Science.gov

Sample records for laser light diffraction

  1. Link between diffraction losses and light beam cross section in laser with telescopic resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, A.K.; Nekrasov, Yu.V.

    1987-06-01

    The light beam cross section change in a laser and its link with the diffraction losses during the telescopic converter defocusing is discussed. In addition, the measurements of the resonator astigmatism compensation by the Brewster window are carried out. It is demonstrated that in the resonator stability region, the light beam cross section is well described by the expression using the transmission matrix elements, the simplified model for the diffraction qualitatively correlates with the test data, and the mirror astigmatism due to the inclined light beam incidence is compensated for by Brewster's window.

  2. Diffraction of Laser Light as a Probe of Ordered Tissue Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Cody; Forrester, Kevin; Frank, C. B.; Irvine-Halliday, David; Muldrew, Ken; Shrive, Nigel; Thompson, Robert

    2002-05-01

    Laser light transmitted through thin slices of ordered tissue, such as tendon and ligament, forms a diffraction pattern elongated in the direction perpendicular to the alignment direction of the tissue fibers. The degree of elongation provides information on the degree of order in the tissue sample and thus provides a probe of the presence of scar tissue since, when damaged, collagen fibers reform more randomly than in healthy tissue. Small Angle Light Scattering (SALS) is an established technique that utilizes the diffraction properties of ordered tissue to determine bulk properties such as angle and degree of fiber orientation. This presentation will present experimental data that appears to dispute certain basic assumptions inherent in the method, as well as a basic theoretical explanation for why these assumptions may be inadequate under some experimental conditions.

  3. Assessing differences between Ostwald ripening and coalescence by rheology, laser diffraction and multiple light scattering.

    PubMed

    Santos, J; Calero, N; Trujillo-Cayado, L A; Garcia, M C; Muñoz, J

    2017-08-14

    This contribution deals with the study of the influence of surfactant ratio, namely triblock copolymer (Pluronic PE9400) to polyoxyethylene glycerol fatty acid ester (Levenol C201), on the stability of emulsions formulated with a mixture of two biosolvents (N,N Dimethyl Decanamide and D-limonene), which find applications as carriers of agrochemicals. Emulsions containing Pluronic, regardless of the concentration studied, underwent Ostwald ripening while coalescence controlled the destabilization process of emulsions containing Levenol C201 as the only emulsifier. The physical stability of the emulsions was analysed not only by means of mean diameters determined by laser diffraction but also with respect to their rheological properties and the so-called TSI parameter derived from multiple light scattering measurements with aging time. We propose that the different structures of both surfactants at the oil/water interface may be responsible for the occurrence of different destabilization mechanisms. It is likely that Copolymer Pluronic PE9400 formed multilayers in the emulsions studied, which may promote flocculation during processing and, subsequently, Ostwald ripening. In contrast, Levenol C201 probably formed a compact adsorbed layer with the molecules perpendicularly oriented to the interface. This work illustrates to what extent the combination of information provided by Multiple Light Scattering, rheology and laser diffraction enables the detection and monitoring of destabilization mechanisms such as Ostwald ripening and coalescence. In addition, this research highlights the importance of surfactant selection for the physical stability of emulsions that exhibited similar droplet size distributions just after preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  5. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-09-14

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm.

  6. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  7. Fraunhofer diffraction of light by human enamel.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, W J

    1988-02-01

    Fraunhofer diffraction patterns of human enamel samples were photographed with a helium-neon laser beam (lambda = 633 nm). The first-order diffraction angle was in reasonable agreement with a prediction based upon enamel prisms acting as a two-dimensional grating. These results support the hypothesis that enamel diffracts light because of the periodic structure of enamel prisms with interprismatic spaces, which act as slits.

  8. Light shifts in atomic Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, E.; Friedrich, A.; Abend, S.; Rasel, E. M.; Schleich, W. P.

    2016-12-01

    Bragg diffraction of an atomic wave packet in a retroreflective geometry with two counterpropagating optical lattices exhibits a light shift induced phase. We show that the temporal shape of the light pulse determines the behavior of this phase shift: In contrast to Raman diffraction, Bragg diffraction with Gaussian pulses leads to a significant suppression of the intrinsic phase shift due to a scaling with the third power of the inverse Doppler frequency. However, for box-shaped laser pulses, the corresponding shift is twice as large as for Raman diffraction. Our results are based on approximate but analytical expressions as well as a numerical integration of the corresponding Schrödinger equation.

  9. Time dependent diffraction ring patterns in bromothymol blue dye doped PMMA film under irradiation with continuous wave green laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saymari, F. A.; Badran, H. A.; Al-Ahmad, A. Y.; Emshary, C. A.

    2013-11-01

    Diffraction ring patterns are generated in bromothymol blue (BTB) doped poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) film with the aid of visible light from a solid state laser of Gaussian distribution. Temporal evolution of patterns i.e. the number of rings increases as time elapse is observed. Based on the experimental findings, change in refractive index ( ∆n) effective nonlinear refractive index ( n 2) and variation of refractive index with temperature ( dn/ dT) have been obtained as 0.0025, 1.45 × 10-6 cm2 W-1, 1.69 × 10-5 K-1 respectively. Obtained results suggest the possibility of using BTB doped PMMA in data storage, recording and holography.

  10. 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light at 515 nm from SHG of a single-frequency tapered diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjarlin Jensen, Ole; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Müller, André; Sumpf, Bernd; Petersen, Paul Michael; Andersen, Peter E.

    2017-02-01

    Multi-Watt efficient compact green laser sources are required for a number of applications e.g. within biophotonics, laser pumping and laser displays. We present generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light at 515 nm by second harmonic generation (SHG) of a tapered diode laser, itself yielding more than 9 W at 1030 nm. SHG is performed in single pass through a cascade of two nonlinear crystals with re-focusing and dispersion compensating optics between the two nonlinear crystals. The laser is single-frequency and the output power is stabilized to better than +/-0.4%.

  11. CONTROLLING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF LASER LIGHT: Correlation of quantum intensity fluctuations in Raman-Nath diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alodzhants, A. P.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Kryukchan, G. Yu

    1993-07-01

    A new method of generating correlated fluctuations in optical fields, based on Raman-Nath diffraction by a fine grating, is discussed. A nonclassical effect is predicted: a suppression of quantum fluctuations below the level of full coherence in the sum or difference photon numbers for the transmitted and scattered waves. The physics of this phenomenon involves a correlation of quantum fluctuations in the intensities of two modes that are coupled nonlinearly. This correlation is most effective in the limit of parametric interaction between the waves in the medium.

  12. Diffraction light analysis method for a diffraction grating imaging lens.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takamasa; Korenaga, Tsuguhiro; Suzuki, Masa-aki; Tanida, Jun

    2014-04-10

    We have developed a new method to analyze the amount and distribution of diffraction light for a diffraction grating lens. We have found that diffraction light includes each-order diffraction light and striped diffraction light. In this paper, we describe characteristics of striped diffraction light and suggest a way to analyze diffraction light. Our analysis method, which considers the structure of diffraction grating steps, can simulate the aberrations of an optical system, each-order diffraction light, and striped diffraction light simultaneously with high accuracy. A comparison between the simulation and experimental results is presented, and we also show how our analysis method can be used to optimize a diffraction grating lens with low flare light.

  13. Efficient concept for generation of diffraction-limited green light by sum-frequency generation of spectrally combined tapered diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Andersen, Peter E; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2012-09-15

    In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power significantly. By combining two distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase in power and a maximum of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light. At this power level, green diode laser systems have a high application potential, e.g., within the biomedical field. Our concept can be expanded combining multiple diode lasers to increase the power even further.

  14. Electro-Optic Diffraction Grating Tuned Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent concerns an electro - optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro - optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro - optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating.

  15. Generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser in a cascade of nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anders K.; Jensen, Ole B.; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Andersen, Peter E.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-02-01

    Many applications, e.g., within biomedicine stand to benefit greatly from the development of diode laser-based multi- Watt efficient compact green laser sources. The low power of existing diode lasers in the green area (about 100 mW) means that the most promising approach remains nonlinear frequency conversion of infrared tapered diode lasers. Here, we describe the generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser, itself yielding 10 W at 1063 nm. This SHG is performed in single pass through a cascade of two PPMgO:LN crystals with re-focusing and dispersion compensating optics between the two nonlinear crystals. In the low-power limit, such a cascade of two crystals has the theoretical potential for generation of four times as much power as a single crystal without adding significantly to the complexity of the system. The experimentally achieved power of 3.5 W corresponds to a power enhancement greater than 2 compared to SHG in each of the crystals individually and is the highest visible output power generated by frequency conversion of a single diode laser. Such laser sources provide the necessary pump power for biophotonics applications, such as optical coherence tomography or multimodal imaging devices, e.g., FTCARS-OCT, based on a strongly pumped ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser.

  16. Diffractive acoustic elements for laser ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M.; Sharples, S. D.; Somekh, M. G.

    2000-05-01

    In a laser based surface acoustic wave (SAW) system the initial wavefront of the SAW is determined by the distribution of generating light on the sample surface. In our usual system the generating light is focussed into an arc or concentric arcs which spatially focus and temporally filter the SAWs. We have developed acoustic diffractive elements (DAEs) which, like diffractive optical elements, can shape the SAW distribution by diffraction. These DAEs are, like their optical analogues, highly dispersive and special consideration has to be made at the design stage in order to accommodate and utilize this dispersion. We demonstrate DAEs that produce well controlled multiple focii, frequency suppression and frequency selection. We also show that these complex acoustic elements can be accurately modelled using a simple angular spectrum technique. The DAEs are produced by computer generated holograms which control the generating distribution of light. These DAEs have applications in multi-frequency acoustic, harmonic acoustic imaging, SAW wavefront control and imaging on curved surfaces.

  17. Optical laue diffraction on photonic structures designed by laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samusev, K. B.; Rybin, M. V.; Lukashenko, S. Yu.; Limonov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals with square symmetry C 4v were obtained using the laser lithography method. The structure of these samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Optical Laue diffraction for monochromatic light was studied experimentally depending on the incidence angle of laser beam and lattice constant. Interpretation of the observed diffraction patterns is given in the framework of the Laue diffraction mechanism for an one-dimensional chain of scattering elements. Red thresholds for different diffraction orders were determined experimentally and theoretically. The results of calculations are in an excellent agreement with experiment.

  18. Light funneling from a photonic crystal laser cavity to a nano-antenna: overcoming the diffraction limit in optical energy transfer down to the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Mivelle, Mathieu; Viktorovitch, Pierre; Baida, Fadi I; El Eter, Ali; Xie, Zhihua; Vo, Than-Phong; Atie, Elie; Burr, Geoffrey W; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Rauch, Jean-Yves; Callard, Ségolène; Grosjean, Thierry

    2014-06-16

    We show that the near-field coupling between a photonic crystal microlaser and a nano-antenna can enable hybrid photonic systems that are both physically compact (free from bulky optics) and efficient at transferring optical energy into the nano-antenna. Up to 19% of the laser power from a micron-scale photonic crystal laser cavity is experimentally transferred to a bowtie aperture nano-antenna (BNA) whose area is 400-fold smaller than the overall emission area of the microlaser. Instead of a direct deposition of the nano-antenna onto the photonic crystal, it is fabricated at the apex of a fiber tip to be accurately placed in the microlaser near-field. Such light funneling within a hybrid structure provides a path for overcoming the diffraction limit in optical energy transfer to the nanoscale and should thus open promising avenues in the nanoscale enhancement and confinement of light in compact architectures, impacting applications such as biosensing, optical trapping, local heating, spectroscopy, and nanoimaging.

  19. Diffraction efficiency enhancement of femtosecond laser-engraved diffraction gratings due to CO2 laser polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hun-Kook; Jung, Deok; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Yong-Tak; Kim, Jin-Tae; Ahsan, Md. Shamim

    2014-11-01

    This research demonstrates laser-assisted fabrication of high-efficiency diffraction gratings in fused-silica glass samples. Initially, femtosecond laser pulses are used to engrave diffraction gratings on the glass surfaces. Then, these micro-patterned glass samples undergo CO2 laser polishing process. unpolished diffraction gratings encoded in the glass samples show an overall diffraction efficiency of 18.1%. diffraction gratings imprinted on the glass samples and then polished four times by using a CO2 laser beam attain a diffraction efficiency of 32.7%. We also investigate the diffraction patterns of the diffraction gratings encoded on fused-silica glass surfaces. The proposed CO2 laser polishing technique shows great potential in patterning high-efficiency diffraction gratings on the surfaces of various transparent materials.

  20. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    2008-01-23

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy have further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.

  1. White-Light Diffraction with a CD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov; Nikolaev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Various wave optics experiments can be carried out using an ordinary compact disc. The CD is suitable for use as a diffraction grating. For instance, a standard CD (700 MB) has 625 lines/mm. In this article, the authors describe two white-light diffraction demonstrations for a large audience, realizable using a CD (as reflection or transmission…

  2. White-Light Diffraction with a CD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov; Nikolaev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Various wave optics experiments can be carried out using an ordinary compact disc. The CD is suitable for use as a diffraction grating. For instance, a standard CD (700 MB) has 625 lines/mm. In this article, the authors describe two white-light diffraction demonstrations for a large audience, realizable using a CD (as reflection or transmission…

  3. Notes: Laser Light Gets Everyone's Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Ellen

    1989-01-01

    Discusses laser demonstration for invoking interest in science, especially physics. Describes some examples, such as diffraction, scattering, expansion by diverging lens, internal reflection in a light pipe, and illumination through optical cable. Provides some practical hints for the demonstration. (YP)

  4. Notes: Laser Light Gets Everyone's Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Ellen

    1989-01-01

    Discusses laser demonstration for invoking interest in science, especially physics. Describes some examples, such as diffraction, scattering, expansion by diverging lens, internal reflection in a light pipe, and illumination through optical cable. Provides some practical hints for the demonstration. (YP)

  5. Five-degrees-of-freedom diffractive laser encoder

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Huang, Hsueh-Liang; Lee, Hau-Wei

    2009-05-10

    Linear laser encoders have been widely used for precision positioning control of a linear stage. We develop a five-degrees-of-freedom (5-DOF) laser linear encoder to simultaneously measure the position, straightness, pitch, roll, and yaw errors along one moving axis. This study integrates the circular polarized interferometric technique with the three-dimensional diffracted ray-tracing method to develop a novel laser encoder with 5-DOF. The phases encoded within the +1 and -1 order diffraction lights reflected from the diffraction grating are decoded by the circular polarized interferometric technique to measure the linear displacement when the diffraction grating moves. The three-dimensional diffracted ray tracing of the +1- and -1-order diffraction lights induced by the motion errors of the moved grating were analyzed to calculate the other motion errors based on the detection of light spots on two quadrant photodiode detectors. The period of the grating is 0.83 {mu}m and the experimental results show that the measurement accuracy was better than {+-}0.3 {mu}m/{+-}41 {mu}m for straightness, {+-}1 arc sec.

  6. Light diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Thorsten; Nitz, Peter

    2014-05-05

    Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as primary optical elements focusing sunlight onto small solar cells or onto entrance apertures of secondary optical elements attached to the solar cells. Calculations using the Young-Maggi-Rubinowicz theory of diffraction yield analytical expressions for the amount of light spilling outside these target areas due to diffraction at the edges of the concentrator Fresnel lenses. Explicit equations are given for the diffraction loss due to planar Fresnel lenses with small prisms and due to arbitrarily shaped Fresnel lenses. Furthermore, the cases of illumination by monochromatic, polychromatic, totally spatially coherent and partially spatially coherent light (e.g. from the solar disc) are treated, resulting in analytical formulae. Examples using realistic values show losses due to diffraction of up to several percent.

  7. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  8. Coherent diffractive imaging using short wavelength light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiney, H. M.

    2010-07-01

    Techniques that recover images from diffraction data obtained using coherent short-wavelength light sources are currently under active development for applications in nanotechnology and structural biology. In this review, an outline of paraxial optics is provided in a form that is sufficiently general to incorporate the coherence properties and frequency structure of illumination sources used in diffractive imaging applications. The Fourier phase problem is formulated in the context of imaging algorithms that are designed to obtain uniquely-determined phase distributions from measurements of diffraction data. The properties of several iterative phase retrieval algorithms for both coherent and partially-coherent diffractive imaging applications are presented in a unified formalism, together with a brief discussion of a non-iterative technique. Approaches to diffractive imaging based on Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction configurations are compared. Applications are described utilising quasi-monochromatic third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources and polychromatic high-harmonic generation table-top soft X-ray sources. The review concludes with a consideration of proposed applications of diffractive imaging approaches to the determination of biomolecular structures from isolated molecules using fourth-generation X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  9. Lighting with laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Chandrajit; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are much more efficient than compact fluorescent lamps and hence are rapidly capturing the market for general illumination. LEDs are also replacing halogen lamps or even newer xenon based lamps in automotive headlamps. Because laser diodes are inherently much brighter and often more efficient than corresponding LEDs, there is great research interest in developing laser diode based illumination systems. Operating at higher current densities and with smaller form factors, laser diodes may outperform LEDs in the future. This article reviews the possibilities and challenges in the integration of visible laser diodes in future illumination systems.

  10. Reflective diffractive beam splitter for laser interferometers.

    PubMed

    Fahr, Stephan; Clausnitzer, Tina; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-08-20

    The first realization of a reflective 50/50 beam splitter based on a dielectric diffraction grating suitable for high-power laser interferometers is reported. The beam splitter is designed to operate at a wavelength of 1064 nm and in s polarization. To minimize the performance degradation of the device that is due to fabrication fluctuations, during the design process special attention was paid to achieve high fabrication tolerances especially of groove width and depth. Applying this beam splitter to high-power laser interferometers, such as future gravitational wave detectors, will avoid critical thermal lensing effects and allow for the free choice of substrate materials.

  11. Remote Laser Diffraction Particle Size Distribution Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2001-03-01

    In support of a radioactive slurry sampling and physical characterization task, an “off-the-shelf” laser diffraction (classical light scattering) particle size analyzer was utilized for remote particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. Spent nuclear fuel was previously reprocessed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC—formerly recognized as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) which is on DOE’s INEEL site. The acidic, radioactive aqueous raffinate streams from these processes were transferred to 300,000 gallon stainless steel storage vessels located in the INTEC Tank Farm area. Due to the transfer piping configuration in these vessels, complete removal of the liquid can not be achieved. Consequently, a “heel” slurry remains at the bottom of an “emptied” vessel. Particle size distribution characterization of the settled solids in this remaining heel slurry, as well as suspended solids in the tank liquid, is the goal of this remote PSD analyzer task. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model LA-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a “hot cell” (gamma radiation) environment. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not previously achievable—making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  12. Laser speckle contrast reduction measurement using diffractive diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Weston; Middlebrook, Christopher; Smith, John

    2009-02-01

    In order to produce future generation micro-projection systems that can function independently or in conjunction with small personal communication devices lasers are the preferred source of illumination over LEDs. Lasers are much brighter and require less power than LEDs allowing for larger screen sizes and smaller battery requirements. In order to illuminate the spatial light modulator used in the micro-projection system micro-optical elements are used within the illumination path of a projector system to shape the RGB laser sources. Due to the diffractive nature of the optical elements and the high coherence of the lasers a speckle pattern is produced in the final image reducing the overall image quality. Diffractive diffusers are typically used in combination with micro-lens arrays in a time varying fashion in an attempt to reduce the spatial coherence of the laser sources and hence reduce the speckle. Previous reduction techniques have successfully used pseudo-random hadamard matrix diffusers to greatly minimize the contrast of the pattern. This paper examines new reduction methods involving diffractive diffusing elements and presents measurements in the reduction of speckle contrast for each technique.

  13. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER ASPECTS OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS Measurement of angular parameters of divergent optical radiation by light diffraction on sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, V. M.; Averin, S. V.; Shkerdin, G. N.

    2010-12-01

    A method is proposed to measure the scattering angle of optical radiation, the method employing two Bragg diffraction processes in which divergent optical radiation propagates close to the optical axis of a uniaxial crystal, while the acoustic wave — orthogonally to this axis. The method does not require additional angular tuning of the acousto-optic cell. We suggest using a mask to measure the light divergence that is larger than the angle of Bragg scattering. The method can be used to measure the size of the polished glass plate inhomogeneities.

  14. Integrated high-order surface diffraction gratings for diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotarev, V V; Leshko, A Yu; Pikhtin, N A; Slipchenko, S O; Sokolova, Z N; Lubyanskiy, Ya V; Voronkova, N V; Tarasov, I S

    2015-12-31

    High-order surface diffraction gratings acting as a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) in mesa stripe semiconductor lasers (λ = 1030 nm) have been studied theoretically and experimentally. Higher order interfering radiation modes (IRMs), which propagate off the plane of the waveguide, have been shown to have a crucial effect on the reflection and transmission spectra of the DBR. The decrease in the reflectivity of the DBR in response to the increase in the diffraction efficiency of these modes may reach 80% and more. According to theoretical analysis results, the intensity of the higher order IRMs is determined by the geometry of the DBR groove profile. Experimental data demonstrate that the noncavity modes are responsible for parasitic light leakage losses in the laser cavity. It has been shown that, in the case of nonoptimal geometry of the grating groove profile, the overall external differential quantum efficiency of the parasitic laser emission may exceed 45%, which is more than half of the laser output power. The optimal geometry of the DBR groove profile is trapezoidal, with the smallest possible lower base. Experimental evidence has been presented that this geometry considerably reduces the power of the higher order IRMs and minimises the parasitic light leakage loss. (lasers)

  15. Slow Light Semiconductor Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-02

    we demonstrate a semiconductor laser with a spectral linewidth of 18 kHz in the telecom band around 1:55um. The views, opinions and/or findings...we demonstrate a semiconductor laser with a spectral linewidth of 18 kHz in the telecom band around 1:55um. Further, the large intracavity field...hybrid Si/III- V platforms Abstract The semiconductor laser is the principal light source powering the world-wide optical fiber network . Ever

  16. Forward light scattering for arbitrary sharp-edged convex crystals in Fraunhofer and anomalous diffraction approximations.

    PubMed

    Heffels, C; Heitzmann, D; Hirleman, E D; Scarlett, B

    1995-10-01

    Fraunhofer diffraction is a well-known physical model for describing forward light scattering from opaque particles much larger than the wavelength of the light. Analytical expressions exist for diffraction from circular- or rectangular-shaped apertures. An expression is derived for diffraction by apertures of a general polygonal shape. From this expression the exact solution for anomalous diffraction by arbitrary convex crystals is calculated. These expressions are useful in characterizing crystal size and shape, by laser diffraction instruments, when measured in a solution.

  17. Verification of the Uncertainty Principle by Using Diffraction of Light Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, D.; Nesic, Lj

    2011-01-01

    We described a simple idea for experimental verification of the uncertainty principle for light waves. We used a single-slit diffraction of a laser beam for measuring the angular width of zero-order diffraction maximum and obtained the corresponding wave number uncertainty. We will assume that the uncertainty in position is the slit width. For the…

  18. Verification of the Uncertainty Principle by Using Diffraction of Light Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, D.; Nesic, Lj

    2011-01-01

    We described a simple idea for experimental verification of the uncertainty principle for light waves. We used a single-slit diffraction of a laser beam for measuring the angular width of zero-order diffraction maximum and obtained the corresponding wave number uncertainty. We will assume that the uncertainty in position is the slit width. For the…

  19. Efficient diffractive collimator for edge-emitting laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalik, Andrzej; Góra, Krzysztof; Adamkiewicz, Grażyna; Ziętek, Monika; Mikuła, Grzegorz; Kołodziejczyk, Andrzej; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew

    2006-04-01

    Compared with conventional optical systems, diffractive optical elements are more suitable to transform laser diode beams because they can form more complex wavefronts and better fulfill requirements of miniaturization. However, high numerical aperture needed to collimate the fast axis of edge-emitting laser diodes demands extremely high spatial frequency elements when single DOE is used. That involves complicated design methods based on rigorous diffraction theory and fabricating technology with sub-wavelength resolution and nanometer accuracy. To overcome these difficulties we propose a transmission DOE consisting of elliptical and cylindrical zone plates fabricated onto opposite sides of a substrate. The main advantage of such a solution lies in fact that each of the zone plates has smaller spatial frequency and can be made even as 8-phase-level element with theoretically 95% diffraction efficiency using available microlithographic technology. In result, monolithic collimating system that allows to compensate astigmatism and to convert an elliptical laser diode light beam to circular one can be achieved with NA higher than 0.5 and efficiency over 80%.

  20. Reconstruction of two-dimensional molecular structure with laser-induced electron diffraction from laser-aligned polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chao; Wei, Hui; Wang, Xu; Le, Anh -Thu; Lu, Ruifeng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-10-27

    Imaging the transient process of molecules has been a basic way to investigate photochemical reactions and dynamics. Based on laser-induced electron diffraction and partial one-dimensional molecular alignment, here we provide two effective methods for reconstructing two-dimensional structure of polyatomic molecules. We demonstrate that electron diffraction images in both scattering angles and broadband energy can be utilized to retrieve complementary structure information, including positions of light atoms. Lastly, with picometre spatial resolution and the inherent femtosecond temporal resolution of lasers, laser-induced electron diffraction method offers significant opportunities for probing atomic motion in a large molecule in a typical pump-probe measurement.

  1. Nanosecond x-ray Laue diffraction apparatus suitable for laser shock compression experiments.

    PubMed

    Suggit, Matthew; Kimminau, Giles; Hawreliak, James; Remington, Bruce; Park, Nigel; Wark, Justin

    2010-08-01

    We have used nanosecond bursts of x-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma, comprised of a mixture of mid-Z elements, to produce a quasiwhite-light spectrum suitable for performing Laue diffraction from single crystals. The laser-produced plasma emits x-rays ranging in energy from 3 to in excess of 10 keV, and is sufficiently bright for single shot nanosecond diffraction patterns to be recorded. The geometry is suitable for the study of laser-shocked crystals, and single-shot diffraction patterns from both unshocked and shocked silicon crystals are presented.

  2. Light diffraction features in an ordered monolayer of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, S. G.

    2017-07-01

    The structure and optical diffraction properties of monolayers of monodisperse spheres crystallized on transparent dielectric substrates are studied. Two types of diffraction phenomena are considered: surface light diffraction on the lattice of spheres and waveguide resonances in the monolayer plane. For experimental study of these phenomena, optical retroreflection and transmission spectra are measured as functions of the light incidence angle and azimuthal orientation of the incidence plane. The monolayer structures determined by scanning electron microscopy and light diffraction methods are in quantitative agreement. It is concluded that one-dimensional Fraunhofer diffraction is applicable to describe surface diffraction in the hexagonal lattice of spheres. In the case of oblique light incidence, anisotropy of diffraction and transmission spectra depending on the light incidence plane orientation with respect to the sphere lattice and linear polarization of incident light is detected. Waveguide resonances of the planar two-dimensional photonic crystal are approximated within the light diffraction model in the "empty" hexagonal lattice. The best approximation of the waveguide resonance dispersion is achieved using the effective refractive index, depending on the wavelength. Surface diffraction suppression by waveguide resonances of the photonic crystal is demonstrated. Surface diffraction orders are identified as diffraction at singular points of the Brillouin zone of the planar twodimensional photonic crystal.

  3. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P.A.; Padmore, H.A.; Lindenberg, A.; Schuck, P.J.; Judd, E.; Falcone, R.W.; Bucksbaum, P.H.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H. Lee, R.W. Wark, J.S.

    1997-07-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si (111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb (111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or {open_quote}camshaft{close_quote} operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P.A.; Larsson, J.; Chang, Z.

    1997-09-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si(111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb(111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or camshaft operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps.

  5. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P. A.; Padmore, H. A.; Larsson, J.; Lindenberg, A.; Schuck, P. J.; Judd, E.; Falcone, R. W.; Chang, Z.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.; Lee, R. W.; Wark, J. S.

    1997-07-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si (111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb (111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or 'camshaft' operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps.

  6. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, P. A.; Larsson, J.; Chang, Z.; Lindenberg, A.; Schuck, P. J.; Judd, E.; Padmore, H. A.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Lee, R. W.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.; Wark, J. S.; Falcone, R. W.

    1997-07-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si (111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb (111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or `camshaft' operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps.

  7. Micron-Accurate Laser Fresnel-Diffraction Ranging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehner, David; Campbell, Jonathan; Smith, Kelly; Sanders, Alvin; Allison, Stephen; Smaley, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Two versions of an optoelectronic system undergoing development are depicted. The system is expected to be capable of measuring a distance between 2 and 10 m with an error of no more than 1 micrometer. The system would be designed to exploit Fresnel diffraction of a laser beam. In particular, it would be designed to take advantage of the fact that a Fresnel diffraction pattern is ultrasensitive to distance. The two versions would differ in the following respects: In version 1, the focus of the telescope would be in the Fresnel region, and the telescope would have a small depth of focus. As a consequence, the Fresnel pattern would be imaged directly onto the photodetector array; in version 2, a multielement lens module would displace the Fresnel region from the vicinity of the pinhole to the vicinity of the optical receiver. As the distance to be measured varied, the location of the receiver relative to the displaced Fresnel-diffraction region would vary, thereby causing the Fresnel diffraction pattern on the focal plane to vary. The multielement lens module would also correct for aberrations. The processing of the digitized Fresnel diffraction pattern in the computer might be accelerated by using only parts of the pattern or even only one small part - the central pixel. As the distance from the pinhole increased, the central pixel would rapidly cycle between maximum and minimum light intensity. This in itself would not be sufficient to uniquely determine the distance. However, by varying the size of the pinhole or the wavelength of the laser, one could obtain a second cycle of variation of intensity that, in conjunction with the first cycle, could enable a unique determination of distance. Alternatively, for a single wavelength and a single pinhole size, it should suffice to consider the data from only two different key pixels in the Fresnel pattern.

  8. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  9. Laser diffraction particle sizing: Instrument probe volume relocation and elongation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert C.; Buchele, Donald R.; Hovenac, Edward A.; Lock, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The effective probe volume of laser diffraction particle sizing instruments depends on many instrument parameters. In particular the probe volume axial boundaries and its location along laser beam are essentially defined by the onset of a vignetting effect where light scattered at large angles from small particles misses the transform lens. This vignetting effect results in a probe volume that must be inconveniently close to the lens in order to detect smaller diameter particles (less than 100 micrometers). With the addition of an appropriately designed Keplerian telescope, the probe volume may be relocated and elongated. The theory of operation of this supplemental optical system is described. Design considerations for these supplemental optical systems are described, including recommendations for lens specifications, assembly and use. An image transfer system is described which has been designed for use on a Malvern 2600HSD instrument. Experimental validation of this image transfer system is described.

  10. Imaging of flames and cold flows in air by diffraction from a laser-induced grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmerling, B.; Stampanoni-Panariello, A.

    1993-10-01

    Nonresonant laser-induced gratings are created in gases employing the second-harmonic output of a Nd: YAG laser in a degenerate four-wave mixing beam geometry. The diffraction efficiency of the gratings has been investigated as a function of laser intensity and gas pressure. Single-shot images of a helium flow in ambient air illustrate that diffraction of light from a laser-induced grating has the potential for remote, two-dimensional diagnostics of gas mixing processes. In addition, this coherent technique is used to image a sooty flame.

  11. Fresnel Diffraction Using a He-Ne Gas Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Allen L.; Vander Meulen, David L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes an advanced laboratory experiment of Fresnel diffraction which uses a He-Ne gas laser as the source and a wire as the opaque diffracting strip. A photograph of the diffraction pattern is compared with the intensity diagram predicted by the Cornu spiral method. Agreement is clear and impressive, although minor differences are detectable.…

  12. Adequacy of laser diffraction for soil particle size analysis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Peter; Aumann, Colin; Chia, Kohleth; O'Halloran, Nick; Chandra, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    Sedimentation has been a standard methodology for particle size analysis since the early 1900s. In recent years laser diffraction is beginning to replace sedimentation as the prefered technique in some industries, such as marine sediment analysis. However, for the particle size analysis of soils, which have a diverse range of both particle size and shape, laser diffraction still requires evaluation of its reliability. In this study, the sedimentation based sieve plummet balance method and the laser diffraction method were used to measure the particle size distribution of 22 soil samples representing four contrasting Australian Soil Orders. Initially, a precise wet riffling methodology was developed capable of obtaining representative samples within the recommended obscuration range for laser diffraction. It was found that repeatable results were obtained even if measurements were made at the extreme ends of the manufacturer's recommended obscuration range. Results from statistical analysis suggested that the use of sample pretreatment to remove soil organic carbon (and possible traces of calcium-carbonate content) made minor differences to the laser diffraction particle size distributions compared to no pretreatment. These differences were found to be marginally statistically significant in the Podosol topsoil and Vertosol subsoil. There are well known reasons why sedimentation methods may be considered to 'overestimate' plate-like clay particles, while laser diffraction will 'underestimate' the proportion of clay particles. In this study we used Lin's concordance correlation coefficient to determine the equivalence of laser diffraction and sieve plummet balance results. The results suggested that the laser diffraction equivalent thresholds corresponding to the sieve plummet balance cumulative particle sizes of < 2 μm, < 20 μm, and < 200 μm, were < 9 μm, < 26 μm, < 275 μm respectively. The many advantages of laser diffraction for soil particle size analysis

  13. Hair treatment device for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, Bruce E.; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2016-01-26

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  14. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2013-12-17

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  15. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2014-11-11

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  16. Diffraction of digital micromirror device gratings and its effect on properties of tunable fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Yan, Bin-bin; Song, Fei-jun; Wang, Yi-quan; Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal

    2012-10-20

    A digital micromirror device (DMD) is a kind of widely used spatial light modulator. We apply DMD as wavelength selector in tunable fiber lasers. Based on the two-dimensional diffraction theory, the diffraction of DMD and its effect on properties of fiber laser parameters are analyzed in detail. The theoretical results show that the diffraction efficiency is strongly dependent upon the angle of incident light and the pixel spacing of DMD. Compared with the other models of DMDs, the 0.55 in. DMD grating is an approximate blazed state in our configuration, which makes most of the diffracted radiation concentrated into one order. It is therefore a better choice to improve the stability and reliability of tunable fiber laser systems.

  17. X-Ray Diffraction Simulation Using Laser Pointers and Printers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a laser pointer to demonstrate the analogy between optical and X-ray diffraction and a laser printer with 600 or 1200 dot resolution to create and modify arrays, print them on transparencies, and illuminate them with laser pointers. Includes 14 references. (Author/YDS)

  18. X-Ray Diffraction Simulation Using Laser Pointers and Printers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a laser pointer to demonstrate the analogy between optical and X-ray diffraction and a laser printer with 600 or 1200 dot resolution to create and modify arrays, print them on transparencies, and illuminate them with laser pointers. Includes 14 references. (Author/YDS)

  19. Explication of diffraction lights on an optical imaging system from a Fraunhofer diffraction perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takamasa; Korenaga, Tsuguhiro; Suzuki, Masa-aki

    2012-06-01

    Low-height camera modules are demanded for such applications as cellular phones and vehicles. For designing optical lens, it has widely been recognized that a trade-off exists between reducing the number of lenses and camera resolution. The optical performance of imaging lenses has been improved by diffraction gratings, which have a peculiar inverse dispersion in the wavelength and exhibit the efficacy of correction for chromatic aberration. We can simultaneously reduce the number of lenses and maintain optical resolution using diffraction gratings. However, we have found a generation of striped flare lights under intense light sources that differ from unnecessary order diffraction lights. In this paper, we reveal the generation mechanism of these new striped diffraction lights and suggest a novel structure of diffraction gratings that can decrease them.

  20. Diffractive optical elements fabricated for beam shaping of high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Helge; Biertümpfel, Ralf; Pawlowski, Edgar

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the use of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) and micro-optics fabricated by precise pressing in glass for beam shaping of high-power diode lasers. The DOEs are used to diffract the light into the point of interest and to improve the laser beam quality. We have realized circular, flat-top and multi-beam intensity profiles. The highest measured diffraction efficiency was higher than 95 %. The new established fabrication process has potential for mass production of DOEs. SCHOTT's precision glass molding process guarantees a very constant quality over the complete production chain.

  1. Erythrocyte shape analysis by means of laser diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Rainer; Schauf, Burkhard; Guenther, Bernd

    1992-05-01

    In quite a large number of disorders, reduced flexibility of red blood cells (RBC) can be detected. In cardiovascular diseases it is supposed that rigidification of RBC may be regarded as a pathogenetic factor aggravating ischemia by disturbing capillary perfusion. Most methods established so far to estimate RBC deformability are hard to standardize and include large measurement errors. We present a low-cost system to determine RBC shape and flexibility. It combines laser diffraction of RBC in Couette flow with automated computer assisted image analysis. Effortless handling allows the system to be used for RBC elongation measurements even in routine diagnostics. Analysis of the whole information content of diffraction patterns reduces errors due to noisy diffraction patterns of working a little off axis. The system allows detection of very small changes in flexibility (less than 5%). The accuracy of measurement is not affected by variation of hematocrit or the intensity of transmitted light. Using the newly developed system it is demonstrated (1) that mechanically induced RBC rigidification may occur without hemolysis; (2) that in photodynamic therapy (e.g., pheophorbide A) RBC rigidification occurs during irridation; and (3) that in-vitro aging of conserved blood may partly be inhibited by calmodulin antagonists (e.g., fendiline).

  2. Diffraction imaging characteristics of slit for ultra-short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiang-yang; Wu, Kun-xi; Lu, Long-zhao

    2015-08-01

    We propose a simple and concise mathematical method based on the Fraunhofer approximation to analyze the imaging characteristics of slit for broadband light sources. Taking Gaussian-shaped ultra-short laser pulse for example, we investigated the diffraction imaging characteristics of ultra-short light sources through a single-slit and a double-slit. We deduced the mathematical expressions of the intensity distribution of far-field diffraction, and conducted numerical calculation and analysis. It turns out the pulse width of the ultra-short light source plays an important role in the diffraction imaging characteristics of slit. We also provide a quantitative criterion to measure the deviation in terms of far-field diffraction intensity distribution between broadband light source and the ideal monochromatic light source.

  3. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-15

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza–Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light–matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects. - Highlights: • Kapitza–Dirac diffraction of entangled particles shows multiparticle interference. • There is a discontinuity in the set of joint detection patterns of entangled states. • We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. • Symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  4. Diffraction-Coupled, Phase-Locked Semiconductor Laser Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Yariv, Amnon; Margalit, Shlomo

    1988-01-01

    Stable, narrow far field produced. Array of lasers fabricated on single chip. Individual laser waveguides isolated from each other except in end portions, where diffraction coupling takes place. Radiation pattern far from laser array has single, sharp central lobe when all lasers operate in phase with each other. Shape of lobe does not vary appreciably with array current. Applications include recording, printing, and range finding.

  5. Active mode locking of lasers by piezoelectrically induced diffraction modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krausz, F.; Turi, L.; Kuti, Cs.; Schmidt, A. J.

    1990-04-01

    A new amplitude-modulation mode-locking technique is presented. Acoustic waves are generated directly on the faces of a resonant photoelastic medium. The created standing waves cause a highly efficient diffraction modulation of light. The modulation depth of standing-wave mode lockers is related to material and drive parameters and a figure of merit is introduced. With a lithium niobate crystal modulation depths over 10 are achieved at 1.054 μm and 1 W of radio frequency power. Using this device for the active mode locking of a continuous-wave Nd:glass laser pulses as short as 3.8 ps are produced at a repetition rate of 66 MHz. Limitations of amplitude-modulation mode locking by standing acoustic waves are discussed.

  6. Inquiry with Laser Printer Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hook, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The pages of "The Physics Teacher" have featured several clever designs for homemade diffraction gratings using a variety of materials--cloth, lithographic film, wire, compact discs, parts of aerosol spray cans, and pseudoliquids and pseudosolids. A different and inexpensive method I use to make low-resolution diffraction gratings takes advantage…

  7. Inquiry with Laser Printer Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hook, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The pages of "The Physics Teacher" have featured several clever designs for homemade diffraction gratings using a variety of materials--cloth, lithographic film, wire, compact discs, parts of aerosol spray cans, and pseudoliquids and pseudosolids. A different and inexpensive method I use to make low-resolution diffraction gratings takes advantage…

  8. Diffractive variable attenuator for femtosecond laser radiation control.

    PubMed

    Poleshchuk, Alexander G; Nasyrov, Ruslan K; Cherkashin, Vadim V; Dubov, Mykhaylo V; Mezentsev, Vladimir M; Bennion, Ian

    2009-02-01

    We present a diffractive phase variable attenuator for femtosecond laser radiation control. It allows the control of beam power up to 0.75.10(13) W/cm(2) without introducing serious distortions in spectra and beam shape while it operates in zero order diffraction. The attenuator can operate with wavelengths from DUV to IR.

  9. Measurements of fine particle size using image processing of a laser diffraction image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, Kotaro

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of fine particle size is important in spray systems, minimum quantity lubrication, and weather observation. Introducing the recent progress of imaging techniques, the authors developed a portable measurement system. To overcome the large light intensity difference between the incident laser light and diffracted light and the limitation of the dynamic range of imaging devices, the event correlation was adopted. The growth of droplets in fog was experimentally measured.

  10. Fraunhofer Diffraction Patterns from Apertures Illuminated with Nonparallel Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingsporn, Paul E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses several aspects of Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from apertures illuminated by diverging light. Develops a generalization to apertures of arbitrary shape which shows that the sizes of the pattern are related by a simple scale factor. Uses the Abbe theory of image formation by diffraction to discuss the intensity of illumination of the…

  11. Diffraction patterns from multiple tilted laser apertures: numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Anton V.; Polyakov, Vadim M.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a Rayleigh-Sommerfeld based method for numerical calculation of multiple tilted apertures near and far field diffraction patterns. Method is based on iterative procedure of fast Fourier transform based circular convolution of the initial field complex amplitudes distribution and impulse response function modified in order to account aperture and observation planes mutual tilt. The method is computationally efficient and has good accordance with the results of experimental diffraction patterns and can be applied for analysis of spatial noises occurring in master oscillator power amplifier laser systems. The example of diffraction simulation for a Phobos-Ground laser rangefinder amplifier is demonstrated.

  12. Measurement of sarcomere shortening in skinned fibers from frog muscle by white light diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Y E

    1987-01-01

    A new optical-electronic method has been developed to detect striation spacing of single muscle fibers. The technique avoids Bragg-angle and interference-fringe effects associated with laser light diffraction by using polychromatic (white) light. The light is diffracted once by an acousto-optical device and then diffracted again by the muscle fiber. The double diffraction reverses the chromatic dispersion normally obtained with polychromatic light. In frog skinned muscle fibers, active and passive sarcomere shortening were smooth when observed by white light diffraction, whereas steps and pauses occurred in the striation spacing signals obtained with laser illumination. During active contractions skinned fibers shortened at high rates (3-5 microns/s per half sarcomere, 0-5 degrees C) at loads below 5% of isometric tension. Compression of the myofibrillar lateral filament spacing using osmotic agents reduced the shortening velocity at low loads. A hypothesis is presented that high shortening velocities are observed with skinned muscle fibers because the cross-bridges cannot support compressive loads when the filament lattice is swollen. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:3496924

  13. Adequacy of laser diffraction for soil particle size analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Peter; Aumann, Colin; Chia, Kohleth; O'Halloran, Nick; Chandra, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    Sedimentation has been a standard methodology for particle size analysis since the early 1900s. In recent years laser diffraction is beginning to replace sedimentation as the prefered technique in some industries, such as marine sediment analysis. However, for the particle size analysis of soils, which have a diverse range of both particle size and shape, laser diffraction still requires evaluation of its reliability. In this study, the sedimentation based sieve plummet balance method and the laser diffraction method were used to measure the particle size distribution of 22 soil samples representing four contrasting Australian Soil Orders. Initially, a precise wet riffling methodology was developed capable of obtaining representative samples within the recommended obscuration range for laser diffraction. It was found that repeatable results were obtained even if measurements were made at the extreme ends of the manufacturer’s recommended obscuration range. Results from statistical analysis suggested that the use of sample pretreatment to remove soil organic carbon (and possible traces of calcium-carbonate content) made minor differences to the laser diffraction particle size distributions compared to no pretreatment. These differences were found to be marginally statistically significant in the Podosol topsoil and Vertosol subsoil. There are well known reasons why sedimentation methods may be considered to ‘overestimate’ plate-like clay particles, while laser diffraction will ‘underestimate’ the proportion of clay particles. In this study we used Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient to determine the equivalence of laser diffraction and sieve plummet balance results. The results suggested that the laser diffraction equivalent thresholds corresponding to the sieve plummet balance cumulative particle sizes of < 2 μm, < 20 μm, and < 200 μm, were < 9 μm, < 26 μm, < 275 μm respectively. The many advantages of laser diffraction for soil particle

  14. Light Diffraction of Aligned Polymer Fibers Periodically Dispersed by Phase Separation of Liquid Crystal and Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    We have confirmed light diffraction of aligned polymer fibers obtained by a phase separation of an anisotropic-phase solution of liquid crystal and polymer. He—Ne laser light passing through the polymer fibers was scattered in the axis vertical to the fibers, and had two peaks of light intensity symmetrical to the center of the transmitting laser spot. The two peaks were found to be caused by light diffraction due to the periodic polymer-fiber dispersion because the peaks corresponded to values calculated by intervals between the fibers. The periodical fiber networks are considered to be formed by anisotropic spinodal decomposition. This effect can be used to measure the dispersion order of the polymer fibers.

