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Sample records for laser na morfologia

  1. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.C.Y.; Judge, D.L.; Roussel, F.; Carre, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-01-01

    The production of Na/sub 2//sup +/ ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200A region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na/sub 2/ molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na/sub 2/ D/sup 1/PI..mu.. Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na/sub 2//sup +/ ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al we estimate that the cross section for producing Na/sub 2//sup +/ through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na/sub 2/ molecules.

  2. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. Y. Robert; Judge, D. L.; Roussel, F.; Carré, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-09-01

    The production of Na2+ ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200Å region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na2 molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na2 D1Πu Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na2+ ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al. we estimate that the cross section for producing Na2+ through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na2 molecules.

  3. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  4. Na + Xe collisions in the presence of two nonresonant lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vries, P. L.; Chang, C. H.; George, T. F.; Laskowski, B.; Stallcop, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Na+Xe collisions in the presence of two distinct laser fields (rhodamine 110 and Nd:glass) are investigated with reference to the response to nonresonant radiation of alkali metals collisionally perturbed by a buffer gas. It is found that the excited Na-asterisk (4s)+Xe state is produced with a measurable cross section due to two-photon absorption with field intensities as low as 10 MW/sq cm.

  5. Excimer lasers for superhigh NA 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzel, Rainer; Albrecht, Hans S.; Lokai, Peter; Zschocke, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Thomas; Bragin, Igor; Schroeder, Thomas; Reusch, Christian; Spratte, Stefan

    2003-06-01

    Excimer lasers are widely used as the light source for microlithography scanners. The volume shipment of scanner systems using 193nm is projected to begin in year 2003. Such tools will directly start with super high numerical aperture (NA) in order to take full advantage of the 193nm wavelength over the advanced 248nm systems. Reliable high repetition rate laser light sources enabling high illumination power and wafer throughput are one of the fundamental prerequisites. In addition these light sources must support a very high NA imaging lens of more than 0.8 which determines the output spectrum of the laser to be less than 0.30 pm FWHM. In this paper we report on our recent progress in the development of high repetition rate ultra-narrow band lasers for high NA 193nm microlithography scanners. The laser, NovaLine A4003, is based on a Single Oscillator Ultral Line-narrowed (SOUL) design which yields a bandwidth of less than 0.30pm FWHM. The SOUL laser enables superior optical performance without adding complexity or cost up to the 4 kHz maximum repetition rate. The A4003's high precision line-narrowing optics used in combination with the high repetition rate of 4 kHz yields an output power of 20 W at an extremely narrow spectral bandwidth of less than 0.30 pm FWHM and highest spectral purity of less than 0.75 pm for the 95% energy content. We present performance and reliability data and discuss the key laser parameters. Improvements in the laser-internal metrology and faster regulation control result in better energy stability and improved overall operation behavior. The design considerations for line narrowing and stable laser operation at high repetition rates are discussed.

  6. Penning and associative ionization in crossed-beam Na/Na collisions assisted by strong resonant laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, J.; Polak-Dingels, P.

    1981-01-01

    We observe the production of Na/sub 2//sup +/ and Na/sup +/ arising from single collisions between crossed beams of sodium atoms when a laser field is tuned near the Na(3p /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3p /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/) transitions. Measurements of ion intensity vs laser intensity show that at moderately high power true laser-induced processes dominate over purely collisional effects. Relative intensity of mass-selected ions produced at either member of the Na resonance doublet shows conclusively that Na/sup +/ does not arise simply from photodissociation of Na/sub 2//sup +/ but must result from a direct, laser-induced collisional ionization.

  7. A semiclassical study of laser-induced atomic fluorescence from Na2, K2 and NaK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, J.-M.; Bhattacharyya, D. K.; George, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    A semiclassical treatment of laser-induced atomic fluorescence for the alkali-dimer systems Na2, K2 and NaK is presented. The variation of the fluorescence intensity with the frequency of the exciting laser photon is studied and a comparison of theoretical results with a set of experimental data is presented.

  8. On the formation of Na nanoparticles in femtosecond-laser irradiated glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Nan; Su Dong; Spence, John C. H.; Qiu Jianrong

    2010-03-15

    This work discusses the response of Na to both high-energy electrons and femtosecond-laser (fs-laser) pulses in the soda-lime glass. The evidence for different responses of Na to high-energy electron irradiation between glasses with and without fs-laser irradiation suggests that the chemical and/or physical states of Na in the fs-laser irradiated glass are different from those in the original glass. Fs-laser pulses in the glass may be able to neutralize Na, which may form clusters. These results suggest that close attention should be paid to the defects associated with Na when optical or physical data are interpreted in fs-laser irradiated Na glasses.

  9. Observation of structure in laser-induced Penning and associative ionization in crossed-beam Na+Na collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Polak-Dingels, P.; Delpech, J.; Weiner, J.

    1980-06-23

    The results of double-laser experiments in which Na/sup +//sub 2/ and Na/sup +/ are produced in crossed-alkali beams under single-collision conditions in the presence of strong optical fields are reported. Structure in the mass-selected product ion intensity as a function laser frequency is observed when the optical field is strongly focused and tuned far off atomic or dimer transitions. These measurements are the first to show that nuclear motion of the quasimolecular collision intermediate plays an important role in laser-induced collisional ionization.

  10. Observation of laser-induced associative ionization in crossed-beam Na+Li collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Polak-Dingels, P.; Keller, J.; Weiner, J.; Gauthier, J.h.; Bras, N.

    1981-08-01

    We report the observation of NaLi/sup +/ produced by crossed-beam collisions of Na and Li in the presence of a single laser field. The magnitude of the cross section and its dependence on laser intensity are in accord with a simple second-order perturbation theory.

  11. Progress in Na laser guide star adaptive optics and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katharine J.

    2016-09-01

    Laser beams have long been applied across many disciplines, extending degrees of freedom for purely spatial control to polarization spatial control. Adaptive beam shaping in Na Laser Guide Star approaches will be assessed for progress and lessons learned. Laser Guide Stars based on Rayleigh Scattering at 530 nm is straightforward: simply frequency double a Nd:YAG. For Na Laser Guide Stars, there is no easy way to get 589 nm and is more cotp:plicated. Significate Laser Guide Star Systems include the Starfire Optical Range (SOR), The Lick Laser Gude Star (UC), Caltech/Mt. Palomar, the Keck Laser Guide Star, ESQ VLT, and Gemini South. These will be compared for progress and future developments.

  12. Laser ablation of NaN3 and CsN3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belau, Leonid; Gorodetsky, Jonathan; Haas, Yehuda

    2005-06-01

    Solid sodium azide and cesium azide crystals were irradiated by high power laser pulses; the ablation products were rapidly cooled by a supersonic expansion of helium and detected by a time of flight mass spectrometer. Neutral and positively charged species were separately recorded and analyzed using N15 isotopomers to help in their assignment. Cluster series of the sequences Na(NaN3)n [or Cs(CsN3)n] were observed, as well as clusters containing NaOH and NaCN; the origin of the C, H, and O atoms appears to be water and CO2 occluded in the salt. Addition of D2O increased the intensity of large clusters and added deuterated ones, whereas addition of chloroform leads to formation of clusters of a Na atom with (NaCl)n clusters. Possible mechanisms for the formation of these clusters are discussed.

  13. Laser ablation of NaN{sub 3} and CsN{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Belau, Leonid; Gorodetsky, Jonathan; Haas, Yehuda

    2005-06-08

    Solid sodium azide and cesium azide crystals were irradiated by high power laser pulses; the ablation products were rapidly cooled by a supersonic expansion of helium and detected by a time of flight mass spectrometer. Neutral and positively charged species were separately recorded and analyzed using {sup 15}N isotopomers to help in their assignment. Cluster series of the sequences Na(NaN{sub 3}){sub n} [or Cs(CsN{sub 3}){sub n}] were observed, as well as clusters containing NaOH and NaCN; the origin of the C, H, and O atoms appears to be water and CO{sub 2} occluded in the salt. Addition of D{sub 2}O increased the intensity of large clusters and added deuterated ones, whereas addition of chloroform leads to formation of clusters of a Na atom with (NaCl){sub n} clusters. Possible mechanisms for the formation of these clusters are discussed.

  14. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode is described. The goal is to produce a {approximately}10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately}10 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM), 1.06 {mu}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately}1 {mu}s FWHM dye laser beam tuned to 5890 {Angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the NaI resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated charge-coupled-device camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately}0.1 {Angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5{endash}2 eV. Laser-induced fluorescence from {approximately}1{times}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} NaI 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately}{plus_minus}0.06 {Angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  16. Efficient operation of a diode-pumped Yb:NaY(WO(4))(2) laser.

    PubMed

    Xie, G Q; Tang, D Y; Zhang, H J; Wang, J Y; Qian, L J

    2008-02-04

    An efficient diode-pumped Yb:NaY(WO(4))(2) (Yb:NYW) disordered crystal laser has been experimentally demonstrated for the fist time. The Yb:NYW crystal has a peak absorption cross section of 1.09 x 10(-20) cm(2) at 972 nm and emission cross section of 1.24 x 10(-20) cm(2) at 1010 nm. Under an absorbed pump power of 11.7 W, the Yb:NYW laser generated an average output power as high as 4.1 W, with a slope efficiency of 45%. It was found that the laser always operated in a self-pulsing mode, and the laser spectrum showed random jumps with time. The mechanism of self-pulsing in the laser was also investigated.

  17. Light-induced drift of Na using a frequency-modulated laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lignie, M. C.; Bloemink, H. I.; de Boer, A. H.; Eliel, E. R.

    1990-08-01

    The influence of the bandwidth of the radiation source on light-induced drift (LID) of Na is studied experimentally. Broadband radiation can be used to eliminate optical hyperfine pumping on the one hand, and to provide more efficient excitation due to an increased velocity coverage, on the other hand. These aspects are highlighted in two separate experiments. An increase of the drift velocity of Na by a factor of 4 compared to monochromatic excitation has been measured. A frequency-modulated (FM) ring dye laser is used as a broadband radiation source, having a bandwidth continuously variable from single mode to multimode with a bandwidth of 10 GHz. Contrary to passive multimode lasers, the spectrum of such a laser is well defined and stable. Various modulation frequencies are used to study the dependence of the drift velocity on the mode spacing of the multimode laser. Only small differences are found. All experimental results are compared with results of a four-level rate-equation model for LID of Na, in which the excited-state hyperfine structure of Na and the detailed shape of the FM spectrum are taken into account. Good agreement between the model and the experimental data is found. The model is also used to show that the FM spectrum yields almost the same values for the drift velocity as a rectangular spectrum, which so far has been considered optimal for LID.

  18. Laser-induced crossed-beam charge transfer: energy threshold of the Na (3 2P 3/2) + I 2 → Na + + I -2 channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañares, L.; González Ureña, A.

    1991-01-01

    A crossed-beam charge-transfer study was carried out for the Na(3 2P 3/2) + I 2 → Na + + I -2 system using laser excitation of the Na atom. The energy threshold and post-threshold laws were measured for the title reaction and the I 2 molecule electron affinity was determined. The value EA (I 2) = 2.69 ± 0.05 eV obtained in the present work is in accordance with previous determinations.

  19. Lasers: Cw and Q-switched Nd:NaLa(MoO4)2 laser noncritical to the temperature drift of the diode pump laser wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, S. N.; Romanyuk, V. A.; Ryabochkina, P. A.; Shestakova, I. A.; Lis, Denis A.; Subbotin, Kirill A.; Shestakov, A. V.; Zharikov, Evgeny V.

    2010-08-01

    Lasing in Nd:NaLa(MoO4)2 crystals is obtained without stabilisation of the diode pump wavelength. A dependence of the cw laser power (at a wavelength of 1059 nm) on the pump diode temperature is found within a range of 10—458C. It is shown that the variations in the diode temperature within this region change the lasing efficiency no more than by 30%. In the passive Q-switching regime, the experiments were performed under both pulsed and cw pumping. Upon pulsed pumping, the laser energy was 16 μJ at the output pulse duration of 11 ns. The laser wavelength was 1059 nm, as well as in the case of cw operation. Upon cw pumping with a power of 1.5 W, laser pulses were obtained with an energy of 15 μJ.

  20. Transparent NaGdF4:Nd3+ colloid prepared by femtosecond laser ablation as a liquid laser medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jiangyun; Feng, Guoying; Wang, Shutong; Zhang, Hong; Dai, Shengyu; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2017-07-01

    By using femtosecond-pulsed laser to ablate the larger nanosized target in liquid, stable transparent NaGdF4:Nd3+ colloid has been successfully fabricated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra reveal that the colloidal nanoparticles remain the hexagonal phase crystal structure of NaGdF4 powder target. SEM and TEM images results indicate that the size of these colloidal nanoparticles decreases sharply. FT-IR results indicate that the number of O-H and C-H groups on the surface is decreased. The emission properties of the colloid have been investigated using 794 nm pulsed wave laser radiation, and it is found that the colloid exhibits near-infrared luminescent emissions in the spectral range of 850-1400 nm, and the decay time for 4F3/2→4I11/2 (1058 nm) Nd3+ ion transitions is lengthened than that of powder target, these results are probably due to the reduced nonradiative relaxation assisted by high energy oscillators. The observed near-infrared emission of the stable transparent colloid makes it a good candidate for application in liquid laser.

  1. Hollow screw pinch pump sources for Na-Ne x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, R.E.; Apruzese, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, population inversion in the resonantly photopumped Na-Ne X-ray laser system was demonstrated at Sandia National Laboratories using a Ne gas cell pumped by a Na z-pinch at a separation of 2 cm. In this work the authors consider a screw pinch configuration which offers the promise of enhanced geometrical coupling between pump and lasant. The dynamics and stability of a hollow, annular screw pinch Na plasma formed by simultaneous pulsing of an exterior azimuthal and an interior axial magnetic field is examined through both 0-D and 1-D models. The scaling of the pump radiation field expected on an interior Ne lasant with density and stagnation radius of the exterior pinch are presented.

  2. Continuous-wave laser operation of Tm and Hoco-doped NaY(WO(4))(2) and NaLu(WO(4))(2) crystals.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Fusari, F; Serrano, M D; Lagatsky, A A; Cano-Torres, J M; Brown, C T A; Zaldo, C; Sibbett, W

    2010-03-15

    Tetragonal single crystals of NaT(WO(4))(2) (T = Y or Lu) co-doped with Tm(3+) and Ho(3+) ions have been employed for broadly tunable and efficient room-temperature laser operation at around 2 mum. With Ti:sapphire laser pumping at 795 nm, a slope efficiency and a maximum output power as high as 48% and 265 mW, respectively, have been achieved at 2050 nm from a Tm,Ho:NaY(WO(4))(2) crystal. Tuning from 1830 nm to 2080 nm has also been obtained using an intracavity Lyot filter.

  3. [Joint Analyses of Na2SO4 Solution by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Raman Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-jia; Lu, Yuan; Liu, Chun-hao; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic sensor is becoming an important issue for the deep-sea exploration due to the advantages of multi-specie, multi-phases and stand-off detection. Different approach have been developing in recent years based on LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) and Raman spectroscopy since Raman-LIBS are complementary techniques with the similar components and the capability of molecular and elementary analysis. In this work, we built a LIBS-Raman system and detected Na2SO4 in aqueous solution to evaluate the potential ocean application. With the same laser, spectrometer and detector, a hybrid of Raman and LIBS system was developed to realize the detection of anions and cations in the seawater. The optics was composed by two parts. Raman channel and LIBS channel, and the signal was collected by a Y type optical fiber bundle. The signal from two channels was separated by imaging on different arrays of the CCD detector. The Raman spectra of SO4(2-) and LIBS spectra of Na was successfully detected simultaneously when the pulse energy was above 3.6 mJ. However, due to the strong bremsstrahlung radiation of LIBS, the signal to noise ratio of Raman was significantly decreased as the laser energy increasing. The results manifested the great potential of Raman-LIBS combination for the underwater detection.

  4. Electron spectra from ionizing collisions in a dense laser-excited Na beam.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, E.; Ramos, G.; Smith, W. W.

    2000-06-01

    We report low-energy (<=4 eV) electron spectra from collision processes occurring in a high density (10^12 - 10^13/cm^3), laser-excited atomic beam. Very different spectra are seen, depending on which states are laser populated. When the 3p_3/2 and 3d_5/2 states are stepwise excited at low intensity, two main electron peaks are seen, attributed to photoionization and Penning ionization.(H.Dengel, M.W.Ruf and H.Hotop, Europhysics Letters 23), 567 (1993). At higher, saturating intensity in our dense beam, we see multiple peaks, with the extra peaks attributed to 3p+3d associative ionization(AI)(E.Babenko, C.Tapalian and W.W.Smith, Chem. Phys. Lett. 244), 121 (1995). and superelastic electron scattering from excited states. The main, broad AI peak at 1.1 eV reflects the vibrorotational distribution of the product Na_2^+ dimer ions, consistent with a simple long-range model of the collision process. A broad, low energy peak at 0.35 eV is tentatively attributed to excitation of the dissociative ^2Σ_u^+ state of the Na_2^+ dimer. Analogous spectra were taken when the 3p and 5s states were selectively laser excited.

  5. Flower-like Na2O nanotip synthesis via femtosecond laser ablation of glass

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in nanotip synthesis relies on techniques that utilize elaborate precursor chemicals, catalysts, or vacuum conditions, and any combination thereof. To realize their ultimate potential, synthesized nanotips require simpler fabrication techniques that allow for control over their final nano-morphology. We present a unique, dry, catalyst-free, and ambient condition method for creating densely clustered, flower-like, sodium oxide (Na2O) nanotips with controllable tip widths. Femtosecond laser ablation of a soda-lime glass substrate at a megahertz repetition rate, with nitrogen flow, was employed to generate nanotips with base and head widths as small as 100 and 20 nm respectively, and lengths as long as 10 μm. Control of the nanotip widths was demonstrated via laser dwell time with longer dwell times producing denser clusters of thinner nanotips. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis reveals that nanotip composition is Na2O. A new formation mechanism is proposed, involving an electrostatic effect between ionized nitrogen and polar Na2O. The synthesized nanotips may potentially be used in antibacterial and hydrogen storage applications. PMID:22809176

  6. Dissipative soliton operation of a diode pumped Yb:NaY(WO₄)₂ laser.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Jun; Shen, Deyuan; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Tang, Dingyuan

    2015-12-14

    We report on the dissipative soliton operation of a diode pumped Yb:NaY(WO₄)₂ (Yb:NYW) solid-state laser. The dissipative solitons and their features as the net cavity group velocity dispersion is changed from the normal to the anomalous dispersion regime are experimentally investigated. Taking advantage of the dissipative soliton shaping of the mode-locked pulses we have generated stable near transform-limited pulses as short as 54 fs. To our knowledge, this is so far the shortest pulse directly obtained from the mode-locked Yb:NYW oscillator.

  7. Packaging of wavelength stabilized 976nm 100W 105µm 0.15 NA fiber coupled diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaochen; Liu, Rui; Gao, Yanyan; Zhang, Tujia; He, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Thomas; Zhang, Cuipeng

    2016-03-01

    Fiber coupled diode lasers are widely used in many fields now especially as pumps in fiber laser systems. In many fiber laser applications, high brightness pumps are essential to achieve high brightness fiber lasers. Furthermore, 976nm wavelength absorption band is narrow with Yb3+ doped fiber lasers which is more challenging for controlling wavelength stabilized in diode laser modules. This study designed and implemented commercial available high brightness and narrow wavelength width lasers to be able to use in previous mentioned applications. Base on multiple single emitters using spatial and polarization beam combining as well as fiber coupling techniques, we report a wavelength stabilized, 105μm NA 0.15 fiber coupled diode laser package with 100W of optical output power at 976 nm, which are 14 emitters inside each multiple single emitter module. The emitting aperture of the combined lasers output are designed and optimized for coupling light into a 105μm core NA 0.15 fiber. Volume Bragg grating technology has been used to improve spectral characteristics of high-power diode lasers. Mechanical modular design and thermal simulation are carried out to optimize the package. The spectral width is roughly 0.5 nm (FWHM) and the wavelength shift per °C < 0.02nm. The output spectrum is narrowed and wavelength is stabilized using Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs). The high brightness package has an electrical to optical efficiency better than 45% and power enclosure more than 90% within NA 0.12. Qualification tests have been included on this kind of package. Mechanical shock, vibration and accelerated aging tests show that the package is reliability and the MTTF is calculated to be more than 100k hours at 25°C.

  8. Cw and Q-switched Nd:NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} laser noncritical to the temperature drift of the diode pump laser wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, S N; Lis, Denis A; Subbotin, Kirill A; Romanyuk, V A; Shestakov, A V; Ryabochkina, P A; Shestakova, I A; Zharikov, Evgeny V

    2010-08-27

    Lasing in Nd:NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals is obtained without stabilisation of the diode pump wavelength. A dependence of the cw laser power (at a wavelength of 1059 nm) on the pump diode temperature is found within a range of 10-458C. It is shown that the variations in the diode temperature within this region change the lasing efficiency no more than by 30%. In the passive Q-switching regime, the experiments were performed under both pulsed and cw pumping. Upon pulsed pumping, the laser energy was 16 {mu}J at the output pulse duration of 11 ns. The laser wavelength was 1059 nm, as well as in the case of cw operation. Upon cw pumping with a power of 1.5 W, laser pulses were obtained with an energy of 15 {mu}J. (lasers)

  9. Sinterability studies on K 0.5Na 0.5NbO 3 using laser as energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyong; Dittmar, Anne; Melcher, Jörg; Heinrich, Jürgen G.

    2010-08-01

    The sinterability of K 0.5Na 0.5NbO 3 (KNN) ceramics by a laser beam has been investigated in the present research. A 100 W CO 2 laser with a beam diameter of 0.6 mm has been used to sinter the KNN specimens prepared on a uniaxial pressing machine. The relations between laser power and thickness of densified layer, crystallographic structures and phase compositions have been studied. A comparison has been made between laser and furnace sintered KNN samples according to the SEM, XRD and XRF results. The possibility of KNN used for the layer-wise laser direct sintering 3D components has been confirmed in this paper.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of AgCl nanoparticles produced by laser ablation of Ag in NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi, Afsaneh; Shoorshinie, Seyedeh Zahra; Dorranian, Davoud

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the structural and optical properties of silver chloride nanoparticles produced by laser ablation of Ag plate in NaCl solution were investigated. Five different concentrations of NaCl solution were used as the ablation environment. The beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser of 1064 nm wavelength and 7 ns pulse width was employed to irradiate the Ag target in NaCl solutions. Fluence of laser pulse was 1.5 J/cm2, and repetition rate was 5 Hz. Samples were prepared using 1500 pulses. Produced nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible-NIR absorption, and transmission spectrum, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction pattern, photoluminescence spectrum, and dynamic light scattering method. Results show that laser ablation is a promising method to produce AgCl nanoparticles. Size of nanoparticles, their lattice structure, and bandgap energy as well as the production rate may be controlled by the concentration of NaCl in the ablation environment.

  11. Applications of spectral analysis and filter design in laser frequency locking for Na Doppler lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, John A.; Chu, Xinzhao; Huang, Wentao; Tan, Bo

    2009-10-01

    A dye ring laser is stabilized to a D2a Doppler-free feature of sodium vapor using a LabVIEW®-based, phase-sensitive servo. Locking precision and stability, at better than +/-1 MHz, are suitable for Na lidar applications. This performance was achieved with improved digital filtering and new approaches to the problem. The inverse (type II) Chebyshev discrete filter employed demonstrates superior filtering and computational efficiency plus improved flexibility. New approaches include the determination of optimum modulation frequency, laser-tuning sensitivity, and bandwidth requirements via spectral analyses of the noise spectrum, derivative scan, and modulated spectrum. This practice guides a user in selecting the system operation parameters and negotiating the trade-offs involved when expanding the filter's passband. Allan deviation plots provide a quantitative description of the short- and long-term frequency excursions. A comparison of Allan deviation plots before and after locking shows a substantial improvement in stability throughout time scales from 0.10 to 10 s.

  12. Low-threshold diode-pumped Yb3+,Na+:CaF2 self-Q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Su, Liangbi; Xu, Jun; Xue, Yinghong; Wang, Chingyue; Chai, Lu; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhao, Guangjun

    2005-07-25

    For the first time to our knowledge, the laser performance of Yb3+, Na+-codoped CaF2 single crystals was demonstrated. Self-Q-switched laser operation at 1050nm was observed for 976 nm diode pumping at room temperature. On 5 W of incident power, the repetition rate and width of the self-Q-switched pulses reached 28 kHz and 1.5 micros, respectively. A maximal slope efficiency of 20.3% and minimal threshold absorbed pump power of 30 mW were respectively achieved with different output couplers, showing the promising application of Yb3+, Na+-codoped CaF2 crystals as compact and efficient solid-state lasers.

  13. NaK 2 (1)Sigma(+) yields 1 (1)Sigma(+) band optically pumped laser near 1. 02 micrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, B.K.; Luh, W.T.; Huennekens, J.

    1989-01-01

    Optically pumped laser emission has been observed on the NaK 2(A) 1 Sigma (+) to 1 (X) 1 Sigma (+) electronic state transition. The emission occurs between 1.015 and 1.035 microns when a sodium-potassium heat-pipe oven is pumped with 695-745nm pulsed dye laser radiation. The laser emission occurs on many ro-vibrational transitions without the use of cavity mirrors. However, the addition of a simple cavity increases both the number of observed lasing transitions and the amplitude of the emission on each line. Reported are results for the dependence of the emission intensity on pump laser power, oven temperature, and buffer gas pressure.

  14. High brightness laser-diode device emitting 160 watts from a 100 μm/NA 0.22 fiber.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junhong; Guo, Linui; Wu, Hualing; Wang, Zhao; Tan, Hao; Gao, Songxin; Wu, Deyong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-11-10

    A practical method of achieving a high-brightness and high-power fiber-coupled laser-diode device is demonstrated both by experiment and ZEMAX software simulation, which is obtained by a beam transformation system, free-space beam combining, and polarization beam combining based on a mini-bar laser-diode chip. Using this method, fiber-coupled laser-diode module output power from the multimode fiber with 100 μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) could reach 174 W, with equalizing brightness of 14.2  MW/(cm2·sr). By this method, much wider applications of fiber-coupled laser-diodes are anticipated.

  15. High brightness laser-diode device emitting 500 W from a 200 μm/NA0.22 fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junhong, Yu; Linhui, Guo; Hualing, Wu; Zhao, Wang; Hao, Tan; Songxin, Gao; Deyong, Wu; Kai, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A practical method of achieving high brightness and high power fiber-coupled laser-diode device is demonstrated both by experiment and ZEMAX software simulation, which is obtained by technologies of precision beam collimation, free space beam combining and polarization beam combining based on mini-bar diode laser chip. Using this method, fiber-coupled laser-diode module output power from the multimode fiber with 200 μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) could reach 528 W, equalizing brightness is 11.0 MW/(cm2 sr) and electro-optical efficiency (defined as fiber output power divided by voltage and current of the module) is 43.0%. By this method, much wider applications of fiber-coupled laser-diode are anticipated.

  16. Longitudinal Effect of Surface Treatments Modified by NaOCl-Induced Deproteinization and Nd:YAG Laser on Dentin Permeability.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Stella Renata Machado Silva; Huhtala, Maria Filomena Rocha Lima; Gomes, Ana Paula Martins; Ye, Qiang; Spencer, Paulette; De Paiva Gonçalves, Sérgio Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dentin permeability after dentin hypersensitivity treatments: fluoride, adhesive system, and collagen deproteinization with and without Nd:YAG laser exposure, and after erosive and abrasive challenges. Dentin permeability was assessed by measuring dentinal fluid flow using a permeability device. Eighty bovine dentin specimens (6 mm diameter/1 mm thickness) had permeability measured in the presence of the smear layer and after removal of the smear layer by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). They were then divided into eight groups according to treatment (n = 10): Group C, control; Group L, Nd:YAG laser; Group F, fluoride; Group FL, fluoride plus Nd:YAG laser; Group A, adhesive; Group AL, adhesive plus Nd:YAG laser; Group D, 10% NaOCl plus adhesive; and group DL, NaOCl plus adhesive plus Nd:YAG laser. Nd:YAG laser was irradiated at 60 mJ/pulse/10 Hz/47.7 J/cm2/1 W and applied freehanded without contact for 60 sec. Permeability was measured 24 h after the treatments. The specimens were exposed to erosive and abrasive challenges for 5 days. Erosive challenge was done by immersion in Coca-Cola, four times a day/90 sec each. After the first and last erosive challenge of the day, the abrasive challenge was conducted by brushing the specimens (24,000 cycles/3.8 cm range/200 g weight), and permeability was measured again. Results were analyzed statistically using two factor ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). With the exception of groups FL and A, all treatments reduced permeability. A significant reduction in permeability was seen when the treatments were combined with laser exposure. The association of adhesive and Nd:YAG laser led to the lowest rate of permeability after 24 h. NaOCl-induced deproteinization associated with Nd:YAG laser showed the lowest permeability rate after erosive/abrasive challenges. Dentin hypersensitivity treatments reduced dentin permeability when associated with Nd

  17. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  18. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  19. Intracavity spectrum analyzer with NaF:F2(+):F3(-) crystal laser for long-wave IR wave band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vratskiy, V. A.; Kolerov, A. N.

