, the experiments were performed at various technique parameters of laser energy density from 70 to 260 J/cm2, substrate temperature from room temperature to 800 °C and nitrogen pressure from 0.1 to 50 Pa. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were applied to characterize the structure and surface morphology of the deposited AlN films. It was found that the structure of AlN films deposited in a vacuum is rocksalt under the condition of substrate temperature 600-800 °C, nitrogen pressure 10-0.1 Pa and a moderate laser energy density (190 J/cm2). The high quality AlN film exhibited good optical property. Project supported by the Yunnan Provincial Natural of Science Foundation of China (No. KKSY201251089).

  13. Improved passivation of the ZnO/Si interface by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gluba, M. A.; Nickel, N. H.; Rappich, J.; Hinrichs, K.

    2013-01-28

    Zinc oxide thin-films were grown on crystalline silicon employing magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition. Bulk and interface properties were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, Raman backscattering, photoluminescence, and infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. Sputter deposited ZnO samples reveal a large degree of disorder and an interface defect density of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. A significant improvement of the structural quality is observed in samples grown by pulsed laser deposition. The bulk defect density is further reduced, when introducing monatomic oxygen during deposition. Simultaneously, the defect density at the ZnO/Si interface decreases by about a factor of five. Implications for devices containing ZnO/Si interfaces are discussed.

  14. Local electrophoresis deposition of nanomaterials assisted by a laser trapping technique.

    PubMed

    Iwata, F; Kaji, M; Suzuki, A; Ito, S; Nakao, H

    2009-06-10

    We describe a novel local deposition technique for nanoparticles using electrophoresis deposition assisted by laser trapping. A solution containing nanometer scale colloidal Au particles was placed between a conductive substrate and a cover glass coated with an indium thin oxide film. Laser spots focused on the substrate gathered the nanoparticles around the spots, and the nanoparticles were then deposited on the substrate by controlling the electric potential between the substrate and the cover glass. A dots array and line patterning of the deposited Au nanoparticles were successfully demonstrated. Furthermore, by using a solution containing colloidal DNA, we were able to obtain a dots array of the DNA. This technique will be very useful for applications in micro-and nanodevices.

  15. Research on laser-removal of a deuterium deposit from a graphite sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubkowska, M.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Malinowski, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Rosinski, M.; Gasior, P.

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents experimental results of investigation of a removal of deuterium deposits from a graphite target by means of pulsed laser beams. The sample was a part of the TEXTOR limiter with a deuterium-deposited layer. That target was located in the vacuum chamber, pumped out to 5×10-5 Torr, and it was irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser, which generated 3.5-ns pulses of energy of 0.5 J at λ1 = 1063 nm, or 0.1 J at λ3 = 355 nm.

  16. CW laser compaction of aqueous solution deposited metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, G.J.; Dennis, T.

    1997-12-01

    Zirconium dioxide films were spin cast onto silica or silicon substrates from an aqueous solution comprised of the precursor metal nitrate and an organic complexant such as glycine. The hydrated films so derived consist of an amorphous organic phase in which the metal cations and nitrate anions are homogeneously dispersed. Heating to temperatures above 200 {degrees}C leads to film dehydration followed by an auto-catalyzed oxidation reaction whereby the bound nitrate oxidizes the organic matrix leaving behind an intact stoichiometric and crystalline metal oxide film. Films are characterized using AFM, XRD, and optical methods. Transformation processes in these films have been studied in detail by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and laser induced fluorescence from films doped with a suitable rare earth probe ion such as SM{sup +3}. In the latter case, the measured fluorescence emission spectra are used to identify the hydrated, dehydrated, amorphous and crystalline metal oxide phases which evolve during processing. These transformations also have been induced upon visible CW laser irradiation at fluences in excess of 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Under these conditions, the film dehydrates and compacts within the footprint of the incident laser beam rendering this region of the film water insoluble. Post irradiation washing of the film with water removes all vestiges of the film outside of the beam footprint suggesting a possible use of this technique for lithography applications. Films subjected to laser irradiation and post irradiation heating have been characterized with respect to thickness, phase composition, crystallite size and optical constants.

  17. Note: Large area deposition of Rh single and Rh/W/Cu multilayer thin films on stainless steel substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mostako, A. T. T.; Khare, Alika

    2014-04-15

    Mirror like thin films of single layer Rh and multilayer Rh/W/Cu are deposited on highly polished 50 mm diameter stainless steel substrate by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique for first mirror application in fusion reactors. For this, the conventional PLD technique has been modified by incorporating substrate rastering stage for large area deposition via PLD. Process optimization to achieve uniformity of deposition as estimated from fringe visibility and thickness is also discussed.

  18. Laser textured superhydrophobic surfaces and their applications for homogeneous spot deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the laser surface modification of 304S15 stainless steel to develop superhydrophobic properties and the subsequent application for homogeneous spot deposition. Superhydrophobic surfaces, with steady contact angle of ∼154° and contact angle hysteresis of ∼4°, are fabricated by direct laser texturing. In comparison with common pico-/femto-second lasers employed for this patterning, the nanosecond fiber laser used in this work is more cost-effective, compact and allows higher processing rates. The effect of laser power and scan line separation on surface wettability of textured surfaces are investigated and optimized fabrication parameters are given. Fluid flows and transportations of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles suspension droplets on the processed surfaces and unprocessed wetting substrates are investigated. After evaporation is complete, the coffee-stain effect is observed on the untextured substrates but not on the superhydrophobic surfaces. Uniform deposition of PS particles on the laser textured surfaces is achieved and the deposited material is confined to smaller area.

  19. Structural and optical properties of SrCu2O2 films deposited on sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambunan, Octolia Togibasa; Tukiman, Hadiyawarman; Parwanta, Kadek Juliana; Jeong, Da Woon; Jung, Chang Uk; Rhee, Seuk Joo; Liu, Chunli

    2012-10-01

    We deposited SrCu2O2 (SCO) films on sapphire (Al2O3) (0 0 0 1) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The crystallographic orientation of the SCO thin film showed clear dependence on the growth temperature. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed that the film deposited at 400 °C was mainly oriented in the SCO [2 0 0] direction, whereas when the growth temperature was increased to 600 °C, the SCO film showed a dominant orientation of SCO [1 1 2]. The SCO film deposited at 500 °C was obvious polycrystalline, showing multi peaks from (2 0 0), (1 1 2), and (2 1 1) diffraction in the XRD spectrum. The SCO film deposited at 600 °C showed a band gap energy of 3.3 eV and transparency up to 80% around 500 nm. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the SCO films grown at 500 °C and 600 °C mainly showed blue-green emission, which was attributed to the intra-band transition of the isolated Cu+ and Cu+-Cu+ pairs according to the temperature dependent-PL analysis.

  20. Ion implantation induced phase transformation and enhanced crystallinity of as deposited copper oxide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bind, Umesh Chandra; Dutta, Raj Kumar; Sekhon, Gurpreet Kaur; Yadav, Kanhaiya Lal; Krishna, J. B. M.; Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Copper oxide thin film of about 260-280 nm thickness was deposited using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on glass substrate at 350 °C and post depositional sample treatment was performed by ion implantation with 50 keV N5+ ion beam with varying particle fluence. Amorphous copper oxide thin film deposited at 80 mTorr partial pressure of oxygen was transformed to cubic Cu2O phase (20.2 nm) when implanted at 1 × 1016 particles/cm2. While mixed Cu2O and CuO phases in the thin film deposited at 100 mTorr oxygen pressure was transformed to single phase of Cu2O (23.5 nm), with enhanced crystallinity when implanted with 2.5 × 1015 particles/cm2. The phase transformation and improved crystallinity is attributed to thermal effect owing to stopping of incident ion beam. Implantation with higher particle fluence led to transformation to CuO phase with reduced crystallite sized and the increased electrical conductivity.

  1. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition.

  2. The minimum amount of "matrix" needed for matrix-assisted pulsed laser deposition of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Tabetah, Marshall; Matei, Andreea; Constantinescu, Catalin; Mortensen, Ninell P; Dinescu, Maria; Schou, Jørgen; Zhigilei, Leonid V

    2014-11-20

    The ability of matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique to transfer and deposit high-quality thin organic, bioorganic, and composite films with minimum chemical modification of the target material has been utilized in numerous applications. One of the outstanding problems in MAPLE film deposition, however, is the presence of residual solvent (matrix) codeposited with the polymer material and adversely affecting the quality of the deposited films. In this work, we investigate the possibility of alleviating this problem by reducing the amount of matrix in the target. A series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are performed for a model lysozyme-water system, where the water serves the role of volatile "matrix" that drives the ejection of the biomolecules. The simulations reveal a remarkable ability of a small (5-10 wt %) amount of matrix to cause the ejection of intact bioorganic molecules. The results obtained for different laser fluences and water concentrations are used to establish a "processing map" of the regimes of molecular ejection in matrix-assisted pulsed laser deposition. The computational predictions are supported by the experimental observation of the ejection of intact lysozyme molecules from pressed lysozyme targets containing small amounts of residual water. The results of this study suggest a new approach for deposition of thin films of bioorganic molecules with minimum chemical modification of the molecular structure and minimum involvement of solvent into the deposition process.

  3. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition. PMID:22105226

  4. The effect of process variables on microstructure in laser-deposited materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontha, Srikanth

    Laser deposition of titanium alloys is under consideration for aerospace applications, which require the consistent control of microstructure and resulting mechanical properties. To date, only limited experimental data exists to link deposition process variables (e.g., laser power and velocity) to resulting microstructure (e.g., grain size and morphology) in laser-deposited materials, and suitable microstructures have typically been obtained only by trial and error. In addition, it is unclear whether knowledge based on small-scale laser deposition processes (e.g., LENS(TM)) can be applied to large-scale (higher power) processes currently under development for commercial applications. Therefore, simulation-based methods are needed to predict the effects of process variables and size-scale on microstructure in laser-deposited titanium and other aerospace materials. The ability to predict and control microstructure in laser deposition processes requires an understanding of the thermal conditions at the onset of solidification. The focus of this work is the development of thermal process maps relating solidification cooling rate and thermal gradient (the key parameters controlling microstructure) to laser deposition process variables (laser power and velocity). The approach employs the well-known Rosenthal solution for a moving point heat source traversing an infinite substrate. Cooling rates and thermal gradients at the onset of solidification are numerically extracted from the Rosenthal solution throughout the depth of the melt pool, and dimensionless process maps are presented for both 2-D thin-wall and bulky 3-D geometries. Results for both small-scale (LENS(TM)) and large-scale (higher power) processes are plotted on solidification maps for predicting trends in grain morphology in laser-deposited Ti-6Al-4V. Although the Rosenthal predictions neglect the nonlinear effects of temperature-dependent properties and latent heat of transformation, a comparison with 2-D

  5. The controlled pulsed laser deposition of Ag nanoparticle arrays for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, C; Neri, F; Ossi, P M; Santo, N; Trusso, S

    2009-06-17

    An effective method for the production of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrates is presented. Nanostructured silver thin films are pulsed laser deposited in an argon atmosphere. The films consist of arrays of nanoparticles whose size is controlled by the Ar pressure. The surface morphology of the films can be tuned by the laser pulse number. Nanoparticle size is calculated by a phenomenological model taking into account the dynamics of the laser generated silver plasma. The SERS activity of the films is investigated by Raman scattering of adsorbed rhodamine 6G at different concentrations.

  6. Fabrication of uniformly dispersed nanoparticle-doped chalcogenide glass

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chao; Arnold, Craig; Almeida, Juliana M. P.; Yao, Nan

    2014-12-29

    The dispersion of metallic nanoparticles within a chalcogenide glass matrix has the potential for many important applications in active and passive optical materials. However, the challenge of particle agglomeration, which can occur during traditional thin film processing, leads to materials with poor performance. Here, we report on the preparation of a uniformly dispersed Ag-nanoparticle (Ag NP)/chalcogenide glass heterogeneous material prepared through a combined laser- and solution-based process. Laser ablation of bulk silver is performed directly within an arsenic sulfide/propylamine solution resulting in the formation of Ag NPs in solution with an average particle size of less than 15 nm as determined by dynamic light scattering. The prepared solutions are fabricated into thin films using standard coating processes and are then analyzed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to investigate the particle shape and size distribution. By calculating the nearest neighbor index and standard normal deviate of the nanoparticle locations inside the films, we verify that a uniformly dispersed distribution is achieved through this process.

  7. Pulsed laser deposition of AlMgB14 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Britson, Jason Curtis

    2008-11-18

    Hard, wear-resistant coatings of thin film borides based on AlMgB14 have the potential to be applied industrially to improve the tool life of cutting tools and pump vanes and may account for several million dollars in savings as a result of reduced wear on these parts. Past work with this material has shown that it can have a hardness of up to 45GPa and be fabricated into thin films with a similar hardness using pulsed laser deposition. These films have already been shown to be promising for industrial applications. Cutting tools coated with AlMgB14 used to mill titanium alloys have been shown to substantially reduce the wear on the cutting tool and extend its cutting life. However, little research into the thin film fabrication process using pulsed laser deposition to make AlMgB14 has been conducted. In this work, research was conducted into methods to optimize the deposition parameters for the AlMgB14 films. Processing methods to eliminate large particles on the surface of the AlMgB14 films, produce films that were at least 1m thick, reduce the surface roughness of the films, and improve the adhesion of the thin films were investigated. Use of a femtosecond laser source rather than a nanosecond laser source was found to be effective in eliminating large particles considered detrimental to wear reduction properties from the films. Films produced with the femtosecond laser were also found to be deposited at a rate 100 times faster than those produced with the nanosecond laser. However, films produced with the femtosecond laser developed a relatively high RMS surface roughness around 55nm. Attempts to decrease the surface roughness were largely unsuccessful. Neither increasing the surface temperature of the substrate during deposition nor using a double pulse to ablate the material was found to be extremely successful to reduce the surface roughness. Finally, the adhesion of the thin films to M2 tool steel

  8. Polycrystalline ZnTe thin film on silicon synthesized by pulsed laser deposition and subsequent pulsed laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Menglei; Gao, Kun; Wu, Jiada; Cai, Hua; Yuan, Ye; Prucnal, S.; Hübner, R.; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2016-03-01

    ZnTe thin films on Si substrates have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition and subsequent pulsed laser melting (PLM) treatment. The crystallization during PLM is confirmed by Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The PL results show a broad peak at 574 nm (2.16 eV), which can be assigned to the transitions from the conduction band to the acceptor level located at 0.145 eV above the valence band induced by zinc-vacancy ionization. Our work provides an applicable approach to low temperature preparation of crystalline ZnTe thin films.

  9. Convection and mass-transport in laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S.; Brown, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Gas flow and energy and species transport in laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LICVD) of amorphous silicon films by silane pyrolysis are analyzed by finite element analysis of a two-dimensional model for the process. Spatial nonuniformity of the deposited film is shown to result from diffusion controlled transport of products between the beam and substrate. Deposition profiles are affected by buoyancy-driven convection only at increased gas pressures. Horizontal orientation of the reactor with respect to gravity is optimal because the stagnation-like flow, that results adjacent to the substrate, enhances mixing, and smoothes the film profile.

  10. Pulsed laser deposition and refractive index measurement of fully substituted bismuth iron garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, T.; Ross, C. A.

    2003-08-01

    A systematic study of the pulsed-laser deposition of fully substituted bismuth iron garnet (BIG, or Bi 3Fe 5O 12) has been carried out. Garnet-structure BIG films grow epitaxially onto gallium gadolinium garnet substrates under deposition conditions that lead to a stoichiometric film. The variation of stoichiometry with deposition conditions is discussed. The refractive index, n, of BIG decreases from 2.819 at 633 nm to 2.584 at 1550 nm, with an imaginary part, k, less than 0.05.

  11. [INVITED] Control of femtosecond pulsed laser ablation and deposition by temporal pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrelie, Florence; Bourquard, Florent; Loir, Anne--Sophie; Donnet, Christophe; Colombier, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    This study explores the effects of temporal laser pulse shaping on femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The potential of laser pulses temporally tailored on ultrafast time scales is used to control the expansion and the excitation degree of ablation products including atomic species and nanoparticles. The ablation plume generated by temporally shaped femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum and graphite targets is studied by in situ optical diagnostic methods. Taking advantage of automated pulse shaping techniques, an adaptive procedure based on spectroscopic feedback regulates the irradiance for the enhancement of typical plasma features. Thin films elaborated by unshaped femtosecond laser pulses and by optimized sequence indicate that the nanoparticles generation efficiency is strongly influenced by the temporal shaping of the laser irradiation. The ablation processes leading either to the generation of the nanoparticles either to the formation of plasma can be favored by using a temporal shaping of the laser pulse. Insights are given on the possibility to control the quantity of the nanoparticles. The temporal laser pulse shaping is shown also to strongly modify the laser-induced plasma contents and kinetics for graphite ablation. Temporal pulse shaping proves its capability to reduce the number of slow radicals while increasing the proportion of monomers, with the addition of ionized species in front of the plume. This modification of the composition and kinetics of plumes in graphite ablation using temporal laser pulse shaping is discussed in terms of modification of the structural properties of deposited Diamond-Like Carbon films (DLC). This gives rise to a better understanding of the growth processes involved in femtosecond-PLD and picosecond-PLD of DLC suggesting the importance of neutral C atoms, which are responsible for the subplantation process.

  12. Chromium Carbide Thin Films Synthesized by Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiaki; Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Terajima, Ryou; Emura, Masanari

    1999-06-01

    Chromium carbide thin films are synthesized on Si(100)substrates by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition method at differentsubstrate temperatures. Glancing-angle X-ray diffraction shows that acrystalline chromium carbide film can be prepared at the substratetemperature of 700°C. Grain size of the films, examined witha field-emission secondary electron microscope, increases withincreasing substrate temperature.

  13. Fabricating functionally graded films with designed gradient profiles using pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Yoo Jai; Ki, Hyungson

    2013-05-07

    A novel picosecond-laser pulsed laser deposition method has been developed for fabricating functionally graded films with pre-designed gradient profiles. Theoretically, the developed method is capable of precisely fabricating films with any thicknesses and any gradient profiles by controlling the laser beam powers for the two different targets based on the film composition profiles. As an implementation example, we have successfully constructed functionally graded diamond-like carbon films with six different gradient profiles: linear, quadratic, cubic, square root, cubic root, and sinusoidal. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy is employed for investigating the chemical composition along the thickness of the film, and the deposition profile and thickness errors are found to be less than 3% and 1.04%, respectively. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first method for fabricating films with designed gradient profiles and has huge potential in many areas of coatings and films, including multifunctional optical films. We believe that this method is not only limited to the example considered in this study, but also can be applied to all material combinations as long as they can be deposited using the pulsed laser deposition technique.

  14. Sorbitol as an efficient reducing agent for laser-induced copper deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemirovsky, V. A.; Logunov, L. S.; Safonov, S. V.; Tumkin, I. I.; Tver'yanovich, Yu. S.; Menchikov, L. G.

    2012-10-01

    We have pioneered in revealing the fact that sorbitol may be used as an efficient reducing agent in the process of laser-induced copper deposition from solutions; in this case, it is possible to obtain copper lines much higher quality than by using conventional formalin.

  15. Method for continuous control of composition and doping of pulsed laser deposited films

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, Douglas H.; McCamy, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for growing a deposit upon a substrate of semiconductor material involves the utilization of pulsed laser deposition techniques within a low-pressure gas environment. The substrate and a target of a first material are positioned within a deposition chamber and a low-pressure gas atmosphere is developed within the chamber. The substrate is then heated, and the target is irradiated, so that atoms of the target material are ablated from the remainder of the target, while atoms of the gas simultaneously are adsorbed on the substrate/film surface. The ablated atoms build up upon the substrate, together with the adsorbed gas atoms to form the thin-film deposit on the substrate. By controlling the pressure of the gas of the chamber atmosphere, the composition of the formed deposit can be controlled, and films of continuously variable composition or doping can be grown from a single target of fixed composition.

  16. Method for continuous control of composition and doping of pulsed laser deposited films by pressure control

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, Douglas H.; McCamy, James W.

    1996-01-01

    A method for growing a deposit upon a substrate of semiconductor material involves the utilization of pulsed laser deposition techniques within a low-pressure gas environment. The substrate and a target of a first material are positioned within a deposition chamber and a low-pressure gas atmosphere is developed within the chamber. The substrate is then heated, and the target is irradiated, so that atoms of the target material are ablated from the remainder of the target, while atoms of the gas simultaneously are adsorbed on the substrate/film surface. The ablated atoms build up upon the substrate, together with the adsorbed gas atoms to form the thin-film deposit on the substrate. By controlling the pressure of the gas of the chamber atmosphere, the composition of the formed deposit can be controlled, and films of continuously variable composition or doping can be grown from a single target of fixed composition.

  17. Pulsed laser deposition of barium metaplumbate thin films for ferroelectric capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardare, A. I.; Mardare, C. C.; Fernandes, J. R. A.; Vilarinho, P. M.; Joanni, E.

    2003-08-01

    Barium metaplumbate thin films were deposited in situ by pulsed laser deposition on Si/SiO2/Ti/Pt substrates with a high deposition rate. The temperatures used ranged between 400 ^circ C and 700 ^circ C. As the deposition temperature was increased, the films assumed a strong (222) preferential orientation. This orientation of the electrodes was reflected on the PZT films, having a very big influence on their ferroelectric behavior. The PZT films made over BPO deposited at high temperature presented high values of remanent polarization (43 μC/cm^2) but indications of high leakage currents could be observed in the hysteresis loops. By using BPO bottom electrodes, a 30% improvement in the fatigue behavior of PZT capacitors when compared with the normal platinum electrodes was observed.

  18. Thermochromic properties of Sn, W co-doped VO2 nanostructured thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Hur, M G; Masaki, T; Yoon, D H

    2014-12-01

    Tin (Sn) and tungsten (W) co-doped vanadium dioxide (VO2) nanostructured thin films with 50-nm thickness were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to reduce the transition temperature and improve the IR transmittance. The crystal structure of the nanostructured thin films and the presence of elements were evaluated by XRD and XPS analysis. The transition temperature (T(c)) of 1 at% Sn-1 at% W co-doped VO2 nanostructured thin film was decreased to about 22 degrees C (from 70.3 to 48.5 degrees C) compared with the undoped VO2 nanostructured thin film. The transmittance width in the IR range of the co-doped nanostructured thin film decreased from 37.5% to 27% compared with the undoped VO2 nanostructured thin film. Also, the width of hysteresis was narrowed by Sn doping. PMID:25970986

  19. High quality ZnS/Au/ZnS transparent conductive tri-layer films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Caifeng; Li, Qingshan; Wang, Jisuo; Zhang, Lichun; Zhao, Fengzhou; Dong, Fangying

    2016-07-01

    ZnS/Au/ZnS tri-layer films were deposited on quartz glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The influence of Au layer thickness on optical and electrical properties of the tri-layer ZnS/Au/ZnS was studied. X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope were employed to characterize the crystalline structure and surface morphology of the tri-layer films. Hall measurements, ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer, four-point probe were used to explore the optoelectronic properties of the ZnS/Au/ZnS. The increase of Au layer thickness resulted in the decreased resistivity, the increased carrier concentration, and the declined transmittance in the visible light region.

  20. Thermochromic properties of Sn, W co-doped VO2 nanostructured thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Hur, M G; Masaki, T; Yoon, D H

    2014-12-01

    Tin (Sn) and tungsten (W) co-doped vanadium dioxide (VO2) nanostructured thin films with 50-nm thickness were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to reduce the transition temperature and improve the IR transmittance. The crystal structure of the nanostructured thin films and the presence of elements were evaluated by XRD and XPS analysis. The transition temperature (T(c)) of 1 at% Sn-1 at% W co-doped VO2 nanostructured thin film was decreased to about 22 degrees C (from 70.3 to 48.5 degrees C) compared with the undoped VO2 nanostructured thin film. The transmittance width in the IR range of the co-doped nanostructured thin film decreased from 37.5% to 27% compared with the undoped VO2 nanostructured thin film. Also, the width of hysteresis was narrowed by Sn doping.

  1. A simple solution to the problem of effective utilisation of the target material for pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzanyan, A. S.; Kuzanyan, A. A.; Petrosyan, V. A.; Pilosyan, S. Kh; Grasiuk, A. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The factors determining the efficiency of the target material utilisation for pulsed laser deposition of films are considered. The target volume is calculated, which is evaporated in the ablation process by the focused laser radiation having a rectangular form. The new device is suggested and developed for obtaining thin films by the method of laser deposition, which is specific in the employment of a simple optical system mounted outside a deposition chamber that comprises two lenses and the diaphragm and focuses the laser beam onto a target in the form of a sector-like spot. Thin films of CuO and YBaCuO were deposited with this device. Several deposition cycles revealed that the target material is consumed uniformly from the entire surface of the target. A maximal spread of the target thickness was not greater than +/-2% both prior to deposition and after it. The device designed provides a high coefficient of the target material utilisation efficiency.

  2. Biocompatible nanocrystalline octacalcium phosphate thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Socol, G; Torricelli, P; Bracci, B; Iliescu, M; Miroiu, F; Bigi, A; Werckmann, J; Mihailescu, I N

    2004-06-01

    We extended for the first time pulsed laser ablation to the deposition of octacalcium phosphate Ca8H2(PO4)6.5H2O (OCP) thin films. The depositions were performed with a pulsed UV laser source (lambda=248 nm, tau> or =20 ns) in a flux of hot water vapors. The targets were sintered from crystalline OCP powder and the laser ablation fluence was set at values of 1.5-2 J/cm2. During depositions the collectors, Si or Ti substrates, were maintained at a constant temperature within the range 20-200 degrees C. The resulting structures were submitted to heat treatment in hot water vapors for up to 6 h. The best results were obtained at a substrate temperature of 150 degrees C during both deposition and post-deposition treatment. High-resolution electron microscopy and XRD at grazing incidence indicated that the coatings obtained were made of nanocrystalline OCP. Cross-section TEM investigations showed that the coatings contained droplets stacked on Ti substrates as well as distributed across the entire thickness of the arborescence-like structure layers. The results of WST-1 assay, cell adherence, DNA replication, and caspase-1 activity confirmed the good biocompatibility of the coatings.

  3. Pulsed-laser deposition and growth studies of Bi3Fe5O12 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lux, Robert; Heinrich, Andreas; Leitenmeier, Stephan; Körner, Timo; Herbort, Michael; Stritzker, Bernd

    2006-12-01

    Magneto-optical garnets are attractive because of their high Faraday rotation and low optical loss in the near infrared. Therefore their use is generally in nonreciprocal devices, i.e., as optical isolators in optical communication. In this paper we present data concerning the deposition of Bi3Fe5O12 (BIG) thin films on (100) and (111) Gd3Ga5O12 substrates using pulsed-laser deposition. Laser-induced processes on the surface of the oxide target used for ablation were analyzed and numerous films were deposited. We found the BIG film quality to be strongly affected by oxygen pressure, laser energy density, and the Bi /Fe film ratio, whereas temperature had a minor influence. We also investigated the BIG-film deposition using a target pressed from metallic Bi and Fe powders and found information on the growth behavior of BIG. We report on details of the film deposition and film properties determined by environmental scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In addition, we determined the Faraday rotation of the films.

  4. Hyperthermal Pulsed-Laser Ablation Beams for Film Deposition and Surface Microstructural Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1999-11-08

    This paper presents an overview of pulsed-laser ablation for film deposition and surface microstructure formation. By changing the ambient gas pressure from high vacuum to several Torr (several hundred Pa) and by selecting the pulsed-laser wavelength, the kinetic energy of ablated atoms/ions can be varied from several hundred eV down to {approximately}0.1 eV and films ranging from superhard to nanocrystalline may be deposited. Furthermore, cumulative (multi-pulse) irradiation of a semiconductor surface (e.g. silicon) in an oxidizing gas (0{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}) et atmospheric pressure can produce dense, self-organized arrays of high-aspect-ratio microcolumns or microcones. Thus, a wide range of materials synthesis and processing opportunities result from the hyperthermal flux and reactive growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

  5. Phase-selective vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) nanostructured thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Masina, B. N. E-mail: slafane@cdta.dz; Lafane, S. E-mail: slafane@cdta.dz; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T.; Wu, L.; Akande, A. A.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2015-10-28

    Thin films of monoclinic nanostructured vanadium dioxide are notoriously difficult to produce in a selective manner. To date, post-annealing, after pulsed laser deposition (PLD), has been used to revert the crystal phase or to remove impurities, and non-glass substrates have been employed, thus reducing the efficacy of the transparency switching. Here, we overcome these limitations in PLD by optimizing a laser-ablation and deposition process through optical imaging of the laser-induced plasma. We report high quality monoclinic rutile-type vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) (M1) nanoparticles without post-annealing, and on a glass substrate. Our samples demonstrate a reversible metal-to-insulator transition at ∼43 °C, without any doping, paving the way to switchable transparency in optical materials at room temperature.

  6. Modeling of Crystal Orientations in Laser Powder Deposition of Single Crystal Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huan; Liu, Zhaoyang

    This paper presents a numerical model which simulates the dynamic molten pool formation and the crystal orientations of solidified SX alloy in a multi-layer laser powder deposition process. Based on the mathematical model of coaxial laser direct deposition, the effect of parameters (laser power, scanning speed, powder feed rate) on the tendency to form [001] direction expitaxial grains during solidification was evaluated. In the transient three- dimensional model, physical phenomena including heat transfer, melting, grain formation during solidification, mass addition, and fluid flow in the melt pool, were modeled in a self-consistent manner. The temperature fields, fluid flow velocity, clad geometry (width, height and melt pool depth) and grain formation in melting pool of single layer are predicted.

  7. Incongruent transfer in laser deposition of FeSiGaRu thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Riet, E.; Kools, J. C. S.; Dieleman, J.

    1993-06-01

    The laser ablation and deposition of FeSiGaRu is studied. The deposited thin films are analyzed with Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. It is found that the gallium and ruthenium content of the thin films is strongly dependent on the laser fluence. At high laser fluences (6 J/cm2) the thin films are depleted of gallium due to preferential sputtering of the gallium atoms from the thin film. Near the threshold fluence (1.9 J/cm2) the films contain an excess of gallium due to preferential evaporation of gallium from the target. The latter conclusions are based on time-of-flight studies of ablated atoms and ions and on measurements of the atoms that are sputtered from the substrate by the incoming flux.

  8. Fabrication of coatings and bulk products made of a nickel-based material by additive technology laser metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorunov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that products made of a nickel-based material can be formed by direct additive laser deposition. Ring samples with good antifriction properties are formed. The material after direct laser deposition is characterized by a heterogeneous structure: coarse inclusions with a high hardness are distributed in a softer matrix. Final laser treatment leads to the formation of a homogeneous microstructure and the refinement of second phases.

  9. Magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposition-fabricated isotropic Fe-Pt film magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Oniki, W.; Yanai, T.; Fukunaga, H.

    2011-04-01

    A high-speed pulsed laser deposition method with the deposition rate of several tens of microns per 1 h enabled us to obtain isotropic Fe-Pt thick film magnets. Increase in the laser power enabled us to obtain as-deposited films with L1{sub 0} ordered phase due to the heat radiation from a target, which means that a substrate heating system and a post-annealing process are not required to achieve hard magnetic properties in the process. Use of an Fe-rich target enhanced the magnetic properties, and as a result (BH){sub max} value exceeded 100 kJ/m{sup 3} in an isotropic Fe-Pt film fabricated at the power of 3 W, which was comparable to those of isotropic Fe-Pt thick film magnets prepared by a sputtering method.

  10. Optical and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline ZrC thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Craciun, D.; Socol, G.; Lambers, E.; McCumiskey, E. J.; Taylor, C. R.; Martin, C.; Argibay, Nicolas; Craciun, V.; Tanner, D. B.

    2015-01-17

    Thin ZrC films (<500 nm) were grown on (100) Si substrates at a substrate temperature of 500 °C by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using a KrF excimer laser under different CH4 pressures. Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that films were nanocrystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies found out films were very dense and exhibited a smooth surface morphology. Optical spectroscopy data shows that the films have high reflectivity (>90%) in the infrared region, characteristic of metallic behavior. Nanoindentation results indicated that films deposited under lower CH4 pressures exhibited slightly higher nanohardness and Young modulus values than films deposited undermore » higher pressures. As a result, tribological characterization revealed that these films exhibited relatively high wear resistance and steady-state friction coefficients on the order of μ = 0.4.« less

  11. Crystallization kinetics of GeTe phase-change thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xinxing; Thelander, Erik; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Decker, Ulrich; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Pulsed laser deposition was employed to the growth of GeTe thin films on Silicon substrates. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the critical crystallization temperature lies between 220 and 240 °C. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the crystallization kinetics of the as-deposited films, determining the activation energy to be 3.14 eV. Optical reflectivity and in situ resistance measurements exhibited a high reflectivity contrast of ~21% and 3-4 orders of magnitude drop in resistivity of the films upon crystallization. The results show that pulsed laser deposited GeTe films can be a promising candidate for phase-change applications.

  12. Three-dimensional microfabrication using local electrophoresis deposition and a laser trapping technique.

    PubMed

    Takai, Takanari; Nakao, Hidenobu; Iwata, Futoshi

    2014-11-17

    We describe a novel fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) microstructures using local electrophoresis deposition together with laser trapping. A liquid cell consisting of two-faced conductive substrates was filled with a colloidal solution of Au nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were trapped by a laser spot and positioned on the bottom substrate, then deposited onto the surface by the application of electrical voltage between the two substrates. By moving the liquid cell downward while maintaining the deposition, 3D microstructures were successfully fabricated. The smallest diameter of the fabricated pillar was 500 nm, almost the same as that of the Airy disc. The Young's modulus of the fabricated structure was 1.5 GPa.

  13. Optical and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline ZrC thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Craciun, D.; Socol, G.; Lambers, E.; McCumiskey, E. J.; Taylor, C. R.; Martin, C.; Argibay, Nicolas; Craciun, V.; Tanner, D. B.