  15. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-05-15

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO{sub 2} molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  16. Diffraction-limited circular single spot from phased array lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuno, K.; Drenten, R.; Poel, C.v.d.; Opschoor, J.; Acket, G. )

    1989-11-01

    Anamorphic prism optics makes it possible to obtain a diffraction-limited ({Sigma}/8) circular single spot from index guided phased array lasers. It served not only for beam shaping but also for astigmatism correction and spatial filtering. The optical path analysis based on the interferometric fringe scanning phase measurements both in the near and far fields indicates that the phased array lasers can be applied to such diffraction-limited precise optical systems as optical disk recording, laser beam printing, or second harmonics generation.

  17. Measuring laser beam quality by use of phase retrieval and Fraunhofer diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenbo; Zhang, Zengbao; He, Xin; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Zhiguo; Ma, Yanhua; Jin, Yuqi

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of phase retrieval and Fraunhofer diffraction as a method for the measurement of laser beam quality. This technique involves using two CCD cameras to record a pair of conjugated light intensity images in defocus plane and one near field measurement instrument to record the light intensity image in near field. The wavefront is then retrieved using an optimization jointly constrained by them. Thereafter, combining with the known light intensity image in near field, light intensity image in focus plane can be figured out. After that, laser beam quality will be obtained by comparing with ideal light intensity distribution in focus plane. As light intensity images in defocus plane can be measured with higher resolution and lower CCD dynamic range than that in focus plane, this method is expected to give a precise laser beam quality.

  18. Lasers and Coherent Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svelto, Orazio; Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Huber, Günter; Kück, Stefan; Pollnau, Markus; Hillmer, Hartmut; Kusserow, Thomas; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Rohlfing (deceased), Frank; Kaiser, Jeffrey; Malz, Ralf; Marowsky, Gerd; Mann, Klaus; Simon, Peter; Rhodes, Charles K.; Duarte, Frank J.; Borsutzky, Annette; L'Huillier, Johannes A.; Sigrist, Markus W.; Wächter, Helen; Saldin, Evgeny; Schneidmiller, Evgeny; Yurkov, Mikhail; Sauerbrey, Roland; Hein, Joachim; Gianella, Michele; Helmcke, Jürgen; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Riehle, Fritz; Steinberg, Steffen; Brand, Hans

    This chapter describes lasers and other sources of coherent light that operate in a wide wavelength range. First, the general principles for the generation of coherent continuous-wave and pulsed radiation are treated including the interaction of radiation with matter, the properties of optical resonators and their modes as well as such processes as Q-switching and mode-locking. The general introduction is followed by sections on numerous types of lasers, the emphasis being on today's most important sources of coherent light, in particular on solid-state lasers and several types of gas lasers. An important part of the chapter is devoted to the generation of coherent radiation coherent radiation by nonlinear processes with optical parametric oscillators, difference- and sum-frequency generation, and high-order harmonics. Radiation in the extended ultraviolet (EUV) and x-ray ranges can be generated by free electron lasers (FEL) and advanced x-ray sources. Ultrahigh light intensities up to 1021 W/cm2 open the door to studies of relativistic laser-matter interaction and laser particle acceleration. The chapter closes with a section on laser stabilization.

  19. Lasers and Coherent Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svelto, Orazio; Longhi, Stefano; Valle, Giuseppe; Kück, Stefan; Huber, Günter; Pollnau, Markus; Hillmer, Hartmut; Hansmann, Stefan; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Brand, Hans; Kaiser, Jeffrey; Peterson, Alan; Malz, Ralf; Steinberg, Steffen; Marowsky, Gerd; Brinkmann, Uwe; Lo, Dennis; Borsutzky, Annette; Wächter, Helen; Sigrist, Markus; Saldin, Evgeny; Schneidmiller, Evgeny; Yurkov, Mikhail; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Hein, Joachim; Sauerbrey, Roland; Helmcke, Jürgen

    This chapter describes lasers and other sources of coherent light that operate in a wide wavelength range. First, the general principles for the generation of coherent continuous-wave and pulsed radiation are treated including the interaction of radiation with matter, the properties of optical resonators and their modes as well as such processes as Q-switching and mode-locking. The general introduction is followed by sections on numerous types of lasers, the emphasis being on today's most important sources of coherent light, in particular on solid-state lasers and several types of gas lasers. An important part of the chapter is devoted to the generation of coherent radiation by nonlinear processes with optical parametric oscillators, difference- and sum-frequency generation, and high-order harmonics. Radiation in the extended ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray ranges can be generated by free electron lasers (FEL) and advanced X-ray sources. Ultrahigh light intensities up to 1021 W/cm2 open the door to studies of relativistic laser-matter interaction and laser particle acceleration. The chapter closes with a section on laser stabilization.

  20. Diffractive optical element with same diffraction pattern for multicolor light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengzhu; Wang, Qixia; Gu, Huarong; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The wavelength-division multiplexing technique can be utilized in visible light communication to increase the channel capacity when a multicolor mixed white LED is used as light source. In such an application, the illumination area of LEDs should be invariant to the incident wavelength, so as to decrease interference within the adjacent regions. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be used in the optical transmitter system to shape the diffraction patterns into polygons. However, traditional DOEs illuminated by a multicolor mixed white LED would result into diffraction patterns with unequal sizes. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm which combines particle swarm optimization with a genetic algorithm is proposed for multicolor oriented DOEs design. A DOE is designed and fabricated for blue and red LEDs, and experimental results show that diffraction patterns with rather good uniformity as well as quasi-equal size for red and blue LEDs are obtained.

  1. Dimension-measurement-based laser diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Mustafa; Ozcalik, H. R.

    1993-09-01

    In this work by using all of the superior properties of laser hardware and software studies which will form a base for a new size measurement system have been realised and a proposal of project has been presented. The purpose of the work is the planning and forming the technology of a contactless system which allows 100 size and profile control of objects after production by using diod laser and CCD camera with shadow method and to form solutions for the problems faced as well.

  2. Fine structures in the light diffraction pattern of striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Leung, A F

    1984-10-01

    Single skeletal muscle fibres of frog were illuminated with a He-Ne, argon-ion or rhodamine 6G dye laser. The fine structures lying within the diffraction columns moved parallel to the fibre axis without changing their pattern when either the wavelength or the incident angle of the laser beam was varied, or when the fibre was stretched slightly. However, their pattern remained nearly constant when the fibre was submerged in hypotonic or hypertonic solution. As the illumination of about 1 mm or 0.1 mm width scanned along the length of the fibre, new structures emerged while others faded away giving rise to the notion that the diffraction columns were moving in the direction of the scan. A decrease in the illumination width caused the structures lying on the periphery of the diffraction column to disappear and the width of the remaining structures to increase. Measurements rule out the existence of large diffraction planes in these muscles. In addition, they indicate that the fine structures come from the diffraction of the whole rather than independent components of the illuminated volume. The origin of the fine structures is explained by two diffraction models.

  3. Note: Design of a laser feedback interferometer with double diffraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Dongmei Wang, Ming

    2015-09-15

    A novel laser feedback interferometer with double diffraction system is proposed in this paper. A beam emitted from the laser is incident onto a transmission grating. The mth order beam is vertically reflected by a mirror and diffracted again by the grating. The double-diffracted beam returns into the laser cavity and mixes with the light inside the active cavity, thus generating a modulation of both the amplitude and the frequency of the lasing field. Theoretical analysis and experimental observations show that the output signal of the proposed system depends on the grating pitch and the direction of the phase movement can be obtained from inclination of the interference signal. It provides a potential displacement sensor with high stability and quite a compact configuration.

  4. A laser microvibration transducer based on two diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyibizi, Alphonse

    2004-06-01

    A laser microvibrations transducer based on diffraction of a laser beam on a system of two diffraction gratings is described. The transducer has an experimental threshold of detection of 0.3A°, a dynamic range of about 10 μm. It contains no expensive elements (simple glass stepped gratings) and it is easy to implement and align. Furthermore it is self-calibrating. It can be successfully used for nuclear explosion monitoring and can be useful tool in industrial machinery, transport equipment vibration testing and control and seismic monitoring.

  5. Lasers with nonlocal feedback, diffraction, and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoff, Francesco; Zambrini, Roberta

    2009-03-01

    An off-axis feedback loop originates a two-point nonlocality that changes the instabilities of lasers of classes A and B: after crossing a first threshold these devices amplify while they lase above a second one. We obtain the instability diagram in presence of off-axis feedback and show that transverse phase and group velocities can be tuned to have the same or opposite sign, depending on control parameters. Counterpropagating noise sustained patterns and localized perturbations are found for an out-of-phase feedback when the laser operates as a signal splitter. We predict these effects in a broad class of devices, with either positive or negative refractive index, diffusion, and in presence of noise.

  6. Diffraction from oxide confinement apertures in vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, P.A.; Carlsten, J.L.; Kilper, D.C.; Lear, K.L.

    1999-08-01

    Direct measurement of scattered fields from oxide confinement apertures in vertical-cavity lasers is presented. Diffraction fringes associated with each transverse lasing mode are detected in the far field from devices with varying oxide aperture dimensions and with quantum efficiencies as high as 48{percent}. The diffracted pattern symmetries match the rectangular symmetry of the oxide apertures present in the devices and fringe locations are compared to Fraunhofer theory. The fraction of power diffracted from the lasing mode remains roughly constant as a function of relative pump rate, but is shown to depend on both transverse mode order and oxide aperture size. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Diffraction of volume Bragg gratings under high flux laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Feng, Jiansheng; Xiong, Baoxing; Zou, Kuaisheng; Yuan, Xiao

    2014-04-07

    Diffraction property of transmitting volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) recorded in photo-thermo-refractive glass (PTR) is studied under the irradiation of a continuous-wave fiber laser with flux of 1274 W/cm2. Dependence of temperature characteristics of VBGs prepared by different crystallization temperatures is presented. When temperature of VBGs rises up to 33°C, there are a 2.7% reduction and 1.59% ripple of diffraction efficiency for VBGs. The period variation caused by the thermal expansion of VBGs is used to explain the reduction of diffraction efficiency, and experimental results are in agreement with theoretical analysis.

  8. Diffraction Limited 3.15 Microns Cascade Diode Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    carriers recycling by the cascade pumping . The narrow ridge 6- m-wide waveguides were defined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching...diffraction limited, diode lasers, cascade pumping REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S...of GaSb-based type-I QW diode lasers by utilizing cascade pumping scheme4. The carriers were recycled with 100% efficiency between two gain stages

  9. Diffractive devices fabricated on azobenezene polymer by polarization laser direct-writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Peng; Duan, Shiyuan; Cao, Zhaolou; Wu, Shuo; Wang, Keyi; Yan, Peizheng

    2012-10-01

    Polarization laser direct-writing system was designed and the recording and research using the azobenzence polymer film on the system was investigated. Only single laser beam was used, and move the laser focal spot on the sample film pointto- point. By composite control of the optical power density, polarization direction and exposure time of the inscribing laser, a special phase-delay distribution graph which have different etching depth in different point can be achieved. Diffractive devices, such as grating and zone plate, have been inscribed. The anisotropy and surface topography was measured by polarizing optical microscopy (POM) and profilometer. Some qualitative analysis was made. Using the red light which is insensitivity to the azo polymer film, the diffractive devices' focal spots were collected by CCD. Compared with the holographic interference method, the method is more flexible, undemanding for the experimental environment and any two-dimension distribution graph can be written in theory. It may get extensive application.

  10. Anomalous light propagation and diffraction control in waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braeuer, Andreas H.; Streppel, Ulrich; Pertsch, Thomas; Peschel, Ulf; Lederer, Falk L.

    2002-11-01

    The understanding of light propagation primarily derives from studies of isotropic media. The law of refraction predicts that the tilt of a beam traversing an interface between two media will monotonously grow with the angle of incidence. The law of diffraction predicts beam spreading being completely determined by the ratio of wavelength and width, only slightly affected by the refractive index and independent of the tilt. In this paper, we demonstrate anomalies in light refraction and diffraction in evanescently coupled waveguide arrays ('discrete' refraction and diffraction). We have studied the propagation of beams in these arrays. It turned out that refraction and diffraction exhibit strong anomalies as they depend periodically on the initial beam tilt. In contrast to isotropic systems we found that transverse energy transport cannot exceed a certain maximum velocity and that the diffractive spreading depends on the direction of propagation, i.e., by varying the angle of incidence, size and sign of diffraction can be controlled and it can even be arrested. For particular initial tilts the array can undo beam spreading. The experiments were performed on homogeneous arrays of 75 waveguides in an inorganic-organic polymer on thermally oxidized silicon wafers. The 6 cm long samples were fabricated by UV-lithography on 4" wafers. Each waveguide provided low loss single mode waveguiding (<0.5 dB/cm) at λ= 633 nm. The uniform separation of adjacent guides was chosen for efficient evanescent coupling. The theoretical explanation of the measured effects was done based on coupled mode theory.

  11. Fabrication of synthetic diffractive elements using advanced matrix laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, M.; Svoboda, J.; Květoň, M.; Fiala, P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a matrix laser writing device based on a demagnified projection of a micro-structure from a computer driven spatial light modulator. The device is capable of writing completely aperiodic micro-structures with resolution higher than 200 000 DPI. An optical system is combined with ultra high precision piezoelectric stages with an elementary step ~ 4 nm. The device operates in a normal environment, which significantly decreases the costs compared to competitive technologies. Simultaneously, large areas can be exposed up to 100 cm2. The capabilities of the constructed device will be demonstrated on particular elements fabricated for real applications. The optical document security is the first interesting field, where the synthetic image holograms are often combined with sophisticated aperiodic micro-structures. The proposed technology can easily write simple micro-gratings creating the color and kinetic visual effects, but also the diffractive cryptograms, waveguide couplers, and other structures recently used in the field of optical security. A general beam shaping elements and special photonic micro-structures are another important applications which will be discussed in this paper.

  12. Novel cases of diffraction of light from a grating: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetty, Ninad R.; Suman, Akash; Khaparde, Rajesh B.

    2012-11-01

    A popular pedagogical approach for introducing diffraction is to assume normal incidence of light on a single slit or a plane transmission grating. Interesting cases of diffraction from a grating at orientations other than normal incidence remain largely unexplored. In this article, we report our study of these unexplored cases, which was taken up as an undergraduate student project. We define various cases of orientation of the grating and use the Fresnel-Kirchhoff formula to arrive at the diffracted intensity distribution. An experimental arrangement consisting of a laser, a grating mount, a digital camera, and a calibrated plane screen is employed to record our observations. We discuss for each case the theoretical and experimental results and establish the conformity between the two. Finally, we analyze the details of various cases and conclude that for an arbitrary orientation of the grating, the diffraction maxima fall along a second degree curve.

  13. Laser Light Scattering by Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Adamovsky, G.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light as it propagates parallel to a shock wave, formed in front of a bluff cylindrical body placed in a supersonic stream, is studied experimentally and numerically. Two incident optical fields are considered. First, a large diameter collimated beam is allowed to pass through the shock containing flow. The light intensity distribution in the resultant shadowgraph image, measured by a low light CCD camera, shows well-defined fringes upstream and downstream of the shadow cast by the shock. In the second situation, a narrow laser beam is brought to a grazing incidence on the shock and the scattered light, which appears as a diverging sheet from the point of interaction, is visualized and measured on a screen placed normal to the laser path. Experiments are conducted on shocks formed at various free-stream Mach numbers, M, and total pressures, P(sub 0). It is found that the widths of the shock shadows in a shadowgraph image become independent of M and P(sub 0) when plotted against the jump in the refractive index, (Delta)n, created across the shock. The total scattered light measured from the narrow laser beam and shock interaction also follows the same trend. In the numerical part of the study, the shock is assumed to be a 'phase object', which introduces phase difference between the upstream and downstream propagating parts of the light disturbances. For a given shape and (Delta)n of the bow shock the phase and amplitude modulations are first calculated by ray tracing. The wave front is then propagated to the screen using the Fresnet diffraction equation. The calculated intensity distribution, for both of the incident optical fields, shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Light bullets by synthetic diffraction-dispersion matching.

    PubMed

    Lobanov, Valery E; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Torner, Lluis

    2010-07-16

    We put forward a new approach to generate stable, fully three-dimensional light bullets, which is based on the matching of the intrinsic material dispersion with a suitable effective diffraction. The matching is achieved in adequate waveguide arrays whose refractive index is periodically modulated along the direction of light propagation. We show that by using nonconventional, out-of-phase longitudinal modulation of the refractive index of neighboring channels, it is possible to tune the effective diffraction to match the intrinsic material group velocity dispersion. Three-dimensional light bullets are shown to form at reduced energy levels, in settings where the dispersion would be far too weak to generate bullets in the absence of array.

  15. Electrically and spatially controllable PDLC phase gratings for diffraction and modulation of laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjichristov, Georgi B.; Marinov, Yordan G.; Petrov, Alexander G.

    2016-03-25

    We present a study on electrically- and spatially-controllable laser beam diffraction, electrooptic (EO) phase modulation, as well as amplitude-frequency EO modulation by single-layer microscale polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) phase gratings (PDLC SLPGs) of interest for device applications. PDLC SLPGs were produced from nematic liquid crystal (LC) E7 in photo-curable NOA65 polymer. The wedge-formed PDLC SLPGs have a continuously variable thickness (2–25 µm). They contain LC droplets of diameters twice as the layer thickness, with a linear-gradient size distribution along the wedge. By applying alternating-current (AC) electric field, the PDLC SLPGs produce efficient: (i) diffraction splitting of transmitted laser beams; (ii) spatial redistribution of diffracted light intensity; (iii) optical phase modulation; (iv) amplitude-frequency modulation, all controllable by the driven AC field and the droplet size gradient.

  16. Light Diffraction by Large Amplitude Ultrasonic Waves in Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Laszlo; Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Light diffraction from ultrasound, which can be used to investigate nonlinear acoustic phenomena in liquids, is reported for wave amplitudes larger than that typically reported in the literature. Large amplitude waves result in waveform distortion due to the nonlinearity of the medium that generates harmonics and produces asymmetries in the light diffraction pattern. For standing waves with amplitudes above a threshold value, subharmonics are generated in addition to the harmonics and produce additional diffraction orders of the incident light. With increasing drive amplitude above the threshold a cascade of period-doubling subharmonics are generated, terminating in a region characterized by a random, incoherent (chaotic) diffraction pattern. To explain the experimental results a toy model is introduced, which is derived from traveling wave solutions of the nonlinear wave equation corresponding to the fundamental and second harmonic standing waves. The toy model reduces the nonlinear partial differential equation to a mathematically more tractable nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The model predicts the experimentally observed cascade of period-doubling subharmonics terminating in chaos that occurs with increasing drive amplitudes above the threshold value. The calculated threshold amplitude is consistent with the value estimated from the experimental data.

  17. Switchable zero order diffraction gratings as light valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melngailis, J.

    1983-06-01

    The motivation of this work is to produce line-addressable arrays of independently switchable light valves for flat-panel video displays. In addition, such light valves would be useful as spatial light modulators in optical signal processing. The principle of the light valves is based on the switching of the zero order of diffraction. Two gratings are fabricated face-to-face and displaced with respect to one another by half of one period. The displacement may be produced by using the strong piezoelectric properties of PVF2 or, alternatively, by using electrostatic forces. The goal of this project is to build a fast, lockable, miniature light valve which is compatible with fabrication into arrays.

  18. Quantitative locomotion study of freely swimming micro-organisms using laser diffraction.

    PubMed

    Magnes, Jenny; Susman, Kathleen; Eells, Rebecca

    2012-10-25

    Soil and aquatic microscopic organisms live and behave in a complex three-dimensional environment. Most studies of microscopic organism behavior, in contrast, have been conducted using microscope-based approaches, which limit the movement and behavior to a narrow, nearly two-dimensional focal field.(1) We present a novel analytical approach that provides real-time analysis of freely swimming C. elegans in a cuvette without dependence on microscope-based equipment. This approach consists of tracking the temporal periodicity of diffraction patterns generated by directing laser light through the cuvette. We measure oscillation frequencies for freely swimming nematodes. Analysis of the far-field diffraction patterns reveals clues about the waveforms of the nematodes. Diffraction is the process of light bending around an object. In this case light is diffracted by the organisms. The light waves interfere and can form a diffraction pattern. A far-field, or Fraunhofer, diffraction pattern is formed if the screen-to-object distance is much larger than the diffracting object. In this case, the diffraction pattern can be calculated (modeled) using a Fourier transform.(2) C. elegans are free-living soil-dwelling nematodes that navigate in three dimensions. They move both on a solid matrix like soil or agar in a sinusoidal locomotory pattern called crawling and in liquid in a different pattern called swimming.(3) The roles played by sensory information provided by mechanosensory, chemosensory, and thermosensory cells that govern plastic changes in locomotory patterns and switches in patterns are only beginning to be elucidated.(4) We describe an optical approach to measuring nematode locomotion in three dimensions that does not require a microscope and will enable us to begin to explore the complexities of nematode locomotion under different conditions.

  19. Two-Photon Microscopy with Diffractive Optical Elements and Spatial Light Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Araya, Roberto; Peterka, Darcy S.; Woodruff, Alan; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy is often performed at slow frame rates due to the need to serially scan all points in a field of view with a single laser beam. To overcome this problem, we have developed two optical methods that split and multiplex a laser beam across the sample. In the first method a diffractive optical element (DOE) generates a fixed number of beamlets that are scanned in parallel resulting in a corresponding increase in speed or in signal-to-noise ratio in time-lapse measurements. The second method uses a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate any arbitrary spatio-temporal light pattern. With an SLM one can image or photostimulate any predefined region of the image such as neurons or dendritic spines. In addition, SLMs can be used to mimic a large number of optical transfer functions including light path corrections as adaptive optics. PMID:20859526

  20. Two-photon microscopy with diffractive optical elements and spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Watson, Brendon O; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Araya, Roberto; Peterka, Darcy S; Woodruff, Alan; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy is often performed at slow frame rates due to the need to serially scan all points in a field of view with a single laser beam. To overcome this problem, we have developed two optical methods that split and multiplex a laser beam across the sample. In the first method a diffractive optical element (DOE) generates a fixed number of beamlets that are scanned in parallel resulting in a corresponding increase in speed or in signal-to-noise ratio in time-lapse measurements. The second method uses a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate any arbitrary spatio-temporal light pattern. With an SLM one can image or photostimulate any predefined region of the image such as neurons or dendritic spines. In addition, SLMs can be used to mimic a large number of optical transfer functions including light path corrections as adaptive optics.

  1. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Song, Shuangqi

    2015-12-22

    A hair treatment process for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction including (a) coating the hair with a material comprising a polymer, (b) pressing the hair with a pressing device including one or more surfaces, and (c) forming a secondary nanostructured surface pattern on the hair that is complementary to the primary nanostructured surface pattern on the one or more surfaces of the pressing device. The secondary nanostructured surface pattern diffracts light into dispersed colors that are visible on the hair. The section of the hair is pressed with the pressing device for from about 1 to 55 seconds. The polymer has a glass transition temperature from about 55.degree. C. to about 90.degree. C. The one or more surfaces include a primary nanostructured surface pattern.

  2. White-light diffraction tomography of unlabelled live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Zhou, Renjie; Mir, Mustafa; Babacan, S. Derin; Carney, P. Scott; Goddard, Lynford L.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    We present a technique called white-light diffraction tomography (WDT) for imaging microscopic transparent objects such as live unlabelled cells. The approach extends diffraction tomography to white-light illumination and imaging rather than scattering plane measurements. Our experiments were performed using a conventional phase contrast microscope upgraded with a module to measure quantitative phase images. The axial dimension of the object was reconstructed by scanning the focus through the object and acquiring a stack of phase-resolved images. We reconstructed the three-dimensional structures of live, unlabelled, red blood cells and compared the results with confocal and scanning electron microscopy images. The 350 nm transverse and 900 nm axial resolution achieved reveals subcellular structures at high resolution in Escherichia coli cells. The results establish WDT as a means for measuring three-dimensional subcellular structures in a non-invasive and label-free manner.

  3. Theoretical Fraunhofer light diffraction patterns calculated from three-dimensional sarcomere arrays imaged from isolated cardiac cells at rest.

    PubMed

    Roos, K P; Leung, A F

    1987-08-01

    Sarcomere striation positions have been obtained throughout the volumes of calcium-tolerant resting heart cells by direct computer interfaced high-resolution optical imaging. Each sarcomere position is stored in a three-dimensional (3-D) matrix array from which Fraunhofer light diffraction patterns have been calculated using numerical methods based on Fourier transforms. Diffraction patterns have been calculated from heart cell data arrays oriented normal to a theoretical laser beam. Twelve characteristic features have been identified and described from these diffraction patterns that correlate to diffraction phenomena observed from both cardiac and skeletal muscle. This numerical approach provides the means to directly assess diffraction pattern formulation, the precision of layer line angular separation, layer-line intensity and angular asymmetries, line widths and fine structures in terms of the known diffracting source structures. These results confirm that theoretical calculations can predict real muscle diffraction patterns and their asymmetries.

  4. Optical fiber alignment using cleaved-edge diffracted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Louis C.; Bergeron, Patrick; Duguay, Michel A.; Ouellette, Francois; Tetu, Michel

    1993-08-01

    We describe a simple technique for aligning optical fibers prior to fusion splicing. The technique relies on the fact that well-cleaved fiber ends have extremely sharp edges. By making the narrow pencil of light emerging from one fiber scan laterally over the entrance face of a second fiber, and by monitoring the light diffracted past its sharp edges, we can locate precisely the geometric center of the output fiber. With this technique, we have aligned fiber cores with a mean lateral offset of 0.81 micrometers , the major part of this offset caused by the eccentricity of the core relative to the cladding's circular perimeter.

  5. Achromatic correction of diffractive dispersion in white light SLM imaging.

    PubMed

    Bouchal, Zdeněk; Chlup, Vladimír; Celechovský, Radek; Bouchal, Petr; Nistor, Ioan Cristian

    2014-05-19

    In contemporary optics, the spatial light modulator (SLM) is effectively used as a flexible optoelectronic device playing the key role in a number of experiments of science and technology. Its operation is optimal when using almost monochromatic light but an extremely strong diffractive dispersion occurs when white light is applied. In this paper, the design concepts are proposed resulting in optimization and implementation of a refractive corrector cooperating with the SLM. The corrector maintains the operation of the SLM unchanged for the central wavelength of light and ensures an achromatic dispersion compensation throughout the visible region in applications based on a lens-pattern formation. A significant improvement of the imaging performance of the achromatic SLM was proved by the computer simulation and measurement of the chromatic focal shift and the image contrast of the resolution target.

  6. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley K.; Hoffmann, W. Clint

    2016-01-01

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected. PMID:27684589

  7. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Bradley K; Hoffmann, W Clint

    2016-09-16

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected.

  8. Uniformity of reshaped beam by diffractive optical elements with light-emitted diode illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mengzhu; Gu, Huarong; Wang, Qixia; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    Due to its low energy consumption, high efficiency and fast switching speed, light-emitted diode (LED) has been used as a new light source in optical wireless communication. To ensure uniform lighting and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) during the data transmission, diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be employed as optical antennas. Different from laser, LED has a low temporal and spatial coherence. And its impacts upon the far-field diffraction patterns of DOEs remain unclear. Thus the mathematical models of far-field diffraction intensity for LED with a spectral bandwidth and source size are first derived in this paper. Then the relation between source size and uniformity of top-hat beam profile for LEDs either considering the spectral bandwidth or not are simulated. The results indicate that when the size of LED is much smaller than that of reshaped beam, the uniformity of reshaped beam obtained by light source with a spectral bandwidth is significantly better than that by a monochromatic light. However, once the size is larger than a certain threshold value, the uniformity of reshaped beam of two LED models are almost the same, and the influence introduced by spectral bandwidth can be ignored. Finally the reshaped beam profiles are measured by CCD camera when the areas of LED are 0.5×0.5mm2 and 1×1mm2. And the experimental results agree with the simulations.

  9. Redistribution of the laser beam power using diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzin, Serguei P.; Liedl, Gerhard; Bielak, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The use of laser technologies in the production of optical fiber requires a careful choice of optical systems for positioning and transforming the laser beam. The purpose of this research is to determine a possibility of the redistribution of the laser beam power using diffractive optical elements. It was determined that for a radius of the focusable beam Rf = rf =2.2×10-2 m, the length of the focal spot will be increased to a value L =13.6×10-3 m, which is 1.2 times larger than Rf = rf =1.8×10-2 m. In this case, the intensity of the laser beam at the centre of the focal spot, q0 , and the maximum value, qmax , decreased by 1.1 times. An approximation of function q(x, y) by polynomials of degree n =5and m =3 was performed. It is shown that the maximal relative error of approximation does not exceed 4%, and the relative error of approximation in the centre of the focal spot does not exceed 3%. Presented equations can be used to calculate the intensity distribution in the focal plane of diffractive optical elements.

  10. Diffractive beam shaping for enhanced laser polymer welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenberger, J.; Vogler, D.; Raab, C.; Gubler, U.

    2015-03-01

    Laser welding of polymers increasingly finds application in a large number of industries such as medical technology, automotive, consumer electronics, textiles or packaging. More and more, it replaces other welding technologies for polymers, e. g. hot-plate, vibration or ultrasonic welding. At the same rate, demands on the quality of the weld, the flexibility of the production system and on processing speed have increased. Traditionally, diode lasers were employed for plastic welding with flat-top beam profiles. With the advent of fiber lasers with excellent beam quality, the possibility to modify and optimize the beam profile by beam-shaping elements has opened. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) can play a crucial role in optimizing the laser intensity profile towards the optimal M-shape beam for enhanced weld seam quality. We present results on significantly improved weld seam width constancy and enlarged process windows compared to Gaussian or flat-top beam profiles. Configurations in which the laser beam diameter and shape can be adapted and optimized without changing or aligning the laser, fiber-optic cable or optical head are shown.

  11. Discrete wavelength-locked external cavity laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An external cavity laser (and method of generating laser light) comprising: a laser light source; means for collimating light output by the laser light source; a diffraction grating receiving collimated light; a cavity feedback mirror reflecting light received from the diffraction grating back to the diffraction grating; and means for reliably tuning the external cavity laser to discrete wavelengths.

  12. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  13. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D. ); Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M. ); Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y. ); Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  14. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D.; Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M.; Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y.; Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  15. Multiple-Zone Diffractive Optic Element for Laser Ranging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    A diffractive optic element (DOE) can be used as a beam splitter to generate multiple laser beams from a single input laser beam. This technology has been recently used in LRO s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to generate five laser beams that measure the lunar topography from a 50-km nominal mapping orbit (see figure). An extension of this approach is to use a multiple-zone DOE to allow a laser altimeter instrument to operate over a wider range of distances. In particular, a multiple-zone DOE could be used for applications that require both mapping and landing on a planetary body. In this case, the laser altimeter operating range would need to extend from several hundred kilometers down to a few meters. The innovator was recently involved in an investigation how to modify the LOLA instrument for the OSIRIS asteroid mapping and sample return mission. One approach is to replace the DOE in the LOLA laser beam expander assembly with a multiple-zone DOE that would allow for the simultaneous illumination of the asteroid with mapping and landing laser beams. The proposed OSIRIS multiple-zone DOE would generate the same LOLA five-beam output pattern for high-altitude topographic mapping, but would simultaneously generate a wide divergence angle beam using a small portion of the total laser energy for the approach and landing portion of the mission. Only a few percent of the total laser energy is required for approach and landing operations as the return signal increases as the inverse square of the ranging height. A wide divergence beam could be implemented by making the center of the DOE a diffractive or refractive negative lens. The beam energy and beam divergence characteristics of a multiple-zone DOE could be easily tailored to meet the requirements of other missions that require laser ranging data. Current single-zone DOE lithographic manufacturing techniques could also be used to fabricate a multiple-zone DOE by masking the different DOE zones during

  16. Remote, Noncontact Strain Sensing by Laser Diffraction Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Marc R.

    2001-01-01

    A system was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for continually monitoring, in real time, the in-plane strain tensor in opaque solids during high-temperature, long-term mechanical testing. The simple, noncontacting, strain-sensing methodology should also be suitable for measurement in hostile environments. This procedure has obvious advantages over traditional, mechanical, contacting techniques, and it is easier to interpret than moir and speckle interferometric approaches. A two-dimensional metallic grid of micrometer dimensions is applied to a metallographically prepared gauge section on the surface of a tensile test specimen by a standard photolithographic process. The grid on the fixtured specimen is interrogated by an He-Ne laser, and the resulting diffraction pattern is projected backwards onto a translucent screen. A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is used to image the first-order diffraction peaks from the translucent screen. A schematic representation of the system is shown in the figure.

  17. Nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction of femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Vyunishev, A M; Slabko, V V; Baturin, I S; Akhmatkhanov, A R; Shur, V Ya

    2014-07-15

    We study the nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction (NRND) of femtosecond laser pulses in a 1D periodic nonlinear photonic structure. The calculated second-harmonic spectra represent frequency combs for different orders of transverse phase matching. These frequency combs are in close analogy with the well-known spectral Maker fringes observed in single crystals. The spectral intensity of the second harmonic experiences a redshift with a propagation angle, which is opposite the case of Čerenkov nonlinear diffraction. We analyze how NRND is affected by the group-velocity mismatch between fundamental and second-harmonic pulses and by the parameters of the structure. Our experimental results prove the theoretical predictions.

  18. Performance comparison of Malvern instruments laser diffraction drop size analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Dodge, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of ten laser diffraction particle sizing instruments (Malvern models 2200 and 2600) has been evaluated using a synthetic particle size reference standard in a round-robin test at nine independent laboratories. A calibration reticle consisting of a two-dimensional array of opaque, circular particle images photoetched in chrome thin film deposited on a glass substrate was used as the reference. Mean diameters (e.g., D32) for the reticle measured by the ten unmodified instruments varied by 27 percent. In contrast, data from six instruments with individually calibrated photodetector correction factors demonstrated much better agreement and were within 2.6 percent of the actual reticle properties.

  19. Performance comparison of Malvern instruments laser diffraction drop size analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Dodge, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of ten laser diffraction particle sizing instruments (Malvern models 2200 and 2600) has been evaluated using a synthetic particle size reference standard in a round-robin test at nine independent laboratories. A calibration reticle consisting of a two-dimensional array of opaque, circular particle images photoetched in chrome thin film deposited on a glass substrate was used as the reference. Mean diameters (e.g., D32) for the reticle measured by the ten unmodified instruments varied by 27 percent. In contrast, data from six instruments with individually calibrated photodetector correction factors demonstrated much better agreement and were within 2.6 percent of the actual reticle properties.

  20. Measurement of erythrocyte deformability by two laser diffraction methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhao, H; Zhuang, F Y; Stoltz, J F

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the deformability of red blood cells (RBC) by two laser diffraction methods: the Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyser (LORCA, Mechatronics, Amsterdam, Netherlands) and a Shear Stress Diffractometer (RHEODYN SSD, Myrenne, Roetgen, Germany). Experiments were carried out on 46 healthy human subjects. The elongation index EI of normal and hardened RBCs (obtained by heating blood at 49 degrees C or by incubating RBCs in solutions of diamide) was measured. The results showed that the standard deviations of the experimental data for normal RBCs were relatively small, especially at high shear stresses (more than 3.0 Pa), but higher than those reported before. Some correlations between the results given by the two instruments were also found. It should be noted that for hardened RBCs, the standard deviations of the measurements were important compared with the mean values in the two instruments.

  1. Microscopic theory of diffraction of light from a small hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jesper; Keller, Ole

    2014-10-01

    On the basis of the Maxwell-Lorentz local-field equations and nonlocal linear response theory, a self-consistent microscopic Green function theory of diffraction of light from a single hole in a thin and plane metallic screen is established. By subtracting the scattering of identical incident fields from screens with and without a hole, a causal effective optical aperture response tensor is introduced. An approximate expression is derived for the aperture response tensor in the limit where the screen behaves like an electric-dipole absorber and radiator. In this limit the internal electron dynamics is that of a quantum well. For a screen so thin that its bound electron motion can be described by a single quantum level, a approach for a quantum mechanical calculation of the aperture response tensor is presented. When the linear dimensions of the hole become sufficiently small the so-called aperture field, defined as the difference between the prevailing electric field with and that without a hole, becomes identical to the field from an incident-field-induced electric dipole with anisotropic linear polarizability. Our theory is formulated in such a manner that preknowledge only of (i) the incident electromagnetic field and (ii) the light-unperturbed optical electron properties (the microscopic conductivity tensor) of the screen with the geometrically given hole is needed. Since the microscopic theory allows for the presence of an (oscillating) component of the sheet current density perpendicular to the plane of the screen, a generalization of (i) the standard jump conditions of the field across the sheet and (ii) the reflection symmetries of the various fields in the plane of the screen is worked out. As our theory deviates radically from the approach of all classical diffraction theories, which are based on the macroscopic Maxwell equations and some kind of pheno-menological expression for the screen conductivity σ (often just σ →∞), we give a brief review of

  2. Exploring the Diffraction Grating Using a He-Ne Laser and a CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2002-01-01

    A compact disc (CD) serves as a diffraction grating for the study of the dependence of angles of diffracted beams on that of the incident beam from a laser. The demonstration/experiment illustrates the occurrence of different orders of diffraction. Knowledge of the wavelength of the laser permits determination of the groove spacing within ~1% by…

  3. Exploring the Diffraction Grating Using a He-Ne Laser and a CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2002-01-01

    A compact disc (CD) serves as a diffraction grating for the study of the dependence of angles of diffracted beams on that of the incident beam from a laser. The demonstration/experiment illustrates the occurrence of different orders of diffraction. Knowledge of the wavelength of the laser permits determination of the groove spacing within ~1% by…

  4. Experimental study of angular and frequency spectra of laser pulse diffraction on a planar periodic nanostructure of gold V antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Balabas, M V; Efremova, E A; Ivanov, A Yu; Kantserov, A I; Krylov, I R; Pelyukhova, E B; Petrov, Yu V; Prokhorova, U V; Silaev, R V; Tretiak, O Yu; Shimko, A A

    2015-10-31

    Irradiation of a planar structure made of periodically spaced gold V antennas by a femtosecond pulsed laser has revealed several anomalously reflected and refracted waves, interpreted as diffraction maxima. Compression of the pulse spectrum in scattered light is observed. The degree of compression and wave polarisation are found to be determined by the scattering direction. (nanophotonics)

  5. Excimer laser ablation lithography applied to the fabrication of reflective diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, M.; Benatmane, A.; Gérard, P.; Montgomery, P. C.; Fontaine, J.; Engel, T.; Schunck, J. P.; Fogarassy, E.

    2003-03-01

    We propose a low cost technique for the production of diffractive optical elements (DOE). These elements are devoted to high power lasers beam shaping in the mid-infrared wavelengths. This process called laser ablation lithography (LAL), may seem similar to laser beam writing (LBW) in the way the whole DOE's design is reproduced pixel by pixel on the substrate placed on a computer controlled XY translation stage. A first difference is that the photoresist is not exposed with UV light but is directly ablated with short excimer laser pulses. Furthermore, with LAL technique the size of the smallest pixel ( 5 μm×5 μm) is more than 10 times greater than those produced by LBW. We discuss in details the experimental set-up for LAL and demonstrate that it gives a resolution up to 10 times greater than photolithography with flexible masks. This makes LAL a promising solution for the production of DOE for use with Nd:YAG lasers. New applications of DOEs are finally introduced with high power lasers sources, such as laser marking or multi-point brazing.

  6. Embedded nanogratings in bulk fused silica under non-diffractive Bessel ultrafast laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, G.; Rudenko, A.; D'Amico, C.; Itina, T. E.; Colombier, J. P.; Stoian, R.

    2017-06-01

    We report the formation of embedded nanogratings in bulk fused silica under quasi-stationary field patterns generated by ultrashort laser pulses in nondiffractive modes. The zero-order Bessel beam consists of almost non-propagative light pulses distributed along a narrow micron-sized channel sustained over a large non-diffracting length. Upon multipulse irradiation, a regular pattern of nanoplanes is formed across the channel, spaced at approximately λ / 2 n . Applying an electromagnetic scattering model [A. Rudenko et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 075427 (2016)], we associate the formation of nanogratings with multiple scattering from randomly distributed scattering centers created by laser light. Constructive interference between the scattered wavelets leads to periodic excitation enhancement without requiring explicit synchronism conditions. Permanent material modifications are found whenever the local carrier densities are maximized towards the critical value. Multiple periodicities are predicted, either implicitly related to the coherent electromagnetic interaction or due to periodic field depletion and photon replenishment.

  7. On the problem of the diffraction pattern visibility in laser diffractometry of red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Priezzhev, A V

    2011-01-24

    We consider the problem of the visibility of the diffraction pattern that is observed in scattering laser radiation on the erythrocyte suspension in ectacytometer. The theoretical estimates show that 10% variation in the particle size reduces the diffraction pattern visibility by 1% only. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  8. Bright diode laser light source.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Erkki; Hernberg, Rolf

    2006-05-20

    A simplified multiwavelength prototype of an axially symmetric diode laser device based on stacks made of single emitters has been made, and the performance of the device has been demonstrated experimentally. The results verify that kilowatt-level light power can be focused into a circular spot with a 1/e2 diameter of 360 microm, a focal length of 100 mm, and a numerical aperture of 0.24, thus producing an average power density in excess of 10 kW/mm2 and a brightness of 6x10(10) W m-2 sr-1. The experiments also predict that it will be possible to increase these values to more than 60 kW/mm2 and 3x10(11) W m-2 sr-1.

  9. Laser-Doppler velocity profile sensor with submicrometer spatial resolution that employs fiber optics and a diffractive lens.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen; Knuppertz, Hans

    2005-04-20

    We report a novel laser-Doppler velocity profile sensor for microfluidic and nanofluidic applications and turbulence research. The sensors design is based on wavelength-division multiplexing. The high dispersion of a diffractive lens is used to generate a measurement volume with convergent and divergent interference fringes by means of two laser wavelengths. Evaluation of the scattered light from tracers allows velocity gradients to be measured in flows with submicrometer spatial resolution inside a measurement volume of 700-microm length. Using diffraction optics and fiber optics, we achieved a miniaturized and robust velocity profile sensor for highly resolved velocity measurements.

  10. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.

    1993-01-01

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  11. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, M.S.

    1993-05-18

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  12. Laser induced white lighting of graphene foam

    PubMed Central

    Strek, Wieslaw; Tomala, Robert; Lukaszewicz, Mikolaj; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gerasymchuk, Yuriy; Gluchowski, Pawel; Marciniak, Lukasz; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Laser induced white light emission was observed from porous graphene foam irradiated with a focused continuous wave beam of the infrared laser diode. It was found that the intensity of the emission increases exponentially with increasing laser power density, having a saturation level at ca. 1.5 W and being characterized by stable emission conditions. It was also observed that the white light emission is spatially confined to the focal point dimensions of the illuminating laser light. Several other features of the laser induced white light emission were also discussed. It was observed that the white light emission is highly dependent on the electric field intensity, allowing one to modulate the emission intensity. The electric field intensity ca. 0.5 V/μm was able to decrease the white light intensity by half. Origins of the laser-induced white light emission along with its characteristic features were discussed in terms of avalanche multiphoton ionization, inter-valence charge transfer and possible plasma build-up processes. It is shown that the laser-induced white light emission may be well utilized in new types of white light sources. PMID:28112254

  13. Laser induced white lighting of graphene foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Tomala, Robert; Lukaszewicz, Mikolaj; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gerasymchuk, Yuriy; Gluchowski, Pawel; Marciniak, Lukasz; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Laser induced white light emission was observed from porous graphene foam irradiated with a focused continuous wave beam of the infrared laser diode. It was found that the intensity of the emission increases exponentially with increasing laser power density, having a saturation level at ca. 1.5 W and being characterized by stable emission conditions. It was also observed that the white light emission is spatially confined to the focal point dimensions of the illuminating laser light. Several other features of the laser induced white light emission were also discussed. It was observed that the white light emission is highly dependent on the electric field intensity, allowing one to modulate the emission intensity. The electric field intensity ca. 0.5 V/μm was able to decrease the white light intensity by half. Origins of the laser-induced white light emission along with its characteristic features were discussed in terms of avalanche multiphoton ionization, inter-valence charge transfer and possible plasma build-up processes. It is shown that the laser-induced white light emission may be well utilized in new types of white light sources.

  14. Superresolution far-field diffraction spot in the free-space laser communication system due to radially polarized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Jiang, Lun; Hu, Yuan; Liu, Zhuang; Li, Ying-chao; Wang, Le

    2016-10-01

    In the free-space laser communication, there is a strong need for a technology that can decrease the size of the diffraction spot in the receiver port, because a smaller diffraction spot in the receive port makes the transmit data more secure. In this paper, instead of the usage of the larger size aperture lens in the free-space laser communication system, we introduce a diffractive superresolution technology that changing the received information laser beam into radially polarized beam which is focused on the detector array. In the paper, firstly, the conversion method of the information natural light which the optical antenna received to the radially polarized beam is discussed in detail. Then, in the focal plane, the transverse intensity distribution expression near the focal point for the radially polarized laser beam are presented, and the numerical simulation results of the intensity distributions around the focal point on different numerical apertures (NA) are given. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the main lobe are considered for the standard of the spot size. Through a comparison of the focal point FWHM values with the natural light and radially polarized beam, we judge the superresolution performance of the receiver optical system with radially polarized beam on different NA of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.75. We find that the method of focusing with radially polarized beam generates a smaller spot size than the Airy spot size when the NA is no less than 0.6; when the NA reach to 0.75, the resolution is 1.5 times than the diffraction limit. But it will decrease the light power in the process of natural light converted to radially polarized beam. When the communication laser is polarized laser, the energy loss can be reduced to around 20%. This technology can be applied when the laser energy is not the main concern in the communication.