    1987-03-01

    An intracavity spectrum analyzer with NaF:F sub 2 (+):F sub 3 (-) crystal laser was used to widen the long-wave application boundary of intracavity laser spectroscopy into the IR waveband and to increase sensitivity. The spectrum analyzer was used for gas and plasma diagnostics. Spectra of atmospheric air and water steam were studied. A number of new lines were detected in the absorption spectra of atmospheric air and in a carbon arc plasma flame, which meant that the real sensitivity of the analyzer was at a (1 to 3) times 10 to the minus 8th power cm (-) level. Concentration of molecules and the absorption cross section of low pressure water steam in a dish was assessed experimentally. The absorption spectra of complex fluorohydrocarbons were studied. It was demonstrated that the spectrum analyzer makes it possible to analyze substances both in gaseous and ionized states.

  20. Thermal Characterization, Crystal Field Analysis and In-Band Pumped Laser Performance of Er Doped NaY(WO4)2 Disordered Laser Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, María Dolores; Cascales, Concepción; Han, Xiumei; Zaldo, Carlos; Jezowski, Andrzej; Stachowiak, Piotr; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Fromzel, Viktor; Dubinskii, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Undoped and Er-doped NaY(WO4)2 disordered single crystals have been grown by the Czochralski technique. The specific heat and thermal conductivity (κ) of these crystals have been characterized from T = 4 K to 700 K and 360 K, respectively. It is shown that κ exhibits anisotropy characteristic of single crystals as well as a κ(T) behavior observed in glasses, with a saturation mean free phonon path of 3.6 Å and 4.5 Å for propagation along a and c crystal axes, respectively. The relative energy positions and irreducible representations of Stark Er3+ levels up to 4G7/2 multiplet have been determined by the combination of experimental low (<10 K) temperature optical absorption and photoluminescence measurements and simulations with a single-electron Hamiltonian including both free-ion and crystal field interactions. Absorption, emission and gain cross sections of the 4I13/2↔4I15/2 laser related transition have been determined at 77 K. The 4I13/2 Er3+ lifetime (τ) was measured in the temperature range of 77–300 K, and was found to change from τ (77K) ≈ 4.5 ms to τ (300K) ≈ 3.5 ms. Laser operation is demonstrated at 77 K and 300 K by resonantly pumping the 4I13/2 multiplet at λ≈1500 nm with a broadband (FWHM≈20 nm) diode laser source perfectly matching the 77 K crystal 4I15/2 → 4I13/2 absorption profile. At 77 K as much as 5.5 W of output power were obtained in π-polarized configuration with a slope efficiency versus absorbed pump power of 57%, the free running laser wavelength in air was λ≈1611 nm with the laser output bandwidth of 3.5 nm. The laser emission was tunable over 30.7 nm, from 1590.7 nm to 1621.4 nm, for the same π-polarized configuration. PMID:23555664

  1. Thermal characterization, crystal field analysis and in-band pumped laser performance of Er doped NaY(WO(4))(2) disordered laser crystals.

    PubMed

    Serrano, María Dolores; Cascales, Concepción; Han, Xiumei; Zaldo, Carlos; Jezowski, Andrzej; Stachowiak, Piotr; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Fromzel, Viktor; Dubinskii, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Undoped and Er-doped NaY(WO4)2 disordered single crystals have been grown by the Czochralski technique. The specific heat and thermal conductivity (κ) of these crystals have been characterized from T = 4 K to 700 K and 360 K, respectively. It is shown that κ exhibits anisotropy characteristic of single crystals as well as a κ(T) behavior observed in glasses, with a saturation mean free phonon path of 3.6 Å and 4.5 Å for propagation along a and c crystal axes, respectively. The relative energy positions and irreducible representations of Stark Er(3+) levels up to (4)G(7/2) multiplet have been determined by the combination of experimental low (<10 K) temperature optical absorption and photoluminescence measurements and simulations with a single-electron Hamiltonian including both free-ion and crystal field interactions. Absorption, emission and gain cross sections of the (4)I(13/2)↔(4)I(15/2) laser related transition have been determined at 77 K. The (4)I(13/2) Er(3+) lifetime (τ) was measured in the temperature range of 77-300 K, and was found to change from τ (77K) ≈ 4.5 ms to τ (300K) ≈ 3.5 ms. Laser operation is demonstrated at 77 K and 300 K by resonantly pumping the (4)I(13/2) multiplet at λ≈1500 nm with a broadband (FWHM≈20 nm) diode laser source perfectly matching the 77 K crystal (4)I(15/2) → (4)I(13/2) absorption profile. At 77 K as much as 5.5 W of output power were obtained in π-polarized configuration with a slope efficiency versus absorbed pump power of 57%, the free running laser wavelength in air was λ≈1611 nm with the laser output bandwidth of 3.5 nm. The laser emission was tunable over 30.7 nm, from 1590.7 nm to 1621.4 nm, for the same π-polarized configuration.

  2. Article on Trident Laser Facility for NA-11 Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Cris W.

    2012-08-13

    The Trident Intermediate-Scale Laser Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an extremely versatile Nd:glass laser system dedicated to high energy density laboratory physics and weapons physics research and fundamental laser-matter interactions. Trident is a three-beam, 200 J/beam at the second harmonic for glass (527 nm wavelength), facility with tremendous flexibility and high beam quality. Pulse durations varying over 6 orders of magnitude, from 0.5 picoseconds to 1.0 microsecs, can be directed to either of two different target chambers with changeable illumination geometries, including the ability to achieve near-diffraction limited focus. This provides a unique range of capability at one facility from sub-picosecond pulses (and high-intensity laser science) to nanosecond pulses (and LPI physics relevant to ICF) to microsecond pulses (and driving flyer plates for supported shock dynamic materials science.) When in short-pulse mode (less than picosecond pulse), a single beam can provide up to 200 TW of power with uniquely controllable and measured pre-pulse contrast of 10 orders of magnitude. A recent external capability review at Los Alamos concluded that 'Trident is generating excellent, cutting edge science and is a leading intermediate scale laser system worldwide.'

  3. Alterações Induzidas Pelo Exercício no Número, Função e Morfologia de Monócitos de Ratos

    PubMed Central

    GUERESCHI, MARCIA G.; PRESTES, JONATO; DONATTO, FELIPE F.; DIAS, RODRIGO; FROLLINI, ANELENA B.; FERREIRA, CLÍLTON KO.; CAVAGLIERI, CLAUDIA R.; PALANCH, ADRIANNE C.

    2008-01-01

    O propósito desse estudo foi verificar as alterações histofisiológicas em monócitos e macrófagos induzidas por curtos períodos de exercícios. Ratos Wistar (idade = 2 meses, peso corporal = 200g) foram divididos em sete grupos (n=6 cada): controle sedentário (C), grupos exercitados (natação) na intensidade leve por 5 (5L), 10 (10L) e 15 minutos (15L), e grupos exercitados em intensidade moderada por 5 (5M), 10 (10M) e 15 minutes (15M). Na intensidade moderada os animais carregaram uma carga de 5% do peso corporal dos mesmos em seus respectivos dorsos. Os monócitos sangüíneos foram avaliados quanto à quantidade e morfologia e os macrófagos peritoneais foram analisados quanto à quantidade e atividade fagocitária. Os dados foram analisados usando ANOVA e Tukey’s post hoc test (p ≤ 0,05). Os grupos de intensidade leve e 5M apresentaram aumento nos níveis dos monócitos quando comparados com o controle. Foi observado aumento na área celular dos monócitos para os grupos 5L, 10L, 5M e 10M; a área nuclear aumentou para os grupos 10L, 5M e 10M em comparação com o controle. Houve aumento nos macrófagos peritoneais para os grupos 15L, 10M, 15M e diminuição no grupo 5M. A capacidade fagocitária dos macrófagos aumentou nos grupos de intensidade leve e para o grupo 10M. O exercício realizado por curtos períodos modulou o número e função dos macrófagos, assim como o número e morfologia dos monócitos, sendo tais alterações dependentes da intensidade. A soma das respostas agudas observadas nesse estudo pode exercer um efeito protetor contra doenças, podendo ser utilizada para a melhora da saúde e qualidade de vida.

  4. Alignment performance of a 0.6-NA 364-nm laser direct writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohan, Michael J.

    1990-06-01

    Alignment performance data is presented on a high resolution laser scanning lithography system. The alignment system is a through-the-lens on-axis design which features multiple optical paths such as bright-field and dark-field illumination and high and low magnification legs. Total system overlay is better than 0. 10 tm. 1. DW ALIGNMENT REQUIREMENTS Translating design data into patterned photoresist on wafers typically requires two lithographic steps. First data is transferred to a mask or reticle using either a laser scanning tool such as the ATEQ CORE-2500 or an e-beam system. Next the patterned mask or reticle is projected onto a wafer coated with resist. Throughout this paper I shall refer to systems which use two lithographic steps to transfer a pattern as Indirect Writers (1W). This is in contrast to Direct Writers (DW). As the name implies a DW patterns a wafer without the need for creation of a mask or reticle. 1W alignment systems must accurately register a wafer pattern to a reticle pattern. The most straightforward technique is to directly reference the reticle to the wafer through the projection lens. This approach eliminates baseline problems. 1W alignment systems require high precision. However since they have a reticle to reference (either directly or indirectly) absolute accuracy is not required. Measurements (alignments) are concerned only with the relative offset of the projected reticle image to a pattern on the wafer. The alignment system

  5. Thermoelectric conversion via laser-induced voltage in highly textured polycrystalline Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, G. W.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, H.; Yu, L.; Zhang, P. X.; Habermeier, H.-U.

    2011-11-15

    We have studied and analyzed the laser-induced voltage effect in highly c-axis-oriented polycrystalline Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2}. The textured and layered stacking Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} (x {approx} 0.7) bulks were prepared by a solid-state reaction process. Under the irradiation on Na{sub 0.67}CoO{sub 2} bulk surface with pulsed laser ({lambda} = 248 nm), the induced voltage signals were observed on the inclined surface with rise time 30 ns-43 ns and peak voltage 200 mV-500 mV; the voltage peak values show a linear dependence of laser energy densities. The crystal grains orientation plays a critical role in voltage peak value whether in film or texture bulk. The transverse voltage signal brings the information of thermoelectric anisotropy. In Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} band structure, the Fermi surface is different in the ab plane and along the c axis, leading to anisotropy of Seebeck coefficient. Additionally, the artificial structure of the inclined surface for highly textured bulk enables us to obtain a transverse voltage on inclined surface. These results demonstrated the layered textured bulk has potential applications in waste-heat conversion via transverse thermoelectric effect.

  6. Quantum electronic properties of the Na/sub 3/Ga/sub 2/Li/sub 3/F/sub 12/:Cr/sup 3+/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Payne, S.A.; Staver, P.R.; Ramponi, A.J.; Chase, L.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1988-06-01

    Few of the existing Cr/sup 3+/ vibronic lasers have achieved the slope efficiency and tuning range expected based on their known spectroscopic properties. In order to discover the causes of this behavior, the performance of chromium doped gallium fluoride garnet, Na/sub 3/Ga/sub 2/Li/sub 3/F/sub 12/:Cr/sup 3+/, as a laser material has been investigated experimentally. The data reported here include absorption and emission spectra, emission rates, quantum efficiency, laser wavelength tuning range, laser output slope efficiencies, and excited state absorption spectra. Similar properties of the alexandrite laser material were studied for comparison. The results indicate that the performance of the gallium fluoride garnet laser is severely limited by Cr/sup 3+/ excited state absorption (ESA). A model is presented to account for the unexpected nature of the ESA, which appears to be a common problem for all Cr/sup 3+/ vibronic lasers. Criteria are suggested for choosing Cr/sup 3+/ hosts for which the effects of ESA will be minimized.

  7. Q-switching of an alexandrite laser by (F/sup +//sub 2/)/sub A/ color centers in NaF

    SciTech Connect

    Kolyago, S.S.; Matrosov, V.N.; Pestryakov, E.V.; Trunov, V.I.; Gusev, Y.L.; Shkadarevich, A.P.

    1985-12-01

    Investigations were made of the characteristics of (F/sup +//sub 2/)/sub A/ color centers in NaF and of the spectral and lasing properties of an alexandrite laser Q-switched by centers of this type. When a Lyot filter and a switch having an initial transmission of approx.70% were used in this laser resonator, pulses of 80--100 nsec duration with a spectral width of approx.0.1 cm/sup -1/ and a tuning range of 0.73--0.783 ..mu.. were obtained under pulse-periodic conditions (12.5 Hz).

  8. Investigations of the ground-state hyperfine atomic structure and beta decay measurement prospects of 21Na with improved laser trapping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Mary Anderson

    1999-05-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which a neutral atom laser trap loaded with radioactive 21Na was improved and then used for measurements. The sodium isotope (half-life=22 sec) is produced on line at the 88 in. cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The author developed an effective magnesium oxide target system which is crucial to deliver a substantive beam of 21Na to the experiment. Efficient manipulation of the 21Na beam with lasers allowed 30,000 atoms to be contained in a magneto-optical trap. Using the cold trapped atoms, the author measured to high precision the hyperfine splitting of the atomic ground state of 21Na. She measured the 3S1/2(F=1,m=0)-3S1/2(F=2,m=0) atomic level splitting of 21Na to be 1,906,471,870±200 Hz. Additionally, she achieved initial detection of beta decay from the trap and evaluated the prospects of precision beta decay correlation studies with trapped atoms.

  9. Interaction of wide-band-gap single crystals with 248-nm excimer laser irradiation. X. Laser-induced near-surface absorption in single-crystal NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Nwe, K.H.; Langford, S.C.; Dickinson, J.T.; Hess, W.P.

    2005-02-15

    Ultraviolet laser-induced desorption of neutral atoms and molecules from nominally transparent, ionic materials can yield particle velocities consistent with surface temperatures of a few thousand kelvin even in the absence of visible surface damage. The origin of the laser absorption required for this surface heating has been often overlooked. In this work, we report simultaneous neutral emission and laser transmission measurements on single-crystal NaCl exposed to 248-nm excimer laser radiation. As much as 20% of the incident radiation at 248 nm must be absorbed in the near-surface region to account for the observed particle velocities. We show that the laser absorption grows from low values over several pulses and saturates at values sufficient to account for the surface temperatures required to explain the observed particle velocity distributions. The growth of absorption in these early pulses is accompanied by a corresponding increase in the emission intensities. The diffuse reflectance spectra acquired after exposure suggest that near-surface V-type centers are responsible for most of the absorption at 248 nm in single-crystal NaCl.

  10. Interaction of Wide-Band-Gap Single Crystals with 248-nm Excimer Laser Irradiation: X. Laser-Induced Near-Surface Absorption in Single-Crystal NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Nwe, K H.; Langford, Stephen C.; Dickinson, J T.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2005-02-15

    Ultraviolet laser-induced desorption of neutral atoms and molecules from nominally transparent, ionic materials can yield particle velocities consistent with surface temperatures of a few thousand Kelvin, even in the absence of visible surface damage. The origin of the laser required for this surface heating has been often overlooked. In this work, we report simultaneous neutral emission and laser transmission measurements on single crystal NaCl exposed to 248-nm excimer laser radiation. As much as 20% of the incident radiation at 248 nm must be absorbed in the near surface region to account for the observed particle velocities. We show that the laser absorption grows from low values over several pulses and saturates at values sufficient to account for the surface temperatures required to explain the observed particle velocity distributions. The growth of absorption in these early pulses is accompanied by a corresponding increase in the emission intensities. Diffuse reflectance spectra acquired after exposure suggest that near surface V-type centers are responsible for most of the absorption at 248 nm in single crystal NaCl.

  11. Deep, high contrast microscopic cell imaging using three-photon luminescence of β-(NaYF4:Er(3+)/NaYF4) nanoprobe excited by 1480-nm CW laser of only 1.5-mW.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Ruitao; Li, Nana; Zhang, Xin; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Sailing

    2015-05-01

    It is challenging to achieve deep microscopic imaging for the strong scattering in biotissue. An efficient three-photon luminescence can effectively increase the penetration depth. Here we report that β-NaYF4: Er(3+)/NaYF4 UCNPs were excited by a 1480-nm CW-laser and emitted 543/653-nm light through a three-photon process. With the merit of the hexagonal crystal phase, sub-milliwatt laser power was utilized to excite the UCNP-probed cells to minimize the heating effect. The polymer-coated UCNPs were shown to be harmless to cells. The deep, high contrast in vitro microscopic imaging was implemented through an artificial phantom. Imaging depth of 800 μm was achieved using only 1.5 mW excitation and a 0.7 NA objective. The green/red emission intensities ratio after penetrating the phantom was studied, indicating that longer emission wavelength is preferred for deep multiphoton microscopy. The proposed and demonstrated β-UCNPs would have great potential in three-photon microscopy.

  12. Deep, high contrast microscopic cell imaging using three-photon luminescence of β-(NaYF4:Er3+/NaYF4) nanoprobe excited by 1480-nm CW laser of only 1.5-mW

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Ruitao; Li, Nana; Zhang, Xin; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Sailing

    2015-01-01

    It is challenging to achieve deep microscopic imaging for the strong scattering in biotissue. An efficient three-photon luminescence can effectively increase the penetration depth. Here we report that β-NaYF4: Er3+/NaYF4 UCNPs were excited by a 1480-nm CW-laser and emitted 543/653-nm light through a three-photon process. With the merit of the hexagonal crystal phase, sub-milliwatt laser power was utilized to excite the UCNP-probed cells to minimize the heating effect. The polymer-coated UCNPs were shown to be harmless to cells. The deep, high contrast in vitro microscopic imaging was implemented through an artificial phantom. Imaging depth of 800 μm was achieved using only 1.5 mW excitation and a 0.7 NA objective. The green/red emission intensities ratio after penetrating the phantom was studied, indicating that longer emission wavelength is preferred for deep multiphoton microscopy. The proposed and demonstrated β-UCNPs would have great potential in three-photon microscopy. PMID:26137385

  13. Mechanisms of the blue emission of NaYF4:Tm(3+) nanoparticles excited by an 800 nm continuous wave laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxin; Jia, Tianqing; Shang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-10-07

    A thorough understanding of energy transfer and upconversion (UC) processes between trivalent lanthanide (Ln(3+)) ions is essential and important for improving UC performance. However, because of the abundant energy states of Ln(3+) ions, UC mechanisms are very complicated, which makes it a challenge to exclusively verify and quantitatively evaluate the dominant process. In this study, the fundamental excitation processes of Tm(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals under 800 nm continuous wave (CW) laser excitation were experimentally investigated on the basis of the quantum transition principle. An 800 nm CW laser combined with other wavelength CW lasers, including 471 nm, 657 nm, 980 nm, and 1550 nm lasers, were designed to study in-depth the excitation processes of UC luminescence via simultaneous two-wavelength laser excitation. The results indicate that the excited state absorption of (3)H6→(3)H4∼∼(3)H5→(1)G4 is the dominant pathway of the 481 nm and 651 nm emission bands, and two kinds of energy transfer UC pathways, uniformly expressed as (1)G4 + (3)H4→(1)D2 + (3)F4, play the primary roles in the 456 nm emission band.

  14. Accessing a low-lying bound electronic state of the alkali oxides, LiO and NaO, using laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, J. V.; Shen, K. K.; Winstead, C. B.; Gole, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The first laser based probe for the sodium and lithium monoxides is established. The Li(Na)+N 2O reactions studied in a multiple collision entrainment mode produce the LiO and NaO ground X 2Π and low-lying monoxide excited states. In contrast to the alkali halides, laser induced excitation spectroscopy confirms that the LiO and NaO B 2Π states, counter to recent predictions, are located at energies well below the ground state dissociation asymptote and, as predicted, possess significant binding energies. An assignment of the laser induced excitation spectra (LIF) for the B 2Π-X 2Π transitions of LiO in the region 3940-4300 Å is based on a direct correlation with the observed chemiluminescence (CL) from the lowest level of the LiO B 2Π state ( ˜4000-7000 Å) and high quality ab initio calculations for the ground state. The self-consistent assignment of the observed LIF and CL spectra makes use of the complimentary extended progressions in the X 2Π (CL) and B 2Π (LIF) vibrational level structure which results from the significant shift of the B 2Π excited state potential relative to that of the ground state. The experimental data are consistent with an excited state vibrational frequency separation of order 130 cm -1, and T e( B2Π) ≈ 26078 ± 800 cm-1. The latter value, in correlation with the ground state dissociation energy of LiO, suggests a B 2Π excited state dissociation energy well in excess of 2000 cm -1. The radiative lifetimes of the lowest levels of the LiO B 2Π state, isoergic with the highest levels of the LiO ground state, are determined to be in excess of 600 ns. The corresponding NaO excitation spectra in the range 6680-7250 Å also correlate well with ab initio calculations for the ground electronic state of NaO. Within this study, we provide optical signatures which one might consider to monitor LiO or NaO in process streams. In correlation with the observed chemiluminescence from B 2Π states of the higher alkali oxides KO, RbO, and

  15. Fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence from glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}:NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals under excitation of two near infrared femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Xiaoying; Cheng, Wenjing; Zhou, Kan; Ma, Jing; Feng, Donghai; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Jia, Tianqing; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-08-14

    In this paper, we report fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence of glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}: NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals excited simultaneously by two near infrared femtosecond lasers. When the glass ceramic was irradiated by 800 nm femtosecond laser, weak red emission centered at 670 nm was detected. Bright red light was observed when the fs laser wavelength was tuned to 1490 nm. However, when excited by the two fs lasers simultaneously, the sample emitted bright green light centered at 550 nm, while the red light kept the same intensity. The dependences of the red and the green light intensities on the two pump lasers are much different, which enables us to manipulate the color emission by adjusting the two pump laser intensities, respectively. We present a theoretical model of Er{sup 3+} ions interacting with two fs laser fields, and explain well the experimental results.

  16. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  17. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  18. Interaction of wide-band-gap single crystals with 248-nm excimer laser irradiation. IX. Photoinduced atomic desorption from cleaved NaCl(100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nwe, K.H.; Langford, S.C.; Dickinson, J.T.

    2005-07-01

    Neutral atomic sodium and chlorine emissions from cleaved, single-crystal NaCl(100) surfaces due to pulsed, 248-nm excimer laser irradiation have been characterized by time-resolved, quadrupole mass spectroscopy. At laser fluences below the threshold for optical breakdown, the resulting time-of-flight signals are consistent with particles emitted in thermal equilibrium with a laser-heated surface. Activation energy measurements made by varying the substrate temperature are consistent with F-H pair formation under UV excitation. By varying the laser fluence and estimating the effective surface temperature from the time-of-flight signals, additional activation energy measurements were made. The corresponding rate-limiting step is attributed to a thermally assisted, photoelectronic process involving atomic steps. Atomic force microscope images of surfaces irradiated at low fluences show monolayer islands that are created by the aggregation of material desorbed from steps. At somewhat higher fluences, monolayer pits due to F-center aggregation are also observed.

  19. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of Ca and Pb impurities on the bulk optical strength of ultrapure NaCl and KCl crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, An V.; Voszka, R.; Kovalev, Valerii I.; Faĭzullov, F. S.; Janszky, J.

    1987-06-01

    A significant increase (by a factor of about 3) of the bulk damage threshold in the case of interaction of CO2 laser radiation pulses with ultrapure NaCl and KCl crystals grown in a reactive atmosphere was observed on introduction of divalent metal ions Ca and Pb in concentrations of 10-5-10-6 mol/mol. Impurities were introduced in concentrations of 10-8-10-3 and 2×10-7-10-4 mol/mol into the melts of KCl and NaCl, respectively. The concentration of other impurities (including OH) did not exceed ~10-6 mol/mol. A physical model was developed to account for the observed dependence on the basis of an analogy between a system of colloidal particles and F centers in a crystal and a liquid-vapor system.

  20. The fabrication of Na doped p-type Zn1- x Mg x O films by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. Q.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Ye, Z. Z.; Lin, S. S.; Lu, B.; He, H. P.; Chen, L. X.; Lu, J. G.; Jiang, J.; Wu, K. W.; Huang, J. Y.; Zhu, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    P-type Zn1- x Mg x O (0≤ x≤0.25) films are obtained through Na doping, as confirmed by repeated Hall-effect measurements and rectification behavior of p-Zn0.81Mg0.19O:Na/ n-Zn0.8Mg0.2O:Al quasi-homojunctions. The absorption and photoluminescence spectra indicate the band gap shifts to higher energy in linearly proportional to Mg content. Critically, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns reveal that the strain induced by Na doping can be counteracted through an appropriate content of Mg alloying. Both XRD data and Hall-effect data imply that the solubility of Na acceptor should be enhanced by alloying with Mg. The X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) result indicates the existence of Na. Microstructure structure of the film is confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscope.

  1. Optically pumped laser lines of Na2 pumped by Kr/+/ /6471 A/ and HeNe /6328 A/ lasers - Identification of old lines and prediction of possible new lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, K. K.; Stwalley, W. C.; Zemke, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    The laser emission lines of a sodium dimer laser pumped by Kr(+) and HeNe lasers at wavelengths of 6471 and 6328 A, respectively, are identified. The Na2 fluorescence was excited in a crossed heat pipe oven at a sodium pressure of about 1 torr, and recorded spectra were compared with transition probability calculations. For the 6471-A pump, three series excited by absorption through the transitions v-prime = 13, J-prime = 35 - v-double prime = 4, J-double prime = 34; v-prime = 13, J-prime = 83 - v-double-prime = 2, J-double prime = 84 and v-prime = 20, J-prime = 98 - v-double prime = 6, J-double prime = 99 are observed in the region 6100-8350 A. At 6328 A, series excited through the transitions v-prime = 14, J-prime = 45 - v-double prime = 2, J-double prime = 46; v-prime = 16, J-prime = 17 - v-double prime = 4, J-double prime = 18; v-prime = 22, J-prime = 86 - v-double prime = 6, J-double prime = 85 and v-prime = 25, J-prime = 87 - v-double prime = 8, J-double prime = 86. Most of the previously observed optically pumped lines are found to correspond to the three level laser system. Additional wavelengths expected to undergo lasing under slightly improved conditions are also identified.

  2. What Do Laser-Induced Transient Techniques Reveal for Batteries? Na- and K-Intercalation from Aqueous Electrolytes as an Example.

    PubMed

    Scieszka, Daniel; Yun, Jeongsik; Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S

    2017-06-14

    Technological advancement has been revolutionized by rechargeable batteries, without which the use of various modern devices would not be possible. Aqueous Na ion batteries have lately garnered much attention, being recognized as a promising alternative to the commonly used Li ion batteries for the large-scale energy storage systems. However, further improvement and optimization of such systems require a more detailed understanding of intercalation mechanisms. In this work, we for the first time demonstrate the implementation of the laser-induced current transient (LICT) technique for in situ characterization of battery systems and investigate the interface between Na2Ni[Fe(CN)6] model battery electrodes and aqueous electrolytes in contact with aqueous electrolytes. Quite counterintuitively, the LICT method revealed that at the quasi-steady-state the electrode surface stays positively charged within the potential range where the intercalation/deintercalation of sodium as well as of potassium is possible, evidencing that the intercalation mechanism of the alkali-metal cations should be rather complex. Furthermore, the specific shape of the observed current transients indicates that the interfacial processes of intercalation/deintercalation have at least three different relaxation time constants. The relaxation behavior is highly influenced by the nature of the alkali-metal cations-most likely through their different solvation energy. In addition, we outline how the laser-based experiments can intensify detailed in situ investigations of battery systems.

  3. Laser cooling of the vibrational motion of Na{sub 2} combining the effects of zero-width resonances and exceptional points

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, R.; Jaouadi, A.; Dulieu, O.; Atabek, O.

    2011-10-15

    We propose various scenarios for molecular vibrational cooling combining the effects of two kinds of resonance states occurring during the photodissociation of Na{sub 2} taken as an illustrative example. Such resonances result from an appropriate sampling of laser parameters (wavelength and intensity): (a) For particular choices of intensity and wavelength, two resonance energies can be brought to complete coalescence, with their positions and widths becoming equal and leading to a so-called exceptional point (EP) in the parameter plane. Advantage can be taken from such points for very selective laser-controlled vibrational transfer strategies. (b) For specific intensities, far beyond the perturbation regime, some resonances can have a zero width (infinite lifetime). They are referred to as a zero-width resonance (ZWR) and may be used for vibrational purification purposes. We show how appropriately shaped, experimentally reachable laser pulses, encircling EPs or inducing ZWRs, may be used for a thorough and comprehensive control aiming at population transfer or purification schemes, which, starting from an initial field-free vibrational distribution, ends up in the ground vibrational level.

  4. Computational study of alkali-metal-noble gas collisions in the presence of nonresonant lasers - Na + Xe + h/2/pi/omega sub 1 + h/2/pi/omega sub 2 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; Chang, C.; George, T. F.; Laskowski, B.; Stallcop, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The collision of Na with Xe in the presence of both the rhodamine-110 dye laser and the Nd-glass laser is investigated within a quantum-mechanical close-coupled formalism, utilizing ab initio potential curves and transition dipole matrix elements. Both one- and two-photon processes are investigated; the Na + Xe system is not asymptotically resonant with the radiation fields, so that these processes can only occur in the molecular collision region. The one-photon processes are found to have measurable cross sections at relatively low intensities; even the two-photon process has a significant section for field intensities as low as 10 MW/sq cm.