    2015-01-17

    Thin ZrC films (<500 nm) were grown on (100) Si substrates at a substrate temperature of 500 °C by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using a KrF excimer laser under different CH4 pressures. Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that films were nanocrystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies found out films were very dense and exhibited a smooth surface morphology. Optical spectroscopy data shows that the films have high reflectivity (>90%) in the infrared region, characteristic of metallic behavior. Nanoindentation results indicated that films deposited under lower CH4 pressures exhibited slightly higher nanohardness and Young modulus values than films deposited under higher pressures. As a result, tribological characterization revealed that these films exhibited relatively high wear resistance and steady-state friction coefficients on the order of μ = 0.4.

  14. Structural strengthening of rocket nozzle extension by means of laser metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honoré, M.; Brox, L.; Hallberg, M.

    2012-03-01

    Commercial space operations strive to maximize the payload per launch in order to minimize the costs of each kg launched into orbit; this yields demand for ever larger launchers with larger, more powerful rocket engines. Volvo Aero Corporation in collaboration with Snecma and Astrium has designed and tested a new, upgraded Nozzle extension for the Vulcain 2 engine configuration, denoted Vulcain 2+ NE Demonstrator The manufacturing process for the welding of the sandwich wall and the stiffening structure is developed in close cooperation with FORCE Technology. The upgrade is intended to be available for future development programs for the European Space Agency's (ESA) highly successful commercial launch vehicle, the ARIANE 5. The Vulcain 2+ Nozzle Extension Demonstrator [1] features a novel, thin-sheet laser-welded configuration, with laser metal deposition built-up 3D-features for the mounting of stiffening structure, flanges and for structural strengthening, in order to cope with the extreme load- and thermal conditions, to which the rocket nozzle extension is exposed during launch of the 750 ton ARIANE 5 launcher. Several millimeters of material thickness has been deposited by laser metal deposition without disturbing the intricate flow geometry of the nozzle cooling channels. The laser metal deposition process has been applied on a full-scale rocket nozzle demonstrator, and in excess of 15 kilometers of filler wire has been successfully applied to the rocket nozzle. The laser metal deposition has proven successful in two full-throttle, full-scale tests, firing the rocket engine and nozzle in the ESA test facility P5 by DLR in Lampoldshausen, Germany.

  15. Isotopically Enriched Films and Nanostructures by Ultrafast Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Pronko

    2004-12-13

    This project involved a systematic study to apply newly discovered isotopic enrichment effects in laser ablation plumes to the fabrication of isotopically engineered thin films, superlattices, and nanostructures. The approach to this program involved using ultrafast lasers as a method for generating ablated plasmas that have preferentially structured isotopic content in the body of the ablation plasma plumes. In examining these results we have attempted to interpret the observations in terms of a plasma centrifuge process that is driven by the internal electro-magnetic fields of the plasma itself. The research plan involved studying the following phenomena in regard to the ablation plume and the isotopic mass distribution within it: (1) Test basic equations of steady state centrifugal motion in the ablation plasma. (2) Investigate angular distribution of ions in the ablation plasmas. (3) Examine interactions of plasma ions with self-generated magnetic fields. (3) Investigate ion to neutral ratios in the ablation plasmas. (5) Test concepts of plasma pumping. (6) Fabricate isotopically enriched nanostructures.

  16. Pulsed-laser evaporation technique for deposition of thin films: Physics and theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajiv K.; Narayan, J.

    1990-05-01

    We have studied in detail the physical phenomena involved in the interaction of high-powered nanosecond excimer-laser pulses with bulk targets resulting in evaporation, plasma formation, and subsequent deposition of thin films. A theoretical model for simulating these laser-plasma-solid interactions has been developed. In this model, the laser-generated plasma is treated as an ideal gas at high pressure and temperature, which is initially confined in small dimensions, and is suddenly allowed to expand in vacuum. The three-dimensional expansion of this plasma gives rise to the characteristic spatial thickness and compositional variations observed in laser-deposited thin films of multicomponent systems. The forward-directed nature of the laser evaporation process has been found to result from anisotropic expansion velocities of the atomic species which are controlled by the dimensions of the expanding plasma. Based on the nature of interaction of the laser beam with the target and the evaporated material, the pulsed-laser evaporation (PLE) process can be classified into three separate regimes: (i) interaction of the laser beam with the bulk target, (ii) plasma formation, heating, and initial three-dimensional isothermal expansion, and (iii) adiabatic expansion and deposition of thin films. The first two processes occur during the time interval of the laser pulse, while the last process initiates after the laser pulse terminates. Under PLE conditions, the evaporation of the target is assumed to be thermal in nature, while the plasma expansion dynamics is nonthermal as a result of interaction of the laser beam with the evaporated material. The equations of compressible gas dynamics are set up to simulate the expansion of the plasma in the last two regimes. The solution of the gas-dynamics equations shows that the expansion velocities of the plasma are related to its initial dimensions and temperature, and the atomic weight of the species. Detailed simulations analyzing

  17. Fokker Planck theory for energetic electron deposition in laser fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, Wallace; Colombant, Denis

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a Fokker Planck model to calculate the transport and deposition of energetic electrons, produced for instance by the two plasmon decay instability at the quarter critical surface. In steady state, the Fokker Planck equation reduces to a single universal equation in energy and space, an equation which appears to be quite simple, but which has a rather unconventional boundary condition. The equation is equally valid in planar and spherical geometry, and it depends on only a single parameter, the charge state Z. Hence one can solve for a universal solution, valid for each Z. An asymptotic solution to this equation will be presented, which allows the heating of the main plasma to be calculated from a simple analytical expression. A more accurate solution in terms of a Bessel function expansion will also be presented. From this, one obtains a heating rate which can be simply incorporated into fluid simulations.

  18. Planar omnidirectional reflectors in chalcogenide glass and polymer.

    PubMed

    Decorby, R; Nguyen, H; Dwivedi, P; Clement, T

    2005-08-01

    We have fabricated and tested planar reflectors exhibiting an omnidirectional stop band centered near 1750 nm wavelength. The reflectors are comprised of multiple layers of Ge33As12Se55 chalcogenide glass and polyamide-imide polymer. Glass layers were deposited by thermal evaporation and polymer layers were deposited by spin-casting. Thin film stacks of up to 13 layers showed good planarity and adhesion, which we attribute to the well-matched thermo-mechanical properties of the materials. The optical properties of the reflectors were tested in both transmission and reflection, and the results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Relatively low-temperature processing steps were employed, making these reflectors of interest for integrated optics.

  19. Laser damage resistance of hafnia thin films deposited by electron beam deposition, reactive low voltage ion plating, and dual ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Gallais, Laurent; Capoulade, Jeremie; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille; Cathelinaud, Michel; Koc, Cian; Lequime, Michel

    2008-05-01

    A comparative study is made of the laser damage resistance of hafnia coatings deposited on fused silica substrates with different technologies: electron beam deposition (from Hf or HfO2 starting material), reactive low voltage ion plating, and dual ion beam sputtering.The laser damage thresholds of these coatings are determined at 1064 and 355 nm using a nanosecond pulsed YAG laser and a one-on-one test procedure. The results are associated with a complete characterization of the samples: refractive index n measured by spectrophotometry, extinction coefficient k measured by photothermal deflection, and roughness measured by atomic force microscopy.

  20. Fluence dependent electrical conductivity in aluminium thin films grown by infrared pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollar, Esther; Martínez-Tong, Daniel E.; Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Marco, José F.; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Castillejo, Marta

    2016-11-01

    We studied the effect of laser fluence on the morphology, composition, structure and electric conductivity of deposits generated by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic aluminium target in vacuum using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 15 ns). Upon irradiation for one hour at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, a smooth layer of several tens of nanometres, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was deposited on glass. Surface chemical composition was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and to study the conductivity of deposits both I-V curves and conductive-AFM measurements were performed. Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm2 resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films. Differently, at higher fluences above 7 J/cm2, the films are constituted by metallic aluminium. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. The results demonstrate the possibility to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films.

  1. Study of deposition parameters for the fabrication of ZnO thin films using femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, Jaweria Zartaj; Siraj, Khurram; Latif, Anwar; Murray, Mathew; Jose, Gin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond (fs) pulsed laser deposition (fs-PLD) of ZnO thin film on borosilicate glass substrates is reported in this work. The effect of important fs-PLD parameters such as target-substrate distance, laser pulse energy and substrate temperature on structure, morphology, optical transparency and luminescence of as-deposited films is discussed. XRD analysis reveals that all the films grown using the laser energy range 120-230 μJ are polycrystalline when they are deposited at room temperature in a ~10-5 Torr vacuum. Introducing 0.7 mTorr oxygen pressure, the films show preferred c-axis growth and transform into a single-crystal-like film when the substrate temperature is increased to 100 °C. The scanning electron micrographs show the presence of small nano-size grains at 25 °C, which grow in size to the regular hexagonal shape particles at 100 °C. Optical transmission of the ZnO film is found to increase with an increase in crystal quality. Maximum transmittance of 95 % in the wavelength range 400-1400 nm is achieved for films deposited at 100 °C employing a laser pulse energy of 180 μJ. The luminescence spectra show a strong UV emission band peaked at 377 nm close to the ZnO band gap. The shallow donor defects increase at higher pulse energies and higher substrate temperatures, which give rise to violet-blue luminescence. The results indicate that nano-crystalline ZnO thin films with high crystalline quality and optical transparency can be fabricated by using pulses from fs lasers.

  2. Preventing Technique of Metal Deposition on Optical Devices in Space Diode Laser Welding for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suita, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Kenji; Ohtani, Masato; Shobako, Shinichiro; Terajima, Noboru; Hiraoka, Nobuaki

    In future space developments, the welding in space may be required for the repairs of the ISS and the constructions of lunar base and space structures. The authors have studied the space Gas Hollow Tungsten Arc (GHTA) welding process since 1993. This paper describes the results for space applying the space Diode Laser (DL) welding process which the authors proposed in 2002. It is necessary to prevent the metal deposition on optical devices in order to utilize the space DL welding process in space. The authors studied the preventing technique of metal deposition which covered optical devices with the nozzle and blew the shielding gas out from nozzle outlet. The metal deposition can be reduced by supplying the nozzle with inert gas and blowing the gas out from nozzle outlet. The shielding gas argon perfectly prevents the metal deposition on optical devices when argon pressurizes the nozzle to over 19.9 Pa and spouts out from the nozzle outlet.

  3. Hybrid nanocomposite coatings from metal (Mg alloy)-drug deposited onto medical implant by laser adaptive ablation deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbezov, Valery; Sotirov, Sotir; Serbezov, Svetlin

    2013-03-01

    Drug-eluting medical implants are active implants whose function is to create healing effects. The current requirements for active medical coatings for Drug-eluting medical implants are to be biocompatible, biodegradable, polymer free, mechanically stable and enable a controlled release of one or more drugs and defined degradation. This brings hybrid nanocomposite coatings into focus especially in the field of cardiovascular implants. We studied the properties of Metal (Mg alloy)-Paclitaxel coatings obtained by novel Laser Adaptive Ablation Deposition Technique (LAAD) onto cardiovascular stents from 316 LVM stainless steel material. The morphology and topology of coatings were studied by Bright field / Fluorescence optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Comparative measurements were made of the morphology and topology of hybrid, polymer free nanocomposite coatings deposited by LAAD and polymerdrug coatings deposited by classical spray technique. The coatings obtained by LAAD are homogeneous without damages and cracks. Metal nanoparticles with sizes from 40 nm to 230 nm were obtained in drug matrixes. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) was used for identification of metal nanoparticles presence in hybrid nanocomposites coatings. The new technology opens up possibilities to obtain new hybrid nanocomposite coatings with applications in medicine, pharmacy and biochemistry.

  4. Micro-droplet deposition by UV-pulsed laser induced forward transfer direct writing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bong-Gu

    2012-12-01

    The laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) direct writing method is a modified LIFT method where an absorption coating layer of transparent (donor or holder) substrate is used to transform laser energy into kinetic energy in order to transfer and deposit material onto the acceptor (target). The processes use a third-harmonic generation UV-pulsed laser (355 nm) to transfer material from a metal thin film mixed photoresist coating layer (donor) to a target (acceptor) substrate. Micro-patterning is achieved by scanning the laser beam to transfer material to the acceptor substrate. In this work, we show that it is possible to build micro-structures by micro-deposition using a UV-pulsed LIFT direct writing method. Further, with improvements in accuracy and spatial resolution, we report on accurate laser direct writing micro-patterning with micro-scale resolution, and we first introduce the fundamentals of this LIFT direct writing technology. Finally, we discuss its applications in writing passive components onto various substrate materials.

  5. The growth of nanostructured Cu2ZnSnS4 films by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Sulaiman, Nurul Suhada; Nee, Chen Hon; Yap, Seong Ling; Lee, Yen Sian; Tou, Teck Yong; Yap, Seong Shan

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we investigated on the growth of Cu2ZnSnS4 films by using pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355 nm) ablation of a quaternary Cu2ZnSnS4 target. Depositions were performed at laser fluence from 0.5 to 4 J cm-2. The films were grown at substrate temperature from 27 °C to 300 °C onto glass and silicon substrates. The dependence of the film morphology, composition, and optical properties are studied and discussed with respect to laser fluence and substrate temperature. Composition analysis from energy dispersive X-ray spectral results show that CZTS films with composition near stoichiometric were obtained at an optimized fluence at 2 J cm-2 by 355 nm laser where the absorption coefficient is >104 cm-1, and optical band gap from a Tauc plot was ∼1.9 eV. At high fluence, Cu and Sn rich droplets were detected which affect the overall quality of the films. The presence of the droplets was associated to the high degree of preferential and subsurface melting on the target during high fluence laser ablation. Crystallinity and optical band gap (1.5 eV) were improved when deposition was performed at substrate temperature of 100 °C.

  6. Engineering of pulsed laser deposited calcium phosphate biomaterials in controlled atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukteinis, Saulius E.

    Synthetic calcium phosphates (CAP) such as hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used as regenerative bone graft materials and also as thin films to improve the integration of biomedical implant devices within skeletal tissue. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) can deposit crystalline HA with significant adhesion on titanium biomaterials. However, there are PLD processing constraints due to the complex physical and chemical interactions occurring simultaneously during PLD, which influence ablation plume formation and development. In this investigation PLD CAP films were engineered with a focus on novel decoupling of partial pressure of H2O (g) ( PH2O ) from total background pressure, in combination with substrate heat treatment and laser energy density control. Characterization of these films was performed with X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and Optical Profilometry. In vitro cellular adhesion testing was also performed using osteoblast (MC3T3) cell lines to evaluate adhesion of bone-forming cells on processed PLD CAP samples. Preferred a-axis orientation films were deposited in H2O (g) saturated atmospheres with reduced laser fluence (< 4 J/cm2). Crystalline HA/tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) films were deposited in H2O ( g)-deficient atmospheres with higher laser fluence (> 3 J/cm 2). Varied PH2O resulted in control of biphasic HA/TTCP composition with increasing TTCP at lower PH2O . These were dense continuous films composed of micron-scale particles. Cellular adhesion assays did not demonstrate a significant difference between osteoblast adhesion density on HA films compared with biphasic HA/TTCP films. Room temperature PLD at varied PH2O combined with furnace heat treatment resulted in controlled variation in surface amplitude parameters including surface roughness (S a), root mean square (Sq), peak to valley height (St), and ten-point height ( Sz). These discontinuous films were

  7. Ablation of atheroma by laser energy: a comparative study of the efficacy of different temporal rates of energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Donald J.; Walker, Philip J.; Dadswell, Nicola G.; May, James; Piper, James A.; Wacher, Christine

    1990-06-01

    Laser angioplasty continues to attract interest as a potential method for treating atherosclerotic arterial disease. Current efforts are aimed at finding the most effective combination of laser and delivery system. High energy pulsed ultraviolet or infrared lasers demonstrate good photoablative properties but there remain practical difficulties with the optical fibre delivery. Continuous wave lasers are widely used in conjunction with "hot-tip" fibres for thermal ablation but their direct (optical) ablation efficiency is low, causing significant surrounding thermal damage in soft tissue. While considerable attention has been directed previously at the ablative effects for different laser wavelengths, little systematic study has been made of the efficacy for different temporal rates of energy deposition. We have compared the efficacy for tissue ablation in cadaveric human aorta of three different laser systems with similar wavelengths in the visible (green) but different temporal rates of energy deposition. The laser sources were the continuous wave argon ion laser (514.5 nm), the high pulse energy, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) and the copper vapour laser. The copper vapour laser is a high repetition rate, high average power, pulsed laser emitting in the green (511 nm) and yellow (578 nm) which has temporal characteristics intermediate between those of the Nd:YAG laser and the argon ion laser, and has the potential to be effective both for direct optical ablation and hot-tip thermal ablation.

  8. Role of suprathermal electrons during nanosecond laser energy deposit in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Grua, P.; Hébert, D.; Lamaignère, L.; Rullier, J.-L.

    2014-08-25

    An accurate description of interaction between a nanosecond laser pulse and a wide band gap dielectric, such as fused silica, requires the understanding of energy deposit induced by temperature changes occurring in the material. In order to identify the fundamental processes involved in laser-matter interaction, we have used a 1D computational model that allows us to describe a wide set of physical mechanisms and intended for comparison with specially designed “1D experiments.” We have pointed out that suprathermal electrons are very likely implicated in heat conduction, and this assumption has allowed the model to reproduce the experiments.

  9. A passively mode locked thulium doped fiber laser using bismuth telluride deposited multimode interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M.; Lee, J.; Song, W.; Lee, J. H.; Shin, W.

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a passively mode-locked thulium doped fiber laser using a bismuth telluride deposited multimode interference (MMI) fiber at a wavelength of 1958 nm. Our MMI based saturable absorber was fabricated by fusion splicing with single mode fiber and null core fiber. The center wavelength and insertion loss of MMI fiber were measured to be ~ 1958 nm and 3.4 dB. We observed a passively mode locked thulium doped fiber laser operating at a wavelength of 1958 nm. The temporal pulse width of output pulses is 4.2 ps with repetition rate of 22.7 MHz.

  10. Infrared laser-based monitoring of the silane dissociation during deposition of silicon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlome, R.; Feltrin, A.; Ballif, C.

    2009-05-18

    The silane dissociation efficiency, or depletion fraction, is an important plasma parameter by means of which the film growth rate and the amorphous-to-microcrystalline silicon transition regime can be monitored in situ. In this letter we implement a homebuilt quantum cascade laser-based absorption spectrometer to measure the silane dissociation efficiency in an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. This infrared laser-based diagnostic technique is compact, sensitive, and nonintrusive. Its resolution is good enough to resolve Doppler-broadened rotovibrational absorption lines of silane. The latter feature various absorption strengths, thereby enabling depletion measurements over a wide range of process conditions.

  11. Direct evidence of strongly inhomogeneous energy deposition in target heating with laser-produced ion beams.

    PubMed

    Brambrink, E; Schlegel, T; Malka, G; Amthor, K U; Aléonard, M M; Claverie, G; Gerbaux, M; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Méot, V; Morel, P; Nicolai, P; Scheurer, J N; Tarisien, M; Tikhonchuk, V; Audebert, P

    2007-06-01

    We report on strong nonuniformities in target heating with intense, laser-produced proton beams. The observed inhomogeneity in energy deposition can strongly perturb equation of state (EOS) measurements with laser-accelerated ions which are planned in several laboratories. Interferometric measurements of the target expansion show different expansion velocities on the front and rear surfaces, indicating a strong difference in local temperature. The nonuniformity indicates at an additional heating mechanism, which seems to originate from electrons in the keV range. PMID:17677318

  12. Formation of rubrene nanocrystals by laser ablation in liquids utilizing MAPLE deposited thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Sean M.; Amin, Mitesh; Borchert, James; Jimenez, Richard; Steiner, Matt; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Bubb, Daniel M.

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of the organic semiconductor rubrene were formed utilizing the laser ablation in liquids (LAL) method. Thin-films deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) served as the ablation targets. We note in the case of amorphous films targets, the absorbed energy is below the threshold value needed for ablation; though polycrystalline films irradiated under the same LAL conditions result in ejecta. It is suggested this stems from an increase in the effective absorption through light trapping within crystalline domains. An observed red-shift in the absorption edge is attributed to the polar aqueous environment and to the crystalline phase.

  13. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite on titanium substrate with titania interlayer.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2011-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been used to deposit hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic over titanium substrate with an interlayer of titania. PLD has been identified as a potential candidate for bioceramic coatings over metallic substrates to be used as orthopedic and dental implants because of better process control and preservation of phase identity of the coating component. However, direct deposition of hydroxyapatite on titanium at elevated temperature results in the formation of natural oxide layer along with some perovskites like calcium titanate at the interface. This leads to easy debonding of ceramic layer from the metal and thereby affecting the adhesion strength. In the present study, adherent and stable HA coating over Ti6Al4V was achieved with the help of an interlayer of titania. The interlayer was made to a submicron level and HA was deposited consecutively to a thickness of around one micron by exposing to laser ablation at a substrate temperature of 400°C. The deposited phase was identified to be phase pure HA by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. The mechanical behavior of coating evaluated by scratch test indicates that the adhesion strength of HA coating was improved with the presence of titania interlayer.

  14. Bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyorgy, E.; Grigorescu, S.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Janackovic, D.; Dindune, A.; Kanepe, Z.; Palcevskis, E.; Zdrentu, E. L.; Petrescu, S. M.

    2007-07-01

    Bioactive glass (BG), calcium hydroxyapatite (HA), and ZrO 2 doped HA thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on Ti substrates. An UV KrF * ( λ = 248 nm, τ ≥ 7 ns) excimer laser was used for the multi-pulse irradiation of the targets. The substrates were kept at room temperature or heated during the film deposition at values within the (400-550 °C) range. The depositions were performed in oxygen and water vapor atmospheres, at pressure values in the range (5-40 Pa). The HA coatings were heat post-treated for 6 h in a flux of hot water vapors at the same temperature as applied during deposition. The surface morphology, chemical composition, and crystalline quality of the obtained thin films were studied by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. The films were seeded for in vitro tests with Hek293 (human embryonic kidney) cells that revealed a good adherence on the deposited layers. Biocompatibility tests showed that cell growth was better on HA than on BG thin films.

  15. Low-Temperature Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Chalcogenide Crystals on Liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yubing; Deng, Bing; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xibiao; Yin, Jianbo; Jin, Chuanhong; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2016-03-01

    The growth of high-quality two-dimensional (2D) layered chalcogenide crystals is highly important for practical applications in future electronics, optoelectronics, and photonics. Current route for the synthesis of 2D chalcogenide crystals by vapor deposition method mainly involves an energy intensive high-temperature growth process on solid substrates, often suffering from inhomogeneous nucleation density and grain size distribution. Here, we first demonstrate a facile vapor-phase synthesis of large-area high-quality 2D layered chalcogenide crystals on liquid metal surface with relatively low surface energy at a growth temperature as low as ∼100 °C. Uniform and large-domain-sized 2D crystals of GaSe and GaxIn1-xSe were grown on liquid metal surface even supported on a polyimide film. As-grown 2D GaSe crystals have been fabricated to flexible photodetectors, showing high photoresponse and excellent flexibility. Our strategy of energy-sustainable low-temperature growth on liquid metal surface may open a route to the synthesis of high-quality 2D crystals of Ga-, In-, Bi-, Hg-, Pb-, or Sn-based chalcogenides and halides.

  16. A highly reactive chalcogenide precursor for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Zhu, Dong-Liang; Zhu, Chun-Nan; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are ideal inorganic materials for solar cells and biomedical labeling. In consideration of the hazard and instability of alkylphosphines, the phosphine-free synthetic route has become one of the most important trends in synthesizing selenide QDs. Here we report a novel phase transfer strategy to prepare phosphine-free chalcogenide precursors. The anions in aqueous solution were transferred to toluene via electrostatic interactions between the anions and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The obtained chalcogenide precursors show high reactivity with metal ions in the organic phase and could be applied to the low-temperature synthesis of various metal chalcogenide NCs based on a simple reaction between metal ions (e.g. Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+) and chalcogenide anions (e.g. S2-) in toluene. In addition to chalcogenide anions, other anions such as BH4- ions and AuCl4- ions can also be transferred to the organic phase for synthesizing noble metal NCs (such as Ag and Au NCs).Metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are ideal inorganic materials for solar cells and biomedical labeling. In consideration of the hazard and instability of alkylphosphines, the phosphine-free synthetic route has become one of the most important trends in synthesizing selenide QDs. Here we report a novel phase transfer strategy to prepare phosphine-free chalcogenide precursors. The anions in aqueous solution were transferred to toluene via electrostatic interactions between the anions and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The obtained chalcogenide precursors show high reactivity with metal ions in the organic phase and could be applied to the low-temperature synthesis of various metal chalcogenide NCs based on a simple reaction between metal ions (e.g. Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+) and chalcogenide anions (e.g. S2-) in toluene. In addition to chalcogenide anions, other anions such as BH4- ions and AuCl4- ions can also be transferred to

  17. Properties of BaFe12O19 films prepared by laser deposition with in situ heating and post annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. F.; Song, W. D.

    2000-01-01

    BaFe12O19 films on (001) sapphire substrates are prepared by laser deposition with in situ heating and postannealing. The properties of the films are analyzed by x-ray diffractometry, vibrating sample magnetometer, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The relationship among the coercivity, crystalline orientation, and grain shape and size is discussed. The film with coercivity of 5.1 kOe has been obtained by laser deposition with postannealing. The film with a preferential c-axis orientation normal to the film plane and the grains having good crystallinity with hexagonal symmetry have been obtained by laser deposition with in situ heating.

  18. Laser Ablative Deposition of Polymer Films: A Promise for Sensor Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazevska-Gilev, Jadranka; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Pola, Josef

    There is a continuing interest in the use of polymer films as insulating components of sensors; a number of such films have been prepared by polymer sputtering or vacuum deposition processes involving gas phase pyrolysis/photolysis and by plasma decomposition of monomers. An attractive and rather new technique for the deposition of novel polymer films is IR laser ablation of polymers containing polar groups. We have recently studied this process with poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) and poly(vinyl chloride-co-vinyl acetate) P(VC/VAc) to establish its specific features and differences to conventional pyrolysis.

  19. In vivo evaluation of titanium implants coated with bioactive glass by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Borrajo, Jacinto P; Serra, Julia; González, Pío; León, Betty; Muñoz, Fernando M; López, M

    2007-12-01

    During the past years, different techniques, like chemical treatment, plasma spraying, sputtering, enamelling or sol-gel; and materials, like metals, hydroxylapatite, calcium phosphates, among others, have been applied in different combinations to improve the performance of prostheses. Among the techniques, Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is very promising to produce coatings of bioactive glass on any metal alloy used as implant. In this work the biocompatibility of PLD coatings deposited on titanium substrates was examined by implantation in vivo. Different coating compositions were checked to find the most bioactive that was then applied on titanium and implanted into paravertebral muscle of rabbit.

  20. Preparation of mixed bismuth and iron thin films by pulsed laser deposition using powder targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Ohshima, Tamiko; Yagyu, Yoshihito; Ihara, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuki; Suda, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth iron garnet (Bi3Fe5O12) thin films, for use in magnetic optics, were prepared by a pulsed laser deposition method using Bi and Fe mixed powder targets in oxygen gas. The deposition rate of the film strongly depended on the target mixture. The X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that the prepared films were not Bi3Fe5O12 but Bi-rich films, because of the lower melting temperature of Bi (544 K) compared with that of Fe (1811 K).

  1. Preparation and characterization of YBCO coating on metallic RABiT substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonal, M. R.; Prajapat, C. L.; Igalwar, P. S.; Maji, B. C.; Singh, M. R.; Krishnan, M.

    2016-05-01

    Superconducting YBCO films are coated on metallic Rolling Assisted Bi-axially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) Ni-5wt % W (NiW) (002) substrate using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system. Targets of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and buffer layers of Ceria and 8 mole % Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) of high density are synthesized. At each stage of deposition coatings are characterized by XRD. Transport studies show superconducting nature of YBCO only when two successive buffer layers of YSZ and CeO2 are used.

  2. X-ray absorption study of pulsed laser deposited boron nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiken, A.; Terminello, L.J.; Wong, J.; Doll, G.L.; Sato, T.

    1994-02-02

    B and N K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements have been performed on three BN thin films grown on Si substrates using ion- assisted pulsed laser deposition. Comparison of the films` spectra to those of several single-phase BN powder standards shows that the films consist primarily of sp{sup 2} bonds. Other features in the films`s spectra suggest the presence of secondary phases, possibly cubic or rhombohedral BN. Films grown at higher deposition rates and higher ion-beam voltages are found to be more disordered, in agreement with previous work.

  3. Laser deposition of SmCo thin film and coating on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allocca, L.; Bonavolontà, C.; Giardini, A.; Lopizzo, T.; Morone, A.; Valentino, M.; Verrastro, M. F.; Viggiano, V.

    2008-10-01

    Thin films and coatings of permanent magnetic materials are very important for different electronic and micromechanical applications. This paper deals with the fabrication, using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique, of good quality magnetic SmCo thin films on polycarbonate, steel, silicon and amorphous quartz substrates, for low cost electronic applications like radio frequency identification (RFID) antennas and electromechanical devices for fuel feeding control in the automotive. X-ray fluorescence and magnetic scanning measurements using giant magneto-resistive (GMR) sensors have been performed to study the functional magnetic properties of the deposited thin films.

  4. Multi-stage pulsed laser deposition of aluminum nitride at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duta, L.; Stan, G. E.; Stroescu, H.; Gartner, M.; Anastasescu, M.; Fogarassy, Zs.; Mihailescu, N.; Szekeres, A.; Bakalova, S.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2016-06-01

    We report on multi-stage pulsed laser deposition of aluminum nitride (AlN) on Si (1 0 0) wafers, at different temperatures. The first stage of deposition was carried out at 800 °C, the optimum temperature for AlN crystallization. In the second stage, the deposition was conducted at lower temperatures (room temperature, 350 °C or 450 °C), in ambient Nitrogen, at 0.1 Pa. The synthesized structures were analyzed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). GIXRD measurements indicated that the two-stage deposited AlN samples exhibited a randomly oriented wurtzite structure with nanosized crystallites. The peaks were shifted to larger angles, indicative for smaller inter-planar distances. Remarkably, TEM images demonstrated that the high-temperature AlN "seed" layers (800 °C) promoted the growth of poly-crystalline AlN structures at lower deposition temperatures. When increasing the deposition temperature, the surface roughness of the samples exhibited values in the range of 0.4-2.3 nm. SE analyses showed structures which yield band gap values within the range of 4.0-5.7 eV. A correlation between the results of single- and multi-stage AlN depositions was observed.

  5. Low-power-threshold photonic saturable absorber in nonlinear chalcogenide glass.

    PubMed

    Minardi, S; Cheng, G; D'Amico, C; Stoian, R

    2015-01-15

    We experimentally demonstrate controllable nonlinear modulation of optical guiding in ultrafast laser-written evanescently coupled waveguide arrays in bulk gallium lanthanum sulfide chalcogenide glass. The intensity-dependent response is validated by simulating light propagation in waveguide arrays with instantaneous Kerr nonlinearity using a discrete-continuous spatiotemporal unidirectional Maxwell equation model. The intensity-driven modulation of transmission in multicore structures acts as a potential saturable absorber at kilowatt threshold levels. PMID:25679858

  6. Minority carrier device comprising a passivating layer including a Group 13 element and a chalcogenide component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barron, Andrew R. (Inventor); Hepp, Aloysius F. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip P. (Inventor); MacInnes, Andrew N. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A minority carrier device includes at least one junction of at least two dissimilar materials, at least one of which is a semiconductor, and a passivating layer on at least one surface of the device. The passivating layer includes a Group 13 element and a chalcogenide component. Embodiments of the minority carrier device include, for example, laser diodes, light emitting diodes, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and solar cells.

  7. On-chip mid-infrared gas detection using chalcogenide glass waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z.; Lin, P.; Singh, V.; Kimerling, L.; Hu, J.; Richardson, K.; Agarwal, A.; Tan, D. T. H.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate an on-chip sensor for room-temperature detection of methane gas using a broadband spiral chalcogenide glass waveguide coupled with off-chip laser and detector. The waveguide is fabricated using UV lithography patterning and lift-off after thermal evaporation. We measure the intensity change due to the presence and concentration of methane gas in the mid-infrared (MIR) range. This work provides an approach for broadband planar MIR gas sensing.

  8. Migration of elements in colour layers deposited on a ceramic substrate under the influence of laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewska, Danuta; Synowiec, Barbara; Olszyna, Andrzej; Marczak, Jan; Sarzyński, Antoni; Strzelec, Marek

    This paper summarizes the experimental results in the laser firing of colour agents on ceramic substrates. White glazed and fired ceramic plates were used as the substrate, while the deposited powders were mixtures containing ceramic colours and other colour agents. Various geometric patterns were deposited by a cw fiber Yb:YAG laser with speed controlled by a set of galvanometric scanners. The results, analyzed by means of optical microscopy, SEM EDS and laser profilometry explained the visually observed changes in pattern colours caused by the migration of pigment particles (characteristic elements) and allowed development of proper laser process.

  9. Chalcogenide Nanoionic-based Radio Frequency Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James (Inventor); Lee, Richard (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A nonvolatile nanoionic switch is disclosed. A thin layer of chalcogenide glass engages a substrate and a metal selected from the group of silver and copper photo-dissolved in the chalcogenide glass. A first oxidizable electrode and a second inert electrode engage the chalcogenide glass and are spaced apart from each other forming a gap therebetween. A direct current voltage source is applied with positive polarity applied to the oxidizable electrode and negative polarity applied to the inert electrode which electrodeposits silver or copper across the gap closing the switch. Reversing the polarity of the switch dissolves the electrodeposited metal and returns it to the oxidizable electrode. A capacitor arrangement may be formed with the same structure and process.

  10. Chalcogenide Nanoionic-Based Radio Frequency Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James (Inventor); Lee, Richard (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A nonvolatile nanoionic switch is disclosed. A thin layer of chalcogenide glass engages a substrate and a metal selected from the group of silver and copper photo-dissolved in the chalcogenide glass. A first oxidizable electrode and a second inert electrode engage the chalcogenide glass and are spaced apart from each other forming a gap there between. A direct current voltage source is applied with positive polarity applied to the oxidizable electrode and negative polarity applied to the inert electrode which electrodeposits silver or copper across the gap closing the switch. Reversing the polarity of the switch dissolves the electrodeposited metal and returns it to the oxidizable electrode. A capacitor arrangement may be formed with the same structure and process.