  15. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-18

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  16. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  17. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  18. Laser light propagation in adipose tissue and laser effects on adipose cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efraín; Rebolledo, Aldo; Gutierrez, Oscar; Criollo, William; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, José; Ramírez, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    Recently Neira et al. have presented a new liposuction technique that demonstrated the movement of fat from inside to outside of the cell, using a low-level laser device during a liposuction procedure with Ultrawet solution. The clinical observations, allowed this new surgical development, started a set of physical, histological and pharmacological studies aimed to determine the mechanisms involved in the observed fat mobilization concomitant to external laser application in liposuction procedures. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy, studies show that the cellular arrangement of normal adipose tissue changes when laser light from a diode laser: 10 mW, 635 nm is applied. Laser exposures longer than 6 minutes cause the total destruction of the adipocyte panicles. Detailed observation of the adipose cells show that by short irradiation times (less than four minutes) the cell membrane exhibits dark zones, that collapse by longer laser exposures. Optical measurements show that effective penetration length depends on the laser intensity. Moreover, the light scattering is enhanced by diffraction and subsequent interference effects, and the tumescent solution produces a clearing of the tissue optical medium. Finally, isolate adipose cell observation show that fat release from adipocytes is a concomitant effect between the tumescent solution (adrenaline) and laser light, revealing a synergism which conduces to the aperture, and maybe the disruption, of the cell membrane. All these studies were consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from inside the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides a strong modification of the cellular membranes.

  19. Method and apparatus for reducing diffraction-induced damage in high power laser amplifier systems

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Newnam, Brian E.; Shapiro, Stanley L.; Terrell, Jr., N. James

    1976-01-01

    Self-focusing damage caused by diffraction in laser amplifier systems may be minimized by appropriately tailoring the input optical beam profile by passing the beam through an aperture having a uniform high optical transmission within a particular radius r.sub.o and a transmission which drops gradually to a low value at greater radii. Apertures having the desired transmission characteristics may readily be manufactured by exposing high resolution photographic films and plates to a diffuse, disk-shaped light source and mask arrangement.

  20. Diffraction-limited dark laser spot produced by a hollow optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Shin, Y I; Kim, K; Kim, J A; Noh, H R; Jhe, W; Oh, K; Paek, U C

    2001-02-01

    By using the diffracted field of the LP(11) mode of a hollow-core optical fiber, we have produced a micrometer-sized, focused dark laser spot in the near field of the fiber. The minimum half-width of the dark spot is less than 1 mum . In particular, by masking the hollow core and metal coating the cladding with a microsphere, we blocked the light propagating in the cladding and obtained a clean dark spot, which may be useful in atom-optical experiments such as with atomic lenses, atom traps, and atom switches.

  1. Anomalous behaviors of the Fraunhofer diffraction patterns for a class of partially coherent light.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Nemoto, Shojiro

    2003-02-24

    In this paper, we investigate the Fraunhofer diffraction of a class of partially coherent light diffracted by a circular aperture. It is shown that by the illumination of partially coherent light of the special spatial correlation function, the anomalous behaviors of the diffraction patterns are found. We find that the decrease of the spatial coherence of the light in the aperture leads to the drastic changes of the diffraction pattern. Specifically, when the light in the aperture is fully coherent, the diffraction pattern is just an Airy disc. However, as the coherence decreases, the diffraction pattern becomes an annulus, and the radius of the annulus increases with the decrease of the coherence. Flattened annuli can be achieved, when the parameters characterizing the correlation of the partially coherent light are chosen with suitable values. Potential applications of modulating the coherence to achieve desired diffraction patterns are discussed.

  2. Polarization gating enables sarcomere length measurements by laser diffraction in fibrotic muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Kevin W.; Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Lieber, Richard L.

    2014-11-01

    Sarcomere length is a key parameter commonly measured in muscle physiology since it dictates striated muscle active force. Laser diffraction (LD)-based measurements of sarcomere length are time-efficient and sample a greater number of sarcomeres compared with traditional microscopy-based techniques. However, a limitation to LD techniques is that signal quality is severely degraded by scattering events as photons propagate through tissue. Consequently, sarcomere length measurements are unattainable when the number of scattering events is sufficiently large in muscle tissue with a high scattering probability. This occurs in fibrotic skeletal muscle seen in muscular dystrophies and secondary to tissue trauma, thus eliminating the use of LD to study these skeletal muscle ailments. Here, we utilize polarization gating to extract diffracted signals that are buried in noise created by scattering. Importantly, we demonstrate that polarization-gated laser diffraction (PGLD) enables sarcomere length measurements in muscles from chronically immobilized mice hind limbs; these muscles have a substantial increase of intramuscular connective tissue that scatter light and disable sarcomere length measurements by traditional LD. Further, we compare PGLD sarcomere lengths to those measured by bright field (BF) and confocal microscopy as positive controls and reveal a significant bias of BF but not of confocal microscopy.

  3. Laser light and tissue: biophysical aspects of medical laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Klaus H.

    1990-09-01

    In order to determine the interaction between laser light and biological tissues quantitatively the physical parameters of the biological objects have to be related to the parameters of the laser light. The degree and extent of the effect depend on the one hand on the properties of the tissue which are determined by the structure water content and blood circulation and on the other hand on the geometry of the laser beam and the wavelength. Depending on the duration of the laser irradiation on tissue and on the laser irradiance in surface or volume interaction three types of tissue interactions can be distinguished: photochemical effects photothermal effects and photoionizing effects. With extremely long interaction times and low power densities photo chemical transformation occurs by absorption of light with no primary heating of the tissue. With decreasing interaction time and higher power density the transition to photothermally induced effects begins. The early and main surgical applications for lasers are based on the conversion of laser light into heat. This thermal effect is broadly applied in surgery for tissue removal and tissue coagulation with the sealing of vessels and lymphatics as well as for tissue7weldig. When exceeding a power density of 10 W/cm nonlinear effects result. The high irradiance generates strong electric fields which lead to a dissociation or ionization of the material involved. Thus laser light is converted into kinetic energy. From

  4. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Telford, William G.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2009-01-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (~480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting “fine-tuning” of excitation wavelength to particular probes. PMID:19072836

  5. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G; Subach, Fedor V; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2009-05-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (approximately 480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting "fine-tuning" of excitation wavelength to particular probes.

  6. Laser forward transfer using structured light.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Kim, Heungsoo; Mathews, Scott; Piqué, Alberto

    2015-01-12

    A digital micromirror device (DMD) is used to spatially structure a 532 nm laser beam to print features spatially congruent to the laser spot in a laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) process known as laser decal transfer (LDT). The DMD is a binary (on/off) spatial light modulator and its resolution, half-toning and beam shaping properties are studied using LDT of silver nanopaste layers. Edge-enhanced "checkerboard" beam profiles led to a ~30% decrease in the laser transfer fluence threshold (compared to a reference "checkerboard" profile) for a 20-pixel bitmap pattern and its resulting 10-μm square feature.

  7. Hybrid light-laser welding for microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Georgy M.; Sysoev, Valentin K.; Bulkin, Yuri N.

    2005-04-01

    High monochromaticity, coherence and low divergence of the laser are the properties thanks to which it has become possible to build a promising high-concentration kind of heat energy emitter. As a source of welding energy, the laser beam has provided welding practices with new features. At present, the laser is the only available energy source that reaches power densities of more than 106 W/cm2 thus maintaining deep welding requirements. The laser welding evolution has further developed in hybrid welding methods, such as two-beam, laser-arc, laser-induction, laser-plasma, lighting laser processing procedures that, due to their high technical and economical efficiency, find ever multiplying applications in industry.

  8. LISST-WING: A New Laser Diffraction Instrument for Cloud Size Distribution and Concentration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Y. C.; Jonsson, H.; Buzorius, G.

    2005-12-01

    We describe the technology and first in-situ measurements in clouds from a laser diffraction instrument, LISST-WING. The instrument was developed as an SBIR project funded by ONR. Laser diffraction techniques offer the advantage of near-instant measurement of size spectra and concentration as it is based on multi-angle scattering of laser light from an ensemble of droplets contained in a 1 cm diameter, 15 cm long beam. The multi-angle scattering is inverted to obtain the size distribution, which produces the concentration or liquid water content from its sum. The size bins of this device are equally spaced in log(diameter), unlike prior technologies. The large volume of particles sensed per measurement (45 litres/sec at 60 knots) enables stable statistics. A size range from 2 micron to 400 micron is covered by the present instrument. The data are stored on board and downloaded at convenience. In summer 2005 the prototype was test-flown at the CIRPAS facility in Marina, California. High temporal resolution data were obtained. In this paper, these data will be described and compared with data where available from prior sensors installed on the CIRPAS research aircraft.

  9. Thermo-driven light controller by using thermal modulation of diffraction wavelength in holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Kakiuchida, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    A microperiodic structure composed of polymer and liquid crystal (LC) phases, called holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC), was fabricated based on a photo-induced phase separation technique by laser interferometric exposure. The diffraction wavelength of HPDLC gratings formed by different LC composites and grating structures was experimentally investigated by spectroscopic measurements as a function of temperature at around 30 °C. The HPDLC gratings composed of nematic LC having low nematic to isotropic temperature (TNI) and film thickness of 25 μm showed the switch of diffraction wavelength between visible and infrared lights by the change of temperature. The optical characteristics achieved in HPDLC gratings are expected to be applicable for the basis of diffractive type of thermodriven light controller which can supply visibility constantly for solar-ray control windows.

  10. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Piltch, M.S.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  11. Electronic Rotator For Sheet Of Laser Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, John M.; Rhodes, David B.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Jones, Stephen B.

    1989-01-01

    Primary flow-visualization system in Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) at NASA Langley Research Center is sheet of laser light generated by 5-W argon-ion laser and two-axis mirror galvanometer scanner. Generates single and multiple sheets of light, which remain stationary or driven to sweep out volume. Sine/cosine potentiometer used to orient two galvanometer/mirror devices simultaneously and yields desired result at reasonable cost and incorporated into prototype in 1 day.

  12. Influence of HCl pretreatment on laser diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Philipp; Steininger, Florian; Lockot, Gregori; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Stauch, Georg; Protze, Jens; Fischer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sample pretreatment methods in grain size (GS) analyses differ and their influence on GS distributions has been subject of controversial discussions. The standard sample preparation usually comprises the disaggregation into single primary particles. The organic binding material is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the containing carbonates are dissolved by hydrochloric acid (HCl). However, laser diffraction measurements of calcified sediment sequences or sediments with high contents of organic matter show non-reproducible changes in the GS distribution. To investigate variations of the GS distribution, selected samples from two different sections in different stages of weathering and sedimentary genesis were measured using a Beckman Coulter LS13320 laser particle size analyser. A high-resolution Holocene sandy loess-paleosol sequence, the Suohuduo section on the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, was investigated. The results were compared with a Pleistocene loess sequence from the Lower Rhine Embayment, the Düsseldorf-Grafenberg section. The entire sample set includes samples of siliciclastic, barely weathered material and sediments from paleosols. The paleosols in the Suohudo section are strongly influenced by steppe fires and are rich in organo-mineral associations and pyrogenic carbon. All samples were pretreated with hydrogen peroxide and sodium pyrophosphate. In order to investigate the influence of HCl on the GS distribution, the samples were subsequently prepared with and without the addition of HCl. The results show that the sample preparation has a significant influence on the detected GS distribution. Hence, prior to the measurement of a sample set, the effectiveness of the pretreatment argents HCl and H2O2 should be evaluated. In order to generate a valid GS distribution, the sample pretreatment must be matched to the aim of the study and the composition of the sample. Paleoclimatic and environmental interpretation based on improper GS

  13. Femtosecond laser processing and spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paivasaari, Kimmo; Silvennoinen, Martti; Kaakkunen, Jarno; Vahimaa, Pasi

    2014-03-01

    The use of the femtosecond laser enables generation of small spot sizes and ablation features. Ablation of the small features usually requires only a small amount of laser power to be delivered to the ablation spot. When using only a one beam for the ablation of the small features this process is bound to be time consuming. The spatial light modulator (SLM) together with the computer generated holograms (CGH) can be used for manipulating and shaping of the laser beam in various applications. In laser micromachining, when using laser with relatively high power, the original beam can be divided up to hundreds beams and still have the energy of the individual beam above the ablation threshold of the material. This parallel laser processing enables more efficient use of the laser power regardless of the machining task.

  14. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    ScienceCinema

    Claire Gmachl

    2016-07-12

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  15. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Claire Gmachl

    2010-03-17

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  16. Astigmatic wavefront correction of a gain-guided laser-diode array using anamorphic diffractive microlenses

    SciTech Connect

    Leger, J.R.; Scott, M.L.; Bundman, P.; Griswold, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    A diffractive microlens array was used to collimate a one-dimensional array of gain-guided AlGaAs lasers. The astigmatism of the lasers was removed by using anamorphic microlenses. The Strehl ratio of the resulting wavefront was 0.98. The microlens array was placed in an external cavity to produce a single coherent diffraction-limited beam from the AlGaAs laser array.

  17. Three-dimensional shape measurement based on light patterns projection using diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twardowski, P.; Serio, B.; Raulot, V.; Guilhem, M.

    2010-05-01

    We propose a structured light micro-opto electromechanical system (MOEMS) projector specially designed to display successively a set of patterns in order to extract the 3-D shape of an object using a CCD cameras module and a small ARM-based computer for control, registration and numerical analysis. This method consists in a temporal codification using a modified Gray code combined with a classical phase shifting technique. Our approach is to combine the unambiguous and robust codification of the Gray code method with the high resolution of the phase shifting method to result in highly accurate 3D reconstructions. The proposed MOEMS is based on an array of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) combined with two planar static diffractive optical elements (DOEs) arrays. DOEs masters on quartz substrate have been fabricated using photolithography therefore replication in polycarbonate is possible at low cost. The first DOE array is designed to collimate the VCSEL light (Fresnel-type element) and the second one to project the codification patterns. DOEs have been designed and fabricated by surface etching to achieve a good diffraction efficiency using four phase levels. First we introduce the MEOMS principle and the features of the different components. We present the layout design of the DOEs and describe the issues related to the micro-fabrication process. An experimental study of the topography of the DOEs is presented and discussed. We then discuss fabrication aspects including the DOEs integration and packaging.

  18. Numerical simulation of Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffractions of monochromatic and white light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Heng; Lin, Wenbin; Qi, Xiexing

    2016-08-01

    We describe a computer simulation technique for generating the monochromatic light diffraction from arbitrary apertures. For the Fresnel diffraction of rectangular and circular apertures, a simple form of equation for the light intensity distribution is derived. A method for displaying the color of monochromatic light on the monitor is presented. On this basis, we implement the diffraction simulation of white light formed via mixing three monochromatic lights of λ=700,546.1,435.8 nm with the same ratio in the RGB color space of CIE1931 system.

  19. Diffraction-dependent spin splitting in spin Hall effect of light on reflection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaodong; Xie, Linguo; Qiu, Jiangdong; Zhang, Zhiyou; Du, Jinglei; Gao, Fuhua

    2015-07-27

    We report on a diffraction-dependent spin splitting of the paraxial Gaussian light beams on reflection theoretically and experimentally. In the case of horizontal incident polarization, the spin splitting is proportional to the diffraction length of light beams near the Brewster angle. However, the spin splitting is nearly independent with the diffraction length for the vertical incident polarization. By means of the angular spectrum theory, we find that the diffraction-dependent spin splitting is attributed to the first order expansion term of the reflection coefficients with respect to the transverse wave-vector which is closely related to the diffraction length.

  20. Determination of Particle Size by Diffraction of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinard, Phillip M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a simplified diffraction experiment offered in a workshop with the purpose of illustrating to high school students the relation of science to society. The radii determined for cigarette smoke particles range from 0.2 to 0.5 micrometer in this experiment. Included is a description of the diffraction theory. (CC)

  1. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  2. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-09-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography.As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc.Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity.Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care.

  3. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuyu

    2012-12-31

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the

  4. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such…

  5. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such…

  6. Efficiency and stray light measurements and calculations of diffraction gratings for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.; Mossessian, D. ); Gullikson, E. ); Heimann, P. )

    1995-02-01

    Water-cooled gratings manufactured for spherical grating monochromators of the Advanced Light Source beamlines 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0 were measured with the laser plasma source and reflectometer in the Center for X-ray Optics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The square-wave gratings are ion milled into the polished electroless nickel surface after patterning by holographic photolithography. Absolute efficiency data are compared with exact electromagnetic theory calculation. Interorder stray light and groove depths can be estimated from the measurements.

  7. Efficient photonic reformatting of celestial light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, D. G.; Harris, R. J.; Gris-Sánchez, I.; Morris, T. J.; Choudhury, D.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Spaleniak, I.; Arriola, A.; Birks, T. A.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2017-02-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive astronomical spectrograph is limited by the trade-off between throughput and the width of the entrance slit. Photonic guided wave transitions have been proposed as a route to bypass this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of incoherent seeing-limited light collected by the telescope into a linear array of single modes: a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis but diffraction-limited in the dispersion axis of the spectrograph. It is anticipated that the size of a single-object spectrograph fed with light in this manner would be essentially independent of the telescope aperture size. A further anticipated benefit is that such spectrographs would be free of `modal noise', a phenomenon that occurs in high-resolution multimode fibre-fed spectrographs due to the coherent nature of the telescope point spread function (PSF). We seek to address these aspects by integrating a multicore fibre photonic lantern with an ultrafast laser inscribed three-dimensional waveguide interconnect to spatially reformat the modes within the PSF into a diffraction-limited pseudo-slit. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and 1530 ± 80 nm stellar light, the device exhibits a transmission of 47-53 per cent depending upon the mode of AO correction applied. We also show the advantage of using AO to couple light into such a device by sampling only the core of the CANARY PSF. This result underscores the possibility that a fully optimized guided-wave device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  8. Polarization effects in the diffraction of light by a planar chiral structure

    SciTech Connect

    Prosvirnin, S.L.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2005-03-01

    We analyze polarization changes of light diffracted on a planar chiral array from the standpoint of the Lorentz reciprocity lemma and find biorthogonality in the polarization eigenstates for waves diffracting though the grating in the opposite direction. Both reciprocal and nonreciprocal components in the polarization azimuth rotation of the diffracted light are identified. The structural chirality of the array arrangement and the chirality of individual elements of the array give rise to polarization effects.

  9. Light diffraction by a particle on an optically smooth surface.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B R

    1997-01-01

    The differential cross section for radiation scattered by a particle that is large compared to the wavelength, and resting on an optically smooth surface, is characterized by an intense, narrow peak in the direction of the reflected beam. This peak is shown to be due mainly to Fraunhofer diffraction by the overlapping projections of the particle and its image on a plane perpendicular to the reflected beam. Results calculated with this simple diffraction theory are compared with accurate results calculated by the multipole expansion method. Simple analytic formulas are derived that characterize the width and height of the central diffraction peak.

  10. Diffractive element design for generating multi-channel structured light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-Zhou; Pang, Hui; Zhang, Man; Shi, Li-Fang; Cao, A.-Xiu; Deng, Qi-Ling; Hu, Song

    2016-10-01

    With the advantages of small structure and high efficiency, the diffractive element is widely used in the construction of a structured light 3D measurement system. But the working wavelength of diffraction element is single, and the light field generated by the diffraction element is only one channel. We make the original single channel into three channels, so as to achieve from the serial algorithm to parallel algorithm to improve the measurement speed. Based on the lattice light field and the design method of multi wavelength diffraction elements, and in the premise of ensuring the number of points, the traditional lattice points of light field are divided into three channels. These channels are regarded as the target fields, and the diffraction element for generating color structure light field is designed.

  11. Application of the maximum entropy technique in tomographic reconstruction from laser diffraction data to determine local spray drop size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongyingsakthavorn, Pisit; Vallikul, Pumyos; Fungtammasan, Bundit; Dumouchel, Christophe

    2007-03-01

    This work proposes a new deconvolution technique to obtain local drop size distributions from line-of-sight intensity data measured by laser diffraction technique. The tomographic reconstruction, based on the maximum entropy (ME) technique, is applied to forward scattered light signal from a laser beam scanning horizontally through the spray on each plane from the center to the edge of spray, resulting in the reconstructed scattered light intensities at particular points in the spray. These reconstructed intensities are in turn converted to local drop size distributions. Unlike the classical method of the onion peeling technique or other mathematical transformation techniques that yield unrealistic negative scattered light intensity solutions, the maximum entropy constraints ensure positive light intensity. Experimental validations to the reconstructed results are achieved by using phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). The results from the PDPA measurements agree very well with the proposed ME tomographic reconstruction.

  12. Laser-triggered high-voltage plasma switching with diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, M; Sunesson, A; Bergkvist, M; Gustavsson, A; Isberg, J; Bernhoff, H; Skytt, P; Bengtsson, J; Hård, S; Larsson, M

    2001-06-01

    High-power lasers can be used to induce ionization of gases and thereby enable rapid triggering of electrical discharge devices, potentially faster than any devices based on mechanical or solid-state switching. With diffractive optical elements (DOEs) the laser light can conveniently be directed to positions within the gas so that an electrical discharge between two high-voltage electrodes is triggered reliably and rapidly. Here we report on two different types of DOE used for creating an electrical discharge in pure argon for potential high-voltage applications. One is the diffractive equivalent of a conventional axicon that yields an extended, and continuous, high-intensity focal region between the electrodes. The other is a multiple-focal-distance kinoform--a DOE that is designed to produce a linear array of 20 discrete foci, with high peak intensities, between the electrodes. We show that DOEs enable efficient, rapid switching and may provide increased flexibility in the design of novel electrode configurations.

  13. Increased diffraction efficiencies of DBR gratings in diode lasers with adiabatic ridge waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, André; Fricke, Jörg; Brox, Olaf; Erbert, Götz; Sumpf, Bernd

    2016-12-01

    The influence of the lateral layout on the diffraction efficiency of gratings in DBR lasers is presented. In this experimental study DBR ridge waveguide (RW) lasers with different ridge widths as well as straight and adiabatic waveguides are compared. The lasers are based on a vertical layer structure with an asymmetric super large optical cavity. DBR gratings of 3rd and 7th order are manufactured using electron beam lithography and dry etching. Their diffraction efficiencies are determined by measuring the optical output power emitted through the rear and front facets of unmounted devices. In comparison to a laser with a 30 μm ridge, the DBR diffraction efficiency in a laser with a 4 μm ridge is reduced by 46 percentage points. Implementing an adiabatic widening of the ridge width increases the diffraction efficiency from 35% to 72%. The latter is close to 81% achieved for the laser with 30 μm ridge. The new layout with enhanced DBR diffraction efficiency increases the optical output power of the narrow RW laser by a factor of 1.3. Similar results are obtained with 7th order gratings. All devices provide single-mode emission with spectral widths of 30 pm and side mode suppressions >60 dΒ. According to these results, implementing adiabatic waveguides is beneficial in terms of diffraction efficiency and performance of narrow RW lasers based on the applied vertical structure.

  14. Enhanced light extraction efficiency of OLEDs with quasiperiodic diffraction grating layer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae-Bin; Cho, Kwan Hyun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Jeong, Yong-Cheol

    2016-08-08

    We presented enhanced light extraction efficiency of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) cells with a nano-sized diffraction grating layer. Various diffraction gratings of different morphologies including linear, cubic, hexagonal and quasiperiodic patterns were fabricated by multiplexing light interference exposure on an azobenzene thin film. The effect of diffraction grating layer on device performances including luminous properties and quantum efficiency was investigated. In contrast to periodic grating patterns, the quasiperiodic structures leading broadband light extraction resulted in improved external quantum efficiency and power efficiency by 73% and 63%, respectively, compared to conventional OLED with flat surface of glass substrate.

  15. Wavefront-correction for nearly diffraction-limited focusing of dual-color laser beams to high intensities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baozhen; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shouyuan; Liu, Cheng; Golovin, Grigory; Banerjee, Sudeep; Brown, Kevin; Mills, Jared; Petersen, Chad; Umstadter, Donald

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrate wavefront correction of terawatt-peak-power laser beams at two distinct and well-separated wavelengths. Simultaneous near diffraction-limited focusability is achieved for both the fundamental (800 nm) and second harmonic (400 nm) of Ti:sapphire-amplified laser light. By comparing the relative effectiveness of various correction loops, the optimal ones are found. Simultaneous correction of both beams of different color relies on the linear proportionality between their wavefront aberrations. This method can enable two-color experiments at relativistic intensities.

  16. How Monochromatic Is Laser Light?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen F.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two derivations of the fundamental laser linewidth that have been used successfully in introductory physics courses. The cause of the finite linewidth is identified with phase fluctuations in the electric field due to spontaneous emissions. A factor of 2 discrepancy between the energy and field analysis is explained. (Author/GA)

  17. Zeeman effect induced by intense laser light.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2014-08-22

    We analyze spectral line shapes of hydrogenlike species subjected to fields of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the magnetic component of an electromagnetic wave may significantly influence the spectra. In particular, the Zeeman effect induced by a visible or infrared light can be experimentally observed using present-day powerful lasers. In addition, the effect may be used for diagnostics of focused beam intensities achieved at existing and newly built laser facilities.

  18. Fabrication of High-effective Silicon Diffractive Optics for the Terahertz Range by Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, V. S.; Komlenok, M. S.; Volodkin, B. O.; Knyazev, B. A.; Kononenko, T. V.; Konov, V. I.; Soifer, V. A.; Choporova, Yu. Yu.

    Comparison of the two laser sources (UV nanosecond and IR femtosecond) used for the formation of micro-relief at the silicon surface showed the advantage of the second one. A four-level silicon diffractive THz Fresnel lens has been fabricated by laser ablation at high repetition rate (f = 200 kHz) of femtosecond Yb:YAG laser. Features of the lens were investigated in the beam of the Novosibirsk free electron laser at the wavelength of 141 μm. Detailed results of investigation of fabricated lens micro-relief are presented. The measured diffractive efficiency of the lens is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  19. Efficient IR Transmission Diffraction Grating for Circularly Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Helen; Chambers, Diana

    1999-01-01

    Numerical methods, using rigorous coupled wave theory, are used to design rectangular relief diffraction gratings for an infrared application which requires comparable first order efficiencies in the TE and TM polarization states. The depth, period, and fill factor of the grating are varied to identify optimal two level binary lamellar grating profiles which predict efficiencies for individual TM and TE polarizations above 75 percent, while keeping the difference between the two efficiencies within 10 percent. The application at hand is a rotating, transmissive diffractive scanner for space-based coherent lidar. The operating wavelength is 2.0 microns. A collimated, circularly polarized beam is incident on the diffractive scanner at the Bragg angle; 30 and 45 degree beam deflection angles being studied. Fused silica is the substrate material of choice. Selected designs are fabricated on 3 inch fused silica substrates using lithographic methods. The performance of the test pieces is measured and compared to theoretical predictions.

  20. Investigation of stimulated raman scattering using short-pulse diffraction limited laser beam near the instability threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L; Montgomery, David S; Flippo, Kirk A; Rose, Harvey A; Yin, L; Albright, B J; Johnson, R P; Shimada, T; Bowers, K; Rousseaux, C; Tassin, V; Baton, S D; Amiranoff, F; Hardin, R A

    2008-01-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and> 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using particle-in-cell codes to validate our understanding quantitatively. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser facility and the LULI (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses) to investigate stimulated Raman scattering near the threshold of the instability using 527 nm and 1059 nm laser light respectively with 1.5-3.0 ps pulses. In both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gas-jet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k{lambda}{sub D} were completed at the Trident laser facility. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Work is currently underway comparing the results of the experiments with simulations using the VPIC [K. J. Bowers, et at., Phys. Plasmas, 15 055703 (2008)] particle-in-cell code. Details of the experimental results are presented in this manuscript.

  1. Lasers and Intense Pulsed Light Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Saunte, Ditte M; Lapins, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment are useful for the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Carbon dioxide lasers are used for cutting or vaporization of the affected area. It is a effective therapy for the management of severe and recalcitrant HS with persistent sinus tract and scarring, and can be performed under local anesthesia. HS has a follicular pathogenesis. Lasers and IPL targeting the hair have been found useful in treating HS by reducing the numbers of hairs in areas with HS. The methods have few side effects, but the studies are preliminary and need to be repeated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diffraction data of core-shell nanoparticles from an X-ray free electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xuanxuan; Chiu, Chun -Ya; Wang, Hsiang -Ju; ...

    2017-04-11

    X-ray free-electron lasers provide novel opportunities to conduct single particle analysis on nanoscale particles. Coherent diffractive imaging experiments were performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Laboratory, exposing single inorganic core-shell nanoparticles to femtosecond hard-X-ray pulses. Each facetted nanoparticle consisted of a crystalline gold core and a differently shaped palladium shell. Scattered intensities were observed up to about 7 nm resolution. Analysis of the scattering patterns revealed the size distribution of the samples, which is consistent with that obtained from direct real-space imaging by electron microscopy. Furthermore, scattering patterns resulting from single particles were selected and compiledmore » into a dataset which can be valuable for algorithm developments in single particle scattering research.« less

  3. Diffraction data of core-shell nanoparticles from an X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuanxuan; Chiu, Chun-Ya; Wang, Hsiang-Ju; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Botha, Sabine; Shoeman, Robert L.; Lawrence, Robert M.; Kupitz, Christopher; Kirian, Richard; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Nelson, Garrett; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Jafarpour, Aliakbar; Foucar, Lutz M.; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry; Liang, Mengning; Menzel, Andreas; Wang, Fenglin; Basu, Shibom; Fromme, Raimund; Doak, R. Bruce; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Huang, Michael H.; Spence, John C. H.; Schlichting, Ilme; Hogue, Brenda G.; Liu, Haiguang

    2017-04-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers provide novel opportunities to conduct single particle analysis on nanoscale particles. Coherent diffractive imaging experiments were performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Laboratory, exposing single inorganic core-shell nanoparticles to femtosecond hard-X-ray pulses. Each facetted nanoparticle consisted of a crystalline gold core and a differently shaped palladium shell. Scattered intensities were observed up to about 7 nm resolution. Analysis of the scattering patterns revealed the size distribution of the samples, which is consistent with that obtained from direct real-space imaging by electron microscopy. Scattering patterns resulting from single particles were selected and compiled into a dataset which can be valuable for algorithm developments in single particle scattering research.

  4. Diffraction data of core-shell nanoparticles from an X-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuanxuan; Chiu, Chun-Ya; Wang, Hsiang-Ju; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Botha, Sabine; Shoeman, Robert L; Lawrence, Robert M; Kupitz, Christopher; Kirian, Richard; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Nelson, Garrett; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Jafarpour, Aliakbar; Foucar, Lutz M; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry; Liang, Mengning; Menzel, Andreas; Wang, Fenglin; Basu, Shibom; Fromme, Raimund; Doak, R Bruce; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Huang, Michael H; Spence, John C H; Schlichting, Ilme; Hogue, Brenda G; Liu, Haiguang

    2017-04-11

    X-ray free-electron lasers provide novel opportunities to conduct single particle analysis on nanoscale particles. Coherent diffractive imaging experiments were performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Laboratory, exposing single inorganic core-shell nanoparticles to femtosecond hard-X-ray pulses. Each facetted nanoparticle consisted of a crystalline gold core and a differently shaped palladium shell. Scattered intensities were observed up to about 7 nm resolution. Analysis of the scattering patterns revealed the size distribution of the samples, which is consistent with that obtained from direct real-space imaging by electron microscopy. Scattering patterns resulting from single particles were selected and compiled into a dataset which can be valuable for algorithm developments in single particle scattering research.

  5. Spatial optical modulator (SOM): high-density diffractive laser projection display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, SangKyeong; Song, JongHyeong; Yeo, InJae; Choi, YoonJoon; Yurlov, Victor; An, SeungDo; Park, HeungWoo; Yang, HaengSeok; Lee, YeongGyu; Han, KyuBum; Shyshkin, Ihar; Lapchuk, Anatoliy; Oh, KwanYoung; Ryu, SeungWon; Jang, JaeWook; Park, ChangSu; Kim, ChunGi; Kim, SunKi; Kim, EungJu; Woo, KiSuk; Yang, JeongSuong; Kim, EuiJoong; Kim, JooHong; Byun, SungHo; Lee, SeungWoo; Lim, OhkKun; Cheong, JongPil; Hwang, YoungNam; Byun, GiYoung; Kyoung, JeHong; Yoon, SangKee; Lee, JaeKwang; Lee, TaeWon; Hong, SeokKee; Hong, YoonShik; Park, DongHyun; Kang, JungChul; Shin, WooChul; Lee, SungIl; Oh, SungKyung; Song, ByungKi; Kim, HeeYeoun; Koh, ChongMann; Ryu, YungHo; Lee, HyunKee; Baek, YoungKi

    2007-02-01

    A new type of diffractive spatial optical modulators, named SOM, has been developed by Samsung Electro-Mechanics for laser projection display. It exhibit inherent advantages of fast response time and high-performance light modulation, suitable for high quality embedded laser projection displays. The calculated efficiency and contrast ratio are 75 % and 800:1 respectively in case of 0 th order, 67 % and 1000:1 respectively in case of +/-1st order. The response time is as fast as 0.7 μs. Also we get the displacement of 400 nm enough to display full color with single panel in VGA format, as being 10 V driven. Optical module with VGA was successfully demonstrated for its potential applications in mobile laser projection display such as cellular phone, digital still camera and note PC product. Electrical power consumption is less than 2 W, volume is less than 13 cc. Brightness is enough to watch TV and movie in the open air, being variable up to 6 lm. Even if it's optimal diagonal image size is 10 inch, image quality does not deteriorate in the range of 5 to 50 inch because of the merit of focus-free. Due to 100 % fill factor, the image is seamless so as to be unpleasant to see the every pixel's partition. High speed of response time can make full color display with 24-bit gray scale and cause no scan line artifact, better than any other devices.

  6. Ultrafast coherent X-ray diffractive imaging with the FLASH Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.; Barty, A.; Benner, W. H.; Bogan, M. J.; Boutet, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Düsterer, S.; Frank, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Iwan, B.; Marchesini, S.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Siebert, M. M.; Treusch, R.; Woods, B. W.

    High-resolution ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging has been carried out at the FLASH FEL. Reconstructed images show no effect of sample destruction. Time resolved imaging was achieved by time-delay holography and with a synchronized optical laser.

  7. Comparison of cascade impaction and laser diffraction for particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jochen; Wachtel, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    The Andersen cascade impactor (ACI) and laser diffraction (LD) can be correlated at ambient temperature for aqueous drug formulations atomized by Soft Mist inhalers. A comparison of the two particle size determination methods at different conditions (flow rate, relative humidity) was performed. Under well-defined conditions, the faster LD can substitute the time consuming ACI at least for routine tests. The measurements were performed with three different drug formulations. The aerosol was generated by Soft Mist inhalers, and the droplet distributions were measured simultaneously using a laser diffraction analyzer together with the eight-stage Andersen cascade impactor. The simultaneous measurements ensure that aerosol and air conditions are identical for both LD and ACI. In order to measure the scattered laser light intensity of the aerosol passing the induction port, glass windows were fitted to the induction port. The evaporation effect of the aqueous aerosols on the PSD was investigated at ambient humidity and high humidity (RH > 90%). The simultaneous determination of the droplet size distribution leads to a good correlation between the ACI and LD method only if the measurements were performed at RH of >90%. The humidity of the ambient air had the strongest influence on PSD not only for ACI, but also for LD. In our set-up, the almost saturated air prevents aqueous droplets from drying. The influence of the flow rate on LD was negligible, whereas for ACI, a flow rate dependence is expected. The advantages of LD and the demonstrated compatibility to established EP/USP methods motivate the substitution of the ACI and the use of LD for routine measurements.

  8. Diffraction characteristics of spatial and temporal Gaussian-shaped femtosecond laser pulse by rectangle reflection grating.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohua; Xu, Rongrong; Yu, Wenbing; Wu, Hanping

    2011-02-20

    The exact intensity distribution expression for the spatial and temporal Gaussian-shaped femtosecond laser pulse diffracted by a rectangle reflection grating is derived. The spatial and temporal diffraction characteristics are theoretically investigated in detail, and a criterion for judging whether or not the diffraction pulse is just split into two independent pulses in the temporal domain is obtained. The results show that the diffraction intensity in the temporal domain consists of three parts: the intensity diffracted by the upper reflection surface of the grating, the intensity diffracted by the nether reflection surface, and their temporal coherent intensity. The temporal coherent intensity becomes weaker, even is zero, for the higher height from the nether surface to the upper surface of the grating. The principal maximum becomes more sharply bright for the bigger waist width of the femtosecond laser pulse in the spatial domain.

  9. Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control

    DOEpatents

    Bishop, Kenneth P.; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Gaspar, Susan M.; Hickman, Kirt C.; McNeil, John R.; Naqvi, S. Sohail H.; Stallard, Brian R.; Tipton, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

  10. CD, DVD, and Blu-Ray Disc Diffraction with a Laser Ray Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWeerd, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    A compact disc (CD) can be used as a diffraction grating, even though its track consists of a series of pits, not a continuous groove. Previous authors described how to measure the track spacing on a CD using an incident laser beam normal to the surface or one at an oblique angle. In both cases, the diffraction pattern was projected on a screen…

  11. CD, DVD, and Blu-Ray Disc Diffraction with a Laser Ray Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWeerd, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    A compact disc (CD) can be used as a diffraction grating, even though its track consists of a series of pits, not a continuous groove. Previous authors described how to measure the track spacing on a CD using an incident laser beam normal to the surface or one at an oblique angle. In both cases, the diffraction pattern was projected on a screen…

  12. Doppler shift generated by a moving diffraction grating under incidence by polychromatic diffuse light.

    PubMed

    Dossou, Kokou B

    2016-05-20

    We consider the spectral response of moving diffraction gratings, in which the incident light extends over a broad angular range and where the diffracted light is observed from a specific angle. We show that the dispersion relation between the frequency perceived by an observer who is looking at a moving grating and the incident frequency can exhibit some unique features, such as a flat band (i.e., a local minimum). An observer can see the light diffracted into a nonspecular diffraction order from a multitude of incident light rays, and the angle of incidence of each ray is frequency dependent; as a consequence, when the grating is moving, each incident ray experiences a Doppler shift in frequency that depends on its angle of incidence. We find that remarkable features appear near a Wood anomaly where the angle of incidence, for a given diffraction angle, can change very quickly with frequency. This means that light of multiple frequencies and incident from multiple angles can be mixed by the motion of the grating into the same diffracted ray and their frequencies can be compressed into a narrower range. The existence of a flat band means that a moving grating can be used as a device to increase the intensity of the perceived diffracted light due to spectral compression. The properties of a grating in motion in sunlight can also be relevant to the study of naturally occurring gratings which are typically in oscillatory motion.

  13. Light scattering by red blood cells in ektacytometry: Fraunhofer versus anomalous diffraction.

    PubMed

    Streekstra, G J; Hoekstra, A G; Nijhof, E J; Heethaar, R M

    1993-05-01

    In the present literature on ektacytometry, small angle light scattering by ellipsoidal red blood cells is commonly approximated by Fraunhofer diffraction. Calculations on a sphere with the size and relative refractive index of a red cell, however, show that Fraunhofer diffraction deviates significantly from exact Mie theory. Anomalous diffraction is found to be a much better approximation. The anomalous diffraction theory is used to calculate the intensity distribution of the light scattered by an ellipsoidally deformed red blood cell. The derived expression shows that the ellipticity of isointensity curves in forward scattered light are equal to the ellipticity of the red blood cell. The theoretical expression is fitted to the intensity patterns measured with an ektacytometer. For the small observation angles used in ektacytometry, the experimental results confirm the validity of the anomalous diffraction approach.

  14. Generation of VUV/XUV laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, Alexandre

    1991-04-01

    Frequency conversion by four- and six-wave mixing in gaseous media is a well established experimental method to generate tunable coherent light in the spectral region of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and more recently in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV). Tunable coherent ``laser like'' radiation can be generated by nonlinear frequency mixing in the 62-200 nm spectral region, starting from the radiation of a pulsed dye laser pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Because of the combination of high pulse power with narrow spectral width of the VUV/XUV radiation, the nonlinear frequency mixing becomes a powerful light source for spectroscopic studies. A short review of the field of nonlinear frequency mixing to obtain VUV/XUV radiation is made, together with a comparison of the spectral brightness of various radiation sources in this spectral region.

  15. The global light system laser station prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Patrick R.

    2015-08-01

    We describe the design and fabrication of a prototype Global Light System (GLS) laser station for the JEM-EUSO project. The GLS will consist of a network of ground-based Ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and steered lasers to monitor and calibrate the cosmic ray detector planned for install on the International Space Station (ISS). The GLS units will generate optical signatures in the atmosphere that are comparable to tracks from cosmic ray extensive air showers (EASs). Unlike an EAS, the number, time, energy, location and direction (for lasers) of GLS events can be specified as JEM-EUSO passes 400 km overhead. Laser tracks from the GLS prototype will be recorded by prototype detectors in ground-to-ground tests. Distant tracks with low angular speed are of particular interest because these are the types of EAS tracks that will be measured by JEM-EUSO. To do these ground-to-ground tests, the prototype detectors will need to measure the laser through the atmosphere at low elevation viewing angles. The beam energy can be adjusted from 1 to 90 mJ to compensate for this additional atmospheric attenuation. The frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser produces 355 nm (7 ns pulse) light. This wavelength is near the center of the UV EAS fluorescence spectrum. The system is housed in a utility trailer that can be transported by a small truck for domestic campaigns or shipped in an industry standard 20 foot container for global deployment. In operation mode, the laser platform inside the trailer is isolated mechanically to maintain beam pointing accuracy. A retractable two stage steering head can point in any direction above the horizon. A slip ring eliminates cable wrap problems. The GLS prototype will be used to test the EUSO-TA detector and will also be used in preflight tests of the EUSO-balloon payload planned for a super pressure balloon mission.

  16. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Generation of diffraction-limited nanosecond and subnanosecond pulses in a XeCl laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu N.; Losev, V. F.; Dudarev, V. V.

    2008-04-01

    The generation of nanosecond and subnanosecond pulses in a XeCl laser is studied. The short radiation pulses are generated in a resonator with a SBS mirror. By focusing laser radiation inside and on the surface of a nonlinear medium, it is possible to generate pulses of duration 3 ns and 150 ps, respectively. The laser beams obtained in this way contain more than 70% of energy within the diffraction angle and have the signal-to-noise ration exceeding 104.

  17. Bragg diffraction of light from ultrasound in cubic centrosymmetric crystals in an external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Kurilkina, S.N.

    1995-03-01

    Special features of noncollinear Bragg diffraction of light from ultrasound in centrosymmetric cubic crystals placed in an external electric field are considered. Particular cases of acousto-electro-optical interaction on (quasi-)longitudinal and (quasi-)transverse acoustic waves propagating the (001) and (110) planes are analyzed. The dependence of diffracted light energy characteristics on photoelastic and electro-optical parameters of a cubic centrosymmetric crystal, as well as external field strength and orientation, is determined. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Diffraction calculation of occultation light curves in the presence of an isothermal atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. G.; Gierasch, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    From diffraction theory, light curves are calculated for stellar occultations by a planetary body with an isothermal atmosphere. The character of the resulting curves is determined by the scale height H, the Fresnel zone size l, the surface atmospheric refractivity, and the planetary radius. An exact general solution and two approximations are presented which are valid when H is much greater than l. The importance is assessed of accounting for diffraction effects of the limb when deducing atmospheric parameters from occultation light curves

  19. High-order diffraction gratings for high-power semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'eva, V. V.; Vinokurov, D. A.; Zolotarev, V. V.; Leshko, A. Yu.; Petrunov, A. N.; Pikhtin, N. A.; Rastegaeva, M. G.; Sokolova, Z. N. Shashkin, I. S.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2012-02-15

    A deep diffraction grating with a large period ({approx}2 {mu}m) within one of the cladding layers is proposed for the implementation of selective feedback in a semiconductor laser. Frequency dependences of reflectance in the 12th diffraction order for rectangular, triangular, and trapezoidal diffraction gratings are calculated. It is shown that the maximum reflectance of the waveguide mode is attained using a rectangular or trapezoidal grating {approx}2 {mu}m deep in the laser structure. Deep trapezoidal diffraction gratings with large periods are fabricated in the Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As cladding layer of a GaAs/AlGaAs laser structure using photolithography and reactive ion etching.

  20. Pixel Detectors For Diffraction Experiments At The Swiss Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Huelsen, G.; Eikenberry, E.F.; Schmitt, B.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Tomizaki, T.; Stampanoni, M.; Willmott, P.; Patterson, B.; Broennimann, Ch.; Horisberger, R.; Toyokawa, H.; Borchert, G. L.

    2004-05-12

    The PILATUS detector (Pixel Apparatus for the SLS) is a large, quantum-limited area X-ray detector for protein crystallography which is currently under construction. Its basic units are modules with 16 CMOS chips bump-bonded to a large, continuously sensitive silicon sensor with 157x366 pixels of 217x217 {mu}m2, leading to an active area of 34x80 mm2. With a counting circuit in each pixel, X-rays are detected in single photon counting mode, leading to excellent, noise-free data. The main properties of the detector are an energy range of 6 to 30 keV, no back-ground due to leakage current or readout-noise, fast read-out time of 6.7 ms, a rate/pixel >104/s and a PSF of one pixel. PILATUS detectors are installed at the SLS X06SA protein crystallography beamline, and at both the surface diffraction (SD) station and the radiography and tomography (XTM) station of beamline X04SA. The detectors are operated at room temperature and thus are very easy to use. Experiments benefit from the ability to detect very weak diffraction spots with high precision. At the SD station and at the XTM station, which is equipped with a Bragg magnifier, diffraction, radiography and tomography experiments showed promising results. At beamline X06SA, a three-module array (1120x157 pixels) with a readout time of 6.7 ms was tested. This system was used to collect fine phi-sliced protein crystal data in continuous sample rotation mode in which the crystal was continuously rotated with a slow angular velocity of 0.04 deg./s without any shutter operation. Exposure time per frame ranged from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the crystal. These initial experiments show the potential of this method.