  5. Computational study of alkali-metal-noble gas collisions in the presence of nonresonant lasers - Na + Xe + h/2/pi/omega sub 1 + h/2/pi/omega sub 2 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; Chang, C.; George, T. F.; Laskowski, B.; Stallcop, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The collision of Na with Xe in the presence of both the rhodamine-110 dye laser and the Nd-glass laser is investigated within a quantum-mechanical close-coupled formalism, utilizing ab initio potential curves and transition dipole matrix elements. Both one- and two-photon processes are investigated; the Na + Xe system is not asymptotically resonant with the radiation fields, so that these processes can only occur in the molecular collision region. The one-photon processes are found to have measurable cross sections at relatively low intensities; even the two-photon process has a significant section for field intensities as low as 10 MW/sq cm.

  6. Highly efficient Yb-free Er-La-Al doped ultra-low NA large mode area single-trench fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Jain, D; Alam, S; Jung, Y; Barua, P; Velazquez, M N; Sahu, J K

    2015-11-02

    We demonstrate a 60µm core diameter Yb free Er-La-Al doped single-trench fiber having a 0.038 ultra-low-NA, fabricated using conventional MCVD process in conjunction with solution doping technique. Numerical simulations predict an effective single mode operation with effective area varying from 1,820µm(2) to 1,960µm(2) (taking bend-induced modal distortion into account) for different thicknesses of trenches and resonant rings at a constant bend radius of 25cm. Moreover, all solid structure favors easy cleaving and splicing. Experimental measurements demonstrate a robust effective single mode operation. Furthermore, with a 4%-4% laser cavity, this fiber shows a record efficiency of 46% with respect to the absorbed pump power.

  7. Longitudinally diode-pumped 1.06-{mu}m Nd{sup 3+}:NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} laser without pump-wavelength stabilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Zharikov, Evgeny V; Lis, Denis A; Subbotin, Kirill A; Ushakov, S N; Onishchenko, A M; Romanyuk, V A; Shestakov, A V

    2006-01-31

    The spectral and lasing characteristics of a Nd{sup 3+}:NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystal longitudinally diode-pumped without pump-wavelength stabilisation are studied. A variation in the output power did not exceed 30% when the pump wavelength was changed in the spectral region from 0.794 to 0.811 {mu}m. (lasers)

  8. Improvement of abrasion resistance in artificial seawater and corrosion resistance in NaCl solution of 7075 aluminum alloy processed by laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Ning, Chengyi; Huang, Yihui; Cao, Zhenya; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Wenwu

    2017-03-01

    As 7075 aluminum alloy is widely used in a humid environment, in order to enhance its abrasion resistance and electrochemical corrosion resistance, the paper studied the effect of laser shock peening on abrasion resistance in artificial seawater and corrosion resistance in 3.5% NaCl solution of 7075 aluminum alloy. Result shows that when specimens were treated once and twice with 7.17 GW/cm2 the abrasion loss would be reduced by 43.75% and 46.09% compare to untreated respectively, and the corrosion rate of 7075 aluminum alloy could be reduced as much as 50.32% by LSP treatment with 7.17 GW/cm2. What's more, the effects on the microhardness, microstructure and residual stress with different LSP impacts and power density were investigated to find out strengthening mechanism of laser shock peening, which were observed and measured by microhardness tester, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction (XRD) residual stress tester. In the entire laboratory tests, it is considered that LSP is a practical option to improve abrasion resistance in seawater and corrosion resistance of 7075 aluminum alloy.

  9. Restoring excited particle interaction potentials from laser spectroscopy data: Na broadened by CO2 as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkova, Lydia P.; Pirgov, Peter S.; Paeva, Gabriela V.; Guerassimov, Nikolay T.; Nefedov, Anatoly P.; Sinel'schikov, Vladimir A.; Usachov, Alexandr D.; Homkin, Mihail A.

    1996-12-01

    Preliminary results of restoring potentials of interactions Na(3s, 3p)-CO2(X1(Sigma) g+) from measured far wing spectra of sodium resonance line Na-D perturbed by CO2 are presented. The spectra in the range of (Delta) (sigma) approximately equals 10-3500 cm-1 are considered following the quasi-static theory of line broadening by inert gases as continua and due to the A ARLR X and B ARLR X transitions of Na-CO2 quasi-molecules. The reduced absorption coefficient K((sigma) ) at frequency (sigma) equals (sigma) 0 + (Delta) (sigma) is calculated as corresponding to the radiation from molecules with internuclear separation R, where hc(sigma) equals VA,B - VX. As a first approximation, all the three potentials are presented in the shape of a (6,12)-Lennard-Jones potential. The constants C6 and C12 are determined as independent variables by minimization of the sum of squared deviations between measured and calculated K((sigma) ). Four versions of minimization were considered successively: (1) only red wing, (2) only blue wing (3) both blue and red wings with 6 independent variables (C6 and C12), and (4) both wings with fixed C6. The calculated K((Delta) (sigma) ) are compared to the measured ones.

  10. Ring-oven based preconcentration technique for microanalysis: simultaneous determination of Na, Fe, and Cu in fuel ethanol by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Juliana; Pasquini, Celio

    2013-02-05

    The ring-oven technique, originally applied for classical qualitative analysis in the years 1950s to 1970s, is revisited to be used in a simple though highly efficient and green procedure for analyte preconcentration prior to its determination by the microanalytical techniques presently available. The proposed preconcentration technique is based on the dropwise delivery of a small volume of sample to a filter paper substrate, assisted by a flow-injection-like system. The filter paper is maintained in a small circular heated oven (the ring oven). Drops of the sample solution diffuse by capillarity from the center to a circular area of the paper substrate. After the total sample volume has been delivered, a ring with a sharp (c.a. 350 μm) circular contour, of about 2.0 cm diameter, is formed on the paper to contain most of the analytes originally present in the sample volume. Preconcentration coefficients of the analyte can reach 250-fold (on a m/m basis) for a sample volume as small as 600 μL. The proposed system and procedure have been evaluated to concentrate Na, Fe, and Cu in fuel ethanol, followed by simultaneous direct determination of these species in the ring contour, employing the microanalytical technique of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Detection limits of 0.7, 0.4, and 0.3 μg mL(-1) and mean recoveries of (109 ± 13)%, (92 ± 18)%, and (98 ± 12)%, for Na, Fe, and Cu, respectively, were obtained in fuel ethanol. It is possible to anticipate the application of the technique, coupled to modern microanalytical and multianalyte techniques, to several analytical problems requiring analyte preconcentration and/or sample stabilization.

  11. Demonstration of ultra-low NA rare-earth doped step index fiber for applications in high power fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Jung, Yongmin; Barua, Pranabesh; Alam, Shaiful; Sahu, Jayanta K

    2015-03-23

    In this paper, we report the mode area scaling of a rare-earth doped step index fiber by using low numerical aperture. Numerical simulations show the possibility of achieving an effective area of ~700 um² (including bend induced effective area reduction) at a bend diameter of 32 cm from a 35 μm core fiber with a numerical aperture of 0.038. An effective single mode operation is ensured following the criterion of the fundamental mode loss to be lower than 0.1 dB/m while ensuring the higher order modes loss to be higher than 10 dB/m at a wavelength of 1060 nm. Our optimized modified chemical vapor deposition process in conjunction with solution doping process allows fabrication of an Yb-doped step index fiber having an ultra-low numerical aperture of ~0.038. Experimental results confirm a Gaussian output beam from a 35 μm core fiber validating our simulation results. Fiber shows an excellent laser efficiency of ~81%and aM² less than 1.1.

  12. Polypeptide-functionalized NaYF4:Yb(3+),Er(3+) nanoparticles: red-emission biomarkers for high quality bioimaging using a 915 nm laser.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ao; Deng, Yunyun; Shi, Huan; Hu, Jin; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Shishan; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Xiaohua; Shen, Jian

    2014-10-22

    We prepared poly-L-aspartic acid (PASP) functionalized NaYF4:Yb(3+),Er(3+) upconversion nanoparticles (UCNP-PASP). These nanoparticles can give red upconversion emission under excitation at 915 nm, whose wavelength of emission and excitation is located in the optical window of biological tissue. Dynamic laser scatting and zeta potentials of UCNP-PASP were used to study their stabilities in different aqueous solution. To understand the mechanism of the red emission of UCNP-PASP, photoluminescence spectra of samples were recorded before and after modification with PASP, poly acrylic acid (PAA), and poly(ether imide) (PEI) ligands under excitation at 915 and 980 nm, respectively. The cytotoxicity of the UCNP-PASP was also examined on a A549 cell and KB cell by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Moreover, the PASP-functionalized UCNP was employed as a potential biomarker for in vitro and in vivo experiments of upconversion luminescence imaging.

  13. Laser beam scanning microscope and piezoresponse force microscope studies on domain structured in 001-, 110-, and 111-oriented NaNbO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazoe, Seiji; Kohori, Akihiro; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Kitanaka, Yuuki; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Wada, Takahiro

    2012-09-01

    NaNbO3 (NN) films were epitaxially grown on SrRuO3/(001), (110), and (111)SrTiO3 substrates, and these NN films were characterized by a laser beam scanning microscope and a piezoresponse force microscope. The 001-oriented NN film had antiferroelectric 90° domains with 100 and 010 polarization axes and 90° domain walls exhibiting piezoresponse. The piezoresponding domain walls would be induced by ferroelasticity. On the other hand, the 110- and 111-oriented NN films possessed 60° domains. The 60° domains of 110-oriented NN film were constructed by antiferroelectric 11¯0 domain and piezoresponding {101} and {011} domains. In the case of 111-oriented NN, three kinds of 60° domains (11¯0 and 01¯1, 01¯1 and 101¯, and 101¯ and 11¯0) were observed. The fine domains with piezoresponse were also observed in the mixed region with the three 60° domains. From the stress measurement, we found that the difference in the domain structure of 001-, 110-, and 111-oriented NN films depends not only on the orientation direction but also on the stress from the substrate. Moreover, the stress and the induction of the piezoelectric domain also influence the dielectric behavior.

  14. Na4MgM2Se6 (M = Si, Ge): The First Noncentrosymmetric Compounds with Special Ethane-like [M2Se6](6-) Units Exhibiting Large Laser-Damage Thresholds.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Yang, Zhihua; Pan, Shilie

    2015-11-02

    Two new noncentrosymmetric compounds, Na4MgM2Se6 (I, M = Si; II, M = Ge), that contain special ethane-like [M2Se6](6-) units were reported for the first time. Remarkably, they exhibit high laser-damage thresholds [9 (I) and 7 (II) × benchmark AgGaS2] and moderate second-harmonic-generation responses with type I phase matching.

  15. Laser-diode-excited blue upconversion in Tm3+/Yb3+ -codoped TeO2-Ga2O3-R2O (R=Li, Na, K) glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Qinyuan; Yang, Gangfeng; Jiang, Zhonghong

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on intense blue upconversion in Tm(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped TeO(2)-Ga(2)O(3)-R(2)O(R=Li, Na, K) glasses upon excitation with commercial available laser diode (LD). Effects of alkali ions on the Raman spectra, thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of the tellurite-gallium glasses have also been investigated. Energy transfer and the involved upconversion mechanisms have been discussed. Intense blue upconversion emission centered at 476 nm along with a weak red emission at 650 nm has been observed upon excitation of 977 nm LD, assigned to the transitions of 1G4-->3H6, and 1G4-->3H4 and/or 3F(2,3)-->3H6 of Tm(3+), respectively. The blue upconversion intensity has a cubelike dependence on incident pump laser power, indicating a three-photon process. However, a quadratic dependence of the 476 nm upconversion intensity on the incident pump laser power has been observed when samples under excitation of 808 nm LD due to a two-photon absorption process. Enhanced upconversion luminescence have been observed with replacing K(+) for Na(+) and Li(+).

  16. Growth and structure of Bi 0.5(Na 0.7K 0.2Li 0.1) 0.5TiO 3 thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lei; Xiao, Dingquan; Lin, Dunmin; Zhang, Yongbin; Zhu, Jianguo

    2009-02-01

    Bi 0.5(Na 0.7K 0.2Li 0.1) 0.5TiO 3 (BNKLT) thin films were prepared on Pt/Ti/SiO 2/Si substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. The films prepared were examined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effects of the processing parameters, such as oxygen pressure, substrate temperature and laser power, on the crystal structure, surface morphology, roughness and deposition rates of the thin films were investigated. It was found that the substrate temperature of 600 °C and oxygen pressure of 30 Pa are the optimized technical parameters for the growth of textured film, and all the thin films prepared have granular structure, homogeneous grain size and smooth surfaces.

  17. Annual Scientific Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063 Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Henry C. Kapteyn

    2005-05-03

    In this project, we use coherent short-wavelength light generated using high-order harmonic generation as a probe of laser-plasma dynamics and phase transitions on femtosecond time-scales. The interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with materials and plasmas is relevant to stockpile stewardship, to understanding the equation of state of matter at high pressures and temperatures, and to plasma concepts such as the fast-ignitor ICF fusion concept and laser-based particle acceleration. Femtosecond laser technology makes it possible to use a small-scale setup to generate 20fs pulses with average power >10W at multiple kHz repetition rates, that can be focused to intensities in excess of 1017W/cm2. These lasers can be used either to rapidly heat materials to initiate phase transitions, or to create laser plasmas over a wide parameter space. These lasers can also be used to generate fully spatially coherent XUV beams with which to probe these materials and plasma systems. We are in process of implementing imaging studies of plasma hydrodynamics and warm, dense matter. The data will be compared with simulation codes of laser-plasma interactions, making it possible to refine and validate these codes.

  18. Na2ZnGe2S6: A New Infrared Nonlinear Optical Material with Good Balance between Large Second-Harmonic Generation Response and High Laser Damage Threshold.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangmao; Wu, Kui; Liu, Qiong; Yang, Zhihua; Pan, Shilie

    2016-06-15

    The development of frequency-conversion technology in the infrared region is in urgent need of new excellent infrared nonlinear optical (IR NLO) materials. How to achieve a good balance between laser damage threshold (LDT) and NLO coefficient (dij) for new IR NLO candidates is still a challenge. The combination of the highly electropositive alkali metal (Na) and Zn with d(10) electronic configuration into crystal structure affords one new IR NLO material, Na2ZnGe2S6. It exhibits excellent properties including a wide transparent region (0.38-22 μm), large band gap (3.25 eV), and especially a balance between a strong NLO coefficient (30-fold that of KDP) and a high LDT (6-fold that of AgGaS2), indicating a promising application in the IR region. Moreover, novel common-vertex-linked wavelike ∞[GeS3]n chains are interestingly discovered in Na2ZnGe2S6, which rarely exist in the reported thiogermanides containing alkali metals. In addition, calculated SHG density and dipole moment demonstrate that the large NLO response is mainly attributed to the cooperative effects of the [GeS4] and [ZnS4] units.

  19. Enhanced piezoelectric properties of lead-free 0.935(Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3-0.065BaTiO3 thin films fabricated by using pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. S.; Lee, M. H.; Kim, D. J.; Do, D.; Kim, M.-H.; Kim, J. S.; Song, T. K.; Kim, S. W.; Choi, H. I.; Jang, K. W.; Hwang, I. R.; Park, B. H.

    2013-04-01

    0.935(Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3-0.065BaTiO3 (BNT-BT) thin films have been grown on Pt(111)/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition method. Deposition conditions of oxygen pressure and deposition temperature were changed. The BNT-BT thin film deposited at 750 °C and 300 mTorr exhibited a slim hysteresis loop with a remnant polarization (2 P r ) of 11 µC/cm2 and a low leakage current density of 7.3 × 10-5 A/cm2 at 98 kV/cm. The piezoelectric responses of the thin films were investigated using piezoelectric force microscopy with a lock-in amplifier. The thin films exhibited piezoelectric properties with a d 33, f value of 168 pm/V.

  20. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  1. Luminescence properties of Er3+/Nd3+ co-doped Na5Lu9F32 single crystals for 2.7 μm mid-infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qingyang; Xia, Haiping; Sheng, Qiguo; He, Shinan; Zhang, Jianli; Chen, Baojiu

    2017-10-01

    The enhanced 2.7 μm mid-infrared emission from the Er3+:4I11/2 → 4I13/2 transition with Nd3+ ions as the sensitizer was achieved in the Na5Lu9F32 single crystal which was successfully grown by a Bridgman method. The transmission spectrum was tested and almost no absorption of 2.7 μm band was observed. It was indicated that the content of OH- ion was very low in the crystal and it was beneficial to the 2.7 μm mid-infrared laser output. Intense 2.7 μm emissions were achieved with Nd3+ ions sensitizing Er3+ ions under the 800 nm LD pumping and the energy transfer processes between Er3+ and Nd3+ ions were analyzed. Meanwhile, the greatly decreased near infrared emission at 1.5 μm and green up-conversion emission were obtained. Additionally, the optimized concentration ratio of Er3+ to Nd3+ for efficient 2.7 μm emission was investigated in this work and the maximum emission cross section at 2.7 μm was calculated. The decay curve of 1.5 μm emission could be well fitted by Inokuti-Hirayama expression, which was strongly indicated the dipole-dipole energy transfer from Er3+ to Nd3+ ions. The results showed that Er3+/Nd3+ co-doped Na5Lu9F32 single crystal had potential applications in 2.7 μm mid-infrared laser.

  2. Optical and microwave dielectric properties of pulsed laser deposited Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Andrews; Goud, J. Pundareekam; Raju, K. C. James; Emani, Sivanagi Reddy

    2016-05-23

    Optical properties of pulsed laser deposited (PLD) sodium bismuth titanate thin films (NBT), are investigated at wavelengths of 190-2500 nm. Microwave dielectric properties were investigated using the Split Post Dielectric Resonator (SPDR) technique. At 10 GHz, the NBT films have a dielectric constant of 205 and loss tangent of 0.0373 at room temperature. The optical spectra analysis reveals that NBT thin films have an optical band gap E{sub g}=3.55 eV and it has a dielectric constant of 3.37 at 1000 nm with dielectric loss of 0.299. Hence, NBT is a promising candidate for photonic device applications.

  3. Final Scientific/Technical Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063 Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henry Kapteyn

    2006-06-06

    The objective of this project was to develop experimental techniques for using coherent extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation generated using the high-order harmonic generation technique, as an illumination source for studies of high-density plasmas relevant to the stockpile stewardship mission. In this project, we made considerable progress, including the first demonstration of imaging of dynamic processes using this coherent ultrashort pulse light. This work also stimulated considerable progress in the development of the required ultrashort EUV pulses, and in the development of new laser technologies that have been commercialized. We also demonstrated the first EUV sources that exhibit full intrinsic optical coherence. This work resulted in 12 publications.

  4. Microchip Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-31

    physics that underlies their performance, typical operating parameters for the devices, and several of their applications . Keywords Composite-cavity...laser, Diode -pumped laser, Laser, Microchip laser, Miniature laser, Monolithic laser, Passively Q-switched laser, Q-switched laser, Saturable...cavity mirrors are deposited directly on the gain medium and the laser is pumped with a diode laser, either directly, as shown in Fig. 1, or via an

  5. Thermal Conductivity of Molten Silicate of Al2O3-CaO-Na2O-SiO2 Measured by Means of a Front Heating-Front Detection Laser Flash Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroki; Kowatari, Takaya; Shiroki, Yasuhiro; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Hiromichi; Waseda, Yoshio

    2012-12-01

    Thermal conductivity values have been systematically obtained for molten silicates containing Al2O3, CaO, Na2O, and SiO2 by means of a front heating-front detection laser flash method. The measurements were made for 13 samples in the temperature range between 1073 K and 1823 K (800 °C and 1550 °C), depending on the composition. Thermal conductivities of the silicate melts are found to be relatively insensitive to the variation of temperature, but they depend on the composition ratio, particularly the ratio of Non-Bridging Oxygen ions per Tetrahedrally coordinated cation—NBO/T. The thermal conductivity values decrease from 2.8 W/mK to 1.5 W/mK with the NBO/T value until it reaches about 1. Thermal conductivity values become constant for silicate melts with a higher value of NBO/T. It is known that the length of the silicate chain decreases with disconnection by the addition of alkaline earth cation or alkaline cation. The strong correlation between thermal conductivity and NBO/T is quite likely to suggest that silicate chain is a preferential path for heat transport in silicate melts.

  6. Electrical behaviors of c-axis textured 0.975Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.025BiCoO3 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feifei; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Shantao; Liu, Danqing; Wu, Fengmin; Wang, Dali; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-10-01

    The thin films of 0.975Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.025BiCoO3 (BNT-BC) have been successfully deposited on (1 1 1) Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si (1 0 0) substrates by pulse laser deposition and their ferroelectric, dielectric, local piezoelectric properties and temperature dependent leakage current behaviors have been investigated systematically. X-ray diffraction indicates the films are single phased and c-axis oriented. The thin films exhibit ferroelectric polarization-electric field (P-E) hysteresis loop with a remnant polarization (Pr) of 10.0 μC/cm2 and an excellent fatigue resistance property up to 5 × 109 switching cycles. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss are 500 and 0.22 at 1 kHz, respectively. The tunability of the dielectric constant is about 12% at 20 kV/mm. The piezo-phase response hysteresis loop and piezo-amplitude response butterfly curve are observed by switching spectroscopy mode of piezoelectric force microscope (SS-PFM) and the piezoelectric coefficient d33 is about 19-63 pm/V, which is comparable to other reports. The dominant leakage current conduction mechanisms are ohmic conduction at low electric field and Schottky emission at high electric field, respectively. Our results may be helpful for further work on BNT-based thin films with improved electric properties.

  7. A velocity map imaging photoelectron spectrometer for the study of ultrafine aerosols with a table-top VUV laser and Na-doping for particle sizing applied to dimethyl ether condensation.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Bruce L; West, Adam H C; Schläppi, Bernhard; Chasovskikh, Egor; Signorell, Ruth

    2013-01-28

    We present a new experimental configuration for the study of size-dependent, angle-resolved photoelectron and photoion spectra of weakly bound ultrafine aerosol particles targeted at particle sizes below ~20 nm. It combines single photon ionization by a tunable, table-top vacuum ultraviolet laser at energies up to 18 eV with velocity map imaging detection and independent size determination of the aerosol particles using the Na-doping method. As an example, the size-dependence of the valence photoelectron spectrum of dimethyl ether clusters and ultrafine aerosols is investigated. Up to a mean particle diameter of ~3-4 nm, the first ionization energy (value at band maximum) decreases systematically (up to ~1 eV) and the corresponding band broadens systematically (up to a factor of ~3) with increasing aggregate size. Plateau values for band positions and bandwidths are reached beyond a diameter of ~3-4 nm. Experimental evidence for the dominance of the fast intermolecular proton transfer over monomer fragmentation reactions upon ionization is presented via photoion imaging.

  8. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  9. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  10. Laser apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A laser apparatus having a pump laser device for producing pump laser energy upon being excited is disclosed. The pump laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the pump laser energy. A source laser device is used for producing source laser energy upon being excited by the pump laser energy. The source laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the source laser energy. The source laser's resonating cavity is coupled within a portion of the pump laser's resonating cavity.

  11. The solubility of platinum and gold in NaCl brines at 1.5 kbar, 600 to 800°C: A laser ablation ICP-MS pilot study of synthetic fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Jacob J.; Pettke, Thomas; Mungall, James E.; Spooner, Edward T. C.

    2005-05-01

    The concentration and distribution of Pt and Au in a fluid-melt system has been investigated by reacting the metals with S-free, single-phase aqueous brines (20, 50, 70 wt% eq. NaCl) ± peraluminous melt at a confining pressure of 1.5 kbar and temperatures of 600 to 800 °C, trapping the fluid in synthetic fluid inclusions (quartz-hosted) and vesicles (silicate melt-hosted), and quantifying the metal content of the trapped fluid and glass by laser ablation ICP-MS. HCl concentration was buffered using the assemblage albite-andalusite-quartz and f was buffered using the assemblage Ni-NiO. Over the range of experimental conditions, measured concentrations of Pt and Au in the brines ( CPtfluid, CAufluid) are on on the order of 1-10 3 ppm. Concentrations of Pt and Au in the melt ( CPtmelt, CAumelt) are ˜35-100 ppb and ˜400-1200 ppb, respectively. Nernst partition coefficients ( DPtfluid/melt, DAufluid/melt) are on the order of 10 2-10 3 and vary as a function of Cmetalfluid (non-Henry's Law behavior). Trapped fluids show a significant range of metal concentrations within populations of inclusions from single experiments (˜ 1 log unit variability for Au; ˜2-3 log unit variability for Pt). Variability in metal concentration within single inclusion groups is attributed to premature brine entrapment (prior to metal-fluid-melt equilibrium being reached); this allows us to make only minimum estimates of metal solubility using metal concentrations from primary inclusions. The data show two trends: (i) maximum and average values of CAufluid and CPtfluid in inclusions decrease ˜2 orders of magnitude as fluid salinity ( m∑Clfluid) increases from ˜4 to 40 molal (20 to 70 wt % eq. NaCl) at a constant temperature; (ii) maximum and average values of CAufluid increase approximately 1 order of magnitude for every 100°C increase temperature at a fixed m∑Clfluid. The observed behavior may be described by the general expression: log⁡(mmetalfluid,T,1.5kbar

  12. Analysis of Laser Breakdown Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Experiments on laser breakdown for ns pulses of 532 nm or 1064 nm light in water and dozens of simple hydrocarbon liquids are analyzed and compared to widely-used models and other laser breakdown experiments reported in the literature. Particular attention is given to the curve for the probability of breakdown as a function of the laser fluence at the beam focus. Criticism is made of the na"ive forms of both ``avalanche'' breakdown and multi-photon breakdown. It appears that the process is complex and is intimately tied to the chemical group of the material. Difficulties with developing an accurate model of laser breakdown in liquids are outlined.

  13. Laser induced nanoparticles and crystals and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaee, Mohammadreza; Compton, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Intense nanosecond lasers are used to fabricate nanoparticles by direct laser solid interactions as well as laser produced shock wave induced crystallization in saturated solutions. In particular, laser graphite interactions under liquid nitrogen results in variety of interesting new carbon nanoclusters. In particular, exfoliation of graphite to produce graphene is considered. Laser produced shock wave in unsaturated salt (e.g. NaCl, NaClO3) solution immediately produces thousands of tiny crystals. These nonmaterials are examined using Raman spectroscopy under liquid nitrogen, RUN), laser induced fluorescence, plasma spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy as well as conventional characterization methods such as SEM and HRTEM imaging.

  14. Two-laser mid-infrared and ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Mark W.; Murray, Kermit K.

    2007-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was performed using two-pulsed lasers with wavelengths in the infrared and ultraviolet regions. A 2.94 [mu]m pulsed optical parametric oscillator laser system and a 337 nm pulsed nitrogen laser irradiated the same spot on the sample target. Sinapinic acid (SA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CCA), and 4-nitroaniline (NA) were used as matrices, and bovine insulin and cytochrome C were used as analytes. The laser energy was adjusted so that one-laser MALDI and LDI was at a minimum and the matrix and analyte ion signal was enhanced when the two lasers were fired together. Two-laser LDI was observed with SA, DHB, and NA matrices and two-laser MALDI was observed with SA and DHB. Plots of ion signal as a function of delay between the IR and UV lasers show two-laser signal from 0 ns up to a delay of 500 ns when the IR laser is fired before the UV laser. The results are interpreted in terms of IR laser heating of the target that leads to an enhancement in UV LDI and MALDI.

  15. Laser principles.

    PubMed

    Bogdan Allemann, Inja; Kaufman, Joely

    2011-01-01

    Since the construction of the first laser in the 1960s, the role that lasers play in various medical specialities, including dermatology, has steadily increased. However, within the last 2 decades, the technological advances and the use of lasers in the field of dermatology have virtually exploded. Many treatments have only become possible with the use of lasers. Especially in aesthetic medicine, lasers are an essential tool in the treatment armamentarium. Due to better research and understanding of the physics of light and skin, there is now a wide and increasing array of different lasers and devices to choose from. The proper laser selection for each indication and treatment requires a profound understanding of laser physics and the basic laser principles. Understanding these principles will allow the laser operator to obtain better results and help avoid complications. This chapter will give an in-depth overview of the physical principles relevant in cutaneous laser surgery. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Inelastic and reactive collisions with polarized excited Na atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Hertel, I.V.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-07-01

    Polarization effects in inelastic collisions of laser state-prepared Na(3/sup 2/P, M/sub J/) with Na/sup +/ leading to Na(3/sup 2/D) or Na(3/sup 2/S) are discussed for the energy range E/sub cm/ = 5-47.5eV. Studies with linearly polarized light can be explained with a simple ''locking'' model of the Na(P)-orbital. The investigations employing circularly polarized light are a very sensitive test of the models describing the nonadiabatic angular momentum coupling between electronic and nuclear motion. The dynamical effects of the electronic spin on the angular momentum transfer are discussed. Recent crossed-beam experiments on the Na + O/sub 2/ -> NaO = O reaction in the energy range E/sub cm/ = 0/3-0.8eV show a pronounced dependence on the electric electronic symmetry of Na. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  17. Initial multi-parameter detection of atmospheric metal layers by Beijing Na-K lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jing; Yang, Guotao; Wang, Jihong; Cheng, Xuewu; Du, Lifang; Wang, Zelong; Gong, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Beijing Na-K lidar has been started running in 2010. This lidar has two laser beams: one dye laser emits a 589-nm laser beam for Na layer detection; the other dye laser emits a 770-nm laser beam for K layer detection. Under similar conditions, the echo signal of K layer is only about 2 orders of magnitude smaller than that of Na layer. This lidar has a sufficient Signal Noise Ratio (SNR). The structure and details of potassium layer can be effectively distinguished from a single original echo. Several examples of co-observation of density of Na and K layer showed some different results with previous studies. This lidar not only can supplement the lack of Na and K layer observation at this latitude region, but also provide evidence for the atmospheric sciences and space environment monitoring.