  11. Resonant vibrational excitation of ethylene molecules in laser-assisted diamond deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, L. S.; Zhou, Y. S.; Wang, M. X.; Gao, Y.; Liu, L.; Silvain, J. F.; Lu, Y. F.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of resonant vibrational excitation of ethylene molecules in combustion chemical vapor deposition of diamond was investigated. Resonant vibrational excitation of the CH2-wagging mode (a type c fundamental band, υ7, at 949.3 cm-1) in ethylene molecules was achieved by using a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser with a matching wavelength at 10.532 µm. By comparing to laser irradiation at off-resonance wavelengths, an on-resonance vibrational excitation is more efficient in energy coupling, increasing flame temperatures, accelerating the combustion reactions, and promoting diamond deposition. An enhanced rate of 5.7 was achieved in terms of the diamond growth rate with an improved diamond quality index at a high flame temperature under a resonant excitation of the CH2-wagging mode. This study demonstrates that a resonant vibrational excitation is an effective route for coupling energy into the gas phase reactions and promoting the diamond synthesis process.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of chromium-doped zinc selenide thin films for mid-infrared applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. E.; Camata, R. P.; Fedorov, V. V.; Mirov, S. B.

    2008-05-01

    We have grown Cr doped ZnSe thin films by pulsed laser deposition on GaAs, sapphire and Si substrates through KrF excimer laser ablation of hot-pressed targets containing appropriate stoichiometric mixtures of Zn, Se, and Cr species and hot-pressed ceramic targets made of ZnSe and CrSe powders in vacuum and in an He background environment (10-4 Torr). Deposited films were analyzed using X-ray diffraction to determine crystallinity and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence to confirm Cr incorporation into the films. Photoluminescence measurements on the films show intracenter Cr2+ emission in the technologically important 2 2.6 μm spectral range.

  13. Negative ions: The overlooked species in thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, M.; Bator, M.; Lippert, T.; Schneider, C. W.; Wokaun, A.; Doebeli, M.

    2011-11-07

    Plasma plume species from a ceramic La{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} target were studied by plasma mass spectrometry as a function of laser fluence, background gas, and deposition pressure to understand the interplay between plasma composition and oxide thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition. The plume composition reveals a significant contribution of up to 24% of negative ions, most notably using a N{sub 2}O background. The significance of negative ions for thin film growth is shown for La{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} films grown in different background conditions where the best structural properties coincide with the largest amount of negative plasma species.

  14. Characterization of Environmental Stability of Pulsed Laser Deposited Oxide Ceramic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, THADM

    2004-03-02

    A systematic investigation of candidate hydrogen permeation materials applied to a substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition has been performed. The investigation focused on application of leading permeation-resistant materials types (oxide, carbides, and metals) on a stainless steel substrate. and evaluation of the stability of the applied coatings. Type 304L stainless steel substrates were coated with aluminum oxide, chromium oxide, and aluminum. Characterization of the coating-substrate system adhesion was performed using scratch adhesion testing and microindentation. Coating stability and environmental susceptibility were evaluated for two conditions-air at 350 degrees Celsius and Ar-H2 at 350 degrees Celsius for up to 100 hours. Results from this study have shown the pulsed laser deposition process to be an extremely versatile technology that is capable of producing a sound coating/substrate system for a wide variety of coating materials.

  15. Vacancies ordered in screw form (VOSF) and layered indium selenide thin film deposition by laser back ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kenneth M.; Wiley, William R.; Venkatasubramanian, Eswaranand; Ohuchi, Fumio

    2009-09-01

    Indium selenide thin films are important due to their applications in non-volatile memory and solar cells. In this work, we present an initial study of a new application of deposition-site selective laser back ablation (LBA) for making thin films of In 2Se 3. Invacuo annealing and subsequent characterization of the films by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that control of substrate temperature during deposition and post-deposition annealing temperature is critical in determining the phase and composition of the films. The initial laser fluence and target film thickness determine the amount of material deposited onto the substrate.

  16. Vacancies Ordered in Screw Form (VOSF) and Layered Indium Selenide Thin Film Deposition by Laser Back Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Kenneth M.; Wiley, William R.; Venkatasubramanian, Eswaranand; Ohuchi, Fumio S.

    2009-09-30

    Indium selenide thin films are important due to their applications in non-volatile memory and solar cells. In this work, we present an initial study of a new application of deposition-site selective laser back ablation (LBA) for making thin films of In2Se3. In-vacuo annealing and subsequent characterization of the films by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that control of substrate temperature during deposition and post-deposition annealing temperature is critical in determining the phase and composition of the films. The initial laser fluence and target film thickness determine the amount of material deposited onto the substrate.

  17. Enhanced localized superconductivity in Sr2RuO4 thin film by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Massarotti, D.; Vickers, M. E.; Kursumovic, A.; Di Bernardo, A.; Robinson, J. W. A.; Tafuri, F.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.; Blamire, M. G.

    2016-09-01

    Superconducting c-axis-oriented Sr2RuO4 thin film has been fabricated using pulsed laser deposition. Although the superconductivity is localized, the onset critical temperature is enhanced over the bulk value. X-ray microstructural analysis of Sr2RuO4 superconducting and non-superconducting thin films suggests the existence of the localized stacking faults and an overall c-axis lattice expansion which may account for the locally enhanced superconductivity.

  18. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Haniam, P.; Kunsombat, C.; Chiangga, S.; Songsasen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  19. Synthesis of cobalt oxides thin films fractal structures by laser chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Haniam, P; Kunsombat, C; Chiangga, S; Songsasen, A

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  20. Effect of deposition temperature on electron-beam evaporated polycrystalline silicon thin-film and crystallized by diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J. Varalmov, S.; Huang, J.; Green, M. A.; Kim, K.

    2014-06-16

    The effects of the deposition temperature on the microstructure, crystallographic orientation, and electrical properties of a 10-μm thick evaporated Si thin-film deposited on glass and crystallized using a diode laser, are investigated. The crystallization of the Si thin-film is initiated at a deposition temperature between 450 and 550 °C, and the predominant (110) orientation in the normal direction is found. Pole figure maps confirm that all films have a fiber texture and that it becomes stronger with increasing deposition temperature. Diode laser crystallization is performed, resulting in the formation of lateral grains along the laser scan direction. The laser power required to form lateral grains is higher in case of films deposited below 450 °C for all scan speeds. Pole figure maps show 75% occupancies of the (110) orientation in the normal direction when the laser crystallized film is deposited above 550 °C. A higher density of grain boundaries is obtained when the laser crystallized film is deposited below 450 °C, which limits the solar cell performance by n = 2 recombination, and a performance degradation is expected due to severe shunting.

  1. Pulsed laser deposition of Mg-Al layered double hydroxide with Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A.; Birjega, R.; Vlad, A.; Luculescu, C.; Epurescu, G.; Stokker-Cheregi, F.; Dinescu, M.; Zavoianu, R.; Pavel, O. D.

    2013-03-01

    Powdered layered double hydroxides (LDHs)—also known as hydrotalcite-like (HT)—compounds have been widely studied due to their applications as catalysts, anionic exchangers or host materials for inorganic or organic molecules. Assembling thin films of nano-sized LDHs onto flat solid substrates is an expanding area of research, with promising applications as sensors, corrosion-resistant coatings, components in optical and magnetic devices. The exploitation of LDHs as vehicles to carry dispersed metal nanoparticles onto a substrate is a new approach to obtain composite thin films with prospects for biomedical and optical applications. We report the deposition of thin films of Ag nanoparticles embedded in a Mg-Al layered double hydroxide matrix by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Ag-LDH powder was prepared by co-precipitation at supersaturation and pH = 10 using aqueous solutions of Mg and Al nitrates, Na hydroxide and carbonate, and AgNO3, having atomic ratios of Mg/Al = 3 and Ag/Al = 0.55. The target to be used in laser ablation experiments was a dry pressed pellet obtained from the prepared Ag-LDH powder. Three different wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser (266, 532 and 1064 nm) working at a repetition rate of 10 Hz were used. X-Ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and secondary ions mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to investigate the structure, surface morphology and composition of the deposited films.

  2. Characterization of Li deposition on the first wall of EAST using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Ran; Li, Cong; Wang, Hongbei; Ding, Hongbin; Zhuo, Haishan; Wu, Jing; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2013-07-01

    Our recent investigations have indicated that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) may have great potential in the monitoring of the deposition features of plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Detailed information on these PFM can be obtained in real time by analyzing the spectra from 200 to 980 nm. The depth distribution of the main elements from PFMs of the EAST divertor was here investigated. The decrease in the concentrations of main deposed elements (such as Li, Fe, and Cr) were clearly observable after the first ten laser pulses at a laser power density of 5 × 109 W/cm2. The concentrations of substrate elements were found to be uniformly distributed along the depth axis. The use of LIBS for the characterization of quasi three-dimensional multielement distribution maps of the deposition of impurities in the gaps between divertor tiles is here presented. This significantly improves the understanding of the Li deposition behavior of EAST.

  3. Accuracy of Nanoscale Pitch Standards Fabricated by Laser-Focused Atomic Deposition

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Jabez J.; Anderson, William R.; Bradley, Curtis C.; Walkiewicz, Mirek; Celotta, Robert J.; Jurdik, Erich; Deslattes, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    The pitch accuracy of a grating formed by laser-focused atomic deposition is evaluated from the point of view of fabricating nanoscale pitch standard artifacts. The average pitch obtained by the process, nominally half the laser wavelength, is simply traceable with small uncertainty to an atomic frequency and hence can be known with very high accuracy. An error budget is presented for a Cr on sapphire sample, showing that a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0049 nm, or a relative uncertainty of 2.3 × 10−5, is readily obtained, provided the substrate temperature does not change. Precision measurements of the diffraction of the 351.1 nm argon ion laser line from such an artifact are also presented. These yield an average pitch of (212.7777 ± 0.0069) nm, which agrees well with the expected value, as corrected for thermal contraction, of (212.7705 ± 0.0049) nm. PMID:27413597

  4. Induced crystallization in CW laser-irradiated sol-gel deposited titania films

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, G.J.; Hess, N.J.

    1993-12-31

    Isothermal annealing of amorphous TiO{sub 2} films deposited from acidic sol-gel precursor solutions results in film densification and concomitant increase in refractive index. Subsequent heating above 300C leads to irreversible transformation to an anatase crystalline phase. Similar phenomena occur when such amorphous films are subjected to focused cw laser irradiation. Controlled variations in laser fluence are used to densify or crystallize selected regions of the film. Low fluence conditioning leads to the evolution of a subtle nanograin-size morphology, evident in AFM images, which appears to retard subsequent film crystallization when such regions are subjected to higher laser fluence. Time-resolved Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize irradiated regions in order to follow the crystallization kinetics, assess phase homogeneity, and evaluate accompanying changes in residual film stress.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition an alternative route to the growth of magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenner, A. G.; Hayes, J. P.; Stone, L. A.; Snelling, H. V.; Greenough, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    A variety of magnetic materials that have potential for sensor and microactuator applications have been grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Studies have been carried out to assess the influence of parameters such as the incident laser fluence (J cm -2) on the magnetic and magnetoelastic responses of these films. Magnetic characterisation and magnetostriction measurements were made by vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and capacitance dilatometry respectively. No obvious trend was shown, in all the magnetic systems studied, between fluence and magnetic properties such as magnetisation or coercivity. Room temperature in-plane magnetostrictions of ˜800 ppm have been measured from thin films (˜200 nm) of the rare earth intermetallic compound Terfenol-D (Tb 0.3Dy 0.7Fe 1.95). The potential of post production laser processing has been evaluated on the Fe-Zr alloy system and the results point to the ability to tailor the magnetic response of a film for a specific application.

  6. Observation of two distinct components during pulsed laser deposition of high T(c) superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, T.; Wu, X. D.; Inam, A.; Wachtman, J. B.

    1988-04-01

    Using Rutherford backscattering technique, the angular distribution of the composition and thickness of the Y-Ba-Cu oxide film deposited by firing excimer laser (30 ns, 248 nm) pulses at a stoichiometric YBa2Cu3O(7-x) pellet was measured. The angular distribution consisted of two distinct components: one a cos theta component, a result of evaporation, and the other a highly forward directed component, a result of a secondary ejection process. The evaporated component is nonstoichiometric, as one would expect, whereas the forward-directed component has a composition close to that of the pellet. Further, the forward-directed stoichiometric component increases with the laser energy density in comparison with the evaporated component. These observations are discussed in the context of current models of laser-induced material ejection at surfaces.

  7. Laser-assisted nanomaterial deposition, nanomanufacturing, in situ monitoring and associated apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Hwang, David J; Minor, Andrew M

    2013-11-12

    Laser-assisted apparatus and methods for performing nanoscale material processing, including nanodeposition of materials, can be controlled very precisely to yield both simple and complex structures with sizes less than 100 nm. Optical or thermal energy in the near field of a photon (laser) pulse is used to fabricate submicron and nanometer structures on a substrate. A wide variety of laser material processing techniques can be adapted for use including, subtractive (e.g., ablation, machining or chemical etching), additive (e.g., chemical vapor deposition, selective self-assembly), and modification (e.g., phase transformation, doping) processes. Additionally, the apparatus can be integrated into imaging instruments, such as SEM and TEM, to allow for real-time imaging of the material processing.

  8. Deposition of high quality TiN films by excimer laser ablation in reactive gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailescu, I. N.; Chitica, N.; Nistor, L. C.; Popescu, M.; Teodorescu, V. S.; Ursu, I.; Andrei, A.; Barborica, A.; Luches, A.; De Giorgi, M. Luisa; Perrone, A.; Dubreuil, B.; Hermann, J.

    1993-11-01

    A new laser method is proposed for the deposition of high purity, hard fcc TiN layers of unlimited thickness. The film thickness can be very finely controlled mainly through the intermediary of the number of applied laser pulses as the deposition rate is of only 0.02-0.05 nm/pulse. The ablation is promoted from a Ti target by high intensity multipulse excimer laser irradiation in a low pressure N2 ambient gas while the forming compound is collected on a Si single-crystalline wafer. The best results have been obtained for an ambient pressure of p=10-30 mTorr and a distance between the target and support of d=10 mm. It is shown that the formation of a liquid phase within the irradiated zone, maintained even after the end of a laser pulse, is the most important requisite for TiN formation. TiN is then ablated as a stoichio- metric phase.

  9. Laser deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on glass fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, J.; Shahidi, S.; Goba, M. M.

    2013-02-01

    In this research work light laser irradiation was used for deposition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the surface of glass mat. For this purpose TiO2 nanoparticles were evenly applied on the surface of a glass fiber mat. The glass fiber mat containing the metals was then irradiated with the laser light beam (100 μs). The morphology of the fabrics was observed using a Scanning Electron Microscope. An X-ray fluorescence spectrum and energy dispersive X-ray were used for elemental analysis. Also mechanical properties and air permeability of the irradiated samples were analyzed and the results show that both tenacity and elongation of laser irradiated sample are reduced but the air permeability is improved after laser irradiation. The photocatalytic activities of TiO2 deposited glass fabrics were assessed by analyzing the decrease in concentration of the Orange II as a colorant after exposure to UV irradiation. The results clarify that the Orange II concentration decreases continuously, concomitant with the UV irradiation time up to 270 min.

  10. Nanoindentation study of niobium nitride thin films on niobium fabricated by reactive pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, Md Abdullah Al; Farha, Ashraf Hassan; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.

    2015-03-01

    Nanomechanical and structural properties of NbNx films deposited on single crystal Nb using pulsed laser deposition for different substrate temperature were previously investigated as a function of film/substrate crystal structure (Mamun et al. (2012) [30]). In this study we focus on the effect of laser fluences and background nitrogen pressure on the nanomechanical and structural properties of NbNx films. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the thin films were tested by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Using nanoindentation, the investigation of the nanomechanical properties revealed that the hardness of the NbNx films was directly influenced by the laser fluence for low background nitrogen pressure, whereas the nanomechanical hardness showed no apparent correlation with laser fluence at high background nitrogen pressure. The NbNx film hardness measured at 30% film thickness increased from 14.0 ± 1.3 to 18.9 ± 2.4 GPa when the laser fluence was increased from 15 to 25 J/cm2 at 10.7 Pa N2 pressure. X-ray diffraction showed NbNx films with peaks that correspond to δ-NbN cubic and β-Nb2N hexagonal phases in addition to the δ'-NbN hexagonal phase. Finally, increasing the laser fluence resulted in NbNx films with larger grain sizes.

  11. Modeling of the Effect of Path Planning on Thermokinetic Evolutions in Laser Powder Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroozmehr, Ehsan; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2011-07-01

    A thermokinetic model coupling finite-element heat transfer with transformation kinetics is developed to determine the effect of deposition patterns on the phase-transformation kinetics of laser powder deposition (LPD) process of a hot-work tool steel. The finite-element model is used to define the temperature history of the process used in an empirical-based kinetic model to analyze the tempering effect of the heating and cooling cycles of the deposition process. An area is defined to be covered by AISI H13 on a substrate of AISI 1018 with three different deposition patterns: one section, two section, and three section. The two-section pattern divides the area of the one-section pattern into two sections, and the three-section pattern divides that area into three sections. The results show that dividing the area under deposition into smaller areas can influence the phase transformation kinetics of the process and, consequently, change the final hardness of the deposited material. The two-section pattern shows a higher average hardness than the one-section pattern, and the three-section pattern shows a fully hardened surface without significant tempered zones of low hardness. To verify the results, a microhardness test and scanning electron microscope were used.

  12. Process development for the manufacture of an integrated dispenser cathode assembly using laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ryan William

    2005-07-01

    Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition (LCVD) has been shown to have great potential for the manufacture of small, complex, two or three dimensional metal and ceramic parts. One of the most promising applications of the technology is in the fabrication of an integrated dispenser cathode assembly. This application requires the deposition of a boron nitride-molybdenum composite structure. In order to realize this structure, work was done to improve the control and understanding of the LCVD process and to determine experimental conditions conducive to the growth of the required materials. A series of carbon fiber and line deposition studies were used to characterize process-shape relationships and study the kinetics of carbon LCVD. These studies provided a foundation for the fabrication of the first high aspect ratio multi-layered LCVD wall structures. The kinetics studies enabled the formulation of an advanced computational model in the FLUENT CFD package for studying energy transport, mass and momentum transport, and species transport within a forced flow LCVD environment. The model was applied to two different material systems and used to quantify deposition rates and identify rate-limiting regimes. A computational thermal-structural model was also developed using the ANSYS software package to study the thermal stress state within an LCVD deposit during growth. Georgia Tech's LCVD system was modified and used to characterize both boron nitride and molybdenum deposition independently. The focus was on understanding the relations among process parameters and deposit shape. Boron nitride was deposited using a B3 N3H6-N2 mixture and growth was characterized by sporadic nucleation followed by rapid bulk growth. Molybdenum was deposited from the MoCl5-H2 system and showed slow, but stable growth. Each material was used to grow both fibers and lines. The fabrication of a boron nitride-molybdenum composite was also demonstrated. In sum, this work served to both advance the

  13. Laser ray tracing and power deposition on an unstructured three-dimensional grid

    PubMed

    Kaiser

    2000-01-01

    A scheme is presented for laser beam evolution and power deposition on three-dimensional unstructured grids composed of hexahedra, prisms, pyramids, and tetrahedra. The geometrical-optics approximation to the electromagnetic wave equation is used to follow propagation of a collection of discrete rays used to represent the beam(s). Ray trajectory equations are integrated using a method that is second order in time, exact for a constant electron-density gradient, and capable of dealing with density discontinuities that arise in certain hydrodynamics formulations. Power deposition by inverse-bremsstrahlung is modeled with a scheme based on Gaussian quadrature to accommodate a deposition rate whose spatial variation is highly nonuniform. Comparisons with analytic results are given for a density ramp in three dimensions, and a "quadratic-well" density trough in two dimensions. PMID:11046339

  14. Pulsed laser deposition of NiMnGa thin films on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakola, A.; Heczko, O.; Jaakkola, A.; Kajava, T.; Ullakko, K.

    Thin films of the magnetic shape-memory (MSM) material NiMnGa have been deposited on Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The --200 300nm-thick films were prepared at substrate temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 650 °C and at different background Ar pressures. Large saturation magnetizations, up to 60% of the bulk value, were measured for the films. Only the films deposited in vacuum or at Ar pressures below 10-3 mbar and at temperatures between 500 °C and 600 °C were ferromagnetic. The films are mainly crystallized in the austenitic phase and they have a smooth surface with a low droplet density (0.01 μm-2). The magnetization and surface quality are sufficient that the films could be utilized in the realization of thin-film MSM devices.

  15. High-rate laser metal deposition of Inconel 718 component using low heat-input approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, C. Y.; Scudamore, R. J.; Allen, J.

    Currently many aircraft and aero engine components are machined from billets or oversize forgings. This involves significant cost, material wastage, lead-times and environmental impacts. Methods to add complex features to another component or net-shape surface would offer a substantial cost benefit. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD), currently being applied to the repair of worn or damaged aero engine components, was attempted in this work as an alternative process route, to build features onto a base component, because of its low heat input capability. In this work, low heat input and high-rate deposition was developed to deposit Inconel 718 powder onto thin plates. Using the optimised process parameters, a number of demonstrator components were successfully fabricated.

  16. Frequency dependent FMR studies on pulsed laser ablated YIG films deposited on (111) GGG substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoi, B.; Venkataramani, N.; Aiyar, R. P. R. C.; Prasad, Shiva; Kostylev, Mikhail; Stamps, R. L.

    2013-02-01

    Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) studies were carried out as a function of frequency on ex-situ post-annealed (Ta: 700 °C and 850 °C) YIG films. The films were deposited at TS: 750 °C on polished single crystal (111) GGG substrate using pulsed laser deposition. Both the films (Ta: 700 °C, 850 °C) shows a in-plane FMR line-width (ΔH) of 40 Oe and 50 Oe respectively which remains constant over a broad frequency range (8 GHz-20 GHz). On the other hand, a linear increment in in-plane resonance field (HR) has been observed with the increase in frequency of RF signal. The effective saturation magnetization (4πMeff) has been estimated for both the films using Kittel's equations and is found as 90% of the bulk value for the film deposited at 750 °C, annealed at 700 °C.

  17. Research Update: Stoichiometry controlled oxide thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Groenen, Rik; Smit, Jasper; Orsel, Kasper; Vailionis, Arturas; Bastiaens, Bert; Huijben, Mark; Boller, Klaus; Rijnders, Guus; Koster, Gertjan

    2015-07-01

    The oxidation of species in the plasma plume during pulsed laser deposition controls both the stoichiometry as well as the growth kinetics of the deposited SrTiO{sub 3} thin films, instead of the commonly assumed mass distribution in the plasma plume and the kinetic energy of the arriving species. It was observed by X-ray diffraction that SrTiO{sub 3} stoichiometry depends on the composition of the background gas during deposition, where in a relative small pressure range between 10{sup −2} mbars and 10{sup −1} mbars oxygen partial pressure, the resulting film becomes fully stoichiometric. Furthermore, upon increasing the oxygen (partial) pressure, the growth mode changes from 3D island growth to a 2D layer-by-layer growth mode as observed by reflection high energy electron diffraction.

  18. Atomic Oxygen Sensors Based on Nanograin ZnO Films Prepared by Pulse Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunfei; Chen Xuekang; Li Zhonghua; Zheng Kuohai; Wang Lanxi; Feng Zhanzu; Yang Shengsheng

    2009-01-05

    High-quality nanograin ZnO thin films were deposited on c-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates by pulse laser deposition (PLD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the samples. The structural and morphological properties of ZnO films under different deposition temperature have been investigated before and after atomic oxygen (AO) treatment. XRD has shown that the intensity of the (0 0 2) peak increases and its FWHM value decreases after AO treatment. The AO sensing characteristics of nano ZnO film also has been investigated in a ground-based atomic oxygen simulation facility. The results show that the electrical conductivity of nanograin ZnO films decreases with increasing AO fluence and that the conductivity of the films can be recovered by heating.

  19. Oxygen reduction activity of N-doped carbon-based films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Shunya; Kawaguchi, Kazuhiro; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Masahito

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-based films with nitrogen species on their surface were prepared on a glassy carbon (GC) substrate for application as a non-platinum cathode catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Cobalt and carbon were deposited in the presence of N 2 gas using a pulsed laser deposition method and then the metal Co was removed by HCl-washing treatment. Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was electrochemically determined using a rotating disk electrode system in which the film samples on the GC substrate were replaceable. The ORR activity increased with the temperature of the GC substrate during deposition. A carbon-based film prepared at 600 °C in the presence of N 2 at 66.7 Pa showed the highest ORR activity among the tested samples (0.66 V vs. NHE). This film was composed of amorphous carbons doped with pyridine type nitrogen atoms on its surface.

  20. Removal Of Surface Deposits And Intrinsic Stains Of Teeth With Fiber Optics Of Nd-YAG Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marioka, Toshio; Maseda, Yusaku; Oho, Takahiko

    1987-03-01

    An impact of the Q-switched Nd-YAG laser caused bleaching of stains and removal of deposits and pit & fissure contents of teeth. No chalky spots or craters were found microscopically on the enamel surface after irradiation. These results strongly suggested the clinical applicability of Q-switched Nd-YAG laser in removing dental deposits, intrinsic pigmentation of enamel, and pit and fissure contents of molar.

  1. Ultrafast Pulsed-Laser Applications for Semiconductor Thin Film Deposition and Graphite Photoexfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oraiqat, Ibrahim Malek

    This thesis focuses on the application of ultrafast lasers in nanomaterial synthesis. Two techniques are investigated: Ultrafast Pulsed Laser Deposition (UFPLD) of semiconductor nanoparticle thin films and ultrafast laser scanning for the photoexfoliation of graphite to synthesize graphene. The importance of the work is its demonstration that the process of making nanoparticles with ultrafast lasers is extremely versatile and can be applied to practically any material and substrate. Moreover, the process is scalable to large areas: by scanning the laser with appropriate optics it is possible to coat square meters of materials (e.g., battery electrodes) quickly and inexpensively with nanoparticles. With UFPLD we have shown there is a nanoparticle size dependence on the laser fluence and the optical emission spectrum of the plume can be used to determine a fluence that favors smaller nanoparticles, in the range of 10-20 nm diameter and 3-5 nm in height. We have also demonstrated there are two structural types of particles: amorphous and crystalline, as verified with XRD and Raman spectroscopy. When deposited as a coating, the nanoparticles can behave as a quasi-continuous thin film with very promising carrier mobilities, 5-52 cm2/Vs, substantially higher than for other spray-coated thin film technologies and orders of magnitude larger than those of colloidal quantum dot (QD) films. Scanning an ultrafast laser over the surface of graphite was shown to produce both filamentary structures and sheets which are semi-transparent to the secondary-electron beam in SEM. These sheets resemble layers of graphene produced by exfoliation. An ultrafast laser "printing" configuration was also identified by coating a thin, transparent substrate with graphite particles and irradiating the back of the film for a forward transfer of material onto a receiving substrate. A promising application of laser-irradiated graphene coatings was investigated, namely to improve the charge

  2. A simple solution to the problem of effective utilisation of the target material for pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzanyan, A S; Kuzanyan, A A; Petrosyan, V A; Pilosyan, S Kh; Grasiuk, A Z

    2013-12-31

    The factors determining the efficiency of the target material utilisation for pulsed laser deposition of films are considered. The target volume is calculated, which is evaporated in the ablation process by the focused laser radiation having a rectangular form. The new device is suggested and developed for obtaining thin films by the method of laser deposition, which is specific in the employment of a simple optical system mounted outside a deposition chamber that comprises two lenses and the diaphragm and focuses the laser beam onto a target in the form of a sector-like spot. Thin films of CuO and YBaCuO were deposited with this device. Several deposition cycles revealed that the target material is consumed uniformly from the entire surface of the target. A maximal spread of the target thickness was not greater than ±2% both prior to deposition and after it. The device designed provides a high coefficient of the target material utilisation efficiency. (laser deposition of thin films)

  3. Electroneutral intrinsic point defects in cadmium chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Kharif, Ya.L.; Kudryashov, N.I.; Strunilina, T.A.

    1987-12-01

    Low-mobility electrically neutral intrinsic point defects were observed in cadmium chalcogenides. It was shown that the concentration of these defects is proportional to the cadmium vapor pressure to the 1/3 power at a constant temperature, and a mechanism for the formation of these defects were proposed.

  4. Development of a high magnetic field assisted pulsed laser deposition system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kejun; Dai, Jianming; Wu, Wenbin; Zhang, Peng; Zuo, Xuzhong; Zhou, Shu; Zhu, Xuebin; Sheng, Zhigao; Liang, Changhao; Sun, Yuping

    2015-09-01

    A high magnetic field assisted pulsed laser deposition (HMF-PLD) system has been developed to in situ grow thin films in a high magnetic field up to 10 T. In this system, a specially designed PLD cylindrical vacuum chamber is horizontally located in the bore configuration of a superconducting magnet with a bore diameter of 200 mm. To adjust the focused pulsed laser into the target in such a narrow PLD vacuum chamber, an ingeniously built-in laser leading-in chamber is employed, including a laser mirror with a reflection angle of 65° and a damage threshold up to 3.4 J/cm(2). A laser alignment system consisting of a built-in video-unit leading-in chamber and a low-energy alignment laser is applied to monitor and align the pulsed laser propagation in the PLD vacuum chamber. We have grown La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) thin films on (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 (001) [LSAT (001)] substrates by HMF-PLD. The results show that the nanostructures of the LSMO films can be tuned from an epitaxially continuous film structure without field to a vertically aligned nanorod structure with an applied high magnetic field above 5 T, and the dimension size of the nanorods can be tuned by the strength of the magnetic field. The associated magnetic anisotropy is found to be highly dependent on the nanorod structures. We show how the HMF-PLD provides an effective route toward tuning the nanostructures and the physical properties of functional thin films, giving it an important role in development of nanodevices and their application. PMID:26429478

  5. Laser metal deposition of TiC/Inconel 718 composites with tailored interfacial microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Chen; Gu, Dongdong; Dai, Donghua; Gasser, Andres; Weisheit, Andreas; Kelbassa, Ingomar; Zhong, Minlin; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2013-12-01

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) was applied to deposit Inconel 718 metal matrix composites reinforced with TiC particles. The influence of laser energy input per unit length on constitution phases, microstructures, hardness, and wear performance of LMD-processed TiC/Inconel 718 composites was studied. It revealed that the LMD-processed composites consisted of γ Ni-Cr solid solution matrix, the intermetallic precipitation phase γ‧, and the TiC reinforcing phase. For the laser energy input per unit length of 80-120 kJ/m, a coherent interfacial layer with the thickness of 0.8-1.4 μm was formed between TiC reinforcing particles and the matrix, which was identified as (Ti,M)C (M=Nb and Mo) layer. Its formation was due to the reaction of the strong carbide-forming elements Nb and Mo of the matrix with the dissolved Ti and C on the surface of TiC particles. The microstructures of the TiC reinforcing phase experienced a successive change as laser energy input per unit length increased: Relatively coarsened poly-angular particles (80 kJ/m) - surface melted, smoothened TiC particles (≥100 kJ/m) - fully melted/precipitated, significantly refined TiC dendrites/particles (160 kJ/m). Using the laser energy input per unit length ≥100 kJ/m produced the fully dense composites having the uniformly dispersed TiC reinforcing particles. Either the formation of reinforcement/matrix interfacial layer or the refinement in TiC dendrites/particles microstructures enhanced the microhardness and wear performance of TiC/Inconel 718 composites.

  6. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm(3)) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiO(x), or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H(2) gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000 °C were achieved even in 200 Torr H(2). We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  7. Seasonal Changes in the Thickness of Martian Polar Crater Deposits From the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerr, N. C.; Garvin, J. B.; Neumann, G. A.; Sakimoto, S. E.

    2001-12-01

    This study uses near-repeat topographic profiles and gridded data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter to investigate temporal changes in several ice-filled craters in the North Polar Region of Mars. The craters we investigated are Korolev (73° N, 163° E), "Sasquatch" (77° N, 89° E) and "Frosty" (77° N, 215° E) [Garvin et. al., 2000, Icarus, 144, 329-352]. Profiles are corrected using crossovers that are not affected by seasonal changes. We find that spatially matched but temporally separated MOLA profiles of the central ice deposits within these craters show vertical variation on the order of 1-5 meters. This change in topography temporally correlates to the seasonal deposition and sublimation of frost in the North Polar Region of Mars [Zuber et al., this session] but is locally greater in magnitude. The change is also localized to the south-facing slopes of the ice deposits within the craters. This suggests that up to 5 m of carbon dioxide frost deposition and ablation may be taking place on the south-facing slopes of these craters each Martian year. This rapid change in ice deposit thickness provides a mechanism for geologically swift modification of the polar-layered terrains.

  8. Laser processing of high-chromium nickel-chromium coatings deposited by various thermal spraying methods

    SciTech Connect

    Longa, Y.; Takemoto, M. . Coll. of Science and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    High-chromium Ni-Cr coatings were deposited by thermal spraying in air and in an argon gas atmosphere. Coatings sprayed in Ar gas were free of pores and defects and of the same chemical composition as the spraying material. Following thermal spraying for each coating, laser glazing or laser gas alloying was applied to provide a protective chromium oxide film, produced by the intermediate oxidation process on top of the coatings. Five types of coatings were treated: (1) arc and (2) flame spraying in Ar, (3) arc and (4) flame spraying in air, and (5) low-pressure plasma spraying (LPPS). Oxide formation mechanisms during laser processing were studied, and the oxidation and hot-corrosion resistance of the coatings in the presence of a sulfate-vanadate fused salt at 900 C in air were examined. High-chromium Ni-Cr coatings deposited by thermal spraying, and they are used mostly to prevent ash attack of boilers and furnace tubes in power plants and oil refineries.

  9. Thin-film CdTe photovoltaic cells by laser deposition and rf sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compaan, A.; Bohn, R. G.; Bhat, A.; Tabory, C.; Shao, M.; Li, Y.; Savage, M. E.; Tsien, L.