  1. Pixel Detectors For Diffraction Experiments At The Swiss Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hülsen, G.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Horisberger, R.; Schmitt, B.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Tomizaki, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Stampanoni, M.; Borchert, G. L.; Willmott, P.; Patterson, B.; Brönnimann, Ch.

    2004-05-01

    The PILATUS detector (Pixel Apparatus for the SLS) is a large, quantum-limited area X-ray detector for protein crystallography which is currently under construction. Its basic units are modules with 16 CMOS chips bump-bonded to a large, continuously sensitive silicon sensor with 157×366 pixels of 217×217 μm2, leading to an active area of 34×80 mm2. With a counting circuit in each pixel, X-rays are detected in single photon counting mode, leading to excellent, noise-free data. The main properties of the detector are an energy range of 6 to 30 keV, no back-ground due to leakage current or readout-noise, fast read-out time of 6.7 ms, a rate/pixel >104/s and a PSF of one pixel. PILATUS detectors are installed at the SLS X06SA protein crystallography beamline, and at both the surface diffraction (SD) station and the radiography and tomography (XTM) station of beamline X04SA. The detectors are operated at room temperature and thus are very easy to use. Experiments benefit from the ability to detect very weak diffraction spots with high precision. At the SD station and at the XTM station, which is equipped with a Bragg magnifier, diffraction, radiography and tomography experiments showed promising results. At beamline X06SA, a three-module array (1120×157 pixels) with a readout time of 6.7 ms was tested. This system was used to collect fine phi-sliced protein crystal data in continuous sample rotation mode in which the crystal was continuously rotated with a slow angular velocity of 0.04 °/s without any shutter operation. Exposure time per frame ranged from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the crystal. These initial experiments show the potential of this method.

  2. Analysis of the scalability of diffraction-limited fiber lasers and amplifiers to high average power.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Jay W; Messerly, Michael J; Beach, Raymond J; Shverdin, Miroslav Y; Stappaerts, Eddy A; Sridharan, Arun K; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2008-08-18

    We analyze the scalability of diffraction-limited fiber lasers considering thermal, non-linear, damage and pump coupling limits as well as fiber mode field diameter (MFD) restrictions. We derive new general relationships based upon practical considerations. Our analysis shows that if the fiber's MFD could be increased arbitrarily, 36 kW of power could be obtained with diffraction-limited quality from a fiber laser or amplifier. This power limit is determined by thermal and non-linear limits that combine to prevent further power scaling, irrespective of increases in mode size. However, limits to the scaling of the MFD may restrict fiber lasers to lower output powers.

  3. Cryogenic, high power, near diffraction limited, Yb:YAG slab laser.

    PubMed

    Ganija, Miftar; Ottaway, David; Veitch, Peter; Munch, Jesper

    2013-03-25

    A cryogenic slab laser that is suitable for scaling to high power, while taking full advantage of the improved thermo-optical and thermo-mechanical properties of Yb:YAG at cryogenic temperatures is described. The laser uses a conduction cooled, end pumped, zigzag slab geometry resulting in a near diffraction limited, robust, power scalable design. The design and the initial characterization of the laser up to 200W are presented.

  4. 160 W high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited beam quality all-fiber picosecond pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chang; Ge, Tingwu; An, Na; Cao, Kang; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited beam quality all-fiber picosecond pulse laser, which consists of a passively mode-locked seed laser and three-stage master power amplifiers. A repetition frequency multiplier and a high Yb-doped gain fiber with shorter length are utilized in the laser system to suppress the nonlinear effects and reduce the pulse broadening caused by dispersion. Moreover, the homemade light mode controllers based on a coiling and tapering fiber technique and the active fiber of the amplifier with a relatively small mode area are adopted to improve the beam quality. In addition, by experimentally adjusting the active fiber length, the optical conversion efficiency of the overall laser system can be optimized. Eventually, a 160 W high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited picosecond pulse fiber laser is obtained, with the beam quality factor M2 at 1.12 and an optical conversion efficiency of the system of 75%.

  5. OH measurement by laser light absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perner, D.

    1986-01-01

    Since the first attempt to measure atmospheric hydroxyl radicals by optical absorption in 1975 (Perner et al., 1976) this method has been continuously developed further and its major obstacles and limitations are known today. The laser beam needs to be expanded in order to reduce the beam divergence. At the same time the energy density of the laser beam which produces OH via ozone photolysis is reduced to such an extent that the self-produced OH concentration ranges well below the atmospheric value. Atmospheric absorptions should be observed over a wide spectral range so that not only the OH radicals are properly identified by several rotational lines but their absorption can be corrected for interfering absorptions from other air constituents as SO2, CH2O, CS2, etc., which can be identified in a wide spectral range with more confidence. Air turbulence demands fast spectral scanning or probing on and off the absorption line. Energy requirements should be kept small in field operations. In the experiment frequency doubled dye laser pulses at 308 nm are produced. The picosecond light pulses are expected to show a smooth profile (light intensity against wavelength) which will be broadened to the required spectral width according to the uncertainty principle. The pump laser will be an optoacoustically modulated Nd:YAG laser.

  6. Diamond anvil cell radial x-ray diffraction program at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

    PubMed

    Hu, J Z; Mao, H K; Shu, J F; Guo, Q Z; Liu, H Z

    2006-06-28

    During the past decade, the radial x-ray diffraction method using a diamond anvil cell (DAC) has been developed at the X17C beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The detailed experimental procedure used with energy dispersive x-ray diffraction is described. The advantages and limitations of using the energy dispersive method for DAC radial diffraction studies are also discussed. The results for FeO at 135 GPa and other radial diffraction experiments performed at X17C are discussed in this report.

  7. Note: Current induced fluctuations in the orientation of the beam diffracted by a liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konwar, Santanu; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we report a peculiar movement of the beam cross sections associated with both the diffracted and undiffracted laser beams from a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM). The beam movement becomes noticeable when the beam position is monitored continuously for several hours. We perform experiments to show that the beam movement is non-mechanical in nature and is connected with the power on/off instants of the LCSLM as well as the heat conductivity of the mounting slab which acts as the rigid support to the LCSLM panel. We also present a detailed analysis of the experimental findings to ascertain the possible cause of the beam fluctuations.

  8. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Arun K; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2016-06-21

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  9. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Arun K.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-09-01

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  10. Light alloy upgrading by surface laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariaut, Francois; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Andreazza-Vignolle, Caroline; Sauvage, Thierry; Langlade, Cecile; Frainais, Michel

    2002-09-01

    The excimer laser nitriding and carburizing process reported is developed to enhance the mechanical and chemical properties of aluminum alloys. An excimer laser beam is focused onto the alloy surface in a cell containing 1 bar nitrogen or propylene gas. Vapor plasma expands from the surface then dissociates and ionizes ambient gas. Nitrogen or carbon atoms from plasma in contact with the surface penetrate in depth due to plasma recoil action onto the target surface heated by the plasma. It is thus necessary to work with a sufficient laser fluence to create the plasma, but this fluence must be limited to prevent laser-induced surface roughness. The nitrogen or carbon concentration profiles are determined from nuclear analysis. Crystalline quality is evidenced by X Ray Diffraction (XRD) technique. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) gives the in-depth microstructure. Fretting coefficient measurements exhibit a satisfying behavior for some experimental conditions. The polycrystalline nitride or carbide layer obtained is several micrometers thick and composed of pure A1N or Al4C3 (columnar microstructure) top layer standing on a diffusion layer.

  11. Laser and intense pulsed light management of couperose and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Dahan, S

    2011-11-01

    Management of couperosis and rosacea has been totally renewed by laser and vascular laser techniques, with efficacy targeted on the telangiectases and to a lesser extent on the erythrosis. Laser management of hypertrophic rosacea or rhinophyma depends on surgical treatment with decortication, continuous CO(2) ablative laser or Erbium, fractionated at high power, then vascular laser treatment for the telangiectases: lasers with pulsed dye, KTP, or pulsed lights for red laser telangiectases and long pulse Nd-Yag laser for blue telangiectases. For papulopustular rosacea, vascular laser treatment (pulsed dye and KTP) and intense pulsed light will be begun once the inflammation has been treated. The major indication for vascular lasers and intense pulsed light is found in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with high efficacy for the telangiectases. Diffuse erythrosis is difficult to treat, requiring a high number of laser and/or intense pulsed light sessions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [Laser and intense pulsed light management of couperose and rosacea].

    PubMed

    Dahan, S

    2011-09-01

    Management of couperosis and rosacea has been totally renewed by laser and vascular laser techniques, with efficacy targeted on the telangiectases and to a lesser extent on the erythrosis. Laser management of hypertrophic rosacea or rhinophyma depends on surgical treatment with decortication, continuous CO(2) ablative laser or Erbium, fractionated at high power, then vascular laser treatment for the telangiectases: lasers with pulsed dye, KTP, or pulsed lights for red laser telangiectases and long pulse Nd-Yag laser for blue telangiectases. For papulopustular rosacea, vascular laser treatment (pulsed dye and KTP) and intense pulsed light will be begun once the inflammation has been treated. The major indication for vascular lasers and intense pulsed light is found in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with high efficacy for the telangiectases. Diffuse erythrosis is difficult to treat, requiring a high number of laser and/or intense pulsed light sessions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Switch for Sub-Diffraction Laser Lithography by Photoenol Intermediate-State Cis-Trans Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Patrick; Zieger, Markus M; Richter, Benjamin; Quick, Alexander S; Fischer, Joachim; Mueller, Jonathan B; Zhou, Lu; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Bastmeyer, Martin; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Wegener, Martin

    2017-06-27

    Recent developments in stimulated-emission depletion (STED) microscopy have led to a step change in the achievable resolution and allowed breaking the diffraction limit by large factors. The core principle is based on a reversible molecular switch, allowing for light-triggered activation and deactivation in combination with a laser focus that incorporates a point or line of zero intensity. In the past years, the concept has been transferred from microscopy to maskless laser lithography, namely direct laser writing (DLW), in order to overcome the diffraction limit for optical lithography. Herein, we propose and experimentally introduce a system that realizes such a molecular switch for lithography. Specifically, the population of intermediate-state photoenol isomers of α-methyl benzaldehydes generated by two-photon absorption at 700 nm fundamental wavelength can be reversibly depleted by simultaneous irradiation at 440 nm, suppressing the subsequent Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction which constitutes the chemical core of the writing process. We demonstrate the potential of the proposed mechanism for STED-inspired DLW by covalently functionalizing the surface of glass substrates via the photoenol-driven STED-inspired process exploiting reversible photoenol activation with a polymerization initiator. Subsequently, macromolecules are grown from the functionalized areas and the spatially coded glass slides are characterized by atomic-force microscopy. Our approach allows lines with a full-width-at-half-maximum of down to 60 nm and line gratings with a lateral resolution of 100 nm to be written, both surpassing the diffraction limit.

  14. Coherent soft X-ray diffraction imaging of coliphage PR772 at the Linac coherent light source.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Hemanth K N; Yoon, Chun Hong; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Bobkov, Sergey; Bucher, Maximilian; Carini, Gabriella A; Carron, Sebastian; Chapman, Henry; Daurer, Benedikt; DeMirci, Hasan; Ekeberg, Tomas; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hanke, Max Felix; Hart, Philip; Hogue, Brenda G; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A; Kurta, Ruslan P; Larsson, Daniel S D; Duane Loh, N; Maia, Filipe R N C; Mancuso, Adrian P; Mühlig, Kerstin; Munke, Anna; Nam, Daewoong; Nettelblad, Carl; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A; Song, Changyong; Spence, John C H; Svenda, Martin; Van der Schot, Gijs; Vartanyants, Ivan A; Williams, Garth J; Xavier, P Lourdu

    2017-06-27

    Single-particle diffraction from X-ray Free Electron Lasers offers the potential for molecular structure determination without the need for crystallization. In an effort to further develop the technique, we present a dataset of coherent soft X-ray diffraction images of Coliphage PR772 virus, collected at the Atomic Molecular Optics (AMO) beamline with pnCCD detectors in the LAMP instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The diameter of PR772 ranges from 65-70 nm, which is considerably smaller than the previously reported ~600 nm diameter Mimivirus. This reflects continued progress in XFEL-based single-particle imaging towards the single molecular imaging regime. The data set contains significantly more single particle hits than collected in previous experiments, enabling the development of improved statistical analysis, reconstruction algorithms, and quantitative metrics to determine resolution and self-consistency.

  15. Coherent soft X-ray diffraction imaging of coliphage PR772 at the Linac coherent light source

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Hemanth K.N.; Yoon, Chun Hong; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Bobkov, Sergey; Bucher, Maximilian; Carini, Gabriella A.; Carron, Sebastian; Chapman, Henry; Daurer, Benedikt; DeMirci, Hasan; Ekeberg, Tomas; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hanke, Max Felix; Hart, Philip; Hogue, Brenda G.; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A.; Kurta, Ruslan P.; Larsson, Daniel S.D.; Duane Loh, N.; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Mancuso, Adrian P.; Mühlig, Kerstin; Munke, Anna; Nam, Daewoong; Nettelblad, Carl; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Song, Changyong; Spence, John C.H.; Svenda, Martin; Van der Schot, Gijs; Vartanyants, Ivan A.; Williams, Garth J.; Xavier, P. Lourdu

    2017-01-01

    Single-particle diffraction from X-ray Free Electron Lasers offers the potential for molecular structure determination without the need for crystallization. In an effort to further develop the technique, we present a dataset of coherent soft X-ray diffraction images of Coliphage PR772 virus, collected at the Atomic Molecular Optics (AMO) beamline with pnCCD detectors in the LAMP instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The diameter of PR772 ranges from 65–70 nm, which is considerably smaller than the previously reported ~600 nm diameter Mimivirus. This reflects continued progress in XFEL-based single-particle imaging towards the single molecular imaging regime. The data set contains significantly more single particle hits than collected in previous experiments, enabling the development of improved statistical analysis, reconstruction algorithms, and quantitative metrics to determine resolution and self-consistency. PMID:28654088

  16. Near-diffraction-limited annular flattop beam shaping with dual phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haotong; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Yanxing; Xi, Fengjie; Xu, Xiaojun; Liu, Zejin

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate the annular flattop beam shaping technique with dual phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC-SLM) based on the refractive laser beam shaping systems. One LC-SLM redistributes the intensity distribution, and the other restores the initial underlying wave front. Differing from the conventional annular beam shaping technique, the wave front of the output beam can be maintained. The influences of deviations of beam waist and beam shape on the output beam profile are discussed in detail. Experimental results show that approximate 71% of the power is enclosed in a region with less than 7% rms intensity variation. The 4.1mm diameter near-diffraction-limited beam retains an annular flattop intensity distribution without significant diffraction peaks for a working distance of more than 24cm in the near field.

  17. Coherent soft X-ray diffraction imaging of coliphage PR772 at the Linac coherent light source

    DOE PAGES

    Reddy, Hemanth K. N.; Yoon, Chun Hong; Aquila, Andrew; ...

    2017-06-27

    Single-particle diffraction from X-ray Free Electron Lasers offers the potential for molecular structure determination without the need for crystallization. In an effort to further develop the technique, we present a dataset of coherent soft X-ray diffraction images of Coliphage PR772 virus, collected at the Atomic Molecular Optics (AMO) beamline with pnCCD detectors in the LAMP instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The diameter of PR772 ranges from 65–70 nm, which is considerably smaller than the previously reported ~600 nm diameter Mimivirus. This reflects continued progress in XFEL-based single-particle imaging towards the single molecular imaging regime. As a result, themore » data set contains significantly more single particle hits than collected in previous experiments, enabling the development of improved statistical analysis, reconstruction algorithms, and quantitative metrics to determine resolution and self-consistency.« less

  18. Light coupling into an optical microcantilever by an embedded diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Zinoviev, K; Dominguez, C; Plaza, J A; Cadarso, V; Lechuga, L M

    2006-01-10

    By measuring the excitation efficiency of an optical waveguide on a diffraction grating one can accurately register the changes in the incidence angle of the exciting light beam. This phenomenon was applied to detect ultrasmall deflections of silicon dioxide cantilevers of submicrometer thickness that were fabricated with corrugation on top to act as diffraction grating couplers. The power of light coupled into the cantilevers was monitored with a conventional photodetector and modulated using mechanical vibration of the cantilever, thus changing the spatial orientation of the coupler with respect to the incident light beam. The technique can be considered as an alternative to the methods known for detection of cantilever deflection.

  19. Diffractive-optics-based beam combination of a phase-locked fiber laser array.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Eric C; Ho, James G; Goodno, Gregory D; Rice, Robert R; Rothenberg, Josh; Thielen, Peter; Weber, Mark; Wickham, Michael

    2008-02-15

    A diffractive optical element (DOE) is used as a beam combiner for an actively phase-locked array of fiber lasers. Use of a DOE eliminates the far-field sidelobes and the accompanying loss of beam quality typically observed in tiled coherent laser arrays. Using this technique, we demonstrated coherent combination of five fiber lasers with 91% efficiency and M2=1.04. Combination efficiency and phase locking is robust even with large amplitude and phase fluctuations on the input laser array elements. Calculations and power handling measurements suggest that this approach can scale to both high channel counts and high powers.

  20. Application of Laser Plasma X-rays to Time-resolved Debye-Sherrer Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanegae, Y.; Kinoshita, K.; Hosokai, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Yoshii, K.; Ueda, T.; Watanabe, T.; Zhidkov, A.; Uesaka, M.

    2003-08-26

    We have studied Laser Plasma X-ray(LPX) in order to apply to time-resolved protein crystallography. We consider that our works will contribute for application of X-ray pulse and breed short pulse handling techniques. LPX pulse duration is femto{approx}pico-second. So, we expect that the laser plasma X-ray system has the potential to satisfy the requirement of time-scale to resolve the early period of protein's structural change. We need about more than 1012photns/shot X-ray to get a diffraction image of organics. We have reinforced our LPX system to get a diffraction image. Now, we try laser pre-pulse effect by experiments and calculations. As the first step of our aim, we will obtain the Debey-Sherrer diffraction image of a biological sample.

  1. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  2. LASER BEAMS. CAVITIES: Efficient diffraction grating for use in a grazing-incidence configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, S. V.

    1998-05-01

    Numerical-experiment methods were used to investigate a combined structure consisting of a dielectric diffraction grating and a metal mirror. It was found that the diffraction efficiency of such a combined grating with specially selected parameters can reach 40%—70% when the angle of incidence is 89°. This should make it possible to improve considerably the characteristics of single-frequency tunable pulsed lasers.

  3. CD, DVD, and Blu-Ray Disc Diffraction with a Laser Ray Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeerd, Alan J.

    2016-05-01

    A compact disc (CD) can be used as a diffraction grating, even though its track consists of a series of pits, not a continuous groove. Previous authors described how to measure the track spacing on a CD using an incident laser beam normal to the surface or one at an oblique angle. In both cases, the diffraction pattern was projected on a screen and distance measurements allowed the track spacing to be calculated. I propose an alternative method using a laser ray box, which is also applied to a DVD and a Blu-ray disc.

  4. Tunable external-cavity diode laser at 650 nm based on a transmission diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Toni; Joutsenoja, Timo; Hernberg, Rolf; Kuittinen, Markku

    2002-09-20

    A tunable external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on a transmission diffraction grating in a Littrow mount has been developed and characterized. A single-transverse-mode diode laser at 650 nm is used in an external-cavity configuration in which the transmission grating is used as a dispersive element to select the single longitudinal mode. The transmission diffraction grating is made with electron-beam lithography. A tunable true single-mode cw output power of >20 mW is obtained from the ECDL. The total wavelength tuning range is 12 nm, and the mode-hop-free continuous tunability is >20 GHz.

  5. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron X-ray diffraction ina diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk,Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-29

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radialx-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup ofALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a samplein a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser whileprobing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cellis placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to thebeam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while thesample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparentboron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of(Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observedabove 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  6. Active cooling of pulse compression diffraction gratings for high energy, high average power ultrafast lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, David A.; Rosso, Paul A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Aasen, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Haefner, Constantin

    2016-12-26

    Laser energy absorption and subsequent heat removal from diffraction gratings in chirped pulse compressors poses a significant challenge in high repetition rate, high peak power laser development. In order to understand the average power limitations, we have modeled the time-resolved thermo-mechanical properties of current and advanced diffraction gratings. We have also developed and demonstrated a technique of actively cooling Petawatt scale, gold compressor gratings to operate at 600W of average power - a 15x increase over the highest average power petawatt laser currently in operation. As a result, combining this technique with low absorption multilayer dielectric gratings developed in our group would enable pulse compressors for petawatt peak power lasers operating at average powers well above 40kW.

  7. Active cooling of pulse compression diffraction gratings for high energy, high average power ultrafast lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Alessi, David A.; Rosso, Paul A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; ...

    2016-12-26

    Laser energy absorption and subsequent heat removal from diffraction gratings in chirped pulse compressors poses a significant challenge in high repetition rate, high peak power laser development. In order to understand the average power limitations, we have modeled the time-resolved thermo-mechanical properties of current and advanced diffraction gratings. We have also developed and demonstrated a technique of actively cooling Petawatt scale, gold compressor gratings to operate at 600W of average power - a 15x increase over the highest average power petawatt laser currently in operation. As a result, combining this technique with low absorption multilayer dielectric gratings developed in ourmore » group would enable pulse compressors for petawatt peak power lasers operating at average powers well above 40kW.« less

  8. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-15

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radial x-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup of ALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a sample in a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser while probing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cell is placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to the beam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while the sample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparent boron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of (Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observed above 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  9. Organic holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal distributed feedback laser from different diffraction orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minghuan; Liu, Yonggang; Zhang, Guiyang; Peng, Zenghui; Li, Dayu; Ma, Ji; Xuan, Li

    2016-11-01

    Holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) based distributed feedback (DFB) lasers were prepared with poly (-methoxy-5-(2‧-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (MEH-PPV) film as the active medium layer. The HPDLC grating film was fabricated via holographic induced photopolymerization. The pure film spectra of MEH-PPV and the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectrum were investigated. The laser device was single-longitudinal mode operation. The tunability of the HPDLC DFB laser was achieved by selecting different grating periods. The lasing performances were also characterized and compared from different diffraction orders. The lasing threshold increased with the diffraction order and the third order laser possessed the largest conversion efficiency in this device. The experimental results were in good agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  10. Active cooling of pulse compression diffraction gratings for high energy, high average power ultrafast lasers.

    PubMed

    Alessi, David A; Rosso, Paul A; Nguyen, Hoang T; Aasen, Michael D; Britten, Jerald A; Haefner, Constantin

    2016-12-26

    Laser energy absorption and subsequent heat removal from diffraction gratings in chirped pulse compressors poses a significant challenge in high repetition rate, high peak power laser development. In order to understand the average power limitations, we have modeled the time-resolved thermo-mechanical properties of current and advanced diffraction gratings. We have also developed and demonstrated a technique of actively cooling Petawatt scale, gold compressor gratings to operate at 600W of average power - a 15x increase over the highest average power petawatt laser currently in operation. Combining this technique with low absorption multilayer dielectric gratings developed in our group would enable pulse compressors for petawatt peak power lasers operating at average powers well above 40kW.

  11. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-01

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radial x-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup of ALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a sample in a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser while probing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cell is placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to the beam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while the sample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparent boron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of (Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observed above 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  12. Optimal mapping of x-ray laser diffraction patterns into three dimensions using routing algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassemeyer, Stephan; Jafarpour, Aliakbar; Lomb, Lukas; Steinbrener, Jan; Martin, Andrew V.; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-10-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging with x-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of noncrystalline objects. Randomly oriented particles are exposed to XFEL pulses for acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) diffraction snapshots. The knowledge of their orientations enables 3D imaging by multiview reconstruction, combining 2D diffraction snapshots in different orientations. Here we introduce a globally optimal algorithm that can infer these orientations. We apply it to experimental XFEL data of nanoparticles and so determine their 3D electron density.

  13. Optimal mapping of x-ray laser diffraction patterns into three dimensions using routing algorithms.

    PubMed

    Kassemeyer, Stephan; Jafarpour, Aliakbar; Lomb, Lukas; Steinbrener, Jan; Martin, Andrew V; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-10-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging with x-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of noncrystalline objects. Randomly oriented particles are exposed to XFEL pulses for acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) diffraction snapshots. The knowledge of their orientations enables 3D imaging by multiview reconstruction, combining 2D diffraction snapshots in different orientations. Here we introduce a globally optimal algorithm that can infer these orientations. We apply it to experimental XFEL data of nanoparticles and so determine their 3D electron density.

  14. APPLICATION OF LASERS AND LASER-OPTICAL METHODS IN LIFE SCIENCES On the problem of the diffraction pattern visibility in laser diffractometry of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Lugovtsov, Andrei E.; Priezzhev, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of the visibility of the diffraction pattern that is observed in scattering laser radiation on the erythrocyte suspension in ectacytometer. The theoretical estimates show that 10% variation in the particle size reduces the diffraction pattern visibility by 1% only.

  15. Complex-valued acquisition of the diffraction imaging by incoherent quasimonochromatic light without a support constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Minghui; Xu Jianfei; Wang Xianfu; Wei Qing

    2010-10-15

    A scheme for complex-valued acquisition of the diffraction imaging with quasimonochromatic incoherent light is theoretically proposed. The main idea is to project the real and the imaginary parts of a Fraunhofer diffraction field on intensity distributions, respectively, with the use of a {pi}/2 phase-changing plate. The whole procedure is iterative algorithm free and needs no a priori knowledge of an arbitrary object. A numerical experiment and a quantitative confirmation are also given. To our knowledge, it was the first physical proposal for the complex-valued acquisition of a diffraction imaging by two-dimensional coherent patterns with thermal illumination.

  16. General algorithm to optimize the diffraction efficiency of a phase-type spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Cibula, Matthew A; McIntyre, David H

    2013-08-01

    We present a general approach for optimizing the diffraction efficiency of a phase-type spatial light modulator (SLM). While the SLM displays a one-dimensional phase grating, the phase shift of one pixel in the grating is varied and the first-order diffraction efficiency is measured. This is repeated pixel-by-pixel to find the optimum phase encoding for the device that maximizes the diffraction efficiency. This method compensates for nonlinearity of the modulator phase response and is especially useful for optimizing modulators with less than 2π phase shift.

  17. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  18. Effect of spectral correlations on spectral switches in the diffraction of partially coherent light.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Nemoto, Shojiro; Lü, Baida

    2003-10-01

    The subject is the spectral characteristics of partially coherent light whose spectral degree of coherence satisfies or violates the scaling law in diffraction by a circular aperture. Three kinds of spectral correlations of the incident light are considered. It is shown that no matter whether the partially coherent light satisfies or violates the scaling law, a spectral switch defined as a rapid transition of spectral shifts is always found in the diffraction field. Different spectral correlations of the incident field in the aperture result in different points at which the spectral switch occurs. With an increment in the correlations, the position at which the spectral switch takes place moves toward the point at which the phase of the center frequency component omega0 becomes singular for illumination by spatially fully coherent light. For light that satisfies the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to the diffraction-induced spectral changes; for partially coherent light that violates the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to both the diffraction-induced spectral changes and the correlation-induced spectral changes.

  19. Calculating the Fresnel diffraction of light from a shifted and tilted plane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Ichihashi, Yasuyuki; Senoh, Takanori; Oi, Ryutaro; Kurita, Taiichiro

    2012-06-04

    We propose a technique for calculating the diffraction of light in the Fresnel region from a plane that is the light source (source plane) to a plane at which the diffracted light is to be calculated (destination plane). When the wavefield of the source plane is described by a group of points on a grid, this technique can be used to calculate the wavefield of the group of points on a grid on the destination plane. The positions of both planes may be shifted, and the plane normal vectors of both planes may have different directions. Since a scaled Fourier transform is used for the calculation, it can be calculated faster than calculating the diffraction by a Fresnel transform at each point. This technique can be used to calculate and generate planar holograms from computer graphics data.

  20. Study of the spatial resolution of laser thermochemical technology for recording diffraction microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Veiko, V P; Korol'kov, V I; Poleshchuk, A G; Sametov, A R; Shakhno, E A; Yarchuk, M V

    2011-07-31

    The thermochemical method for recording data, which is based on local laser oxidation of a thin metal film with subsequent etching of the unirradiated region, is an alternative to laser photolithography and direct laser removal of the film material. This recording technology is characterised by the absence of thermal and hydrodynamic image distortions, as in the case of laser ablation, and the number of necessary technological operations is much smaller as compared with the photomask preparation in classical photolithography. The main field of application of the thermochemical technology is the fabrication of diffraction optical elements (DOEs), which are widely used in printers, bar-code readers, CD and DVD laser players, etc. The purpose of this study is to increase the resolution of thermochemical data recording on thin chromium films. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  1. Investigation of correlation properties of light fields by Fresnel diffraction from a step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. R.; Tavassoly, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a new method, based on Fresnel diffraction of light from a step, for the study of correlation properties (temporal and spatial) of optical fields. The method renders to measure wavelength, coherence length, and coherence width by recording the visibility of the diffraction fringes versus optical path difference and spacing of the interfering beams. In addition, the method permits to specify the spectral line shape, particularly, of lights with short coherence lengths and the spatial coherence behavior of the lights with short coherence widths. Since, in the introduced method the optical path difference can be varied by changing the light incident angle, practically, in an interval of 90º, a large volume of data is acquired which leads to reliable and accurate study of the subject. The method can be applied easily using modest equipment. We have applied the method to the study of correlation properties of the lights emitted by LED, incandescent bulb, and Hg lamp.

  2. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  3. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  4. Highly Effective Light Beam Diffraction on Holographic PDLC Photonic Structure, Controllable by the Spatially Inhomogeneous Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkin, A. O.; Sharangovich, S. N.

    In this work the highly effiective light beam diffraction on holographic photonic structure formed in polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLCs) is theoretically described. The ability to manage its diffraction characteristics by the spatially inhomogeneous electric field is also shown.

  5. Rear-Surface Laser Damage on 355-nm Silica Optics Owing to Fresnel Diffraction on Front-Surface Contamination Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génin, François Y.; Feit, Michael D.; Kozlowski, Mark R.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Salleo, Alberto; Yoshiyama, James

    2000-07-01

    Light intensity modulations caused by opaque obstacles (e.g., dust) on silica lenses in high-power lasers often enhance the potential for laser-induced damage. To study this effect, particles (10 250 m) with various shapes were sputter deposited on the input surface and irradiated with a 3-ns laser beam at 355 nm. Although a clean silica surface damages at fluences above 15 J cm 2 , a surface contaminated with particles can damage below 11.5 J cm 2 . A pattern that conforms to the shape of the input surface particle is printed on the output surface. Repetitive illumination resulted in catastrophic drilling of the optic. The damage pattern correlated with an interference image of the particle before irradiation. The image shows that the incident beam undergoes phase (and amplitude) modulations after it passes around the particle. We modeled the experiments by calculating the light intensity distribution behind an obscuration by use of Fresnel diffraction theory. The comparison between calculated light intensity distribution and the output surface damage pattern showed good agreement. The model was then used to predict the increased damage vulnerability that results from intensity modulations as a function of particle size, shape, and lens thickness. The predictions provide the basis for optics cleanliness specifications on the National Ignition Facility to reduce the likelihood of optical damage.

  6. Vectorial analytical description of the polarized light of a high-power laser diode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Wang, Jiajie; Han, Yiping; Wu, Zhensen

    2013-03-10

    A mathematical model to describe the far-field of a high-power laser diode (LD) beam is presented. The laser beam propagation is studied by the vector Rayleigh-Sommerfeld far-field diffraction integral formula The far-field distribution of the LD beam is studied in detail; the light polarized parallel and perpendicular to the junction plane are all considered. This model is employed to predict the light intensity of high-power LDs. The computed intensity distributions are in a good agreement with the corresponding measurements. This model can be easily used to analyze the propagation properties of the high-power LD beam.

  7. Software for portable laser light show system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buruchin, Dmitrey J.; Leonov, Alexander F.

    1995-04-01

    Portable laser light show system LS-3500-10M is connected to the parallel port of IBM PC/AT compatible computer. Computer performs output of digital control data describing images. Specially designed control device is used to convert digital data coming from parallel port to the analog signal driving scanner. Capabilities of even cost nothing 286 computer are quite enough for laser graphics control. Technology of scanning used in laser graphics system LS-3500-10M essentially differs from widely spread systems based on galvanometers with mobile core or with mobile magnet. Such devices are based on the same principle of work as electrically driven servo-mechanism. As scanner we use elastic system with hydraulic dampen oscillations and opened loop. For most of applications of laser graphics such system provides satisfactory precision and speed of scanning. LS-3500-10M software gives user ability to create on PC and play his own laser graphics demonstrations. It is possible to render recognizable text and pictures using different styles, 3D and abstract animation. All types of demonstrations can be mixed in slide-show. Time synchronization is supported. Software has the following features: (1) Different types of text output. Built-in text editor for typing and editing of textural information. Different fonts can be used to display text. User can create his own fonts using specially developed font editor. (2) Editor of 3D animation with library of predefined shapes. (3) Abstract animation provided by software routines. (4) Support of different graphics files formats (PCX or DXF). Original algorithm of raster image tracing was implemented. (5) Built-in slide-show editor.

  8. Indetermination of particle sizing by laser diffraction in the anomalous size ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Linchao; Ge, Baozhen; Zhang, Fugen

    2017-09-01

    The laser diffraction method is widely used to measure particle size distributions. It is generally accepted that the scattering angle becomes smaller and the angles to the location of the main peak of scattered energy distributions in laser diffraction instruments shift to smaller values with increasing particle size. This specific principle forms the foundation of the laser diffraction method. However, this principle is not entirely correct for non-absorbing particles in certain size ranges and these particle size ranges are called anomalous size ranges. Here, we derive the analytical formulae for the bounds of the anomalous size ranges and discuss the influence of the width of the size segments on the signature of the Mie scattering kernel. This anomalous signature of the Mie scattering kernel will result in an indetermination of the particle size distribution when measured by laser diffraction instruments in the anomalous size ranges. By using the singular-value decomposition method we interpret the mechanism of occurrence of this indetermination in detail and then validate its existence by using inversion simulations.

  9. Diffractive optics development for application on high-power solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bett, Thomas H.; Stevenson, R. M.; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R.; Miller, J. M.; Lightbody, Malcolm T. M.; Blair, Paul; Layet, Ben; Watson, Norman F.; Barton, Ian M.; Robb, Graeme; McMonagle, J.

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports on the development of several diffractive optical elements (DOE) to fulfill applications on high power Nd glass laser systems. The measured performance for those components realized is discussed. These are focusing beam samplers, beam shapers, and harmonic separation filters (HSF). Designs of more demanding components operating in the resonance domain are also presented. These are linear polarizing elements and beam deflectors.

  10. Nanosecond X-ray diffraction from biological samples with a laser-produced plasma source.

    PubMed

    Frankel, R D; Forsyth, J M

    1979-05-11

    By using 4.45-angstrom radiation generated by Cl+15 ions in a laser plasma and nanosecond exposures, low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns were obtained from dried rat spinal nerves and a powder of cholesterol. Three to four 400-picosecond, 45-joule pulses were required for the exposure. This new technique should have wide application in structural kinetic studies.

  11. Photoelectron dynamics in x-ray free-electron-laser diffractive imaging of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P

    2012-06-08

    X-ray free electron lasers hold the promise of enabling atomic-resolution diffractive imaging of single biological molecules. We develop a hybrid continuum-particle model to describe the x-ray induced damage and find that the photoelectron dynamics and electrostatic confinement strongly affect the time scale of the damage processes. These phenomena are not fully captured in hydrodynamic modeling approaches.

  12. Measuring Particle Size Distribution using Laser Diffraction: Implications for Predicting Soil Hydraulic Properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methods to predict soil hydraulic properties frequently require information on the particle size distribution (PSD). The objectives of this study were to investigate various protocols for rapidly measuring PSD using the laser diffraction technique, compare the obtained PSDs with those determined usi...

  13. Beat the diffraction limit in 3D direct laser writing in photosensitive glass.

    PubMed

    Bellec, Matthieu; Royon, Arnaud; Bousquet, Bruno; Bourhis, Kevin; Treguer, Mona; Cardinal, Thierry; Richardson, Martin; Canioni, Lionel

    2009-06-08

    Three-dimensional (3D) femtosecond laser direct structuring in transparent materials is widely used for photonic applications. However, the structure size is limited by the optical diffraction. Here we report on a direct laser writing technique that produces subwavelength nanostructures independently of the experimental limiting factors. We demonstrate 3D nanostructures of arbitrary patterns with feature sizes down to 80 nm, less than one tenth of the laser processing wavelength. Its ease of implementation for novel nanostructuring, with its accompanying high precision will open new opportunities for the fabrication of nanostructures for plasmonic and photonic devices and for applications in metamaterials.

  14. Generating A Strobed Laser Light Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Franke, John M.; Rhodes, David B.; Jones, Stephen B.

    1994-01-01

    An optoelectronic system generating synchronous, strobed sheet of laser light developed for use in making visible flow of air about model helicopter rotor. Used in wind-tunnel tests to determine actual locations of vortices for comparison with locations predicted by mathematical models to validate models. Each blade tip produces vortex. By establishing successive vortex locations, researcher determines trajectory of vortex pattern. Light-sheet strobe circuits provide selection of blade positions, strobe-pulse durations, and multiple pulses per revolution for rotors having two to nine blades. To make flow visible, vaporizing propylene glycol injected upstream of model. System also provides calibrated trigger delay of strobe pulses, adjustable strobe-pulse durations, selectable number of blades, and slip-sync mode to make flow visible as though in slow motion.

  15. Diffraction-free light droplets for axially-resolved volume imaging.

    PubMed

    Antonacci, G; Domenico, G Di; Silvestri, S; DelRe, E; Ruocco, G

    2017-12-01

    An ideal direct imaging system entails a method to illuminate on command a single diffraction-limited region in a generally thick and turbid volume. The best approximation to this is the use of large-aperture lenses that focus light into a spot. This strategy fails for regions that are embedded deep into the sample, where diffraction and scattering prevail. Airy beams and Bessel beams are solutions of the Helmholtz Equation that are both non-diffracting and self-healing, features that make them naturally able to outdo the effects of distance into the volume but intrinsically do not allow resolution along the propagation axis. Here, we demonstrate diffraction-free self-healing three-dimensional monochromatic light spots able to penetrate deep into the volume of a sample, resist against deflection in turbid environments, and offer axial resolution comparable to that of Gaussian beams. The fields, formed from coherent mixtures of Bessel beams, manifest a more than ten-fold increase in their undistorted penetration, even in turbid milk solutions, compared to diffraction-limited beams. In a fluorescence imaging scheme, we find a ten-fold increase in image contrast compared to diffraction-limited illuminations, and a constant axial resolution even after four Rayleigh lengths. Results pave the way to new opportunities in three-dimensional microscopy.

  16. Assessment of Multiple Scattering Errors of Laser Diffraction Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-17

    Rosin - Rammler or log-normal size distribution. With the multiple scattering correction, the 2600c instrument has been reported to be accurate at...geared toward providing maximum accuracy in a volume mean diameter. Figures 2 and 3 are plots of percent error in measured D43 as a function of light...data is defined for the volume distribution as; = [ •(D)D(D- ,3• 1/ 2 Yr (D)-,3(D)3D43 eqn. (3) Figure 6 contains plots of measurement error, expressed

  17. Eyesafe diffraction-limited single-frequency 1-ns pulsewidth Er:YAG laser transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneman, Robert C.; Hartman, Ross; Schneider, Eric A.; Garvin, Charles G.; Henderson, Sammy W.

    2007-04-01

    We report an eyesafe diffraction-limited single-frequency 1617 nm Er:YAG laser transmitter for coherent laser radar applications. The transmitter utilizes a master oscillator/power amplifier architecture, enabling the production of high peak power output. The pulsed oscillator is Q-switched and cavity-dumped, resulting in a 1.1 ns pulsewidth. The pulsed oscillator is injection-seeded by a commercial 1617 nm CW distributed feedback laser diode, resulting in single longitudinal mode output. The oscillator and amplifier are directly pumped into the Er:YAG laser upper state by commercial diode-pumped CW 1533 nm Yb,Er-doped fiber lasers. The injection-seeded pulsed oscillator produces an average output power of 2.2 W at 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) with a pulsewidth of 1.1 ns (0.20 MW peak power) with a beam quality 1.1 times the diffraction limit. The oscillator has a slope efficiency of 47% in the CW mode, and a conversion efficiency of 85% from CW mode to injection-seeded pulsed mode. The power amplifier produces 20 W in the CW mode with an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 34% and a beam quality 1.1 times the diffraction limit, and 6.5 W in the pulsed mode at 10 kHz PRF with 1.1 ns pulsewidth (0.59 MW peak power).

  18. Evidence for inhibited diffraction of light propagating through nanolaminate metallodielectric material.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M J; Guenthner, Andrew; Feng, Simin

    2007-09-17

    We report the fabrication and characterization of laterally continuous silver layers alternated with glassy amorphous polycarbonate films with the thickness of each layer much less than the wavelength. Such films exhibit physical phenomena associated with the coupled plasmon resonances. We have characterized light propagation through the resulting metal-dielectric (MD) periodic structures using collection mode Near Field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM). In agreement with published theoretical models, our experiments provide evidence that diffraction can be inhibited for light propagating through metallodielectric nanolaminate.

  19. Green laser light activates the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Balster, Sven; Zhang, Kaiyin; Lim, Hubert H.; Reich, Uta; Massow, Ole; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Guenter

    2009-07-01

    The hearing performance with conventional hearing aids and cochlear implants is dramatically reduced in noisy environments and for sounds more complex than speech (e. g. music), partially due to the lack of localized sensorineural activation across different frequency regions with these devices. Laser light can be focused in a controlled manner and may provide more localized activation of the inner ear, the cochlea. We sought to assess whether visible light with parameters that could induce an optoacoustic effect (532 nm, 10-ns pulses) would activate the cochlea. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded preoperatively in anesthetized guinea pigs to confirm normal hearing. After opening the bulla, a 50-μm core-diameter optical fiber was positioned in the round window niche and directed toward the basilar membrane. Optically induced ABRs (OABRs), similar in shape to those of acoustic stimulation, were elicited with single pulses. The OABR peaks increased with energy level (0.6 to 23 μJ/pulse) and remained consistent even after 30 minutes of continuous stimulation at 13 μJ, indicating minimal or no stimulation-induced damage within the cochlea. Our findings demonstrate that visible light can effectively and reliably activate the cochlea without any apparent damage. Further studies are in progress to investigate the frequency-specific nature and mechanism of green light cochlear activation.

  20. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs.

  1. Spin-orbit interaction of light and diffraction of polarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr Ya

    2017-08-01

    The edge diffraction of a homogeneously polarized light beam is studied theoretically based on the paraxial optics and Fresnel-Kirchhoff approximation, and the dependence of the diffracted beam pattern of the incident beam polarization is predicted. If the incident beam is circularly polarized, the trajectory of the diffracted beam center of gravity exhibits a small angular deviation from the geometrically expected direction. The deviation is parallel to the screen edge and reverses the sign with the polarization handedness; it is explicitly calculated for the case of a Gaussian incident beam with a plane wavefront. This effect is a manifestation of the spin-orbit interaction of light and can be interpreted as a revelation of the internal spin energy flow immanent in circularly polarized beams. It also exposes the vortex character of the weak longitudinal field component associated with the circularly polarized incident beam.

  2. Polarization sensitivity of light diffraction for periodic array of anisotropic gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ming-shan Liu, Tung-kai; Tsen, Chun-yu; Ting, Chen-ching

    2015-06-15

    This article aims to analyze the first order diffraction intensity of the incident polarized light which is diffracted by the gold nanoparticles array in terms of the surface plasmon effect. The inspected gold nanoparticles array films are built in grating pattern with stripe thickness of 4 μm and diameters of gold nanoparticles ca. 10–56 nm, which are formed by annealing at temperatures of 400, 450, 500, and 550 °C, respectively. The probing light is linearly polarized with wavelengths of 450–800 nm and counterclockwise turns its polarization direction from 0° to 90° during measurements. The results show that the diffraction intensity depends on the anisotropic configuration samples which gold nanoparticles are orientated by analyzing the scanning electron microscope images. It results that the localized surface plasmon effect induced by incident field depends on orientation and causes the sample polarization-sensitive.

  3. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Dörner, Katerina; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Grant, Thomas D.; Nelson, Garrett; James, Daniel; Calero, Guillermo; Wachter, Rebekka M.; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also permit an analysis

  4. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Dörner, Katerina; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Grant, Thomas D.; Nelson, Garrett; James, Daniel; Calero, Guillermo; Wachter, Rebekka M.; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2015-08-19

    We report that the advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ~4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. Ultimately, this method will also

  5. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; ...

    2015-08-19

    We report that the advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles canmore » be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ~4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. Ultimately, this method

  6. Adaptive Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Hirleman, E D; Dellenback, P A

    1989-11-15

    Integration of a magnetooptic spatial light modulator into a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument is proposed and demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. The concept gives the instrument the ability to reconfigure a detector array on-line and thereby adapt to the measurement context.