  18. Laser clock

    SciTech Connect

    Facklam, R.L.

    1983-05-26

    A laser clock includes a linear laser in one embodiment of the clock and a ring laser gyro in the other embodiment. The linear laser is frequency stabilized and utilizes a single active medium in the form of a low pressure gas, such as He-Ne, with a Doppler broadened gain curve. The ring laser gyro is a four frequency laser with a Faraday rotor. Detector and electronic circuitry associated with the laser of each embodiment detects a beat frequency and convert it to a clock signal.

  19. Compact watt-level passively Q-switched ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AIF3-NaF fiber laser at 2.8 μm using Fe2+:ZnSe saturable absorber mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Feng, Guoying; Zhang, Hong; Ning, Shougui; Lan, Bin; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2016-08-01

    A midinfrared (mid-IR) saturable absorber mirror (SAM) was fabricated by coating aluminum film on Fe2+:ZnSe crystal, based on the vacuum evaporation method. By employing the prepared SAM, we demonstrated a high-power passively Q-switched Er3+-doped ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fiber laser at 2.8 μm. The highest output power in excess of 1.01 W was obtained with a pulse energy of 11.37 μJ and pulse duration of 0.73 μs, corresponding to a repetition rate of 88.84 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, these values represent the highest output power/pulse energy from a passively Q-switched ZBLAN fiber laser around 2.8 μm. Our results demonstrate that Fe2+:ZnSe SAM is a promising device for high-power/high-energy pulse generation in compact mid-IR fiber lasers.

  20. The formation mechanism of clusters produced by laser ablation of solid sodium azide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Ruiqi; Wu, Lizhi; Ye, Yinghua; Hu, Yan; Zhu, Peng

    2013-02-01

    The mass spectra of sodium azide (NaN3) cluster ions, produced by 532 nm laser ablation of a solid NaN3 sample, were measured by a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The spectra showed that most of the cluster ions could be ascribed to the following series: Nan-, (NaN3)n-, Na(NaN3)n-, N3(NaN3)n-, Nan+, Nan(NaN3)+ and Na2(NaN3)n+. According to the possible distribution of the ions, possible formation mechanisms of NaN3 clusters are proposed.

  1. Blue Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION 13 4. EXPERIENCE WITH THE BLUE LASER 18 4.1 Operational and Processing Experience 18 4.2 Performance Testing 20 5...34 -. - . •. SECTION 3 BLUE HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION This section presents an overview of the steps taken in creating a HCL. There is...to the laser assembly. These steps can actually be considered as the final steps in laser fabrication because some of them involve adding various

  2. Laser power density dependent energy transfer between Tm3+ and Tb3+: tunable upconversion emissions in NaYF4:Tm3+,Tb3+,Yb3+ microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaojie; Thitsa, Makhin; Cheng, Tonglei; Gao, Weiqing; Deng, Dinghuan; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2016-11-14

    Energy transfer between Tm3+ and Tb3+ dependent on the power density of pump laser was investigated in NaYF4: Tb3+,Tm3+,Yb3+ microcrystals. Under the excitation of a 976-nm near-infrared laser at various power densities, Tb3+-Tm3+-Yb3+ doped samples exhibited intense visible emissions with tunable color between green and blue. The ratio of blue and green emission were determined by energy transfer between Tm3+ and Tb3+. When the power density of pump laser was low, the energy transfer process from Tm3+ (3F4) to Tb3+ (7F0) occurred efficiently. Upconversion processes in Tm3+ were inhibited, only visible emissions from Tb3+ with green color were observed. When the power density increased, energy transfer from the 3F4 (Tm3+) to 7F0 level (Tb3+) was restrained and population on high energy levels of Tm3+ was increased. Contribution of upconversion emissions from Tm3+ gradually became dominant. The emission color was tuned from green to blue with increasing the power density. Energy transfer processes between low-lying levels of activators, such as Tm3+ will greatly reduce the population on certain levels for further high-order upconversion processes. The Tb3+-Tm3+-Yb3+ doped phosphors are promising materials for detecting the condition of power density of the invisible near-infrared laser.

  3. Studies of Inelastic Collisions of NaK and NaCs Molecules with Atomic Perturbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Joshua A.

    We have investigated collisions of NaK molecules in the first excited state [2(A)1Sigma+], with Ar and He collision partners using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) and polarization-labeling (PL) spectroscopy in a two-step excitation scheme. Additionally, we have investigated collisions of NaCs molecules in the first excited state [2(A)1Sigma +] with Ar and He perturbers using the LIF technique. We use a pump-probe, two-step excitation process. The pump laser prepares the molecule in a particular ro-vibrational (v, J) level in the A state. The probe laser frequency is scanned over transitions to the 31Π in NaK or to the 53Π in NaCs. In addition to observing strong direct lines, we also see weak collisional satellite lines that arise from collisions in the intermediate state that take the molecule from the prepared level (v, J) to level (v, J + Delta J). The ratio of the intensity of the collisional line to the intensity of the direct line in LIF and PL yield information about population and orientation transfer. Our results show a propensity for DeltaJ=even collisions of NaK with Ar and an even stronger propensity for collisions with He. Collisions of NaCs with Ar do not show any such J=even propensity. Preliminary investigations of collisions of NaCs with He seem to indicate a slight J=even propensity. In addition, we observe that rotationally inelastic collisions of excited NaK molecules with potassium atoms destroy almost all of the orientation, while collisions with argon destroy about one third to two thirds and collisions with helium destroy only about zero to one third of the initial orientation.

  4. Laser Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Dopant level analysis is important to the laser system designer because it allows him to model the laser's performance. It also allows the end user to determine what went wrong when a laser fails to perform as expected. Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Scientific Materials Corporation has developed a process for producing uniform laser rods in which the amount of water trapped in the crystal during growth is reduced. This research led to the formation of a subsidiary company, Montana Analytical Services, which conducts analysis of laser rods for dopant ion concentrations. This is a significant advance in laser technology.

  5. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  6. Laser microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  7. Laser sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatenko, A. A.; Revina, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The review is devoted to the major advances in laser sampling. The advantages and drawbacks of the technique are considered. Specific features of combinations of laser sampling with various instrumental analytical methods, primarily inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, are discussed. Examples of practical implementation of hybrid methods involving laser sampling as well as corresponding analytical characteristics are presented. The bibliography includes 78 references.

  8. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  9. Long-Lifetime Laser Materials For Effective Diode Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1991-01-01

    Long quantum lifetimes reduce number of diodes required to pump. Pumping by laser diodes demonstrated with such common Nd laser materials as neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and Nd:YLiF4, but such materials as Nd:LaF3, Nd:NaF.9YF3, and possibly Nd:YF3 more useful because of long lifetimes of their upper laser energy levels. Cost effectiveness primary advantage of solid-state laser materials having longer upper-laser-level lifetimes. Because cost of diodes outweighs cost of laser material by perhaps two orders of magnitude, cost reduced significantly.

  10. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  11. Cutaneous lasers.

    PubMed

    Fedok, Fred G; Garritano, Frank; Portela, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    There has been a remarkable development and evolution of laser technology, leading to adaptation of lasers for medical use and the treatment of skin problems and disorders. Many treatments that required incisional surgery and other invasive methods are now preferentially treated with a laser. Although laser advances have resulted in the availability of some amazing tools, they require the clinical skill and judgment of the clinician for their optimal use. This article provides a clinically oriented overview of many of the lasers valuable in facial plastic surgery. Basic science, clinical adaptations, and patient management topics are covered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  13. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  14. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  15. Light-induced drift of Na atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werij, H. G. C.; Woerdman, J. P.

    1988-10-01

    Light can induce a flux of optically absorbing particles immersed in a buffer gas, when these particles have a different mobility in the ground and excited state. This paper presents a study of light-induced drift (LID) of Na atoms in noble gases, which can be regarded as the “canonical” system for experiments in this field. We have experimentally studied the LID effect in the optically thin and the optically thick regimes. Parameters which have been varied are laser frequency, laser intensity, buffer gas pressure and buffer gas species. This work gives the first critical comparison of LID experiments with realistic theory in which the multilevel complications of the Na atom have been incorporated. In the optically thick case (“optical piston”) one can distinguish the open cell and the closed cell regimes. Effects of adsorption and desorption of Na atoms at the surface of the cell wall have been incorporated into the theory. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with the results of a four-level rate-equation model for LID which incorporates the fine and hyperfine structure of the level scheme of the Na absorbers.

  16. Nonlinear optical materials based on MBe2BO3F2 (M=Na,K)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Linfeng; Wang, Yebin; Chen, Chuangtian; Wu, Bochuang

    1993-12-01

    In a detailed analysis on the component elements, beryllium borate was chosen, and the alkaline metal beryllium borate fluorides MBe2BO3F2 (MBBF) (M = Na, K) were investigated. The compounds MBBF (M = Na, K) were synthesized by normal solid state reaction from the MBF4-BeO systems at 650-800 C, and the MBBF (M = Na, K) crystals were grown by the flux method. MBFF (Na,K) are promising candidates for VUV NLO crystals. A VUV NLO crystal can play an important role in laser chemistry, laser medical science and other fields.

  17. Issue of data acquisition and processing using short range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning for educational portals and virtual museums based on Wawel cathedral. (Polish Title: Problematyka pozyskiwania i przetwarzania danych fotogrametrycznych i z naziemnego skaningu laserowego na potrzeby tworzenia portali edukacyjnych i wirtualnych muzeów na przykładzie Katedry Wawelskiej)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitka, B.; Szelest, P.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the issues related to the acquisition and processing of terrestrial photogrammetry and laser scanning for building educational portals and virtual museums. Discusses the specific requirements of measurement technology and data processing for all kinds of objects, ranging from architecture through sculpture and architectural detail on the fabric and individual museum exhibits. Educational portals and virtual museums require a modern, high-quality visuals (3D models, virtual tours, animations, etc.) supplemented by descriptive content or audio commentary. Source for obtaining such materials are mostly terrestrial laser scanning and photogrammetry as technologies that provide complete information about the presented geometric objects. However, the performance requirements of web services impose severe restrictions on the presented content. It is necessary to use optimalization geometry process to streamline the way of its presentation. Equally important problem concerns the selection of appropriate technology and process measurement data processing presented for each type of objects. Only skillful selection of measuring equipment and data processing tools effectively ensure the achievement of a satisfactory end result. Both terrestrial laser scanning technology and digital close range photogrammetry has its strengths which should be used but also the limitations that must be taken into account in this kind of work. The key is choosing the right scanner for both the measured object and terrain such as pixel size in the performance of his photos.

  18. Photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold highly excited NaCs molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaseelan, Maitreyi; Haruza, Marek; Bigelow, Nicholas

    2013-05-01

    We report on our spectroscopic investigations of translationally ultracold NaCs molecules. Photoassociation from laser cooled mixtures of ground state sodium and excited cesium atoms creates molecules in excited states detuned from the Na(3s) + Cs(6d) dissociation asymptote. This is an as yet unexplored asymptote for molecule formation. We infer properties of the scattering wave from the PA spectra, and investigate the populated ground states using photoionization and depletion spectroscopy.

  19. Focused laser lithographic system with sub-wavelength resolution based on vortex laser induced opacity of photochromic material.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen; Bai, Jian; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Chen; Yao, Yuan; Hu, Neibin; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei; Yang, Guoguang

    2014-12-01

    A focused laser lithographic system combines with vortex laser induced opacity of photochromic layer to write patterns with linewidth below wavelength. A photochromic layer is formed by coating the mixture of metanil yellow and aqueous PVA solution on the photoresist layer. In our system, the center of a lithographic laser with a 405 nm wavelength coincides with the center of vortex laser with a 532 nm wavelength. When a photochromic layer is illuminated by both lasers simultaneously, the absorbance for the lithographic laser decreases at the hollow region of the vortex laser but increases at its annular region, so that a transparent aperture for the lithographic laser is created and its size could be tuned by changing the power of vortex laser; therefore, the linewidth of written patterns is variable. Experimentally, using a 20× lens (NA = 0.4), this system condenses the linewidth of written patterns from 6614 to 350 nm.

  20. Laser Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Tunable diode lasers are employed as radiation sources in high resolution infrared spectroscopy to determine spectral characteristics of gaseous compounds. With other laser systems, they are produced by Spectra-Physics, and used to monitor chemical processes, monitor production of quantity halogen lamps, etc. The Laser Analytics Division of Spectra-Physics credits the system's reliability to a program funded by Langley in the 1970s. Company no longer U.S.-owned. 5/22/97

  1. Laser apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Owen; Stogran, Edmund M.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus is described wherein an active laser element, such as the disc of a face-pumped laser, is mounted in a housing such that the weight of the element is supported by glass spheres which fill a chamber defined in the housing between the walls of the housing and the edges of the laser element. The uniform support provided by the spheres enable the chamber and the pump side of the laser element to be sealed without affecting the alignment or other optical properties of the laser element. Cooling fluid may be circulated through the sealed region by way of the interstices between the spheres. The spheres, and if desired also the cooling fluid may contain material which absorbs radiation at the wavelength of parasitic emissions from the laser element. These parasitic emissions enter the spheres through the interface along the edge surface of the laser element and it is desirable that the index of refraction of the spheres and cooling fluid be near the index of refraction of the laser element. Thus support, cooling, and parasitic suppression functions are all accomplished through the use of the arrangement.

  2. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  3. Biocavity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  4. Studies of rotationally inelastic collisions of NaK and NaCs with Ar and He perturbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Faust, C.; Richter, K.; Wolfe, C. M.; Ashman, S.; Malenda, R. F.; Weiser, P.; Carlus, S.; Fragale, A.; Hickman, A. P.; Huennekens, J.

    2013-05-01

    We report studies of rotationally inelastic collisions of Ar and He atoms with the molecules NaK and NaCs prepared in various ro-vibrational levels of the A1Σ+ electronic state. We use laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and polarization labeling (PL) spectroscopy in a pump-probe, two step excitation process. The pump excites the molecule to a ro-vibrational level (v , J) in the A state. The probe laser is scanned over transitions to the 31 Π state in NaK or the 53 Π state in NaCs. In addition to strong direct lines, we observe weak satellite lines that arise from collision-induced transitions of the A state level (v , J) to (v , J + ΔJ) . The ratio of intensities of the satellite line to the direct line in LIF and PL yields information about population and orientation transfer. Preliminary results show a strong propensity for collisions with ΔJ =even for NaK; the propensity is larger for He than for Ar. Collisions of NaCs with He show a similar propensity, but collisions of NaCs with Ar do not. Theoretical calculations are also underway. For He-NaK, we have completed potential surface calculations using GAMESS and coupled channel scattering calculations of rotational energy transfer and transfer of orientation. Work supported by NSF and XSEDE.

  5. High-repetition-rate TEM00-mode diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chun; Yang, ChengLong; Wang, Weimin; Yan, Senlin; Chen, Jingyan

    1998-08-01

    A diode-laser side-pumped E-O Q-switched TEM00 Nd:YAG slab laser that uses a large N.A. cylindrical lens and a thin slab pumping geometry has been investigated. The pumping scheme has the ability to match well the pump beam to the laser's fundamental transverse mode in two axes. Approximately 1.1 times diffraction limited laser beam is obtained. The slope efficiency is 31% and 18.9% at long-pump and Q-switched operation, respectively.

  6. Laser Physics and Laser Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    is probably better than will ever be needed. Publications that have appeared, or are in the final stages of preparation, covering the FHT algorithm...and the understanding of the energy storage and laser trigger requirements make pursuit of a two photon laser a much more probable success now than...of energy migration for the amlec- 1) In the haigh comipressibility eginic produced by the laser tilar excited states, obtained by studying the decay

  7. Multimegajoule laser design. [Glass lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, K.R.; Ozarski, R.G.; Hagen, W.F.; Holzrichtr, J.F.

    1985-08-01

    New technologies make multimegajoule glass lasers economically feasible. We have devised new laser architectures using harmonic switchout, target-plane holographic injection, phase conjugation, continuous apodization, and higher amplifier efficiencies. Our plan for building a multimegajoule laser for a recurring cost under $300 million relies on the following manufacturing economies of scale: high-volume glass production, rapid harmonic-crystal growth, capacitor sizing and packing to increase energy capacity, and part standardization.

  8. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  9. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  10. The collinear laser beam line at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, C. D. P.; Baartman, R.; Behr, J. A.; Kiefl, R. F.; Pearson, M.; Poutissou, R.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hirayama, Y.

    2004-12-01

    The collinear laser beam line at ISAC is producing a range of highly polarized Li and Na isotopes with high beam transmission efficiency. Using a Ta production target, a 8Li rate of more than 10 8 atoms s -1 with 60% polarization at the user experiment is typical. The beam line is also used for laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy on heavy ions and atoms. A preliminary scheme for polarizing 20F is presented.

  11. Co Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    newsletter setvice covering the moj-t recent research findings in 25 areas of industrial, technological , and sociological interest— invaluable information...service will be backdated to furnish you microfiche of reports issued earlier. Because of contractual arrangements with several Special Technology ...pressure electrical CO laser and, thereby, to develop the technology for high pres- sure, scalable, electric CO lasers exhibiting properties of

  12. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  13. Na double-edge magneto-optic filter for Na lidar profiling of wind and temperature in the lower atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wentao; Chu, Xinzhao; Williams, B P; Harrell, S D; Wiig, Johannes; She, C-Y

    2009-01-15

    A Na double-edge magneto-optic filter is proposed for incorporation into the receiver of a three-frequency Na Doppler lidar to extend its wind and temperature measurements into the lower atmosphere. Two prototypes based on cold- and hot-cell designs were constructed and tested with laser scanning and quantum mechanics modeling. The hot-cell filter exhibits superior performances over the cold-cell filter containing buffer gas. Lidar simulations, metrics, and error analyses show that simultaneous wind and temperature measurements are feasible in the altitude range of 20-50 km using the hot-cell filter and reasonable Na lidar parameters.

  14. High throughput laser processing

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2016-12-27

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  15. Laser goniometer

    DOEpatents

    Fairer, George M.; Boernge, James M.; Harris, David W.; Campbell, DeWayne A.; Tuttle, Gene E.; McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

  16. Laser propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rom, F. E.; Putre, H. A.

    1972-01-01

    The use of an earth-based high-power laser beam to provide energy for earth-launched rocket vehicle is investigated. The laser beam energy is absorbed in an opaque propellant gas and is converted to high-specific-impulse thrust by expanding the heated propellant to space by means of a nozzle. This laser propulsion scheme can produce specific impulses of several thousand seconds. Payload to gross-weight fractions about an order of magnitude higher than those for conventional chemical earth-launched vehicles appear possible. There is a potential for a significant reduction in cost per payload mass in earth orbit.

  17. Explosive laser

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Davis, W.C.; Sullivan, J.A.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO$sub 2$ and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO$sub 2$ lasing. (auth)

  18. Antibiofilm activity of three irrigation protocols activated by ultrasonic, diode laser or Er:YAG laser in vitro.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, P; Cheng, C Q; Mohanraj, R; Sriraman, P; Subbarao, C; Sharma, S

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the impact of three irrigation protocols, activated by three different methods, on mature biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis in vitro. Root canals in 280 single-rooted teeth were instrumented using a rotary Ni-Ti system. Biofilms of E. faecalis were generated based on a previously established protocol. Samples were randomly divided into three experimental (n = 80) and one control (n = 40) group based on the irrigation protocol employed: group 1 (NaOCl + Etidronic acid), 1 : 1 mixture of 6% NaOCl and 18% etidronic acid; group 2 (NaOCl-EDTA), 3% NaOCl followed by 17% EDTA; group 3 (NaOCl-EDTA-NaOCl), 3% NaOCl followed by 17% EDTA and a final flush of 3% NaOCl. Saline served as the control. Samples were further divided into four subgroups (n = 20) based on the activation method: subgroup A, no activation; subgroup B, ultrasonic activation; group C, diode laser; group D, Er:YAG laser. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess bacterial viability in situ. Root dentine powder was obtained for determining the colony-forming units (CFU mL(-1) ). Data were analysed by appropriate statistical analyses with P = 0.05. All experimental irrigation protocols caused complete destruction of the biofilm in the root canal lumen. Within the dentinal tubules, all groups had a significantly higher percentage of dead bacteria than the saline control (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between NaOCl + etidronic acid and NaOCl-EDTA-NaOCl (P > 0.05), whereas both groups brought about more bacterial reduction than NaOCl-EDTA (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between diode laser and Er:YAG laser in any of the groups (P > 0.05). Both diode and Er:YAG laser were more effective than ultrasonic activation and conventional syringe irrigation in reducing E. fecalis biofilms (P < 0.05). The use of NaOCl after or in combination with a chelator caused the greatest reduction of E. faecalis. Diode laser and Er:YAG laser activation were superior to

  19. Highly efficient Raman distributed feedback fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jindan; Alam, Shaif-ul; Ibsen, Morten

    2012-02-27

    We demonstrate highly efficient Raman distributed feedback (DFB) fibre lasers for the first time with up to 1.6 W of continuous wave (CW) output power. The DFB Bragg gratings are written directly into two types of commercially available passive germano-silica fibres. Two lasers of 30 cm length are pumped with up to 15 W of CW power at 1068 nm. The threshold power is ~2 W for a Raman-DFB (R-DFB) laser written in standard low-NA fibre, and only ~1 W for a laser written in a high-NA fibre, both of which oscillate in a narrow linewidth of <0.01 nm at ~1117 nm and ~1109 nm, respectively. The slope efficiencies are ~74% and ~93% with respect to absorbed pump power in the low-NA fibre and high-NA fibre respectively. Such high conversion efficiency suggests that very little energy is lost in the form of heat through inefficient energy transfer. Our results are supported by numerical simulations, and furthermore open up for the possibility of having narrow linewidth all-fibre laser sources in wavelength bands not traditionally covered by rare-earth doped silica fibres. Simulations also imply that this technology has the potential to produce even shorter R-DFB laser devices at the centimetre-level and with mW-level thresholds, if Bragg gratings formed in fibre materials with higher intrinsic Raman gain coefficient than silica are used. These materials include for example tellurite or chalcogenide glasses. Using glasses like these would also open up the possibility of having narrow linewidth fibre sources with DFB laser oscillating much further into the IR than what currently is possible with rare-earth doped silica glasses.

  20. Compact Fiber Laser for 589nm Laser Guide Star Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D.; Drobshoff, D.; Mitchell, S.; Brown, A.

    Laser guide stars are crucial to the broad use of astronomical adaptive optics, because they facilitate access to a large fraction of possible locations on the sky. Lasers tuned to the 589 nm atomic sodium resonance can create an artificial beacon at altitudes of 95-105 km, thus coming close to reproducing the light path of starlight. The deployment of multiconjugate adaptive optics on large aperture telescopes world-wide will require the use of three to nine sodium laser guide stars in order to achieve uniform correction over the aperture with a high Strehl value. Current estimates place the minimum required laser power at > 10 W per laser for a continuous wave source, though a pulsed format, nominally 6?s in length at ~ 16.7 kHz, is currently preferred as it would enable tracking the laser through the Na layer to mitigate spot elongation. The lasers also need to be compact, efficient, robust and turnkey. We are developing an all-fiber laser system for generating a 589 nm source for laser-guided adaptive optics. Fiber lasers are more compact and insensitive to alignment than their bulk laser counterparts, and the heat-dissipation characteristics of fibers, coupled with the high efficiencies demonstrated and excellent spatial mode characteristics, make them a preferred candidate for many high power applications. Our design is based on sum-frequency mixing an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser operating at 1583 nm with a 938 nm Nd:silica fiber laser in a periodically poled crystal to generate 589 nm. We have demonstrated 14 W at 1583 nm with an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser, based on a Koheras single frequency fiber oscillator amplified in an IPG Photonics fiber amplifier. The Nd:silica fiber laser is a somewhat more novel device, since the Nd3+ ions must operate on the resonance transition (i.e. 4F3/2-4I9/2), while suppressing ASE losses at the more conventional 1088 nm transition. Optimization of the ratio of the fiber core and cladding permits operation of the laser at room

  1. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  2. Shooting Lasers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-02

    This picture shows a lab demonstration of the measurement chamber inside the Tunable Laser Spectrometer, an instrument that is part of the Sample Analysis at Mars investigation on NASA Curiosity rover.

  3. [Laser myringotomy].

    PubMed

    Hassmann-Poznańska, Elzbieta; Skotnicka, Bozena

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was assessment of the qualities of laser-assisted myringotomy (LAM) as a treatment for acute and secretory otitis media. Laser-assisted myringotomy was performed on 65 children (113 ears) mean age 6.2 years diagnosed with secretory otitis media (80%), recurrent secretory otitis media (11%) and acute otitis media (9%). Myringotomy was performed under general anesthesia using the OtoLAM device (ESC/Sharplan, Israel). In 64 ears pressure equalisation tubes were inserted after fenestration of the tympanic membrane with laser. Adenoidectomy alone or with tonsillectomy was performed at the same time in 51 cases. Laser tympanostomies remained patent for 7-32 days. All tympanostomies healed with no noticeable scarring. LAM appears to be a safe, and easy to performed, alternative technique in the treatment of otitis media.

  4. Laser barometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

  5. Laser reduced graphene for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongfang; Bock, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Graphene was prepared by excimer laser irradiation reduction of graphite oxide dissolved in an aqueous solution at different laser energies and irradiation time. The morphologies and structure of the laser reduced graphene were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The XRD results confirm that the deoxygenation of the graphite oxide sheets occurred almost completely for all laser irradiation conditions used. The graphene fabricated by laser irradiation reduction appears to be randomly aggregated, crumpled, disordered and small sheet solid material. The total amount of oxygen functional groups reduced significantly and the CC/CO intensity ratio increased, however, the atomic percentages of the Cdbnd O double bond were increased after laser reduction. The laser reduced graphene was used as the electrode active material for supercapacitors and its specific capacitance was evaluated in a two electrode cell in either a 0.5 M Na2SO4 aqueous or a 1 M Tetraethylammoniumtetrafluoroborate acetonitrile based electrolyte. The specific capacitance of the laser fabricated graphene was found to depend on the energy and irradiation time of the laser. The highest specific capacitance was determined to be 141 F/g at 1.04 A/g and 84 F/g at 1.46 A/g in the aqueous and ACN electrolytes, respectively.

  6. Laser Cutting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    lasers that are optically modified to produce high beam quality at reduced power levels for precision drilling and trepanning. * Nd:YAG lasers with...a smooth, dross-free cut face while the marking consists of a series of precisely placed shallow pits where surface finish and dross are not usually...neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) pulsed cutting data because the technique is considered vital in meeting the detailed precision cutting

  7. Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Amoco Laser Company, a subsidiary of Amoco Corporation, has developed microlasers for the commercial market based on a JPL concept for optical communications over interplanetary distances. Lasers emit narrow, intense beams of light or other radiation. The beams transmit communication signals, drill, cut or melt materials or remove diseased body tissue. The microlasers cover a broad portion of the spectrum, and performance is improved significantly. Current applications include medical instrumentation, color separation equipment, telecommunications, etc.

  8. Laser Physics and Laser Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Mass Spectroscopy X -ray spectroscopy Single Crystal Fibers X -ray lithography Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser Sow-ce X -ray microscopy as. AISYRACT (Cenue an...UNCLASSIFIED SCUNITYV CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGUZ(lM DWO &aeA") 20. (continued) studied and compared the laser produced plasma X -ray source to other X -ray...sourc s such as synchrotron and rotating anodes. It is clear that the laser plasma X -ra source has an important role to play in soft X -ray

  9. Laser optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weijian; Adair Gerke, Stephen; Wei Ng, Kar; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2015-09-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the interaction between optical field and mechanical motion. So far, this interaction has relied on the detuning between a passive optical resonator and an external pump laser. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator supporting the mirror of a laser and the optical field generated by the laser itself. The optically active cavity greatly enhances the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we use an electrically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity. We observe >550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micromechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical, and correspondingly a 23 nm laser wavelength sweep. In addition to its immediate applications as a high-speed wavelength-swept source, this scheme also offers a new approach for integrated on-chip sensors.