    1992-12-01

    Laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD) and radio-frequency (rf) sputtering have been used to fabricate thin-film solar cells on SnO2-coated glass substrates. The laser-ablation process readily permits the use of several target materials in the same vacuum chamber and complete solar cell structures have been fabricated on SnO2-coated glass using LDPVD for the CdS, CdTe, and CdCl2. To date the best devices (˜9% AM1.5) have been obtained after a post-deposition anneal at 400 °C. In addition, cells have been fabricated with the combination of LDPVD CdS, rf-sputtered CdTe, and LDPVD CdCl2. The performance of these cells indicates considerable promise for the potential of rf sputtering for CdTe photovoltaic devices. The physical mechanisms of LDPVD have been studied by transient optical spectroscopy on the laser ablation plume. These measurements have shown that, e.g., Cd is predominantly in the neutral atomic state in the plume but with a large fraction which is highly excited internally (≥6 eV) and that the typical neutral Cd translational kinetic energies perpendicular to the target are 20 eV and greater. Quality of as-grown and annealed films has been analyzed by optical absorption. Raman scattering, photoluminescence, electrical conductivity, Hall effect, x-ray diffraction, and SEM/EDS.

  10. One-pot synthesis and transfer of PMMA/Ag photonic nanocomposites by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoutsos, V.; Koutselas, I.; Orfanou, P.; Mpatzaka, Th.; Vasileiadis, M.; Vassilakopoulou, A.; Vainos, N. A.; Perrone, A.

    2015-08-01

    Nanocomposite films comprising metallic nanoparticles in polymer matrices find increasing use in emerging photonic, electronic and microsystem applications owing to their tailored advanced functionalities. The versatile development of such films based on poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) matrix having embedded Ag nanoparticles is addressed here. Two low-cost one-pot chemical methods for the synthesis of bulk target nanocomposite materials are demonstrated. These nanocomposites are subsequently transferred via pulsed laser deposition using 193 nm ArF excimer laser radiation, producing films maintaining the structural and functional properties. Both target- and laser-deposited materials have been thoroughly characterized using microscopic, spectroscopic and thermal analysis methods. Infrared spectra demonstrated the close molecular PMMA chain similarity for both target and film materials, though structural alterations identified by thermal analysis proved the enhanced characteristics of films grown. High-resolution electron microscopy proved the transfer of Ag nanoparticles sized 10-50 nm. Visible absorption peaked in the spectral range of 430-440 nm and attributed to the Ag nanocomposite plasmonic response verifying the transfer of the functional performance from target to film.

  11. Structural and optical properties of GaAsSb QW heterostructures grown by laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V. Dorokhin, M. V.; Kalentyeva, I. L.; Morozov, S. V.; Kryzhkov, D. I.; Yunin, P. A.

    2015-01-15

    The possibility of using the laser deposition method to grow crystalline light-emitting structures with GaAsSb/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The growth temperature of the GaAs{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} layers is varied within the range 450–550°C; according to X-ray diffraction analyses, the content of antimony reaches x{sub Sb} ≈ 0.37 at a growth temperature of 450°C. Low-temperature (4 K) photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates the presence of a peak associated with the GaAsSb/GaAs QW at around 1.3 μm at the minimum laser-light pumping level. The optimal growth temperature T{sub g} = 500°C and arsine flow rate P{sub A} = 2.2 × 10{sup −8} mol/s at which the best emission properties of QWs with x{sub Sb} ∼ 0.17–0.25 are observed at temperatures of 77 and 300 K are determined. It is shown that GaAsSb/GaAs QWs with similar parameters (width and composition) grown by laser deposition at 500°C and metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy at 580°C have comparable optical quality.

  12. Epitaxial growth of metal fluoride thin films by pulsed-laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, D.P.; Budal, J.D.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Geohegan, D.B.; Puretzky, A.

    1995-12-01

    We have studied growth of GdLiF4 thin films for optical waveguide applications. Epitaxial, c-axis oriented GdLiF4 films wer grown from undoped GdLiF4 targets in an on-axis Pulsed-laser deposition geometry on (100) CaF2. These films exhibit a high density of particulates on the surface which are ejected from the target in the ablation process. Growth from Nd-doped polycrystalline GdLiF4 ablation targets results in smooth films with lower particulate densities, as Nd doping increases the optical absorption of GdLiF4 at the ablation laser wavelength 193 nm and permits efficient pulsed-laser deposition. Optical emission spectra of the ablation pume reveals the presence of atomic F, Gd, and Li, indicating the dissociation of the metal-fluorine bonds in the ablation process. In addition, we find that the residual background oxygen pressure must be reduced to avoid formation of Gd4O3F6 as an impurity oxyfluoride phase in the films.

  13. Antimicrobial oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) film deposited by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wangyao; Yu, Qian; López, Gabriel P; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D

    2014-04-01

    The antimicrobial oligomer, oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) (OPE), was deposited as thin films by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) on solid substrates and exhibited light-induced biocidal activity. The biocidal activity of OPE thin films deposited by spin-coating and drop-casting was also investigated for comparison. Enhanced bacterial attachment and biocidal efficiency of the film deposited by RIR-MAPLE were observed and attributed to nanoscale surface topography of the thin film.

  14. Tunable stoichiometry of SiOx-BaTiOy-BOz fabricated by multitarget pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, John G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Smith, Steven R.; Landis, Gerald R.; Grazulis, Lawrence; Sun, Lirong; Murphy, Neil R.; Kozlowski, Gregory; Jakubiak, Rachel; Stutz, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Oxide materials of desired stoichiometry are challenging to make in small quantities. Nanostructured thin films of multiple oxide materials were obtained by using pulsed laser deposition and multiple independent targets consisting of Si, BaTiO3, and B. Programmable stoichiometry of nanostructured thin films was achieved by synchronizing a 248-nm krypton fluoride excimer laser at an energy of 300 mJ/pulse, a galvanometer mirror system, and the three independent target materials with a background pressure of oxygen. Island growth occurred on a per pulse basis; some 500 pulses are required to deposit 1 nm of material. The number of pulses on each target was programmed with a high degree of precision. Trends in material properties were systematically identified by varying the stoichiometry of multiple nanostructured thin films and comparing the resulting properties measured using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, capacitance measurements including relative permittivity and loss, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Films were deposited ˜150 to 907 nm thickness, and in situ ellipsometry data were modeled to calculate thickness n and k. A representative atomic force microscopy measurement was also collected. EDS, ellipsometry, and capacitance measurements were all performed on each of the samples, with one sample having a calculated permittivity greater than 20,000 at 1 kHz.

  15. Towards a reliable laser spray powder deposition system through process characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Keicher, D.M.; Jellison, J.L.; Schanwald, L.P.; Romero, J.A.; Abbott, D.H.

    1995-07-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to characterize the laser spray powder deposition tea-one (HAZ) in the process. Goal of these experiments was to minimize the heat affected base substrate while obtaining a maximum build-up rate of the deposited material. Response surface models have been developed to achieve this goal. These models indicate that laser irradiance and component travel speed are both important factors to be considered in optimization of this process. These models suggest that a minimum HAZ can be obtained with a maximum material build-up height by maintaining with a slow travel speed. Although these models are useful in identifying significant factor and process trends, further refinement is required for practical use in industrial applications. Weighting of the response variables used in generating the models is being considered to improve the model robustness. High speed imaging of the deposition process suggests that the powder particle size and/or size distribution affects the stability of this process.

  16. Real-time measurement of temperature variation during nanosecond pulsed-laser-induced contamination deposition.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Dimitrios; Gailly, Patrick; Georges, Marc P; Tzeremes, Georgios; Rochus, Pierre; Fleury-Frenette, Karl

    2015-12-20

    In this paper, a study of heat generation during UV laser-induced contamination (LIC) and potentially resulting subsequent thermal damage are presented. This becomes increasingly interesting when optics with delicate coatings are involved. During LIC, radiation can interact with outgassing molecules, both in the gas phase and at the surface, thus triggering chemical and photo-fixation reactions. This is a major hazard, in particular for laser units operating under vacuum conditions such as in space applications. The intense photon flux not only affects the contaminant deposition rate but also alters their chemical structure, which can increase their absorption coefficient. Over cumulative irradiation shots, these molecules formed deposits that increasingly absorb photons and produce heat as a by-product of de-excitation, eventually leading to thermal damage. One could better assess the risk of the latter with the knowledge of temperature during the contamination process. For this purpose, a thermoreflectance technique is used here to estimate the temperature variation from pulse to pulse during contamination deposition through the analysis of a temperature-dependent surface reflectance signal.

  17. Laser ablation and deposition of Bioglass ® 45S5 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, L.; Ferro, D.; Marotta, V.; Santagata, A.; Teghil, R.; Zaccagnino, M.

    2001-11-01

    A study of the laser ablation and deposition, on Ti6Al4V substrates, of a biological active glass (Bioglass ® 45S5) is reported. The gaseous phase composition has been determined by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, optical imaging and emission spectroscopy. The deposited films were studied by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy and wavelength dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction. The adhesion of films to the substrates has been studied by scratch tests. Moreover, after exposing the coatings to a simulating body fluid solution, their bioactivity has been monitored by X-ray diffraction analysis of the hydroxylapatite growth. This procedure has been followed for different time scales up to a maximum of 24 days. The deposition mechanism seems to be related mainly to the mechanical transport of the target material in form of droplets, while the gaseous phase, having a very different composition, plays a marginal role. The overall film retains the target stoichiometry and bioactivity in a large range of experimental conditions.

  18. Improvement of the Laser Direct Metal Deposition Process in 5-axis Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisselier, Didier; Sankaré, Simon; Engel, Thierry

    The implementation of the continuous 5-axis configuration can extend the limits of the Laser Direct Metal Deposition (LDMD) processes, especially when the complexity of the parts to be built is growing. In order to follow the profile of a part, we use the orientation of its growth axis. Although 5-axis machining is well known nowadays, LDMD processes require a specific optimization that depends on many parameters. Unlike conventional machining, it has to be noted that the speed variation tool tip affects the stability of deposition. Thus, we have to smooth trajectories in order to provide fluid movements and also to ensure the stability of deposition. This article describes the method and results in the optimization of trajectories to build metallic parts with freeform. Optical sensors have been implemented in the focusing unit in order to follow the variations of the laser-powder-substrate interaction and also to detect the process instabilities. Thanks to the right use of a new and large 5 axis machine and specific setting trajectories, manufacturing parts in 5-axis, with no concession on the construction rate has been possible.

  19. Highly sensitive NO2 sensors by pulsed laser deposition on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodu, Margus; Berholts, Artjom; Kahro, Tauno; Avarmaa, Tea; Kasikov, Aarne; Niilisk, Ahti; Alles, Harry; Jaaniso, Raivo

    2016-09-01

    Graphene as a single-atomic-layer material is fully exposed to environmental factors and has therefore a great potential for the creation of sensitive gas sensors. However, in order to realize this potential for different polluting gases, graphene has to be functionalized—adsorption centers of different types and with high affinity to target gases have to be created at its surface. In the present work, the modification of graphene by small amounts of laser-ablated materials is introduced for this purpose as a versatile and precise tool. The approach has been demonstrated with two very different materials chosen for pulsed laser deposition (PLD)—a metal (Ag) and a dielectric oxide (ZrO2). It was shown that the gas response and its recovery rate can be significantly enhanced by choosing the PLD target material and deposition conditions. The response to NO2 gas in air was amplified up to 40 times in the case of PLD-modified graphene, in comparison with pristine graphene, and it reached 7%-8% at 40 ppb of NO2 and 20%-30% at 1 ppm of NO2. The PLD process was conducted in a background gas (5 × 10-2 mbar oxygen or nitrogen) and resulted in the atomic areal densities of the deposited materials of about 1015 cm-2. The ultimate level of NO2 detection in air, as extrapolated from the experimental data obtained at room temperature under mild ultraviolet excitation, was below 1 ppb.

  20. Structural investigation of Bi doped InSe chalcogenide thin films using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shaveta; Sharma, Rita; Kumar, Praveen; Chander, Ravi; Thangaraj, R.; Mian, M.

    2015-05-01

    The infrared transparency of the chalcogenide glasses have been investigated presently for the CO/CO2 laser power in various medical diagnostic applications. The addition of Bi improves the chemical durability and broadens the IR transparency region of various chalcogenide glassy systems. In the present work, we have studied the effect of Bi addition on the structural properties of In-Se thin films by using the RAMAN spectroscopy. The melt quenched bulk ingot of BixIn25-xSe75 (1≤ x≤ 7) alloys were used for the vacuum thermal evaporation of films in a vacuum better than 10-5 mbar. RAMAN bands at 1575, 1354 and 525 cm-1 has been observed, while with the increase in the Bi concentration vibrational band disappear at 525 cm-1 in sample x=7.

  1. Regularly arranged indium islands on glass/molybdenum substrates upon femtosecond laser and physical vapor deposition processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringleb, F.; Eylers, K.; Teubner, Th.; Boeck, T.; Symietz, C.; Bonse, J.; Andree, S.; Krüger, J.; Heidmann, B.; Schmid, M.; Lux-Steiner, M.

    2016-03-01

    A bottom-up approach is presented for the production of arrays of indium islands on a molybdenum layer on glass, which can serve as micro-sized precursors for indium compounds such as copper-indium-gallium-diselenide used in photovoltaics. Femtosecond laser ablation of glass and a subsequent deposition of a molybdenum film or direct laser processing of the molybdenum film both allow the preferential nucleation and growth of indium islands at the predefined locations in a following indium-based physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. A proper choice of laser and deposition parameters ensures the controlled growth of indium islands exclusively at the laser ablated spots. Based on a statistical analysis, these results are compared to the non-structured molybdenum surface, leading to randomly grown indium islands after PVD.

  2. Experimental Study of Direct Laser Deposition of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 by Using Pulsed Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kamran; Haq, Izhar Ul; Shah, Shaukat Ali; Khan, Farid Ullah; Khan, Sikander

    2014-01-01

    Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD) has developed from a prototyping to a single metal manufacturing tool. Its potential for creating multimaterial and functionally graded structures is now beginning to be explored. This work is a first part of a study in which a single layer of Inconel 718 is deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Single layer tracks were built at a range of powder mass flow rates using a coaxial nozzle and 1.5 kW diode laser operating in both continuous and pulsed beam modes. This part of the study focused on the experimental findings during the deposition of Inconel 718 powder on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed for characterization and phase identification. Residual stress measurement had been carried out to ascertain the effects of laser pulse parameters on the crack development during the deposition process. PMID:24592190

  3. Structural and magnetic properties of NiZn and Zn ferrite thin films obtained by laser ablation deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sorescu, Monica; Diamandescu, L.; Swaminathan, R.; McHenry, M.E.; Feder, M.

    2005-05-15

    Laser ablation deposition has been used to synthesize nanoscale ferrite structures. Our investigations were performed on NiZn and Zn ferrite films deposited on silicon(100) substrates. Films produced by laser ablation at room temperature were annealed at 550 deg. C for 1 h. Other films were deposited directly at a 550 deg. C substrate temperature without subsequent annealing. Complementary x-ray diffraction and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry measurements helped identify the optimum laser ablation deposition conditions for obtaining the desired nanoferrite structures. From the hysteresis loops at 300 and 10 K we identified the paramagnetic or ferromagnetic behavior of the films. The zero field cooled-field cooled (ZFC-FC) magnetization, M(T), curves yielded the value of the blocking temperature in both NiZn and Zn ferrite systems.

  4. Experimental study of direct laser deposition of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 by using pulsed parameters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kamran; Izhar Ul Haq; Shah, Shaukat Ali; Khan, Farid Ullah; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Khan, Sikander

    2014-01-01

    Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD) has developed from a prototyping to a single metal manufacturing tool. Its potential for creating multimaterial and functionally graded structures is now beginning to be explored. This work is a first part of a study in which a single layer of Inconel 718 is deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Single layer tracks were built at a range of powder mass flow rates using a coaxial nozzle and 1.5 kW diode laser operating in both continuous and pulsed beam modes. This part of the study focused on the experimental findings during the deposition of Inconel 718 powder on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed for characterization and phase identification. Residual stress measurement had been carried out to ascertain the effects of laser pulse parameters on the crack development during the deposition process.

  5. Ar ions irradiation effects in ZrN thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciun, D.; Socol, G.; Dorcioman, G.; Simeone, D.; Gosset, D.; Behdad, S.; Boesl, B.; Craciun, V.

    2015-05-01

    Thin ZrN films (<500 nm) were grown on (1 0 0)Si substrates at a substrate temperature of 500 °C by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using a KrF excimer laser under CH4 or N2 atmosphere. Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that films were nanocrystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies indicated that the films were very dense and with a smooth surface. The films were used to study the effect of 800 keV Ar ion irradiation on their structure and properties. After irradiation with a dose of 1014 at/cm2 the lattice parameter and crystallites size did marginally change. However, after irradiation with a 1015 at/cm2 dose, a clear increase in the lattice parameter accompanied by a significant decrease in nanohardness and Young modulus were observed.

  6. In situ electron spectroscopic identification of carbon species deposited by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Samano, E.C.; Gamietea, A.; Cota, L.; Soto, G. |

    1997-05-01

    Thin carbon films were grown on Si (111) substrates by ablating a graphite target utilizing an excimer pulsed laser in a UHV Riber {copyright} LDM-32 system. Two kinds of films were produced, a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) type and a diamond-like carbon (DLC) type. A relationship of the films microstructure with laser power density and substrate conditions was observed. The HOPG films were homogeneous but the DLC films were heterogeneous, as shown by micrographs. The thin films are monitored and analyzed in situ during the first stages of the deposition process. The monitoring was done by RHEED and the characterization by several surface spectroscopic techniques, AES, XPS and EELS. The formation of a SiC interface was observed for both films due to the reaction of the first carbon species with the substrate surface.

  7. Laser-induced damage to spray pyrolysis deposited transparent conducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, P.; Sathianandan, K.; Subhash, N.

    1986-02-01

    Laser-induced damage study of transparent conducting coatings of tin oxide prepared by spray pyrolysis has been made using a dye Q-switched Nd:glass laser emitting 25-ns (FWHM) pulses at 1062 nm. For comparison tin oxide films prepared by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method and indium tin oxide (ITO) prepared by the reactive RF sputtering method have also been damage tested. The study reveals that the spray pyrolysis method yields good electrical and optical quality films with a damage threshold value of 5.2 + or - 0.3 J/sq cm. Though CVD technique provides the highest damage threshold coatings (14.2 + or - 0.6 J/sq cm), their electrical characteristics and uniformity are inferior to RF-sputtered ITO films which have the best electrical properties and the lowest damage threshold values (1.3 + or - 0.1 J/sq cm).

  8. Tuning of cross-linking and mechanical properties of laser-deposited poly (methyl methacrylate) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süske, Erik; Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Panchenko, Elena; Junkers, Thomas; Egorov, Mark; Buback, Michael; Kijewski, Harald

    2005-03-01

    The chemical composition, amount of cross-linking and its influence on the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at a wavelength of 248nm under ultrahigh vacuum were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, thermogravimetric analysis, and nanoindentation experiments. The films consist of two components, one fraction with a molecular weight well below that of the target material and a second fraction, which is cross-linked. Compared to bulk material, the Young's modulus of the film is increased. The amount of cross-linking in the film can be tuned by the applied laser fluence leading to changes of the mechanical properties.

  9. Pulsed laser deposition of bioactive glass films in ammonia and disilane atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrajo, J. P.; González, P.; Liste, S.; Serra, J.; Chiussi, S.; León, B.; Pérez-Amor, M.

    2005-07-01

    The effect of two reactive gases on the properties of bioactive glass thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was studied. The ablation of a bioactive silica-based glass was carried out by an ArF excimer laser ( λ = 193 nm, Φ = 4.2 J cm -2, τ = 25 ns, f = 10 Hz) at various pressures of Si 2H 6/Ar and NH 3/Ar reactive mixtures. The bonding configuration and chemical environment of the resulting coatings were followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The composition and bond arrangement of bioactive glass films were tuned by varying the chamber atmosphere. The results show how to adjust film characteristics for osteointegration of implants.

  10. Infrared Polarizer Fabrication by Imprinting on Sb-Ge-Sn-S Chalcogenide Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Itsunari; Yamashita, Naoto; Tani, Kunihiko; Einishi, Toshihiko; Saito, Mitsunori; Fukumi, Kouhei; Nishii, Junji

    2012-01-01

    We fabricated infrared wire-grid polarizers consisting of a 500-nm pitch Al grating on a low toxic chalcogenide glass (Sb-Ge-Sn-S system) using the direct imprinting of subwavelength grating followed by a deposition of Al metal by thermal evaporation. To fabricate the subwavelength grating on a chalcogenide glass more easily, the sharp grating was formed on the mold surface. The fabricated polarizer with Al thickness of 130 nm exhibited a polarization function with a transverse magnetic transmittance greater than 60% in the 5-9 µm wavelength range, and an extinction ratio greater than 20 dB in 3.5-11 µm wavelength range. The extinction ratio of the element with Al wires of 180-nm thickness reached 27 dB at 5.4-µm wavelength. The polarizer can be fabricated at lower costs and simpler fabrication processes compared to conventional infrared polarizers.

  11. Direct imprinting on chalcogenide glass and fabrication of infrared wire-grid polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Itsunari; Yamashita, Naoto; Einishi, Toshihiko; Saito, Mitsunori; Fukumi, Kouhei; Nishii, Junji

    2013-05-01

    Infrared wire-grid polarizers were fabricated consisting of a 500-nm pitch Al grating on a low toxic chalcogenide glass (Sb-Ge-Sn-S system) using the direct imprinting of subwavelength grating followed by a deposition of Al metal by thermal evaporation. To fabricate the subwavelength grating on a chalcogenide glass more easily, the sharp grating was formed on the mold surface. The fabricated polarizer with Al thickness of 130 nm exhibited a polarization function with a transverse magnetic transmittance greater than 60% in the 5-9-μm wavelength range, and an extinction ratio greater than 20 dB in the 4-11-μm wavelength range. The polarizer can be fabricated at lower costs and simpler fabrication processes compared to conventional infrared polarizers.

  12. Laser ablation source for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Vucković, S; Svanqvist, M; Popok, V N

    2008-07-01

    This work describes construction of a source and optimisation of its parameters for production of cluster ion beams using material ablation by the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The influence of different source parameters such as carrier gas pressure, laser power, delay time between gas, and laser pulses as well as nozzle configuration on the cluster formation are studied. For the current experiments the laser ablation cluster source was optimized for production of Con+ cluster ions. Clusters with n up to 150 atoms are registered by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Deposition of size-selected Co50+ clusters with kinetic energies in the interval of 250-4850 eV/cluster on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite is studied. At the highest impact energies the clusters are implanted. Craters and well-like structures can be seen by scanning tunneling microscopy at impact spots. A decrease in cluster kinetic energy leads to formation of bumplike structures which probably represent damaged graphite areas with incorporated Co atoms. Further decrease in the cluster impact energy to the level of 450-250 eV/cluster creates condition for so-called cluster pinning when the cluster constituents are intact but the energy transferred to the graphite is still enough to produce radiation defects to which the cluster is bound. PMID:18681696

  13. Solution-Phase Deposition and Nanopattering of GeSbSe Phase-Change Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Milliron,D.; Raoux, S.; Shelby, R.; Jordan-Sweet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Chalcogenide films with reversible amorphous-crystalline phase transitions have been commercialized as optically rewritable data-storage media, and intensive effort is now focused on integrating them into electrically addressed non-volatile memory devices (phase-change random-access memory or PCRAM). Although optical data storage is accomplished by laser-induced heating of continuous films, electronic memory requires integration of discrete nanoscale phase-change material features with read/write electronics. Currently, phase-change films are most commonly deposited by sputter deposition, and patterned by conventional lithography. Metal chalcogenide films for transistor applications have recently been deposited by a low-temperature, solution-phase route. Here, we extend this methodology to prepare thin films and nanostructures of GeSbSe phase-change materials. We report the ready tuneability of phase-change properties in GeSbSe films through composition variation achieved by combining novel precursors in solution. Rapid, submicrosecond phase switching is observed by laser-pulse annealing. We also demonstrate that prepatterned holes can be filled to fabricate phase-change nanostructures from hundreds down to tens of nanometres in size, offering enhanced flexibility in fabricating PCRAM devices with reduced current requirements.

  14. TC17 titanium alloy laser melting deposition repair process and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Wang, Yudai; Zheng, Hang; Tang, Kang; Li, Huaixue; Gong, Shuili

    2016-08-01

    Due to the high manufacturing cost of titanium compressor blisks, aero engine repairing process research has important engineering significance and economic value. TC17 titanium alloy is a rich β stable element dual α+β phase alloy whose nominal composition is Ti-5Al-2Sn-2Zr-4Mo-4Cr. It has high mechanical strength, good fracture toughness, high hardenability and a wide forging-temperature range. Through a surface response experiment with different laser powers, scanning speeds and powder feeding speeds, the coaxial powder feeding laser melting deposition repair process is studied for the surface circular groove defects. In this paper, the tensile properties, relative density, microhardness, elemental composition, internal defects and microstructure of the laser-repaired TC17 forging plate are analyzed. The results show that the laser melting deposition process could realize the form restoration of groove defect; tensile strength and elongation could reach 1100 MPa and 10%, which could reach 91-98% that of original TC17 wrought material; with the optimal parameters (1000 W-25 V-8 mm/s), the microhardness of the additive zone, the heat-affected zone and base material is evenly distributed at 370-390 HV500. The element content difference between the additive zone and base material is less than ±0.15%. Due to the existence of the pores 10 μm in diameter, the relative density could reach 99%, which is mainly inversely proportional to the powder feeding speed. The repaired zone is typically columnar and dendrite crystal, and the 0.5-1.5 mm-deep heat-affected zone in the groove interface is coarse equiaxial crystal.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition and characterization of conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Iembo, A.; Fuso, F.; Arimondo, E.; Ciofi, C.; Pennelli, G.; Curro, G.M.; Neri, F.; Allegrini, M. |

    1997-06-01

    RuO{sub 2} thin films have been produced on silicon-based substrates by {ital in situ} pulsed laser deposition for the first time. The electrical properties, the surface characteristics, the crystalline structure, and the film-substrate interface of deposited samples have been investigated by 4-probe resistance versus temperature technique, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The films show good electrical properties. The RuO{sub 2}-substrate interface is very thin ({approx}3 nm), since not degraded by any annealing process. These two characteristics render our films suitable to be used as electrodes in PZT-based capacitors.{copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  16. Nanoforest Nb2O5 Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Rudresh; Brennaman, Kyle M.; Uher, Tim; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Samulski, Edward T.; McNeil, L. E.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Lopez, Rene

    2011-10-26

    Vertically aligned bundles of Nb₂O₅ nanocrystals were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and tested as a photoanode material in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). They were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopies, optical absorption spectroscopy (UV–vis), and incident-photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) experiments. The background gas composition and the thickness of the films were varied to determine the influence of those parameters in the photoanode behavior. An optimal background pressure of oxygen during deposition was found to produce a photoanode structure that both achieves high dye loading and enhanced photoelectrochemical performance. For optimal structures, IPCE values up to 40% and APCE values around 90% were obtained with the N₃ dye and I₃{sup –}/I{sup –} couple in acetonitrile with open circuit voltage of 0.71 V and 2.41% power conversion efficiency.

  17. Effects of atomic collisions on the stoichiometry of thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro

    2013-07-19

    We present an analytical model to quantitatively study the effect of collisions between the atoms of a plume and the molecules of a surrounding gas on the nonstoichiometry of lithium-containing oxide thin films deposited using pulsed laser deposition. A comparison of the experimental data and the model ascertain the inevitable loss of the lighter cation, leading to a nonstoichiometric reduction in the content of lighter cations in the films. Our model is the first analytic model of collision-induced plume expansion that can explain the partial oxygen pressure dependence of the Li content of a thin film. These studies have important implications for collision effects that affect the growth of thin films containing both light and heavy elements.

  18. Inverted fractal analysis of TiOx thin layers grown by inverse pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Égerházi, L.; Smausz, T.; Bari, F.

    2013-08-01

    Inverted fractal analysis (IFA), a method developed for fractal analysis of scanning electron microscopy images of cauliflower-like thin films is presented through the example of layers grown by inverse pulsed laser deposition (IPLD). IFA uses the integrated fractal analysis module (FracLac) of the image processing software ImageJ, and an objective thresholding routine that preserves the characteristic features of the images, independently of their brightness and contrast. IFA revealed fD = 1.83 ± 0.01 for TiOx layers grown at 5-50 Pa background pressures. For a series of images, this result was verified by evaluating the scaling of the number of still resolved features on the film, counted manually. The value of fD not only confirms the fractal structure of TiOx IPLD thin films, but also suggests that the aggregation of plasma species in the gas atmosphere may have only limited contribution to the deposition.

  19. Vaporization and deposition of an intact polyimide precursor by resonant infrared pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, N. L.; Schriver, K. E.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Poly(amic acid) (PAA), a precursor to polyimide, was successfully deposited on substrates without reaching curing temperature, by resonant infrared pulsed laser ablation. The PAA was prepared by dissolving pyromellitic dianhydride and 4, 4' oxidianiline in the polar solvent N-methyl pyrrolidinone (NMP). RIR-PLD transferred material showed two distinct geometries, droplets and string-like moieties. The unaltered nature of the deposited PAA was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Thermal curing was achieved by heating for one hour on a 250°C hotplate, and the transformation to polyimide was demonstrated from changes in the FTIR spectrum following curing. Plume shadowgraphy showed very clear contrasts in the ablation mechanism between ablation of the solvent alone and the ablation of the PAA, with additional contrast shown between the various resonant frequencies used.

  20. Suitability of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in screening potential additives to mitigate fouling deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, S.; Midhun Reddy, V.; Mehta, A.; Vasa, N. J.; Nagarajan, R.

    2016-04-01

    Alkali vapors present in the flue gas generated during coal-based combustion form fouling deposits as they condense. An additive added to coal can trap alkali elements in ash, therefore suppress the growth rate of fouling deposits, and increase thermal efficiency of a coal-fired thermal power plant. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique is proposed and demonstrated to screen potential additives to trap alkali elements in ash. Five additives—namely, kaolinite, alumina, silica, magnesia, and pumice—were analyzed for their effectiveness on four Indian coals for retaining/confining alkali elements in ash during coal combustion. Ratio analysis based on LIBS emission intensity values clearly shows that kaolinite and pumice are promising additives to trap sodium. Similarly, kaolinite, pumice, and silica exhibited good potassium retention.

  1. Studies of aluminum oxide thin films deposited by laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płóciennik, P.; Guichaoua, D.; Korcala, A.; Zawadzka, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the structural and optical investigations of the aluminum oxide nanocrystalline thin films. Investigated films were fabricated by laser ablation technique in high vacuum onto quartz substrates. The films were deposited at two different temperatures of the substrates equal to room temperature and 900 K. X-ray Diffraction spectra proved nanocrystalline character and the corundum phase of the film regardless on the substrate temperature during the deposition process. Values of the refractive indices, extinction and absorption coefficients were calculated by using Transmission and Reflection Spectroscopy in the UV-VIS-NIR range of the wavelength. Coupling Prism Method was used for films thickness estimations. Experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of the Third Harmonic Generation were also reported. Obtained results show that the lattice strain may affect obtained values of the third order nonlinear optical susceptibility.

  2. Structural, optical, and electrical properties of pulsed laser deposition CIGSS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan-Bin; Kang, Y. Zhen-Feng; Fan, Yue; Xiao, Ling-ling; Bo, Qing-Rui; Ding, Tie-Zhu

    2015-12-01

    High-quality CuIn0.75Ga0.25(Se0.75S0.25)2 (CIGSS) thin films were synthesized on the soda-lime glass (SLG) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The structural and optical properties of CIGSS thin films were studied by experiments and theoretical calculations. XRD result reveals that the films are of chalcopyrite structure. The experiments and theory show that CIGSS is a semiconductor with a direct band gap. The direct band gap energy of the deposited CIGSS thin films are in the solar energy range. The band structure and density of states of the CIGSS crystals were studied by the first principles density functional theory. The experimental data and theoretical data have demonstrated good agreement.

  3. Synthesis of Novel Thin-Film Materials by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    PubMed

    Lowndes; Geohegan; Puretzky; Norton; Rouleau

    1996-08-16

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a conceptually and experimentally simple yet highly versatile tool for thin-film and multilayer research. Its advantages for the film growth of oxides and other chemically complex materials include stoichiometric transfer, growth from an energetic beam, reactive deposition, and inherent simplicity for the growth of multilayered structures. With the use of PLD, artificially layered materials and metastable phases have been created and their properties varied by control of the layer thicknesses. In situ monitoring techniques have provided information about the role of energetic species in the formation of ultrahard phases and in the doping of semiconductors. Cluster-assembled nanocrystalline and composite films offer opportunities to control and produce new combinations of properties with PLD.

  4. Raman spectroscopy of ZnMnO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, S.; Riascos, H.; Duque, S.

    2016-02-01

    ZnMnO thin films were grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique onto Silicon (100) substrates at different growth conditions. Thin films were deposited varying Mn concentration, substrate temperature and oxygen pressure. ZnMnO samples were analysed by using Raman Spectroscopy that shows a red shift for all vibration modes. Raman spectra revealed that nanostructure of thin films was the same of ZnO bulk, wurzite hexagonal structure. The structural disorder was manifested in the line width and shape variations of E2(high) and E2(low) modes located in 99 and 434cm-1 respectively, which may be due to the incorporation of Mn ions inside the ZnO crystal lattice. Around 570cm-1 was found a peak associated to E1(LO) vibration mode of ZnO. 272cm-1 suggest intrinsic host lattice defects. Additional mode centred at about 520cm-1 can be overlap of Si and Mn modes.

  5. The properties of gallium oxide thin film grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qian; Li, Fuguo; Dai, Bo; Jia, Zhitai; Xie, Wenlin; Xu, Tong; Lu, Xiaoli; Tao, Xutang; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue

    2015-12-01

    Ga2O3 films were deposited on MgAl6O10(1 0 0) substrates by means of pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The influence of oxygen pressure on crystal quality, surface morphology and transmittance were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM) and spectrophotometer. The results showed that the grain size increased, the surface roughness and FWHM of X-ray rocking curve reduced with the oxygen pressure decreasing. Furthermore, the photoluminescence spectra were recorded as a function of excitation power and temperature. A blue shift of the visible luminescence at higher excitation power was observed, indicating that donor-acceptor transitions were responsible for the visible emissions. The thermal quenching of the blue and green bands corresponded to the activation energies of 0.028 eV, 0.037 eV and 0.034 eV, respectively.