  7. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  8. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  9. Small bore ceramic laser tube inspection light table

    DOEpatents

    Updike, Earl O.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for inspecting small bore ceramic laser tubes, which includes a support base with one or more support rollers. A fluorescent light tube is inserted within the laser tube and the laser tube is supported by the support rollers so that a gap is maintained between the laser tube and the fluorescent tube to enable rotation of the laser tube. In operation, the ceramic tube is illuminated from the inside by the fluorescent tube to facilitate visual inspection. Centering the tube around the axial light of the fluorescent tube provides information about straightness and wall thickness of the laser tube itself.

  10. Fraunhofer diffraction of Laguerre-Gaussian laser beam by helical axicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topuzoski, S.

    2014-11-01

    In this article we present a theoretical study for Fraunhofer diffraction of a Laguerre-Gaussian laser beam with “0” radial mode number and “l” azimuthal mode number (LG0l) by helical axicon. Analytical expressions describing the diffracted wave field amplitude and intensity distributions in the back focal plane of a convergent lens are derived in a form of product of a Gauss-doughnut function and a sum of hypergeometric Kummer functions. Also, the diffracted LG beam by axicon only, as well as by spiral phase plate only, and the diffracted Gaussian beam by helical axicon, are described mathematically in the back focal plane of a convergent lens. Different possibilities for obtaining output vortex beam with reduced or increased topological charge compared to that of the incident beam, or for obtaining chargeless beam are analyzed.

  11. Femtosecond powder diffraction with a laser-driven hard X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, F; Ansari, Z; Woerner, M; Elsaesser, T

    2010-01-18

    X-ray powder diffraction with a femtosecond time resolution is introduced to map ultrafast structural dynamics of polycrystalline condensed matter. Our pump-probe approach is based on photoexcitation of a powder sample with a femtosecond optical pulse and probing changes of its structure by diffracting a hard X-ray pulse generated in a laser-driven plasma source. We discuss the key aspects of this scheme including an analysis of detection sensitivity and angular resolution. Applying this technique to the prototype molecular material ammonium sulfate, up to 20 powder diffraction rings are recorded simultaneously with a time resolution of 100 fs. We describe how to derive transient charge density maps of the material from the extensive set of diffraction data in a quantitative way.

  12. Laser-Based Lighting: Experimental Analysis and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Trivellin, Nicola; Yushchenko, Maksym; Buffolo, Matteo; De Santi, Carlo; Meneghini, Matteo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Zanoni, Enrico

    2017-10-11

    This paper presents an extensive analysis of the operating principles, theoretical background, advantages and limitations of laser-based lighting systems. In the first part of the paper we discuss the main advantages and issues of laser-based lighting, and present a comparison with conventional LED-lighting technology. In the second part of the paper, we present original experimental data on the stability and reliability of phosphor layers for laser lighting, based on high light-intensity and high-temperature degradation tests. In the third part of the paper (for the first time) we present a detailed comparison between three different solutions for laser lighting, based on (i) transmissive phosphor layers; (ii) a reflective/angled phosphor layer; and (iii) a parabolic reflector, by discussing the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. The results presented within this paper can be used as a guideline for the development of advanced lighting systems based on laser diodes.

  13. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence, John C. H.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump–probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  14. Ghost imaging and ghost diffraction with pseudo-thermal light generated by means of a programmable SLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capeluto, M. G.; Duisterwinkel, H.; Schmiegelow, C. T.; Francisco, D.; Ledesma, S.; Iemmi, C.

    2011-01-01

    Ghost imaging and ghost diffraction are techniques in which information about the object or about its diffraction pattern is extracted by measuring the correlation between a reference beam and a beam that passes through the object. Although first experiments were carried on by using entangled photons, it was demonstrated that this technique can be performed by splitting incoherent pseudo-thermal radiation such as that obtained with a laser passing through a moving diffuser. In this work we implemented the use of a programmable phase spatial light modulator (SLM) in order to replace the rotating ground glass. In this way the random phase distributions obtained from the moving diffuser can be emulated by displaying onto the SLM different realizations of a random function with uniform distribution. Based on the programmability of the modulator we have studied the influence of diverse parameters such as speckle size or phase distributions in the final image quality. We carry on the experiment for two different cases ghost imaging and far field ghost diffraction.

  15. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J; Spence, John C H; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-07-17

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Note: Laser beam scanning using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Abhijit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2014-04-15

    In this work we describe laser beam scanning using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator. Commercially available ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulators are capable of displaying 85 colored images in 1 s using a time dithering technique. Each colored image, in fact, comprises 24 single bit (black and white) images displayed sequentially. We have used each single bit image to write a binary phase hologram. For a collimated laser beam incident on the hologram, one of the diffracted beams can be made to travel along a user defined direction. We have constructed a beam scanner employing the above arrangement and demonstrated its use to scan a single laser beam in a laser scanning optical sectioning microscope setup.

  17. Measurement of thermal energy coupling to metallic materials in millisecond laser based on optical diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huazhong; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu; Shen, Zhonghua; Zhang, Hongchao

    2017-05-01

    A method which is based on the theory of Fraunhofer diffraction, thermal expansion effect, as well as lumped parameter approximation is presented to measure the laser absorptance of metallic materials under the irradiation of pulse laser. Experiments were made in a vacuum condition, using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser at wavelength of 1064 nm and pulse duration of 0.4 ms. Fine copper wires with bare and oxidized surfaces were respectively studied as samples. In order to eliminate the complicated influence of laser ablation, the intensities used in this work were all below the damage threshold of copper. With this approach the quantitative result of coupling efficiency is obtained by analyzing the fringe spacing of diffraction without the temperature measurement. The experimental result shows a dramatic increase in laser absorptance from 0.03 (bare copper) to 0.09 (oxidized copper), implying that the efficiency of laser energy coupling to metals can be influenced significantly by surface oxidation. In addition, the average temperature rise and diameter variation of samples are calculated by the proposed method and compared with the results of simulation. Furthermore, an additional test that painted sample wire get a permanent damage is performed and discussed.

  18. Adaptability of laser diffraction measurement technique in soil physics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Gyöngyi; Szabó, József; Rajkai, Kálmán; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor; László, Péter; Hauk, Gabriella; Makó, András

    2016-04-01

    There are intentions all around the world to harmonize soils' particle size distribution (PSD) data by the laser diffractometer measurements (LDM) to that of the sedimentation techniques (pipette or hydrometer methods). Unfortunately, up to the applied methodology (e. g. type of pre-treatments, kind of dispersant etc.), PSDs of the sedimentation methods (due to different standards) are dissimilar and could be hardly harmonized with each other, as well. A need was arisen therefore to build up a database, containing PSD values measured by the pipette method according to the Hungarian standard (MSZ-08. 0205: 1978) and the LDM according to a widespread and widely used procedure. In our current publication the first results of statistical analysis of the new and growing PSD database are presented: 204 soil samples measured with pipette method and LDM (Malvern Mastersizer 2000, HydroG dispersion unit) were compared. Applying usual size limits at the LDM, clay fraction was highly under- and silt fraction was overestimated compared to the pipette method. Subsequently soil texture classes determined from the LDM measurements significantly differ from results of the pipette method. According to previous surveys and relating to each other the two dataset to optimizing, the clay/silt boundary at LDM was changed. Comparing the results of PSDs by pipette method to that of the LDM, in case of clay and silt fractions the modified size limits gave higher similarities. Extension of upper size limit of clay fraction from 0.002 to 0.0066 mm, and so change the lower size limit of silt fractions causes more easy comparability of pipette method and LDM. Higher correlations were found between clay content and water vapor adsorption, specific surface area in case of modified limit, as well. Texture classes were also found less dissimilar. The difference between the results of the two kind of PSD measurement methods could be further reduced knowing other routinely analyzed soil parameters

  19. Violet Laser Diode Enables Lighting Communication.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Yu-Fang; Wu, Tsai-Chen; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Li-Yin; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2017-09-05

    Violet laser diode (VLD) based white-light source with high color rendering index (CRI) for lighting communication is implemented by covering with Y3Al5O12:Ce(3+) (YAG:Ce) or Lu3Al5O12:Ce(3+)/CaAlSiN3:Eu(2+) (LuAG:Ce/CASN:Eu) phosphorous diffuser plates. After passing the beam of VLD biased at 70 mA (~2I th ) through the YAG:Ce phosphorous diffuser, a daylight with a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5068 K and a CRI of 65 is acquired to provide a forward error correction (FEC) certified data rate of 4.4 Gbit/s. By using the VLD biased at 122 mA (~3.5I th ) to excite the LuAG:Ce/CASN:Eu phosphorous diffuser with 0.85-mm thickness, a warm white-light source with a CCT of 2700 K and a CRI of 87.9 is obtained at a cost of decreasing transmission capacity to 2.4 Gbit/s. Thinning the phosphor thickness to 0.75 mm effectively reduces the required bias current by 32 mA to achieve the same CCT for the delivered white light, which offers an enlarged CRI of 89.1 and an increased data rate of 4.4 Gbit/s. Further enlarging the bias current to 105 mA remains the white-light transmission capacity at 4.4 Gbit/s but reveals an increased CCT of 3023 K and an upgraded CRI of 91.5.

  20. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-11-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such experiments. It would, however, be possible for students to analyze data from scientific experiments by analogy to experiments they themselves had performed. Based on this rationale, this paper describes two pairs of experiments that may be of interest to teachers aiming to teach the wave nature of light and of particles to upper secondary school (or to college) students. Specifically, students are asked to (i) carry out a double-slit experiment by using monochromatic light, thus repeating in a way the historical experiment of Young,1 and then analyze real data from Jönsson's2-3 scientific double-slit experiment with electrons, and (ii) perform an experiment involving diffraction of monochromatic light using a compact disc (CD) as a reflection grating, and then by analogy analyze data from the experiment of Davisson and Germer.4 The proposed real experiments are not original, and different versions of them have been wi dely described in the literature.5,6 The educational value of the present work lies in the use of the analogy between experiments carried out in the school lab and experiments performed in the scientific lab.

  1. Light trapping by backside diffraction gratings in silicon solar cells revisited.

    PubMed

    Wellenzohn, Markus; Hainberger, Rainer

    2012-01-02

    This numerical study investigates the influence of rectangular backside diffraction gratings on the efficiency of silicon solar cells. Backside gratings are used to diffract incident light to large propagation angles beyond the angle of total internal reflection, which can significantly increase the interaction length of long wavelength photons inside the silicon layer and thus enhance the efficiency. We investigate the influence of the silicon thickness on the optimum grating period and modulation depth by a simulation method which combines a 2D ray tracing algorithm with rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) for calculating the grating diffraction efficiencies. The optimization was performed for gratings with period lengths ranging from 0.25 µm to 1.5 µm and modulation depths ranging from 25 nm to 400 nm under the assumption of normal light incidence. This study shows that the achievable efficiency improvement of silicon solar cells by means of backside diffraction gratings strongly depends on the proper choice of the grating parameters for a given silicon thickness. The relationship between the optimized grating parameters resulting in maximum photocurrent densities and the silicon thickness is determined. Moreover, the thicknesses of silicon solar cells with and without optimized backside diffraction gratings providing the same photocurrent densities are compared.

  2. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    PubMed Central

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  3. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-08-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy.

  4. LIGHT MODULATION: Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdich, L. N.; Yushkov, K. B.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2009-04-01

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 μm.

  5. Two-mirrored galvanometer laser light sheet generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, B. D.; Franke, J. M.; Jones, S. B.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    Light sheets generated with either laser or noncoherent sources have found widespread application to flow visualization. Previous light sheet generating systems were usually dedicated to a specific viewing geometry. The technique with the most flexibility is the galvanometer mirror based laser light sheet system. A two-mirrored system was designed and developed to provide flexibility and adaptability to a wide range of applications. The design includes the capability to control the size and location of the laser light sheet in real time, to generate horizontal or vertical sheets, to sweep the sheet repeatedly through a volume, to generate multiple sheets with controllable separation and to rotate single or multiple laser light sheets. The system is capable of producing up to 12 sheets of laser light at an angular divergence of + or - 20 degrees. Maximum scan rate of any one line is 500 Hertz. This system has proven to be uniquely versatile and a patent has been applied for.

  6. Diffraction characteristics of a Fresnel zone plate illuminated by 10 fs laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, HaiFeng; Li, JianChao; Doerr, David W; Alexander, Dennis R

    2006-11-20

    Results of experimental and theoretical work performed to compare diffraction patterns and focal distributions of a Fresnel zone plate illuminated by ultrashort 10 fs pulsed and cw laser beams are presented. It is shown that the foci intensities of 10 fs pulses are considerably lower than those of cw beams while the focal widths in the axial and radial directions are broadened. Calculations also indicate the spectral modulation along the center of the diffraction patterns. These phenomena are explained by the coherent superposition of the composing frequency content.

  7. Reconstruction of three-dimensional molecular structure from diffraction of laser-aligned molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Makhija, Varun; Kumarappan, Vinod; Centurion, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction from laser-aligned molecules has been proposed as a method for determining 3-D molecular structures in the gas phase. However, existing structural retrieval algorithms are limited by the imperfect alignment in experiments and the rotational averaging in 1-D alignment. Here, we demonstrate a two-step reconstruction comprising a genetic algorithm that corrects for the imperfect alignment followed by an iterative phase retrieval method in cylindrical coordinates. The algorithm was tested with simulated diffraction patterns. We show that the full 3-D structure of trifluorotoluene, an asymmetric-top molecule, can be reconstructed with atomic resolution. PMID:26798781

  8. Bragg diffraction for normal and obliquely circularly polarized light due a new chiral mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Manzanares-Martinez, J.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Rosas-Burgos, A.; Lizola, Josue; Clark, Marielena; Palma, Lillian

    2015-09-01

    We have found experimentally the transmittance of normal incident circularly polarized light due to new chiral mixture that was distorted by electric field. The chiral mixture was achieved by mixtures of two nematic liquid crystals (5OCB and 5CB) and S-1-bromo-2-methylbutane. We have found a regime of circular Bragg diffraction for certain values of concentrations and thickness. Optical diffraction phenomenon have received particular attention in research for optical and electro-optical applications, such as low -voltage modulators, reflective phase gratings and smart reflectors.

  9. Nonreciprocal diffraction of light based on double-transition-assisted photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Li, Yanfeng

    2016-10-01

    We propose a nonreciprocal diffraction system based on the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. The implementation utilizes the simultaneous up and down photonic transition of Bloch modes in a dielectric grating created by time-harmonic dielectric constant modulation. This double transition process generates opposite effective magnetic fluxes for photons in symmetric and antisymmetric modes, which gives rise to nonreciprocal spatial interference between them. With the broken time-reversal symmetry, this system is possible to exhibit unidirectional highly efficient diffraction, which enables grating-based nonmagnetic isolation and circulation of free space light, and integrates the functions of gratings and isolators.

  10. Robotic visible-light laser adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-12-01

    Robo-AO is the first autonomous laser adaptive optics system and science instrument operating on sky. With minimal human oversight, the system robotically executes large scale surveys, monitors long-term astrophysical dynamics and characterizes newly discovered transients, all at the visible diffraction limit. The adaptive optics setup time, from the end of the telescope slew to the beginning of an observation, is a mere ~50-60 s, enabling over 200 observations per night. The first of many envisioned systems has finished 58 nights of science observing at the Palomar Observatory 60-inch (1.5 m) telescope, with over 6,400 robotic observations executed thus far. The system will be augmented in late 2013 with a low-noise wide field infrared camera, which doubles as a tip-tilt sensor, to widen the spectral bandwidth of observations and increase available sky coverage while also enabling deeper visible imaging using adaptive-optics sharpened infrared tip-tilt guide sources. Techniques applicable to larger telescope systems will also be tested: the infrared camera will be used to demonstrate advanced multiple region-of-interest tip-tilt guiding methods, and a visitor instrument port will be used for evaluation of other instrumentation, e.g. single-mode and photonic fibers to feed compact spectrographs.

  11. Metallic surfaces decontamination by using laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier

    2013-07-01

    Metal surface cleaning appears to be one of the major priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. The research and the development of a new technology that is able to meet the actual requirements (i.e. waste volume minimization, liquid effluents and chemicals free process...) seems to be the main commitment. Currently, a wide panel of technologies already exists (e.g. blasting, disk sander, electro-decontamination...) but for some of them, the efficiency is limited (e.g, Dry Ice blasting) and for others, the wastes production (liquid and/or solid) remains an important issue. One answer could be the use of a LASER light process. Since a couple of years, the Clean- Up Business Unit of the AREVA group investigates this decontamination technology. Many tests have been already performed in inactive (i.e. on simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides) or active conditions (i.e. pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and metallic pieces covered with grease). The paper will describe the results obtained in term of decontamination efficiency during all our validation process. Metallographic characterizations (i.e. SEM, X-ray scattering) and radiological analysis will be provided. We will also focus our paper on the future deployment of the LASER technology and its commercial use at La Hague reprocessing facility in 2013. (authors)

  12. Diffuse Reflection of Laser Light From Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Davis, A.; McGill, M.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light reflected from an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution defines the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing retrieval of that important quantity. We describe a laboratory simulation of G, useful in design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness. Clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The size distribution extends from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, roughly lognormal, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so photon mean-free-path is about 10 cm, 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a Nd:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting PMTs, with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls position and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider,and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns. Step size is selectable. Far from the beam, the rate of exponential increase in the beam direction scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, independent of particle size. Nearer the beam the signal increases faster than exponential and depends on particle size. Results verify 3D Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate detectability of remotely sensed offbeam returns, without filters at night, with narrow bandpass filter in day.

  13. Diffuse Reflection of Laser Light From Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Davis, A.; McGill, M.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light reflected from an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution defines the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing retrieval of that important quantity. We describe a laboratory simulation of G, useful in design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness. Clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The size distribution extends from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, roughly lognormal, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so photon mean-free-path is about 10 cm, 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a Nd:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting PMTs, with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls position and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider,and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns. Step size is selectable. Far from the beam, the rate of exponential increase in the beam direction scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, independent of particle size. Nearer the beam the signal increases faster than exponential and depends on particle size. Results verify 3D Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate detectability of remotely sensed offbeam returns, without filters at night, with narrow bandpass filter in day.

  14. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Yuta; Wang, Chuncheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Okunishi, Misaki; Ding, Dajun; Lin, C. D.; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Here, we have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatial resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a “molecular movie” of the dynamic system may be created with sub-A°ngstrom spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions.

  15. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuta; Wang, Chuncheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Okunishi, Misaki; Ding, Dajun; Lin, C. D.; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatial resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a “molecular movie” of the dynamic system may be created with sub-Ångström spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions. PMID:27462650

  16. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Ito, Yuta; Wang, Chuncheng; Le, Anh-Thu; ...

    2016-05-01

    Here, we have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatialmore » resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a “molecular movie” of the dynamic system may be created with sub-A°ngstrom spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions.« less

  17. Creation of vector beams from a polarization diffraction grating using a programmable liquid crystal spatial light modulator and a q-plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badham, Katherine Emily

    This thesis presents the ability of complete polarization control of light to create a polarization diffraction grating (PDG). This system has the ability to create diffracted light with each order having a separate high-order polarization state in one location on the optical axis. First, an external Excel program is used to create a grating phase profile from userspecified target diffraction orders. High-order vector beams in this PDG are created using a combination of two devices---a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) manufactured by Seiko Epson, and a tunable q -plate from Citizen Holdings Co. The transmissive SLM is positioned in an optical setup with a reflective architecture allowing control over both the horizontal and vertical components of the laser beam. The SLM has its LC director oriented vertically only affecting the vertically polarized state, however, the optical setup allows modulation of both vertical and horizontal components by the use of a quarter-wave plate (QWP) and a mirror to rotate the polarizations 90 degrees. Each half of the SLM is encoded with an anisotropic phase-only diffraction grating which are superimposed to create a select number of orders with the desired polarization states and equally distributed intensity. The technique of polarimetry is used to confirm the polarization state of each diffraction order. The q-plate is an inhomogeneous birefringent waveplate which has the ability to convert zero-order vector beams into first-order vector beams. The physical placement of this device into the system converts the orders with zero-order polarization states to first-order polarization states. The light vector patterns of each diffraction order confirm which first-order polarization state of is produced. A specially made PDG sextuplicator is encoded onto the SLM to generate six diffraction orders with separate states of polarization.

  18. Light pollution generated by laser guide star at Canarian Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chueca, Sergio; Fuensalida, Jesus J.

    2004-11-01

    A new generation of instrument using a launching laser is been developed to correct the atmospheric image blurring and to establish optical communication with space. Then, light pollution generated by laser will be a serious operational problem in next years. This laser could affect astronomical works of adjacent telescopes when the laser lay across the field of view of the observing telescope, this is a kind of light pollution. This could be avoided with an adequate operational politic to detect possible interference between the laser and the astronomical telescopes. In this paper is analysed the mathematical probability of a cross-event happen.

  19. Twin-Mirrored-Galvanometer Laser-Light-Sheet Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, David B.; Franke, John M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1991-01-01

    Multiple, rotating laser-light sheets generated to illuminate flows in wind tunnels. Designed and developed to provide flexibility and adaptability to wide range of applications. Design includes capability to control size and location of laser-light sheet in real time, to generate horizontal or vertical sheets, to sweep sheet repeatedly through volume, to generate multiple sheets with controllable separation, and to rotate single or multiple laser-light sheets. Includes electronic equipment and laser mounted on adjustable-height platform. Twin-mirrored galvanometer unit supported by tripod to reduce vibration. Other possible applications include use in construction industry to align beams of building. Artistic or display applications also possible.

  20. NASA Laser Light Scattering Advanced Technology Development Workshop, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to explore the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware and to assess user requirements and needs for a laser light scattering instrument in a reduced gravity environment. The workshop addressed experimental needs and stressed hardware development.

  1. Diffraction losses of Nd:YAG and Yb:YAG laser crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenjie; Kwon, Young; Tam, Siu-Chung; Lam, Yee-Loy

    2001-03-01

    Based on space-dependent rate equations, the lowest threshold input power for a diode end-pumped solid-state laser is obtained for the pump spot size wp→0. However, as the pump beam waist is decreased, the thermally induced effects in the laser rod would be very high. Diffraction losses caused by radial and tangential variations of refractive index have been analyzed and compared for the Nd : YAG and the Yb : YAG at room temperature ( 300 K) and liquid-nitrogen temperature ( 77 K).

  2. Acousto-optic diffraction of multicolour Ar-laser radiation in crystalline quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M; Averin, S V; Voronko, A I; Kuznetsov, P I; Tikhomirov, S A; Shkerdin, G N; Bulyuk, A N

    2015-10-31

    We have studied acousto-optic Bragg diffraction of multicolour radiation, generated by an Ar laser in the blue-green region of the spectrum, on an acoustic wave propagating in crystalline quartz. It is shown that crystalline quartz significantly exceeds commonly used paratellurite in terms of phase matching of optical beams with a single acoustic wave. We have performed experiments on pulse modulation of Ar-laser radiation. It is shown that distortions introduced into optical pulses are substantially less when use is made of a quartz crystal rather than paratellurite. (acoustooptics)

  3. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, T.; Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Reis, D. A.; Wang, X. J.; Dürr, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  4. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, T.; Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Dürr, H. A.; Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Wang, X. J.; Reis, D. A.

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  5. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, T.; Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Reis, D. A.; Wang, X. J.; Dürr, H. A.

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  6. Near-diffraction-limited diode end-pumped 2 µm Tm:YAG Innoslab laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haitao; Liu, Pian; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Hui; Jin, Lin; Shen, Deyuan

    2017-04-01

    A compact, near-diffraction-limited laser diode end-pumped 2 µm Tm:YAG Innoslab laser was demonstrated for the first time. A maximum output power of 36.4 W was achieved under the incident pump power of 184 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 23.4% with respect to the incident pump power. The beam quality factors M 2 were measured to be 1.44 in the stable direction and 1.23 in the unstable direction.

  7. High coherent bi-chromatic laser with gigahertz splitting produced by the high diffraction orders of acousto-optic modulator used for coherent population trapping experiments.

    PubMed

    Yun, Peter; Tan, Bozhong; Deng, Wei; Gu, Sihong

    2011-12-01

    To prepare the coherent population trapping (CPT) states with rubidium and cesium, the commonly used atoms in CPT studies, a coherent bi-chromatic light field with frequency difference of several GHz is a basic requirement. With a 200 MHz center frequency acousto-optic modulator (AOM), we have realized bi-chromatic laser fields with several GHz frequency splits through high diffraction orders. We have experimentally studied the coherence between two frequency components of a bi-chromatic laser beam, which is composed of ±6 orders with frequency split of 3 GHz diffracted from the same laser beam, and the measured residual phase noise is Δφ(2)<0.019 rad(2). The bi-chromatic laser fields were used to prepare CPT states with (85)Rb and (87)Rb atoms, and high contrast CPT signals were obtained. For CPT states preparation, our study result shows that it is a feasible approach to generate the bi-chromatic light field with larger frequency splits through high diffraction orders of AOM.

  8. Revealing modes from controlling an off-optical axis conical diffraction laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenier, Alain

    2017-10-01

    Thanks to controlling the off-optical axis propagation in the monoclinic KGd(WO4)2:Nd biaxial crystal used as a laser gain medium, we exhibited remarkable crescent laser modes and mode switching, demonstrating the preservation of the conical diffraction. We revealed an optical singularity in addition to the optical axis: the directions of polarization changed abruptly to the highest emission cross-section mode, which leads to un-polarized lasing. The key explanation is a severe mode selection due to the threshold behavior of lasing. This is confirmed by a theoretical model taking into account a two-axes crystal rotation and including the conical diffraction behavior. The rotation around the two-fold b crystallographic axis of the frame, which makes the imaginary part of the dielectric susceptibility tensor diagonal, is exhibited.

  9. Effect of Fiber Diameter on the Reliability of Composites - Automated Laser Diffraction Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Fraunhofer diffraction theory is well documented in most Physics textbooks. The following discussion was taken substantially from Tipler [Ref. 16...Kerker, Milton. 1969. The Scattering of Light and Other Electromagnetic Radiation. New York: Academic Press. 16. Tipler , Paul A. 1976. Physics. New...ate School, Monterey, California, Sep. 1986. Tipler , Paul A. Physics. New York: Worth Publishers, Inc., 1976. Tsai, Stephen W. Composites Design

  10. Integrated RGB laser light module for autostereoscopic outdoor displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitterer, Jörg; Fidler, Franz; Hambeck, Christian; Saint Julien-Wallsee, Ferdinand; Najda, Stephen; Perlin, Piotr; Stanczyk, Szymon; Czernecki, Robert; McDougall, Stewart D.; Meredith, Wyn; Vickers, Garrie; Landles, Kennedy; Schmid, Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    We have developed highly compact RGB laser light modules to be used as light sources in multi-view autostereoscopic outdoor displays and projection devices. Each light module consists of an AlGaInP red laser diode, a GaInN blue laser diode, a GaInN green laser diode, as well as a common cylindrical microlens. The plano-convex microlens is a so-called "fast axis collimator", which is widely used for collimating light beams emitted from high-power laser diode bars, and has been optimized for polychromatic RGB laser diodes. The three light beams emitted from the red, green, and blue laser diodes are collimated in only one transverse direction, the so-called "fast axis", and in the orthogonal direction, the so-called "slow axis", the beams pass the microlens uncollimated. In the far field of the integrated RGB light module this produces Gaussian beams with a large ellipticity which are required, e.g., for the application in autostereoscopic outdoor displays. For this application only very low optical output powers of a few milliwatts per laser diode are required and therefore we have developed tailored low-power laser diode chips with short cavity lengths of 250 μm for red and 300 μm for blue. Our RGB laser light module including the three laser diode chips, associated monitor photodiodes, the common microlens, as well as the hermetically sealed package has a total volume of only 0.45 cm³, which to our knowledge is the smallest RGB laser light source to date.

  11. A review of laser and light therapy in melasma.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, M K; Yang, F C; Cho, B K

    2017-03-01

    Melasma is a dysregulation of the homeostatic mechanisms that control skin pigmentation and excess pigment is produced. Traditional treatment approaches with topical medications and chemical peels are commonly used but due to the refractory and recurrent nature of melasma, patients often seek alternative treatment strategies such as laser and light therapy. Several types of laser and light therapy have been studied in the treatment of melasma. Intense pulsed light, low fluence Q-switched lasers, and non-ablative fractionated lasers are the most common lasers and light treatments that are currently performed. They all appear effective but there is a high level of recurrence with time and some techniques are associated with an increased risk for postinflammatory hyper- or hypopigmentation. The number and frequency of treatments varies by device type but overall, Q-switched lasers require the greatest number of treatment applications to see a benefit. Vascular-specific lasers do not appear to be effective for the treatment of melasma. Ablative fractionated lasers should be used with caution because they have a very high risk for postinflammatory hypo- and hyperpigmentation. The use of nonablative fractionated laser treatments compared with other laser and light options may result in slightly longer remission intervals. Picosecond lasers, fractional radiofrequency, and laser-assisted drug delivery are promising future approaches to treat melasma. The goal of this review is to summarize the efficacy and safety of the most commonly used laser and light therapies to treat melasma, briefly present future laser-based treatment options for patients with melasma, and provide recommendations for treatment on the basis of the reviewed information.

  12. Analysis of beam steering by diffraction and the scattering of light by turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Jing M.

    This thesis addresses two problems. The first is the performance of non-mechanical beam steering devices based on diffractive optics, and the second is the problem of the scattering of light by turbulence. Two beam steering devices namely holographic optical elements and optical phased arrays are analyzed. Of particular interest are the wavelength selectivity of the uniform volume holographic grating and the impact of dispersion on the spatial and temporal fidelity of an optically transmitted communication signal through both beamsteering devices. Longitudinal refractive index modulation (apodization) in photosensitive glass is used to improve sidelobe. Theoretical methods are developed to model both devices. For uniform grating, it is shown that the temporal dispersion due to the diffraction increase with beam diameter yielding a higher power penalty for large diffraction angles and aperture sizes. For an optical phased array, it is shown the power penalty increase as the diffraction angles and diameters increase. In addition, the scattering of light in turbulent medium is investigated. Of particular interest is to determine region of validity of the Born approximation which is used to compute the scattering field. Pade approximants are used to analyze the propagation through a media having strong turbulent intensity. It is shown that the region of convergence of Born approximation increases as the outer scale of the turbulence decreases. In the case of the strong turbulence, the Born approximation does not capture the correct angular distribution of the scattering intensity.

  13. Laser-diffraction slit rheometer to measure red blood cell deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, S.; Ku, Y. H.; Park, M. S.; Moon, S. Y.; Jang, J. H.; Suh, J. S.

    2004-02-01

    The laser-diffraction technique has been applied to design a slit rheometer for measuring red blood cell deformability over a range of shear stress. Flow-rate and pressure-drop measurements are replaced with a measurement of pressure variation with time. Using a precision pressure transducer, one can measure the variation of pressure in the vacuum chamber, p(t), from which the shear stress and shear rate are mathematically calculated. In addition, a laser beam traverses a diluted blood suspension and is diffracted by red blood cells (RBCs) in the volume. The diffraction patterns are captured by a charge coupled device-video camera, linked to a frame grabber integrated with a computer. When deforming under decreasing shear stress, RBCs change gradually from the prolate ellipsoid towards a circular biconcave morphology. The elongation index as a measure of RBC deformability is determined from an isointensity curve in the diffraction pattern using an ellipse-fitting program. The advantages of this design are simplicity, i.e., ease of operation and no moving parts, low cost, short operating time, and the disposable kit which is in contact with the blood sample.

  14. Controlled far-field pattern selection in diffraction-coupled semiconductor laser arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, J.Z.; Jansen, M.; Silver, A.H.; Yang, J.J.J.; Simmons, W.W.

    1988-08-16

    A diffraction-coupled semiconductor laser array is described capable of being switched between essentially in-phase and essentially out-of-phase supermodes of operation. The array consists of: a waveguide section having an array of semiconductor lasers coupled together by evanescent coupling, and having one at least partially reflective optical emission element; a diffraction section connected to the waveguide section, and having an at least partially reflective optical emission element that cooperates with the optical emission element in the waveguide section, to produce lasing of the array; wherein the dimensions of the waveguide section and the diffraction section are selected to encourage in-phase lasing of the array; and wherein the diffraction section and the waveguide section have electrically isolated contact layers to switch the array, by independent current injection, between two different operating states, one of which promotes lasing in the in-phase supermode and the other of which promotes lasing in the out-of-phase supermode.

  15. Characterisation of Residual Stresses Generated by Laser Shock Peening by Neutron and Synchrotron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Alexander Dominic; King, Andrew; Pirling, Thilo; Peyre, Patrice; Withers, Phillip John

    The fatigue behaviour of engineering alloys can be significantly improved through the application of mechanical surface treatments. These processes generate significant compressive residual stresses near surface by inhomogeneous plastic deformation. In the case of mechanical surface treatments such as laser shock peening, certain burnishing and rolling techniques and ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT), the compressive residual stress layer can extend to a depth of the order of millimeters, with balancing tensile stresses located deeper. Techniques to characterise the residual stresses generated by such mechanical surface treatments non-destructively are mainly limited to diffraction methods using penetrating neutron and synchrotron X-ray radiations. The application of these radiation sources is illustrated here by the characterisation of residual strain distributions in a two types of specimens treated with laser shock peening (LSP). Analyses of diffraction peak broadening provide qualitative information concerning the depth to which the plastic deformation of the treatments extends. Two case studies of laser shock peening of titanium and aluminium alloys is presented to demonstrate the capabilities of neutron and synchrotron diffraction techniques in the field of residual stress characterisation of surface engineered material non-destructively.

  16. Effect of Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy on refraction in multifocal apodized diffractive pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Vrijman, Violette; van der Linden, Jan Willem; Nieuwendaal, Carla P; van der Meulen, Ivanka J E; Mourits, Maarten P; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effect on refraction of neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy for posterior capsule opacification (PCO), and to evaluate the correlation between automated and subjective refraction in multifocal apodized diffractive pseudophakia. A retrospective study of 75 pseudophakic eyes (50 patients) with multifocal apodized diffractive pseudophakia, treated for PCO with Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy, was performed. Pre- and postintervention values of refractive and visual parameters were compared. The outcomes of autorefraction and subjective refraction were also compared. Uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity improved significantly after Nd:YAG capsulotomy (P<.001). No significant changes were noted in defocus equivalent, astigmatic power vectors J(0) and J(45), and overall blurring strength in subjective refraction and autorefraction. Spherical equivalent changed significantly in autorefraction (P=.008), but not in subjective refraction. Autorefraction and subjective refraction were highly correlated in spherical equivalent, defocus equivalent, and blurring strength (r(2)>0.59). In approximately 7% of eyes, a change of more than 0.50 diopters in spherical equivalent in subjective refraction occurred. In most cases, Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in patients with multifocal pseudophakia did not result in a change in refraction. However, 7% of eyes experienced a significant change in subjective refraction. Autorefraction correlated well with subjective refraction in apodized diffractive multifocal IOLs. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Immobilization of biomolecules onto surfaces according to ultraviolet light diffraction patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoern Petersen, Steffen; Kold di Gennaro, Ane; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Skovsen, Esben; Parracino, Antonietta

    2010-10-01

    We developed a method for immobilization of biomolecules onto thiol functionalized surfaces according to UV diffraction patterns. UV light-assisted molecular immobilization proceeds through the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that can bind covalently to thiol reactive surfaces. We demonstrate that, by shaping the pattern of the UV light used to induce molecular immobilization, one can control the pattern of immobilized molecules onto the surface. Using a single-aperture spatial mask, combined with the Fourier transforming property of a focusing lens, we show that submicrometer (0.7 {mu}m) resolved patterns of immobilized prostate-specific antigen biomolecules can be created. If a dual-aperture spatial mask is used, the results differ from the expected Fourier transform pattern of the mask. It appears as a superposition of two diffraction patterns produced by the two apertures, with a fine structured interference pattern superimposed.

  18. Mathematical model for light scanning system based on circular laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peiquan; Yao, Shun; Lu, Fenggui; Tang, Xinhua; Zhang, Wei

    2005-11-01

    A novel light scanning system based on circular laser trajectory for welding robot is developed. With the help of image processing technique, intelligent laser welding could be realized. According to laser triangulation algorithm and Scheimpflug condition, mathematical model for circular laser vision is built. This scanning system projects circular laser onto welded seams and recovers the depth of the welded seams, escapes from shortcomings of less information, explains ambiguity and single tracking direction inherent in "spot" or "line" type laser trajectory. Three-dimensional (3D) model for welded seams could be recognized after depth recovery. The imaging error is investigated also.

  19. Predictions for diffractive ɸ meson production using an AdS/QCD light-front wavefunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmady, Mohammad; Sandapen, Ruben; Sharma, Neetika

    2017-03-01

    We compute the rate for diffractive ɸ electro-production using the Color Glass Condensate dipole model. The model parameters are obtained from fits to the most recent combined HERA data on inclusive deep inelastic scattering. As for the ɸ meson, we use an AdS/QCD holographic light front wavefunction. Our predictions are compared to the available data collected at the HERA collider.

  20. Diffraction Free Light Source for Ghost Imaging of Objects Viewed Through Obscuring Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Ghost Imaging ( QGI ) to exploit quantum optical information. This research experimentally demonstrated the ability of diffraction free light sources to...the capability of QGI to reveal images of objects through partial obstructions of the illumination. The results of this effort also demonstrated the... QGI ) to exploit quantum optical information. QGI increases versatility in imaging objects of interest to the warfighter. The Army fights in all

  1. Evaluation of photoelectric processes in photorefractive crystals via the exposure characteristics of light diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kadys, A; Gudelis, V; Sudzius, M; Jarasiunas, K

    2005-01-12

    We demonstrate a novel way to analyse carrier recombination and transport processes in photorefractive semiconductors via the exposure characteristics of light induced diffraction. The results of a picosecond four-wave mixing on free carrier gratings in semi-insulating GaAs crystals at various grating periods and modulation depths of a light interference pattern are discussed. The role of a deep-trap recharging in carrier diffusion and recombination is sensitively revealed through a feedback effect of a space-charge field to non-equilibrium carrier transport.

  2. Fraunhofer diffraction of light with orbital angular momentum by a slit.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Queila S; Jesus-Silva, Alcenísio J; Fonseca, Eduardo J S; Hickmann, Jandir M

    2011-08-15

    We study the Fraunhofer diffraction problem while taking into account the orbital angular momentum of light. In this case, the phase singularity of the light beam is incident on the slit in two different cases: in one, it is incident slightly above the slit, and in the other it is centered on the slit. We observed that the symmetry and the fringe formation in the interference pattern strongly depend on the amount of orbital angular momentum and the slit position in relation to the beam.

  3. Diffraction as a reason for slowing down light pulses in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, M. V.; Vintskevich, S. V.; Grigoriev, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    The mean velocity of a finite-size short light pulse in a far zone is defined as the vectorial sum of velocities of all rays forming the pulse. Because of diffraction, the mean pulse velocity defined in this way is always somewhat smaller than the speed of light. The conditions are found when this slowing-down effect is sufficiently pronounced to be experimentally measurable. Under these conditions the original Gaussian shape of a pulse is found to be strongly modified with significant lengthening of the rear wing of the field envelope. Schemes for measuring these effects are suggested and discussed.

  4. Peculiarities of propagation of quasi-diffraction-free light beams in strongly scattering absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Katsev, I L; Prikhach, A S; Kazak, N S; Kroening, M

    2006-04-30

    Based on the relation between the theory of light field coherence and theory of radiation transfer in scattering media, a method is proposed for calculating the illumination distribution produced by coherent quasi-diffraction-free beams at different penetration depths of radiation into scattering media such as biological tissues. The method uses the optical transfer function or the point spread function (PSF) of the medium. A simple and convenient analytic PSF model is described. Examples of the illumination distribution produced by a Bessel light beam in a medium with optical parameters typical of real biological tissues are presented. It is shown that the half-width of the axial maximum of a Bessel light beam scattered due to scattering almost does not increase up to optical depths where the contribution of multiple scattering is already considerable. (light beams)

  5. Diffractive intermediate layer enables broadband light trapping for high efficiency ultrathin c-Si tandem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guijun; Ho, Jacob Y. L.; Li, He; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2014-06-01

    Light management through the intermediate reflector in the tandem cell configuration is of great practical importance for achieving high stable efficiency and also low cost production. So far, however, the intermediate reflectors employed currently are mainly focused on the light absorption enhancement of the top cell. Here, we present a diffractive intermediate layer that allows for light trapping over a broadband wavelength for the ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cell. Compared with the standard intermediate reflector, this nanoscale architectural intermediate layer results in a 35% and 21% remarkable enhancement of the light absorption in the top (400-800 nm) and bottom (800-1100 nm) cells simultaneously, and ultrathin c-Si tandem cells with impressive conversion efficiency of 13.3% are made on the glass substrate.

  6. Spatial and spectral image distortions caused by diffraction of an ordinary polarised light beam by an ultrasonic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Machikhin, A S; Pozhar, V E

    2015-02-28

    We consider the problem of determining the spatial and spectral image distortions arising from anisotropic diffraction by ultrasonic waves in crystals with ordinary polarised light (o → e). By neglecting the small-birefringence approximation, we obtain analytical solutions that describe the dependence of the diffraction angles and wave mismatch on the acousto-optic (AO) interaction geometry and crystal parameters. The formulas derived allow one to calculate and analyse the magnitude of diffraction-induced spatial and spectral image distortions and to identify the main types of distortions: chromatic compression and trapezoidal deformation. A comparison of the values of these distortions in the diffraction of ordinary and extraordinary polarised light shows that they are almost equal in magnitude and opposite in signs, so that consistent diffraction (o → e → o or e → o → e) in two identical AO cells rotated through 180° in the plane of diffraction can compensate for these distortions. (diffraction of radiation)

  7. Directly laser-written integrated photonics devices including diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Ramme, Mark; Richardson, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-written integrated devices involving Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) and waveguide arrays are demonstrated as built-in optical couplers. These structures were fabricated in borosilicate glass using a direct laser writing technique. The optical properties of these integrated photonic structures were investigated using CW lasers and high-resolution CCDs. For a single FZP coupled to a single waveguide, the overall coupling efficiency was 9%. A multiplexed optical coupler composed of three FZP layers was demonstrated to couple three waveguides simultaneously in a waveguide array. Structures of this type can be used as platforms for multichannel waveguide coupling elements or as microfluidic sensors that require higher light collecting efficiency.

  8. Imaging live cell in micro-liquid enclosure by X-ray laser diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Shibuya, Akemi; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sangsoo; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Oshima, Tairo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Emerging X-ray free-electron lasers with femtosecond pulse duration enable single-shot snapshot imaging almost free from sample damage by outrunning major radiation damage processes. In bioimaging, it is essential to keep the sample close to its natural state. Conventional high-resolution imaging, however, suffers from severe radiation damage that hinders live cell imaging. Here we present a method for capturing snapshots of live cells kept in a micro-liquid enclosure array by X-ray laser diffraction. We place living Microbacterium lacticum cells in an enclosure array and successively expose each enclosure to a single X-ray laser pulse from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser. The enclosure itself works as a guard slit and allows us to record a coherent diffraction pattern from a weakly-scattering submicrometre-sized cell with a clear fringe extending up to a 28-nm full-period resolution. The reconstructed image reveals living whole-cell structures without any staining, which helps advance understanding of intracellular phenomena. PMID:24394916

  9. A diffraction-limited laser of 25/400 Yb3+/Al3+/P5+/F- silica fiber with a zigzag refractive index profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiquan; Lou, Fengguang; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Guodong; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Suya; Yu, Chunlei; Chen, Danping; Hu, Lili

    2017-08-01

    In this work, a Yb3+/Al3+/P5+/F- co-doped low-NA preform with larger than 0.4 wt.% Yb3+ doping concentration and zigzag refractive index profile was fabricated based on solution doping modified chemical vapor deposition technology. The modality of the preform refractive index profile was simulated based on a circle-symmetry-distribution fiber model. According to the simulation results a step-index 25/400 double cladding fiber with core NA of ~0.04 was drawn. Pumped with a 970 nm laser diode, a diffraction-limited oscillator-laser output with ~71% slope efficiency and M 2 of ~1.06 were achieved at bending diameter  ⩾50 cm after stripping cladding light. For bending diameters less than 50 cm, the laser efficiency measured at stripping cladding light decreases with decrease in bending diameter.

  10. Femtosecond laser induced tunable surface transformations on (111) Si aided by square grids diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Weina; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei Liu, Yang

    2015-12-21

    We report an extra freedom to modulate the femtosecond laser energy distribution to control the surface ablated structures through a copper-grid mask. Due to the reduced deposited pulse energy by changing the scanning speed or the pulse fluence, a sequential evolution of three distinctly different surface patterns with periodic distributions is formed, namely, striped ripple lines, ripple microdots, and surface modification. By changing the scanning speed, the number of the multiple dots in a lattice can be modulated. Moreover, by exploring the ablation process through the copper grid mask, it shows an abnormal enhanced ablation effect with strong dependence of the diffraction-aided fs laser ablated surface structures on polarization direction. The sensitivity shows a quasi-cosinusoid-function with a periodicity of π/2. Particularly, the connection process of striped ripple lines manifests a preferential formation direction with the laser polarization.

  11. Self-imaging of molecules from diffraction spectra by laser-induced rescattering electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Junliang; Chen Zhangjin; Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C. D.