  10. Laser optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weijian; Adair Gerke, Stephen; Wei Ng, Kar; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the interaction between optical field and mechanical motion. So far, this interaction has relied on the detuning between a passive optical resonator and an external pump laser. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator supporting the mirror of a laser and the optical field generated by the laser itself. The optically active cavity greatly enhances the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we use an electrically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity. We observe >550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micromechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical, and correspondingly a 23 nm laser wavelength sweep. In addition to its immediate applications as a high-speed wavelength-swept source, this scheme also offers a new approach for integrated on-chip sensors. PMID:26333804

  11. Laser Angioplasty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The principal method of dealing with coronary artery blockage is bypass surgery. A non-surgical alternative available to some patients is balloon angioplasty. For several years, medical researchers have been exploring another alternative that would help a wider circle of patients than the balloon treatment and entail less risk than bypass surgery. A research group is on the verge of an exciting development: laser angioplasty with a 'cool' type of laser, called an excimer laser, that does not damage blood vessel walls and offers non-surgical cleansing of clogged arteries with extraordinary precision. The system is the Dymer 200+ Excimer Laser Angioplasty System, developed by Advanced Intraventional Systems. Used in human clinical tests since 1987, the system is the first fully integrated 'cool' laser capable of generating the requisite laser energy and delivering the energy to target arteries. Thirteen research hospitals in the U.S. have purchased Dymer 200+ systems and used them in clinical trials in 121 peripheral and 555 coronary artery cases. The success rate in opening blocked coronary arteries is 85 percent, with fewer complications than in balloon angioplasty. Food and Drug Administration approval for the system is hoped for in the latter part of 1990. * Advanced Intraventional Systems became Spectranetics in 1994 and discontinued the product.

  12. Solvation structure of I- and Na+ on the surface of NaI aqueous solution studied by photodetachment spectroscopy in combination with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Makoto; Kaniwa, Keisuke; Hiranuma, Yojiro; Maselli, Olivia; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2011-03-24

    We investigated solvation structures of I(-) and Na(+) on an aqueous solution surface by photodetachment spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. An aqueous solution of NaI was introduced into the vacuum as a continuous liquid flow (liquid beam), and the liquid beam was irradiated with a UV laser pulse. The abundance of electrons emitted by the laser excitation was measured as a function of wavelength (photodetachment spectroscopy). For a concentrated aqueous solution of NaI, we observe an absorption peak at longer wavelengths than the charge-transfer-to-solvent band of I(-) in solution. This feature is assigned to the photoabsorption of I(-) at the surface. This finding indicates that when the concentration of NaI is high (>1.0 M), I(-) exists on the solution surface. The identity of the ion clusters ejected from the liquid beam following selective laser excitation of I(-) on the surface or I(-) inside the solution was revealed by mass spectrometry. The mass spectra show that Na rich clusters are formed when I(-) inside the solution is excited, whereas Na rich clusters are hardly formed by the excitation of surface I(-). These findings lead us to conclude that Na(+) does not exist on the surface of the NaI aqueous solution.

  13. Testing Na+ in blood

    PubMed Central

    Lava, Sebastiano A.G.; Bianchetti, Mario G.; Milani, Gregorio P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Both direct potentiometry and indirect potentiometry are currently used for Na+ testing in blood. These measurement techniques show good agreement as long as protein and lipid concentrations in blood remain normal. In severely ill patients, indirect potentiometry commonly leads to relevant errors in Na+ estimation: 25% of specimens show a disagreement between direct and indirect potentiometry, which is ≥4 mmol/L (mostly spuriously elevated Na+ level due to low circulating albumin concentration). There is a need for increased awareness of the poor performance of indirect potentiometry in some clinical settings.

  14. Laser Physics and Laser Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    effect which limits the power throughout of a device; terbium qallium garnet (TGG), a Faraday isolator material; potassium niobate (KNbO 31 a nonlinear...extending the range of materials grown in fiber form. Two materials to be emphasized are terbium gallium garnet for optical isolators and potassium niobate...for doubling gallium arsenide diode lasers. References 1. R.H. Stolen, "Fiber Raman Lasers", Fiber and Integrated Optics, 3 (1980). 2. E. Ipoen and

  15. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  16. Laser Physics and Laser-Tissue Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Welch, A. J.; Torres, Jorge H.; Cheong, Wai-Fung

    1989-01-01

    Within the last few years, lasers have gained increasing use in the management of cardiovascular disease, and laser angioplasty has become a widely performed procedure. For this reason, a basic knowledge of lasers and their applications is essential to vascular surgeons, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists. To elucidate some fundamental concepts regarding laser physics, we describe how laser light is generated and review the properties that make lasers useful in medicine. We also discuss beam profile and spotsize, as well as dosimetric specifications for laser angioplasty. After considering laser-tissue interaction and light propagation in tissue, we explain how the aforementioned concepts apply to direct laser angioplasty and laser-balloon angioplasty. An understanding of these issues should prove useful not only in performing laser angioplasty but in comparing the reported results of various laser applications. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1989;16:141-9) PMID:15227198

  17. Laser construction

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.W.; Osterhage, R.J.; Summa, K.M.

    1989-02-14

    A laser device is described comprising an elongated laser medium of crystal material having a cylindrical shape modified to have a flat face formed on one side thereof, a highly heat conducting mounting member having a flat surface on a portion thereof, the medium being mounted on the mounting member with the flat face of the medium in face-to-face relation with the flat surface on the mounting member, a heat sink member having a surface for attaching the mounting member to, a pump source including an array of laser diodes each having opposite ends and positioned in side-by-side single file relation, a second highly heat conducting mounting member having a surface on which the array of laser diodes is positioned, the second mounting member being mounted on the heat sink member wherein the array of laser diodes are in substantial alignment with the axis of the medium along the side thereof opposite from the flat face of the medium.

  18. Laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  19. Tunable solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, R.; Budgor, A.B.; Pinto, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included transition-metal-doped lasers, line-narrowed alexandrite lasers, NASA specification, meteorological lidars, laser materials spectroscopy, laser pumped single pass gain, vibronic laser materials growth, crystal growth methods, vibronic laser theory, cross-fertilization through interdisciplinary fields, and laser action of color centers in diamonds.

  20. Header For Laser Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Spadin, Paul L.

    1990-01-01

    Header designed to contain laser diode. Output combined incoherently with outputs of other laser diodes in grating laser-beam combiner in optical communication system. Provides electrical connections to laser diode, cooling to thermally stabilize laser operation, and optomechanical adjustments that steer and focus laser beam. Range of adjustments provides for correction of worst-case decentering and defocusing of laser beam encountered with laser diodes. Mechanical configuration made simple to promote stability and keep cost low.

  1. Laser cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.

    2014-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in our understanding of the cosmos, which in turn points to even deeper questions to be further addressed. Concurrently the laser technology has undergone dramatic revolutions, providing exciting opportunity for science applications. History has shown that the symbiosis between direct observations and laboratory investigation is instrumental in the progress of astrophysics. We believe that this remains true in cosmology. Current frontier phenomena related to particle astrophysics and cosmology typically involve one or more of the following conditions: (1) extremely high energy events;(2) very high density, high temperature processes; (3) super strong field environments. Laboratory experiments using high intensity lasers can calibrate astrophysical observations, investigate underlying dynamics of astrophysical phenomena, and probe fundamental physics in extreme limits. In this article we give an overview of the exciting prospect of laser cosmology. In particular, we showcase its unique capability of investigating frontier cosmology issues such as cosmic accelerator and quantum gravity.

  2. Excimer lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Hess, L. D.; Stephens, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation into the possibility of achieving CW discharge pumped excimer laser oscillation is reported. Detailed theoretical modeling of capillary discharge pumping of the XeF and KXe and K2 excimer systems was carried out which predicted the required discharge parameters for reaching laser threshold on these systems. Capillary discharge pumping of the XeF excimer system was investigated experimentally. The experiments revealed a lower excimer level population density than predicted theoretically by about an order of magnitude. The experiments also revealed a fluorine consumption problem in the discharge in agreement with theory.

  3. Laser barometer

    DOEpatents

    Abercrombie, Kevin R.; Shiels, David; Rash, Tim

    2001-02-06

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  4. Graviton laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the possibility of creating a graviton laser. The lasing medium would be a system of contained, ultra cold neutrons. Ultra cold neutrons are a quantum mechanical system that interacts with gravitational fields and with the phonons of the container walls. It is possible to create a population inversion by pumping the system using the phonons. We compute the rate of spontaneous emission of gravitons and the rate of the subsequent stimulated emission of gravitons. The gain obtainable is directly proportional to the density of the lasing medium and the fraction of the population inversion. The applications of a graviton laser would be interesting.

  5. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  6. Laser barometer

    DOEpatents

    Abercrombie, Kevin R.; Shiels, David; Rash, Tim

    2001-02-06

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  7. Dye laser principles, with applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, F.J. . Dept. of Physics); Hillman, L.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers which explain dye laser principles. Topics covered include: laser dynamics, femtosecond dye lasers, CW dye lasers, technology of pulsed dye lases, photochemistry of laser dyes, and laser applications.

  8. Collisional Transfer of Population and Orientation in NaK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, C. M.; Ashman, S.; Huennekens, J.; Beser, B.; Bai, J.; Lyyra, A. M.

    2010-03-01

    We report current work to study transfer of population and orientation in collisions of NaK molecules with argon and potassium atoms using polarization labeling (PL) and laser- induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. In the PL experiment, a circularly polarized pump laser excites a specific NaK A^1&+circ;(v'=16, J') <- X^1&+circ;(v''=0, J'±1) transition, creating an orientation (non-uniform MJ' level distribution) in both levels. The linearly polarized probe laser is scanned over various 3^1π(v, J'±1) <- A^1&+circ;(v'=16, J') transitions. The probe laser passes through a crossed linear polarizer before detection, and signal is recorded if the probe laser polarization has been modified by the vapor (which occurs when it comes into resonance with an oriented level). Using both spectroscopic methods, analysis of weak collisional satellite lines adjacent to these directly populated lines, as a function of argon buffer gas pressure and cell temperature, allows us to discern separately the effects collisions with argon atoms and potassium atoms have on the population and orientation of the molecule. In addition, code has been written which provides a theoretical analysis of the process, through a solution of the density matrix equations of motion for the system.

  9. Laser Accelerator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    stretched pulse with a low enough peak power to safely pass through the main laser gain medium usually Nd:glass or Ti:sapphire (3). The amplified pulse ...2.1 Chirped Gaussian Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Figure 2.2 Diagram Illustrating Chirped Pulse Amplification...High Magnetic Field Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Figure 2.7 Cutaway Diagram of a Pulsed Magnet System at the

  10. Laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of a laser altimeter for use in the Apollo Lunar Orbital Experiments mission is discussed. The altimeter provides precise measurement of an Apollo vehicle above the lunar surface from an orbit of 40 to 80 nautical miles. The technical characteristics of the altimeter are described. Management of the altimeter development program is analyzed.

  11. [Vascular lasers].

    PubMed

    Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    After reviewing the main technical features of the lasers and flashlamps currently available, the indications for these devices are detailed, mainly port wine stains, facial telangiectasia, hemangiomas, and lower-limb varicosities. Respecting the principles of treatment (briefly reviewed herein), contributes to preventing complications, which are consequently becoming rare.

  12. Excimer lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Hess, L. D.; Stephens, R. R.; Pepper, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a two-year investigation into the possibility of developing continuous wave excimer lasers are reported. The program included the evaluation and selection of candidate molecular systems and discharge pumping techniques. The K Ar/K2 excimer dimer molecules and the xenon fluoride excimer molecule were selected for study; each used a transverse and capillary discharges pumping technique. Experimental and theoretical studies of each of the two discharge techniques applied to each of the two molecular systems are reported. Discharge stability and fluorine consumption were found to be the principle impediments to extending the XeF excimer laser into the continuous wave regime. Potassium vapor handling problems were the principal difficulty in achieving laser action on the K Ar/K2 system. Of the four molecular systems and pumping techniques explored, the capillary discharge pumped K Ar/K2 system appears to be the most likely candidate for demonstrating continuous wave excimer laser action primarily because of its predicted lower pumping threshold and a demonstrated discharge stability advantage.

  13. Laser Balancing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical Technology, Incorporated developed a fully automatic laser machining process that allows more precise balancing removes metal faster, eliminates excess metal removal and other operator induced inaccuracies, and provides significant reduction in balancing time. Manufacturing costs are reduced as a result.

  14. Laser Balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical Technology, Incorporated developed a fully automatic laser machining process that allows more precise balancing removes metal faster, eliminates excess metal removal and other operator induced inaccuracies, and provides significant reduction in balancing time. Manufacturing costs are reduced as a result.

  15. Nanowire Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couteau, C.; Larrue, A.; Wilhelm, C.; Soci, C.

    2015-05-01

    We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D) nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  16. Laser diode pumped solid state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.M.; Keirstead, M.S.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes a high-efficiency, laser diode pumped array, frequency doubled, compact solid state laser, comprising: a rare earth doped birefringent solid laser rod selected from the group consisting of Nd:YLF, Nd:YALO having a front end and a back end, the rod producing a polarized output beam; a housing with means holding the laser rod in fixed position in the housing with its front end forward; a laser array having a predetermined wavelength pumping the laser rod, having a output frequency sufficiently matched to the laser rod to pump the laser rod, secured in the housing behind and in optical alignment with the rod; laser cavity means defining a laser cavity mounted in the housing with the laser rod positioned within the cavity, the laser cavity means further including within the cavity an output coupler means; a frequency doubler, positioned to receive a suitably polarized output beam from the laser rod and to halve its wavelength and double its frequency; a polarization means for polarizing the output beam of the laser rod and substantially maintaining a polarization which optimizes frequency doubling at the frequency doubler and means for matching a focused image of the laser diode with a lasing volume of the laser cavity.

  17. Specific oxidation pattern of soluble starch with TEMPO-NaBr-NaClO system.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jie; Lu, Jiaojiao; Xu, Naiyu; Linhardt, Robert J; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2016-08-01

    Oxidized starch, one of the most important starch derivatives, has many different properties and applications. Currently, there are two ways to produce oxidized starch, through specific and nonspecific oxidation. Specific oxidation using the stable nitroxyl radical, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl preparidinloxy (TEMPO), with NaBr and NaClO can produce oxidized starches with different properties under good quality control. In the current study, we examine the products of specifically oxidized starch. As the amount of oxidant and the temperature, two critical factors impacting the oxidation of starch were thoroughly investigated. Analysis of the molecular weight (MW), degree of oxidization (DO) and the detailed structures of corresponding products was accomplished using gel permeation chromatography with multi-angle laser light scattering (GPC-MALLS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and quadrapole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q/TOF-MS). According to the analytical results, the oxidation patterns of starch treated with specific oxidant TEMPO-NaBr-NaClO were established. When high amounts of oxidant was applied, more glucose residues within starch were oxidized to glucuronic acids (higher DO) and substantial degradation to starch oligosaccharides was observed. By selecting a reaction temperature of 25°C a high DO could be obtained for a given amount of oxidant. The reducing end sugar residue within oxidized starch was itself oxidized and ring opened in all TEMPO-NaBr-NaClO reactions. Furthermore, extra oxidant generated additional novel structures in the reducing end residues of some products, particularly in low temperature reactions.

  18. A feasibility study on femtosecond laser thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Bidinger, Johannes; Ackermann, Roland; Cattaneo, Giorgio; Kammel, Robert; Nolte, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In this feasibility study, we investigate possible femtosecond laser thrombolysis. Because of low pulse energies, femtosecond laser surgery inherently minimizes side effects on the surrounding tissue. Moreover, current femtosecond laser sources as well as fiber technology allow consideration of catheter-based treatments. Two femtosecond laser systems (λ=800 nm, λ=1030 nm) along with a three dimensional (3D) scanner system (NA ~0.1) were used in this study. In vitro experiments were performed on porcine thrombi and blood vessels. Ablation thresholds were determined in air, by determining the pulse energy at which single shot ablation was visible under the optical microscope. Ablation rates were determined in physiological saline. Additionally, ablation of thrombi and blood vessels was monitored by means of a fiber spectrometer. Depending upon the scan velocity, typical ablation rates for thrombi were ~0.04 mm(3)/sec. Ablation thresholds of thrombi and blood vessels differ by factors of 3 and 1.5 at laser wavelengths of 800 and 1030 nm, respectively. At a distance of 5 mm above the surface, second harmonic generation was observed in blood vessels, but not within thrombi. The results show that a typical thrombus volume can be destroyed within a reasonable time frame. Because of the higher threshold difference of thrombi and blood vessels, the use of a laser wavelength of 800 nm is preferable. Furthermore, the detection of the second harmonic could provide a feedback mechanism to protect the vascular wall from mechanical and laser damage.

  19. New laser source technology.

    PubMed

    Christensen, C P

    1984-04-13

    Over the past 5 to 8 years several new laser sources have been developed as a result of R & D efforts stimulated by a growing number of laser applications. Four families of new devices-semiconductor diod laser arrays, free electron lasers, rare gas halide excimer sources, and several new tunable solid-state lasers-show particular promise.

  20. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  1. Making a Laser Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Harry

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how to construct a laser level. This laser level can be made using a typical 4' (or shorter) bubble level and a small laser point. The laser unit is detachable, so the bubble level can also be used in the conventional way. However, the laser level works better than a simple bubble level. Making this inexpensive device is an…

  2. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  3. Making a Laser Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Harry

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how to construct a laser level. This laser level can be made using a typical 4' (or shorter) bubble level and a small laser point. The laser unit is detachable, so the bubble level can also be used in the conventional way. However, the laser level works better than a simple bubble level. Making this inexpensive device is an…

  4. Laser Photochemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    reaction due to decreased adsorption of the species on the catalytic surface. For example, i. . . 41 in the catalytic decomposition of formic acid ...over platinum (Ulmstead and Lin, 1978), the preexcitation of the gaseous formic acid molecules (by a 10 W/cm2 CW CO2 laser) resulted in a 50% increase...attention is given to selective and thermal excitation and the role of multiphonon couplings, heterogeneous catalysis , and chemical vapor deposition and

  5. Project LASER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA formally launched Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering and Research) in March 1990, a program designed to help teachers improve science and mathematics education and to provide 'hands on' experiences. It featured the first LASER Mobile Teacher Resource Center (MTRC), is designed to reach educators all over the nation. NASA hopes to operate several MTRCs with funds provided by private industry. The mobile unit is a 22-ton tractor-trailer stocked with NASA educational publications and outfitted with six work stations. Each work station, which can accommodate two teachers at a time, has a computer providing access to NASA Spacelink. Each also has video recorders and photocopy/photographic equipment for the teacher's use. MTRC is only one of the five major elements within LASER. The others are: a Space Technology Course, to promote integration of space science studies with traditional courses; the Volunteer Databank, in which NASA employees are encouraged to volunteer as tutors, instructors, etc; Mobile Discovery Laboratories that will carry simple laboratory equipment and computers to provide hands-on activities for students and demonstrations of classroom activities for teachers; and the Public Library Science Program which will present library based science and math programs.

  6. In rat hepatocytes, the hypertonic activation of Na(+) conductance and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport--but not Na(+)-H(+) antiport--is mediated by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Heinzinger, H; van den Boom, F; Tinel, H; Wehner, F

    2001-11-01

    1. The initial event in the regulatory volume increase (RVI) of rat hepatocytes is an import of extracellular Na(+) via Na(+) conductance, Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport, and Na(+)-H(+) antiport. 2. Here, the protein kinase inhibitors staurosporine (100 nmol l(-1)) and bis-indolyl-maleimide I (400 nmol l(-1)) were used to test for a possible contribution of protein kinase C (PKC) to the hypertonic activation of these transporters in confluent primary cultures. 3. Stimulation of Na(+) conductance was monitored: (i) by use of a differential approach based on Na(+) fluxes, (ii) by means of cable analysis, and (iii) in experiments with low Na(+) pulses. All three experimental protocols in concert demonstrated a block of the activation of Na(+) conductance by staurosporine and bis-indolyl-maleimide I. 4. In addition, both compounds significantly reduced the hypertonic activation of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport (quantified on the basis of furosemide-sensitive (86)Rb(+) uptake) to approximately 30 %. 5. In contrast, neither staurosporine nor bis-indolyl-maleimide I had any detectable effect on the hypertonicity-induced alkalinization of cell pH via Na(+)-H(+) antiport (determined fluorometrically). 6. Staurosporine and bis-indolyl-maleimide I completely blocked the RVI of rat hepatocytes (quantified by means of confocal laser-scanning microscopy). The high efficiency of the block suggests an additional inhibitory effect of both compounds on the activity of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (determined as ouabain-sensitive (86)Rb(+) uptake). 7. It is concluded that the hypertonic activation of rat hepatocyte Na(+) conductance and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport--but not Na(+)-H(+) antiport--is probably mediated by PKC.

  7. Spectroscopic Analysis of High Intensity Laser Beam Jets Interaction Experiments on the Leopard Laser at UNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, E. E.; Weller, M. E.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Moschella, J. J.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyapsteva, V. V.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; University of Nevada Reno Team

    2013-10-01

    Results of Ar gas-puff experiments performed on the high power Leopard laser at UNR are presented. Flux density of laser radiation in focal spot was up to 2 × 1016 W/cm2 (pulse duration was 0.8 ns and laser wavelength was 1.057 μm). Specifically, spectroscopic analysis of K-shell Ar spectra are investigated and compared as functions of the orientation of the laser beam to linear gas jet. The laser beam axis was positioned either along the jet plane or orthogonal to it at a distance of 1 mm from the nozzle output. The diagnostics used included a time-integrated x-ray spectrometer along with a set of filtered Si diodes with various cutoff energies. In order to identify lines, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) kinetic model was utilized and was also used to determine plasma parameters such as electron temperature and density. The importance of the spectroscopic study of high intensity laser beam-jets interaction experiments is discussed. This work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno, and in part by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreements DE-NA0001984 and DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  8. Laser nitriding and laser carburizing of surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Peter

    2003-11-01

    Laser irradiation of surfaces with short pulses in reactive atmospheres (nitrogen, methane) can lead to very effective nitrification and carburization via complicated laser-surface-gas-plasma-interactions. This laser nitriding and laser carburizing and their basic underlying phenomena will be presented and partly explained by results of example materials (iron, titanium, aluminum, silicon) where nitride and carbide coatings can be formed by fast and easily by Excimer Laser, Nd:YAG laser, Free Electron Laser and also by femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. This implies laser pulse durations from the nanosecond to the femtosecond regime and wavelengths from ultra-violet to infrared. The resulting surfaces, thin films, coatings and their properties are investigated by combining Mossbauer Spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Nanoindentation, Resonant Nuclear Reaction Analysis, and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy.

  9. Laser Damage in Thin Film Optical Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    OTHER RELEVANT ISSUES The damage thresholds of refractory oxides used as AR coatings for alexandrite laser rods were determined and measured by...used and a limited number of TiO 2/SiO2 coatings were put on alexandrite substrates. Single layer AR coatings of MgF2 and NaAIF 6 were also tested for...measurements were made using an alexandrite laser at a wavelength of 790 nm. with a pulse duration of 200 nsec at 30Hz for 2 seconds. The near spot

  10. Thermal aspects of laser-based measurement and ultrafast laser processing of dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ching-Hua

    Two extreme regimes for laser applications on dielectric materials are presented in this dissertation. First, two independent novel techniques that use low power laser light to make precision non-contact measurement of liquids are introduced: (1) real-time concentration measurement of NaCl-H2O and MgCl2-H2O aqueous mixtures in a flowing system, and (2) temperature or concentration measurements of liquids, including water, ethanol, methanol, 1-proponal, and their mixtures, at a free surface as well as a solid-liquid interface. These measurement techniques exhibit very high spatial and temporal resolutions, making them good candidates for use in microscale and MEMS-based measurement technologies. Another extreme of laser applications is materials processing using high power ultrashort laser pulses, which exhibits exciting new opportunities for non-contact materials modification with high precision and high feature quality. The second part of this dissertation focuses on modeling the interactions between ultrashort laser pulses and dielectrics. Present models effectively characterize several dominant parameters during ultrafast laser processing of dielectrics. Good agreement has been found between the model predictions and the experimental results. Future research will be directed towards the utilization of these model predictions to enhance energy deposition and material removal rate during ultrafast laser processing, improve machined features, and optimize technologies that involve laser-microstructures fabrication.

  11. Lasers in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Described are the characteristics of the laser and its effects on the body. Discussed are examples of laser treatments, including angioplasty, ophthalmology, and dermatology. A discussion of lasers of clinical interest and their applications is presented. (YP)

  12. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  13. Diode Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    2005-11-01

    Contributors; 1. Monolithic phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays D. Botez; 2. High power coherent, semiconductor laser master oscillator power amplifiers and amplifier arrays D. F. Welch and D. G. Mehuys; 3. Microoptical components applied to incoherent and coherent laser arrays J. R. Leger; 4. Modeling of diode laser arrays G. R. Hadley; 5. Dynamics of coherent semiconductor laser arrays H. G. Winfuland and R. K. Defreez; 6. High average power semiconductor laser arrays and laser array packaging with an emphasis for pumping solid state lasers R. Solarz; 7. High power diode laser arrays and their reliability D. R. Scifres and H. H. Kung; 8. Strained layer quantum well heterostructure laser arrays J. J. Coleman; 9. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser arrays C. J. Chang-Hasnain; 10. Individually addressed arrays of diode lasers D. Carlin.

  14. Hypersonic gasdynamic laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Foreman, K.M.; Maciulaitis, A.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a visible, or near to mid infra-red, hypersonic gas dynamic laser system. It comprises: a hypersonic vehicle for carrying the hypersonic gas dynamic laser system, and also providing high energy ram air for thermodynamic excitation and supply of the laser gas; a laser cavity defined within the hypersonic vehicle and having a laser cavity inlet for the laser cavity formed by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle, such that ram air directed through the laser cavity opening supports gas dynamic lasing operations at wavelengths less than 10.6{mu} meters in the laser cavity; and an optical train for collecting the laser radiation from the laser cavity and directing it as a substantially collimated laser beam to an output aperture defined by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle to allow the laser beam to be directed against a target.

  15. Lasers in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Described are the characteristics of the laser and its effects on the body. Discussed are examples of laser treatments, including angioplasty, ophthalmology, and dermatology. A discussion of lasers of clinical interest and their applications is presented. (YP)

  16. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  17. Laser therapy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A laser is used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it enables ... without injuring surrounding tissue. Some uses of the laser are retinal surgery, excision of lesions, and cauterization ...

  18. Laser transmitter for space-based sodium lidar instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Janches, Diego; Konoplev, Oleg

    2016-05-01

    We are currently developing a laser transmitter to remotely measure Sodium (Na) by adapting existing lidar technology with space flight heritage. The developed instrumentation will serve as the core for the planning of a Heliophysics mission targeted to study the composition and dynamics of Earth's mesosphere based on a spaceborne lidar that will measure the mesospheric Na layer. We present performance results from our laser transmitter development effort with emphasis on wavelength tuning and power scaling of a diode-pumped Q-switched self-Raman c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser with intra-cavity frequency doubling that could produce multi-watt 589 nm wavelength output. We will review technologies that provide strong leverage for the sodium lidar laser system with strong heritage from past and current space flight missions.

  19. The temperature dependence of the cross section for the energy pooling process Na(3P)+Na(3P) to Na(4D)+Na(3S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvatic, V.; Movre, M.; Vadla, C.

    1999-10-01

    We report the measurements of the temperature dependence of the cross section σ4D for the energy pooling process Na(3P)+Na(3P) to Na(4D)+Na(3S). The latest two, as yet undisputed, results for σ4D obtained by different authors at T = 597 K and T = 483 K suggest that this cross section decreases with increasing T, which contradicts the theory and other experiments on similar processes. To resolve this controversy and to examine the temperature trend of the cross section, we have measured the σ4D in the temperature range 567-705 K, covering the high-temperature region that has not yet been investigated experimentally. To determine σ4D we have excited sodium atoms in the quasistatic wing of the D1 line using a cw dye laser and measured the fluorescence intensity for the 4D to 3P3/2 transition, relative to the intensity of the optically thin quasistatic wing of the D2 line. The spatial distribution of the number density of the sodium atoms in the 3P3/2 state and the sodium ground-state number density were measured too. The method used for the determination of the cross section is advantageous since it entirely circumvents the need to account for the radiation trapping of 3P level radiation, which was substantial under experimental conditions of the ground-state densities being 1014-1016 cm-3. The measurements of the cross section σ4D in the investigated temperature range have shown that it increases as ~exp(-Δ E/kT). From the experiment we obtained Δ E = (608±95) cm-1, which is in excellent agreement with the energy defect (613 cm-1) for the considered process, and in fair agreement with the values which follow from recent theoretical calculations.

  20. High-power disordered Nd:CaYAlO(4)lasers at 1.08 microm.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haohai; Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Dongzhen; Wang, Zhengping; Xu, Jun

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the high-power laser performance with a disordered Na:CaYAlO(4) crystal at a wavelength of about 1.08microm. Continuous-wave output power of 5.16W is achieved with a laser diode as the pump source. For the first time to our knowledge, the passively Q-switched Na:CaYAlO(4) laser is obtained with the maximum average output power of 2.39W, shortest pulse width of 5.7ns, and highest peak power of 15.47kW. By spectral analysis, the Nd:CaAlO(4) laser wavelength is centered at about 1.08microm. We propose that, by suitable tuning, the Na:CaYAlO(4) laser should be an excellent source for helium optical pumping.