  6. Apparatus and method for pulsed laser deposition of materials on wires and pipes

    DOEpatents

    Fernandez, Felix E.

    2003-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed which allow uniform coatings to be applied by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on inner and outer surfaces of cylindrical objects, such as rods, pipes, tubes, and wires. The use of PLD makes this technique particularly suitable for complex multicomponent materials, such as superconducting ceramics. Rigid objects of any length, i.e., pipes up to a few meters, and with diameters from less than 1 centimeter to over 10 centimeters can be coated using this technique. Further, deposition is effected simultaneously onto an annular region of the pipe wall. This particular arrangement simplifies the apparatus, reduces film uniformity control difficulties, and can result in faster operation cycles. In addition, flexible wires of any length can be continuously coated using the disclosed invention.

  7. Growth of Metastable β-AlN by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi; Mohri, Satoshi; Hara, Takeshi; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2008-05-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were prepared on sapphire (0001) in ambient nitrogen by pulsed laser deposition using a sintered AlN target, and the film structure was evaluated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The central area of the film was partially studded with cubic AlN (β-AlN) crystallites with obvious facets. This area was located on the normal of the irradiation spot on the target, and it corresponded to the region on the film where the highly energetic and dense species were deposited. A nonequilibrium condition and large supply of nitrogen are both important factors for the growth of metastable β-AlN.

  8. Protein Adsorption on Patterned Hydroxyapatite Thin Films Fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusunoki, Masanobu; Kawasima, Masami; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Koichi; Hayami, Takashi; Hontsu, Shigeki; Kawai, Tomoji

    2005-02-01

    Protein adsorption on hydroxyapatite (HAP) thin film was investigated before and after patterning. Hydroxyapatite thin film 100 nm thick was deposited by pulsed laser deposition. The film was patterned by photolithography and wet etching with HCl solution. Proteins (phospholyrase b, bovine serum albumin, and others) labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were used as the reagent. After the HAP film was soaked in the reagent and washed with pure water, a conspicuous contrast in FITC was observed between the HAP pattern and the glass substrate (or photoresist). This behavior showed that the biocompatibility of the HAP thin film was not influenced by the patterning process. Our technique for HAP thin film is adaptable for applications involving biosensors as electronic devices and scaffolds for tissue culture.

  9. Combinatorial pulsed laser deposition of doped yttrium iron garnet films on yttrium aluminium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Sposito, A. Eason, R. W.; Gregory, S. A.; Groot, P. A. J. de

    2014-02-07

    We investigate the crystalline growth of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films doped with bismuth (Bi) and cerium (Ce) by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition, co-ablating a YIG target and either a Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} or a CeO{sub 2} target, for applications in microwave and optical communications. Substrate temperature is critical for crystalline growth of YIG with simultaneous inclusion of Bi in the garnet lattice, whereas Ce is not incorporated in the garnet structure, but forms a separate CeO{sub 2} phase.

  10. George E. Pake Prize Lecture: Pulsed Laser Deposition and the Oxide Electronics Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    2012-02-01

    The discovery of the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) Process at Bellcore was followed by a stream of advances in the epitaxial growth of oxides and a variety of heterostructures and interfaces. Today Oxide Electronics is a fascinating field with a great deal of new Science and potential for applications. Following a discussion of these events, my talk will focus on the adventure involved in creating a new company, Neocera, and, at the same time, pushing ahead in the evolving field of oxide electronics. There, electron spin, pairing, and alignment to create superconductivity and magnetism have opened up new frontiers for research and materials development.

  11. Si nanostructures grown by picosecond high repetition rate pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervolaraki, M.; Komninou, Ph.; Kioseoglou, J.; Athanasopoulos, G. I.; Giapintzakis, J.

    2013-08-01

    One-step growth of n-doped Si nanostructures by picosecond ultra fast pulsed laser deposition at 1064 nm is reported for the first time. The structure and morphology of the Si nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the shape of the Si nanostructures depends on the ambient argon pressure. Fibrous networks, cauliflower formations and Si rectangular crystals grew when argon pressure of 300 Pa, 30 Pa and vacuum (10-3 Pa) conditions were used, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistance of the vacuum made material was investigated.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of zinc nanostructures and their nonlinear optical characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golian, Y.; Motamedi, A.; Rashidian Vaziri, M. R.; Hajiesmaeilbaigi, F.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, preparation of zinc nanostructured thin films using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique has been described. Optical absorption spectera of the thin films have been obtained by Spectrophotometry. Morphology and mean size of nanoparticles in the prepared nanostructured thin films were obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy. Nonlinear optical properties of the films have been investigated using the well-known Z-scan technique. Our measurements indicate positive signs for both nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and refraction indices of the nanostructured zinc thin films. The used method for measuring the optical limiting properties of the thin films and its results are also represented.

  13. Hall-Petch hardening in pulsed laser deposited nickel and copper thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Banks, J.C.; Myers, S.M. Jr.

    2000-01-03

    Very fine-grained Ni and Cu films were formed using pulsed laser deposition on fused silica substrates. The grain sizes in the films were characterized by electron microscopy, and the mechanical properties were determined by ultra-low load indentation, with finite-element modeling used to separate the properties of the layers from those of the substrate. Some Ni films were also examined after annealing to 350 and 450 C to enlarge the grain sizes. These preliminary results show that the observed hardnesses are consistent with a simple extension of the Hall-Petch relationship to grain sizes as small as 11 nm for Ni and 32 nm for Cu.

  14. Growth of epitaxial bismuth and gallium substituted lutetium iron garnet films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Leitenmeier, Stephan; Heinrich, Andreas; Lindner, Joerg K. N.; Stritzker, Bernd

    2006-04-15

    Epitaxial bismuth and gallium substituted lutetium iron garnet thin films have been grown on (100) oriented gadolinium gallium garnet Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The films have been studied using x-ray diffraction, high resolution x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron diffraction. We obtained smooth films with thicknesses between 0.3 and 1.0 {mu}m showing good crystalline quality and epitaxial growth.

  15. Behavior of pulsed laser deposited hydroxyapatite thin films under simulated biological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorescu, S.; Sima, F.; Axente, E.; Feugeas, F.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2007-03-01

    In the present paper, a study concerning the in-vitro behaviour of Hydroxyapatite films obtained by Pulsed Laser Deposition technique on titanium under different conditions was performed. The structures were immersed in Hank's Solution for 21 days in accurately controlled environment conditions. Both film and immersion solution changes were analyzed by means of XRD, SEM, EDX and X-Ray fluorescence respectively. The obtained results point to an excellent behaviour of the obtained films as bioactive structures, recommending this type of covering for further analysis in view of its use in orthopedic and dental implantology.

  16. Photoreceptor perturbation around subretinal drusenoid deposits revealed by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhua; Wang, Xiaolin; Rivero, Ernesto Blanco; Clark, Mark E; Witherspoon, Clark Douglas; Spaide, Richard F; Girkin, Christopher A.; Owsley, Cynthia; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the microscopic structure of photoreceptors impacted by subretinal drusenoid deposits, also called pseudodrusen, an extracellular lesion associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Design Observational case series. Methods Fifty-three patients with AMD and 10 age-similar subjects in normal retinal health were recruited. All subjects underwent color fundus photography, infrared reflectance, red-free reflectance, autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Subretinal drusenoid deposits were classified with a 3-stage OCT-based grading system. Lesions and surrounding photoreceptors were examined with AOSLO. Results Subretinal drusenoid deposits were found in 26 eyes of 13 patients with AMD and imaged by AOSLO and SD-OCT in 18 eyes (n=342 lesions). SD-OCT showed subretinal drusenoid deposits as highly reflective material accumulated internal to the retinal pigment epithelium. AOSLO revealed that photoreceptor reflectivity was qualitatively reduced by stage 1 subretinal drusenoid deposits and greatly reduced by stage 2. AOSLO presented a distinct structure in stage 3, a hyporeflective annulus consisting of deflected, degenerated or absent photoreceptors. A central core with a reflectivity superficially resembling photoreceptors is formed by the lesion material itself. A hyporeflective gap in the photoreceptor ellipsoid zone on either side of this core shown in SD-OCT corresponded to the hyporeflective annulus seen by AOSLO. Conclusions AOSLO and multimodal imaging of subretinal drusenoid deposits indicate solid, space filling lesions in the subretinal space. Associated retinal reflectivity changes are related to lesion stages and are consistent with perturbations to photoreceptors, as suggested by histology. PMID:24907433

  17. Quantum cascade laser-based measurement of metal alkylamide density during atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Maslar, James E; Kimes, William A; Sperling, Brent A

    2012-03-01

    An in situ gas-phase diagnostic for the metal alkylamide compound tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), Hf[N(C(2)H(5))(CH(3))](4), was demonstrated. This diagnostic is based on direct absorption measurement of TEMAH vapor using an external cavity quantum cascade laser emitting at 979 cm(-1), coinciding with the most intense TEMAH absorption in the mid-infrared spectral region, and employing 50 kHz amplitude modulation with synchronous detection. Measurements were performed in a single-pass configuration in a research-grade atomic layer deposition (ALD) chamber. To examine the detection limit of this technique for use as a TEMAH delivery monitor, this technique was demonstrated in the absence of any other deposition reactants or products, and to examine the selectivity of this technique in the presence of deposition products that potentially interfere with detection of TEMAH vapor, it was demonstrated during ALD of hafnium oxide using TEMAH and water. This technique successfully detected TEMAH at molecular densities present during simulated industrial ALD conditions. During hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, absorbance from gas-phase reaction products did not interfere with TEMAH measurements while absorption by reaction products deposited on the optical windows did interfere, although interfering absorption by deposited reaction products corresponded to only ≈4% of the total derived TEMAH density. With short measurement times and appropriate signal averaging, estimated TEMAH minimum detectable densities as low as ≈2 × 10(12) molecules/cm(3) could be obtained. While this technique was demonstrated specifically for TEMAH delivery and hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, it should be readily applicable to other metal alkylamide compounds and associated metal oxide and nitride deposition chemistries, assuming similar metal alkylamide molar absorptivity and molecular density in the measurement chamber.

  18. Pulsed-Laser Deposited Amorphous Diamond and Related Materials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Field Emission Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Geohegan, D.B.; Jellison, G.E., Jr.; Lowndes, D.H.; Merkulov, V.I.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1999-01-23

    Amorphous carbon films with variable sp{sup 3} content were produced by ArF (193nm) pulsed laser deposition. An in-situ ion probe was used to measure kinetic energy of C{sup +} ions. In contrast to measurements made as a function of laser fluence, ion probe measurements of kinetic energy are a convenient as well as more accurate and fundamental method for monitoring deposition conditions, with the advantage of being readily transferable for inter-laboratory comparisons. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements reveal that tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films with the most diamond-like properties are obtained at the C ion kinetic energy of {approximately}90 eV. Film properties are uniform within a 12-15{degree} angle from the plume centerline. Tapping-mode atomic force microscope measurements show that films deposited at near-optimum kinetic energy are extremely smooth, with rms roughness of only {approximately} 1 {angstrom} over distances of several hundred nm. Field emission (FE) measurements show that ta-C does not appear to be a good electron emitter. After conditioning of ta-C films deposited on n-type Si a rather high turn-on voltage of {approximately}50 V/{micro}m was required to draw current of {approximately}1 nA to the probe. The emission was unstable and typically ceased after a few minutes of operation. The FE tests of ta-C and other materials strongly suggest that surface morphology plays a dominant role in the FE process, in agreement with conventional Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  19. Pulsed-laser-deposited amorphous diamond and related materials: synthesis, characterization, and field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Baylor, Larry R.; Jellison, Gerald E., Jr.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.

    1999-07-01

    Amorphous carbon films with variable sp3 content were produced by ArF pulsed laser deposition. An in-situ ion probe was used to measure kinetic energy of C+ ions. In contrast to measurements made as a function of laser fluence, ion probe measurements of kinetic energy are a convenient as well as more accurate and fundamental method for monitoring deposition conditions, with the advantage of being readily transferable for inter-laboratory comparisons. Electron energy loss spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurement reveal that tetrahedral amorphous carbon films with the most diamond-like properties are obtained at the C ion kinetic energy of approximately 90 eV. Film properties are uniform within a 12-15 degrees angle from the plume centerline. Tapping-mode atomic force microscope measurements show that films deposited at near- optimum kinetic energy are extremely smooth, with rms roughness of only approximately 1 angstrom over distances of several hundred nm. Field emission (FE) measurements show that ta-C does not appear to be a good electron emitter. After conditioning of ta-C films deposited on n-type Si a rather high turn-on voltage of approximately 50 V/micrometers was required to draw current of approximately 1 nA to the probe. The emission was unstable and typically ceased after a few minutes of operation. The FE tests of ta-C and other materials strongly suggest that surface morphology plays a dominant role in the FE process, in agreement with conventional Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  20. Utilizing pulsed laser deposition lateral inhomogeneity as a tool in combinatorial material science.

    PubMed

    Keller, David A; Ginsburg, Adam; Barad, Hannah-Noa; Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Rosh-Hodesh, Eli; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Aviv, Hagit; Tischler, Yaakov R; Anderson, Assaf Y; Zaban, Arie

    2015-04-13

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is widely used in combinatorial material science, as it enables rapid fabrication of different composite materials. Nevertheless, this method was usually limited to small substrates, since PLD deposition on large substrate areas results in severe lateral inhomogeneity. A few technical solutions for this problem have been suggested, including the use of different designs of masks, which were meant to prevent inhomogeneity in the thickness, density, and oxidation state of a layer, while only the composition is allowed to be changed. In this study, a possible way to take advantage of the large scale deposition inhomogeneity is demonstrated, choosing an iron oxide PLD-deposited library with continuous compositional spread (CCS) as a model system. An Fe₂O₃-Nb₂O₅ library was fabricated using PLD, without any mask between the targets and the substrate. The library was measured using high-throughput scanners for electrical, structural, and optical properties. A decrease in electrical resistivity that is several orders of magnitude lower than pure α-Fe₂O₃ was achieved at ∼20% Nb-O (measured at 47 and 267 °C) but only at points that are distanced from the center of the PLD plasma plume. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we show that the PLD inhomogeneity can be used as an additional degree of freedom, helping, in this case, to achieve iron oxide with much lower resistivity. PMID:25798538

  1. Pulsed laser deposition of YBCO thin films on IBAD-YSZ substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Ma, B.; Koritala, R. E.; Fisher, B. L.; Venkataraman, K.; Balachandran, U.

    2003-01-01

    High-quality YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) films were fabricated on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-buffered Hastelloy C276 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. YSZ was grown by ion-beam-assisted deposition. A thin (approx10 nm) CeO2 layer was deposited before the deposition of YBCO. The crystalline structure and biaxial texture of the YBCO film and the buffer layer were examined by x-ray diffraction 2theta-scan, phi-scan and pole-figure analysis. Epitaxial growth of the YBCO film on the buffer layer was observed. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) value of 7.4° was measured from the phi-scan of YBCO(103). Raman spectroscopy showed compositional uniformity and phase integrity in the YBCO films. Surface morphologies of the YBCO films were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Comparative studies indicated that the CeO2 buffer layer significantly improves the structural alignment and superconducting properties of YBCO films. Tc = 90 K, with sharp transition, and transport Jc = 2.2 × 106 A cm-2 at 77 K in zero-external field were obtained on the 0.5 mum thick YBCO films. The dependence of Jc on the FWHM of the YBCO(103) phi-scan indicated that high Jc is associated with low FWHM.

  2. Correlations between microstructure and hydrophobicity properties of pulsed laser deposited diamond-like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modabber Asl, A.; Kameli, P.; Ranjbar, M.; Salamati, H.; Jannesari, M.

    2015-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on Si-(1 0 0) substrates in the substrate temperature range of room temperature (RT) to 300 °C. The structural, hydrophobicity, mechanical, and morphological properties of the DLC films were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nanoindentation, water contact angle (CA) measurement, atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that the DLC films deposited at RT were purely amorphous in structure with high sp3 bonding and had very smooth surfaces. Raman and XPS results indicated a structural transition from amorphous to nano-crystalline graphitic nature, structural ordering of DLC films, and decrease of the sp3 content with increasing substrate temperature. Degradation of the surface morphology and enhancement of the surface roughness with the substrate temperature were observed by AFM. It was also found that the mechanical properties such as nanohardness, elastic modulus, plastic index parameter, and elastic recovery decreased with the increasing substrate temperature. The CA measurements indicated that the hydrophobicity of DLC films increased with the substrate temperature and was sensitive not only to sp2/sp3 ratio, but also to the ordering of sp2 clusters. The observed hydrophobicity, mechanical and morphological properties were attributed to structural changes during deposition based on the sub-plantation model and stress induced mechanism.

  3. Utilizing pulsed laser deposition lateral inhomogeneity as a tool in combinatorial material science.

    PubMed

    Keller, David A; Ginsburg, Adam; Barad, Hannah-Noa; Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Rosh-Hodesh, Eli; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Aviv, Hagit; Tischler, Yaakov R; Anderson, Assaf Y; Zaban, Arie

    2015-04-13

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is widely used in combinatorial material science, as it enables rapid fabrication of different composite materials. Nevertheless, this method was usually limited to small substrates, since PLD deposition on large substrate areas results in severe lateral inhomogeneity. A few technical solutions for this problem have been suggested, including the use of different designs of masks, which were meant to prevent inhomogeneity in the thickness, density, and oxidation state of a layer, while only the composition is allowed to be changed. In this study, a possible way to take advantage of the large scale deposition inhomogeneity is demonstrated, choosing an iron oxide PLD-deposited library with continuous compositional spread (CCS) as a model system. An Fe₂O₃-Nb₂O₅ library was fabricated using PLD, without any mask between the targets and the substrate. The library was measured using high-throughput scanners for electrical, structural, and optical properties. A decrease in electrical resistivity that is several orders of magnitude lower than pure α-Fe₂O₃ was achieved at ∼20% Nb-O (measured at 47 and 267 °C) but only at points that are distanced from the center of the PLD plasma plume. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we show that the PLD inhomogeneity can be used as an additional degree of freedom, helping, in this case, to achieve iron oxide with much lower resistivity.

  4. Growth process of nanosized aluminum thin films by pulsed laser deposition for fluorescence enhancement.

    PubMed

    Abdellaoui, N; Pillonnet, A; Berndt, J; Boulmer-Leborgne, C; Kovacevic, E; Moine, B; Penuelas, J; Pereira, A

    2015-03-20

    Pulsed laser deposition was used to deposit aluminum thin films of various thicknesses (tAl) ranging from 5 to 40 nm and to investigate their growth process when they are deposited onto SiO2 and Y2O3. Atomic force microscopy and x-ray reflectivity measurements show that the structure of the Al films are related to the wettability properties of the underlaying layer. Onto SiO2, ultra-smooth layers of aluminum are obtained, due to a perfect wetting of SiO2 by Al. In contrast when deposited onto Y2O3, percolated Al layers are observed with apparent pore size decreasing from 200 to 82 nm as t(Al) is increased from 5 to 40 nm, respectively. This particular morphology is related to partial dewetting of Al on Y2O3. These two different growth mechanisms of aluminum depend therefore on the surface properties of SiO2 and Y2O3. The plasmon resonance of such Al nanostructures in the UV region was then analyzed by studying the coupling between Eu(3+) rare earth emitters and Al. PMID:25712708

  5. Effect of laser fluence on electrical properties of (Sr0.75,La0.25)TiO3 thin films grown by pulsed-laser-deposition.

    PubMed

    Eom, Kitae; Kim, Taemin; Seo, Jiwon; Choi, Jaedu; Lee, Jaichan

    2014-11-01

    We have grown Sr0.75La0.25TiO3 (SLTO) thin films using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with various laser energy fluences. We investigated the effect of energy fluence on the compositions of SLTO films. The stoichiometry of SLTO films was controlled by adjusting the laser energy density. At low energy densities below 1.0 J/cm2, SLTO films become non-stoichiometric with Ti deficiency. The Ti deficiency increases with decreasing the laser energy fluence. We have also investigated the effect of laser energy fluence on the electrical properties of the thin films. The electrical resistivity and carrier density intimately depend on the laser energy fluence as a result of the non-stoichiometry. After eliminating the effect of oxygen vacancies by post-annealing, the electrical properties are dependent on the cation stoichiometry in the oxide films.

  6. Plasma-Assisted Laser Deposition of High T(c) Oxide Superconducting Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witanachchi, Sarath

    1990-01-01

    Since the discovery of the high T_ {rm c} oxide superconductor YBa _2Cu_3O _7 a great deal of attention has been given to the fabrication of superconducting thin films of this material. Thin films of the new superconductor have an immense importance in scientific research, such as microwave, infrared and critical current studies, and also in applications, such as Josephson junction based digital computer circuits, SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices), transmission lines, and interconnectors. Integration of these films with semiconductors and multilayer capabilities are important for future practical uses. For most of these applications, a low temperature in-situ fabrication process is designed to obtain smooth surfaces and sharp interfaces. Less than 500^circC growth temperatures would be compatible with the existing semiconductor technology. At the beginning of this research project, the lowest deposition temperature reported for the fabrication of in-situ superconducting films was about 650^circC. Our goal was to develop a technique that would enable us to fabricate in-situ high T_{ rm c} superconducting films at a substrate temperature lower than 650^circC. By incorporating a weak oxygen plasma in the laser evaporation zone, we have been able to develop a novel plasma assisted laser deposition (PLD) technique to grow YBaCuO films that are superconducting in the as-deposited state. Using this technique, good quality superconducting films with mirror -like surfaces have been grown at substrate temperatures as low as 500^circC. YBaCuO films were deposited on single crystal substrates, SrTiO_3, ZrO _2, MgO, sapphire and Si, and also on flexible stainless steel substrates. Films deposited on SrTiO _3 at 500^circC showed a critical temperature of 86K and a critical current of 10^5 A/cm^2 at 80K and 5 times 10^6 A/cm^2 at 4.3K. The possibility of improving the superconducting properties of the films deposited on sapphire, Si, and stainless steel by

  7. Highly textured fresnoite thin films synthesized in situ by pulsed laser deposition with CO2 laser direct heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Michael; de Pablos-Martin, Araceli; Patzig, Christian; Stölzel, Marko; Brachwitz, Kerstin; Hochmuth, Holger; Grundmann, Marius; Höche, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Fresnoite Ba2TiSi2O8 (BTS) thin films were grown and crystallized in situ using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with CO2 laser direct heating of the a-plane sapphire (1 1 0) substrates up to 1250 °C. Starting with 775 °C growth temperature, (0 0 1)- and (1 1 0)-textured BTS and BaTiO3 phases, respectively, could be assigned in the films, and the typical fern-like BTS crystallization patterns appear. For higher process temperatures of 1100 to 1250 °C, atomically smooth, terraced surface of the films was found, accompanied by crystalline high-temperature phases of Ba-Ti-Si oxides. HAADF micrographs taken in both scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry mode show details of morphology and elemental distribution inside the films and at the interface. To balance the inherent Si deficiency of the BTS films, growth from glassy BTS × 2 SiO2 and BTS × 2.5 SiO2 targets was considered as well. The latter targets are ideal for PLD since the employed glasses possess 100% of the theoretical density and are homogeneous at the atomic scale.

  8. Effect of laser power on the microstructural behaviour and strength of modified laser deposited Ti6Al4V+Cu alloy for medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erinosho, Mutiu F.; Akinlabi, Esther T.

    2016-03-01

    The excellent biocompatibility property of Grade 5 titanium alloy has made its desirability largely increasing in the field of biomedical. The titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) was modified with the addition of 3 weight percent (wt %) copper via a laser deposition process using the Ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength of 1.047 μm. Therefore, this paper presents the effect of laser power on the microstructural behaviour and strength of the modified Ti6Al4V+Cu alloy. The laser powers were varied between 600 W and 1600 W respectively while all other parameters such as the scanning speed, powder flow rates and gas flow rates were kept constant. The melt pool and width of the deposited alloy increases as the laser power was increased. The α-lamella was observed to be finer at low laser power, and towards the fusion zone, Widmanstettan structures were fused and become smaller; and showing an evidence of α-martensite phases. The strength of the modified alloy was derived from the hardness values. The strength was observed to increase initially to a point as the laser power increases and afterwards decreased as the laser power was further increased. The improved Ti6Al4V+Cu alloy can be anticipated for biomedical application.

  9. Fretting wear behavior of laser-nitrided Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe alloy fabricated by laser melting deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Shangguan, Y. J.; Tang, H. B.; Wang, H. M.

    2014-09-01

    Fretting wear behavior of laser-nitrided titanium alloy (Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe) fabricated by laser melting deposition (LMD) has been investigated to explore surface engineering for protection against wear damage of laser melting deposited titanium alloy. The morphology and volume of the wear scars of unmodified and laser-nitrided LMD Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe tested at different frequencies, 10 and 50 Hz, were studied using non-contact three-dimensional surface profilometer and scanning electron microscope. Friction coefficients measured at different frequencies or loading forces were compared for unmodified and laser-nitrided LMD specimens. Experimental results show that laser-nitrided LMD specimens have shown fretting resistance superior to unmodified LMD specimens due to the presence of hard TiN dendrites in the laser-nitrided layer. W-shaped wear scar caused by local rotation of fretting ball at the two ends of the scar was observed. Given a constant loading force of 50 N, unmodified and laser-nitrided LMD specimens exhibited similar friction coefficients and their friction coefficients increased with test frequency. The friction coefficients of both specimens increased with the reduction of normal load, which corresponds to the trend in Hertzian contact model.

  10. Chalcogenide nanowires by evaporation-condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Bradley R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2005-02-02

    Chalcogenide (arsenic sulfide) nanowires have been successfully synthesized from As2S3 under near-equilibrium conditions via evaporation-condensation process in evacuated glass ampoules. The as-synthesized nanowires were pure, nearly stoichiometric, and amorphous. The nanowires had diameters ranging from 40 to 140 nm and lengths up to a few millimeters. Distinct joints of the crisscrossing nanowires indicate potential for forming structural networks. They have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine their structure, composition, and morphology. Selected area diffraction (SAD) in the TEM and XRD confirmed their amorphous nature. The As-S nanowires could make an ideal system for understanding the carrier transport and photonic properties in nanoscale for this family of materials (IV-V compounds). Chalcogenide nanowires show promise for integrated nanoelectronics and biophotonics.

  11. An Experimental Study on Slurry Erosion Resistance of Single and Multilayered Deposits of Ni-WC Produced by Laser-Based Powder Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Prabu; Hamid, Syed; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Single and multilayered deposits containing different mass fractions of tungsten carbide (WC) in nickel (Ni)-matrix (NT-20, NT-60, NT-80) are deposited on a AISI 4140 steel substrate using a laser-based powder deposition process. The transverse cross section of the coupons reveals that the higher the mass fraction of WC in Ni-matrix leads to a more uniform distribution through Ni-matrix. The slurry erosion resistance of the fabricated coupons is tested at three different impingement angles using an abrasive water jet cutting machine, which is quantified based on the erosion rate. The top layer of a multilayered deposit (i.e., NT-60 in a two-layer NT-60 over NT-20 deposit) exhibits better erosion resistance at all three tested impingement angles when compared to a single-layer (NT-60) deposit. A definite increase in the erosion resistance is noted with an addition of nano-size WC particles. The relationship between the different mass fractions of reinforcement (WC) in the deposited composite material (Ni-WC) and their corresponding matrix (Ni) hardness on the erosion rate is studied. The eroded surface is analyzed in the light of a three-dimensional (3-D) profilometer and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that a volume fraction of approximately 62% of WC with a Ni-matrix hardness of 540 HV resulting in the gouging out of WC from the Ni-matrix by the action of slurry. It is concluded that the slurry erosion resistance of the AISI 4140 steel can be significantly enhanced by introducing single and multilayered deposits of Ni-WC composite material fabricated by the laser-based powder deposition process.

  12. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  13. Pulse Laser Deposition Fabricating Gold Nanoclusters on a Glassy Carbon Surface for Nonenzymatic Glucose Sensing.

    PubMed

    Shu, Honghui; Chang, Gang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Pai; Zhang, Yuting; He, Yunbin

    2015-01-01

    A One-step technique for depositing gold nanoclusters (GNCs) onto the surface of a glassy carbon (GC) plate was developed by using pulse laser deposition (PLD) with appropriate process parameters. The method is simple and clean without using any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. The experimental factors (pulse laser number and the pressure of inert gas (Ar)) that affect the morphology and structure of GNCs, and thus affect the electrocatalytic oxidation performance towards glucose were systematically investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammograms (CV) and chronoamperometry methods). The GC electrode modified by GNCs exhibited a rapid response time (about 2 s), a broad linear range (0.1 to 20 mM), and good stability. The sensitivity was estimated to be 31.18 μA cm(-2) mM(-1) (vs. geometric area), which is higher than that of the Au bulk electrode. It has a good resistance to the common interfering species, such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and 4-acetaminophen (AP). Therefore, this work has demonstrated a simple and effective sensing platform for the nonenzymatic detection of glucose, and can be used as a new material for a novel non-enzymatic glucose sensor. PMID:26165282

  14. Towards new binary compounds: Synthesis of amorphous phosphorus carbide by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Judy N.; May, Paul W.; Allan, Neil L.; Hallam, Keith R.; Claeyssens, Frederik; Fuge, Gareth M.; Ruda, Michelle; Heard, Peter J.

    2013-02-15

    We have recently undertaken comprehensive computational studies predicting possible crystal structures of the as yet unknown phosphorus carbide as a function of composition. In this work, we report the synthesis of amorphous phosphorus-carbon films by pulsed laser deposition. The local bonding environments of carbon and phosphorus in the synthesised materials have been analysed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; we have found strong evidence for the formation of direct P-C bonding and hence phosphorus carbide. There is a good agreement between the bonding environments found in this phosphorus carbide material and those predicted in the computational work. In particular, the local bonding environments are consistent with those found in the {beta}-InS-like structures that we predict to be low in energy for phosphorus:carbon ratios between 0.25 and 1. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have synthesised amorphous phosphorus-carbon films by pulsed laser deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate formation of direct P-C bonds and hence phosphorus carbide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local bonding environments are consistent with those in predicted structures.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite on nanostructured titanium towards drug eluting implants.

    PubMed

    Rajesh P; Mohan, Nimmy; Yokogawa, Y; Varma, Harikrishna

    2013-07-01

    Titania nanotubes grown on titanium substrates by electrochemical anodization in glycerol-ammonium fluoride-water system were used to develop efficient drug carrying implants upon coating hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic. The nanostructured surfaces achieved by anodization were caped with HA crystallites by pulsed laser deposition. The implant substrates were studied for their drug carrying capacity using gentamicin as a model. The nano-tubular surface with HA coating had better drug loading capacity of about 800 μg/cm(2) gentamicin while the bare anodized substrate carried less than 660 μg/cm(2). The HA coating alone stored as low as 68 μg/cm(2) and released the drug within the initial burst period itself. The ceramic coated anodized substrates were found to be more efficient in controlled delivery for longer than 160 h with a drug release of 0.5 μg/cm(2) even towards the end. The substrate with nanostructuring alone delivered the whole drug within 140 h. This study proposes the application of laser deposition of HA over nanostructured titanium, which proves to be promising towards controlled drug eluting bioceramic coated metallic prostheses.

  16. Pulse Laser Deposition Fabricating Gold Nanoclusters on a Glassy Carbon Surface for Nonenzymatic Glucose Sensing.

    PubMed

    Shu, Honghui; Chang, Gang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Pai; Zhang, Yuting; He, Yunbin

    2015-01-01

    A One-step technique for depositing gold nanoclusters (GNCs) onto the surface of a glassy carbon (GC) plate was developed by using pulse laser deposition (PLD) with appropriate process parameters. The method is simple and clean without using any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. The experimental factors (pulse laser number and the pressure of inert gas (Ar)) that affect the morphology and structure of GNCs, and thus affect the electrocatalytic oxidation performance towards glucose were systematically investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammograms (CV) and chronoamperometry methods). The GC electrode modified by GNCs exhibited a rapid response time (about 2 s), a broad linear range (0.1 to 20 mM), and good stability. The sensitivity was estimated to be 31.18 μA cm(-2) mM(-1) (vs. geometric area), which is higher than that of the Au bulk electrode. It has a good resistance to the common interfering species, such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and 4-acetaminophen (AP). Therefore, this work has demonstrated a simple and effective sensing platform for the nonenzymatic detection of glucose, and can be used as a new material for a novel non-enzymatic glucose sensor.

  17. Pr–Fe–B+α-Fe nanocomposite film magnets prepared by pulsed laser deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Nakano, Masaki; Oshima, Shuichi; Yanai, Takeshi; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi

    2016-07-01

    An increase in the remanence of an isotropic film magnet is indispensable to improve the properties of miniaturized devices. We, therefore, tried to prepare Pr–Fe–B/α-Fe multilayered nanocomposite thick-film magnets by a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. Namely, a rotated target composed of a Pr x Fe14B (x = 2.2 or 2.4) target together with an α-Fe segment was ablated. We also took account of a small spot size of the laser beam in order to suppress the emission of droplets (large particles) from each target. An optimization on the area of the α-Fe segment in each Pr x Fe14B target was carried out, and the remanence of an annealed film reached approximately 1.1 T. Moreover, a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of the above-mentioned sample revealed that the microstructure varied from a multilayered structure (as-deposited) to a dispersed one through the annealing process. Resultantly, the annealed film had a dispersed nanocomposite structure with good exchange coupling.

  18. Improvement of Energy Deposition in Absorber-free Laser Welding through Quasi-simultaneous Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamuschkin, Viktor; Engelmann, Christoph; Olowinsky, Alexander

    Laser transmission welding is usually known to put little thermal stress on the joining partners, indicated by a small heat affected zone (HAZ). However, this only applies when the joining partners have adapted optical properties. When it comes to welding of optically equal thermoplastics without absorbers, the main issue is the HAZ extending far from the interface. To enable welding without absorbers, lasers emitting within the polymer's intrinsic absorption bands are used. So far, different beam shaping approaches have already been investigated to achieve a selective energy deposition at the interface but, with little success to date. The approach presented in this paper is irradiating the welding path quasi-simultaneously to exploit the poor heat conductivity of polymers. Therefore, the influence of the irradiation regime on the seam formation is considered in detail. Another aspect investigated is the length of the irradiated contour which is a crucial factor in quasi-simultaneous welding. The results show that the energy deposition can be significantly improved when the welding contour length does not exceed a critical length determined by the capability of the welding system. However, by welding in segments the approach can also be applied to longer contours without any noticeable loss in welding time. The ideal irradiation regime obtained in the trials corresponds to an effective welding speed of 37mm/s and reduces the vertical extent of the HAZ by 30%.