    2010-09-15

    We study high-energy angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of molecules in strong fields. In an oscillating laser electric field, electrons released earlier in the pulse may return to recollide with the target ion, in a process similar to scattering by laboratory prepared electrons. If midinfrared lasers are used, we show that the images generated by the returning electrons are similar to images observed in typical gas-phase electron diffraction (GED). These spectra can be used to retrieve the positions of atoms in a molecule as in GED. Since infrared laser pulses of durations of a few femtoseconds are already available today, the study of these high-energy photoelectrons offers the opportunity of imaging the structure of transient molecules with temporal resolution of a few femtoseconds.

  12. LIGHT BEAMS: Peculiarities of propagation of quasi-diffraction-free light beams in strongly scattering absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsev, I. L.; Prikhach, A. S.; Kazak, N. S.; Kroening, M.

    2006-04-01

    Based on the relation between the theory of light field coherence and theory of radiation transfer in scattering media, a method is proposed for calculating the illumination distribution produced by coherent quasi-diffraction-free beams at different penetration depths of radiation into scattering media such as biological tissues. The method uses the optical transfer function or the point spread function (PSF) of the medium. A simple and convenient analytic PSF model is described. Examples of the illumination distribution produced by a Bessel light beam in a medium with optical parameters typical of real biological tissues are presented. It is shown that the half-width of the axial maximum of a Bessel light beam scattered due to scattering almost does not increase up to optical depths where the contribution of multiple scattering is already considerable.

  13. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Thomas, A. G.; Mangles, S. P.D.; Banerjee, S.; Corde, S.; Flacco, A.; Litos, M.; Neely, D.; Viera, J.; Najmudin, Z.; Bingham, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  14. Changing correlation into anticorrelation by superposing thermal and laser light.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbin; Zhou, Yu; Li, Fu-Li; Xu, Zhuo

    2014-07-01

    Correlation can be changed into anticorrelation by superposing thermal and laser light with the same frequency and polarization. Two-photon interference theory is employed to interpret this phenomenon. An experimental scheme is designed to verify the theoretical predictions by employing pseudothermal light to simulate thermal light. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical results.

  15. Linear discrete diffraction and transverse localization of light in two-dimensional backbone lattices.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yiling; Zhang, Guoquan

    2010-09-13

    We study the linear discrete diffraction characteristics of light in two-dimensional backbone lattices. It is found that, as the refractive index modulation depth of the backbone lattice increases, high-order band gaps become open and broad in sequence, and the allowed band curves of the Floquet-Bloch modes become flat gradually. As a result, the diffraction pattern at the exit face converges gradually for both the on-site and off-site excitation cases. Particularly, when the refractive index modulation depth of the backbone lattice is high enough, for example, on the order of 0.01 for a square lattice, the light wave propagating in the backbone lattice will be localized in transverse dimension for both the on-site and off-site excitation cases. This is because only the first several allowed bands with nearly flat band curves are excited in the lattice, and the transverse expansion velocities of the Floquet-Bloch modes in these flat allowed bands approach to zero. Such a linear transverse localization of light may have potential applications in navigating light propagation dynamics and optical signal processing.

  16. LIGHT SOURCE: TW Laser system for Thomson scattering X-ray light source at Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li-Xm; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Hua, Jian-Fei; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    A TW (Tera Watt) laser system based on Ti:sapphire mainly for the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray light source (TTX) is being built. Both UV (ultraviolet) laser pulse for driving the photocathode radio-frequency (RF) gun and the IR (infrared) laser pulse as the electron-beam-scattered-light are provided by the system. Efforts have also been made in laser pulse shaping and laser beam transport to optimize the high-brightness electron beam production by the photocathode RF gun.

  17. Laser wavelength effect on nanosecond laser light reflection in ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, O.; de la Cruz May, L.; Mejia, E. B.; Ruz Hernandez, J. A.; Flores Gil, A.

    2016-12-01

    Reflection of nanosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths (1.06 and 0.69 µm) in ablation of titanium in air is studied experimentally. The laser wavelength effect on reflection is essential at low laser fluence values. However, it becomes negligible for laser fluence values by about an order of magnitude higher than the plasma ignition threshold. We speculate that the disappearance of the wavelength effect is explained by counter-acting processes of the laser light absorption in plasma, which increases with laser wavelength, and absorption in the surface layer, which decreases with increasing laser wavelength.

  18. Multi-point laser spark generation for internal combustion engines using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Elliott; Kuang, Zheng; Cheng, Hua; Page, Vincent; Shenton, Tom; Dearden, Geoff

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on a technique demonstrating for the first time successful multi-point laser-induced spark generation, which is variable in three dimensions and derived from a single laser beam. Previous work on laser ignition of internal combustion engines found that simultaneously igniting in more than one location resulted in more stable and faster combustion - a key potential advantage over conventional spark ignition. However, previous approaches could only generate secondary foci at fixed locations. The work reported here is an experimental technique for multi-point laser ignition, in which several sparks with arbitrary spatial location in three dimensions are created by variable diffraction of a pulsed single laser beam source and transmission through an optical plug. The diffractive multi-beam arrays and patterns are generated using a spatial light modulator on which computer generated holograms are displayed. A gratings and lenses algorithm is used to accurately modulate the phase of the input laser beam and create multi-beam output. The underpinning theory, experimental arrangement and results obtained are presented and discussed.

  19. The MYTHEN detector for X-ray powder diffraction experiments at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Cervellino, Antonio; Dinapoli, Roberto; Gozzo, Fabia; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Kraft, Philipp; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian

    2010-01-01

    The MYTHEN single-photon-counting silicon microstrip detector has been developed at the Swiss Light Source for time-resolved powder diffraction experiments. An upgraded version of the detector has been installed at the SLS powder diffraction station allowing the acquisition of diffraction patterns over 120° in 2θ in fractions of seconds. Thanks to the outstanding performance of the detector and to the calibration procedures developed, the quality of the data obtained is now comparable with that of traditional high-resolution point detectors in terms of FWHM resolution and peak profile shape, with the additional advantage of fast and simultaneous acquisition of the full diffraction pattern. MYTHEN is therefore optimal for time-resolved or dose-critical measurements. The characteristics of the MYTHEN detector together with the calibration procedures implemented for the optimization of the data are described in detail. The refinements of two known standard powders are discussed together with a remarkable application of MYTHEN to organic compounds in relation to the problem of radiation damage. PMID:20724787

  20. Multi-wavelength speckle reduction for laser pico-projectors using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Weston H.

    Personal electronic devices, such as cell phones and tablets, continue to decrease in size while the number of features and add-ons keep increasing. One particular feature of great interest is an integrated projector system. Laser pico-projectors have been considered, but the technology has not been developed enough to warrant integration. With new advancements in diode technology and MEMS devices, laser-based projection is currently being advanced for pico-projectors. A primary problem encountered when using a pico-projector is coherent interference known as speckle. Laser speckle can lead to eye irritation and headaches after prolonged viewing. Diffractive optical elements known as diffusers have been examined as a means to lower speckle contrast. Diffusers are often rotated to achieve temporal averaging of the spatial phase pattern provided by diffuser surface. While diffusers are unable to completely eliminate speckle, they can be utilized to decrease the resultant contrast to provide a more visually acceptable image. This dissertation measures the reduction in speckle contrast achievable through the use of diffractive diffusers. A theoretical Fourier optics model is used to provide the diffuser's stationary and in-motion performance in terms of the resultant contrast level. Contrast measurements of two diffractive diffusers are calculated theoretically and compared with experimental results. In addition, a novel binary diffuser design based on Hadamard matrices will be presented. Using two static in-line Hadamard diffusers eliminates the need for rotation or vibration of the diffuser for temporal averaging. Two Hadamard diffusers were fabricated and contrast values were subsequently measured, showing good agreement with theory and simulated values. Monochromatic speckle contrast values of 0.40 were achieved using the Hadamard diffusers. Finally, color laser projection devices require the use of red, green, and blue laser sources; therefore, using a

  1. Light-induced structural changes in a photosynthetic reaction center caught by Laue diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wöhri, Annemarie B; Katona, Gergely; Johansson, Linda C; Fritz, Emelie; Malmerberg, Erik; Andersson, Magnus; Vincent, Jonathan; Eklund, Mattias; Cammarata, Marco; Wulff, Michael; Davidsson, Jan; Groenhof, Gerrit; Neutze, Richard

    2010-04-30

    Photosynthetic reaction centers convert the energy content of light into a transmembrane potential difference and so provide the major pathway for energy input into the biosphere. We applied time-resolved Laue diffraction to study light-induced conformational changes in the photosynthetic reaction center complex of Blastochloris viridis. The side chain of TyrL162, which lies adjacent to the special pair of bacteriochlorophyll molecules that are photooxidized in the primary light conversion event of photosynthesis, was observed to move 1.3 angstroms closer to the special pair after photoactivation. Free energy calculations suggest that this movement results from the deprotonation of this conserved tyrosine residue and provides a mechanism for stabilizing the primary charge separation reactions of photosynthesis.

  2. Efficiency and stray light measurements and calculations of diffraction gratings for the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.; Mossessian, D.; Gullikson, E.; Heimann, P.

    1994-07-01

    Water cooled gratings manufactured for spherical grating monochromators of the Advanced Light Source beamlines 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0 were measured with the laser plasma source and reflectometer in the Center for X-ray Optics at LBL. The square-wave gratings are ion-milled into the polished electroless nickel surface after patterning by holographic photolithography. Absolute efficiency data are compared with exact electromagnetic theory calculation. Inter-order stray light and groove depths can be estimated from the measurements.

  3. Replicated diffractive optical lens components for laser-diode-to-fiber coupling in optical bench arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soechtig, Juergen; Schift, Helmut; Patterson, Bruce D.; Westenhoefer, S.

    1997-09-01

    We report on the fabrication of lens components, based on diffractive optical elements, for the purpose of imaging laser-diode emission onto fibers or photodetectors, or for collimation applications. The miniature optical elements are arranged in arrays with 250 micrometer pitch which make them well suited for applications with fiber ribbons. Test optical plates were made of polycarbonate using hot stamper replication technology. The imaging properties of these optical plates from single-mode fibers onto single-mode fibers or from lasers onto single-mode fibers are discussed. The addition of 3D-marker structures to the outline borders of such plates made them suitable for use in micro-optical benches with built-in mechanical registration structures. We fabricated the optical bench inserts with built-in passive alignment elements using deep x-ray LIGA technology (LIGA is a German acronym for 'lithographie, galvanik und abformung' meaning lithography, electroforming and molding). This technology offers high mechanical precision even for the 500 micrometer thick optical bench inserts which we fabricated by injection molding out of transparent and thermally stable polycarbonate. We report on first arrangements of plastic optical bench inserts into micro-optical benches. With the aim towards a fully replicated micro-optical bench made out of plastic we also report on a mounting concept for laser-didoes with built-in alignment trenches. The fabrication process and important properties of these special lasers which we recently developed for transceiver applications are described. We use these lasers for imaging onto single-mode fibers applying the diffractive optical element plates already mentioned.

  4. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kantor, Innokenty; Rivers, Mark L.; Dalton, D. Allen

    2010-11-01

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell at pressure up to 60 GPa. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 μs pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time-resolved radiometric temperature measurements. This enables the time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a microsecond time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10 000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration, samples 4 μm thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformities as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. This delicate control, which may also prevent chemical reactivity and diffusion, enables accurate measurement of melting curves, phase changes, and thermal equations of state.

  5. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kantor, Innokenty; Rivers, Mark L.; Dalton, D. Allen

    2010-11-19

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell at pressure up to 60 GPa. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 {micro}s pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time-resolved radiometric temperature measurements. This enables the time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a microsecond time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10,000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration, samples 4 {micro}m thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformities as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. This delicate control, which may also prevent chemical reactivity and diffusion, enables accurate measurement of melting curves, phase changes, and thermal equations of state.

  6. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Dalton, D. Allen; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kantor, Innokenty; Rivers, Mark L.

    2010-11-15

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell at pressure up to 60 GPa. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 {mu}s pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time-resolved radiometric temperature measurements. This enables the time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a microsecond time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10 000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration, samples 4 {mu}m thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformities as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. This delicate control, which may also prevent chemical reactivity and diffusion, enables accurate measurement of melting curves, phase changes, and thermal equations of state.

  7. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kantor, Innokenty; Rivers, Mark L.; Dalton, D. Allen

    2010-11-03

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell at pressure up to 60 GPa. We used an electronically modulated 2–10 kHz repetition rate, 1064–1075 nm fiber laser with 1–100 μs pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time-resolved radiometric temperature measurements. This enables the time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a microsecond time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10,000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration, samples 4 μm thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformities as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. This delicate control, which may also prevent chemical reactivity and diffusion, enables accurate measurement of melting curves, phase changes, and thermal equations of state.

  8. I19, the small-molecule single-crystal diffraction beamline at Diamond Light Source.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Harriott; Barnett, Sarah A; Christensen, Kirsten E; Teat, Simon J; Allan, David R

    2012-05-01

    The dedicated small-molecule single-crystal X-ray diffraction beamline (I19) at Diamond Light Source has been operational and supporting users for over three years. I19 is a high-flux tunable-wavelength beamline and its key details are described in this article. Much of the work performed on the beamline involves structure determination from small and weakly diffracting crystals. Other experiments that have been supported to date include structural studies at high pressure, studies of metastable species, variable-temperature crystallography, studies involving gas exchange in porous materials and structural characterizations that require analysis of the diffuse scattering between Bragg reflections. A range of sample environments to facilitate crystallographic studies under non-ambient conditions are available as well as a number of options for automation. An indication of the scope of the science carried out on the beamline is provided by the range of highlights selected for this paper.

  9. Ultrafast laser parallel microdrilling using multiple annular beams generated by a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Zheng; Perrie, Walter; Edwardson, Stuart P.; Fearon, Eamonn; Dearden, Geoff

    2014-03-01

    Ultrafast laser parallel microdrilling using diffractive multiple annular beam patterns is demonstrated in this paper. The annular beam was generated by diffractive axicon computer generated holograms (CGHs) using a spatial light modulator. The diameter of the annular beam can be easily adjusted by varying the radius of the smallest ring in the axicon. Multiple annular beams with arbitrary arrangement and multiple annular beam arrays were generated by superimposing an axicon CGH onto a grating and lenses algorithm calculated multi-beam CGH and a binary Dammann grating CGH, respectively. Microholes were drilled through a 0.03 mm thick stainless steel foil using the multiple annular beams. By avoiding huge laser output attenuation and mechanical annular scanning, the processing is ˜200 times faster than the normal single beam processing.

  10. Solid-state laser pumping by light guides

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardes, Pedro H.; Liang Dawei

    2006-06-01

    What we believe to be novel pumping schemes for lamp-pumped solid-state lasers are proposed. Based on the refractive and total internal reflection principles, curved fused-silica light guides of rectangular cross sections are used to couple the pump radiation from an arc lamp into a laser crystal. The performances of light-guide pumping schemes are analyzed through a nonsequential ray-trace program and are compared to that of a single elliptical cavity. Improved pump radiation distribution around the laser crystal was registered. The light-guide cavities also permit tailoring the pump flux distribution within the active medium. A lamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser by alight-guide cavity was built and tested. An overall laser efficiency of 1.1% was measured.

  11. Recording of diffraction gratings in polyvinyl alcohol/acrylamide photopolymers by pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Celia; Costela, Angel; Fimia, Antonio; Garcia-Moreno, Inmaculada; Pascual, Inmaculada V.; Sastre, Roberto

    2001-06-01

    In this communication we present the experimental results obtained when diffraction gratings are stored using pulsed exposure in polyvinyl alcohol/acrylamide photopolymer deposited in a dry film. The influence of the energy of the irradiation pulse was studied and the number of pulses needed to reach maximum diffraction efficiency was obtained. The recording was performed using a n holographic copying process. The original patten employed was a gratin of 1000 lines/mm processed according to sliver halide sensitized gelatin, with a beam ratio of 1:2 and transmittance of 75 percent. We exposed the samples by recording holograms with as collimated beam from a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG Q- switched laser. The pulse duration was approximately 8 ns and the frequency of repetition varied between 2 and 10 Hz. The pulse fluence was increased from 0.07 mJ/cm2 to 6.7 mJ/cm2. Our initial results show that it is possible to obtain diffraction gratings with a diffraction efficiency of 60 percent. The energetic sensitivities achieved are close to those obtained when working with the same material and continuous irradiation, without processing of the gratings.

  12. Ring-Gaussian laser pulse filamentation in a self-induced diffraction waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu E.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    Self-action in air of a high-power femtosecond laser pulse with the spatial form of a ring-Gaussian beam (‘dressed’ beam) is studied theoretically. Pulse self-focusing and filamentation is analyzed in detail through the numerical solution of the spectral propagation equation, taking into account medium optical nonlinearity and plasma generation. Pulse propagation dynamics and energy fluxes inside the beam are visualized by means of averaged diffraction ray tracing. We clearly show that, in terms of diffraction optics, the outer ring forms a specific nonmaterial diffractive waveguide, favoring long-range self-channeling of the central part of a beam by delivering optical energy to a filament. The spatial robustness and stability of such diffractive waveguides strongly depends on the energy stored in the ring, as well as on its position relative to the beam axis. The striking advantage of such ‘dressed’ beams is their reduced angular divergence during plasma-free (post-filamentation) evolution.

  13. Imaging polyatomic molecules with ultrafast laser-induced electron diffraction (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, Chii-Dong

    2016-10-01

    Molecular structure determination of chemical reactions or processes has been one of the grand challenges in physics, chemistry, and biology. To image these processes, it typically requires sub-Angstrom spatial and femtosecond temporal resolutions. One of the standard imaging techniques, X-ray diffraction, however, currently suffers from temporal jitters and is available only at large facilities. Furthermore, it also suffers from very low elastic scattering cross sections, which make it difficult to apply to gas phase molecules. Another technique, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), overcomes this low cross section problem, but the temporal resolution is still limited to hundreds of femtoseconds, mainly due to Coulomb repulsion in electron beam and velocity mismatch between laser-pump pulse and electron probe pulse in a typical pump-probe scheme. The recently proposed laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) is based on two basic ideas. First, an electron wave packet can be generated from a target itself by an intense laser pulse and driven back within the subsequent half-cycle of the laser to rescatter from the parent ion, thus realizing a self-imaging process. Laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCS) can then be extracted from high-energy electron spectra, as demonstrated by the Quantitative Rescattering theory (QRS). Second, the target structure information can be retrieved from the DCS. This retrieval is further simplified by using back-scattered electrons with collision energy of about 100 eV, for which the independent-atom model (IAM) can be employed to quite accurately simulate the DCS. Demonstration of ultrafast imaging with the LIED has been reported so far on simple diatomic molecules. Here we discuss recent progress in LIED with polyatomic molecules in two examples. The first one is aligned acetylene (C2H2) and the second one is benzene (C6H6). In both cases, two bond lengths, C-C and C-H have been successfully retrieved. For even more

  14. Spectrometer for hard X-ray free-electron laser based on diffraction focusing.

    PubMed

    Kohn, V G; Gorobtsov, O Y; Vartanyants, I A

    2013-03-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) generate sequences of ultra-short spatially coherent pulses of X-ray radiation. A diffraction focusing spectrometer (DFS), which is able to measure the whole energy spectrum of the radiation of a single XFEL pulse with an energy resolution of ΔE/E 2 × 10(-6), is proposed. This is much better than for most modern X-ray spectrometers. Such resolution allows one to resolve the fine spectral structure of the XFEL pulse. The effect of diffraction focusing occurs in a single-crystal plate due to dynamical scattering, and is similar to focusing in a Pendry lens made from a metamaterial with a negative refraction index. Such a spectrometer is easier to operate than those based on bent crystals. It is shown that the DFS can be used in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 20 keV.

  15. Nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction of femtosecond laser pulses in a 2D nonlinear photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Vyunishev, A M; Arkhipkin, V G; Slabko, V V; Baturin, I S; Akhmatkhanov, A R; Shur, V Ya; Chirkin, A S

    2015-09-01

    We study second-harmonic generation (SHG) of femtosecond laser pulses in a rectangular two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal (NLPC). Multiple SH beams were observed in the vicinity of the propagation direction of the fundamental beam. It has been verified that the angular positions of these beams obey the conditions of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction (NRND). The measured SH spectra of specific NRND orders consist of narrow peaks that experience a high-frequency spectral shift as the order grows. We derive an analytical expression for the process studied and find the theoretical results to be in good agreement with the experimental data. We estimate the enhancement factor of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction in 2D NLPC to be 70.

  16. Highly efficient, diffraction-limited laser emission from a vertical external-cavity surface-emitting organic laser.

    PubMed

    Rabbani-Haghighi, Hadi; Forget, Sébastien; Chénais, Sébastien; Siove, Alain

    2010-06-15

    We report on a solid-state laser structure functioning as the organic counterpart of a vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) design. The gain medium is a poly(methyl methacrylate) film doped with Rhodamine 640, spin casted onto the high-reflectivity mirror of a plano-concave resonator. Upon pumping by 7 ns pulses at 532 nm, a diffraction-limited beam (M(2)=1) was obtained, with a conversion efficiency of 43%; higher peak powers (2 kW) could be attained when resorting to shorter (0.5 ns) pump pulses. The spectrum was controlled by the thickness of the active layer playing the role of an intracavity etalon; tunability is demonstrated at over and up to 20 nm.

  17. Proton displacement damage in light-emitting and laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of proton displacement damage on light-emitting diodes and laser diodes are discussed, comparing the radiation sensitivity of current technology devices with older devices for which data exists in the literature.

  18. Diffusion filter eliminates fringe effects of coherent laser light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsasky, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Diffusion filter comprised of small particles in colloidal suspension reduces the coherence of a laser beam used as a photographic light source. Interference patterns which obscure details in photographic film are eliminated, the intensity and collimation are moderately affected.

  19. Interferometer combines laser light source and digital counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Measurement of small linear displacements in digital readouts with extreme accuracy and sensitivity is achieved by an interferometer. The instrument combines a digital electro-optical fringe-counting system and a laser light source.

  20. Visible light surface emitting semiconductor laser

    DOEpatents

    Olbright, Gregory R.; Jewell, Jack L.

    1993-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is disclosed comprising a laser cavity sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. The laser cavity comprises a pair of spacer layers surrounding one or more active, optically emitting quantum-well layers having a bandgap in the visible which serve as the active optically emitting material of the device. The thickness of the laser cavity is m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer, .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the laser radiation and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the cavity. Electrical pumping of the laser is achieved by heavily doping the bottom mirror and substrate to one conductivity-type and heavily doping regions of the upper mirror with the opposite conductivity type to form a diode structure and applying a suitable voltage to the diode structure. Specific embodiments of the invention for generating red, green, and blue radiation are described.

  1. Normalization schemes for ultrafast x-ray diffraction using a table-top laser-driven plasma source.

    PubMed

    Schick, D; Bojahr, A; Herzog, M; von Korff Schmising, C; Shayduk, R; Leitenberger, W; Gaal, P; Bargheer, M

    2012-02-01

    We present an experimental setup of a laser-driven x-ray plasma source for femtosecond x-ray diffraction. Different normalization schemes accounting for x-ray source intensity fluctuations are discussed in detail. We apply these schemes to measure the temporal evolution of Bragg peak intensities of perovskite superlattices after ultrafast laser excitation.

  2. Efficient generation of 509 nm light by sum-frequency mixing between two tapered diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfieq, Mahmoud; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Sumpf, Bernd; Paschke, Katrin; Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a concept for visible laser sources based on sum-frequency generation of beam combined tapered diode lasers. In this specific case, a 1.7 W sum-frequency generated green laser at 509 nm is obtained, by frequency adding of 6.17 W from a 978 nm tapered diode laser with 8.06 W from a 1063 nm tapered diode laser, inside a periodically poled MgO doped lithium niobate crystal. This corresponds to an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 12.1%. As an example of potential applications, the generated nearly diffraction-limited green light is used for pumping a Ti:sapphire laser, thus demonstrating good beam quality and power stability. The maximum output powers achieved when pumping the Ti:sapphire laser are 226 mW (CW) and 185 mW (mode-locked) at 1.7 W green pump power. The optical spectrum emitted by the mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser shows a spectral width of about 54 nm (FWHM), indicating less than 20 fs pulse width.

  3. Time-Domain X-ray Diffraction in the Pulsed Laser Heated Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapenka, V.; Goncharov, A. F.; Struzhkin, V.; Kantor, I.; Rivers, M. L.; Dalton, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) at pressure up to 100 GPa and 3500 K. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 microseconds pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time resolved radiometric temperature measurements. For the special APS hybrid mode, the measurements were also synchronized with a 500 ns long bunch carrying 88% of the ring current. This setup enables time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a micrometers time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10,000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration samples 4 micrometers thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformity as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. We will show examples of studies of the melting, thermal equation of state, and chemical reactivity. We acknowledge support from NSF EAR-0842057, DOE/ NNSA (CDAC), and EFree, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. DESC0001057. X-ray diffraction measurements were performed at GSECARS (APS) supported by DOE Contract No.W-31-109- Eng-38.

  4. Laser-induced effects in carbon suspensions and diffraction by volume gratings in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huxiong

    1997-12-01

    Two projects are covered in this thesis. The first project is an investigation of acoustic and chemical effects generated by high power laser pulses in carbon suspensions. Carbon particles absorb energy from the laser pulses and are heated to a few thousand degrees C. The high temperatures initiate reactions between carbon and the surrounding water generating permanent gases. Hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and several hydrocarbons have been identified as product gases. With respect to sound wave generation the change in volume of the material owing to thermal and chemical expansion is discussed. A thermodynamic theory governing the generation of the photoacoustic waves from these two mechanism is developed. A comparison between photoacoustic effects caused mainly by the chemical mechanism and those generated by the thermal mechanism is given. The chemical mechanism gives an acoustic signal 2,000 times greater in magnitude than would be generated by purely thermal mechanism (normalized to absorption coefficient). Structural changes of the carbon particle are reported. The originally solid particles first become large hollow particles and then disappear according to electron microscopy. The second project deals with diffraction by volume gratings. A rigorous theory governing non-attentuated planar volume gratings developed by Gaylord and Moharam is utilized. A generalized theory incorporating attentuation along the depth for planar volume gratings with TE incident probe beams is developed. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the diffraction of volume gratings generated by two coherent nanosecond laser pulses in methanol. The magnitude of the change in index of refraction is extracted. Criteria for delineation of different diffraction regimes are discussed. Approximate solutions to the first order coupled-wave equations are given substantiating the criteria.

  5. Laser entertainment and light shows in education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaratnam, Andrew T.; Symons, Charles

    2002-05-01

    Laser shows and beam effects have been a source of entertainment since its first public performance May 9, 1969, at Mills College in Oakland, California. Since 1997, the Photonics Center, NgeeAnn Polytechnic, Singapore, has been using laser shows as a teaching tool. Students are able to exhibit their creative skills and learn at the same time how lasers are used in the entertainment industry. Students will acquire a number of skills including handling three- phase power supply, operation of cooling system, and laser alignment. Students also acquire an appreciation of the arts, learning about shapes and contours as they develop graphics for the shows. After holography, laser show animation provides a combination of the arts and technology. This paper aims to briefly describe how a krypton-argon laser, galvanometer scanners, a polychromatic acousto-optic modulator and related electronics are put together to develop a laser projector. The paper also describes how students are trained to make their own laser animation and beam effects with music, and at the same time have an appreciation of the operation of a Class IV laser and the handling of optical components.

  6. Development of a Compact Optical-MEMS Scanner with Integrated VCSEL Light Source and Diffractive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Krygowski, Thomas W.; Reyes, David; Rodgers, M. Steven; Smith, James H.; Warren, Mial; Sweatt, William; Blum-Spahn, Olga; Wendt, Joel R.; Asbill, Randy

    1999-06-30

    In this work the design and initial fabrication results are reported for the components of a compact optical-MEMS laser scanning system. This system integrates a silicon MEMS laser scanner, a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) and passive optical components. The MEMS scanner and VCSEL are mounted onto a fused silica substrate which serves as an optical interconnect between the devices. Two Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are etched into the fused silica substrate to focus the VCSEL beam and increase the scan range. The silicon MEMS scanner consists of an actuator that continuously scans the position of a large polysilicon gold-coated shuttle containing a third DOE. Interferometric measurements show that the residual stress in the 500 {micro}m x 1000 {micro}m shuttle is extremely low, with a maximum deflection of only 0.18{micro}m over an 800 {micro}m span for an unmetallized case and a deflection of 0.56{micro}m for the metallized case. A conservative estimate for the scan range is {approximately}{+-}4{degree}, with a spot size of about 0.5 mm, producing 50 resolvable spots. The basic system architecture, optical and MEMS design is reported in this paper, with an emphasis on the design and fabrication of the silicon MEMS scanner portion of the system.

  7. Focusing metasurface quantum-cascade laser with a near diffraction-limited beam

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Luyao; Chen, Daguan; Itoh, Tatsuo; ...

    2016-10-17

    A terahertz vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser (VECSEL) is demonstrated using an active focusing reflectarray metasurface based on quantum-cascade gain material. The focusing effect enables a hemispherical cavity with flat optics, which exhibits higher geometric stability than a plano-plano cavity and a directive and circular near-diffraction limited Gaussian beam with M2 beam parameter as low as 1.3 and brightness of 1.86 × 106 Wsr–1m–2. As a result, this work initiates the potential of leveraging inhomogeneous metasurface and reflectarray designs to achieve high-power and high-brightness terahertz quantum-cascade VECSELs.

  8. Fraunhofer diffraction of atomic matter waves: electron transfer studies with a laser cooled target.

    PubMed

    van der Poel, M; Nielsen, C V; Gearba, M A; Andersen, N

    2001-09-17

    We have constructed an apparatus combining the experimental techniques of cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy and a laser cooled target. We measure angle differential cross sections in Li(+)+Na-->Li+Na(+) electron transfer collisions in the keV energy regime with a momentum resolution of 0.12 a.u. yielding an order of magnitude better angular resolution than previous measurements. We resolve Fraunhofer-type diffraction patterns in the differential cross sections. Good agreement with predictions of the semiclassical impact parameter method is obtained.

  9. Laser-induced electron diffraction: inversion of photo-electron spectra for molecular orbital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthumpally-Joseph, R.; Viau-Trudel, J.; Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Atabek, O.; Charron, E.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of imaging molecular orbitals from photoelectron spectra obtained via Laser Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED) in linear molecules. This is an extension of our work published recently in Physical Review A \\textbf{94}, 023421 (2016) to the case of the HOMO-1 orbital of the carbon dioxide molecule. We show that such an imaging technique has the potential to image molecular orbitals at different internuclear distances in a sub-femtosecond time scale and with a resolution of a fraction of an Angstr\\"om.

  10. Integration of diffractive lenses with addressable vertical-cavity laser arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.E.; Du, T.C.; Wendt, J.R.; Vawter, G.A.; Carson, R.F.; Lear, K.L.; Kilcoyne, S.P.; Schneider, R.P.; Zolper, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    An optical interconnection system is being developed to provide vertical, digital data channels for stacked multichip modules. A key component of the system is an array of individually addressable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with diffractive lenses integrated into the substrate to control beam divergence and direction. The lenses were fabricated by direct-write e-beam lithography and reactive ion beam etching into the GaAs substrate. Preliminary device performance data and the design and fabrication issues are discussed.

  11. Coherent Soft X-ray Diffraction Imaging of Coliphage PR772 at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Data Explorer

    Reddy, Hemanth, K.N.

    2017-01-05

    A dataset of coherent soft X-ray diffraction images of Coliphage PR772 virus, collected at the Atomic Molecular Optics (AMO) beamline with pnCCD detectors in the LAMP instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

  12. Laser- and light-based hair removal: an update.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David J

    2007-03-01

    A variety of laser technologies are now able to successfully remove unwanted hair. Successful removal is based on an understanding of laser physics and appropriate wavelengths, pulse durations and cooling of the skin. Although ruby lasers were among the first to be used, alexandrite, diode and neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers, as well as a variety of broad-spectrum intense pulsed light sources, are currently more commonly used for the treatment of unwanted hair. Darker skin types are more difficult to treat but can also be treated. Complications can occur after laser hair removal but can be reduced through an understanding of the fundamentals of laser removal. These complications include the obvious, such as scarring and pigmentary changes, and the not so obvious, such as reticulate erythema and uveitis. Laser hair removal is now widely accepted as a successful approach to remove unwanted hair in both men and women. The future will involve office-based laser and light source hair removal, as well as a variety of laser and light-based home devices.

  13. Selenium single-wavelength anomalous diffraction de novo phasing using an X-ray-free electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Mark S.; Yoon, Chun Hong; DeMirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Dao, E. Han; Ahmadi, Radman; Aksit, Fulya; Aquila, Andrew L.; Ciftci, Halilibrahim; Guillet, Serge; Hayes, Matt J.; Lane, Thomas J.; Liang, Meng; Lundström, Ulf; Koglin, Jason E.; Mgbam, Paul; Rao, Yashas; Zhang, Lindsey; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Holton, James M.; Boutet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Structural information about biological macromolecules near the atomic scale provides important insight into the functions of these molecules. To date, X-ray crystallography has been the predominant method used for macromolecular structure determination. However, challenges exist when solving structures with X-rays, including the phase problem and radiation damage. X-ray-free electron lasers (X-ray FELs) have enabled collection of diffraction information before the onset of radiation damage, yet the majority of structures solved at X-ray FELs have been phased using external information via molecular replacement. De novo phasing at X-ray FELs has proven challenging due in part to per-pulse variations in intensity and wavelength. Here we report the solution of a selenobiotinyl-streptavidin structure using phases obtained by the anomalous diffraction of selenium measured at a single wavelength (Se-SAD) at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Our results demonstrate Se-SAD, routinely employed at synchrotrons for novel structure determination, is now possible at X-ray FELs. PMID:27811937

  14. Selenium single-wavelength anomalous diffraction de novo phasing using an X-ray-free electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Hunter, Mark S.; Yoon, Chun Hong; DeMirci, Hasan; ...

    2016-11-04

    Structural information about biological macromolecules near the atomic scale provides important insight into the functions of these molecules. To date, X-ray crystallography has been the predominant method used for macromolecular structure determination. However, challenges exist when solving structures with X-rays, including the phase problem and radiation damage. X-ray-free electron lasers (X-ray FELs) have enabled collection of diffraction information before the onset of radiation damage, yet the majority of structures solved at X-ray FELs have been phased using external information via molecular replacement. De novo phasing at X-ray FELs has proven challenging due in part to per-pulse variations in intensity andmore » wavelength. Here we report the solution of a selenobiotinyl-streptavidin structure using phases obtained by the anomalous diffraction of selenium measured at a single wavelength (Se-SAD) at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Finally, our results demonstrate Se-SAD, routinely employed at synchrotrons for novel structure determination, is now possible at X-ray FELs.« less

  15. Selenium single-wavelength anomalous diffraction de novo phasing using an X-ray-free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Mark S; Yoon, Chun Hong; DeMirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G; Dao, E Han; Ahmadi, Radman; Aksit, Fulya; Aquila, Andrew L; Ciftci, Halilibrahim; Guillet, Serge; Hayes, Matt J; Lane, Thomas J; Liang, Meng; Lundström, Ulf; Koglin, Jason E; Mgbam, Paul; Rao, Yashas; Zhang, Lindsey; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Holton, James M; Boutet, Sébastien

    2016-11-04

    Structural information about biological macromolecules near the atomic scale provides important insight into the functions of these molecules. To date, X-ray crystallography has been the predominant method used for macromolecular structure determination. However, challenges exist when solving structures with X-rays, including the phase problem and radiation damage. X-ray-free electron lasers (X-ray FELs) have enabled collection of diffraction information before the onset of radiation damage, yet the majority of structures solved at X-ray FELs have been phased using external information via molecular replacement. De novo phasing at X-ray FELs has proven challenging due in part to per-pulse variations in intensity and wavelength. Here we report the solution of a selenobiotinyl-streptavidin structure using phases obtained by the anomalous diffraction of selenium measured at a single wavelength (Se-SAD) at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Our results demonstrate Se-SAD, routinely employed at synchrotrons for novel structure determination, is now possible at X-ray FELs.

  16. High-power near-diffraction-limited solid-state amplified spontaneous emission laser devices.

    PubMed

    Smith, G; Shardlow, P C; Damzen, M J

    2007-07-01

    We present investigations into high-power scaling of solid-state amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) laser sources by use of two high-gain (~10(4)) Nd:YVO(4) bounce amplifiers. The sources deliver high power with a high-quality spatial output, but unlike a laser they have a high misalignment tolerance and do not require a precisely aligned cavity. In one system with two amplifiers, we demonstrate an ASE source with 24.5W of output power with good spatial quality, M(2)<2.5 in the horizontal and M(2)<1.2 in the vertical. In a more sophisticated setup, the two amplifiers are arranged in a loop configuration producing 30W of ASE output with near-diffraction-limited spatial quality, with M(2)<1.3 in the horizontal and M(2)<1.2 in the vertical, at an ~38% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency.

  17. Imaging an aligned polyatomic molecule with laser-induced electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Michael G.; Wolter, Benjamin; Le, Anh-Thu; Baudisch, Matthias; Hemmer, Michaël; Senftleben, Arne; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Ullrich, Joachim; Moshammer, Robert; Lin, C. D.; Biegert, Jens

    2015-06-01

    Laser-induced electron diffraction is an evolving tabletop method that aims to image ultrafast structural changes in gas-phase polyatomic molecules with sub-Ångström spatial and femtosecond temporal resolutions. Here we demonstrate the retrieval of multiple bond lengths from a polyatomic molecule by simultaneously measuring the C-C and C-H bond lengths in aligned acetylene. Our approach takes the method beyond the hitherto achieved imaging of simple diatomic molecules and is based on the combination of a 160 kHz mid-infrared few-cycle laser source with full three-dimensional electron-ion coincidence detection. Our technique provides an accessible and robust route towards imaging ultrafast processes in complex gas-phase molecules with atto- to femto-second temporal resolution.

  18. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Inconel 718 Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Chou, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the crystallographic texture of an Inconel 718 part fabricated by selective laser melting was investigated. The front surface (X-Z plane) microstructure is characterized by the columnar grains growing along the build direction, and the width of columnar grains is in the range of about 75-150 µm, with the bottom layers having narrower grains as a result of a higher cooling rate. In addition to equiaxed grains, the top surface (X-Y plane) has a feature of patch patterns resulting from the laser scanning strategy. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction results, there appears only weak crystallographic texture in both the X-Z plane and the X-Y plane of the part. From the grain boundary map, the microstructures are composed of high-angle boundaries with a larger fraction of subgrain boundaries.

  19. Imaging an aligned polyatomic molecule with laser-induced electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Pullen, Michael G.; Wolter, Benjamin; Le, Anh-Thu; Baudisch, Matthias; Hemmer, Michaël; Senftleben, Arne; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Ullrich, Joachim; Moshammer, Robert; Lin, C. D.; Biegert, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced electron diffraction is an evolving tabletop method that aims to image ultrafast structural changes in gas-phase polyatomic molecules with sub-Ångström spatial and femtosecond temporal resolutions. Here we demonstrate the retrieval of multiple bond lengths from a polyatomic molecule by simultaneously measuring the C–C and C–H bond lengths in aligned acetylene. Our approach takes the method beyond the hitherto achieved imaging of simple diatomic molecules and is based on the combination of a 160 kHz mid-infrared few-cycle laser source with full three-dimensional electron–ion coincidence detection. Our technique provides an accessible and robust route towards imaging ultrafast processes in complex gas-phase molecules with atto- to femto-second temporal resolution. PMID:26105804

  20. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Inconel 718 Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Chou, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the crystallographic texture of an Inconel 718 part fabricated by selective laser melting was investigated. The front surface (X-Z plane) microstructure is characterized by the columnar grains growing along the build direction, and the width of columnar grains is in the range of about 75-150 µm, with the bottom layers having narrower grains as a result of a higher cooling rate. In addition to equiaxed grains, the top surface (X-Y plane) has a feature of patch patterns resulting from the laser scanning strategy. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction results, there appears only weak crystallographic texture in both the X-Z plane and the X-Y plane of the part. From the grain boundary map, the microstructures are composed of high-angle boundaries with a larger fraction of subgrain boundaries.

  1. Control of light backscattering in blood during intravenous laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Popov, V. D.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1997-02-01

    One of the most important problems in modern laser medicine is the determination of system response on laser treatment. Reaction of living system is significant during many kinds of laser procedures like surgery, therapy and biostimulation. Our study was aimed to optimize laser exposure using feed-back fiber system for intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). This system consisted of helium-neon laser (633 nm, 5 mW) with coupled fiber unit, photodetector and PC interface. Photodetector signals produced due to light backscattering were storaged and processed during all blood irradiation procedure. Significant time-dependent variations were observed within 9-15 min after beginning of treatment procedure and were correlated with number of trials, stage and character of disease. The designed feed-back system allows us to register a human blood response on laser irradiation to achieve better cure effect.

  2. Laser Light: Using Laser Refractometry to Determine Concentration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Laser refractometry is a science-technology-based activity that requires students to manipulate a variety of equipment, tools, materials, and critical-thinking skills. Students use a laser to measure the percent of glucose in a solution by calibrating the system, taking measurements, and computing the concentration. (MKR)

  3. Biomodulation of light on cells in laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Li, Yan; Duan, Rui; Cai, Xiongwei

    2002-04-01

    In laser surgery, it has been observed pulsed 532-nm laser can avoid postoperative purpura, but pulsed 585-nm, 595-nm or 600-nm lasers nonetheless cause purpura when they were used to treat port-wine stains; the XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) can safely and effectively clear psoriasis; both XeCl excimer laser and Ho:YAG laser were used in coronary interventions, but only former was approved by the FDA; open channels after ultraviolet (UV) laser treatment and closed channels with infrared (IR) lasers for transmyocardial laser revascularization; and so on. In this paper, the biological information model of low intensity laser (BIML) is extended to include UVA biomodulation and is used to understand these phenomena. Although the central intensity of the laser beam is so intense that it destroys the tissue, the edge intensity is so low that it can induce biomodulation. Our investigation showed that biomodulation of light on cells might play an important role in the long-term effects of laser surgery.

  4. Hollow light guide and optical fiber for UV laser transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Uichi; Hashishin, Yuichi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    1997-12-01

    The applications of ultraviolet lasers in medicine and surgery are expected to produce new therapies since UV laser is strongly absorbed by lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The suitable tools for the UV laser power delivery, however, have not been developed yet. In an effort to make efficient delivery of UV laser, we have proposed hollow light guide which consists of an aluminum-phosphor bronze reflector and a teflon E-type rail spacer. The delivery characteristics of the hollow light guide have been investigated using the ArF and KrF excimer lasers. In case of the KrF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy reached 77%/m and 110 mJ/pulse, respectively. In the ArF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy were obtained to be 56%/m and 40 mJ/pulse, respectively. It is known that 193 nm radiation by the ArF laser are absorbed by the air. Thus, the ArF laser beam delivery were examined in the helium gas. The transmittance and the delivery energy were obtained to be 72%/m and 50 mJ/pulse using helium-filled hollow light guide, which were greatly improved for comparison with the case of the air. We have also tried the quartz fiber with OH ion doped core. The effects of a lightly doped core with Cl and a clad with B-F on the laser transmittance have been investigated. In these result, the Cl was not good core dopant. The B and F were useful clad dopants for the excimer laser transmission.

  5. Hollow light guide and optical fiber for UV laser transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Uichi; Hashishin, Yuichi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    1998-01-01

    The applications of ultraviolet lasers in medicine and surgery are expected to produce new therapies since UV laser is strongly absorbed by lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The suitable tools for the UV laser power delivery, however, have not been developed yet. In an effort to make efficient delivery of UV laser, we have proposed hollow light guide which consists of an aluminum-phosphor bronze reflector and a teflon E-type rail spacer. The delivery characteristics of the hollow light guide have been investigated using the ArF and KrF excimer lasers. In case of the KrF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy reached 77%/m and 110 mJ/pulse, respectively. In the ArF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy were obtained to be 56%/m and 40 mJ/pulse, respectively. It is known that 193 nm radiation by the ArF laser are absorbed by the air. Thus, the ArF laser beam delivery were examined in the helium gas. The transmittance and the delivery energy were obtained to be 72%/m and 50 mJ/pulse using helium-filled hollow light guide, which were greatly improved for comparison with the case of the air. We have also tried the quartz fiber with OH ion doped core. The effects of a lightly doped core with Cl and a clad with B-F on the laser transmittance have been investigated. In these result, the Cl was not good core dopant. The B and F were useful clad dopants for the excimer laser transmission.

  6. Shaping laser accelerated ions for future applications - The LIGHT collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busold, S.; Almomani, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Barth, W.; Bedacht, S.; Blažević, A.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Brabetz, C.; Burris-Mog, T.; Cowan, T. E.; Deppert, O.; Droba, M.; Eickhoff, H.; Eisenbarth, U.; Harres, K.; Hoffmeister, G.; Hofmann, I.; Jaeckel, O.; Jaeger, R.; Joost, M.; Kraft, S.; Kroll, F.; Kaluza, M.; Kester, O.; Lecz, Z.; Merz, T.; Nürnberg, F.; Al-Omari, H.; Orzhekhovskaya, A.; Paulus, G.; Polz, J.; Ratzinger, U.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schmidt, P.; Schramm, U.; Schreiber, G.; Schumacher, D.; Stoehlker, T.; Tauschwitz, A.; Vinzenz, W.; Wagner, F.; Yaramyshev, S.; Zielbauer, B.

    2014-03-01

    The generation of intense ion beams from high-intensity laser-generated plasmas has been the focus of research for the last decade. In the LIGHT collaboration the expertise of heavy ion accelerator scientists and laser and plasma physicists has been combined to investigate the prospect of merging these ion beams with conventional accelerator technology and exploring the possibilities of future applications. We report about the goals and first results of the LIGHT collaboration to generate, handle and transport laser driven ion beams. This effort constitutes an important step in research for next generation accelerator technologies.