  1. Laser Weapons for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-27

    IPG fiber lasers , 10 kW/ fiber 7 • Output wavelength is tunable (can operate in atmospheric window) Free Electron Lasers ...Multiple kilowatts over multiple kilometers • Laser power converters can be highly efficient, > 60 % • Fiber lasers are highly compact and... lasers - Free electron lasers • Background • Laser candidates • Additional capabilities - Power beaming 3 Laser Lethality -

  2. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  3. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, Uğur; Çakır, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  5. New laser protective eyewear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLear, Mark

    1996-04-01

    Laser technology has significantly impacted our everyday life. Lasers are now used to correct your vision, clear your arteries, and are used in the manufacturing of such diverse products as automobiles, cigarettes, and computers. Lasers are no longer a research tool looking for an application. They are now an integral part of manufacturing. In the case of Class IV lasers, this explosion in laser applications has exposed thousands of individuals to potential safety hazards including eye damage. Specific protective eyewear designed to attenuate the energy of the laser beam below the maximum permissible exposure is required for Class 3B and Class IV lasers according to laser safety standards.

  6. Measuring the Contribution of Atmospheric Scatter to Laser Eye Dazzle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    contribution of atmospheric scatter to laser eye dazzle 5b. GRANT NUMBER NA 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 0602202F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...atmospheric scatter function. With very conservative estimates of the scatter from the human eye , atmospheric scatter was found to contribute no more...than 5% to the overall veiling luminance across the scene for a human observer experiencing laser eye dazzle. It was concluded that atmospheric

  7. [Laser physics].

    PubMed

    Banús Gassol, J M

    2008-11-01

    The commission of this article plunged me into doubt. First I should confess that I don't find excuse to escape this part if somebody wants to minimally deepen in the knowledge of the biological effects of this energy source. Secondly, when we talk about results, we use terms made and defined by Physics. Often we have polemics about results, and what really happens is that we don't reach agreements because we refer to different terms to explain the same observation; in conclusion we cannot understand each other because we do not know the adequate terms; for example, hypoxemia as oxygen deficit, which is true in an anemic patient as well as in a low oxygen saturation rate. In consequence, a good review of these concepts seems necessary to me. The third reason is the confusion that exists in our environment, I think sometimes of interest, about properties and effects of different types of laser. Only a minimal knowledge of physics will help us to state the scientific basis for understanding. The problems, nevertheless, accumulate due to the fact that the universe to which this article is directed is formed by urologists. What Physics education should we suppose they have? Superficial? Medium? Is it a collective with a uniform knowledge, being it whatever it is? The implication is clear. The article depth will depend on the answers to these questions. Nevertheless, the aim of the authors is to give a base enough to know what the laser is and how it acts. For that, the answer I gave to my questions is that the reader should understand the article and have enough base for, at least, reading critically the articles about laser published in urological journals.

  8. Laser Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, John L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Ye, Jun

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter covers the basics of the field of stabilizing lasers to optical frequency references such as optical cavities and molecular transitions via the application of servo control systems. These discussions are given with reference to the real-life frequency metrology experienced in Hall-Labs (now Ye-Labs), JILA, University of Colorado. The subjects covered include: the basics of control system stability, a discussion of both the theoretical and experimental limitations, an outline of optical cavity susceptibility to environmental noise, and a brief introduction to the use and limitations of molecular transitions as frequency references.

  9. Laser biophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Priezzhev, A. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This issue of Quantum Electronics presents the papers that reflect the state-of-the-art of laser technologies used in biomedical studies and medical practice. Among the new technologies, one can note the methods of correlation and Doppler spectroscopy, as well as THz spectroscopy, in which biologically significant molecules are characterised by specific resonances. The latter topic is considered in the paper by Nazarov et al., where the dielectric function of aqueous solutions of glucose and albumin is studied using pulsed THz spectroscopy.

  10. Theoretical studies of solar-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    Metallic vapor lasers of Na2 and Li2 are examined as solar energy converters. The absorbed photons cause transitions to vibrational-rotational levels in an upper electronic state. With broad band absorption the resultant levels can have quantum numbers considerably higher than the upper lasing level. The excited molecule then relaxes to the upper lasing level which is one of the lower vibrational levels in the upper electronic state. The relaxation occurs from collisions, provided the molecule is not quenched into the ground level electronic state. Lasing occurs with a transition to a vibrational level in the lower electronic state. Rough estimates of solar power efficiencies are 1 percent for Na2 and probably a similar figure for Li2. The nondissociative lasers from a family distinct from materials which dissociate to yield an excited atom.

  11. Efficient high-brightness diode laser modules offer new industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revermann, Markus; Timmermann, Andre; Meinschien, Jens; Bruns, Peter

    2007-02-01

    We present new developed high power diode laser modules which are performing at outstanding brightness and their applications. The combination of recently designed laser diode bars on passive heat sinks and optimized micro-optics results to laser modules up to 50W out of a 100μm fibre with a 0.22 NA at one single wavelength based on broad area laser bars (BALB) and up to 50W out of 50μm fibre with a 0.22 NA based on single-mode emitter array laser (SEAL) bars. The fibre coupled systems are based on diode lasers with a collimated beam of superior beam data, namely < 10 mm x 10 mm beam diameter (FW1/e2) and < 2mrad x 2mrad divergence (FW1/e2). Such free beam diode lasers deliver 30 W or 60 W output power. The applications for such laser diode modules varies from direct marking, cutting and welding of metals and other materials up to pumping of fibre lasers and amplifiers. Marking speed with up to 30mm/s on stainless steel was observed with 20W laser power and 50μm fibre with a conventional marking setup. Cutting speed of about 1m/min of 0.2mm Kovar sheet was shown with a diode laser module with 50W laser power from a 100μm fibre.

  12. Sequential growth of sandwiched NaYF4:Yb/Er@NaYF4:Yb@NaNdF4:Yb core-shell-shell nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Huang-Yong; Ding, Bin-Bin; Ma, Yin-Chu; Sun, Shi-Qi; Tao, Wei; Guo, Yan-Chuan; Guo, Hui-Chen; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Qian, Hai-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Upconversion (UC) nanostructures have attracted much interest for their extensive biological applications. In this work, we describe a sequential synthetic route to prepare sandwiched NaYF4:Yb/Er@NaYF4:Yb@NaNdF4:Yb core-shell upconversion nanoparticles. The as-prepared products were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, JEM 2100F), respectively. The as-prepared core-shell nanoparticles of NaYF4:Yb/Er@NaYF4:Yb@NaNdF4:Yb are composed of elliptical nanoparticles with a length of 80 nm and width of 42 nm, which show efficient upconversion fluorescence excited at 808 nm indicating the formation of core-shell-shell sandwiched nanostructures. In addition, the as-prepared sandwiched NaYF4:Yb/Er@NaYF4:Yb@NaNdF4:Yb core-shell upconversion nanoparticles also show strong upconversion fluorescence excited at 980 nm. Amphiphilic mPEG2k-b-PEBEP6K copolymers (denoted as PPE) were chosen to transfer these hydrophobic UCNPs into the aqueous phase for biological application. In vitro photodynamic therapy of cancer cells show that the viability of cells incubated with the nanoparticles loaded with MC 540 was significantly lower as compared to the nanoparticles without photosensitizers exposed to NIR laser.

  13. Laser Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    structures, monolithic phased arrays, multiple stripe lasers which were made possible by improved manufacturing technologies su LPE and particular...mass production of single laser diodes in Japan, went a development in the U.S. which is aimed at the fabrication of powerful monolithic arrays. The...Significant progress has been made recently in developing the monolithic , linear laser diode array. Output power, slope efficiency, laser threshold and

  14. Femtosecond laser in laser in situ keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Salomão, Marcella Q.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Flap creation is a critical step in laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Efforts to improve the safety and predictability of the lamellar incision have fostered the development of femtosecond lasers. Several advantages of the femtosecond laser over mechanical microkeratomes have been reported in LASIK surgery. In this article, we review common considerations in management and complications of this step in femtosecond laser–LASIK and concentrate primarily on the IntraLase laser because most published studies relate to this instrument. PMID:20494777

  15. Laser Propulsion - Quo Vadis

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Willy L.

    2008-04-28

    First, an introductory overview of the different types of laser propulsion techniques will be given and illustrated by some historical examples. Second, laser devices available for basic experiments will be reviewed ranging from low power lasers sources to inertial confinement laser facilities. Subsequently, a status of work will show the impasse in which the laser propulsion community is currently engaged. Revisiting the basic relations leads to new avenues in ablative and direct laser propulsion for ground based and space based applications. Hereby, special attention will be devoted to the impact of emerging ultra-short pulse lasers on the coupling coefficient and specific impulse. In particular, laser sources and laser propulsion techniques will be tested in microgravity environment. A novel approach to debris removal will be discussed with respect to the Satellite Laser Ranging (SRL) facilities. Finally, some non technical issues will be raised aimed at the future prospects of laser propulsion in the international community.

  16. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afzal, R. S.; Dallas, J. L.; Yu, A. W.; Mamakos, W. A.; Lukemire, A.; Schroeder, B.; Malak, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), scheduled to launch in 2001, is a laser altimeter and lidar for tile Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. The laser transmitter requirements, design and qualification test results for this space- based remote sensing instrument are presented.

  17. Studies on lasers and laser devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Siegman, A. E.; Young, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this grant was to study lasers, laser devices, and uses of lasers for investigating physical phenomena are studied. The active projects included the development of a tunable, narrowband XUV light source and its application to the spectroscopy of core excited atomic states, and the development of a technique for picosecond time resolution spectroscopy of fast photophysical processes.

  18. Na+ coordination at the Na2 site of the Na+/I- symporter.

    PubMed

    Ferrandino, Giuseppe; Nicola, Juan Pablo; Sánchez, Yuly E; Echeverria, Ignacia; Liu, Yunlong; Amzel, L Mario; Carrasco, Nancy

    2016-09-13

    The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) mediates active I(-) transport in the thyroid-the first step in thyroid hormone biosynthesis-with a 2 Na(+): 1 I(-) stoichiometry. The two Na(+) binding sites (Na1 and Na2) and the I(-) binding site interact allosterically: when Na(+) binds to a Na(+) site, the affinity of NIS for the other Na(+) and for I(-) increases significantly. In all Na(+)-dependent transporters with the same fold as NIS, the side chains of two residues, S353 and T354 (NIS numbering), were identified as the Na(+) ligands at Na2. To understand the cooperativity between the substrates, we investigated the coordination at the Na2 site. We determined that four other residues-S66, D191, Q194, and Q263-are also involved in Na(+) coordination at this site. Experiments in whole cells demonstrated that these four residues participate in transport by NIS: mutations at these positions result in proteins that, although expressed at the plasma membrane, transport little or no I(-) These residues are conserved throughout the entire SLC5 family, to which NIS belongs, suggesting that they serve a similar function in the other transporters. Our findings also suggest that the increase in affinity that each site displays when an ion binds to another site may result from changes in the dynamics of the transporter. These mechanistic insights deepen our understanding not only of NIS but also of other transporters, including many that, like NIS, are of great medical relevance.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  1. Experimental femtosecond laser photodisruption of rabbit sclera for minimally invasive laser sclerostomy: An in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaobo; Dai, Nengli; Long, Hua; Lu, Peixiang; Li, Wan; Jiang, Fagang

    2010-07-01

    Femtosecond laser technology, used as a minimally invasive tool in intrastromal refractive surgery, may also have potential as a useful instrument for glaucoma filtration surgery. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive laser sclerostomy by femtosecond laser photodisruption and seek the appropriate patterns of laser ablation and relevant laser parameters. A femtosecond laser (800 nm/50 fs/1 kHz), focused by a 0.1 numerical aperture (NA) objective lens, with different pulse energies and exposure times was applied to ablate hydrated rabbit sclera in vitro. The irradiated samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). By moving a three-dimensional, computer-controlled translation stage to which the sample was attached, the femtosecond laser could produce three types of ablation patterns, including linear ablation, cylindrical aperture and rectangular cavity. With pulse energies ranging from 37.5 to 150 μJ, the linear lesions were consistently observed at the inner surface of sclera, whereas it failed to make any photodisruption if pulse energy was below the threshold value of 31.25 μJ, with the corresponding threshold intensity of 4.06×10 14 W/cm 2. The depths of the linear lesions increased linearly with both pulse energy (37.5-150 μJ) and exposure time (0.1-0.4 s). Histological examination showed the incisions produced by femtosecond laser photodisruption had precise geometry and the edges were sharp and smooth, with no evidence of collateral damage to the surrounding tissue. Our results predict the potential application of femtosecond laser pulses in minimally invasive laser sclerostomy for glaucoma treatment.

  2. Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, H.; Yoneda, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Shimizu, F.

    2010-02-01

    .] -- Ultracold Ytterbium atoms in optical lattices / S. Sugawa ... [et al.] -- Ultracold polar molecules in the rovibrational ground state / J. Deiglmayr ... [et al.] -- Polar molecules near quantum degeneracy / J. Ye and D. S. Jin -- Production of a quantum gas of rovibronic ground-state molecules in an optical lattice / J. G. Danzl ... [et al.] -- Recent progress in x-ray nonlinear optics / K. Tamasaku, K. Sawada, and T. Ishikawa -- Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - laser spectroscopy in unconventional environments / S. Svanberg -- Laser spectroscopy on relativistic ion beams / S. Reinhardt ... [et al.] -- Single frequency microcavity lasers and applications / L. Xu ... [et al.].

  3. Lasers and laser-tissue interaction.

    PubMed

    Peavy, George M

    2002-05-01

    Light produced by a laser differs from incandescent light in that it is monochromatic, coherent, and intense; and it is these properties that allow lasers to be used as such unique tools in biomedical research and patient care. The effect of a laser beam on tissue is dependent on the optical and mechanical properties of the tissue, and the wavelength, power parameters, and time domains of the laser exposure. Understanding these principles is not only important for the selection of an appropriate laser system for a specific application, but also is essential for that application to be successful.

  4. Laser Wire Stripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  5. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  6. Obstacles to Laser Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2005-04-25

    The growth of laser development & technology has been remarkable. Unfortunately, a number of traps or obstacles to laser safety have also developed with that growth. The goal of this article is to highlight those traps, in the hope that an aware laser user will avoid them. These traps have been the cause or contributing factor of many a preventable laser accident.

  7. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  8. Reverse laser drilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Thomas R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a method for laser drilling small diameter, closely-spaced, and accurately located holes in a body of material which is transparent or substantially transparent to the laser radiation employed whereby the holes are drilled through the thickness of the body from the surface opposite to that on which the laser beam impinges to the surface of laser beam impingement.

  9. Lasers in cosmetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pang, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Lasers have become a necessary instrument in the esthetic restorative armamentarium. This article presents smile design guidelines for soft tissue lasers, as well as an overview of hard tissue procedures that may be performed using all-tissue lasers. The goal is to help dentists determine the appropriate laser for a given clinical situations.

  10. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  11. X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a source that surveys the fundamentals of x-ray lasers and summarizes recent advances. The author emphasizes x-ray lasers created using high temperature plasmas as the medium. Specific topics discussed included electron-collisional excitation pumping, plasma laser pumping, and gamma-ray lasers. Numerous literature references provided.

  12. Laser photobiology and photomedicine

    SciTech Connect

    Martellucci, S.; Chester, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the physical and biological basis of photobiology and photomedicine; the biological effects and applications of laser technology; photochemotherapy; photobiology and dermatology; surgical and ophthalmological applications of lasers; laser safety; and diagnostics and technological aspects of recent laser developments.

  13. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  14. Laser therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of organs inside the body. They can treat basal cell skin cancer and cancers of the cervix, vagina, and vulva. Argon lasers. These lasers can treat skin cancer and are also used with light-sensitive drugs in a treatment called photodynamic therapy . Nd:Yag lasers. These lasers ...

  15. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam.

  16. Characterization of new color center and transition metal ion lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Carrig, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis describes efforts to develop and characterize promising new solid-state laser materials. The author has been interested in lasers in the 1 to 2 [mu]m spectral region, with emphasis on developing a tunable laser at 1.3 [mu]m. The aim is for broadly tunable systems that deliver high continuous-wave (cw) output powers ([approximately]1 W), are efficient, can be diode pumped, can be operated as single longitudinal mode devices (narrow linewidth), and can be used to generate ultrashort (subpicosecond) pulses. This thesis involves the NaCl F[sub 2][sup +]:O[sup 2[minus

  17. Solar driven lasers for power satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taussio, R.; Cassady, P.; Klosterman, E.

    1980-01-01

    The technological feasibility of using multimagawatt lasers for space power transmission is discussed. Candidate lasers include electric discharge lasers, direct optically pumped lasers, and free electron lasers.

  18. PHYSICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF STEAM-EXPLODED LASER-PRINTED PAPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser-printed paper was pulped by the steam-explosion process. A full-factorial experimental design was applied to determine the effects of key operating variables on the properties of steam-exploded pulp. The variables were addition level for pulping chemicals (NaOH and/or Na2SO...

  19. PHYSICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF STEAM-EXPLODED LASER-PRINTED PAPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser-printed paper was pulped by the steam-explosion process. A full-factorial experimental design was applied to determine the effects of key operating variables on the properties of steam-exploded pulp. The variables were addition level for pulping chemicals (NaOH and/or Na2SO...

  20. Laser Refrigeration of Ytterbium-Doped Sodium-Yttrium-Fluoride Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuezhe; Smith, Bennett E; Roder, Paden B; Pauzauskie, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    Sodium yttrium fluoride (β-NaYF4 ) nanowires (NWs) with a hexagonal crystal structure are synthesized using a low-cost hydrothermal process and are shown to undergo laser refrigeration based on an upconversion process leading to anti-Stokes (blueshifted) photoluminescence. Single-beam laser trapping combined with forward light scattering is used to investigate cryophotonic laser refrigeration of individual NWs through analysis of their local Brownian dynamics.

  1. Agile beam laser

    SciTech Connect

    Valley, G. C.

    1985-01-08

    A laser system for providing a rapidly steerable laser output beam. The laser system includes a phase conjugate reflector, laser gain medium and its associated pump source, an output coupling device, and an optical element which selectably controls the transverse lasing mode of the laser system. The components are arranged to form a laser oscillator between the phase conjugate reflector and the optical device, and is operated in such a manner that each selected transverse mode of laser operation generates an output beam from the system which has a different wavefront tilt. Accordingly, the output beam is steerable and is dependent upon the selected transverse mode which is currently lasing in the oscillator.

  2. Polarization/Spatial Combining of Laser-Diode Pump Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelsinger, Paul; Liu, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    A breadboard version of an optical beam combiner is depicted which make it possible to use the outputs of any or all of four multimode laser diodes to pump a non-planar ring oscillator (NPRO) laser. The output of each laser diode has a single-mode profile in the meridional plane containing an axis denoted the 'fast' axis and a narrower multimode profile in the orthogonal meridional plane, which contains an axis denoted the 'slow' axis and a narrower multimode profile in the orthogonal meridional plane, which contains an axis denoted the 'slow' axis. One of the purposes served by the beam-combining optics is to reduce the fast-axis numerical aperture (NA) of the laser-diode output to match the NA of the optical fiber. Along the slow axis, the unmodified laser-diode NA is already well matched to the fiber optic NA, so no further slow-axis beam shaping is needed. In this beam combiner, the laser-diode outputs are collimated by aspherical lenses, then half-wave plates and polarizing beam splitters are used to combine the four collimated beams into two beams. Spatial combination of the two beams and coupling into the optical fiber is effected by use of anamorphic prisms, mirrors, and a focusing lens. The anamorphic prisms are critical elements in the NA-matching scheme, in that they reduce the fast-axis beam width to 1/6 of its original values. Inasmuch as no slow-axis beam shaping is needed, the collimating and focusing lenses are matched for 1:1 iumaging. Because these lenses are well corrected for infinite conjugates the combiner offers diffraction-limited performance along both the fast and slow axes.

  3. Laser extensometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, P. J.; Marcus, H. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A drift compensated and intensity averaged extensometer for measuring the diameter or other properties of a substantially cylindrical sample based upon the shadow of the sample is described. A beam of laser light is shaped to provide a beam with a uniform intensity along an axis normal to the sample. After passing the sample, the portion of the beam not striking said sample is divided by a beam splitter into a reference signal and a measurement signal. Both of these beams are then chopped by a light chopper to fall upon two photodiode detectors. The resulting ac currents are rectified and then divided into one another, with the final output being proportional to the size of the sample shadow.

  4. Effects of different lasers on organic/inorganic ratio of radicular dentin.

    PubMed

    Lopes, F C; Roperto, R; Akkus, A; Akkus, O; Souza-Gabriel, A E; Sousa-Neto, M D

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical stability of endodontic-treated root dentin after different laser irradiations through Raman spectroscopy. Fifty maxillary canines were selected and prepared with K3 system. Roots were randomly distributed into five groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment: GI (water), GII (NaOCl + EDTA), GIII (NaOCl + EDTA + 980 nm Diode laser), GIV (NaOCl + EDTA+ 1064 nm Nd: YAG laser) and GV (NaOCl + EDTA+ 2780 nm Er,Cr: YSGG laser). Lasers were applied for 20 s. Samples were bisected, and the organic and inorganic content of dentin was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p < 0.05). None of the surface treatments alter the inorganic content (cts) (p = 0.183). Roots irradiated with Er,Cr: YSGG laser had a reduced collagen content (GV-290.7 ± 41.7) compared with the water-treated roots (GI-328.3 ± 63.5) and those treated with NaOCl + EDTA (GII-333.9 ± 55.8). Roots irradiated with Er,Cr: YSGG laser also showed a higher inorganic/organic ratio (GV-9.5 ± 1.1) than roots treated with water (GI-7.7 ± 1.5), NaOCl + EDTA (GII-8.0 ± 1.4) and diode laser (GIII-8.2 ± 1.6). Both organic and inorganic contents increased from cervical to apical thirds in all groups. None of the surface treatments were able to promote changes in the inorganic content of the root dentin; treatment with NaOCl + EDTA combined with Er,Cr: YSGG altered collagen.

  5. Lasers in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2011-01-01

    Laser technology has advanced tremendously since the first gas lasers were incorporated into early flow cytometers. Gas lasers have been largely replaced by solid-state laser technology, making virtually any desirable visible light wavelength available for flow cytometry. Multiwavelength, white light, and wavelength tunable lasers are poised to enhance our analytical capabilities even further. In this chapter, I summarize the role that lasers play in cytometry, and the practical characteristics that make a laser appropriate for flow cytometry. I then review the latest single wavelength lasers available for flow cytometry, and how they can be used to excite the ever-expanding array of available fluorochromes. Finally, I review the contribution and potential of the latest tunable laser technology to flow cytometry, and show several examples of these novel sources integrated into production instruments. Technical details and critical parameters for successful application of these lasers for biomedical analysis are covered in depth.

  6. Tunable lasers- an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, B.D.; Buser, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    This overview of tunable lasers describes their applicability to spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and middle infrared ranges; to rapid on-line diagnostics by ultrashort cavity lasers; to exploration, by the free electron laser, for its wide tuning in the far infrared to submillimeter region; to remote detection, in areas such as portable pollution monitors, on-line chemical analyzers, auto exhaust analyzers, and production line controls; to photochemistry; and to other potential areas in diagnostics, communications, and medical and biological sciences. The following lasers are characterized by their tunability: solid state lasers, primarily alexandrite, with a tuning range of ca 1000 Angstroms; color center lasers; semiconductor lasers; dye lasers; gas lasers, where high-pressure CO/sub 2/ discharges are the best known example for a wide tunability range, and research is continuing in systems such as the alkali dimers; and, at wavelengths beyond 10 micrometers, the possibilities beyond Cerenkov and free electron lasers.

  7. What is a Laser?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Lucile; Schwob, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    The first laser was built more than 50 years ago, inMay 1960: it was a pulsed ruby laser. It was a simple laboratory curiosity and nobody knew what its usefulness could be. Other devices were rapidly demonstrated, and the variety and number of lasers in the world increased at a huge rate. Currently, the annual laser world market is worth about 6 billion dollars. Thanks to the remarkable properties of laser light, laser applications increase steadily in the domains of industry, building, medicine, telecommunications, etc. One can find many lasers in research laboratories, and they are used more and more in our everyday life and almost everybody has already seen a laser beam. The goal of the first chapter of this book is to explain simply what a laser is, how it is built and how it operates. Firstly, let us point out the outstanding properties of the laser light.

  8. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Y.T.; Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.; Campbell, J.H.; Aston, M.K.; Elder, M.L.

    1996-06-11

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  9. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Yuiko T.; Payne, Stephen A.; Hayden, Joseph S.; Campbell, John H.; Aston, Mary Kay; Elder, Melanie L.

    1996-01-01

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  10. Reflected laser radiation - relevance for laser safety?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeh, M. F.; Braunreuther, S.; Daub, R.; Stadler, T.

    Safety is compulsory in today's production lines. Those lines often use laser material processing applications. The highest risk for the operator or a bystander of a laser application is the exposure to the direct beam. With the present laser beam intensities, an accident at least causes sudden blindness or severe burns. Even if the process works correctly, which means the beam is always oriented towards the workpiece, the scattered and reflected parts of the laser beam still can be powerful enough to cause serious harm. The state-of-the-art safety measures are passive laser safety cabins around the application. Because of the high intensities and the low beam divergence of the highly brilliant laser beam sources, they cannot guarantee a safe use of these laser applications. An option is to use active laser safety barriers that react to an impinging laser beam on its surface. A new approach to guarantee laser safety is to monitor the system and watch for incidents, to ensure that the laser spot never reaches the safety barrier. Assuming that accidents with the direct laser beam cannot occur, the passive safety measures still have to withstand the reflected laser radiation. In this paper a theoretical model is presented with which the energy distribution in a hemisphere above a deep-welding-process can be calculated. The model was calibrated and validated with intensity measurements during a welding process. The results of the measurement can be used to develop a process-tailored safety cabin. Because of the increased mobility such a system increases the flexibility of the production cell. Furthermore, the costs for laser-safety may be decreased significantly.

  11. LASER-tissue interactions.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Lisa; Humphreys, Tatyana R

    2006-01-01

    As new laser devices continue to emerge, it becomes increasingly important for the clinical dermatologist to understand the basic principles behind their operation. A fundamental understanding of how lasers interact with tissue will enable the physician to choose the most appropriate laser for a given clinical situation. Although the physical laws guiding laser design are vastly complex, the fundamental principles of laser-tissue interaction can be summarized as they are applicable to the clinician.

  12. Mercury Bromide Laser Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-04

    Discharge", Optics Lett., 2(3), (March 1978). 7. R. Burnham, "Discharge Pumped Mercuric Halide Dissociation Lasers", Appl. Phys. Lett., 33: 15 (July 1978...laser and fluorescence signals. Neutral density filters served to prevent saturation of the detector during the laser measurements. F. Laser Output as a...REFERENCES . E. J. Schimitschek and J. E. Celto, " Mercuric Bromide Dissociation Laser in an Electric Discharge," Optics Lett. 2(3), March 1978. This

  13. Surgical lasers in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.; Mindak, Marek K.

    1997-10-01

    Almost every laser for medical applications was first tried in dermatology. The efficiency of YAG, CO2, and Argon lasers on this area and their potential advantages over conventional methods were mostly evaluated by cosmetic effect of laser therapy. The indications for different laser treatment in such dermatological cases as: angiomas, telangiectasias, pigmented lesions, nevus flammeus congenitus, deep cavernous angiomas, skin neoplasms and condylomata acuminata are discussed in this paper and the results of the laser therapy are also presented.

  14. Intracavity Raman lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y.B.; Ackerhalt, J.R.; Krasinski, J.S.; Heller, D.F.

    1989-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of intracavity Raman lasers are presented. Advantages of intracavity Raman lasers, particularly for low-emission cross section and broadly tunable vibronic gain media, are described. Experimental studies of a hydrogen gas Raman laser pumped inside the cavity of an alexandrite laser are presented. A theoretical model of the dynamics of a unidirectional intracavity Raman ring laser is developed and solved analytically. This model is adapted to simulate experiments.

  15. Ultrafast science using Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have considerable benefits for ultrafast science. Laser wakefield acceleration provides radiation pulses that have femtosecond duration and intrinsic synchronisation with the laser source, allowing for pump-probe measurements with unprecedented temporal resolution. These pulses can be used to study ultrafast dynamical phenomena in plasma and dense material, such as transient magnetic fields, rapidly evolving plasma dynamics and crystal lattice oscillations. In this talk, I will review recent experiments in laser wakefield acceleration and energetic photon generation using the laser systems HERCULES and Lambda-Cubed at the University of Michigan and their use for capturing the dynamics of laser-pumped samples. Studies of the electron beam hosing instability and the generation of annular phase space distributions increase X-ray flux while maintaining its femtosecond duration. Single-shot, spectrally resolved absorption measurements in laser pumped foils can be made on ultrafast timescales using this broadband photon source. Ultrafast electron radiography is able to temporally resolve relativistically expanding magnetic fields in high-intensity laser-solid interactions and the evolution of electric fields in low density plasma. Time-resolved electron diffraction captures structural dynamics in crystalline silicon. I will also discuss the technological needs for and potential impact of such revolutionary compact radiation sources for ultrafast science in the future. US Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-12-1-0310, the US National Science Foundation Grants No. 1054164, 0935197, 1535628 and 0810979, US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-NA0002372 and Army Research Office Grant No. W911NF1.