  19. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite on nanostructured titanium towards drug eluting implants.

    PubMed

    Rajesh P; Mohan, Nimmy; Yokogawa, Y; Varma, Harikrishna

    2013-07-01

    Titania nanotubes grown on titanium substrates by electrochemical anodization in glycerol-ammonium fluoride-water system were used to develop efficient drug carrying implants upon coating hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic. The nanostructured surfaces achieved by anodization were caped with HA crystallites by pulsed laser deposition. The implant substrates were studied for their drug carrying capacity using gentamicin as a model. The nano-tubular surface with HA coating had better drug loading capacity of about 800 μg/cm(2) gentamicin while the bare anodized substrate carried less than 660 μg/cm(2). The HA coating alone stored as low as 68 μg/cm(2) and released the drug within the initial burst period itself. The ceramic coated anodized substrates were found to be more efficient in controlled delivery for longer than 160 h with a drug release of 0.5 μg/cm(2) even towards the end. The substrate with nanostructuring alone delivered the whole drug within 140 h. This study proposes the application of laser deposition of HA over nanostructured titanium, which proves to be promising towards controlled drug eluting bioceramic coated metallic prostheses. PMID:23623112

  20. Confinement of phonon propagation in laser deposited tungsten/polycarbonate multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Florian; Ulrichs, Henning; Pagel, Sinja; Müller, Markus; Mansurova, Maria; Müller, Matthias; Eberl, Christian; Erichsen, Torben; Huebner, Dennis; Vana, Philipp; Mann, Klaus; Münzenberg, Markus; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale multilayer thin films of W and PC (Polycarbonate) show, due to the great difference of the components’ characteristics, fascinating properties for a variety of possible applications and provide an interesting research field, but are hard to fabricate with low layer thicknesses. Because of the great acoustic mismatch between the two materials, such nanoscale structures are promising candidates for new phononic materials, where phonon propagation is strongly reduced. In this article we show for the first time that W/PC-multilayers can indeed be grown with high quality by pulsed laser deposition. We analyzed the polymer properties depending on the laser fluence used for deposition, which enabled us to find best experimental conditions for the fabrication of high-acoustic-mismatch W/PC multilayers. The multilayers were analyzed by fs pump-probe spectroscopy showing that phonon dynamics on the ps time-scale can strongly be tailored by structural design. While already periodic multilayers exhibit strong phonon localization, especially aperiodic structures present outstandingly low phonon propagation properties making such 1D-layered W/PC nano-structures interesting for new phononic applications.

  1. Perpendicularly oriented barium ferrite thin films with low microwave loss, prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da-Ming, Chen; Yuan-Xun, Li; Li-Kun, Han; Chao, Long; Huai-Wu, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Barium ferrite (BaM) thin films are deposited on platinum coated silicon wafers by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The effects of deposition substrate temperature on the microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties of BaM thin films are investigated in detail. It is found that microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties of BaM thin film are very sensitive to deposition substrate temperature, and excellent BaM thin film is obtained when deposition temperature is 910 °C and oxygen pressure is 300 mTorr (1 Torr = 1.3332 × 102 Pa). X-ray diffraction patterns and atomic force microscopy images show that the best thin film has perpendicular orientation and hexagonal morphology, and the crystallographic alignment degree can be calculated to be 0.94. Hysteresis loops reveal that the squareness ratio (M r/M s) is as high as 0.93, the saturated magnetization is 4004 Gs (1 Gs = 104 T), and the anisotropy field is 16.5 kOe (1 Oe = 79.5775 A·m‑1). Ferromagnetic resonance measurements reveal that the gyromagnetic ratio is 2.8 GHz/kOe, and the ferromagnetic resonance linewith is 108 Oe at 50 GHz, which means that this thin film has low microwave loss. These properties make the BaM thin films have potential applications in microwave devices. Project supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (Grant No. KFJJ201506), the Scientific Research Starting Foundation of Hainan University (Grant No. kyqd1539), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hainan Province (Grant No. 20165187).

  2. Hydroxyapatite thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition and radio-frequency magnetron sputtering: comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelea, V.; Morosanu, C.; Iliescu, M.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2004-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) thin films for applications in the biomedical field were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and radio-frequency magnetron sputtering (RF-MS) techniques. The depositions were performed from pure hydroxyapatite targets on Ti-5Al-2.5Fe (TiAlFe) alloys substrates. In order to prevent the HA film penetration by Ti atoms or ions diffused from the Ti-based alloy during and after deposition, the substrates were pre-coated with a thin buffer layer of TiN. In both cases, TiN was introduced by reactive PLD from TiN targets in low-pressure N 2. The PLD films were grown in vacuum onto room temperature substrates. The RF-MS films were deposited in low-pressure argon on substrates heated at 550 °C. The initially amorphous PLD thin films were annealed at 550 °C for 1 h in ambient air in order to restore the initial crystalline structure of HA target. The thickness of the PLD and RF-MS films were ˜1 μm and ˜350 nm, respectively. All films were structurally studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and white light confocal microscopy (WLCM). The mechanical properties of the films were tested by Berkovich nano-indentation. Both PLD and RF-MS films mostly contain HA phase and exhibit good mechanical characteristics. Peaks of CaO were noticed as secondary phase in the GIXRD patterns only for RF-MS films. By its turn, the sputtered films were smoother as compared to the ones deposited by PLD (50 nm versus 250 nm average roughness). The RF-MS films were harder, more mechanically resistant and have a higher Young modulus.

  3. Growth of III-V nitrides and buffer layer investigation by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tzu-Fang

    1999-11-01

    III-V nitrides have been investigated intensively due to the enormous interest in optoelectronic device applications in the green, blue, violet, and near-ultraviolet regions. Advances in III-V nitride materials for short wavelength light sources will lead to both a revolution in optical disk storage, as higher densities can be achieved with short wavelengths, and a major impact on imaging and graphic technology as high quality red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes (LED) and lasers become available. High quality GaN films have mostly been prepared by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and vapor phase epitaxy (VPE). Compared to these techniques, pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a relatively new growth technique used widely for the growth of oxide thin films. However, several advantages of PLD make it worthy of study as a method of growing nitrides. The congruent ablation achieved with short UV-laser pulses allows deposition of a multicomponent material by employing a single target and the ability for depositing a wide variety of materials. This advantage makes PLD very suitable for growing multilayer structures sequentially in the same chamber and investigating the effect of buffer layers. Moreover, the strong nonequilibrium growth conditions of PLD may lead to different nucleation and growth processes. In this work, GaN and (Al,Ga)N films have been epitaxially grown on (0001) sapphire substrate by PLD, which has been successfully applied to controlling the lattice constant and band gap of (Al,Ga)N. Room-temperature photoluminescence of PLD-GaN exhibits a strong band edge emission at 3.4eV. The threading dislocations of GaN are predominantly screw dislocations with Burgers vector of <0001> while edge dislocations with Burgers vector of 1/3<11-20> are the dominant ones in GaN grown by MBE, MOCVD and VPE. This variation observed in defect characteristics may come from the difference in nucleation and growth kinetics between PLD

  4. Chalcogenide Glass Optical Waveguides for Infrared Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Anne, Marie-Laure; Keirsse, Julie; Nazabal, Virginie; Hyodo, Koji; Inoue, Satoru; Boussard-Pledel, Catherine; Lhermite, Hervé; Charrier, Joël; Yanakata, Kiyoyuki; Loreal, Olivier; Le Person, Jenny; Colas, Florent; Compère, Chantal; Bureau, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Due to the remarkable properties of chalcogenide (Chg) glasses, Chg optical waveguides should play a significant role in the development of optical biosensors. This paper describes the fabrication and properties of chalcogenide fibres and planar waveguides. Using optical fibre transparent in the mid-infrared spectral range we have developed a biosensor that can collect information on whole metabolism alterations, rapidly and in situ. Thanks to this sensor it is possible to collect infrared spectra by remote spectroscopy, by simple contact with the sample. In this way, we tried to determine spectral modifications due, on the one hand, to cerebral metabolism alterations caused by a transient focal ischemia in the rat brain and, in the other hand, starvation in the mouse liver. We also applied a microdialysis method, a well known technique for in vivo brain metabolism studies, as reference. In the field of integrated microsensors, reactive ion etching was used to pattern rib waveguides between 2 and 300 μm wide. This technique was used to fabricate Y optical junctions for optical interconnections on chalcogenide amorphous films, which can potentially increase the sensitivity and stability of an optical micro-sensor. The first tests were also carried out to functionalise the Chg planar waveguides with the aim of using them as (bio)sensors. PMID:22423209

  5. Experimental and numerical studies on laser-based powder deposition of slurry erosion resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Prabu

    Slurry erosion (the removal of material caused by the randomly moving high velocity liquid-solid particle mixture) is a serious issue in crude oil drilling, mining, turbines, rocket nozzles, pumps, and boiler tubes that causes excessive downtime and high operating costs as a result of premature part failure. The goal of this research is to enhance the service life of high-value components subjected to slurry erosion by utilizing the concept of functionally graded metal-ceramic composite material (FGMCCM) in which the favorable properties of metal (toughness, ductility, etc.) and ceramic (hardness) are tailored smoothly to improve erosion resistance. Among the potential manufacturing processes, such as the laser-based powder deposition (LBPD), the plasma transferred arc (PTA), and the thermal spray the LBPD process offers good composition and microstructure control with a high deposition rate in producing the FGMCCM. This research focuses on the development of nickel-tungsten carbide (Ni-WC) based FGMCCM using the LBPD process for applications the above mentioned. The LBPD of Ni-WC involves the introduction of Ni and WC powder particle by an inert gas into the laser-formed molten pool at the substrate via nozzles. The LBPD of Ni-WC includes complex multi-physical interactions between the laser beam, Ni-WC powder, substrate, and carrier and shielding gases that are governed by a number of process variables such as laser power, scanning speed, and powder flow rate. In order to develop the best Ni-WC based slurry erosion resistant material using the LBPD process, the following challenges associated with the fabrication and the performance evaluation need to be addressed: 1) flow behavior of the Ni-WC powder and its interaction with the laser, 2) the effect of the process variables, the material compositions, and the thermo-physical properties on thermal cycles, temperature gradient, cooling rate, and residual stress formation within the material and the subsequent

  6. Multi-beam pulsed laser deposition: new method of making nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Abdalla M.; Wilson, Simeon; Blackwell, Ashely; Taylor, Keylantra; Sarkisov, Sergey; Patel, Darayas; Mele, Paolo; Koplitz, Brent

    2015-08-01

    Huge number of new photonic devices, including light emitters, chemical sensors, and energy harvesters, etc. can be made of the nanocomposite coatings produced by the new multi-beam pulsed laser deposition (MB-PLD) process. We provide a short review of the conventional single-beam PLD method and explain why it is poorly suitable for making nanocomposite coatings. Then we describe the new MB-PLD process and system, particularly the multiple-beam matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MB-MAPLE) version with laser beam scanning and plume direction control. The latter one is particularly designed to make organic (polymer) - inorganic functionalized nanocomposite coatings. Polymer film serves as a host for inorganic nanoparticles that add a specific functionality to the film. We analyze the properties of such coatings using the examples of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films impregnated with the nanoparticles of rare-earth (RE) upconversion phosphors. They demonstrated the preservation of microcrystalline structure and bright upconversion emission in visible region of the phosphor nanoparticles after they were transferred in the polymer matrix during the MB-MAPLE process. The proposed technology has thus proven to serve its purpose: to make functionalized polymer nanocomposite coatings for a various potential applications.

  7. Organo-layered double hydroxides composite thin films deposited by laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birjega, R.; Vlad, A.; Matei, A.; Dumitru, M.; Stokker-Cheregi, F.; Dinescu, M.; Zavoianu, R.; Raditoiu, V.; Corobea, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    We used laser techniques to create hydrophobic thin films of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and organo-modified LDHs. A LDH based on Zn-Al with Zn2+/Al3+ ratio of 2.5 was used as host material, while dodecyl sulfate (DS), which is an organic surfactant, acted as guest material. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) were employed for the growth of the films. The organic anions were intercalated in co-precipitation step. The powders were subsequently used either as materials for MAPLE, or they were pressed and used as targets for PLD. The surface topography of the thin films was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the crystallographic structure of the powders and films was checked by X-ray diffraction. FTIR spectroscopy was used to evidence DS interlayer intercalation, both for powders and the derived films. Contact angle measurements were performed in order to establish the wettability properties of the as-prepared thin films, in view of functionalization applications as hydrophobic surfaces, owing to the effect of DS intercalation.

  8. Kr/sup +/ laser-induced chemical vapor deposition of W

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, G.Q.; Szoerenyi, T.; Baeuerle, D.

    1987-07-15

    Kr/sup +/ laser-induced pyrolytic direct writing of W stripes by H/sub 2/ reduction of WF/sub 6/ has been investigated. The reproducibility of the process and the morphology and electrical properties of deposits depend heavily on the partial pressures of both WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/; the best results have been obtained with p(WF/sub 6/) = 5 mbar and 100 mbarless than or equal top(H/sub 2/)less than or equal to800 mbar. For a laser focus of 2w/sub 0/ = 7 ..mu..m and laser powers between 30 and 200 mW, the widths of stripes varied between 1.5 and 15 ..mu..m with corresponding thicknesses between 0.1 to 3 ..mu..m. The width of stripes is independent of the scanning speed within the range 20 ..mu..m/sless than or equal toV/sub s/ less than or equal to400 ..mu..m/s. The electrical resistivities of these stripes were about a factor of 1.3--2.3 larger than the bulk value.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of multimaterial chalcogenide glass fiber tapers with high numerical apertures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya'nan; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Peiqing; Wang, Xunsi; Xu, Yinsheng; Liu, Zijun; Chen, Feifei; Wu, Yuehao; Zhang, Yuji; Wang, Rongping; Tao, Guangming

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of multimaterial chalcogenide fiber tapers that have high numerical apertures (NAs). We first fabricated multimaterial As(2)Se(3)-As(2)S(3) chalcogenide fiber preforms via a modified one-step coextrusion process. The preforms were drawn into multi- and single-mode fibers with high NAs (≈1.45), whose core/cladding diameters were 103/207 and 11/246 μm, respectively. The outer diameter of the fiber was tapered from a few hundred microns to approximately two microns through a self-developed automatic tapering process. Simulation results showed that the zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs) of the tapers were shorter than 2 μm, indicating that the tapers can be conveniently pumped by commercial short wavelength infrared lasers. We also experimentally demonstrated the supercontinuum generation (SCG) in a 15-cm-long multimaterial As(2)Se(3)-As(2)S(3) chalcogenide taper with 1.9 μm core diameter and the ZDW was shifted to 3.3 μm. When pumping the taper with 100 fs short pulses at 3.4 µm, a 20 dB spectral of the generated supercontinuum spans from 1.5 μm to longer than 4.8 μm. PMID:26368447

  10. Angular Distribution of Tungsten Material and Ion Flux during Nanosecond Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. S.; Dogar, A. H.; Qayyum, A.; Abbasi, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten thin films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on glass substrates placed at the angles of 0∘ to 70∘ with respect to the target surface normal. Rutherford backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) analysis of the films indicated that about 90% of tungsten material flux is distributed in a cone of 40∘ solid angle while about 54% of it lies even in a narrower cone of 10∘ solid angle. Significant diffusion of tungsten in glass substrate has been observed in the films deposited at smaller angles with respect to target surface normal. Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements performed using Langmuir probe indicated that the most probable ion energy decreases from about 600 to 91eV for variation of θ from 0∘ to 70∘. In general ion energy spread is quite large at all angles investigated here. The enhanced tungsten diffusion in glass substrate observed at smaller angles is most probably due to the higher ion energy and ion assisted recoil implantation of already deposited tungsten.

  11. Fabrication of Nano-engineered Transparent Conducting Oxides by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Gondoni, Paolo; Ghidelli, Matteo; Di Fonzo, Fabio; Li Bassi, Andrea; Casari, Carlo S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanosecond Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) in the presence of a background gas allows the deposition of metal oxides with tunable morphology, structure, density and stoichiometry by a proper control of the plasma plume expansion dynamics. Such versatility can be exploited to produce nanostructured films from compact and dense to nanoporous characterized by a hierarchical assembly of nano-sized clusters. In particular we describe the detailed methodology to fabricate two types of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films as transparent electrodes in photovoltaic devices: 1) at low O2 pressure, compact films with electrical conductivity and optical transparency close to the state of the art transparent conducting oxides (TCO) can be deposited at room temperature, to be compatible with thermally sensitive materials such as polymers used in organic photovoltaics (OPVs); 2) highly light scattering hierarchical structures resembling a forest of nano-trees are produced at higher pressures. Such structures show high Haze factor (>80%) and may be exploited to enhance the light trapping capability. The method here described for AZO films can be applied to other metal oxides relevant for technological applications such as TiO2, Al2O3, WO3 and Ag4O4. PMID:23486076

  12. Pulsed laser deposited GeTe-rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 thin films

    PubMed Central

    Bouška, M.; Pechev, S.; Simon, Q.; Boidin, R.; Nazabal, V.; Gutwirth, J.; Baudet, E.; Němec, P.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for the fabrication of Ge-Te rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 (Ge6Sb2Te9, Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15) amorphous thin films. To evaluate the influence of GeTe content in the deposited films on physico-chemical properties of the GST materials, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction and reflectometry, atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, optical reflectivity, and sheet resistance temperature dependences as well as variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize as-deposited (amorphous) and annealed (crystalline) layers. Upon crystallization, optical functions and electrical resistance of the films change drastically, leading to large optical and electrical contrast between amorphous and crystalline phases. Large changes of optical/electrical properties are accompanied by the variations of thickness, density, and roughness of the films due to crystallization. Reflectivity contrast as high as ~0.21 at 405 nm was calculated for Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15 layers. PMID:27199107

  13. Influence of nitrogen background pressure on structure of niobium nitride films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ashraf H. Farha, Ali O. Er, Yüksel Ufuktepe, Ganapati Myneni, Hani E. Elsayed-Ali

    2011-12-01

    Depositions of niobium nitride thin films on Nb using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with different nitrogen background pressures (10.7 to 66.7 Pa) have been performed. The effect of nitrogen pressure on NbN formation in this process was examined. The deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Hexagonal {beta}-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic {delta}-NbN phases resulted when growth was performed in low nitrogen background pressures. With an increase in nitrogen pressure, NbN films grew in single hexagonal {beta}-Nb{sub 2}N phase. The formation of the hexagonal texture during the film growth was studied. The c/a ratio of the hexagonal {beta}-Nb{sub 2}N unit cell parameter increases with increasing nitrogen pressure. Furthermore, the N:Nb ratio has a strong influence on the lattice parameter of the {delta}-NbN, where the highest value was achieved for this ratio was 1.19. It was found that increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to change in the phase structure of the NbN film. With increasing nitrogen pressure, the film structure changes from hexagonal to a mixed phase and then back to a hexagonal phase.

  14. Fabrication of nano-engineered transparent conducting oxides by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Gondoni, Paolo; Ghidelli, Matteo; Di Fonzo, Fabio; Li Bassi, Andrea; Casari, Carlo S

    2013-02-27

    Nanosecond Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) in the presence of a background gas allows the deposition of metal oxides with tunable morphology, structure, density and stoichiometry by a proper control of the plasma plume expansion dynamics. Such versatility can be exploited to produce nanostructured films from compact and dense to nanoporous characterized by a hierarchical assembly of nano-sized clusters. In particular we describe the detailed methodology to fabricate two types of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films as transparent electrodes in photovoltaic devices: 1) at low O₂ pressure, compact films with electrical conductivity and optical transparency close to the state of the art transparent conducting oxides (TCO) can be deposited at room temperature, to be compatible with thermally sensitive materials such as polymers used in organic photovoltaics (OPVs); 2) highly light scattering hierarchical structures resembling a forest of nano-trees are produced at higher pressures. Such structures show high Haze factor (>80%) and may be exploited to enhance the light trapping capability. The method here described for AZO films can be applied to other metal oxides relevant for technological applications such as TiO₂, Al₂O₃, WO₃ and Ag₄O₄.

  15. Pulsed laser deposited GeTe-rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouška, M.; Pechev, S.; Simon, Q.; Boidin, R.; Nazabal, V.; Gutwirth, J.; Baudet, E.; Němec, P.

    2016-05-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for the fabrication of Ge-Te rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 (Ge6Sb2Te9, Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15) amorphous thin films. To evaluate the influence of GeTe content in the deposited films on physico-chemical properties of the GST materials, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction and reflectometry, atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, optical reflectivity, and sheet resistance temperature dependences as well as variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize as-deposited (amorphous) and annealed (crystalline) layers. Upon crystallization, optical functions and electrical resistance of the films change drastically, leading to large optical and electrical contrast between amorphous and crystalline phases. Large changes of optical/electrical properties are accompanied by the variations of thickness, density, and roughness of the films due to crystallization. Reflectivity contrast as high as ~0.21 at 405 nm was calculated for Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15 layers.

  16. Phase transition and thermal expansion studies of alumina thin films prepared by reactive pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, G; Thirumurugesan, R; Mohandas, E; Sastikumar, D; Kuppusami, P; Songl, J I

    2014-10-01

    Aluminium oxide (Al2O3) thin films were deposited on Si (100) substrates at an optimized oxygen partial pressure of 3 x 10(-3) mbar at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films were characterized by high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The HTXRD pattern showed the cubic y-Al2O3 phase in the temperature range 300-973 K. At temperatures ≥ 1073 K, the δ and θ-phases of Al2O3 were observed. The mean linear thermal expansion coefficient and volume thermal expansion coefficient of γ-Al2O3 was found to be 12.66 x 10(-6) K(-1) and 38.87 x 10(-6) K(-1) in the temperature range 300 K-1073 K. The field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed a smooth and structureless morphology of the films deposited on Si (100). The atomic force microscopy study indicated the increased crystallinity and surface roughness of the films after annealing at high temperature.

  17. Antibacterial copper-nickel bilayers and multilayer coatings by pulsed laser deposition on titanium.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Vinita; Josephine, J; George, R P; Krishnan, R; Dash, S; Kamruddin, M; Kalavathi, S; Manoharan, N; Tyagi, A K; Dayal, R K

    2009-11-01

    Biofouling, especially microfouling, is a major concern with the use of titanium (Ti) in the marine environment as a condenser material in cooling water systems. Earlier, copper-nickel (Cu/Ni) alloys were extensively used in marine environments due to their high corrosion and biofouling resistance. However, the choice of condenser material for the new fast breeder reactor in Kalpakkam is Ti to avoid steam side corrosion problems, which may pose a threat to steam generator parts having sodium as the secondary coolant. This study evaluates the surface modification of Ti using nano films of copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) to utilize the antibacterial property of copper ions in reducing microfouling. The surface modification of Ti was carried out by the deposition of a Cu/Ni bilayer and (Cu/Ni)(10) multilayer films using a pulsed laser deposition technique. Various surface characterization studies revealed that the deposited Cu/Ni films were thin and nanocrystalline in nature. The antibacterial properties were evaluated using total viable count and epifluorescence microscopic techniques. The results showed an apparent decrease in bacterial attachment on multilayered and bilayered Cu/Ni thin films on Ti surfaces. Comparative studies between the two types of films showed a bigger reduction in numbers of microorganisms on the multilayers. PMID:20183129

  18. Pulsed laser deposited GeTe-rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Bouška, M; Pechev, S; Simon, Q; Boidin, R; Nazabal, V; Gutwirth, J; Baudet, E; Němec, P

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for the fabrication of Ge-Te rich GeTe-Sb2Te3 (Ge6Sb2Te9, Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15) amorphous thin films. To evaluate the influence of GeTe content in the deposited films on physico-chemical properties of the GST materials, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction and reflectometry, atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, optical reflectivity, and sheet resistance temperature dependences as well as variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize as-deposited (amorphous) and annealed (crystalline) layers. Upon crystallization, optical functions and electrical resistance of the films change drastically, leading to large optical and electrical contrast between amorphous and crystalline phases. Large changes of optical/electrical properties are accompanied by the variations of thickness, density, and roughness of the films due to crystallization. Reflectivity contrast as high as ~0.21 at 405 nm was calculated for Ge8Sb2Te11, Ge10Sb2Te13, and Ge12Sb2Te15 layers. PMID:27199107

  19. Mobility enhancement in graphene transistors on low temperature pulsed laser deposited boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, Md Ahsan E-mail: gkoley@clemson.edu; Koley, Goutam E-mail: gkoley@clemson.edu; Glavin, Nicholas; Singh, Amol; Naguy, Rachel; Jespersen, Michael; Voevodin, Andrey

    2015-11-16

    Low temperature pulsed laser deposited (PLD) ultrathin boron nitride (BN) on SiO{sub 2} was investigated as a dielectric for graphene electronics, and a significant enhancement in electrical transport properties of graphene/PLD BN compared to graphene/SiO{sub 2} has been observed. Graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and transferred on PLD deposited and annealed BN exhibited up to three times higher field effect mobility compared to graphene on the SiO{sub 2} substrate. Graphene field effect transistor devices fabricated on 5 nm BN/SiO{sub 2} (300 nm) yielded maximum hole and electron mobility of 4980 and 4200 cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively. In addition, significant improvement in carrier homogeneity and reduction in extrinsic doping in graphene on BN has been observed. An average Dirac point of 3.5 V and residual carrier concentration of 7.65 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2} was observed for graphene transferred on 5 nm BN at ambient condition. The overall performance improvement on PLD BN can be attributed to dielectric screening of charged impurities, similar crystal structure and phonon modes, and reduced substrate induced doping.

  20. Microstructure and tribological behavior of pulsed laser deposited a-CN x films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X. H.; Tu, J. P.; Song, R. G.

    2010-03-01

    The a-CN x films were deposited onto high-speed steel substrate by pulsed laser deposition at different nitrogen pressures. The tribological properties of the films in humid air and in vacuum were investigated using a ball-on-disk tribometer under various loads. The composition, microstructure and morphology of the films, wear tracks and paired balls were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA), X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). With increasing the deposition pressure, the fraction of sp 3 C bond reduces, the fraction of trapped nitrogen increases and the friction coefficient of the films declines both in humid air and vacuum. The friction coefficient of a-CN x film decreases with increasing normal load. The tribological performances of the films in humid air are better than those of in vacuum. A transferred graphite-like tribo-layer is observed from a-CN x film to the paired ball for both environments.

  1. Super growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on pulsed laser deposited catalytic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejes, D.; Pápa, Z.; Kecsenovity, E.; Réti, B.; Toth, Z.; Hernadi, K.

    2015-03-01

    Efficient and reproducible growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) requires precise setting of the properties of the catalyst thin films and CVD conditions. In this work, super growth of vertically aligned CNTs onto Al2O3 support and Fe-Co catalyst layer system is presented. The layers were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) onto silicon wafer pieces. Their thickness and optical properties were controlled by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The effect of heat treatment at 750 °C in nitrogen and in hydrogen of these PLD layers was compared. High-resolution electron microscopic images showed that treatment of catalyst layers in H2 resulted in finer and denser catalytic particles. As a result, well-aligned, dense and few-walled CNT forests with 1-1.5 mm height were deposited by water-vapor-assisted CVD on the hydrogen-treated films, while without hydrogen treatment defected CNT structures were grown. According to these observations, Raman spectroscopy showed a higher degree of crystallinity in case of CNT-s, where reduction by hydrogen influenced the oxidation state of the metallic catalytic particles in a beneficial way.

  2. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributedmore » to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.« less

  3. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributed to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.

  4. An experimental investigation of inhomogeneities in resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed-laser deposited thin polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Daniel M.; Corgan, Jeff; Yi, Sunyong; Khan, Mishae; Hughes, Leon; Gurudas, Ullas; Papantonakis, Michael; McGill, R. Andrew

    2010-08-01

    Thin polymer films are deposited using matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation and subsequently are characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. An Er : YAG laser (2937 nm, 350 μs) is used as a light source and the effect of the energy density supplied by the laser on the morphology of the deposited films is investigated. It is found that the appearance of undesirable non-uniform morphological features arises from either poor solubility of the guest molecules or insufficient energy density provided by the laser to vaporize the entire ejected volume. In addition, the surface roughness of two guest-host systems is found to depend linearly on the polymer concentration. These results allow us to better understand earlier work in the field and to establish a framework by which MAPLE films may be improved.

  5. Fabrication of Co thin films using pulsed laser deposition method with or without employing external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsani, M. H.; Mehrabad, M. Jalali; Kameli, P.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the external magnetic field effects on growth condition during deposition processes of the Co thin films were studied. Two specimens of Co films with different condition (with and without external magnetic field) were synthesized by pulsed laser deposition method. Structural and magnetic properties of the Co thin films were systematically studied, using atomic force microscope analysis and magnetization measurement, respectively. During the deposition processes, the external applied magnetic field had been provided by a permanent magnet. The experimental results show that the external magnetic field enables one to tune the magnetic properties of the deposited thin films. To clarify this effect, using Multi-Physics COMSOL simulation environment, a study of vapor flux by applied magnetic field during deposition were performed. Comparison between experimental data and output data of the simulation show promising accommodation and approve the existence of a strong correlation between the structural and magnetic properties of the specimens, and deposition rate of Co thin films.

  6. MAPLE-deposited PFO films: influence of the laser fluence and repetition rate on the film emission and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricato, A. P.; Anni, M.; Cesaria, M.; Lattante, S.; Leggieri, G.; Leo, C.; Martino, M.; Perulli, A.; Resta, V.

    2015-06-01

    The Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique is emerging as an alternative route to the conventional methods for depositing organic materials, although the MAPLE-deposited films very often present high surface roughness and characteristic morphological features. Films of the blue-emitting polymer, poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene)—PFO, have been deposited by MAPLE to investigate the influence of the laser fluence and repetition rate on both their topography and emission properties. The laser fluence has been changed from 150 up to 450 mJ/cm2, while laser repetition rates of 2 and 10 Hz have been considered. The interplay/relationship between the topography and the emission properties of the MAPLE-deposited films has been studied by confocal microscopy, photoluminescence spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. It has been found that under high irradiation (fluence of 450 mJ/cm2) conditions, the sample surface is characterized by bubbles presenting the intrinsic PFO blue emission. Instead, while improvements in the film morphology can be observed for lowered fluence and laser repetition rate, green emission becomes predominant in such conditions. Such result is very interesting to better understand the MAPLE ablation mechanism, which is discussed in this study.

  7. Laser Surface Treatment of Stellite 6 Coating Deposited by HVOF on 316L Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoja-Razavi, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research aimed to study the effects of laser glazing treatment on microstructure, hardness, and oxidation behavior of Stellite 6 coating deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying. The as-sprayed Stellite 6 coating (ST-HVOF) was subjected to single-pass and multiple-pass laser treatments to achieve the optimum glazing parameters. Microstructural characterizations were performed by x-ray diffractometry and field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Two-step optimization showed that laser treatment at the power of 200 W with a scan rate of 4 mm/s causes a surface layer with a thickness of 208 ± 32 µm to be remelted, while the underlying layers retain the original ST-HVOF coating structure. The obtained sample (ST-Glazing) exhibited a highly dense and uniform structure with an extremely low porosity of ~0.3%, much lower than that of ST-HVOF coating (2.3%). The average microhardness of ST-Glazing was measured to be 519 Hv0.3 indicating a 17% decrease compared to ST-HVOF (625 Hv0.3) due to the residual stress relief and dendrite coarsening from submicron size to ~3.4 µm after laser treatment. The lowest oxidation mass gain was obtained for ST-Glazing by 2 mg/cm2 after 8 cycles at 900 °C indicating 52 and 84% improvement in oxidation resistance in comparison to ST-HVOF and bare 316L steel substrates, respectively.

  8. The Surface Chemistry of Metal Chalcogenide Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Nicholas Charles

    The surface chemistry of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals is explored through several interrelated analytical investigations. After a brief discussion of the nanocrystal history and applications, molecular orbital theory is used to describe the electronic properties of semiconductors, and how these materials behave on the nanoscale. Quantum confinement plays a major role in dictating the optical properties of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals, however surface states also have an equally significant contribution to the electronic properties of nanocrystals due to the high surface area to volume ratio of nanoscale semiconductors. Controlling surface chemistry is essential to functionalizing these materials for biological imaging and photovoltaic device applications. To better understand the surface chemistry of semiconducting nanocrystals, three competing surface chemistry models are presented: 1.) The TOPO model, 2.) the Non-stoichiometric model, and 3.) the Neutral Fragment model. Both the non-stoichiometric and neutral fragment models accurately describe the behavior of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. These models rely on the covalent bond classification system, which divides ligands into three classes: 1.) X-type, 1-electron donating ligands that balance charge with excess metal at the nanocrystal surface, 2.) L-type, 2-electron donors that bind metal sites, and 3.) Z-type, 2-electron acceptors that bind chalcogenide sites. Each of these ligand classes is explored in detail to better understand the surface chemistry of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. First, chloride-terminated, tri-n-butylphosphine (Bu 3P) bound CdSe nanocrystals were prepared by cleaving carboxylate ligands from CdSe nanocrystals with chlorotrimethylsilane in Bu3P solution. 1H and 31P{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the isolated nanocrystals allowed assignment of distinct signals from several free and bound species, including surface-bound Bu3P and [Bu3P-H]+[Cl]- ligands as well as a Bu

  9. Growth of monocrystalline Cu(1 1 1) films on MgO(1 1 1) by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aweke, F.; Antoni, F.; Hulik, J.; Morvan, G.; Speisser, C.; Veis, P.; Le Normand, F.

    2015-05-01

    Copper (Cu) films with a minimal thickness of 300 nm were grown on MgO(1 1 1) substrates in high vacuum by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at various temperatures to achieve a single crystal Cu film with flat terraces without grain boundaries. We investigated the effect of the substrate temperature, the pulse repetition rate, the deposition time and the laser fluence. A temperature threshold is observed above which the growth mode is changed from a uniform flat mode to a three dimensional mode. A combined process involving a germination step at moderate temperature followed by a growth step at higher temperature yields a 450 nm almost continuous film.