  7. Novel light trapping concepts for crystalline silicon solar cells using diffractive rear side structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenlohr, J.; Tucher, N.; Bett, Alexander; Hauser, H.; Graf, M.; Benick, J.; Goldschmidt, J. C.; Bläsi, B.; Hermle, M.

    2014-05-01

    Crystalline silicon solar cells absorb light in the near infrared only weakly. To utilize also the infrared light of the solar spectrum with energies still greater than the band gap of silicon, the effective path of the light inside the solar cell has to be enhanced. Light paths can be manipulated at the front side as well as at the rear side of a solar cell. For the front side, pyramidal textures that also show anti-reflection properties are widely used. These anti-reflection properties, however, can also be achieved with planar dielectric coatings or nanostructured surfaces. In this case, the path length enhancement can be achieved with rear side structures that are especially optimized for this purpose, thus de-coupling anti-reflection and path-length enhancement functionalities. This de-coupling creates leeway to optimize not only the optical properties but also the electrical properties of the optically active structures, and to realize structures that are compatible with very thin silicon wafers. To this end, this paper investigates two kinds of diffractive rear side structures, both, theoretically and experimentally. First, hexagonal sphere gratings that are produced by a self-organized growth process using spin coating, and second, binary gratings produced via nano-imprint lithography. Both process chains are potentially scalable to large areas. In optical measurements we determined potential photocurrent density gains of over 1 mA/cm2 for 250 μm thick wafers for both structures. Furthermore, we developed a process for contact formation as one key step to fully processed solar cells with diffractive rear side structures.

  8. Spin-to-orbit conversion at acousto-optic diffraction of light: conservation of optical angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Skab, Ihor; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic diffraction of light in optically active cubic crystals is analyzed from the viewpoint of conservation of optical angular momentum. It is shown that the availability of angular momentum in the diffracted optical beam can be necessarily inferred from the requirements of angular momentum conservation law. As follows from our analysis, a circularly polarized diffracted wave should bear an orbital angular momentum. The efficiency of the spin-to-orbit momentum conversion is governed by the efficiency of acousto-optic diffraction.

  9. Combined resistive and laser heating technique for in situ radial X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell at high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Kaercher, Pamela; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Alarcon, Eloisa Zepeda; Raju, Selva Vennila; Knight, Jason; MacDowell, Alastair; Williams, Quentin

    2013-02-15

    To extend the range of high-temperature, high-pressure studies within the diamond anvil cell, a Liermann-type diamond anvil cell with radial diffraction geometry (rDAC) was redesigned and developed for synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source. The rDAC, equipped with graphite heating arrays, allows simultaneous resistive and laser heating while the material is subjected to high pressure. The goals are both to extend the temperature range of external (resistive) heating and to produce environments with lower temperature gradients in a simultaneously resistive- and laser-heated rDAC. Three different geomaterials were used as pilot samples to calibrate and optimize conditions for combined resistive and laser heating. For example, in Run1, FeO was loaded in a boron-mica gasket and compressed to 11 GPa then gradually resistively heated to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side). The laser heating was further applied to FeO to raise temperature to 2273 K. In Run2, Fe-Ni alloy was compressed to 18 GPa and resistively heated to 1785 K (1973 K at the diamond side). The combined resistive and laser heating was successfully performed again on (Mg{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})O in Run3. In this instance, the sample was loaded in a boron-kapton gasket, compressed to 29 GPa, resistive-heated up to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side), and further simultaneously laser-heated to achieve a temperature in excess of 2273 K at the sample position. Diffraction patterns obtained from the experiments were deconvoluted using the Rietveld method and quantified for lattice preferred orientation of each material under extreme conditions and during phase transformation.

  10. Combined resistive and laser heating technique for in situ radial X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell at high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Raju, Selva Vennila; Kaercher, Pamela; Knight, Jason; MacDowell, Alastair; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Williams, Quentin; Alarcon, Eloisa Zepeda

    2013-02-01

    To extend the range of high-temperature, high-pressure studies within the diamond anvil cell, a Liermann-type diamond anvil cell with radial diffraction geometry (rDAC) was redesigned and developed for synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source. The rDAC, equipped with graphite heating arrays, allows simultaneous resistive and laser heating while the material is subjected to high pressure. The goals are both to extend the temperature range of external (resistive) heating and to produce environments with lower temperature gradients in a simultaneously resistive- and laser-heated rDAC. Three different geomaterials were used as pilot samples to calibrate and optimize conditions for combined resistive and laser heating. For example, in Run#1, FeO was loaded in a boron-mica gasket and compressed to 11 GPa then gradually resistively heated to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side). The laser heating was further applied to FeO to raise temperature to 2273 K. In Run#2, Fe-Ni alloy was compressed to 18 GPa and resistively heated to 1785 K (1973 K at the diamond side). The combined resistive and laser heating was successfully performed again on (Mg0.9Fe0.1)O in Run#3. In this instance, the sample was loaded in a boron-kapton gasket, compressed to 29 GPa, resistive-heated up to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side), and further simultaneously laser-heated to achieve a temperature in excess of 2273 K at the sample position. Diffraction patterns obtained from the experiments were deconvoluted using the Rietveld method and quantified for lattice preferred orientation of each material under extreme conditions and during phase transformation.

  11. IR sensitivity enhancement of CMOS Image Sensor with diffractive light trapping pixels.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Sozo; Oshiyama, Itaru; Ikeda, Harumi; Ebiko, Yoshiki; Hirano, Tomoyuki; Saito, Suguru; Oinoue, Takashi; Hagimoto, Yoshiya; Iwamoto, Hayato

    2017-06-19

    We report on the IR sensitivity enhancement of back-illuminated CMOS Image Sensor (BI-CIS) with 2-dimensional diffractive inverted pyramid array structure (IPA) on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and deep trench isolation (DTI). FDTD simulations of semi-infinite thick c-Si having 2D IPAs on its surface whose pitches over 400 nm shows more than 30% improvement of light absorption at λ = 850 nm and the maximum enhancement of 43% with the 540 nm pitch at the wavelength is confirmed. A prototype BI-CIS sample with pixel size of 1.2 μm square containing 400 nm pitch IPAs shows 80% sensitivity enhancement at λ = 850 nm compared to the reference sample with flat surface. This is due to diffraction with the IPA and total reflection at the pixel boundary. The NIR images taken by the demo camera equip with a C-mount lens show 75% sensitivity enhancement in the λ = 700-1200 nm wavelength range with negligible spatial resolution degradation. Light trapping CIS pixel technology promises to improve NIR sensitivity and appears to be applicable to many different image sensor applications including security camera, personal authentication, and range finding Time-of-Flight camera with IR illuminations.

  12. Toward efficient light diffraction and intensity variations by using wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ok; Chen, Fu; Lee, Kee Keun

    2016-06-01

    We have developed acoustic-optic (AO) based display units for implementing a handheld hologram display by modulating light deflection through wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave (SAW). The developed AO device consists of a metal layer, a ZnS waveguide layer, SAW inter digital transducers (IDTs), and a screen for display. When RF power with a particular resonant frequency was applied to IDTs, SAW was radiated and interfered with confined beam propagating along ZnS waveguide layer. The AO interacted beam was deflected laterally toward a certain direction depending on Bragg diffraction condition, exited out of the waveguide layer and then directed to the viewing screen placed at a certain distance from the device to form a single pixel. The deflected angles was adjusted by modulating the center frequency of the SAW IDT (SAW grating), the RF power of SAW, and the angles between propagating light beam path along waveguide and radiating SAW. The diffraction efficiency was also characterized in terms of waveguide thickness, SAW RF input power, and aperture length. Coupling of mode (COM) modeling was fulfilled to find optimal device parameters prior to fabrication. All the parameters affecting the deflection angle and efficiency to form a pixel for a three-dimensional (3D) hologram image were characterized and then discussed.

  13. Interaction of light with a metal wedge: the role of diffraction in shaping energy flow.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yonggang; Jung, Yun Suk; Kim, Hong Koo

    2010-02-01

    When a light wave hits a metal wedge structure, the metal surfaces respond to the incident light by generating both free-space and surface-bound waves. Here we present a physical model that elucidates electromagnetic interactions of an incoming planar wave with a simple semi-infinite 90 degrees metal wedge. We show that a metal wedge structure possesses an intrinsic capability of directing the incident power around the corner into the forward direction. Interplay of the boundary diffraction wave and the incident and reflection waves in the near field region of a metal corner is found to form a basis of the funneling phenomena that are commonly observed in metal nanoslit structures. Theory and experiment reveal that the incident wave propagating parallel to the sidewall destructively interferes with the boundary diffraction wave forming a depleted-energy-flow region along the glancing angle direction. A physical understanding of various electromagnetic phenomena associated with a metal wedge structure confirms rich potential of the simple structure as an elemental building block of complex metal nanostructures.

  14. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; ...

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  15. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E.; Fry, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS. PMID:25931064

  16. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Minitti, Michael P; Robinson, Joseph S; Coffee, Ryan N; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E; Fry, Alan R

    2015-05-01

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump-probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump-probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  17. Quantum-mechanical diffraction theory of light from a small hole: Extinction-theorem approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jesper; Keller, Ole

    2015-07-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 90, 043830 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.043830] it was shown that the so-called aperture response tensor is the central concept in the microscopic quantum theory of light diffraction from a small hole in a flat screen. It was further shown that the quantum mechanical theory of diffraction only requires a preknowledge of the incident field plus the electronic properties of identical screens with and without a hole. Starting from the quantum mechanical expression for the linear conductivity tensor, we study the related causal conductivity tensor paying particular attention to diamagnetic electron dynamics. Using a nonlocal-potential separation assumption, we present a calculation of the diamagnetic causal surface conductivity for a jellium quantum-well screen using a two-dimensional Hartree-Fock model. In the diamagnetic case the difference between the light-unperturbed electron densities for screens with (n0) and without (n∞0) holes are the primary quantities for the diffraction theory. In a central part (Sec. IV) of this article we determine n0 via a quantum-mechanical two-dimensional extinction-theorem approach related to elastic electron scattering from a hole with an electronic selvedge. For heuristic purposes we illustrate aspects of the extinction-theorem theory by applying the approach for an infinitely high potential barrier to the vacuum hole. Finally, we calculate and discuss the aperture response tensor in the small hole limit and in the zeroth-order Born approximation. Our final result for the aperture response tensor establishes the bridge to the anisotropic electric dipole polarizability tensor of the hole. It turns out that the effective optical aperture (hole) size relates closely to the extension of the relevant electronic wave functions scattered from the hole.

  18. Properties of nuclei probed by laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugart, Rainer

    2017-03-01

    Viewing objects as small as atomic nuclei by visible light sounds quite unrealistic. However, nuclei usually appear as constituents of atoms whose excitations are indeed associated with the absorption and emission of light. Nuclei can thus interact with light via the atomic system as a whole.

  19. The ARGOS laser system: green light for ground layer adaptive optics at the LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Walfried; Rabien, Sebastian; Gässler, Wolfgang; Esposito, Simone; Barl, Lothar; Borelli, Jose; Daysenroth, Matthias; Gemperlein, Hans; Kulas, Martin; Ziegleder, Julian

    2014-07-01

    We report on the development of the laser system of ARGOS, the multiple laser guide star adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The system uses a total of six high powered, pulsed Nd:YAG lasers frequency-doubled to a wavelength of 532 nm to generate a set of three guide stars above each of the LBT telescopes. The position of each of the LGS constellations on sky as well as the relative position of the individual laser guide stars within this constellation is controlled by a set of steerable mirrors and a fast tip-tilt mirror within the laser system. The entire opto-mechanical system is housed in two hermetically sealed and thermally controlled enclosures on the SX and DX side of the LBT telescope. The laser beams are propagated through two refractive launch telescopes which focus the beams at an altitude of 12 km, creating a constellation of laser guide stars around a 4 arcminute diameter circle by means of Rayleigh scattering. In addition to the GLAO Rayleigh beacon system, ARGOS has also been designed for a possible future upgrade with a hybrid sodium laser - Rayleigh beacon combination, enabling diffraction limited operation. The ARGOS laser system was successfully installed at the LBT in April 2013. Extensive functional tests have been carried out and have verified the operation of the systems according to specifications. The alignment of the laser system with respect to the launch telescope was carried out during two more runs in June and October 2013, followed by the first propagation of laser light on sky in November 2013.

  20. Laser warning receiver to identify the wavelength and angle of arrival of incident laser light

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair; Michael B.; Sweatt, William C.

    2010-03-23

    A laser warning receiver is disclosed which has up to hundreds of individual optical channels each optically oriented to receive laser light from a different angle of arrival. Each optical channel has an optical wedge to define the angle of arrival, and a lens to focus the laser light onto a multi-wavelength photodetector for that channel. Each multi-wavelength photodetector has a number of semiconductor layers which are located in a multi-dielectric stack that concentrates the laser light into one of the semiconductor layers according to wavelength. An electrical signal from the multi-wavelength photodetector can be processed to determine both the angle of arrival and the wavelength of the laser light.

  1. An evaluation of the hypothesis that laser light is more conspicuous than incandescent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, T. S.; Mandler, M. B.

    1986-05-01

    It has been thought that laser aids to navigation might appear more conspicuous than aids employing conventional light sources. Two experiments rigorously tested the hypothesis that laser light is more conspicuous than incandescent light. Incandescent and Helium Neon laser sources were optically filtered and adjusted to present the same illuminance and color to distant observers. Thirty-seven observers viewed 60 random presentations (2 source types, 2 illuminance levels) from a distance of 1500 yards. Group correct source discrimination percentages were 52.6 and 55.2 for the low and high illuminance levels, respectively. The experiment was repeated indoors at higher illuminances with resultant group correct source discrimination percentages of 57, 67.5, and 66 for the low, medium, and high illuminances, respectively. It was concluded that at practical design illuminance levels, no significant conspicuity advantage would be gained by replacing existing navigational aids with laser aids-to-navigation. Calculations show that a significant conspicuity advantage is likely to be obtained if the mariner uses a narrow bandpass filter (3 to 10 nm) centered at the laser wavelength. The illuminance from the laser will be relatively unaffected, while the illuminances from all background lights will be dramatically diminished. An additional section compares the electrical efficiency of a standard Coast Guard FA-240 range light with a laser aid configured for the same application. For equal input power, the FA-240 is shown to produce 10 times the luminous intensity of the laser aid.

  2. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Marchesini, Stefano; Woods, Bruce W.; Bajt, Saša; Benner, W. Henry; London, Richard A.; Plönjes, Elke; Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Düsterer, Stefan; Tschentscher, Thomas; Schneider, Jochen R.; Spiller, Eberhard; Möller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Hoener, Matthias; Shapiro, David A.; Hodgson, Keith O.; van der Spoel, David; Burmeister, Florian; Bergh, Magnus; Caleman, Carl; Huldt, Gösta; Seibert, M. Marvin; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Lee, Richard W.; Szöke, Abraham; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos

    2006-12-01

    Theory predicts that, with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft-X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25fs, 4×1013Wcm-2 pulse, containing 1012 photons at 32nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nanostructured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000K. A novel X-ray camera assured single-photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and is reconstructed at the diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  3. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton: AUTHOR = Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastian; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Marchesini, Stefano; Woods, Bruce W.; Bajt, Sasa; Benner, W.Henry; London, Richard A.; Plonjes, Elke; Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Dusterer, Stefan; Tschentscher, Thomas; Schneider, Jochen R.; Spiller, Eberhard; Moller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Hoener, Matthias; Shapiro, David A.; /UC, Davis /SLAC /Uppsala U. /LLNL, Livermore /Uppsala U. /Uppsala U. /SLAC /Uppsala U.

    2010-10-07

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  4. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Bogan, M; Boutet, S; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S P; Marchesini, S; Woods, B; Bajt, S; Benner, W H; London, R; Ploenjes-Palm, E; Kuhlmann, M; Treusch, R; Dusterer, S; Tschentscher, T; Schneider, J; Spiller, E; Moller, T; Bostedt, C; Hoener, M; Shapiro, D; Hodgson, K O; der Spoel, D v; Burmeister, F; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Lee, R; Szoke, A; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J

    2006-03-13

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  5. X-ray laser-induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A; Putkunz, Corey T; Martin, Andrew V; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W M; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G; Nugent, Keith A; Quiney, Harry M

    2016-09-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration.

  6. Picosecond X-Ray Diffraction from Laser-Shocked Copper and Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wark, J. S.; Hawreliak, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Rosolankova, K.; Sheppard, J.; Belak, J. F.; Collins, G. W.; Colvin, J. D.; Duchaineau, M.; Eggert, J. H.; Kalantar, D. H.; Lorenzana, H. E.; Remington, B. A.; Rudd, R. E.; Stolken, J. S.; Davies, H. M.; Germann, T. C.; Holian, B. L.; Kadau, K.; Lomdahl, P. S.

    2006-07-28

    In situ X-ray diffraction allows the determination of the structure of transient states of matter. We have used laser-plasma generated X-rays to study how single crystals of metals (copper and iron) react to uniaxial shock compression. We find that copper, as a face-centred-cubic material, allows rapid generation and motion of dislocations, allowing close to hydrostatic conditions to be achieved on sub-nanosecond timescales. Detailed molecular dynamics calculations provide novel information about the process, and point towards methods whereby the dislocation density might be measured during the passage of the shock wave itself. We also report on recent experiments where we have obtained diffraction images from shock-compressed single-crystal iron. The single crystal sample transforms to the hcp phase above a critical pressure, below which it appears to be uniaxially compressed bcc, with no evidence of plasticity. Above the transition threshold, clear evidence for the hcp phase can be seen in the diffraction images, and via a mechanism that is also consistent with recent multi- million atom molecular dynamics simulations that use the Voter- Chen potential. We believe these data to be of import, in that they constitute the first conclusive in situ evidence of the transformed structure of iron during the passage of a shock wave.

  7. PICOSECOND X-RAY DIFFRACTION FROM LASER-SHOCKED COPPER AND IRON

    SciTech Connect

    Wark, J S; Belak, J F; Collins, G W; Colvin, J D; Davies, H M; Duchaineau, M; Eggert, J H; Germann, T C; Hawreliak, J; Higginbotham, A; Holian, B L; Kadau, K; Kalantar, D H; Lomdahl, P S; Lorenzana, H E; Meyers, M A; Remington, B A; Rosolankova, K; Rudd, R E; Schneider, M S; Sheppard, J; Stolken, J S

    2005-08-23

    In situ X-ray diffraction allows the determination of the structure of transient states of matter. We have used laser-plasma generated X-rays to study how single crystals of metals (copper and iron) react to uniaxial shock compression. We find that copper, as a face-centered-cubic material, allows rapid generation and motion of dislocations, allowing close to hydrostatic conditions to be achieved on sub-nanosecond timescales. Detailed molecular dynamics calculations provide novel information about the process, and point towards methods whereby the dislocation density might be measured during the passage of the shock wave itself. We also report on recent experiments where we have obtained diffraction images from shock-compressed single-crystal iron. The single crystal sample transforms to the hcp phase above a critical pressure, below which it appears to be uniaxially compressed bcc, with no evidence of plasticity. Above the transition threshold, clear evidence for the hcp phase can be seen in the diffraction images, and via a mechanism that is also consistent with recent multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations that use the Voter-Chen potential. We believe these data to be of import, in that they constitute the first conclusive in situ evidence of the transformed structure of iron during the passage of a shock wave.

  8. NASA Now: Lasers and Light: STORRM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Byron Meadows, a laser systems engineer at NASA, describes his work on sensor testing for the Orion Relative Navigation Risk Mitigation, or STORRM, project. Learn why NASA wants to develop technolo...

  9. Final Report: Cooling Molecules with Laser Light

    SciTech Connect

    Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2012-05-08

    Certain diatomic molecules are disposed to laser cooling in the way successfully applied to certain atoms and that ushered in a revolution in ultracold atomic physics, an identification first made at Los Alamos and which took root during this program. Despite their manipulation into numerous achievements, atoms are nonetheless mundane denizens of the quantum world. Molecules, on the other hand, with their internal degrees of freedom and rich dynamical interplay, provide considerably more complexity. Two main goals of this program were to demonstrate the feasibility of laser-cooling molecules to the same temperatures as laser-cooled atoms and introduce a means for collecting laser-cooled molecules into dense ensembles, a foundational start of studies and applications of ultracold matter without equivalence in atomic systems.

  10. Observation of Femtosecond, Sub-Angstrom Molecular Bond Relaxation Using Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaga, Cosmin I.; Dichiara, Anthony D.; Zhang, Kaikai; Sistrunk, Emily; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis F.; Xu, Junliang; Lin, Chii-Dong; Miller, Terry A.

    2011-06-01

    Imaging, or the determination of the atomic positions in molecules, has always occupied an essential role in physical, chemical and biological sciences. For structural determination, the well established methods of X-ray and electron diffraction easily achieve sub-Angstrom spatial resolution. However, these conventional approaches are not suitable for investigating structural transformations, such as the reaction of molecules or the function of biological systems that occur on the timescales faster than a picosecond. Over the past decade, major efforts directed at developing femtosecond pulsed sources, e.g. X-ray free-electron lasers and electron beams, have resulted in pioneering investigations on imaging large biological molecules and condensed phase dynamics. We report on a different approach, laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED), for achieving sub-femtosecond, sub-Angstrom spatio-temporal resolution for investigating gas-phase molecular dynamics. In contrast to the above mentioned techniques, the LIED method generates bursts of coherent electron wave packets directly from the molecule under interrogation. The study is performed by measuring the diffracted photoelectron momentum distribution produced by strong-field ionization of oxygen and nitrogen molecules at several mid-infrared wavelengths (1.7-2.3 μm). The bond lengths retrieved from the LIED analysis show sensitivity to a change of 0.05 Å in 1 fs. This initial report provides the first direct evidence of bond relaxation following an electronic excitation and establishes the foundation of the LIED method as a general approach for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics.

  11. Generalized phase contrast-enhanced diffractive coupling to light-driven microtools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated on-demand dynamic coupling to optically manipulated microtools coined as wave-guided optical waveguides using diffractive techniques on a "point and shoot" approach. These microtools are extended microstructures fabricated using two-photon photopolymerization and function as free-floating optically trapped waveguides. Dynamic coupling of focused light via these structures being moved in three-dimensional space is done holographically. However, calculating the necessary holograms is not straightforward when using counter-propagating trapping geometry. The generation of the coupling spots is done in real time following the position of each microtool with the aid of an object tracking routine. This approach allows continuous coupling of light through the microtools which can be useful in a variety of biophotonics applications. To complement the targeted-light delivery capability of the microtools, the applied spatial light modulator has been illuminated with a properly matched input beam cross section based on the generalized phase contrast method. Our results show a significant gain in the output at the tip of each microtool as measured from the fluorescence signal of the trapping medium. The ability to switch from on-demand to continuous addressing with efficient illumination leverages our microtools for potential applications in stimulation and near-field-based biophotonics on cellular scales.

  12. Thermal imaging technique to characterize laser light reflection from thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhikannickal, Elizabeth; Bates, Philip J.; Zak, Gene

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of laser light reflection during the laser transmission welding (LTW) of thermoplastics is especially important for applications in which non-zero laser incidence angles are used. At higher laser incidence angles, reflection increases and has the potential to burn surrounding features of the part to be welded. This study presents and validates a technique for laser reflection measurement. Reflected energy is absorbed by a black plastic plate (containing carbon black, which is the absorber of the reflected energy). The surface temperature of the plate is measured by an infrared (IR) camera. The distribution of reflected power required to generate this temperature profile is estimated using a simple heat transfer model. The technique was validated by irradiating the black plate by the laser directly, while observing the time-varying temperature distribution of the plate by the IR camera. In this case, good agreement was observed between the estimated total power and the actual laser input power. Good agreement also existed between the estimated power distribution and that determined experimentally via a knife edge based beam profiling technique. The thermal imaging technique was subsequently used to measure the magnitude and distribution of laser light reflection from unreinforced nylon 6. Abbreviations: LTW—laser transmission welding, CB—carbon black, IR—infrared, NPFD—normalized power flux distribution

  13. ERL R&D: Laser and Laser Light Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehy, B.

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the photocathode gun in the ERL requires that a tightly controlled optical pulse train, consisting of temporally and spatially shaped pulses, be delivered at the photocathode in synchrony with the RF field in the gun cavity. The pulse train must also be dynamically variable, in order to tune or ramp up the current in the ERL. A laser was developed especially for this task by Lumera Laser GmbH, of Kaiserslautern Germany, under design supervision and review of the ERL project. Following the final design review, the laser was delivered in August 2009. Preliminary tests certifying its compliance with design specifications have been performed, with further tests planned following the final certification of the ERL laser room in January 2010. The development of the necessary spatial and temporal shaping techniques is an ongoing project: proof of principle experiments have been successfully carried out with a laser of similar pulse width, operating at 532 nm and 81.5 MHz. The next stage is to evaluate the application of these techniques and alternatives, using the operations laser. A transport line has been designed and the propagation of a shaped pulse through it to the photocathode simulated and tested experimentally. As the performance of the complete photocathode drive system is critical for ERL operation, an extensive set of diagnostics will be in place to monitor and maintain its performance. The block diagram in Fig. 1 breaks the optical system down into its basic components, which are discussed.

  14. A twin-mirrored galvanometer laser light sheet generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, David B.; Franke, John M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1988-01-01

    A galvanometer mirror-based laser light sheet system has been developed for use in the Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel at NASA Langley. This system generates and positions single or multiple light sheets over aeronautical research models being tested in the low speed tunnel. This report describes a twin mirrored galvanometer laser light sheet generator and shows typical light sheet arrangements in use. With this system, illumination of smoke entrained in the flow over a delta wing model reveals the vortical flow produced by the separation of the flow at the leading edge of the model. The light sheet system has proven to be very adaptable and easy to use in sizing and positioning light sheets in wind tunnel applications.

  15. Progress on the prevention of stray light and diffraction effects on the Thai National Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buisset, Christophe; Prasit, Apirat; Leckngam, Apichat; Lépine, Thierry; Poshyajinda, Saran; Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar; Irawati, Puji; Richichi, Andrea; Sawangwit, Utane; Dhillon, Vik; Hardy, Liam K.

    2015-09-01

    The 2.4-m Thai National Telescope (TNT) is the main facility of the Thai National Observatory located on the Doi Inthanon, Thailand's highest mountain. The first astronomical images obtained at the TNT suffered from diffraction and stray light problems: bright spikes spread from bright stellar images over few arcminutes in the focal plane, and the images taken during observations in bright moon conditions were contaminated by high levels of stray light. We performed targeted investigations to identify the origin of these problems. In a first time, these investigations consisted of analyzing the irradiance distribution of defocused stellar images and of identifying the contributors. We concluded that these bright spikes around the bright stellar images were due to the chamfer and the wavefront error at the mirror edge. We thus installed an annular mask along the edge of the primary mirror that fully suppressed these spikes and we quantified the improvement by observing the double star Sirius. In a second time, we identified the contributors to the stray light by placing a pinhole camera at the TNT focal plane. Then, we designed a new baffle to improve the stray light rejection. The final design of the baffle comprises 21 diaphragms, is painted with an ordinary black paint and was designed, developed and installed on the TNT in less than 8 months. We assessed the improvement on the performance by measuring the variation of the stray light signal before and after installing the baffle in the telescope structure. These steps significantly improved the image quality and enhanced the rejection of the stray light at the focal plane level. In this paper, we present our investigations, we describe the method used to design the TNT baffle, and we present the improvement in quantitative terms.

  16. High-Average-Power Diffraction Pulse-Compression Gratings Enabling Next-Generation Ultrafast Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, D.

    2016-11-01

    Pulse compressors for ultrafast lasers have been identified as a technology gap in the push towards high peak power systems with high average powers for industrial and scientific applications. Gratings for ultrashort (sub-150fs) pulse compressors are metallic and can absorb a significant percentage of laser energy resulting in up to 40% loss as well as thermal issues which degrade on-target performance. We have developed a next generation gold grating technology which we have scaled to the petawatt-size. This resulted in improvements in efficiency, uniformity and processing as compared to previous substrate etched gratings for high average power. This new design has a deposited dielectric material for the grating ridge rather than etching directly into the glass substrate. It has been observed that average powers as low as 1W in a compressor can cause distortions in the on-target beam. We have developed and tested a method of actively cooling diffraction gratings which, in the case of gold gratings, can support a petawatt peak power laser with up to 600W average power. We demonstrated thermo-mechanical modeling of a grating in its use environment and benchmarked with experimental measurement. Multilayer dielectric (MLD) gratings are not yet used for these high peak power, ultrashort pulse durations due to their design challenges. We have designed and fabricated broad bandwidth, low dispersion MLD gratings suitable for delivering 30 fs pulses at high average power. This new grating design requires the use of a novel Out Of Plane (OOP) compressor, which we have modeled, designed, built and tested. This prototype compressor yielded a transmission of 90% for a pulse with 45 nm bandwidth, and free of spatial and angular chirp. In order to evaluate gratings and compressors built in this project we have commissioned a joule-class ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser system. Combining the grating cooling and MLD technologies developed here could enable petawatt laser systems to

  17. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  18. Methods development for diffraction and spectroscopy studies of metalloenzymes at X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Kern, Jan; Hattne, Johan; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Laksmono, Hartawan; Gul, Sheraz; Sierra, Raymond G; Rehanek, Jens; Erko, Alexei; Mitzner, Rolf; Wernet, Phillip; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2014-07-17

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) open up new possibilities for X-ray crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples under close to physiological conditions. To facilitate these new X-ray sources, tailored experimental methods and data-processing protocols have to be developed. The highly radiation-sensitive photosystem II (PSII) protein complex is a prime target for XFEL experiments aiming to study the mechanism of light-induced water oxidation taking place at a Mn cluster in this complex. We developed a set of tools for the study of PSII at XFELs, including a new liquid jet based on electrofocusing, an energy dispersive von Hamos X-ray emission spectrometer for the hard X-ray range and a high-throughput soft X-ray spectrometer based on a reflection zone plate. While our immediate focus is on PSII, the methods we describe here are applicable to a wide range of metalloenzymes. These experimental developments were complemented by a new software suite, cctbx.xfel. This software suite allows for near-real-time monitoring of the experimental parameters and detector signals and the detailed analysis of the diffraction and spectroscopy data collected by us at the Linac Coherent Light Source, taking into account the specific characteristics of data measured at an XFEL. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Methods development for diffraction and spectroscopy studies of metalloenzymes at X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Jan; Hattne, Johan; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Laksmono, Hartawan; Gul, Sheraz; Sierra, Raymond G.; Rehanek, Jens; Erko, Alexei; Mitzner, Rolf; Wernet, Phillip; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) open up new possibilities for X-ray crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples under close to physiological conditions. To facilitate these new X-ray sources, tailored experimental methods and data-processing protocols have to be developed. The highly radiation-sensitive photosystem II (PSII) protein complex is a prime target for XFEL experiments aiming to study the mechanism of light-induced water oxidation taking place at a Mn cluster in this complex. We developed a set of tools for the study of PSII at XFELs, including a new liquid jet based on electrofocusing, an energy dispersive von Hamos X-ray emission spectrometer for the hard X-ray range and a high-throughput soft X-ray spectrometer based on a reflection zone plate. While our immediate focus is on PSII, the methods we describe here are applicable to a wide range of metalloenzymes. These experimental developments were complemented by a new software suite, cctbx.xfel. This software suite allows for near-real-time monitoring of the experimental parameters and detector signals and the detailed analysis of the diffraction and spectroscopy data collected by us at the Linac Coherent Light Source, taking into account the specific characteristics of data measured at an XFEL. PMID:24914169

  20. Luminescent light source for laser pumping and laser system containing same

    DOEpatents

    Hamil, Roy A.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a pumping lamp for use with lasers comprising a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting light upon interaction of the component with exciting radiation and a source of exciting radiation. Preferably, the pumping lamp comprises a source of exciting radiation, such as an electron beam, and an aerogel or xerogel substrate loaded with a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce light, e.g., visible light, of a suitable band width and of a sufficient intensity to generate a laser beam from a laser material.

  1. Stray-light suppression with high-collection efficiency in laser light-scattering experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deilamian, K.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Kelleher, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    An optical system is described for collecting a large fraction of fluorescent light emitted isotropically from a cylindrical interaction region. While maintaining an overall detection efficiency of 9 percent, the system rejects, by more than 12 orders of magnitude, incident laser light along a single axis that intersects the interaction region. Such a system is useful for a wide variety of light-scattering experiments in which high-collection efficiency is desirable, but in which light from an incident laser beam must be rejected without resorting to spectral filters.

  2. Sound Velocity and Diffraction Intensity Measurements Based on Raman-Nath Theory of the Interaction of Light and Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeson, John F.; Austin, Stephen

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the measurement of the velocity of sound in various liquids based on the Raman-Nath theory of light-sound interaction. Utilizes an analog computer program to calculate the intensity of light scattered into various diffraction orders. (CP)

  3. Sound Velocity and Diffraction Intensity Measurements Based on Raman-Nath Theory of the Interaction of Light and Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeson, John F.; Austin, Stephen

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the measurement of the velocity of sound in various liquids based on the Raman-Nath theory of light-sound interaction. Utilizes an analog computer program to calculate the intensity of light scattered into various diffraction orders. (CP)

  4. X-ray diffraction of periclase in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiquet, G.; Andrault, D.; Itié, J. P.; Gillet, P.; Richet, P.

    1996-05-01

    Periclase (MgO) has been studied up to 16 GPa and temperatures in excess of 3000 K by X-ray diffraction in an energy-dispersive configuration at the DCI storage ring of LURE (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation du Royonnement Electromagnétique, Orsay, France). The experiments were conducted in a diamond-anvil cell heated with a CO 2 laser with argon as a pressure transmitting medium. With this newly developed experimental set-up, the molar volume of periclase was measured as a function of pressure and temperature, which were both measured on-line. The thermal expansion coefficient (α) determined in these preliminary experiments has apparently too strong a pressure dependence, decreasing for instance from 4.9 10 -5 K -1 at room pressure to 7.5 10 -6 K -1 at 13.0 GPa. These results would yield a very high Anderson-Grüneisen parameter ( δT = 25-30), in disagreement with the expected δT = 6.5-4.3, as calculated for MgO or obtained by Fei et al. (1992a) on magnesiowüstite from room temperature to 900 K. This difference indicates that thermal pressure in the laser-heated spot can be significant and should be addressed in laser-heated diamond-anvil cell experiments.

  5. Sub-Diffraction Limited Writing based on Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS)

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaolong; Datta, Anurup; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-01-01

    Controlled fabrication of single and multiple nanostructures far below the diffraction limit using a method based on laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is presented. In typical LIPSS, multiple lines with a certain spatial periodicity, but often not well-aligned, were produced. In this work, well-controlled and aligned nanowires and nanogrooves with widths as small as 40 nm and 60 nm with desired orientation and length are fabricated. Moreover, single nanowire and nanogroove were fabricated based on the same mechanism for forming multiple, periodic structures. Combining numerical modeling and AFM/SEM analyses, it was found these nanostructures were formed through the interference between the incident laser radiation and the surface plasmons, the mechanism for forming LIPSS on a dielectric surface using a high power femtosecond laser. We expect that our method, in particular, the fabrication of single nanowires and nanogrooves could be a promising alternative for fabrication of nanoscale devices due to its simplicity, flexibility, and versatility. PMID:27721428

  6. Sub-Diffraction Limited Writing based on Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS).

    PubMed

    He, Xiaolong; Datta, Anurup; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-10-10

    Controlled fabrication of single and multiple nanostructures far below the diffraction limit using a method based on laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is presented. In typical LIPSS, multiple lines with a certain spatial periodicity, but often not well-aligned, were produced. In this work, well-controlled and aligned nanowires and nanogrooves with widths as small as 40 nm and 60 nm with desired orientation and length are fabricated. Moreover, single nanowire and nanogroove were fabricated based on the same mechanism for forming multiple, periodic structures. Combining numerical modeling and AFM/SEM analyses, it was found these nanostructures were formed through the interference between the incident laser radiation and the surface plasmons, the mechanism for forming LIPSS on a dielectric surface using a high power femtosecond laser. We expect that our method, in particular, the fabrication of single nanowires and nanogrooves could be a promising alternative for fabrication of nanoscale devices due to its simplicity, flexibility, and versatility.

  7. The 'Magic Light': A Discussion on Laser Ethics.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Andreas; Talias, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Innovations in technology and science form novel fields that, although beneficial, introduce new bio-ethical issues. In their short history, lasers have greatly influenced our everyday lives, especially in medicine. This paper focuses particularly on medical and para-medical laser ethics and their origins, and presents the complex relationships within laser ethics through a three-dimensional matrix model. The term 'laser' and the myth of the 'magic light' can be identified as landmarks for laser related ethical issues. These ethical issues are divided into five major groups: (1) media, marketing, and advertising; (2) economic outcomes; (3) user training; (4) the user-patient/client relationship; and (5) other issues. In addition, issues arising from two of the most common applications of lasers, laser eye surgery and laser tattoo removal, are discussed. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that the use of medical and para-medical lasers has so greatly influenced our lives that the scientific community must initiate an earnest discussion of medical laser ethics.

  8. Influence of laser light on bioimplants used in otorhinolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Siedek, Vanessa; Nehls, Kristina; Zur Nieden, Katrin; Leunig, Andreas; Sroka, Ronald

    2014-05-01

    In otorhinolaryngology, dermatology and reconstructive surgery biomaterials as implants and a variety of lasers are used. Laser light applied near to an implant could have the risk to damage these materials. Therefore, their resistance exposed to laser light is of interest. A diode laser emitting at 940 nm and a CO2 laser were used to investigate its effects to the biomaterials Bioverit®, Medpor® and Palacos®, and in addition, an excised implant containing Medpor® and nasal turbinate tissue, excised and fixed in formalin. The macro- and microscopic changes of the material, temperature development during laser energy application in dependency to distance of fibre and material, time of exposure and applied power were investigated. Interaction of diode laser light with Bioverit® (0 mm distance, 360 s, 10 W, 3,600 J) resulted in minimal microscopic effects in direct contact of with the fibre. Using Medpor® (1 mm, 10s, 10 W, 100 J) resulted in melting and perforation. In the case of Palacos® (0.6 mm, 10s, 10 W, 100 J), melting occurred creating a flat excavation. The effect to Medpor® in nasal turbinate (1-2 mm, 10s, 10 W, 100 J) showed tissue denaturation and carbonisation and creation of a hole. The interaction of the CO2 laser with Bioverit® (3 cm, 0.5, 1 and 5 s, 2, 10 or 20 W) induced melting and discolouring resulting finally in a perforating hole. Depending on the material, first damage starts 10 s after an impact of 100 J (threshold value). So interaction between laser energy and biomaterials occurs. This should be carefully considered during clinical laser treatments especially nearby implants.

  9. Single-shot diffractive imaging with a table-top femtosecond soft x-ray laser-harmonics source.

    PubMed

    Ravasio, A; Gauthier, D; Maia, F R N C; Billon, M; Caumes, J-P; Garzella, D; Géléoc, M; Gobert, O; Hergott, J-F; Pena, A-M; Perez, H; Carré, B; Bourhis, E; Gierak, J; Madouri, A; Mailly, D; Schiedt, B; Fajardo, M; Gautier, J; Zeitoun, P; Bucksbaum, P H; Hajdu, J; Merdji, H

    2009-07-10

    Coherent x-ray diffractive imaging is a powerful method for studies on nonperiodic structures on the nanoscale. Access to femtosecond dynamics in major physical, chemical, and biological processes requires single-shot diffraction data. Up to now, this has been limited to intense coherent pulses from a free electron laser. Here we show that laser-driven ultrashort x-ray sources offer a comparatively inexpensive alternative. We present measurements of single-shot diffraction patterns from isolated nano-objects with a single 20 fs pulse from a table-top high-harmonic x-ray laser. Images were reconstructed with a resolution of 119 nm from the single shot and 62 nm from multiple shots.

  10. Comparison between ray-tracing and physical optics for the computation of light absorption in capillaries--the influence of diffraction and interference.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuan; Michalowski, Andreas; Weber, Rudolf; Yang, Sen; Graf, Thomas; Ni, Xiaowu

    2012-11-19

    Ray-tracing is the commonly used technique to calculate the absorption of light in laser deep-penetration welding or drilling. Since new lasers with high brilliance enable small capillaries with high aspect ratios, diffraction might become important. To examine the applicability of the ray-tracing method, we studied the total absorptance and the absorbed intensity of polarized beams in several capillary geometries. The ray-tracing results are compared with more sophisticated simulations based on physical optics. The comparison shows that the simple ray-tracing is applicable to calculate the total absorptance in triangular grooves and in conical capillaries but not in rectangular grooves. To calculate the distribution of the absorbed intensity ray-tracing fails due to the neglected interference, diffraction, and the effects of beam propagation in the capillaries with sub-wavelength diameter. If diffraction is avoided e.g. with beams smaller than the entrance pupil of the capillary or with very shallow capillaries, the distribution of the absorbed intensity calculated by ray-tracing corresponds to the local average of the interference pattern found by physical optics.

  11. Laser remote sensing of backscattered light from a target sample

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Williams, John D.

    2008-02-26

    A laser remote sensing apparatus comprises a laser to provide collimated excitation light at a wavelength; a sensing optic, comprising at least one optical element having a front receiving surface to focus the received excitation light onto a back surface comprising a target sample and wherein the target sample emits a return light signal that is recollimated by the front receiving surface; a telescope for collecting the recollimated return light signal from the sensing optic; and a detector for detecting and spectrally resolving the return light signal. The back surface further can comprise a substrate that absorbs the target sample from an environment. For example the substrate can be a SERS substrate comprising a roughened metal surface. The return light signal can be a surface-enhanced Raman signal or laser-induced fluorescence signal. For fluorescence applications, the return signal can be enhanced by about 10.sup.5, solely due to recollimation of the fluorescence return signal. For SERS applications, the return signal can be enhanced by 10.sup.9 or more, due both to recollimation and to structuring of the SERS substrate so that the incident laser and Raman scattered fields are in resonance with the surface plasmons of the SERS substrate.

  12. Laser and light therapy for facial warts: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Maranda, E L; Lim, V M; Nguyen, A H; Nouri, K

    2016-10-01

    Facial verruca plana, or flat warts, are benign skin papillomas caused by human papillomavirus infections. A large portion of cases are refractory to treatment and can cause psychosocial distress in patients. Laser and light modalities offer an alternative therapeutic approach that has not been extensively explored. We systematically reviewed PubMed for studies describing treatment of facial verruca plana using lasers, photodynamic therapy and infrared coagulation. Final inclusion and review of eighteen studies suggests laser and light therapies to have considerable potential in the treatment of this recalcitrant condition. In particular, yttrium aluminium garnet lasers, infrared coagulation and photodynamic therapies have been reported to demonstrate efficacy. Further studies with larger power are required to determine which method should be established as the alternative treatment of choice for recalcitrant facial verrucae.

  13. Laser and light therapy for onychomycosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ledon, Jennifer A; Savas, Jessica; Franca, Katlein; Chacon, Anna; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-03-01

    More than just a cosmetic concern, onychomycosis is a prevalent and extremely difficult condition to treat. In older and diabetic populations, severe onychomycosis may possibly serve as a nidus for infection, and other more serious complications may ensue. Many treatment modalities for the treatment of onychomycosis have been studied, including topical lacquers and ointments, oral antifungals, surgical and chemical nail avulsion, and lasers. Due to their minimally invasive nature and potential to restore clear nail growth with relatively few sessions, lasers have become a popular option in the treatment of onychomycosis for both physicians and patients. Laser or light systems that have been investigated for this indication include the carbon dioxide, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet, 870/930-nm combination, and femtosecond infrared 800-nm lasers, in addition to photodynamic and ultraviolet light therapy. This systematic review will discuss each of these modalities as well as their respective currently published, peer-reviewed literature.

  14. Application of dynamic diffractive optics for enhanced femtosecond laser based cell transfection.

    PubMed

    Antkowiak, Maciej; Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate the advantages of a dynamic diffractive optical element, namely a spatial light modulator (SLM) for the controlled and enhanced optoinjection and phototransfection of mammalian cells with a femtosecond light source. The SLM provides full control over the lateral and axial positioning of the beam with sub-micron precision. Fast beam translation enables time-sequenced irradiation, which is shown to enhance the optoinjection efficiency and alleviate the problem of exact beam positioning on the cell membrane. We show that irradiation in three axial positions doubles the number of viably optoinjected cells when compared with a single dose. The presented system also enables untargeted raster scan irradiation which provides a higher throughput transfection of adherent cells at the rate of 1 cell per second. Additionally, fluorescent imaging is used to demonstrate cell selective two-step gene therapy.

  15. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  16. Investigation of ferrofluid nanostructure by laser light scattering: medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomnyashchaya, E. K.; Velichko, E. N.; Pleshakov, I. V.; Aksenov, E. T.; Savchenko, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    Investigation of ferrofluids nanostructure by the laser light scattering technique is presented. Experimental studies involved measurements of the intensity of the laser radiation scattered by ferrofluid particles in interaction with albumin and under the influence of magnetic field. The effects of the magnitude and duration of the applied magnetic field on the formation of aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles and also the influence of magnetic fluids of different concentrations on blood proteins are considered. The findings may be useful for medical applications.