  16. Lasers used in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Lim, J T; Goh, C L

    1994-01-01

    This review introduces the various lasers available for the treatment of dermatological conditions. The applications of various lasers used in dermatology, including the carbon dioxide, argon, Q-switch Nd:YAG, ruby, dye and metal vapour lasers are discussed. We present our experience with the use of the carbon dioxide laser, flashlamp pulse-dye laser and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser in the National Skin Centre, Singapore. Our experience indicated that the lasers if used selectively are useful tools in the management of numerous skin disorders. The carbon dioxide laser is a versatile tool, useful for vaporizing or destroying skin lesions. The treatment of vascular or pigmented (melanin) lesions requires lasers that emit wavelengths corresponding to the absorption spectrum of haemoglobin or melanin respectively. Choosing the right laser gives optimal cosmetic result whereas the wrong lasers can lead to a less satisfactory result and even severe scarring. It is important to note that there is no single laser system that is versatile enough to be used to treat all skin disorders. To provide full coverage in the treatment of skin disorders, a laser centre has to be equipped with many different laser systems. This makes using lasers in the treatment of skin disorders very expensive.

  17. Laser communication system

    SciTech Connect

    Fredriksen, H.A.; Walter, R.K.; Mentzer, R.B.

    1987-04-28

    A laser communication system is described for transmission across an atmospheric link between a radio frequency source and a load comprising: a primary transmitter including a primary laser, a primary laser modulator connected to the primary laser and to a signal source, and a laser intensity control means connected to the laser for varying the primary laser intensity; a primary receiver located in the path of a beam from the primary laser; a haze comparator circuit connected to a primary photodetector means and comparing the electrical signal from the primary photodetector means to a standard signal to produce an output signal which indicates the sense and degree of difference between the two; a secondary laser located at the primary receiver location; secondary laser modulator circuit; a secondary laser control circuit; a secondary photodetector; a first control means connected to the secondary photodetector and the primary laser intensity control means; and an interconnection between the output of the haze comparator circuit and the secondary laser intensity control circuit so that the intensity of the output of the secondary laser is varied by the haze comparator in the same manner as is the intensity of the output of the primary laser.

  18. Assignment of the /Li-7/2 optically pumped laser transitions pumped by Ar/+/ and Kr/+/ laser lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, K. K.; Stwalley, W. C.; Zemke, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    Welling and Wellegehausen (1977) have reported a list of Na2 and Li2 lines (belonging to B-X and A-X systems) which lase when vapors of these dimers are pumped with an Ar(+) or Kr(+) laser. A description is presented of a fluorescence study of the A-X system of the (Li-7)2 molecule excited by a Kr(+) laser (6471 A). The optically pumped laser lines are identified as P and R doublets in two different fluorescence series. The conditions which favor lasing action of these lines are pointed out. All but one of the known optically pumped laser lines of (Li-7)2 along with their assignments are presented in a table. For each pumping line, several additional wavelengths are listed which satisfy the condition for laser oscillations and which might well lase well under slightly improved conditions.

  19. FY 2005 Quantum Cascade Laser Alignment System Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hatchell, Brian K.

    2006-01-11

    The Alignment Lasers Task of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project (Project PL211I) is a co-funded project between DOE NA-22 and a Classified Client. This project, which began in the second half of FY03, involved building and delivering a Quantum Cascade (QC) Laser Alignment System to be used for testing the pupil alignment of an infrared sensor by measuring the response from four pairs of diametrically opposed QC lasers. PNNL delivered the system in FY04 and provided technical assistance in FY05 culminating into a successful demonstration of the system. This project evolved from the Laser Development Task of PL211I, which is involved in developing novel laser technology to support development of advanced chemical sensors for detecting the proliferation of nuclear weapons. The laser systems are based on quantum cascade (QC) lasers, a new semiconductor source in the infrared. QC lasers can be tailored to emit light throughout the infrared region (3.5 ? 17 ?m) and have high output power and stability. Thus, these lasers provide an infrared source with superb power and spectral stability enabling them to be used for applications such as alignment and calibration in addition to chemical sensing.

  20. The combined use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser and fluoride to prevent root dentin demineralization

    PubMed Central

    GERALDO-MARTINS, Vinícius Rangel; LEPRI, Cesar Penazzo; FARAONI-ROMANO, Juliana Jendiroba; PALMA-DIBB, Regina Guenka

    2014-01-01

    The use of erbium lasers to prevent caries in enamel has shown positive results. However, it is not known if Er,Cr:YSGG laser can also be used to increase acid resistance of root dentine, which is another dental tissue susceptible to the action of cariogenic bacteria. Objective To analyze the effects of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser (λ=2.78 μm, 20 Hz) irradiation associated with 2% neutral sodium fluoride (NaF) to prevent root dentin demineralization. Material and Methods One hundred human root dentin samples were divided into 10 groups (G) and treated as follows: G1: no treatment; G2: NaF; G3: laser (4.64 J/cm2) with water cooling (WC=5.4 mL/min); G4: laser (4.64 J/cm2) without WC; G5: laser (8.92 J/cm2) with WC; G6: laser (8.92 J/cm2) without WC; G7: laser (4.64 J/cm2) with WC and NaF; G8: laser (4.64 J/cm2) without WC and NaF; G9: laser (8.92 J/cm2) with WC and NaF; G10: laser (8.92 J/cm2) without WC and NaF. The NaF gel was applied alone or after 4 min of irradiation. After 14 days of acid challenge, the samples were sectioned and the Knoop microhardness (KHN) test was done at different depths (30, 60, 90 and 120 μm) from the outer dentin surface. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Fisher's test (α=5%). Results The results showed that G8 and G10 presented higher KHN than the G1 for the depths of 30 and 60 μm, indicating an increase of the acid resistance of the dentin in up to 35% (p<0.05). Conclusions The use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 4.64 J/ cm2 and 8.92 J/cm2 without water cooling and associated with 2% NaF can increase the acid resistance of human root dentin. PMID:25466479

  1. Giant-laser-pulse-induced Rabi sideband of a multilevel dressed atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tian-Jie; Duan, Shao-Guang

    1993-03-01

    Rabi sidebands of the Na atomic vapor excited by a resonant-pulsed-laser beam were observed in the forward-direction radiation. While the laser power scans over a factor of 10, the change of Rabi shift is much less than what is expected by the two-level dressed-atom model. Therefore a multilevel dressed-atom model is developed to calculate the levels of the dressed Na atom, and the influence of the time evolution of the laser power is also taken into account in counting the real observable spectrum. After considering all these factors, the final calculated data fit the experimental results satisfactorily.

  2. Salinity controls on Na incorporation in Red Sea planktonic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezger, E. M.; Nooijer, L. J.; Boer, W.; Brummer, G. J. A.; Reichart, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    Whereas several well-established proxies are available for reconstructing past temperatures, salinity remains challenging to assess. Reconstructions based on the combination of (in)organic temperature proxies and foraminiferal stable oxygen isotopes result in relatively large uncertainties, which may be reduced by application of a direct salinity proxy. Cultured benthic and planktonic foraminifera showed that Na incorporation in foraminiferal shell calcite provides a potential independent proxy for salinity. Here we present the first field calibration of such a potential proxy. Living planktonic foraminiferal specimens from the Red Sea surface waters were collected and analyzed for their Na/Ca content using laser ablation quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Using the Red Sea as a natural laboratory, the calibration covers a broad range of salinities over a steep gradient within the same water mass. For both Globigerinoides ruber and Globigerinoides sacculifer calcite Na/Ca increases with salinity, albeit with a relatively large intraspecimen and interspecimen variability. The field-based calibration is similar for both species from a salinity of 36.8 up to 39.6, while values for G. sacculifer deviate from this trend in the northernmost transect. It is hypothesized that the foraminifera in the northernmost part of the Red Sea are (partly) expatriated and hence should be excluded from the Na/Ca-salinity calibration. Incorporation of Na in foraminiferal calcite therefore provides a potential proxy for salinity, although species-specific calibrations are still required and more research on the effect of temperature is needed.

  3. Enhanced ferroelectric polarization in tetragonally strained NaNbO3 thin film on single crystal Rh substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeng, W. J.; Jung, I.; Son, J. Y.

    2012-06-01

    Epitaxial NaNbO3 thin films were deposited on single crystal Rh substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The epitaxial NaNbO3 thin film exhibited the tetragonally stained structure with a c/a ratio of about 1.04 and a good ferroelectric property with the high remanent polarization (Pr) of about 40 μC/cm2. The piezoresponse force microscope study revealed that the epitaxial NaNbO3 thin film has a mosaic ferroelectric domain structure. A Pt/NaNbO3/Rh capacitor showed rapid ferroelectric switching behavior, which gives opportunity for a non-volatile memory application.

  4. Na Cauda do Cometa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    Quando viam um cometa, os antigos gregos imaginavam uma estrela com uma vasta cabeleira. Não à toa, a palavra deriva do termo koma, que significa cabelo. Constituídos por fragmentos de gelo e gases, os cometas possuem um núcleo sólido, que pode ter vários quilômetros de diâmetro, e uma cauda que sempre aponta na direção contrária ao Sol, devido aos ventos solares. Graças à aparência de pontos luminosos em movimento (ao contrário de outros astros, que parecem estáticos), esses corpos celestes foram interpretados por diferentes povos com muito misticismo, inspirando mitos tanto de boas-novas como de maus presságios. Conheça algumas dessas histórias:

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of laser processing in active crystal with nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Alvira, F C; Ródenas, A; Torchia, G A

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis is applied to study the ablation threshold and the main plasma features of active crystals used for laser processing with Nd(3+) ions. The experiments were conducted by using nanosecond laser pulses from a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd : YAG) laser and its harmonics. In particular, we have studied the ablation process in SBN, strontium barium niobate (SrxBa1-xNb2O6, x = 0.6), and SBN, sodium barium niobate (Ba2NaNb5O15), nonlinear and ferroelectric crystals. Two different ablation regimes have been identified by LIBS analysis with high sensitivity compared with the standard method of hole-diameter measurement. Analyzing spectroscopically the plasma emission, we have found a particular behavior with the excitation wavelength. For example, the electronic density and temperature in SBN-generated plasmas present an abnormal behavior with the excitation wavelength. We therefore conclude that the energy gap corresponding to these crystals plays an important role in describing this fact. Hence, the resonant ablation in doped crystals can be a suitable point for exploration in further works in order to use the plasma performances to optimize the laser processing by nanosecond pulses for technological applications.

  6. Ceramic Laser Materials

    PubMed Central

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  7. Quantum well lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zory, P.S. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The semiconductor quantum well (QW) laser structure is rapidly becoming the preferred design in many applications because of its low threshold, design flexibility, and high reliability. The book begins with a brief, interesting foreword by C.H. Henry on the history of the QW laser concept and its early development. Following this introduction is a 79-page chapter by S.W. Corzine et al. on optical gain in III-V bulk and QW lasers. The next chapter on intraband relaxation and line broadening effects by M. Asada is an excellent expanded review of a topic introduced by Corzine. The remaining chapters describe multiple QW lasers, low-threshold QW laser, special aspects of AlGaAs and (short-wavelength) InGaAsP lasers, valence-band engineering, strained-layer QW lasers, AlGaInP QW lasers, and quantum wire lasers. These chapters are well written by recognized experts in the field.

  8. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  9. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  10. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  11. Laser ablation-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the measurement of total elemental concentration in soils.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Jhon; López, Sebastian; Jaramillo, Daniel; Hahn, David W; Molina, Alejandro

    2013-04-10

    The performances of traditional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation-LIBS (LA-LIBS) were compared by quantifying the total elemental concentration of potassium in highly heterogeneous solid samples, namely soils. Calibration curves for a set of fifteen samples with a wide range of potassium concentrations were generated. The LA-LIBS approach produced a superior linear response different than the traditional LIBS scheme. The analytical response of LA-LIBS was tested with a large set of different soil samples for the quantification of the total concentration of Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, and K. Results showed an acceptable linear response for Ca, Fe, Mg, and K while poor signal responses were found for Na and Mn. Signs of remaining matrix effects for the LA-LIBS approach in the case of soil analysis were found and discussed. Finally, some improvements and possibilities for future studies toward quantitative soil analysis with the LA-LIBS technique are suggested.

  12. Laser Surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has produced a laser-aided system for surveying land boundaries in difficult terrain. It does the job more accurately than conventional methods, takes only one-third the time normally required, and is considerably less expensive. In surveying to mark property boundaries, the objective is to establish an accurate heading between two "corner" points. This is conventionally accomplished by erecting a "range pole" at one point and sighting it from the other point through an instrument called a theodolite. But how do you take a heading between two points which are not visible to each other, for instance, when tall trees, hills or other obstacles obstruct the line of sight? That was the problem confronting the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service. The Forest Service manages 187 million acres of land in 44 states and Puerto Rico. Unfortunately, National Forest System lands are not contiguous but intermingled in complex patterns with privately-owned land. In recent years much of the private land has been undergoing development for purposes ranging from timber harvesting to vacation resorts. There is a need for precise boundary definition so that both private owners and the Forest Service can manage their properties with confidence that they are not trespassing on the other's land.

  13. Encasing of Na+ ion in dimer-formed acetic acid clusters.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, Tonia M; Bende, Attila

    2015-10-01

    Peaks with anomalous abundance found in the mass spectra are associated with ions with enhanced stability. Among the scientific community focused on mass spectrometry, these peaks are called 'magic peaks' and their stability is often because of suggestive symmetric structures. Here, we report findings on ionised Na-acetic acid clusters [Na(+) -(AcA)n ] produced by Na-doping of (AcA)n and UV laser ionisation. Peaks labelled n = 2, 4, 8 are clearly distinguishable in the mass spectra from their anomalous intensity. Ab initio calculations helped elucidate cluster structures and energetic. A plausible interpretation of the magic peaks is given in terms of (AcA)n formed by dimer aggregation. The encasing of Na(+) by twisted dimers is proposed to be the origin of the enhanced cluster stability. A conceivable dimer-formed tube-like closed structure is found for the Na(+) -(AcA)8 . Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Alexandrite laser pumped by semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheps, Richard; Gately, Bernard M.; Myers, Joseph F.; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Heller, Donald F.

    1990-06-01

    We report the first operation of a direct diode-pumped tunable chromium-doped solid-state laser. A small alexandrite (Cr:BeAl2O4) crystal was longitudinally pumped by two visible laser diodes. The threshold pump power was 12 mW using the R1 line at 680.4 nm for the pump transition, and the slope efficiency was 25%. The measured laser output bandwidth was 2.1 nm.

  15. Dye laser chain for laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doizi, Denis; Jaraudias, Jean; Pochon, E.; Salvetat, G.

    1993-05-01

    Uranium enrichment by laser isotope separation uses a three step operation which requires four visible wavelengths to boost an individual U235 isotope from a low lying atomic energy level to an autoionizing state. The visible wavelengths are delivered by dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers (CVL). In this particular talk, a single dye chain consisting of a master oscillator and amplifier stages will be described and some of its performance given.

  16. Alexandrite laser pumped by semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Scheps, R.; Gately, B.M.; Myers, J.F. ); Krasinski, J.S. ); Heller, D.F. )

    1990-06-04

    We report the first operation of a direct diode-pumped tunable chromium-doped solid-state laser. A small alexandrite (Cr:BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) crystal was longitudinally pumped by two visible laser diodes. The threshold pump power was 12 mW using the {ital R}{sub 1} line at 680.4 nm for the pump transition, and the slope efficiency was 25%. The measured laser output bandwidth was 2.1 nm.

  17. Na+ coordination at the Na2 site of the Na+/I− symporter

    PubMed Central

    Ferrandino, Giuseppe; Nicola, Juan Pablo; Sánchez, Yuly E.; Echeverria, Ignacia; Liu, Yunlong; Amzel, L. Mario; Carrasco, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) mediates active I− transport in the thyroid—the first step in thyroid hormone biosynthesis—with a 2 Na+: 1 I− stoichiometry. The two Na+ binding sites (Na1 and Na2) and the I− binding site interact allosterically: when Na+ binds to a Na+ site, the affinity of NIS for the other Na+ and for I− increases significantly. In all Na+-dependent transporters with the same fold as NIS, the side chains of two residues, S353 and T354 (NIS numbering), were identified as the Na+ ligands at Na2. To understand the cooperativity between the substrates, we investigated the coordination at the Na2 site. We determined that four other residues—S66, D191, Q194, and Q263—are also involved in Na+ coordination at this site. Experiments in whole cells demonstrated that these four residues participate in transport by NIS: mutations at these positions result in proteins that, although expressed at the plasma membrane, transport little or no I−. These residues are conserved throughout the entire SLC5 family, to which NIS belongs, suggesting that they serve a similar function in the other transporters. Our findings also suggest that the increase in affinity that each site displays when an ion binds to another site may result from changes in the dynamics of the transporter. These mechanistic insights deepen our understanding not only of NIS but also of other transporters, including many that, like NIS, are of great medical relevance. PMID:27562170

  18. Scaling brilliance of high power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Harald; Grönninger, Guenther; Lauer, Christian; Reill, Wolfgang; Arzberger, Markus; Strauß, Uwe; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens; Kösters, Arnd; Malchus, Joerg; Krause, Volker K.

    2010-02-01

    New direct diode laser systems and fiber lasers require brilliant fiber coupled laser diodes for efficient operation. In the German funded project HEMILAS different laser bar designs are investigated with tailored beam parameter products adapted for efficient fiber coupling. In this paper we demonstrate results on 9xx and 1020nm bars suitable for coupling into 200μm fibers. With special facet technology and optimised epitaxial structure COD-free laser bars were fabricated with maximum efficiency above 66%. For short bars consisting of five 100μm wide emitters 75W CW maximum output power was reached. In QCW-mode up to 140W are demonstrated. The 10% fill factor bars with 4mm cavity are mounted with hard solder. Lifetime tests in long pulse mode with 35W output power exceed 5000 hours of testing without degradation or spontaneous failures. Slow axis divergence stays below 7° up to power levels of 40W and is suitable for simple fiber coupling into 200μm NA 0.22 fibers with SAC and FAC lenses. For fiber coupling based on beam rearrangement with step mirrors, bars with higher fill factor of 50% were fabricated and tested. The 4mm cavity short bars reach efficiencies above 60%. Lifetime tests at accelerated powers were performed. Finally fiber coupling results with output powers of up to 2.4 kW and beam quality of 30 mm mrad are demonstrated.

  19. Optical autofocus for high resolution laser photoplotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Jose; Crespo, Daniel; Jimenez, Isidoro; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2005-07-01

    An all optical autofocus has been designed and tested for tight line width control in a high NA laser photoplotter system. The laser system is based in a GaN semiconductor laser with power 30 mW and wavelength 405 nm. The advantage of using this laser, despite the relatively long wavenlength, is compactness and easy for high frequency modulation. The autofocus system is based in a secondary 635 nm GaAlAs laser without need for wavelength, neither power stabilization. The two beams are delivered coaxially through the focusing lens by means of a dichroic beamsplitter. Focusing lens need no correction for chromatic aberration, as this is compensed by appropriate autofocus beam divergence. After reflection in the sample, the autofocus beam is separated from the returning writing beam and then guided to a collimation sensor, in which defocus of about 1/20 of the Rayleigh range of the writing beam can be detected and compensated by an analogue PID electronic control. Stable linewidth within 5% is achieved with different numerical aperture focusing lenses.

  20. Lasers in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-08-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20(th) century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics.

  1. Lasers in aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, I. N.; Dezhin, V. N.; Kutakhov, V. P.; Petukhov, A. V.; Sidorin, V. M.; Sukhar, I. M.

    The way in which lasers are being incorporated into the military aircraft of the United States and the countries of Western Europe is discussed. Descriptions are given of laser weapons-guiding systems (including ranger finders and systems for target illumination), laser systems for navigation and flight-safety assurance (gyroscopes, velocity gauges, altimeters, systems providing meteorological data, proximity warning systems), and laser systems for air reconnaissance, communications, and control. Attention is also given to the Glissada laser guide path system, developed in the USSR. The physics of the systems is emphasized in the description and the principles underlying the operation of a laser are discussed in the introduction.

  2. Maser and laser engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    This book is intended to be a textbook for an upper division one-semester electrical engineering course. Students are expected to have had some undegraduate course work in modern physics and in electromagnetic field theory. General aspects regarding devices based on quantum electronics are considered along with gas masers, solid masers, gas lasers, solid lasers, semiconductor lasers, liquid lasers, modulation techniques for lasers, and opto-electrical demodulators and energy convertors. Attention is given to quantum electric harmonic generators, Raman lasers, optical parametric interactions, holograms, optical terms, crystallographic terms, band theory, Schroedinger formulation and Dirac formation, and the quantum number of electrons in a hydrogen atom.

  3. Tunable chromium lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, L.L.; Payne, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    During the decade that has passed since the discovery of the alexandrite laser, many other tunable vibronic sideband lasers based on Cr/sup 3 +/ have been developed. These lasers span the wavelength range from 700 nm to at least 1235 nm. Experimental and theoretical research has provided an understanding of the important factors that influence the performance of these Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers and other solid state vibronic lasers. The intrinsic performance levels of some of the most promising Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers are evaluated from extrapolated slope efficiency measurements. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Laser Safety Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A major focus of work done at Air Products and Chemicals' Laser Application Laboratory is on use of ultraviolet radiation using high energy excimer lasers. Because light within the wavelength of excimer lasers is invisible, it can cause serious damage to eyes and tissue. To contain the laser beam, Air Products Incorporated a Jet Propulsion Laboratory invention described in a technical support package into its beam stops. The technology interrupts the laser pathway and allows workers to remain in the target area without shutting off the laser.

  5. Laser Materials and Laser Spectroscopy - A Satellite Meeting of IQEC '88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Zhiming

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Laser Materials * Laser Site Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Ions in Glass * Spectroscopy of Chromium Doped Tunable Laser Materials * Spectroscopic Properties of Nd3+ Ions in LaMgAl11O19 Crystal * Spectral Study and 2.938 μm Laser Emission of Er3+ in the Y3Al5O12 Crystal * Raman-infrared Spectra and Radiationless Relaxation of Laser Crystal NdAl3(BO3)4 * A Study on HB and FLN in BaFCl0.5Br0.5:Sm2+ at 77K * Pair-pumped Upconversion Solid State Lasers * CW Upconversion Laser Action in Neodymium and Erbium doped Solids * Ultra-high Sensitive Upconversion Fluorescence of YbF3 Doped with Trace Tm3+ and Er3+ * The Growth and Properties of NYAB and EYAB Multifunctional Crystal * Study on Fluorescence and Laser Light of Er3+ in Glass * Growth and Properties of Single Crystal Fibers for Laser Materials * A Study on the Quality of Sapphire, Ruby and Ti3+ Doped Sapphire Grown by Temperature Gradient Technique (TGT) and Czochralski Technique (CZ) * The Measurement of Output Property of Ti3+ Al2O3 Laser Crystal * An Xα Study of the Laser Crystal MgF2 : V2+ * Q-switched NAB Laser * Miniature YAG Lasers * Study of High Efficiency {LiF}:{F}^-_2 Color Center Crystals * Study on the Formation Conditions and Optical Properties of (F2+)H Color Center in NaCl:OH- Crystals * Novel Spectroscopic Properties of {LiF}:{F}^+_3 - {F}_2 Mixed Color Centers Laser Crystals * Terraced Substrate Visible GaAlAs Semiconductor Lasers with a Large Optical Cavity * The Temperature Dependence of Gain Spectra, Threshold Current and Auger Recombination in InGaAsP-InP Double Heterojunction Laser diode * Time-resolved Photoluminescence and Energy Transfer of Bound Excitons in GaP:N Crystals * Optical Limiting with Semiconductors * A Critical Review of High-efficiency Crystals for Tunable Lasers * Parametric Scattering in β - BaB2O4 Crystal Induced by Picosecond Pulses * Generation of Picosecond Pulses at 193 nm by Frequency Mixing in β - BaB2O4

  6. Laser peening of metals- enabling laser technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; Daly, J.; Harrisson, J.

    1997-11-13

    Laser peening, a surface treatment for metals, employs laser induced shocks to create deep and intense residual stresses in critical components. In many applications this technology is proving to be superior to conventional treatments such as shot peening. The laser peening process has generated sufficiently impressive results to move it from a laboratory demonstration phase into a significant industrial process. However until now this evolution has been slowed because a laser system meeting the average power requirements for a high throughput process has been lacking.

  7. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  8. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, S.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Murnane, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethrough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate. 7 figs.

  9. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, Sterling; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-01-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate.

  10. Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollberg, Leo; Bergquist, James Charles; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2008-04-01

    Degenerate gases. Probing vortex pair sizes in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless regime on a two-dimensional lattice of Bose-Einstein condensates / V. Schweikhard ... [et al.]. Interacting Bose-Einstein condensates in random potentials / P. Bouyer ... [et al.]. Towards quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms in optical lattices / I. Bloch -- Precision measurement and fundamental physics. T-violation and the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the mercury atom / E. N. Fortson -- Quantum information and control I. Quantum information processing and ramsey spectroscopy with trapped ions / C. F. Roos ... [et al.]. Quantum non-demolition counting of photons in a cavity / S. Haroche ... [et al.] -- Ultra-fast control and spectroscopy. Frequency-Comb- assisted mid-infrared spectroscopy / P. de Natale ... [et al.] -- Precision measurement and applications. Precision gravity tests by atom interferometry / G. M. Tino ... [et al.] -- Novel spectroscopic applications. On a variation of the proton-electron mass ratio / W. Ubachs ... [et al.] -- Quantum information and control II. Quantum interface between light and atomic ensembles / H. Krauter ... [et al.] -- Degenerate Fermi gases. An atomic Fermi gas near a P-wave Feshbach resonance / D. S. Jin, J. P. Gaebler and J. T. Stewart. Bragg scattering of correlated atoms from a degenerate Fermi gas / R. J. Ballagh, K. J. Challis and C. W. Gardiner -- Spectroscopy and control of atoms and molecules. Stark and Zeeman deceleration of neutral atoms and molecules / S. D. Hogan ... [et al.]. Generation of coherent, broadband and tunable soft x-ray continuum at the leading edge of the driver laser pulse / A. Jullien ... [et al.]. Controlling neural atoms and photons with optical conveyor belts and ultrathin optical fibers / D. Meschede. W. Alt and A. Rauschenbeutel -- Spectroscopy on the small scale. Wide-field cars-microscopy / C. Heinrich ... [et al.]. Atom nano-optics and nano-lithography / V. I. Balykin ... [et al

  11. Conformation of Macromolecules in the Gas Phase: Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Methods in Ion Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Helden, Gert; Wyttenbach, Thomas; Bowers, Michael T.

    1995-03-01

    Conformational data for macromolecules in the gas phase have been obtained by the coupling of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ion source to an ion chromatograph. A series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers "cationized" (converted to a cation) by sodium ions (Na^+PEG9 to Na^+PEG19) and a protonated neurotransmitter protein, bradykinin, were studied. Mobilities of Na^+PEG9 to Na^+PEG19 are reported. Detailed modeling of Na^+PEG9 with molecular mechanics methods indicates that the lowest energy structure has the Na^+ ion "solvated" by the polymer chain with seven oxygen atoms as nearest neighbors. The agreement between the model and experiment is within 1 percent for Na^+PEG9, Na^+PEG13, and Na^+PEG17, giving strong support to both the method and the deduced structures. Similar agreement was obtained in initial studies that modeled experimental data for arginine-protonated bradykinin.

  12. Phased laser array for generating a powerful laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2004-02-17

    A first injection laser signal and a first part of a reference laser beam are injected into a first laser element. At least one additional injection laser signal and at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are injected into at least one additional laser element. The first part of a reference laser beam and the at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are amplified and phase conjugated producing a first amplified output laser beam emanating from the first laser element and an additional amplified output laser beam emanating from the at least one additional laser element. The first amplified output laser beam and the additional amplified output laser beam are combined into a powerful laser beam.

  13. n/a

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    The first manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 11, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon, while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon in the Sea of Tranquility. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew set up experiments, collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth, planted the U.S. Flag, and left a message for all mankind. In this photograph, Aldrin walks past some rocks, easily carrying scientific equipment experiements, which would have been to heavy too carry on Earth. The two packages made up the Early Apollo Scientific Experiment Package (EASEP) on Apollo 11. On the left is the Passive Seismic Experiment Package (PSEP) and on the right is the Laser Ranging Retroreflector (LRRR).