  10. Determination of the stability of laser deposited apatite coatings in phosphate buffered saline solution using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, E. N.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Popov, V. K.; Sobol, E. N.; Howdle, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    We report the use of grazing angle Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for determination of the stability to erosion of hydroxyapatite coatings. A series of coatings were deposited by pulsed laser ablation onto titanium foils. The coatings were exposed to a phosphate buffered saline solution, and FTIR spectroscopy was used to monitor the depletion of infrared bands associated with phosphate moieties in the hydroxyapatite coatings. The technique allows determintion of the effects of the laser deposition parameters upon the stability to erosion of the coatings.

  11. Nd:YVO4 laser direct ablation of indium tin oxide films deposited on glass and polyethylene terephthalate substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Kwon, Sang Jik; Han, Jae-Hee; Cho, Eou Sik

    2013-09-01

    A Q-switched diode-pumped neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate (Nd:YVO4, lambda = 1064 nm) laser was applied to obtain the indium tin oxide (ITO) patterns on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by a direct etching method. After the ITO films were deposited on a soda-lime glass and PET substrate, laser ablations were carried out on the ITO films for various conditions and the laser ablated results on the ITO films were investigated and analyzed considering the effects of substrates on the laser etching. The laser ablated widths on ITO deposited on glass were found to be much narrower than those on ITO deposited on PET substrate, especially, at a higher scanning speed of laser beam such as 1000 mm/s and 2000 mm/s. As the thermal conductivity of glass substrate is about 7.5 times higher than that of PET, more thermal energy would be spread and transferred to lateral direction in the ITO film in case of PET substrate. PMID:24205645

  12. Rapid deposition of biaxially-textured CeO 2 buffer layers on polycrystalline nickel alloy for superconducting tapes by ion assisted pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xuming; Winkler, Dag

    2000-07-01

    The long deposition time of sharply textured buffer layer was the main obstacle for the ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) process to go to large scale fabrication of superconducting tapes. This paper shows that this obstacle can be overcome. (002)-oriented, sharply-textured CeO 2 buffer layers with (111) phi-scan full width of half maximum (FWHM) of 10° were deposited by ion beam assisted pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on polycrystalline Hastelloy C in 10 min. The deposition rate was about 3 nm/s. CeO 2 film surface was smooth and free of cracks compared with film by inclined substrate deposition (ISD). The IBAD was carried out at small ion-to-atom ratio values, which resulted in CeO 2 (200) plane aligned along the incident plane of the ion beam. The Jc of Y 1Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) film deposited on the buffer layer was 7.3×10 5 A/cm 2.

  13. Pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured Co-B-O thin films as efficient catalyst for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, H.; Singh, A. K.; Patel, N.; Fernandes, R.; Gupta, S.; Kothari, D. C.; Miotello, A.; Sinha, S.

    2016-11-01

    Nanoparticles assembled Co-B-O thin film catalysts were synthesized by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique for hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride (SBH). Surface morphology of the deposited films was investigated using SEM and TEM, while compositional analysis was studied using XPS. Structural properties of Co-B-O films were examined using XRD and HRTEM. Laser process is able to produce well separated and immobilized Co-B-O NPs on the film surface which act as active centers leading to superior catalytic activity producing hydrogen at a significantly higher rate as compared to bulk powder. Co-B-O thin film catalyst produces hydrogen at a maximum rate of ∼4400 ml min-1 g-1 of catalyst, which is four times higher than powder catalyst. PLD parameters such as laser fluence and substrate-target distance were varied during deposition in order to understand the role of size and density of the immobilized Co-B-O NPs in the catalytic process. Films deposited at 3-5 cm substrate-target distance showed better performance than that deposited at 6 cm, mainly on account of the higher density of active Co-B-O NPs on the films surface. Features such as high particle density, polycrystalline nature of Co NPs and good stability against agglomeration mainly contribute towards the superior catalytic activity of Co-B-O films deposited by PLD.

  14. Surface structure of tetrahedral-coordinated amorphous diamond-like carbon films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, T.W.; DiNardo, N.J. |; Martinez-Miranda, L.J.; Fang, F.; Friedmann, T.A.; Sullivan, J.P.; Siegal, M.P.

    1994-12-31

    The structure and composition of tetrahedral-coordinated amorphous diamond-like carbon films (a-tC) grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of graphite has been studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The nanometer-scale surface structure has been studied as a function of growth parameters (e.g., laser energy density and film thickness) using contact-mode and tapping-mode AFM. Although the surfaces were found to be generally smooth, they exhibited reproducible structural features on several size scales which correlate with the variation of laser energy and th excited ion etching.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of air-sensitive hydride epitaxial thin films: LiH

    SciTech Connect

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Shigehito; Kuwano, Hiroki; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-09-01

    We report on the epitaxial thin film growth of an air-sensitive hydride, lithium hydride (LiH), using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). We first synthesized a dense LiH target, which is key for PLD growth of high-quality hydride films. Then, we obtained epitaxial thin films of [100]-oriented LiH on a MgO(100) substrate at 250 °C under a hydrogen pressure of 1.3 × 10{sup −2} Pa. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the film demonstrates a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and that the film with a thickness of ∼10 nm has a good surface flatness, with root-mean-square roughness R{sub RMS} of ∼0.4 nm.

  16. Highly crystalline MoS{sub 2} thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Serrao, Claudy R.; You, Long; Gadgil, Sushant; Hu, Chenming; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Diamond, Anthony M.; Hsu, Shang-Lin; Clarkson, James; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2015-02-02

    Highly crystalline thin films of MoS{sub 2} were prepared over large area by pulsed laser deposition down to a single monolayer on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001), GaN (0001), and SiC-6H (0001) substrates. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction studies show that the films are quasi-epitaxial with good out-of-plane texture. In addition, the thin films were observed to be highly crystalline with rocking curve full width half maxima of 0.01°, smooth with a RMS roughness of 0.27 nm, and uniform in thickness based on Raman spectroscopy. From transport measurements, the as-grown films were found to be p-type.

  17. Lithium outdiffusion in LiTi2O4 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesoraca, S.; Kleibeuker, J. E.; Prasad, B.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.; Blamire, M. G.

    2016-11-01

    We report surface chemical cation composition analysis of high quality superconducting LiTi2O4 thin films, grown epitaxially on MgAl2O4 (111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The superconducting transition temperature of the films was 13.8 K. Surface chemical composition is crucial for the formation of a good metal/insulator interface for integrating LiTi2O4 into full-oxide spin-filtering devices in order to minimize the formation of structural defects and increase the spin polarisation efficiency. In consideration of this, we report a detailed angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Results show Li segregation at the surface of LiTi2O4 films. We attribute this process due to outdiffusion of Li toward the outermost LiTi2O4 layers.

  18. Hydroxyapatite thin films synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition onto titanium mesh implants for cranioplasty applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duta, L.; Stan, G. E.; Popescu, A. C.; Socol, G.; Miroiu, F. M.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Ianculescu, A.; Poeata, I.; Chiriac, A.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the synthesis of advanced nanostructured hydroxyapatite thin films onto 3D titanium (Ti) mesh substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition method. Morphological and structural investigations as well as pull-out tests proved the stoichiometric transfer of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) films along with their good adherence. In vivo tests were performed on 12 patients (six with simple Ti mesh, six with Ti mesh biofunctionalized with HA). The tomodensitometry analysis of the cranial control scans evidenced the process of osseogenesis. For four patients with implanted HA/Ti mesh structures, the modification of the value obtained on Hounsfield scale was observed at the level of implant, proving the progress of osseointegration. We conclude that the structures exhibit excellent bonding strength and functionality, and are suitable for neurosurgical applications.

  19. Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film grown by pulse laser deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Bhaumik V.; Joshi, U. S.

    2016-05-01

    Highly electrically conducting and transparent in visible light IGZO thin film were grown on glass substrate at substrate temperature of 400 C by a pulse laser deposition techniques. Structural, surface, electrical, and optical properties of IGZO thin films were investigated at room temperature. Smooth surface morphology and amorphous nature of the film has been confirmed from the AFM and GIXRD analysis. A resistivity down to 7.7×10-3 V cm was reproducibly obtained while maintaining optical transmission exceeding 70% at wavelengths from 340 to 780 nm. The carrier densities of the film was obtain to the value 1.9×1018 cm3, while the Hall mobility of the IGZO thin film was 16 cm2 V-1S-1.

  20. Tight comparison of Mg and Y thin film photocathodes obtained by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, A.; Gontad, F.; Solombrino, L.; Chiadroni, E.; Broitman, E.; Perrone, A.

    2016-11-01

    In this work Magnesium (Mg) and Yttrium (Y) thin films have been deposited on Copper (Cu) polycrystalline substrates by the pulsed laser ablation technique for photocathode application. Such metallic materials are studied for their interesting photoemission properties and are proposed as a good alternative to the Cu photocathode, which is generally used in radio-frequency guns. Mg and Y films were uniform with no substantial differences in morphology; a polycrystalline structure was found for both of them. Photoemission measurements of such cathodes based on thin films were performed, revealing a quantum efficiency higher than Cu bulk. Photoemission theory according to the three-step model of Spicer is invoked to explain the superior photoemission performance of Mg with respect to Y.

  1. Surface roughness analysis after machining of direct laser deposited tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Chwalczuk, T.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental surface roughness analysis in machining of tungsten carbide is presented. The tungsten carbide was received using direct laser deposition technology (DLD). Experiments carried out included milling of tungsten carbide samples using monolithic torus cubic boron nitride (CBN) tool and grinding with the diamond cup wheel. The effect of machining method on the generated surface topography was analysed. The 3D surface topographies were measured using optical surface profiler. The research revealed, that surface roughness generated after the machining of tungsten carbide is affected by feed per tooth (fz) value related to kinematic-geometric projection only in a minor extent. The main factor affecting machined surface roughness is the occurrence of micro grooves and protuberances on the machined surface, as well as other phenomena connected, inter alia, with the mechanism for material removal.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of hexagonal GaN-on-Si(100) template for MOCVD applications.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kun-Ching; Jiang, Ming-Chien; Liu, Hong-Ru; Hsueh, Hsu-Hung; Kao, Yu-Cheng; Horng, Ray-Hua; Wuu, Dong-Sing

    2013-11-01

    Growth of hexagonal GaN on Si(100) templates via pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was investigated for the further development of GaN-on-Si technology. The evolution of the GaN growth mechanism at various growth times was monitored by SEM and TEM, which indicated that the GaN growth mode changes gradually from island growth to layer growth as the growth time increases up to 2 hours. Moreover, the high-temperature operation (1000 °C) of the PLD meant no significant GaN meltback occurred on the GaN template surface. The completed GaN templates were subjected to MOCVD treatment to regrow a GaN layer. The results of X-ray diffraction analysis and photoluminescence measurements show not only the reliability of the GaN template, but also the promise of the PLD technique for the development of GaN-on-Si technology.

  3. Forced convection and transport effects during hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, James L; Chavez, Craig A; Espinoza, Miguel; Black, Marcie; Maskaly, Karlene; Boman, Mats

    2009-01-01

    This work explores mass transport processes during HP-LCYD, including the transverse forced-flow of precursor gases through a nozzle to enhance fiber growth rates. The use of laser trapping and suspension of nano-scale particles in the precursor flow is also described, providing insights into the nature of the gas flow, including jetting from the fiber tip and thermodiffusion processes near the reaction zone. The effects of differing molecular-weight buffer gases is also explored in conjunction with the Soret effect, and it is found that nucleation at the deposit surface (and homogeneous nucleation in the gas phase) can be enhanced/ retarded, depending on the buffer gas molecular weight. To demonstrate that extensive microstructures can be grown simultaneously, three-dimensional fiber arrays are also grown in-parallel using diffractive optics--without delatory effects from neighboring reaction sites.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of Mn doped CdSe quantum dots for improved solar cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Qilin; Wang, Wenyong E-mail: jtang2@uwyo.edu; Tang, Jinke E-mail: jtang2@uwyo.edu; Sabio, Erwin M.

    2014-05-05

    In this work, we demonstrate (1) a facile method to prepare Mn doped CdSe quantum dots (QDs) on Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} photoanodes by pulsed laser deposition and (2) improved device performance of quantum dot sensitized solar cells of the Mn doped QDs (CdSe:Mn) compared to the undoped QDs (CdSe). The band diagram of photoanode Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} and sensitizer CdSe:Mn QD is proposed based on the incident-photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) data. Mn-modified band structure leads to absorption at longer wavelengths than the undoped CdSe QDs, which is due to the exchange splitting of the CdSe:Mn conduction band by the Mn dopant. Three-fold increase in the IPCE efficiency has also been observed for the Mn doped samples.

  5. Plasma-Enhanced Pulsed Laser Deposition of Wide Bandgap Nitrides for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triplett, G. E., Jr.; Durbin, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    The need for a reliable, inexpensive technology for small-scale space power applications where photovoltaic or chemical battery approaches are not feasible has prompted renewed interest in radioisotope-based energy conversion devices. Although a number of devices have been developed using a variety of semiconductors, the single most limiting factor remains the overall lifetime of the radioisotope battery. Recent advances in growth techniques for ultra-wide bandgap III-nitride semiconductors provide the means to explore a new group of materials with the promise of significant radiation resistance. Additional benefits resulting from the use of ultra-wide bandgap materials include a reduction in leakage current and higher operating voltage without a loss of energy transfer efficiency. This paper describes the development of a novel plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition system for the growth of cubic boron nitride semiconducting thin films, which will be used to construct pn junction devices for alphavoltaic applications.

  6. Preparation of strontium hexaferrite film by pulsed laser deposition with in situ heating and post annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudpanah, S. M.; Seyyed Ebrahimi, S. A.; Ong, C. K.

    2012-09-01

    Strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) films have been fabricated by pulsed laser deposition on Si(1 0 0) substrate with Pt(1 1 1) underlayer through in situ and post annealing heat treatments. C-axis perpendicular oriented SrFe12O19 films have been confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns for both of the in situ heated and post annealed films. The cluster-like single domain structures are recognized by magnetic force microscopy. Higher coercivity in perpendicular direction than that for the in-plane direction shows that the films have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. High perpendicular coercivity, around 3.8 kOe, has been achieved after post annealing at 500 °C. Higher coercivity of the post annealed SrFe12O19 films was found to be related to nanosized grain of about 50-80 nm.

  7. Magnetic properties of strontium hexaferrite films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudpanah, S. M.; Seyyed Ebrahimi, S. A.; Ong, C. K.

    2012-08-01

    The magnetic properties of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition on the Si(100) substrate with Pt(111) underlayer have been studied as a function of film thickness (50-700 nm). X-ray diffraction patterns confirm that the films have c-axis perpendicular orientation. The coercivities in perpendicular direction are higher than those for in-plane direction which indicates the films have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The coercivity was found to decrease with increasing of thickness, due to the increasing of the grain size and relaxation in lattice strain. The 200 nm thick film exhibits hexagonal shape grains of 150 nm and optimum magnetic properties of Ms=298 emu/cm3 and Hc=2540 Oe.

  8. Detecting salt deposition on a wind turbine blade using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiesh Kumar, V.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Sarathi, R.

    2013-07-01

    The study of pollution performance on a wind turbine blade due to lightning is important, as it can cause major damage to wind turbine blades. In the present work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) technique is used to understand the influence of pollutant deposited on a wind turbine blade in an off-shore environment. A methodical experimental study was carried out by adopting IEC 60507 standards, and it was observed that the lightning discharge propagates at the interface between the pollutant and the glass fiber reinforced plastic (Material used in manufacturing of wind turbine blades). In addition, as a diagnostic condition monitoring technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is proposed and demonstrated to rank the severity of pollutant on the wind turbine blades from a remote area. Optical emission spectra observed during surface discharge process induced by lightning impulse voltage is in agreement with the spectra observed during LIBS.

  9. Technology of High-speed Direct Laser Deposition from Ni-based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimova-Korsmik, Olga; Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeniy; Babkin, Konstantin; Petrovsky, Pavel; Travyanov, Andrey

    Recently, additive manufacturing is the one of most perspective technologies; it can replace conventional methods of casting and subsequent time-consuming machining. One of the most interesting additive technologies - high-speed direct laser deposition (HSDLD) allows realizing heterophase process during the manufacturing, which there is process takes place with a partial melting of powder. This is particularly important for materials, which are sensitive to strong fluctuations of temperature treatment regimes, like nickel base alloys with high content of gamma prime phase. This alloys are interested for many industrial areas, mostly there are used in engine systems, aircraft and shipbuilding, aeronautics. Heating and cooling rates during the producing process determine structure and affect on its properties. Using HSDLD process it possible to make a products from Ni superalloys with ultrafine microstructure and satisfactory mechanical characteristics without special subsequent heatreatment.

  10. Pulsed laser deposition of high-quality thin films of the insulating ferromagnet EuS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qi I.; Zhao, Jinfeng; Risbud, Subhash H.; Zhang, Li; Dolev, Merav; Fried, Alexander D.; Marshall, Ann F.; Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2014-02-24

    High-quality thin films of the ferromagnetic insulator europium(II) sulfide (EuS) were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) and Si (100) substrates. A single orientation was obtained with the [100] planes parallel to the substrates, with atomic-scale smoothness indicates a near-ideal surface topography. The films exhibit uniform ferromagnetism below 15.9 K, with a substantial component of the magnetization perpendicular to the plane of the films. Optimization of the growth condition also yielded truly insulating films with immeasurably large resistance. This combination of magnetic and electric properties opens the gate for future devices that require a true ferromagnetic insulator.

  11. Mechanism of critical catalyst size effect on MgO nanowire growth by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takeshi; Nagashima, Kazuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji

    2008-07-01

    The size controllability of oxide nanowires formed via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism is desired for the oxide nanowire-based device applications. However, the complex nature of oxide nanowire VLS growth has held back such size controllability. Here we demonstrate the critical size effect of a Au catalyst on MgO nanowire VLS growth by pulsed laser deposition. The presence of a critical catalyst size was found. Above such critical size, an oxide nanowire VLS growth is no longer feasible. Interestingly, such critical size increased with increasing growth temperature. The mechanism of the critical phenomenon is interpreted in terms of the catalyst size dependence on the amount of adatoms diffused from surroundings into the catalyst.

  12. Photoresponse in thin films of WO{sub 3} grown by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Moulik, Samik; Samanta, Sudeshna; Ghosh, Barnali

    2014-06-09

    We report, the photoresponse behaviour of Tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) films of different surface morphology, grown by using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Growth parameters for PLD were changed for two substrates SiO{sub 2}/Si (SO) and SrTiO{sub 3} (STO), such a way which, result nanocrystalline film on SO and needle like structured film on STO. The photoresponse is greatly modified in these two films because of two different surface morphologies. The nanocrystalline film (film on SO) shows distinct photocurrent (PC) ON/OFF states when light was turned on/off, the enhancement of PC is ∼27%. Whereas, the film with needle like structure (film on STO) exhibits significantly enhanced persistent photocurrent even in light off condition, in this case, the enhancement of PC ∼ 50% at room temperature at lowest wavelength (λ = 360 nm) at a nominal bias voltage of 0.1 V.

  13. Formation and properties of novel artificially-layered cuprate superconductors using pulsed-laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, D.P.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Budai, J.D.

    1996-03-01

    Pulsed-laser deposition and epitaxial stabilization have been effectively used to engineer artificially-layered thin-film materials. Novel cuprate compounds have been synthesized using the constraint of epitaxy to stabilize (Ca,Sr)CuO{sub 2}/(Ba,Ca,Sr)CuO{sub 2} superconducting superlattices in the infinite layer structure. Superlattice chemical modulation can be observed from the x-ray diffraction patterns for structures with SrCuO{sub 2} and (Ca, Sr)CuO{sub 2} layers as thin as a single unit cell ({approximately}3. 4 {angstrom}). X-ray diffraction intensity oscillations, due to the finite thickness of the film, indicate that (Ca,Sr)CuO{sub 2} films grown by pulsed-laser deposition are extremely flat with a thickness variation of only {approximately}20 {angstrom} over a length scale of several thousand angstroms. This enables the unit-cell control of (Ca, Sr)CuO{sub 2} film growth in an oxygen pressure regime in which in situ surface analysis using electron diffraction is not possible. With the incorporation of BaCuO{sub 2} layers, superlattice structures have been synthesized which superconduct at temperatures as high as 70 K. Dc transport measurements indicate that (Ca, Sr)CuO{sub 2}/BaCuO{sub 2} superlattices are two dimensional superconductors with the superconducting transition primarily associated with the BaCuO{sub 2} layers. Superconductivity is observed only for structures with BaCuO{sub 2} layers at least two unit cells thick with {Tc} decreasing as the (Ca,Sr)CuO{sub 2} layer thickness increases. Normalized resistance in the superconducting region collapse to the Ginzburg-Landau Coulomb gas universal resistance curve consistent with the two-dimensional vortex fluctuation model.

  14. Antimicrobial oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) film deposited by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wangyao; Yu, Qian; López, Gabriel P; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D

    2014-04-01

    The antimicrobial oligomer, oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) (OPE), was deposited as thin films by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) on solid substrates and exhibited light-induced biocidal activity. The biocidal activity of OPE thin films deposited by spin-coating and drop-casting was also investigated for comparison. Enhanced bacterial attachment and biocidal efficiency of the film deposited by RIR-MAPLE were observed and attributed to nanoscale surface topography of the thin film. PMID:24581926

  15. Second-order Bragg gratings in single-mode chalcogenide fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Bernier, M; Asatryan, K E; Vallee, R; Galstian, T M; Vasil'ev, Sergei A; Medvedkov, O I; Plotnichenko, V G; Gnusin, P I; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2011-05-31

    Bragg gratings with a second-order resonance wavelength in the near-IR spectral region have been inscribed into single-mode chalcogenide (As{sub 2}S{sub 3}) glass fibre by a He - Ne laser beam using a configuration typical of Bragg grating fabrication in germanosilicate fibre, with the use of a phase mask that ensures effective diffraction of the writing light into the +1 and -1 orders. The spectra of the inscribed gratings show no resonances due to cladding mode excitation because the cladding material is photosensitive. (fibre optics)

  16. Octave-spanning infrared supercontinuum generation in robust chalcogenide nanotapers using picosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Shabahang, Soroush; Marquez, Michael P; Tao, Guangming; Piracha, Mohammad U; Nguyen, Dat; Delfyett, Peter J; Abouraddy, Ayman F

    2012-11-15

    We report on infrared supercontinuum generation extending over more than one octave of bandwidth, from 850 nm to 2.35 μm, produced in a single spatial mode from a robust, compact, composite chalcogenide glass nanotaper. A picosecond laser at 1.55 μm pumps a high-index-contrast, all-solid nanotaper that strongly confines the field to a 480 nm diameter core, while a thermally compatible built-in polymer jacket lends the nanotaper mechanical stability. PMID:23164864

  17. Growth of chalcogenide semiconductors within a nanoporous aluminum oxide template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, Catherine Mary

    This dissertation reports investigations on the synthesis of metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanoparticles grown within the pores of a nanoporous aluminum oxide template. The template used to restrict the growth of the materials contained cylindrical pores, yielding nanoparticles with non-spherical shapes. Two classes of metal chalcogenides were studied: those with three dimensional structures and those with layered structures. Three different methods were developed and investigated for the growth of MQ compounds (M = Cd, Zn, Cu, Hg; Q = S, Te): (1) a dipping method, (2) a U-tube method, and (3) a sublimation. The dipping method produced material on the template's outer surface and within the pores only within ˜2 mum of their ends. Within the limits of the template pore size, particle size and shape could not be controlled. The U-tube method deposited multiple oval shaped particles within each pore of the template. The oval particles were polycrystalline, had sizes ranging from ˜5-120 nm, and were concentrated in only one location in the pores. Reasons for the uneven distribution of particles throughout the pores were investigated. The sublimation method only deposited material on the outer surfaces of the template, and the conditions used for the sublimation altered the morphology of the template. Layered MSsb2 compounds (M = Mo, W, Re, Ti) were prepared by the thermal decomposition of selected precursor molecules within the pores of the template. The fibers produced had the same dimensions as the pores of the template. When MoSsb2 was prepared by this method, tubules of oriented crystals were formed with multiple plugs in each tubule. When WSsb2 was prepared, more solid fibers were formed. The preparation of ReSsb2 and TiSsb2 resulted in fibers that were similar in morphology to the MoSsb2 fibers. The effect of template loading method, precursor concentration, precursor type, solvent, presence of a surfactant, and annealing temperature on morphology and

  18. Fokker Planck and Krook theory for energetic electron deposition in laser fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, Wallace; Colombant, Denis

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a Fokker Planck and Krook model to calculate the transport and deposition of energetic electrons, produced for instance by the two plasmon decay instability at the quarter critical surface of a laser produced plasma. In steady state, the Fokker Planck equation reduces to a single universal equation in energy and space, an equation which whose asymptotic solution we calculate. The Krook theory also gives rise to an analytic expression solution. From each, one can calculate the spatially dependent heating of the interior plasma, which can be implemented at each time step in a fluid simulation. The equation is equally valid in planar and spherical geometry, and it depends on only a single parameter, the charge state Z. Hence one can solve for a universal solution, valid for each Z. the two approaches will be compared and discussed. We look to cooperate with anyone having a more advanced simulation capability, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo or Fokker Planck, who is willing to test our results. Work supported by the NRL Laser fusion program, DOE- NNSA and ONR.

  19. Bacterial Suspensions Deposited on Microbiological Filter Material for Rapid Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Identification.

    PubMed

    Malenfant, Dylan J; Gillies, Derek J; Rehse, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    Four species of bacteria, E. coli, S. epidermidis, M. smegmatis, and P. aeruginosa, were harvested from agar nutrient medium growth plates and suspended in water to create liquid specimens for the testing of a new mounting protocol. Aliquots of 30 µL were deposited on standard nitrocellulose filter paper with a mean 0.45 µm pore size to create highly flat and uniform bacterial pads. The introduction of a laser-based lens-to-sample distance measuring device and a pair of matched off-axis parabolic reflectors for light collection improved both spectral reproducibility and the signal-to-noise ratio of optical emission spectra acquired from the bacterial pads by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. A discriminant function analysis and a partial least squares-discriminant analysis both showed improved sensitivity and specificity compared to previous mounting techniques. The behavior of the spectra as a function of suspension concentration and filter coverage was investigated, as was the effect on chemometric cell classification of sterilization via autoclaving. PMID:26819441

  20. Cubic boron nitride formation on Si (100) substrates at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, T.A.; McCarty, K.F.; Klaus, E.J.; Boehme, D.; Clift, W.M.; Johnsen, H.A.; Mills, M.J.; Ottesen, D.K. )

    1992-11-16

    We are studying the boron nitride system by using a pulsed excimer laser to ablate from hexagonal BN(hBN) targets to form BN films. We have deposited BN films on heated (600 {degree}C) and room-temperature silicon (100) surface in an ambient background gas of N{sub 2}. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflection spectroscopy indicates that the films grown at high temperature have short-range {ital sp}{sup 2} (hexagonal-like) order, whereas films grown at room temperature are a mixture of {ital sp}{sup 3}-bonded BN and {ital sp}{sup 2}-bonded BN. Electron diffraction confirms the presence of cubic BN (cBN) material in the films grown at low temperature and the corresponding TEM lattice images show a grain size of {similar to}200 A. The presence of cBN in the films correlates with laser energy density, with cubic material appearing around 2.4 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) indicates that the films are nitrogen deficient.

  1. Temperature engineered growth of low-threshold quantum well lasers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dzurko, K.M.; Menu, E.P.; Beyler, C.A.; Osinski, J.S.; Dapkus, P.D.

    1989-01-09

    A new technique is demonstrated for the formation of narrow active regions in quantum well lasers. In temperature engineered growth (TEG), the substrate temperature is varied during the growth of epitaxial layers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on nonplanar substrates, allowing two-dimensional control of device features. Buried heterostructure designs with submicron active region stripe widths are obtained without the need for fine process control of lateral dimensions. The contact area above the active region is coplanar with the surrounding surface and wide enough to allow easy contacting and heat sinking. Carrier confinement is accomplished by lateral thickness variation of the quantum well active region resulting in a local strip of minimum band gap. Lasers grown in this manner exhibit cw threshold currents as low as 3.8 mA (3.4 mA pulsed), having an as-grown active region width of 0.5 ..mu..m. The near-field optical profile indicates stable, single transverse mode operation and minimal current leakage in these devices.

  2. The effect of deposition atmosphere on the chemical composition of TiN and ZrN thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciun, D.; Socol, G.; Stefan, N.; Dorcioman, G.; Hanna, M.; Taylor, C. R.; Lambers, E.; Craciun, V.

    2014-05-01

    Very thin TiN and ZrN films (<500 nm) were grown on (1 0 0) Si substrates at temperatures up to 500 °C by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using a KrF excimer laser under residual vacuum or various mixtures of CH4 or N2. Auger electron spectroscopy investigations found that films contained a relatively low oxygen concentration, usually below 3.0 at%. Films deposited under residual vacuum or very low N2 pressures (<3 × 10-3 Pa) contained 3-6 at% C atoms in the bulk. This fraction grew to 8-10 at% when the deposition was performed under an atmosphere of 2 × 10-3 Pa CH4. To avoid C atoms incorporation into the bulk a deposition pressure of 10 Pa N2 was required. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations found that oxygen was mostly bonded in an oxynitride type of compound, while carbon was bonded into a metallic carbide. The presence of C atoms in the chemical composition of the TiN or ZrN improved the measured hardness of the films.

  3. In-situ plume diagnosis during pulsed laser deposition of epitaxial-oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, D.B.; Kung, P.J.; Goeres, J.; Li, Q.

    1996-12-31

    The visible plume, induced during pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) of epitaxial La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3}/Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3}/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}/YSZ heterostructures on silicon (100) wafers, was studied by optical-emission spectroscopy (OES). These films are suitable for the fabrication of ferroelectric capacitors and pyroelectric-sensor devices. A YAG laser, at 266 nm, is used for ablation. A collection lens transfers the PLD-plume emission into an optical fiber and onto a diffraction grating and a CCD array, for time-averaged spectroscopy from 410 to 640 nm. Plume emissions from ablated targets in the presence of an oxygen ambient, due to various atomic (Ba, Co, Cu, Sr, Ti, Y, Zr), ionic (Ba{sup +}, La{sup +}, Sr{sup +}, Y{sup +}), and a diatomic oxide (YO) species were identified. Emission intensity and evolution of ablated species are reported for distance away from the target surface, oxygen pressures, and laser fluences (1 to 4 J/cm{sup 2}). The behavior of reactive-product species, especially YO for plumes from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and YBCO targets, is discussed. This simple and inexpensive OES system is suitable for use as a plume-quality monitor on routine PLD film synthesis.

  4. Hydroxyapatite kinetic deposition on solid substrates induced by laser-liquid-solid interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramatarova, Liliana; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Todor; Presker, Radina; Stutzmann, Martin

    2005-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is present in the human body as a mineral constituent of the bones and teeth, as well as a major or minor component of kidney stones. HA deposited on different solid substrates can find applications including biomaterials and biosensors. This work deals with the kinetics of the HA growth by applying a novel method of laser-liquid-solid-interaction (LLSI) process on three types of materials (stainless stell, silicon and silica glass). The method allows interaction between a pulsed laser and a substrate immersed in a solution (simulated body fluid, SBF). By a scanning system, a design of seven squares at a distance of 200 μm was created at the end of each sample. In this way the center of the substrate (about 6x6 mm) was no irradiated. Following the LLSI process, the samples were left in the irradiated SBF for various intervals of time. Light microscopy (LM) showed surfaces seede with randomly distributed transparent and white particles. The surface seeding increased with the immersion time and was dependent on the substrate type. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrsocopy showed that in the first stage of soaking (up to 6 h) the observed white particles were calcium phosphate containing. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrsocopy revealed that the transparent particles were NaCl. In the next stage (after 12 h) vibrational modes typical for HA were clearly observed. Detailed observation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after 12 h showed morphology of sphere-like aggregates, grouped in a porous network. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and EDX confirmed that after 12 h the grown layer was HA. It was found that in comparison to the traditionally empoyed prolonged soaking in SBF, the applied LLSI process yielded a synergistic effect due to the simultaneous use of the solid substrate, the aqueous solution and the laser energy.

  5. Microstructures, hardness and bioactivity of hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by direct laser melting process.

    PubMed

    Tlotleng, Monnamme; Akinlabi, Esther; Shukla, Mukul; Pityana, Sisa

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) coatings on bioinert metals such as Ti-6Al-4V are necessary for biomedical applications. Together, HAP and Ti-6Al-4V are biocompatible and bioactive. The challenges of depositing HAP on Ti-6Al-4V with traditional thermal spraying techniques are well founded. In this paper, HAP was coated on Ti-6Al-4V using direct laser melting (DLM) process. This process, unlike the traditional coating processes, is able to achieve coatings with good metallurgical bonding and little dilution. The microstructural and mechanical properties, chemical composition and bio-activities of the produced coatings were studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness machine, and by immersion test in Hanks' solution. The results showed that the choice of the laser power has much influence on the evolving microstructure, the mechanical properties and the retainment of HAP on the surface of the coating. Also, the choice of laser power of 750 W led to no dilution. The microhardness results inferred a strong intermetallic-ceramic interfacial bonding; which meant that the 750 W coating could survive long in service. Also, the coating was softer at the surface and stronger in the heat affected zones. Hence, this process parameter setting can be considered as an optimal setting. The soak tests revealed that the surface of the coating had unmelted crystals of HAP. The CaP ratio conducted on the soaked coating was 2.00 which corresponded to tetra calcium phosphate. This coating seems attractive for metallic implant applications.

  6. Microstructures, hardness and bioactivity of hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by direct laser melting process.