  17. First light of the ESO Laser Guide Star Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccini Calia, D.; Allaert, E.; Alvarez, J. L.; Araujo Hauck, C.; Avila, G.; Bendek, E.; Buzzoni, B.; Comin, M.; Cullum, M.; Davies, R.; Dimmler, M.; Guidolin, I.; Hackenberg, W.; Hippler, S.; Kellner, S.; van Kesteren, A.; Koch, F.; Neumann, U.; Ott, T.; Popovic, D.; Pedichini, F.; Quattri, M.; Quentin, J.; Rabien, S.; Silber, A.; Tapia, M.

    2006-06-01

    Two teams of scientists and engineers at Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik and at the European Southern Observatory have joined forces to design, build and install the Laser Guide Star Facility for the VLT. The Laser Guide Star Facility has now been completed and installed on the VLT Yepun telescope at Cerro Paranal. In this paper we report on the first light and first results from the Commissioning of the LGSF.

  18. Nonlinear optics and liquid crystal light valve for laser beam control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huignard, Jean Pierre; Brignon, Arnaud; Steinhausser, Bastien

    2008-11-01

    The recent advances in solid state laser technology now permit to achieve high energy and efficiency sources for a wide range of applications extending from laser physics to material processing, biophotonics, remote sensing and coherent lidar systems. In particular the progress of fibre laser exploiting the double clading diode pumping structure are impressive: they are compact and emit single mode beams. However optical damage and nonlinear effects limit the output peak power emitted by a single mode fiber laser. Also limitations arise in bulk laser materials due to the thermal loading which induces strong wavefront distortions on the beams. We develop in this paper original concepts adapted to power-energy scaling of bulk or fibre lasers. The final objective is to emit high brightness and high energy beams whose quality is close to the diffraction limit. For this purpose we present new technics to be inspired from from Fourier optics and allowing the wavefront processing either through nonlinear interactions or with adaptive optical components such as electro optic phase modulators or liquid crystal light valves.

  19. Laser and Light-Based Aesthetics in Men.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeremy B; Metelitsa, Andrei I; Kaufman, Joely; Keaney, Terrence

    2015-09-01

    Men represent an important evolving segment of the cosmetic market. With the growing acceptability of cosmetic procedures along with societal and workplace pressure to maintain youthfulness, men increasingly seek the advice of aesthetic practitioners. Despite this so-called "Menaissance," there is a paucity of published literature regarding laser and light treatments of male skin. Herein the differences in male cutaneous physiology are addressed, followed by a review of light-based treatment of conditions largely unique to male skin, pseudofolliculitis barbae, and rhinophyma. Next, the publications related to laser treatment of male skin specifically are examined. We conclude with a discussion of personal observations derived from clinical experience with laser and light-based treatments in men.

  20. Diffraction Revisited: Position of Diffraction Spots upon Rotation of a Transmission Grating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are often used in the laboratory to determine the wavelength of laser light. What happens to the spots on the screen if the grating is rotated in this set-up? The answer is nontrivial and instructive.

  1. Diffraction Revisited: Position of Diffraction Spots upon Rotation of a Transmission Grating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are often used in the laboratory to determine the wavelength of laser light. What happens to the spots on the screen if the grating is rotated in this set-up? The answer is nontrivial and instructive.

  2. Modular sub-wavelength diffractive light modulator for high-definition holographic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Richard; Rochus, Veronique; Rottenberg, Xavier; Cosemans, Stefan; Haspeslagh, Luc; Severi, Simone; Van der Plas, Geert; Lafruit, Gauthier; Donnay, Stephane

    2013-02-01

    Holography is undoubtedly the ultimate 3D visualization technology, offering true 3D experience with all the natural depth cues, without the undesirable side-effects of current stereoscopic systems (uncomfortable glasses, strained eyes, fatiguing experience). Realization of a high-definition holographic display however requires a number of breakthroughs from existing prototypes. One of the main challenges lies in technology scaling, as holography is based on light diffraction and interference - to achieve wide viewing angles, the light-modulating pixels need to be spaced close to or below the wavelength of the used visible light. Furthermore, achieving high 3D image quality, hundreds of millions of such individually programmable pixels are needed. As a solution, we develop a modular sub-wavelength light modulator, consisting of three main sub-systems: the optical sub-system, comprising a 2D array of sub-wavelength pixels; the driver sub-system for individual pixel control, and the holographic computational engine. Based on conclusions from our state-of-the art studies, numerous experiments and holographic demonstrators, we have focused on reflective phase-modulating MEMS-based system and its scaling beyond 500nm pitch. We have devised a unique binary-programmable phase-modulating pixel architecture realizing vertical pixel displacement of up to 150nm at 500nm by 500nm pixel pitch, while sustaining low operating voltages compatible with CMOS driver circuitry. IMEC SiGe MEMS technology enables integration of the CMOS pixel-line drivers, scan-line drivers and I/O circuits underneath the 2D MEMS array, resulting in a compact and modular single-chip system design. Refresh rates of few hundred frames per second are achieved using our patented segmented driver-array architecture. Integrated circuits implementing parallel holographic computational engines can be added to the module using advanced 3D stacking technology. Herein we further report on our progress in realizing

  3. Focusing metasurface quantum-cascade laser with a near diffraction-limited beam.

    PubMed

    Xu, Luyao; Chen, Daguan; Itoh, Tatsuo; Reno, John L; Williams, Benjamin S

    2016-10-17

    A terahertz vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser (VECSEL) is demonstrated using an active focusing reflectarray metasurface based on quantum-cascade gain material. The focusing effect enables a hemispherical cavity with flat optics, which exhibits higher geometric stability than a plano-plano cavity and a directive and circular near-diffraction limited Gaussian beam with M2 beam parameter as low as 1.3 and brightness of 1.86 × 106 Wsr-1m-2. This work initiates the potential of leveraging inhomogeneous metasurface and reflectarray designs to achieve high-power and high-brightness terahertz quantum-cascade VECSELs.

  4. Focusing metasurface quantum-cascade laser with a near diffraction-limited beam

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Luyao; Chen, Daguan; Itoh, Tatsuo; Reno, John L.; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2016-10-17

    A terahertz vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser (VECSEL) is demonstrated using an active focusing reflectarray metasurface based on quantum-cascade gain material. The focusing effect enables a hemispherical cavity with flat optics, which exhibits higher geometric stability than a plano-plano cavity and a directive and circular near-diffraction limited Gaussian beam with M2 beam parameter as low as 1.3 and brightness of 1.86 × 106 Wsr–1m–2. As a result, this work initiates the potential of leveraging inhomogeneous metasurface and reflectarray designs to achieve high-power and high-brightness terahertz quantum-cascade VECSELs.

  5. Carrier-envelope phase mapping in laser-induced electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiseler, Henning; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Kaneshima, Keisuke; Geier, Florian; Kanai, Teruto; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Itatani, Jiro

    2016-09-01

    We present laser-induced electron diffraction measurements of elastic differential scattering cross sections (DCSs) of a photoelectron on the parent ion for argon, krypton, and xenon, using waveform-controlled few-cycle pulses. Considering only cutoff electrons and employing the adiabatic theory for the analysis enables us to eliminate ambiguities in extracting the DCSs from experimental spectra. Contrary to previous works, which mainly focused on the angular dependence of the DCS, our method allows us to extract also its dependence on the scattering momentum. In the case of xenon, we demonstrate how this method can be used to obtain the complete angular and momentum dependence of the DCS in a range of these variables determined by the pulse. The obtained results are compared to theoretical calculations based on the single-active-electron approximation, which shows a high level of agreement. Further investigations may provide opportunities to study multielectron effects when more advanced theoretical models become available.

  6. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-04-12

    Here, serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.

  7. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N; Spence, John C H; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-04-12

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.

  8. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-04-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.

  9. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C.H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes. PMID:27070998

  10. Third order optical nonlinearity and diffraction pattern of Ni nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhani, S.; Tajalli, H.; Koushki, E.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we studied all-optical Kerr effect of Ni nanoparticles immersed in ethanol using z-scan method. The nanoparticles were prepared by high frequency pulsed laser ablation. UV-Visible optical absorption spectroscopy and SEM observation were employed for characterization and studying the morphology of Ni nanoparticles. Analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the synthesized nanoparticles shape were dominantly spherical, varying from 19 nm to 40 nm for 1 mJ pulse energy. The nonlinear absorption and refraction indices were measured using open- and closed-aperture z-scan techniques, with both CW and pulsed irradiations. In both regimes results were studied. Furthermore, diffraction rings pattern as a result of nonlinear refraction was observed. We suggested an opportunity to form a new nonlinear-optical media for nonlinear optical applications.

  11. Laser light: its nature and its action on the eye.

    PubMed Central

    Bessette, F M; Nguyen, L C

    1989-01-01

    Lasers produce a coherent, focused, monochromatic, high-energy form of light. Because laser surgery is more versatile and precise and is freer of complications than conventional surgery it has become widely accepted in ophthalmology over the past 10 years. Applications range from routine procedures in the fundus to recent, more delicate interventions in the cornea. The argon laser is the most widely used to treat extrafoveal chorioretinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy; it has also been used successfully to treat glaucoma by iridectomy or trabeculoplasty. The krypton red laser is the argon laser's counterpart in the treatment of subfoveal and pigment-epithelium-related diseases. Posterior capsulotomy is the most widespread and successful intervention with the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet crystal laser; this laser is also used to cut vitreous traction bands and is increasingly used in iridectomy. Although the use of the excimer laser in corneal surgery is still largely investigational it has been shown to produce precise cuts in corneal layers for the correction of myopia or astigmatism. The variable-wavelength dye laser, capable of reaching a specific level in the retina or choroid, has offered exciting new developments, and it promises to soon be part of the ophthalmologist's armamentarium in the treatment of eye disease. PMID:2684379

  12. In-situ monitoring by reflective high energy electron diffraction during pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Dave H. A.; Rijnders, Guus J. H. M.; Koster, Gertjan; Rogalla, Horst

    1999-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has developed during the past decade from a fast but limited preparation tool towards a competitive thin film deposition technique. One of the advantages above other techniques is the possibility of growth at relative high background pressure. There is a large freedom in choosing which kind of gas. Moreover, in a number of applications, the gaseous species in the background pressure are part of the elements to be grown, e.g., oxygen in the case of high Tc superconductors. However, the advantage of relative high pressures leads to restrictions of using standard diagnostics and monitoring of the film growth, e.g., reflective high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Here, a PLD chamber including an in-situ RHEED system is presented, which makes it possible to monitor and study the growth at standard PLD parameters. Using a two-stages differential pumped, magnetically shielded, extension tube mounted at the electron gun side and a special designed phosphor screen including CCD camera, real time monitoring by observation of RHEED oscillations could be established at pressures up to 50 Pa. In this paper the latest results on applying this technique on SrTiO 3 and YBa 2Cu 3O 7 will be presented. Additional to the usual diagnostics performed with RHEED, another phenomena can be observed. The pulsed way of deposition, characteristic for PLD, leads to relaxations in the intensity of the diffracted pattern due to the mobility of the deposited material. These relaxation times give extra information about relaxation, crystallization, and nucleation of the deposited material. The presented technique leads to a better understanding of the growth during pulsed laser deposition and, because of the possibility to monitor the growth, will make PLD competitive with other deposition techniques.

  13. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    DOE PAGES

    Albert, Felicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons inmore » the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. Here, we first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.« less

  14. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Felicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. Here, we first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  15. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Félicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. We first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  16. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Felicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. Here, we first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  17. Designing Light Beam Transmittance Measuring Tool Using a Laser Pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuroso, H.; Kurniawan, W.; Marwoto, P.

    2016-08-01

    A simple instrument used for measuring light beam transmittance percentage made of window film has been developed. The instrument uses a laser pointer of 405 nm and 650 nm ±10% as a light source. Its accuracy approaches 80%. Transmittance data was found by comparing the light beam before and after passing the window film. The light intensity measuring unit was deleted by splitting the light source into two beams through a beam splitter. The light beam was changed into resistance by a NORP12 LDR sensor designed at a circuit of voltage divider rule of Khirchoff's laws. This conversion system will produce light beam intensity received by the sensor to become an equal voltage. This voltage will, then, be presented on the computer screen in the form of a real time graph via a 2.0 USB data transfer.

  18. Fabrication of x-ray diffractive optical elements for laser fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Hailiang; Niu, Jiebin; Hua, Yilei; Shi, Lina

    2013-03-01

    We review our recent progress on the fabrication of x-ray diffractive optical elements (DOEs) by combining complementary advantages of electron beam, x-ray, and proximity optical lithography. First, an electron beam lithography tool with an accelerating voltage of 100 kV is used to expose initial x-ray mask based on SiC membrane with a low aspect ratio. Second, x-ray lithography is used to replicate x-ray DOEs and amplify the aspect ratio up to 14:1. Third, proximity optical lithography is used to fabricate a large-scale gold mesh as the supporting structures. We demonstrate that this method can achieve high aspect ratio metal nanometer structures without the need of a complicated multilayer resist process. A large number of x-ray DOEs have been fabricated with feature sizes down to 100 nm for the purpose of laser plasma fusion applications. Among them, the ninth-order diffraction peak on the positive side of the zeroth order can be observed for both 3333 and 5000 lines/mm x-ray gold transmission gratings.

  19. Destruction-and-diffraction by X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin

    2016-09-01

    It is common knowledge that macromolecular crystals are damaged by the X-rays they are exposed to during conventional data collection. One of the claims made about the crystallographic data collection now being collected using X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) is that they are unaffected by radiation damage. XFEL data sets are assembled by merging data obtained from a very large number of crystals, each of which is exposed to a single femtosecond pulse of radiation, the duration of which is so short that diffraction occurs before the damage done to the crystal has time to become manifest, i.e. "diffraction-before-destruction." However, recent theoretical studies have shown that many of the elemental electronic processes that ultimately result in the destruction of such crystals occur during a single pulse. It is predicted that the amplitudes of atomic scattering factor could be reduced by as much as 75% within the first 5 femtoseconds of such pulses, and that different atoms will respond in different ways. Experimental evidence is provided here that these predictions are correct. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  20. Self-reconstruction of diffraction-free and accelerating laser beams in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, T.; Yalizay, B.; Akturk, S.

    2012-12-01

    We experimentally investigate propagation of laser beams with different intensity profiles in highly scattering media. We generate transverse laser amplitude profiles with Gaussian, Bessel and Airy function envelopes. We then propagate these beams through optical phantoms formed with variable density intralipid solutions. At the sample exit, we compare change in maximum intensities, as well as beam profile reconstruction. We show that self-reconstruction properties of Bessel and Airy beams bring about slower decrease in maximum intensity with increasing scatterer density. On the other hand, the beam profiles deteriorate faster, as compared to reference Gaussian beams. Slower decrease in the intensity can be attributed to the wavevector spectra providing a continuous flow of energy to the beam center, while beam deterioration is linked to total beam volume in the scattering medium. These results show that beam shaping methods can significantly enhance delivery of intense light deeper into turbid media, but this enhancement is compromised by stronger speckling of beam profiles.

  1. Determination of wood grain direction from laser light scattering pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonaho, Simo-Pekka; Palviainen, Jari; Tolonen, Yrjö; Silvennoinen, Raimo

    2004-01-01

    Laser light scattering patterns from the grains of wood are investigated in detail to gain information about the characteristics of scattering patterns related to the direction of the grains. For this purpose, wood samples of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) and silver birch ( Betula pubescens) were investigated. The orientation and shape of the scattering pattern of laser light in wood was found to correlate well with the direction of grain angles in a three-dimensional domain. The proposed method was also experimentally verified.

  2. Control of Laser High-Harmonic Generation with Counterpropagating Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, S. L.; Kohl, I.; Madsen, J. B.; Simmons, J.; Terry, N.; Titensor, J.; Wang, Q.; Peatross, J.

    2001-09-01

    Relatively weak counterpropagating light is shown to disrupt the emission of laser high-harmonic generation. Harmonic orders ranging from the teens to the low thirties produced by a 30-femtosecond pulse in a narrow argon jet are ``shut down'' with a contrast as high as 2 orders of magnitude by a chirped 1-picosecond counterpropagating laser pulse (60 times less intense). Alternatively, under poor phase-matching conditions, the counterpropagating light boosts harmonic production by similar contrast through quasiphase matching where out-of-phase emission is suppressed.

  3. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar; Allam, Srinivasa Rao; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.; Sharan, Alok

    2014-10-01

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  4. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  5. Heating of blood vessels exposed to laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, Liudmila G.; Zheltov, Georgy; Schmidt, Wolf-Dieter

    2003-10-01

    An advanced model of blood vessel heating by laser radiation is proposed for tasks of laser skin surgery and therapy. Blood vessel is modeled by infinite circular cylinder situated in skin dermis. Heat conduction equation taking into account the inhomogeneous internal source function is calculated. The source function inside the blood vessel is calculated according to the theory of diffraction of electromagnetic radiation on infinite circular cylinder. Dynamics of the temperature fields inside the vessels as a function of vessel diameters and duration of irradiance is calculated for the wavelength of 0.532 μm. It is determined the irradiance conditions whereby the near-homogeneous heating along the perimeter of walls of blood vessels on minimum laser exposure to surrounding tissues is achieved.

  6. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-07-28

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements.

  7. Fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements for an Integrated Compact Optical-MEMS Laser Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    WENDT,JOEL R.; KRYGOWSKI,T.W.; VAWTER,GREGORY A.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WARREN,MIAL E.; REYES,DAVID NMN

    2000-07-13

    The authors describe the microfabrication of a multi-level diffractive optical element (DOE) onto a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) as a key element in an integrated compact optical-MEMS laser scanner. The DOE is a four-level off-axis microlens fabricated onto a movable polysilicon shuttle. The microlens is patterned by electron beam lithography and etched by reactive ion beam etching. The DOE was fabricated on two generations of MEMS components. The first generation design uses a shuttle suspended on springs and displaced by a linear rack. The second generation design uses a shuttle guided by roller bearings and driven by a single reciprocating gear. Both the linear rack and the reciprocating gear are driven by a microengine assembly. The compact design is based on mounting the MEMS module and a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) onto a fused silica substrate that contains the rest of the optical system. The estimated scan range of the system is {+-}4{degree} with a spot size of 0.5 mm.

  8. Reconstruction of Laser-Induced Surface Topography from Electron Backscatter Diffraction Patterns.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Patrick G; Echlin, McLean P; Pollock, Tresa M; De Graef, Marc

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate that the surface topography of a sample can be reconstructed from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns collected with a commercial EBSD system. This technique combines the location of the maximum background intensity with a correction from Monte Carlo simulations to determine the local surface normals at each point in an EBSD scan. A surface height map is then reconstructed from the local surface normals. In this study, a Ni sample was machined with a femtosecond laser, which causes the formation of a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS). The topography of the LIPSS was analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reconstructions from EBSD patterns collected at 5 and 20 kV. The LIPSS consisted of a combination of low frequency waviness due to curtaining and high frequency ridges. The morphology of the reconstructed low frequency waviness and high frequency ridges matched the AFM data. The reconstruction technique does not require any modification to existing EBSD systems and so can be particularly useful for measuring topography and its evolution during in situ experiments.

  9. Light-induced self-written waveguide fabrication using 1550  nm laser light.

    PubMed

    Terasawa, Hidetaka; Tan, Freddy; Sugihara, Okihiro; Kawasaki, Akari; Inoue, Daisuke; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Kagami, Manabu; Maury, Olivier; Bretonnière, Yann; Andraud, Chantal

    2017-06-01

    Light-induced self-written (LISW) optical waveguides were fabricated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, using a photopolymerizable resin system formed by 1550 nm pulse laser light. A two-photon absorption (TPA) chromophore with a TPA cross section of several hundred Goeppert-Mayer (GM) at 1550 nm was used. Furthermore, the optical interconnection between a single-mode fiber and a fiber Bragg grating was demonstrated by the present technique, using one-way irradiation of 1550 nm laser light through the single-mode fiber. The LISW waveguide formation using 1550 nm laser light offers a new and promising alternative route for optical interconnection in silicon photonics technology.

  10. Plasmas as Light Sources for Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    RD-R159 460 PLASMS RS LIGHT SOURCES FOR LSERS(U) LBANA UNIV IN ./I HUNTSVILLE T A BARR ET AL. SEP 64 ANSMI/RH-CR-85-14 pAAHS-82-D-AS±6 N...and experimental results are presented, together with a * possible explanation of the optical radiation-tim history of the plasm . Potential...into a cold pl’sma device at Te - 1 eV and l018 / cc ions. Incidentally this experiment showed why there may be a need for a plasma light source

  11. Light sailboats: Laser driven autonomous microrobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Búzás, Anrdás; Kelemen, Lóránd; Mathesz, Anna; Oroszi, László; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Vicsek, Tamás; Ormos, Pál

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a system of light driven microscopic autonomous moving particles that move on a flat surface. The design is simple, yet effective: Micrometer sized objects with wedge shape are produced by photopolymerization, and they are covered with a reflective surface. When the area of motion is illuminated perpendicularly from above, the light is deflected to the side by the wedge shaped objects, in the direction determined by the position and orientation of the particles. The momentum change during reflection provides the driving force for an effectively autonomous motion. The system is an efficient tool to study self propelled microscopic robots.

  12. Above-threshold ionization and laser-induced electron diffraction in diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Noslen; Chacón, Alexis; Ciappina, Marcelo F.; Wolter, Benjamin; Biegert, Jens; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2016-10-01

    Strong-field photoemission and electron recollision provide a viable route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal resolution. However, since an ab initio treatment of even the simplest diatomic systems is beyond today's capabilities, approximate qualitative descriptions are warranted. In this paper, we develop such a theoretical approach to model the photoelectrons resulting from intense laser-molecule interaction. We present a general theory for symmetric diatomic molecules in the single active electron approximation that, amongst other capabilities, allows adjusting both the internuclear separation and molecular potential in a direct and simple way. More importantly, we derive an analytic approximate solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), based on a generalized strong-field approximation (SFA) version. Using that approach, we obtain expressions for electron emitted transition amplitudes from two different molecular centers, and accelerated then in the strong laser field. In addition, our approach directly underpins different underlying physical processes that correspond to (i) direct tunneling ionization; (ii) electron rescattering on the center of origin; and, finally, (iii) electron rescattering on a different center. One innovative aspect of our theory is the fact that the dipole matrix elements are free from nonphysical gauge and coordinate system-dependent terms: this is achieved by adapting the coordinate system, in which SFA is performed, to the center from which the corresponding part of the time-dependent wave function originates. Our analytic results agree very well with the numerical solution of the full three-dimensional TDSE for the H2 + molecule. Moreover, the theoretical model was applied to describe laser-induced electron diffraction measurements of O2 + molecules, obtained at ICFO, and reproduces the main features of the experiment very well. Our approach can be extended in

  13. Light beam diffraction on inhomogeneous holographic photonic PDLC structures under the influence of spatially non-uniform electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkin, A. O.; Sharangovich, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the theoretical model of two-dimensional Bragg diffraction of quasimonochromatic light beams on amplitude- and phase- inhomogeneous holographic photonic PDLC structures under the impact of spatially non-uniform electric field is proposed. The selfconsistent solutions for the light diffraction on PDLC structure with uniform amplitude and quasi-quadratic profiles are obtained for the case of influence of linearly varying electric field. The possibility to compensate the PDLC structure response inhomogeneity by the impact of non-unifrom external field is shown.

  14. Quantum properties of light emitted by dipole nano-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghannam, Talal

    Recent technological advances allow entire optical systems to be lithographically implanted on small silicon chips. These systems include tiny semiconductor lasers that function as light sources for digital optical signals. Future advances will rely on even smaller components. At the theoretical limit of this process, the smallest lasers will have an active medium consisting of a single atom (natural or artificial). Several suggestions for how this can be accomplished have already been published, such as nano-lasers based on photonic crystals and nano wires. In particular, the "dipole nanolaser" consists of a single quantum dot functioning as the active medium. It is optically coupled to a metal nanoparticles that form a resonant cavity. Laser light is generated from the near-field optical signal. The proposed work is a theoretical exploration of the nature of the resulting laser light. The dynamics of the system will be studied and relevant time scales described. These will form the basis for a set of operator equations describing the quantum properties of the emitted light. The dynamics will be studied in both density matrix and quantum Langevin formulations, with attention directed to noise sources. The equations will be linearized and solved using standard techniques. The result of the study will be a set of predicted noise spectra describing the statistics of the emitted light. The goal will be to identify the major noise contributions and suggest methods for suppressing them. This will be done by studying the probability of getting squeezed light from the nanoparticle for the certain scheme of parameters.

  15. CONTROLLING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF LASER LIGHT: Stimulated-Raman pulse peaker for terawatt femtosecond laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losev, Leonid L.; Lutsenko, Andrei P.

    1993-04-01

    An optical layout for shortening the rise time of femtosecond light pulses is proposed. A stimulated-Raman converter operating on rotational levels of orthohydrogen is placed between amplifier stages of a wide-band, terawatt, femtosecond titanium-sapphire laser system. Light in the first Stokes component is extracted by a polarization technique and then amplified.

  16. Ephemeral cataclastic fabrics in loose carbonate fault breccia and the reliability of laser diffraction particle size distribution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storti, Fabrizio; Balsamo, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    Cataclastic rocks exert a primary control on the frictional strength, stability, seismic velocity, and permeability properties of fault zones. Particle size distributions are central to these studies and have been widely used to investigate on the evolution of cataclasis. Despite the large amount of available data, interpretation of particle size distributions from poorly cohesive cataclastic rocks is still controversial, particularly because results from microscopic and sieve analyses, and from laser diffraction granulometry have been used to support either fractal or non fractal behaviours, respectively. Given the fundamental importance of grain fragmentation on fault friction and hydrology, further studies are necessary to better understand the main reasons governing the difference between results obtained from microscopic and sieve analyses, and from laser diffraction granulometry, respectively. We performed specific tests on poorly coherent carbonate platform cataclastic rocks from a fault zone in the Central Apennines, Italy, by combining laser diffraction granulometry, thin section analysis, and optical morphometry. During laser diffraction granulometry tests, we used several wet and dry operating procedures that included different pump speeds, analyses with and without sample ultrasonication, and different dispersant liquids. The variability of particle size distributions from a given sample, as a function of the adopted operating procedure, has the same magnitude of that theoretically predicted in natural cataclastic rocks, from low- to high-deformation shear zones. Thin section image analysis and optical morphometry support mechanical disintegration of internally microfractured coarser particles in ephemeral cataclastic fabrics as the major cause of such a size variability.

  17. Intensity of light diffraction from striated muscle as a function of incident angle.

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, R J; Lieber, R L; Oba, T; Yeh, Y

    1981-01-01

    In a recently developed theory of light diffraction by single striated muscle fibers, we considered only the case of normal beam incidence. The present investigation represents both an experimental and theoretical extension of the previous work to arbitrary incident angle. Angle scan profiles over a 50 degrees range of incident angle (+25 degrees to -25 degrees) were obtained at different sarcomere lengths. Left and right first-order scan peak separations were found to be a function of sarcomere length (separation angle = 2 theta B), and good agreement was found between theory and experiment. Our theoretical analysis further showed that a myofibrillar population with a single common skew angle can yield an angle scan profile containing many peaks. Thus, it is not necessary to associate each peak with a different skew population. Finally, we have found that symmetry angle, theta s, also varies with sarcomere length, but not in a regular manner. Its value at a given sarcomere length is a function of a particular region of a given fiber and represents the average skew angle of all the myofibril populations illuminated. The intensity of a diffraction order line is considered to be principally the resultant of two interference phenomena. The first is a volume-grating phenomenon which results from the periodic A-I band structure of the fiber (with some contribution from Z bands and H zones). The second is Bragg reflection from skew planes, if the correct relation between incident angle and skew angle is met. This may result in intensity asymmetry between the left and right first order lines. PMID:6976802

  18. Fabrication and applications of large aperture diffractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S; Britten, J B; Hyde, R; Rushford, M; Summers, L; Toeppen, J

    2002-02-19

    Large aperture diffractive optics are needed in high power laser applications to protect against laser damage during operation and in space applications to increase the light gathering power and consequently the signal to noise. We describe the facilities we have built for fabricating meter scale diffractive optics and discuss several examples of these.

  19. The efficiency of photovoltaic cells exposed to pulsed laser light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, R. A.; Landis, G. A.; Jenkins, P.

    1993-01-01

    Future space missions may use laser power beaming systems with a free electron laser (FEL) to transmit light to a photovoltaic array receiver. To investigate the efficiency of solar cells with pulsed laser light, several types of GaAs, Si, CuInSe2, and GaSb cells were tested with the simulated pulse format of the induction and radio frequency (RF) FEL. The induction pulse format was simulated with an 800-watt average power copper vapor laser and the RF format with a frequency-doubled mode-locked Nd:YAG laser. Averaged current vs bias voltage measurements for each cell were taken at various optical power levels and the efficiency measured at the maximum power point. Experimental results show that the conversion efficiency for the cells tested is highly dependent on cell minority carrier lifetime, the width and frequency of the pulses, load impedance, and the average incident power. Three main effects were found to decrease the efficiency of solar cells exposed to simulated FEL illumination: cell series resistance, LC 'ringing', and output inductance. Improvements in efficiency were achieved by modifying the frequency response of the cell to match the spectral energy content of the laser pulse with external passive components.

  20. Laser light passage through restored and carious posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Chandler, N P; Pitt Ford, T R; Monteith, B D

    2014-08-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been used to investigate pulpal blood flow as a means of pulp vitality testing. Transmission of laser light from the tooth surface to the pulp space may be influenced by caries and restorations. One hundred and twenty-two first and second molars that had caries into dentine, restorations or significant loss of coronal tissue were sectioned in half axio-bucco-lingually. The two sections were illuminated with a laser from their buccal and lingual aspects 2 mm coronal to the amelocemental junction. Light reaching the pulp space was recorded. Buccal and lingual illumination sites were equally effective for 67 teeth (55%). Buccal sites alone were effective for 35 teeth (29%), despite over one-third of these surfaces being restored or featuring enamel or dentine caries. A lingual position alone was effective for 20 teeth (16%). Caries affected light transmission, but for over half the teeth, the pulp could be illuminated from all four probe positions. No effect was found when the influence of mesial and distal restorations on transmission into the corresponding tooth section was examined. The pulp spaces of most (84%) restored, and carious posterior teeth could be illuminated by laser light from their buccal aspect and these teeth could potentially be vitality tested using LDF. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Amplitude-squeezed light from quantum-well lasers.

    PubMed

    Freeman, M J; Wang, H; Steel, D G; Craig, R; Scifres, D R

    1993-03-01

    High-impedance pump noise suppression was used to generate amplitude squeezing in an index-guided quantumwell laser. Light exhibiting photon-number noise 1.4 dB below the shot-noise limit was observed, and the corresponding polarization properties were examined. an unsaturated detector revealed 2.9 dB of squeezing.

  2. Toward ultrafast time-resolved Debye-Scherrer x-ray diffraction using a laser-plasma source.

    PubMed

    Shymanovich, U; Nicoul, M; Lu, W; Kähle, S; Tarasevitch, A; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; von der Linde, D

    2009-08-01

    An elliptical glass capillary has been used to focus ultrashort Cu K alpha x-ray pulses emitted from a femtosecond laser-produced plasma. Due to its high magnification (7x), the optic transforms the divergent x-ray emission of the plasma into a quasicollimated x-ray beam with a divergence of only 0.18 degrees. As an application we demonstrate the possibility to perform Debye-Scherrer diffraction experiments with the simultaneous detection of several diffraction orders. This will allow one to extend time-resolved x-ray diffraction with femtosecond laser-plasma x-ray sources to a much wider range of materials, which are not easily available as single crystals.

  3. Rate-equation approach to atomic-laser light statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Chusseau, Laurent; Arnaud, Jacques; Philippe, Fabrice

    2002-11-01

    We consider three- and four-level atomic lasers that are either incoherently (unidirectionally) or coherently (bidirectionally) pumped, the single-mode cavity being resonant with the laser transition. The intracavity Fano factor and the photocurrent spectral density are evaluated on the basis of rate equations. According to that approach, fluctuations are caused by jumps in active and detecting atoms. The algebra is simple. Whenever a comparison is made, the expressions obtained coincide with the previous results. The conditions under which the output light exhibits sub-Poissonian statistics are considered in detail. Analytical results, based on linearization, are verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. An essentially exhaustive investigation of sub-Poissonian light generation by three- and four-level lasers has been performed. Only special forms were reported earlier.

  4. Towards Laser Cooling Trapped Ions with Telecom Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kristina; Becker, Patrick; Donoghue, Liz; Liu, Jackie; Olmschenk, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information has many potential applications in communication, atomic clocks, and the precision measurement of fundamental constants. Trapped ions are excellent candidates for applications in quantum information because of their isolation from external perturbations, and the precise control afforded by laser cooling and manipulation of the quantum state. For many applications in quantum communication, it would be advantageous to interface ions with telecom light. We present progress towards laser cooling and trapping of doubly-ionized lanthanum, which should require only infrared, telecom-compatible light. Additionally, we present progress on optimization of a second-harmonic generation cavity for laser cooling and trapping barium ions, for future sympathetic cooling experiments. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  5. Strategies for in situ laser heating in the diamond anvil cell at an X-ray diffraction beamline

    PubMed Central

    Petitgirard, Sylvain; Salamat, Ashkan; Beck, Pierre; Weck, Gunnar; Bouvier, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    An overview of several innovations regarding in situ laser-heating techniques in the diamond anvil cell at the high-pressure beamline ID27 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility is presented. Pyrometry measurements have been adapted to allow simultaneous double-sided temperature measurements with the installation of two additional online laser systems: a CO2 and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. This reiteration of laser-heating advancements at ID27 is designed to pave the way for a new generation of state-of-the-art experiments that demand the need for synchrotron diffraction techniques. Experimental examples are provided for each major development. The capabilities of the double pyrometer have been tested with the Nd:YAG continuous-wave lasers but also in a time-resolved configuration using the nanosecond-pulsed Nd:YAG laser on a Fe sample up to 180 GPa and 2900 K. The combination of time-resolved X-ray diffraction with in situ CO2 laser heating is shown with the crystallization of a high-pressure phase of the naturally found pyrite mineral MnS2 (11 GPa, 1100–1650 K). PMID:24365921

  6. Intensity Measurements in a Fresnel Diffraction Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, R.; Fortin, E.

    1972-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate optics laboratory experiment to verify the law of intensity in the Fesnel diffraction of a thin wire. A gas laser as light source and a photocell as detector scan the diffraction pattern. The agreement with the theoretical pattern is remarkably good. (Author/TS)

  7. Intensity Measurements in a Fresnel Diffraction Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, R.; Fortin, E.

    1972-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate optics laboratory experiment to verify the law of intensity in the Fesnel diffraction of a thin wire. A gas laser as light source and a photocell as detector scan the diffraction pattern. The agreement with the theoretical pattern is remarkably good. (Author/TS)

  8. Laser experiments in light cloudiness with the geostationary satellite ARTEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzkov, V.; Kuzkov, S.; Sodnik, Z.

    2016-08-01

    The geostationary satellite ARTEMIS was launched in July 2001. The satellite is equipped with a laser communication terminal, which was used for the world's first inter-satellite laser communication link between ARTEMIS and the low earth orbit satellite SPOT-4. Ground-to-space laser communication experiments were also conducted under various atmospheric conditions involving ESA's optical ground station. With a rapidly increasing volume of information transferred by geostationary satellites, there is a rising demand for high-speed data links between ground stations and satellites. For ground-to-space laser communications there are a number of important design parameters that need to be addressed, among them, the influence of atmospheric turbulence in different atmospheric conditions and link geometries. The Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine developed a precise computer tracking system for its 0.7 m AZT-2 telescope and a compact laser communication package LACES (Laser Atmosphere and Communication experiments with Satellites) for laser communication experiments with geostationary satellites. The specially developed software allows computerized tracking of the satellites using their orbital data. A number of laser experiments between MAO and ARTEMIS were conducted in partial cloudiness with some amount of laser light observed through clouds. Such conditions caused high break-up (splitting) of images from the laser beacon of ARTEMIS. One possible explanation is Raman scattering of photons on molecules of a water vapor in the atmosphere. Raman scattering causes a shift in a wavelength of the photons.In addition, a different value for the refraction index appears in the direction of the meridian for the wavelength-shifted photons. This is similar to the anomalous atmospheric refraction that appears at low angular altitudes above the horizon. We have also estimated the atmospheric attenuation and the influence of atmospheric turbulence on observed results

  9. High Energy Gain of Trapped Electrons in a Tapered, Diffraction-Dominated Inverse-Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, P.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Boucher, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Doyuran, A.; England, R. J.; Joshi, C.; Pellegrini, C.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Sung, C.; Tolmachev, S.; Travish, G.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Yarovoi, T.; Yoder, R. B.

    2005-04-01

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, ˜1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  10. High energy gain of trapped electrons in a tapered, diffraction-dominated inverse-free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, P; Tochitsky, S Ya; Boucher, S; Clayton, C E; Doyuran, A; England, R J; Joshi, C; Pellegrini, C; Ralph, J E; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tolmachev, S; Travish, G; Varfolomeev, A A; Varfolomeev, A A; Yarovoi, T; Yoder, R B

    2005-04-22

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, approximately 1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  11. Real-time detection of focal position of workpiece surface during laser processing using diffractive beam samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Binh Xuan; Hoang, PhuongLe; Ahn, Sanghoon; Kim, Jeng-o.; Sohn, Hyonkee; Noh, Jiwhan

    2016-11-01

    The real-time fabrication of microgrooves on a curved surface using a laser beam, without preprogramming their shapes into the machining instructions, is a major challenge in laser processing owing to limitations associated with the real-time detection of the focal position. A new approach using a sampled fraction of the beam from a diffractive beam sampler (DBS) is therefore presented in order to overcome this limitation. By considering the sampled fraction of the beam an analysis of the results allows for precise positioning of the specimen for focal-point identification. This allows for the determination of the focus for a broad variety of laser types and laser powers, thereby providing stringent focusing conditions with high numerical apertures. This approach is easy to implement, inexpensive, independent of the roughness or granularity of the workpieces, and more importantly does not require auxiliary lasers and displacement sensors for real-time measurement during the fabrication process.

  12. Perovskite Materials for Light-Emitting Diodes and Lasers.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Boix, Pablo P; Yantara, Natalia; Li, Mingjie; Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2016-08-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have cemented their position as an exceptional class of optoelectronic materials thanks to record photovoltaic efficiencies of 22.1%, as well as promising demonstrations of light-emitting diodes, lasers, and light-emitting transistors. Perovskite materials with photoluminescence quantum yields close to 100% and perovskite light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 8% and current efficiencies of 43 cd A(-1) have been achieved. Although perovskite light-emitting devices are yet to become industrially relevant, in merely two years these devices have achieved the brightness and efficiencies that organic light-emitting diodes accomplished in two decades. Further advances will rely decisively on the multitude of compositional, structural variants that enable the formation of lower-dimensionality layered and three-dimensional perovskites, nanostructures, charge-transport materials, and device processing with architectural innovations. Here, the rapid advancements in perovskite light-emitting devices and lasers are reviewed. The key challenges in materials development, device fabrication, operational stability are addressed, and an outlook is presented that will address market viability of perovskite light-emitting devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2011-03-02

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  14. Efficient generation of 3.5 W laser light at 515 nm by frequency doubling a single-frequency high power DBR tapered diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Müller, André; Sumpf, Bernd; Petersen, Paul Michael; Andersen, Peter E.

    2017-06-01

    More than 3.5 W of green light at 515 nm is generated by frequency doubling a single-frequency high power DBR tapered diode laser. The frequency doubling is performed in a cascade of PPMgLN and PPMgSLT crystals in order to reach high power and avoid thermal effects present in PPMgLN at high power. The green light is diffraction limited (M2 <1.1) and single-frequency operation is demonstrated with a linewidth less than 2 pm.

  15. Coherent diffraction imaging analysis of shape-controlled nanoparticles with focused hard X-ray free-electron laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of the coherent diffraction imaging analysis of nanoparticles using focused hard X-ray free-electron laser pulses, allowing us to analyze the size distribution of particles as well as the electron density projection of individual particles. We measured 1000 single-shot coherent X-ray diffraction patterns of shape-controlled Ag nanocubes and Au/Ag nanoboxes and estimated the edge length from the speckle size of the coherent diffraction patterns. We then reconstructed the two-dimensional electron density projection with sub-10 nm resolution from selected coherent diffraction patterns. This method enables the simultaneous analysis of the size distribution of synthesized nanoparticles and the structures of particles at nanoscale resolution to address correlations between individual structures of components and the statistical properties in heterogeneous systems such as nanoparticles and cells.

  16. Laser and light-based treatments of acne and acne scarring.

    PubMed

    Alexiades, Macrene

    The treatment of acne and acne scarring with lasers and light-based and energy-based technologies has become an integral component of our therapeutic arsenal. Lasers including infrared wavelengths and pulsed dye lasers; light devices including blue light, red light, and broadband light; and photodynamic therapy with aminolevulinic acid and methylaminolevulinic acid have been shown to be effective in the treatment of acne vulgaris. The optimal outcomes are achieved with photodynamic therapy combined with medical therapy. Acne scarring has been best treated with lasers, including nonablative infrared lasers, fractional nonablative and ablative laser resurfacing, and most recently needle-based radiofrequency devices.

  17. Optical diffraction tomography microscopy with transport of intensity equation using a light-emitting diode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiaji; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Jialin; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an effective label-free technique for quantitatively refractive index imaging, which enables long-term monitoring of the internal three-dimensional (3D) structures and molecular composition of biological cells with minimal perturbation. However, existing optical tomographic methods generally rely on interferometric configuration for phase measurement and sophisticated mechanical systems for sample rotation or beam scanning. Thereby, the measurement is suspect to phase error coming from the coherent speckle, environmental vibrations, and mechanical error during data acquisition process. To overcome these limitations, we present a new ODT technique based on non-interferometric phase retrieval and programmable illumination emitting from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. The experimental system is built based on a traditional bright field microscope, with the light source replaced by a programmable LED array, which provides angle-variable quasi-monochromatic illumination with an angular coverage of ±37 degrees in both x and y directions (corresponding to an illumination numerical aperture of ∼0.6). Transport of intensity equation (TIE) is utilized to recover the phase at different illumination angles, and the refractive index distribution is reconstructed based on the ODT framework under first Rytov approximation. The missing-cone problem in ODT is addressed by using the iterative non-negative constraint algorithm, and the misalignment of the LED array is further numerically corrected to improve the accuracy of refractive index quantification. Experiments on polystyrene beads and thick biological specimens show that the proposed approach allows accurate refractive index reconstruction while greatly reduced the system complexity and environmental sensitivity compared to conventional interferometric ODT approaches.

  18. Laser pumped (4)He magnetometer with light shift suppression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zaisheng; Wang, He; Peng, Xiang; Wu, Teng; Guo, Hong

    2016-11-01

    We report a laser-pumped (4)He atomic magnetometer with light shift suppression through the atomic sensor itself. A linearly polarized light is used to optically align the (4)He metastable atoms and we monitor the magneto-optical double resonance (MODR) signals produced by the left- and right-circularly orthogonal components. It is shown that light shift leads to the atomic alignment to orientation conversion effect, and thus, the difference between the two MODR signals. One of these two MODR signals is locked at the Larmor frequency and is used to measure the ambient magnetic field, while the differential signal is, simultaneously, fed back to suppress the light shift. The scheme could be of the advantage to the design of compact magnetometers by reducing the systematic errors due to light shift.

  19. Multimodal Spectral Imaging of Cells Using a Transmission Diffraction Grating on a Light Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Isailovic, Dragan; Xu, Yang; Copus, Tyler; Saraswat, Suraj; Nauli, Surya M.

    2011-01-01

    A multimodal methodology for spectral imaging of cells is presented. The spectral imaging setup uses a transmission diffraction grating on a light microscope to concurrently record spectral images of cells and cellular organelles by fluorescence, darkfield, brightfield, and differential interference contrast (DIC) spectral microscopy. Initially, the setup was applied for fluorescence spectral imaging of yeast and mammalian cells labeled with multiple fluorophores. Fluorescence signals originating from fluorescently labeled biomolecules in cells were collected through triple or single filter cubes, separated by the grating, and imaged using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Cellular components such as nuclei, cytoskeleton, and mitochondria were spatially separated by the fluorescence spectra of the fluorophores present in them, providing detailed multi-colored spectral images of cells. Additionally, the grating-based spectral microscope enabled measurement of scattering and absorption spectra of unlabeled cells and stained tissue sections using darkfield and brightfield or DIC spectral microscopy, respectively. The presented spectral imaging methodology provides a readily affordable approach for multimodal spectral characterization of biological cells and other specimens. PMID:21639978

  20. High throughput imaging of blood smears using white light diffraction phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Bhaduri, Basanta; Han, Kevin; Luo, Zelun; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    While automated blood cell counters have made great progress in detecting abnormalities in blood, the lack of specificity for a particular disease, limited information on single cell morphology and intrinsic uncertainly due to high throughput in these instruments often necessitates detailed inspection in the form of a peripheral blood smear. Such tests are relatively time consuming and frequently rely on medical professionals tally counting specific cell types. These assays rely on the contrast generated by chemical stains, with the signal intensity strongly related to staining and preparation techniques, frustrating machine learning algorithms that require consistent quantities to denote the features in question. Instead we opt to use quantitative phase imaging, understanding that the resulting image is entirely due to the structure (intrinsic contrast) rather than the complex interplay of stain and sample. We present here our first steps to automate peripheral blood smear scanning, in particular a method to generate the quantitative phase image of an entire blood smear at high throughput using white light diffraction phase microscopy (wDPM), a single shot and common path interferometric imaging technique.