    PubMed

    Tlotleng, Monnamme; Akinlabi, Esther; Shukla, Mukul; Pityana, Sisa

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) coatings on bioinert metals such as Ti-6Al-4V are necessary for biomedical applications. Together, HAP and Ti-6Al-4V are biocompatible and bioactive. The challenges of depositing HAP on Ti-6Al-4V with traditional thermal spraying techniques are well founded. In this paper, HAP was coated on Ti-6Al-4V using direct laser melting (DLM) process. This process, unlike the traditional coating processes, is able to achieve coatings with good metallurgical bonding and little dilution. The microstructural and mechanical properties, chemical composition and bio-activities of the produced coatings were studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness machine, and by immersion test in Hanks' solution. The results showed that the choice of the laser power has much influence on the evolving microstructure, the mechanical properties and the retainment of HAP on the surface of the coating. Also, the choice of laser power of 750 W led to no dilution. The microhardness results inferred a strong intermetallic-ceramic interfacial bonding; which meant that the 750 W coating could survive long in service. Also, the coating was softer at the surface and stronger in the heat affected zones. Hence, this process parameter setting can be considered as an optimal setting. The soak tests revealed that the surface of the coating had unmelted crystals of HAP. The CaP ratio conducted on the soaked coating was 2.00 which corresponded to tetra calcium phosphate. This coating seems attractive for metallic implant applications. PMID:25175204

  7. Laser Irradiated Impact Experiments Show that Nanophase Iron Particles Formed by Shock-Induced Melting Rather than Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Li, S. J.; Xie, Z. D.; Li, X. Y.

    2016-08-01

    As the laser irradiated results of chondrite, Impact melting fractionation of ferromagnesian silicates induced by meteorites may be the major origin of np-Fe0, rather than vapour deposition origin only, especially for np-Fe0 in agglutinatic glasses.

  8. Titanium dioxide thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition and integration in radio frequency devices: Study of structure, optical and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlianges, Jean-Christophe; Crunteanu, Aurelian; Pothier, Arnaud; Merle-Mejean, Therese; Blondy, Pierre; Champeaux, Corinne

    2012-12-01

    Titanium dioxide presents a wide range of technological application possibilities due to its dielectric, electrochemical, photocatalytic and optical properties. The three TiO2 allotropic forms: anatase, rutile and brookite are also interesting, since they exhibit different properties, stabilities and growth modes. For instance, rutile has a high dielectric permittivity, of particular interest for the integration as dielectric in components such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for radio frequency (RF) devices. In this study, titanium dioxide thin films are deposited by pulsed laser deposition. Characterizations by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction show the evolution of the structural properties. Thin films optical properties are investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry and transmission measurements from UV to IR range. Co-planar waveguide (CPW) devices are fabricated based on these films. Their performances are measured in the RF domain and compared to simulation, leading to relative permittivity values in the range 30-120, showing the potentialities of the deposited material for capacitive switches applications.

  9. Laser Wire Deposition (WireFeed) for Fully Dense Shapes LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFITH,MICHELLE L.; ENSZ,MARK T.; GREENE,DONALD L.; RECKAWAY,DARYL E.; MORIN,JACOB A.; BUCHHEIT,THOMAS E.; LAVAN,DAVID A.; CRENSHAW,THOMAS B.; TIKARE,VEENA; ROMERO,JOSEPH A.

    1999-11-01

    Direct metal deposition technologies produce complex, near net shape components from Computer Aided Design (CAD) solid models. Most of these techniques fabricate a component by melting powder in a laser weld pool, rastering the weld bead to form a layer, and additively constructing subsequent layers. This report will describe anew direct metal deposition process, known as WireFeed, whereby a small diameter wire is used instead of powder as the feed material to fabricate components. Currently, parts are being fabricated from stainless steel alloys. Microscopy studies show the WireFeed parts to be filly dense with fine microstructural features. Mechanical tests show stainless steel parts to have high strength values with retained ductility. A model was developed to simulate the microstructural evolution and coarsening during the WireFeed process. Simulations demonstrate the importance of knowing the temperature distribution during fabrication of a WireFeed part. The temperature distribution influences microstructural evolution and, therefore, must be controlled to tailor the microstructure for optimal performance.

  10. Erosion and deposition processes determined by terrestrial laser scanner and photogrammetric techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal Romero, Estela; Revuelto, Jesús; Errea, Paz; López Moreno, José Ignacio; María García Ruiz, José

    2014-05-01

    Erosion and deposition processes in badland areas have been widely estimated by discrete and traditional observations of topographic changes measure by erosion pins or profile meters (invasive techniques). In recent times, geomatic techniques (non-invasive) have been routinely applied in geomorphology studies, and especially in erosion studies. These techniques provide the opportunity to build high resolution topographic models at sub-centimeter accuracy. By comparing different DEMs of the same area, obtained at different moments, variations in the terrain and temporal dynamics can be analyzed. The aim of this study is to assess and compare the functioning of Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS, LPM-321 RIEGL) and close-range photogrammetry techniques (Camera FUJIFILM, Finepix x100 and Software PhotoScan by AgiSoft) to evaluate erosion and deposition processes in a humid badland area. Results show that TLS data sets and photogrammetry techniques provide new opportunities in soil erosion studies. Moreover, the non-contact nature of both techniques removes problematic complications of surface disturbance when using traditional and invasive methods.

  11. Raman spectroscopy of organic dyes adsorbed on pulsed laser deposited silver thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, E.; Neri, F.; Valenti, A.; Ossi, P. M.; Trusso, S.; Ponterio, R. C.

    2013-08-01

    The results of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study performed on representative organic and inorganic dyes adsorbed on silver nanostructured thin films are presented and discussed. Silver thin films were deposited on glass slides by focusing the beam from a KrF excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse duration 25 ns) on a silver target and performing the deposition in a controlled Ar atmosphere. Clear Raman spectra were acquired for dyes such as carmine lake, garanza lake and brazilwood overcoming their fluorescence and weak Raman scattering drawbacks. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy measurements were not able to discriminate among the different chromophores usually referred as carmine lake (carminic, kermesic and laccaic acid), as brazilwood (brazilin and brazilein) and as garanza lake (alizarin and purpurin). SERS measurements showed that the analyzed samples are composed of a mixture of different chromophores: brazilin and brazilein in brazilwood, kermesic and carminic acid in carmine lake, alizarin and purpurin in garanza lake. Detection at concentration level as low as 10-7 M in aqueous solutions was achieved. Higher Raman intensities were observed using the excitation line of 632.8 nm wavelength with respect to the 785 nm, probably due to a pre-resonant effect with the molecular electronic transitions of the dyes.

  12. Paramagnetic dysprosium-doped zinc oxide thin films grown by pulsed-laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Fang-Yuh Ting, Yi-Chieh; Chou, Kai-Chieh; Hsieh, Tsung-Chun; Ye, Cin-Wei; Hsu, Yung-Yuan; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chern, Ming-Yau

    2015-06-07

    Dysprosium(Dy)-doped zinc oxide (Dy:ZnO) thin films were fabricated on c-oriented sapphire substrate by pulsed-laser deposition with doping concentration ranging from 1 to 10 at. %. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman-scattering, optical transmission spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry revealed incorporation of Dy into ZnO host matrix without secondary phase. Solubility limit of Dy in ZnO under our deposition condition was between 5 and 10 at. % according to XRD and Raman-scattering characteristics. Optical transmission spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry also showed increase in both transmittance in ultraviolet regime and band gap of Dy:ZnO with increasing Dy density. Zinc vacancies and zinc interstitials were identified by photoluminescence spectroscopy as the defects accompanied with Dy incorporation. Magnetic investigations with a superconducting quantum interference device showed paramagnetism without long-range order for all Dy:ZnO thin films, and a hint of antiferromagnetic alignment of Dy impurities was observed at highest doping concentration—indicating the overall contribution of zinc vacancies and zinc interstitials to magnetic interaction was either neutral or toward antiferromagnetic. From our investigations, Dy:ZnO thin films could be useful for spin alignment and magneto-optical applications.

  13. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Herklotz, A.; Dörr, Kathrin; Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, Michael D.

    2015-04-03

    In this paper, to have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can bemore » utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Sr n +1Ti n O3 n +1 Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. Finally, this method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.« less

  14. Transmission of reactive pulsed laser deposited VO2 films in the THz domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Émond, Nicolas; Hendaoui, Ali; Ibrahim, Akram; Al-Naib, Ibraheem; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Chaker, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    This work reports on the characteristics of the insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) of reactive pulsed laser deposited vanadium dioxide (VO2) films in the terahertz (THz) frequency range, namely the transition temperature TIMT, the amplitude contrast of the THz transmission over the IMT ΔA, the transition sharpness ΔT and the hysteresis width ΔH. XRD analysis shows the sole formation of VO2 monoclinic structure with an enhancement of (011) preferential orientation when varying the O2 pressure (PO2) during the deposition process from 2 to 25 mTorr. THz transmission measurements as a function of temperature reveal that VO2 films obtained at low PO2 exhibit low TIMT, large ΔA, and narrow ΔH. Increasing PO2 results in VO2 films with higher TIMT, smaller ΔA, broader ΔH and asymmetric hysteresis loop. The good control of the VO2 IMT features in the THz domain could be further exploited for the development of advanced smart devices, such as ultrafast switches, modulators, memories and sensors.

  15. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    SciTech Connect

    Herklotz, A.; Dörr, Kathrin; Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, Michael D.

    2015-04-03

    In this paper, to have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can be utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Sr n +1Ti n O3 n +1 Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. Finally, this method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.

  16. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herklotz, A.; Dörr, K.; Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    To have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can be utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Srn+1TinO3n+1 Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. This method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on pulsed laser deposited amorphous calcium phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    García, F; Arias, J L; Mayor, B; Pou, J; Rehman, I; Knowles, J; Best, S; León, B; Pérez-Amor, M; Bonfield, W

    1998-01-01

    Amorphous calcium phosphate coatings were produced by pulsed laser deposition from targets of nonstoichiometric hydroxyapatite (Ca/P = 1.70) at a low substrate temperature of 300 degrees C. They were heated in air at different temperatures: 300, 450, 525 and 650 degrees C. Chemical and structural analyses of these coatings were performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR, and SEM, XRD analysis of the as-deposited and heated coatings revealed that their crystallinity improved as heat treatment temperature increased. The main phase was apatitic, with some beta-tricalcium phosphate in the coatings heated at 525 and 600 degrees C. In the apatitic phase there was some carbonate substitution for phosphate and hydroxyl ions at 450 degrees C and almost solely for phosphate at 525 and 600 degrees C as identified by FTIR. This was accompanied by a higher hydroxyl content at 525 and 600 degrees C. At 450 degrees C a texture on the coating surface was observable by SEM that was attributable to a calcium hydroxide and calcite formation by XRD. These phases almost disappeared at 600 degrees C, probably due to a transformation into calcium oxide.

  18. Biocompatible Mn2+-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    György, E; Toricelli, P; Socol, G; Iliescu, M; Mayer, I; Mihailescu, I N; Bigi, A; Werckman, J

    2004-11-01

    Mn(2+)-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite (Mn-CHA) thin films were obtained by pulsed laser deposition on Ti substrates. The results of the performed complementary diagnostic techniques, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy investigations indicate that the films are crystalline with a Ca/P ratio of about 1.64-1.66. The optimum conditions, when nearly stoichiometric crystalline thin films were deposited, were found to be 10 Pa oxygen pressure, 400 degrees C substrate temperature, and postdeposition heat treatment in water vapors at the same substrate temperature. The films were seeded with L929 fibroblast and hFOB1.19 osteoblast cells and subjected to in vitro tests. Both fibroblast and osteoblast cells have a good adherence on the Mn-CHA film and on the Ti or polystyrene references. Proliferation and viability tests showed that osteoblast cells growth on Mn-CHA-coated Ti was enhanced as compared to uncoated pure Ti surfaces. Caspase-1 activity was not affected significantly by the material, showing that Mn-CHA does not induce apoptosis of cultured cells. These results demonstrate that Mn-CHA films on Ti should provoke a faster osteointegration of the coated implants as compared to pure Ti. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 71A: 353-358, 2004.

  19. Growth of calcium phosphate thin films by in situ assisted ultraviolet pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelea, V.; Craciun, V.; Iliescu, M.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Pelletier, H.; Mille, P.; Werckmann, J.

    2003-03-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) thin films including hydroxyapatite were intensively studied in order to optimize the technology of the bone prostheses manufacturing. A drawback in the CaP films processing is the poor mechanical characteristics, especially hardness, tensile strength and adherence to the metallic substrate. We report a new method for the growth of high quality CaP films with substantial improvement of the mechanical properties: pulsed laser deposition (PLD) assisted by in situ ultraviolet (UV) radiation emitted by a low pressure Hg lamp. The depositions were made on Si and Ti-5Al-2.5Fe alloys in very low ambient oxygen at pressures of 10 -2 to 10 -1 Pa with the substrates maintained at 500-600 °C temperature. The films were analyzed by electron microscopy, white light confocal microscopy (WLCM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Berkovich nanoindentation. The films were crystalline and exhibited remarkable mechanical characteristics with values of hardness and Young modulus of 6-8 and 150-170 GPa, respectively, which are uncommonly high for the CaP ceramics. The UV lamp radiation enhanced the gas reactivity and atoms mobility during processing, while the tensile strength between the film's grains and the bonding strength at the CaP film-substrate interface were increased.

  20. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    SciTech Connect

    Herklotz, A.; Dörr, K.; Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, M. D.

    2015-03-30

    To have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can be utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Sr{sub n+1}Ti{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. This method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.

  1. Superconductivity in Pd, Ir, and Pt chalcogenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yoon Seok; Yang, Junjie; Choi, Y. J.; Hogan, A.; Horibe, Y.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2012-02-01

    Large spin-orbit coupling in materials with heavy chalcogens can result in unique quantum states or functional properties such as topological insulator, giant thermoelectric power, and superconductivity. When materials contain heavy cations in addition to heavy chalcogens, spin-orbit coupling can be further enhanced. For these reasons, we have studied the superconductivity of Pd, Ir, and Pt tellurides and selenides. In the exploration of these chalcogenides, we have focused on the competition between superconductivity and charge density wave that is associated with superlattice reflections.

  2. Synthesis and structures of metal chalcogenide precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Duraj, Stan A.; Eckles, William E.; Andras, Maria T.

    1990-01-01

    The reactivity of early transition metal sandwich complexes with sulfur-rich molecules such as dithiocarboxylic acids was studied. Researchers recently initiated work on precursors to CuInSe2 and related chalcopyrite semiconductors. Th every high radiation tolerance and the high absorption coefficient of CuInSe2 makes this material extremely attractive for lightweight space solar cells. Their general approach in early transition metal chemistry, the reaction of low-valent metal complexes or metal powders with sulfur and selenium rich compounds, was extended to the synthesis of chalcopyrite precursors. Here, the researchers describe synthesis, structures, and and routes to single molecule precursors to metal chalcogenides.

  3. Chemical Routes to Colloidal Chalcogenide Nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Schaak, Raymond

    2015-02-19

    This project sought to develop new low-temperature synthetic pathways to intermetallic and chalcogenide nanostructures and powders, with an emphasis on systems that are relevant to advancing the synthesis, processing, and discovery of superconducting materials. The primary synthetic routes involved solution chemistry methods, and several fundamental synthetic challenges that underpinned the formation of these materials were identified and investigated. Methods for incorporating early transition metals and post transition metals into nanoscale and bulk crystals using low-temperature solution chemistry methods were developed and studied, leading to colloidal nanocrystals of elemental indium, manganese, and germanium, as well as nanocrystalline and bulk intermetallic compounds containing germanium, gallium, tin, indium, zinc, bismuth, and lithium. New chemical tools were developed to help target desired phases in complex binary intermetallic and metal chalcogenide systems that contain multiple stable phases, including direct synthesis methods and chemical routes that permit post-synthetic modification. Several phases that are metastable in bulk systems were targeted, synthesized, and characterized as nanocrystalline solids and bulk powders, including the L12-type intermetallic compounds Au3Fe, Au3Ni, and Au3Co, as well as wurtzite-type MnSe. Methods for accessing crystalline metal borides and carbides using direct solution chemistry methods were also developed, with an emphasis on Ni3B and Ni3C, which revealed useful correlations of composition and magnetic properties. Methods for scale-up and nanoparticle purification were explored, providing access to centimeter-scale pressed pellets of polyol-synthesized nanopowders and a bacteriophage-mediated method for separating impure nanoparticle mixtures into their components. Several advances were made in the synthesis of iron selenide and related superconducting materials, including the production of colloidal Fe

  4. Mechanical and tribological characterization of tetrahedral diamond-like carbon deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition on pre-treated orthopaedic biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loir, A.-S.; Garrelie, F.; Donnet, C.; Subtil, J.-L.; Belin, M.; Forest, B.; Rogemond, F.; Laporte, P.

    2005-07-01

    Femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been performed using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser including an amplification stage (150 fs, 800 nm, 1 kHz) to deposit tetrahedral-amorphous carbon films (ta-C) on AISI 316L stainless steel and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, in perspective to extend the wear resistance of materials used in hip joints. Ta-C films have been elaborated in high vacuum conditions at room temperature. The diamond-like coated silicon substrates exhibit high wear resistance (in the 10 -8-10 -9 mm 3 (N m) -1 range) with moderate hardness (in the 20-30 GPa range), which may be favorable for the accommodation motion between contacting surfaces in a hip joint. In situ sputter cleaning of the orthopaedic substrates in argon plasma prior to carbon deposition has been investigated, leading to the enhancement of the adhesion of the films onto the stainless steel substrates. The adhesion properties of films deposited in various conditions on metallic substrates have been studied by tensile tests. The tribological behavior of the coatings deposited on cleaned substrates have been widely investigated in a pin-on-flat configuration in ambient air and Ringer solution. Finally, a DLC thin film with an homogeneous thickness has been deposited on hemispherical surface of 22.2 mm in diameter of a stainless steel femoral head of a hip prosthesis, whose wear behavior will be quantified using a hip joint simulator during one million of cycles (corresponding to the human activity during one year).

  5. The importance of the energetic species in pulsed laser deposition for nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Castelo, A; Afonso, C N; Pesce, E; Piscopiello, E

    2012-03-16

    This work reports on the optical and structural properties of nanostructured films formed by Ag nano-objects embedded in amorphous aluminium oxide (a-Al(2)O(3)) prepared by alternate pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The aim is to understand the importance of the energetic species involved in the PLD process for nanostructuring, i.e. for organizing nanoparticles (NPs) in layers or for self-assembling them into nanocolumns (NCls), all oriented perpendicular to the substrate. In order to change the kinetic energy of the species arriving at the substrate, we use a background gas during the deposition of the embedding a-Al(2)O(3) host. It was produced either in vacuum or in a gas pressure (helium and argon) while the metal NPs were always produced in vacuum. The formation of NPs or NCls is easily identified through the features of the surface plasmon resonances (SPR) in the extinction spectra and confirmed by electron microscopy. The results show that both the layer organization and self-assembling of the metal are prevented when the host is produced in a gas pressure. This result is discussed in terms of the deceleration of species arriving at the substrate in gas that reduces the metal sputtering by host species (by ≈58%) as well as the density of the host material (by ≥19%). These reductions promote the formation of large voids along which the metal easily diffuses, thus preventing organization and self-organisation, as well as an enhancement of the amount of metal that is deposited.

  6. Sensitive measurement of optical nonlinearity in amorphous chalcogenide materials in nanosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Rani, Sunita; Mohan, Devendra; Kishore, Nawal; Purnima

    2012-07-01

    The present work focuses on the nonlinear optical behavior of chalcogenide As(2)S(3) film as well as on bulk material. The thin film of As(2)S(3) grown by thermal evaporation and bulk glass developed by melt-quenched technique has been characterized using nanosecond pulses of Nd:YAG (532 nm) and Nd:YVO(4) (1,064 nm) laser. Using Z-scan technique, the laser induced nonlinear optical parameters viz. nonlinear refractive index (n(2)), nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) and third order nonlinear susceptibility (χ(3)) have been estimated. At 1,064 nm excitation, the materials exhibit stronger nonlinearity as compared to that of 532 nm laser. In case of As(2)S(3) thin film, observed nonlinearity attributes to two-photon absorption. The optical limiting response of chalcogenide film as well as bulk sample has also been reported. The study predicts that the As(2)S(3) thin film is a better optical limiting material than bulk glass due to relatively higher nonlinearity and lower limiting threshold.

  7. Properties of CsI, CsBr and GaAs thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel, V M; Garnov, S V; Yagafarov, T F; Iskhakova, L D; Ermakov, R P

    2014-09-30

    CsI, CsBr and GaAs thin films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition on glass substrates. The morphology and structure of the films have been studied using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The CsI and CsBr films were identical in stoichiometry to the respective targets and had a polycrystalline structure. Increasing the substrate temperature led to an increase in the density of the films. All the GaAs films differed in stoichiometry from the target. An explanation was proposed for this fact. The present results demonstrate that, when the congruent transport condition is not fulfilled, films identical in stoichiometry to targets can be grown by pulsed laser deposition in the case of materials with a low melting point and thermal conductivity. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  8. The Influence of Ni-Coated TiC on Laser-Deposited IN625 Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Topping, Troy; Smugeresky, John E.; Zhou, Yizhang; Biswas, Asit; Baker, Dean; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2010-03-01

    IN625 Ni-based metal matrix composites (MMCs) components were deposited using Laser Engineered Net-Shaping (LENS) with Ni-coated and uncoated TiC reinforcement particles to provide insight into the influence of interfaces on MMCs. The microstructures and spatial distribution of TiC particles in the deposited MMCs were characterized, and the mechanical responses were investigated. The results demonstrate that the flowability of the mixed powders, the integrity of the interface between the matrix and the TiC particles, the interaction between the laser beam and the TiC ceramic particles, and the mechanical properties of the LENS-deposited MMCs were all effectively improved by using Ni-coated TiC particles.

  9. Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Robert; Loomis, Gary E.; Thomas, Ian M.

    1999-01-01

    Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (.about.1.10-1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm.

  10. Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer

    DOEpatents

    Chow, R.; Loomis, G.E.; Thomas, I.M.

    1999-03-16

    Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (ca. 1.10--1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm. 2 figs.

  11. One-step synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposite coatings by novel laser adaptive ablation deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbezov, Valery; Sotirov, Sotir

    2013-03-01

    A novel approach for one-step synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposite coatings by new modification of Pulsed Laser Deposition technology called Laser Adaptive Ablation Deposition (LAAD) is presented. Hybrid nanocomposite coatings including Mg- Rapamycin and Mg- Desoximetasone were produced by UV TEA N2 laser under low vacuum (0.1 Pa) and room temperature onto substrates from SS 316L, KCl and NaCl. The laser fluence for Mg alloy was 1, 8 J/cm2 and for Desoximetasone 0,176 J/cm2 and for Rapamycin 0,118 J/cm2 were respectively. The threedimensional two-segmented single target was used to adapt the interaction of focused laser beam with inorganic and organic material. Magnesium alloy nanoparticles with sizes from 50 nm to 250 nm were obtained in organic matrices. The morphology of nanocomposites films were studied by Bright field / Fluorescence optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements were applied in order to study the functional properties of organic component before and after the LAAD process. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) was used for identification of Mg alloy presence in hybrid nanocomposites coatings. The precise control of process parameters and particularly of the laser fluence adjustment enables transfer on materials with different physical chemical properties and one-step synthesis of complex inorganic- organic nanocomposites coatings.

  12. Influence of ion-assisted deposition on laser-induced damage threshold and microstructure of optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abromavicius, G.; Buzelis, R.; Drazdys, R.; Grigonis, R.; Melninkaitis, A.; Miksys, D.; Rakickas, T.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Skrebutenas, A.; Juskenas, R.; Selskis, A.

    2005-12-01

    High density, improved adhesion and environmental stability are the main features of dielectric optical coatings produced using ion-assisted deposition (IAD) technology. However, investigations of resistance of IAD coatings to intensive laser radiation show controversial results. A series of experiments were done to examine the influence of ion gun operation on the transmittance of fused silica substrates. It was shown that operation of ion source introduced extinction in UV spectral range. Optical properties of single hafnia layers and multilayer dielectric mirrors deposited using conventional e-beam evaporation and different modes of IAD were investigated. Microstructural analysis using X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements and AFM scanning of coated areas was carried out. Single hafnia layers deposited using high energy ion assistance had more amorphous structure with smaller crystallites of monoclinic phase. High reflection UV mirrors deposited using high energy ion assistance had slightly higher mean refractive indices of hafnia, higher extinction than conventional e-beam deposition, but demonstrated slightly higher laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) values measured at 355 nm. Deposition using the lowest energy ions produced the most porous coatings with the best LIDT of 7.7 J/cm2.

  13. Vortex pinning properties in Fe-chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, A.; Grimaldi, G.; Guarino, A.; Avitabile, F.; Nigro, A.; Galluzzi, A.; Mancusi, D.; Polichetti, M.; Pace, S.; Buchkov, K.; Nazarova, E.; Kawale, S.; Bellingeri, E.; Ferdeghini, C.

    2015-12-01

    Among the families of iron-based superconductors, the 11-family is one of the most attractive for high field applications at low temperatures. Optimization of the fabrication processes for bulk, crystalline and/or thin film samples is the first step in producing wires and/or tapes for practical high power conductors. Here we present the results of a comparative study of pinning properties in iron-chalcogenides, investigating the flux pinning mechanisms in optimized Fe(Se{}1-xTe x ) and FeSe samples by current-voltage characterization, magneto-resistance and magnetization measurements. In particular, from Arrhenius plots in magnetic fields up to 9 T, the activation energy is derived as a function of the magnetic field, {U}0(H), whereas the activation energy as a function of temperature, U(T), is derived from relaxation magnetization curves. The high pinning energies, high upper critical field versus temperature slopes near critical temperatures, and highly isotropic pinning properties make iron-chalcogenide superconductors a technological material which could be a real competitor to cuprate high temperature superconductors for high field applications.

  14. Observation of enhanced thermal lensing due to near-Gaussian pump energy deposition in a laser-diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, David; Rines, David M.; Dinerman, Bradley J.; Martinsen, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The authors report operation of a laser-diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser with a novel pumping geometry that ensures efficient conversion of pump energy into the TEM00 mode. Significant enhancement of thermally induced lensing due to the near-Gaussian energy deposition profile of the pump radiation was observed. An induced lens of approximately 3.2-m focal length was measured at average incident pump powers of only 3.2 W (corresponding to a 0.6 W heat load).

  15. Effects of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and its influence on the topography of the Fe thin film grown in pulsed laser deposition facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Rawat, R. S.; Wang, Y.; Lee, S.; Tan, T. L.; Springham, S. V.; Lee, P.; Zakaullah, M.

    2012-10-15

    The effect of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities in laser induced Fe plasma is investigated using time-resolved fast gated imaging. The snow plow and shock wave models are fitted to the experimental results and used to estimate the ablation parameters and the density of gas atoms that interact with the ablated species. It is observed that RT instability develops during the interface deceleration stage and grows for a considerable time for higher laser energy fluence. The effects of RT instabilities formation on the surface topography of the Fe thin films grown in pulsed laser deposition system are investigated (i) using different laser energy fluences for the same wavelength of laser radiation and (ii) using different laser wavelengths keeping the energy fluence fixed. It is concluded that the deposition achieved under turbulent condition leads to less smooth deposition surfaces with bigger sized particle agglomerates or network.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Transport Phenomena for a Double-Layer Laser Powder Deposition of Single-Crystal Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaoyang; Qi, Huan

    2014-04-01

    A turbine blade made of single-crystal superalloys has been commonly used in gas turbine and aero engines. As an effective repair technology, laser powder deposition has been implemented to restore the worn turbine blade tips with a near-net shape capability and highly controllable solidified microstructure. Successful blade repair technology for single-crystal alloys requires a continuous epitaxial grain growth in the same direction of the crystalline orientation of the substrate material to the newly deposited layers. This work presents a three-dimensional numerical model to simulate the transport phenomena for a multilayer coaxial laser powder deposition process. Nickel-based single-crystal superalloy Rene N5 powder is deposited on a directional solidified substrate made of nickel-based directional-solidified alloy GTD 111 to verify the simulation results. The effects of processing parameters including laser power, scanning speed, and powder feeding rate on the resultant temperature field, fluid velocity field, molten pool geometric sizes, and the successive layer remelting ratios are studied. Numerical simulation results show that the maximum temperature of molten pool increases over layers due to the reduced heat dissipation capacity of the deposited geometry, which results in an increased molten pool size and fluid flow velocity at the successive deposited layer. The deposited bead geometry agrees well between the simulation and the experimental results. A large part of the first deposition layer, up to 85 pct of bead height, can be remelted during the deposition of the second layer. The increase of scanning speed decreases the ratio of G/ V (temperature gradient/solidification velocity), leading to an increased height ratio of the misoriented grain near the top surface of the previous deposited layer. It is shown that the processing parameters used in the simulation and experiment can produce a remelting ratio R larger than the misoriented grain height ratio

  17. Pulsed laser annealing of highly doped Ge:Sb layers deposited on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalov, R. I.; Bayazitov, R. M.; Faizrakhmanov, I. A.; Lyadov, N. M.; Shustov, V. A.; Ivlev, G. D.

    2016-10-01

    Germanium (Ge) is a promising material for micro- and optoelectronics to produce high speed field-effect transistors, photodetectors, light-emitting diodes and lasers. For such applications tensile-strained and/or highly n-doped Ge layers are needed. The authors have performed the formation of such layers by ion-beam sputtering of composite Sb/Ge target, deposition of thin amorphous Ge:Sb films (~200 nm thick) on different substrates (c-Si, c-Al2O3, α-SiO2) followed by pulsed laser annealing (PLA) for their crystallization and Sb dopant activation. Structural, electrical and optical characterization of Ge:Sb films was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry methods and by measuring sheet resistance, carrier concentration and photoluminescence. The obtained polycrystalline n-Ge:Sb layers (N Sb ~ 1 at.%) are characterized by increased values of tensile strain (up to 1%) and homogenious Sb dopant distribution within layer thickness. The electrical measurements at 300 K revealed the low sheet resistance (up to 40 Ω/□) and extremely high electron concentration (up to 5.5  ×  1020 cm-3) in Ge:Sb/SiO2 samples that indicated full electrical activation of Sb dopant on SiO2 substrate. The increased values of tensile strain and electron concentration of Ge:Sb films on α-SiO2 are explained by low values of thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficients of quartz substrate.

  18. Pulsed laser deposition of rare-earth-doped glasses: a step toward lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, R.; Fernandez, J.; Balda, R.; Gonzalo, J.

    2016-02-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is used to produce Er-doped lead-niobium germanate (PbO-Nb2O5-GeO2) and fluorotellurite (TeO2-ZnO-ZnF2) thin film glasses. Films having high refractive index, low absorption and large transmission are obtained in a narrow processing window that depends on the actual PLD configuration (O2 pressure ˜a few Pa, Laser energy density ˜2-3 J cm-2 for the results presented in this work). However, Er-doped thin film glasses synthetized at room temperature using these experimental parameters show poor photoluminescence (PL) performance due to non-radiative decay channels, such as a large OH- concentration. Thermal annealing allows improving PL intensity and lifetime (τPL), the latter becoming close to that of the parent Er-doped bulk glass. In addition, the use of alternate PLD from host glass and rare-earth targets allows the synthesis of nanostructured thin film glasses with a controlled rare-earth concentration and in-depth distribution, as it is illustrated for Er-doped PbO-Nb2O5-GeO2 film glasses. In this case, PL intensity at 1.53 μm increases with the spacing between Er-doped layers to reach a maximum for a separation between Er-doped layers >= 5 nm, while τPL is close to the bulk value independently of the spacing. Finally, the comparison of these results with those obtained for films grown by standard PLD from Er-doped glass targets suggests that nanostructuration allows reducing rare-earth clustering and concentration quenching effects.

  19. Deposition of High-Temperature Superconducting Thin Films on Metallic and Nometallic Substrates by Laser Ablation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Anqi

    This dissertation covers my research in four steps: basic understanding of the theory of superconductors, development of the experimental setup, deposition of high temperature superconducting thin films (HTSTF) on metallic and nonmetallic substrates by laser ablation, and characterization HTSTFs on metallic and nonmetallic substrates. High quality HTSTFs have been grown on metallic and nonmetallic substrates, including SrTiO_3 , MgO, YSZ, Cu, Ag, Ni, and Stainless Steel. Of particular note, there have been no other successful reports of a superconducting YBa_2Cu _3O_{rm 7-x} (YBCO) film on Cu. Cu is a unique candidate for a YBCO substrate material. My investigation shows that it is possible, using laser ablation, to make good YBCO films on Cu substrates, possessing a natural oxide layer interface. The films on Cu exhibit a metallic normal state, and a resistive transition width of 6 K to zero resistance (R ~ 0) at 84 K. We determined the critical current density, J_{rm c}, to be 1,300 A/cm^2 at 13 K by the 4-probe transport method. The Naval Research Laboratory found J_{rm c} of another film to be about 3,880 A/cm ^2 at 4.2 K using the contactless single coil method. Analysis of the film compositions and structures have been made using XRD, EDAX, SEM, and AFM. STM, AFM, and high-magnification SEM images of the YBCO films on Cu show random orientation and rough surface relative to similar films on SrTiO_3, MgO, and YSZ. Due to the formation of a natural, irregular Cu oxide layer between the film and Cu substrate, the gaps between grains of YBCO on polycrystalline Cu are definitely larger than those of films deposited on single crystal such as SrTiO_3 (J_{ rm c} = 1.4 times 10^6 A/cm^2 at 77 K). This may explain the differences in J _{rm c}. The Cu-oxide layer significantly affects the quality of YBCO film on Cu because of larger lattice mismatches and thermal expansion differences between the Cu-oxide and YBCO film compared to Cu and YBCO. Applying an electric field

  20. High indium content InGaN films grown by pulsed laser deposition using a dual-compositing target.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kun-Ching; Wang, Tzu-Yu; Wuu, Dong-Sing; Horng, Ray-Hua

    2012-07-01

    High indium compositions InGaN films were grown on sapphires using low temperature pulse laser deposition (PLD) with a dual-compositing target. This target was used to overcome the obstacle in the InGaN growth by PLD due to the difficulty of target preparation, and provided a co-deposition reaction, where InGaN grains generated from the indium and GaN vapors deposit on sapphire surface and then act as nucleation seeds to promote further InGaN growth. The effects of co-deposition on growth mechanisms, surface morphology, and electrical properties of films were thoroughly investigated and the results clearly show promise for the development of high indium InGaN films using PLD technique with dual-compositing targets. PMID:22772213