  14. Controlled synthesis of NaYF4 nanoparticles and upconversion properties of NaYF4:Yb, Er (Tm)/FC transparent nanocomposite thin films.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjuan; Lu, Chunhua; Jiang, Chenfei; Wang, Wei; Song, Jianbin; Ni, Yaru; Xu, Zhongzi

    2012-06-15

    Monodisperse oleic acid stabilized pure NaYF(4) nanoparticles with controlled size and shape have been successfully synthesized by changing the initial reaction temperature. Transparent nanocomposite thin films consisting of NaYF(4):Yb, Er (Tm) upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) and fluorocarbon resin (FC) are deposited on the slide glass by dip-coating method. The results show that these nanocomposite thin films exhibit intense green and blue upconversion photoluminescence under 980 nm laser excitation and higher transparency than blank substrate. The NaYF(4):Yb,Er (Tm) nanoparticles and NaYF(4):Yb,Er (Tm)/FC nanocomposite thin films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM/back-scattered electron (BSE), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-Vis spectrophotometer (UVPC), and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. These nanocomposite thin films can be potentially used in solar cells field.

  15. Laser Trapping of Radioactive Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    2013-04-01

    Stuart Freedman conceived the idea of laser trapping radioactive atoms for the purpose of studying beta correlation effects. ``This is really the theorist's view of a radioactive source,'' as he fondly claimed. It is ideal because the atoms form a point source, compressed in both position and momentum space, with no material walls nearby. The Berkeley group succeeded in trapping ^21Na (half-life = 22 s) atoms [Lu et al., PRL 72, 3791 (1994)], and determined its beta-neutrino correlation coefficient a=0.5502(60) to be in agreement with the Standard Model [Vetter et al., PRC 77, 035502 (2008)]. Other groups have joined this effort with searches for scalar or tensor couplings in the weak interaction. Moreover, the technique has been extended to trap very short lived ^8He (0.1 s) to study its halo structure or the very long lived ^81Kr (230,000 yr) to map the movement of groundwater.

  16. Laser surgery - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  17. Laser Radar Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Laser and radar instruments aboard NASA aircraft provide measurements of the snow and ice surface and down to the bedrock under the ice. Lasers, with a shorter wavelength, measure the surface eleva...

  18. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  19. Laser safety in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Although many regulations and standards relating to laser safety are in effect, there continue to be an average of 35 laser injuries per year. Laser safety professionals believe that this number under-represents the actual number of injuries and that many more accidents per year occur that are not documented with federal agencies. A review of these accidents has determined that failing to wear available eye protection is one of the most frequent contributing factors to laser injuries. As the purchase and use of lasers in dentistry continues to grow, so must concern for laser safety. This article provides basic information to advance the safe use of lasers in dentistry and to help establish laser safety protocols for the dental office.

  20. Laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, there have been numerous advances in hair laser removal that utilize melanin as a chromophore. All of the devices on the market may be used in patients with light skin (phototypes I-III) and yield hair reduction near 75%. The ruby (694 nm) laser, alexandrite (755 nm) laser, and diode (810 nm) laser, as well as intense pulsed light are commonly used devices for hair laser removal. The long-pulsed Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser represents the safest device for hair removal in dark-skinned patients because of its long wavelength, although the diode laser, alexandrite laser, and intense pulse light may be used. For treatment of light hair, combination radiofrequency and optical devices as well as photodynamic therapy are under investigation.

  1. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Wells, William E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  2. High power laser dump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, M. S.; Hsu, J. P.

    1985-08-01

    A high power laser dump has defined laser beam introduction angles to the internal surface of a cylinder to maximize energy dispersion and absorption and, has two zones formed of distinctive reflective and absorbing materials.

  3. Lasers In Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    Fifty people around have participated in the workshop "Lasers in Medicine": most of them participants on the previous days on the conference "Laser Technologies in Industry", also some invited physicians and others interested in the topic from various University Departments.

  4. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Find an Ophthalmologist Advanced ...

  5. Lasers in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, S; Powers, S K

    1994-01-01

    Lasers have been used in neurosurgery for the past 25 years, undergoing modifications to suit the specific needs of this medical discipline. The present report reviews the current use of lasers in neurosurgical practice and examines the pros and cons of lasers in specific neurosurgical applications. In spite of their advantages, laser use is still not widespread in neurosurgery. One reason is the continued lack of complete control over real-time laser interactions with neural tissue. A greater acceptance and use of lasers by neurosurgeons will depend upon automated control over defined specific parameters for laser applications based upon the type of tissue, the desired effect on tissue, and application to the clinical situation without loss of precision and a lot of expense. This will require the integration of newer lasers, computers, robotics, stereotaxy, and concepts of minimally invasive surgery into the routine management of neurosurgical problems.

  6. Laser device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J. D.

    1985-06-25

    A simplified, relatively inexpensive laser device, wherein the laser elements are fixed in a body exoskeleton of electrical insulating material having a low coefficient of thermal expansion. The preferred embodiment includes a shotgun type laser filter having parallel bores which receive the laser flashlamp and laser rod in fixed relation in a body chamber. The reflector surrounds the laser filter and retains the filter within the body chamber. In the preferred method of this invention, several controlled lasing pulses are generated with each illumination pulse of the flashlamp, substantially increasing the efficiency of the laser device. The number of pulses is generally controlled by increasing the voltage to the flashlamp. The rapid multiple lasing pulses generate an elongated plasma in a fluid medium, such as the vitreous fluid body of an eye which makes the laser device extemely efficient for treating glaucoma and other medical treatments.

  7. Modern retinal laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor; Luttrull, Jeffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal lasers are a standard source of light to produce retinal tissue photocoagulation to treat retinovascular disease. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were large randomized clinical trials that have shown beneficial effect of retinal laser photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy and have dictated the standard of care for decades. However, current treatment protocols undergo modifications. Types of lasers used in treatment of retinal diseases include argon, diode, dye and multicolor lasers, micropulse lasers and lasers for photodynamic therapy. Delivery systems include contact lens slit-lamp laser delivery, indirect ophthalmocope based laser photocoagulation and camera based navigated retinal photocoagulation with retinal eye-tracking. Selective targeted photocoagulation could be a future alternative to panretinal photocoagulation. PMID:25892934

  8. Laser spectroscopy 9

    SciTech Connect

    Feld, M.S. . Dept. of Physics); Thomas, J.E. . Dept. of Physics); Mooradian, A. . Lincoln Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    This book covers subjects under the following headings: New cooling mechanisms; Laser spectroscopy; Cavity Qed; Noise and coherence; Quantum size effects; Surface spectroscopy; Laser light sources; Trapped ion spectroscopy; and Fundamental measurements.

  9. Slender tip laser scalpel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-01-06

    A laser scalpel includes a ribbon optical waveguide extending therethrough and terminating at a slender optical cutting tip. A laser beam is emitted along the height of the cutting tip for cutting tissue therealong.

  10. Laser programs highlights 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the scope of our laser research has grown immensely. The small, low-power laser systems of our early days have given way to laser systems of record-breaking size and power. Now we are focusing our activities within the target physics and laser science programs to support the ignition and gain goals of the proposed glass-laser National Ignition Facility. In our laser isotope separation work, we completed the most important set of experiments in the history of the AVLIS Program in 1993, which culminated in a spectacularly successful run that met or exceeded all our objectives. We are also developing lasers and laser-related technologies for a variety of energy, commercial, and defense uses. On the horizon are transfers of important technologies for waste treatment, x-ray lithography, communications and security, optical imaging, and remote sensing, among others.

  11. MESSENGER Laser Altimeter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    MESSENGER's Mercury Laser Altimeter sends out laser pulses that hit the ground and return to the instrument. The amount of light that returns for each pulse gives the reflectance at that point on t...

  12. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a narrow beam and creates a very high-intensity light. This powerful beam of light may be ... it used in cancer treatment? Laser therapy uses high-intensity light to treat cancer and other illnesses. Lasers ...

  13. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, John C.; Buican, Tudor N.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser defines an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam interrogates the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam intersects the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis.

  14. TELEC laser experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental thermoelectronic laser energy converter (TELEC) was constructed and tested with a 40 kW combustion laser operating at a wave length of 10.6 microns. The objective of the test was to demonstrate the feasibility of the TELEC concept for converting a laser beam into electric power. The TELEC System is intended as the receiver for a laser power transmission system in space.

  15. CO2 laser modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  16. Tunable semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Tunable semiconductor lasers are disclosed requiring minimized coupling regions. Multiple laser embodiments employ ring resonators or ring resonator pairs using only a single coupling region with the gain medium are detailed. Tuning can be performed by changing the phase of the coupling coefficient between the gain medium and a ring resonator of the laser. Another embodiment provides a tunable laser including two Mach-Zehnder interferometers in series and a reflector coupled to a gain medium.

  17. Laser Gyro Theory Extension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    111. ൔ+2ŕ GYRO. .. ......................... 2 IV. APPLICATION OF LASER ROTATIONAL SENSORS TO PROBLEMS IN GENERAL AND SPECIAL RELATIVITY ...model. 3 IV. APPLICATION OF LASER ROTATIONAL SENSORS TO PROBLEMS IN GENERAL AND SPECIAL RELATIVITY In our on-going study involving the application of ring...34The Laser Gyro," in Laser Applications , M. Ross, Ed. (Academic, New York, 1971), pp. 131-200. 4. G. Yntema, D. Grant, Jr. and R. Warner, U. S

  18. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  19. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  20. Laser shaping of cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil N.; Bagratashvili, Victor N.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Helidonis, Emmanuel S.; Kavvalos, George; Christodoulou, P. N.; Naoumidi, I.; Velegrakis, G.; Ovchinnikov, Yuriy M.; Shechter, A.

    1994-09-01

    The carbon dioxide laser has been used for the first time to change the cartilage's shape. After the laser irradiation the cartilage has the tendency to retain its new form. Different types of laser modified cartilage structures were studied. The inferred physical mechanism for cartilage shaping using the stresses relaxation process is presented. The clinical significance of the results for corrective laser surgery is discussed.

  1. Carbon dioxide slab laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tulip, J.

    1988-01-12

    A gas slab laser is described comprising: first and second elongated electrodes each including a planar light reflecting surface disposed so as to form a light guide only in a plane perpendicular to the planar surface and to define a gas discharge gap therebetween; a laser gas disposed in the gap; and means for applying a radio frequency current between the first and second electrodes to establish a laser-exciting discharge in the laser gas.

  2. Laser cutting system

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    2015-03-03

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  3. Laser Assisted Microsurgical Anastomosis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-22

    Miami School of Medicine This Paper describes new experimental microsurgical procedures that * utilize laser infrared energy emitted at 10.6 um to...dioxide laser microsurgical technique takes advantage of the very high absorption of laser energy (at 10.6 um) by water in soft tissue to effect successful...describes a new surgical technique that utilizes laser heat energy to repair transected rat sciatic nerves, and nerve grafts. The energy emitted at

  4. Solidification of NaCl-NaF eutectic in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yu, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Continuous and discontinuous NaF fibers, embedded in a NaCl matrix, have been produced in space and on earth, respectively. The production of continuous fibers in a eutectic mixture was attributed to the absence of convection current in the liquid during solidification in space. Image transmission and optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space-grown and earth-grown ingots were made with a light microscope and a spectrometer. It was found that better optical properties were obtained from samples grown in space. This was attributed to a better alignment of NaF fibers along the ingot axis.

  5. Optically biased laser gyro

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.Z.; Chow, W.W.; Scully, M.O.; Sanders, V.E.

    1980-10-01

    We describe a four-mode ring laser that exhibits none of the mode-locking characteristics that plague laser gyros. This laser is characterized by a bias that changes sign with a change in the direction of rotation and prevents the counterpropagating modes from locking. A theoretical analysis explaining the experimental results is outlined.

  6. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  7. Zeeman laser gyroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Azarova, V V; Golyaev, Yu D; Saveliev, I I

    2015-02-28

    The history of invention and development of Zeeman laser gyroscopes, specific features of their optical scheme and operation principle are described. The construction and element base of modern laser angular velocity sensors with Zeeman-based frequency biasing are considered. The problems and prospects of their development are discussed. (laser gyroscopes)

  8. Laser power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Edmund J.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of previous studies related to laser power transmission is presented. Particular attention is given to the use of solar pumped lasers for space power applications. Three general laser mechanisms are addressed: photodissociation lasing driven by sunlight, photoexcitation lasing driven directly by sunlight, and photoexcitation lasing driven by thermal radiation.

  9. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  10. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  11. X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to-guide for specialists. It provides comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. The book collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development.

  12. Laser Fundamentals and Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Pelt, W. F.; And Others

    As a result of work performed at the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory with respect to lasers, this manual was prepared in response to the increasing use of lasers in high schools and colleges. It is directed primarily toward the high school instructor who may use the text for a short course in laser fundamentals. The definition of the…

  13. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiš, S.; Cihelka, J.; Matulková, I.

    2010-12-01

    Three types of lasers (double-heterostructure 66 K InAsSb/InAsSbP laser diode, room temperature, multi quantum wells with distributed feedback (MQW with DFB) (GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb based) diode laser and vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) (GaSb based) have been characterized using Fourier transform emission spectroscopy and compared. The photoacoustic technique was employed to determine the detection limit of formaldehyde (less than 1 ppmV) for the strongest absorption line of the v3 + v5 band in the emission region of the GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb diode laser. The detection limit (less than 10 ppbV) of formaldehyde was achieved in the 2820 cm-1 spectral range in case of InAsSb/InAsSbP laser (fundamental bands of v1, v5). Laser sensitive detection (laser absorption together with high resolution Fourier transform infrared technique including direct laser linewidth measurement, infrared photoacoustic detection of neutral molecules (methane, form-aldehyde) is discussed. Additionally, very sensitive laser absorption techniques of such velocity modulation are discussed for case of laser application in laboratory research of molecular ions. Such sensitive techniques (originally developed for lasers) contributed very much in identifying laboratory microwave spectra of a series of anions (C6H-, C4H-, C2H-, CN-) and their discovery in the interstellar space (C6H-, C4H-).

  14. Laser Detection of Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, C. K. N.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the use of laser spectroscopy in determining the presence of specific gaseous constituents. Three of currently used modes for laser detection of pollution are reviewed; (1) long-path measurements; (2) laser raman (differential absorption) measurements; and (3) optoacoustic detection. (HM)

  15. Velocimetry with diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mul, F. F. M.; Jentink, H. W.; Koelink, M.; Greve, J.; Aarnoudse, J. G.

    The history of the application of diode lasers in velocimetry is reviewed. Some problems arising when using those lasers, e.g., mode hopping and wavelength shifts caused by temperature effects, are discussed, together with coherence effects encountered with diode lasers. The application in dual-beam velocimetry, in direct-contact velocimetry and in velocimetry using self-mixing will be discussed.

  16. LaserFest Celebration

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  17. Argon laser for otosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Wojciech; Pospiech, Lucyna; Jankowska-Kuc, Malgorzata

    1995-03-01

    Up to now, among different kinds of lasers an argon laser is mostly used for otosclerosis. Exposure conditions at use of the laser beam are still not well defined. In order to achieve the optimum conditions a series of experiments has been made. Obtained results are presented in this paper.

  18. Laser Detection of Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, C. K. N.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the use of laser spectroscopy in determining the presence of specific gaseous constituents. Three of currently used modes for laser detection of pollution are reviewed; (1) long-path measurements; (2) laser raman (differential absorption) measurements; and (3) optoacoustic detection. (HM)

  19. Solar pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Weaver, W. R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A solar pumped laser is described in which the lasant is a gas that will photodissociate and lase when subjected to sunrays. Sunrays are collected and directed onto the gas lasant to cause it to lase. Applications to laser propulsion and laser power transmission are discussed.

  20. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  1. Excimer Lasers In Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittel, Frank K.; Saidi, Iyad S.; Pettit, George H.; Wisoff, P. J.; Sauerbrey, Roland A.

    1989-06-01

    Excimer lasers emit light energy, short optical pulses at ultraviolet wavelengths, that results in a unique laser tissue interaction. This has led to an increasing number of studies into medical applications of these lasers in fields such as ophthalmology, urology, cardiology and neurology.

  2. Laser material processing system

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  3. Scalable high-power and high-brightness fiber coupled diode laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Ahlert, Sandra; Bayer, Andreas; Kissel, Heiko; Müntz, Holger; Noeske, Axel; Rotter, Karsten; Segref, Armin; Stoiber, Michael; Unger, Andreas; Wolf, Paul; Biesenbach, Jens

    2012-03-01

    The demand for high-power and high-brightness fiber coupled diode laser devices is mainly driven by applications for solid-state laser pumping and materials processing. The ongoing power scaling of fiber lasers requires scalable fibercoupled diode laser devices with increased power and brightness. For applications in materials processing multi-kW output power with beam quality of about 30 mm x mrad is needed. We have developed a modular diode laser concept combining high power, high brightness, wavelength stabilization and optionally low weight, which becomes more and more important for a multitude of applications. In particular the defense technology requires robust but lightweight high-power diode laser sources in combination with high brightness. Heart of the concept is a specially tailored diode laser bar, whose epitaxial and lateral structure is designed such that only standard fast- and slow-axis collimator lenses in combination with appropriate focusing optics are required to couple the beam into a fiber with a core diameter of 200 μm and a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.22. The spectral quality, which is an important issue especially for fiber laser pump sources, is ensured by means of Volume Holographic Gratings (VHG) for wavelength stabilization. In this paper we present a detailed characterization of different diode laser sources based on the scalable modular concept. The optical output power is scaled from 180 W coupled into a 100 μm NA 0.22 fiber up to 1.7 kW coupled into a 400 μm NA 0.22 fiber. In addition we present a lightweight laser unit with an output power of more than 300 W for a 200 μm NA 0.22 fiber with a weight vs. power ratio of only 0.9 kg/kW.

  4. Diode laser and endoscopic laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullins, Kenneth E

    2002-05-01

    Two functionally important differences exist between the diode laser and the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (used more commonly in small animal surgery). Diode laser energy is delivered through a quartz fiber instead of being reflected through an articulated arm or waveguide. Quartz fibers are generally more flexible and resilient than waveguides and can be inserted through an endoscope for minimally invasive procedures. Laser-tissue interaction is the other significant difference. The CO2 laser is completely absorbed by water, which limits the effect to visible tissue. The diode wavelength is minimally absorbed by water and may affect tissue as deep as 10 mm below the surface in the free-beam mode. With proper respect for the tissue effect, these differences can be used to the advantage of the patient.

  5. Two-step predissociation of NaK

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbour, Z.J.; Huennekens, J.

    1993-05-01

    We use two-step excitation to measure predissociation rates and to map out high-lying molecular states of NaK. A single-mode ring dye laser is set at a particular 2 (A) {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} (v{prime}, J{prime}) {l_arrow} 1 (X){sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}(v{double_prime}, J{double_prime}) transition. Another single-mode laser (Ti-sapphire) is then used in the second step to excite the molecule, now in the A state, to a higher predissociating state. The predissociation is monitored by the atomic potassium emission on the 3D{sub 3/2} {yields} 4P{sub {1/2}} transition while bound state radiative processes are detected by total fluorescence and laser absorption methods. Absolute predissociation rates are determined by Doppler-free linewidths. By scanning the Ti-sapphire laser, different ro-vibrational states can be reached allowing us to map out and identify the states, involved in the predissociation process.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of Na narrowband wind-temperature lidar systems.

    PubMed

    Papen, G C; Pfenninger, W M; Simonich, D M

    1995-01-20

    The performance and measurement accuracy of Na narrowband wind-temperature lidar systems are characterized. Error budgets are derived that include several effects not previously reported, such as power-dependent spectral characteristics in the frequency reference, magnetic-field-dependent oscillator line strengths (Hanle effect), saturation, and optical pumping. It is shown that the overall system uncertainty is dependent on the power, pulse temporal characteristics, and beam divergence of the laser transmitter. Results indicate that even systems with significant saturation can produce accurate measurements, which implies the prospect of continuous daytime wind and temperature measurements on semidiurnal and diurnal time periods.

  7. Stabilized Zeeman split laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of a stablized Zeeman split laser for use in a polarization profilometer is discussed. A Hewlett-Packard laser was modified to stabilize the Zeeman split beat frequency thereby increasing the phase measurement accuracy from the Hewlett-Packard 3 degrees to an accuracy of .01 degrees. The addition of a two layered inductive winding converts the laser to a current controlled oscillator whose frequency is linearly related to coil current. This linear relationship between coil current and laser frequency permits phase locking the laser frequency to a stable crystal controlled reference frequency. The stability of the system is examined and the equipment operation procedures are outlined.

  8. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  9. Chalcogenide glass microsphere laser.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Gregor R; Murugan, G Senthil; Wilkinson, James S; Zervas, Michalis N; Hewak, Daniel W

    2010-12-06

    Laser action has been demonstrated in chalcogenide glass microsphere. A sub millimeter neodymium-doped gallium lanthanum sulphide glass sphere was pumped at 808 nm with a laser diode and single and multimode laser action demonstrated at wavelengths between 1075 and 1086 nm. The gallium lanthanum sulphide family of glass offer higher thermal stability compared to other chalcogenide glasses, and this, along with an optimized Q-factor for the microcavity allowed laser action to be achieved. When varying the pump power, changes in the output spectrum suggest nonlinear and/or thermal effects have a strong effect on laser action.

  10. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  11. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  12. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  13. Laser assisted deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of laser-based processing techniques to solar cell metallization are discussed. Laser-assisted thermal or photolytic maskless deposition from organometallic vapors or solutions may provide a viable alternative to photovoltaic metallization systems currently in use. High power, defocused excimer lasers may be used in conjunction with masks as an alternative to direct laser writing to provide higher throughput. Repeated pulsing with excimer lasers may eliminate the need for secondary plating techniques for metal film buildup. A comparison between the thermal and photochemical deposition processes is made.

  14. Application of the Stark effect in NaK molecule to the determination of the local electric field in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Derouard, J.; Sadeghi, N.

    1986-08-01

    Electric-field-induced mixing between and f ..lambda.. doublet states of an NaK (B/sup 1/II) molecule has been used to determine the amplitude of the local electric field inside a discharge. This nonperturbative technique is based on the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of NaK (B-X) transition with a tunable CW laser. Electric fields of a few volts per centimeter up to several kilovolts per centimeter can be measured with a spatial resolution of 0.1 mm.

  15. Interaction of intense multi-picosecond laser pulses with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Andreas; Divol, Laurent; Cohen, Bruce

    2011-10-01

    We present new results on the two- and three-dimensional kinetic modeling of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of Petawatt pulses at the spatial and temporal scales relevant to current experiments. We address key questions such as characterizing the multi-picosecond evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, i.e., conversion efficiency as well as angular- and energy distribution; the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction; and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport. We will report applications to current experiments at LLNL's Titan laser and Omega EP, and to a Fast-Ignition point design. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Compositional Analysis of Drugs by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beldjilali, S. A.; Axente, E.; Belasri, A.; Baba-Hamed, T.; Hermann, J.

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility of the compositional analysis of drugs by calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was investigated using multivitamin tablets as a sample material. The plasma was produced by a frequencyquadrupled Nd:YAG laser delivering UV pulses with a duration of 5 ns and an energy of 12 mJ, operated at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The relative fractions of the elements composing the multivitamin drug were determined by comparing the emission spectrum of the laser-produced plume with the spectral radiance computed for a plasma in a local thermodynamic equilibrium. Fair agreement of the measured fractions with those given by the manufacturer was observed for all elements mentioned in the leafl et of the drug. Additional elements such as Ca, Na, Sr, Al, Li, K, and Si were detected and quantifi ed. The present investigations demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a viable technique for the quality control of drugs.

  17. Design of erbium doped double clad ZBLAN Fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladeji, A.; Phillips, A.; Lamrini, S.; Scholle, K.; Fuhrberg, P.; Seddon, A. B.; Benson, T. M.; Sujecki, S.

    2015-06-01

    A high powered octagonal double clad ZBLAN (33 μm/330 μm, NA=0.13) glass fibre for mid-infrared light generation is studied using a one dimensional rate equation model. The fibre laser design employs the concept of cascade lasing and includes up-conversion phenomena. The results obtained demonstrate that efficient cascade lasing may be achieved in practice without the need for fibre grating fabrication, as a sufficient level of feedback for laser action is provided by Fresnel light reflection at ZBLAN glass fibre air interfaces. Further enhancement of the laser efficiency can be achieved by terminating one of the fibre ends with a mirror. Simulation results show that the laser operation with 20 W of pump power at 0.98 μm wavelength can be achieved at 2.75 μm operating wavelength with Er3+ ion concentrations of 60,000 ppm.

  18. Plasma Jet Interaction with Thomson Scattering Probe Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byvank, Tom; Banasek, Jacob; Potter, William; Kusse, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering systems can diagnose plasma temperatures and velocities. When probing a plasma jet with the Thomson scattering laser, we observe a laser-plasma interaction that inputs energy into the plasma jet. The absorbed energy causes a bubble of low density ( 5*1017 cm-2) in the jet (unperturbed 1018 cm-2). A pulsed power machine (1 MA peak current, 100 ns rise time) with a radial foil (15 μm thick Al) configuration generates the plasma jet. We compare the effects of using 10 J and 1 J laser energies, for which the 10 J laser is a larger perturbation. We discuss how the interaction affects the Thomson scattering temperature and velocity measurements. Work supported by National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836 and National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant PHY-1102471.

  19. Lasers in otorhinolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais Clemente, Manuel P.

    1992-03-01

    Lasers are now commonly accepted and widely used surgical instruments in otorhinolaryngology. There have been a great number of technological advances with lasers that have contributed to the expansion of this new surgical modality with an increased number of medical applications. Surgical strategies have also changed and are more favorable toward conservative surgery in which less tissues is removed than with more radical resections. This combination of improving technology and medical attitudes has changed the field of otorhinolaryngology, and resulted in an expanding use of laser surgery. Since 1973 we have been using the carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of diseases of the upper aero digestive systems, learning this new surgical technique from the pioneer work of Strong, Jako, and Vaughan. It is our conviction that a laser surgeon must have a thorough knowledge of laser biophysics, instrumentation, safety protocols, and surgical indications, and have the technical skills to perform laser surgery. Laser technology continues to improve at an increased speed, and it is imperative to update knowledge of current and potential applications of lasers in our specialty. It is the purpose of this article to present our clinical experience of 18 years with the use of lasers in surgery of ORL, emphasizing the carbon dioxide laser.

  20. Evaluation of Direct Diode Laser Deposited Stainless Steel 316L on 4340 Steel Substrate for Aircraft Landing Gear Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2010-4149 EVALUATION OF DIRECT DIODE LASER DEPOSITED STAINLESS STEEL 316L ON 4340 STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR...March 2010 – 01 March 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EVALUATION OF DIRECT DIODE LASER DEPOSITED STAINLESS STEEL 316L ON 4340 STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR...Code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Evaluation of Direct Diode Laser Deposited Stainless Steel 316L on

  1. Micromachining with copper lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Martyn R. H.; Bell, Andy; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Rutterford, Graham; Chudzicki, J.; Kearsley, Andrew J.

    1997-04-01

    In recent years the copper laser has undergone extensive development and has emerged as a leading and unique laser for micromachining. The copper laser is a high average power (10 - 250 W), high pulse repetition rate (2 - 32 kHz), visible laser (511 nm and 578 nm) that produces high peak power (typically 200 kW), short pulses (30 ns) and very good beam quality (diffraction limited). This unique set of laser parameters results in exceptional micro-machining in a wide variety of materials. Typical examples of the capabilities of the copper laser include the drilling of small holes (10 - 200 micrometer diameter) in materials as diverse as steel, ceramic, diamond and polyimide with micron precision and low taper (less than 1 degree) cutting and profiling of diamond. Application of the copper laser covers the electronic, aerospace, automotive, nuclear, medical and precision engineering industries.

  2. Raman fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supradeepa, V. R.; Feng, Yan; Nicholson, Jeffrey W.

    2017-02-01

    High-power fiber lasers have seen tremendous development in the last decade, with output powers exceeding multiple kilowatts from a single fiber. Ytterbium has been at the forefront as the primary rare-earth-doped gain medium owing to its inherent material advantages. However, for this reason, the lasers are largely confined to the narrow emission wavelength region of ytterbium. Power scaling at other wavelength regions has lagged significantly, and a large number of applications rely upon the diversity of emission wavelengths. Currently, Raman fiber lasers are the only known wavelength agile, scalable, high-power fiber laser technology that can span the wavelength spectrum. In this review, we address the technology of Raman fiber lasers, specifically focused on the most recent developments. We will also discuss several applications of Raman fiber lasers in laser pumping, frequency conversion, optical communications and biology.

  3. Adiabatic Soliton Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakova, Anastasia; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2015-03-01

    The key to generating stable optical pulses is mastery of nonlinear light dynamics in laser resonators. Modern techniques to control the buildup of laser pulses are based on nonlinear science and include classical solitons, dissipative solitons, parabolic pulses (similaritons) and various modifications and blending of these methods. Fiber lasers offer remarkable opportunities to apply one-dimensional nonlinear science models for the design and optimization of very practical laser systems. Here, we propose a new concept of a laser based on the adiabatic amplification of a soliton pulse in the cavity—the adiabatic soliton laser. The adiabatic change of the soliton parameters during evolution in the resonator relaxes the restriction on the pulse energy inherent in traditional soliton lasers. Theoretical analysis is confirmed by extensive numerical modeling.

  4. Space qualified laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Frank; Schwander, Thomas; Lange, Robert; Smutny, Berry

    2006-04-01

    Tesat-Spacecom has developed a series of fiber coupled single frequency lasers for space applications ranging from onboard metrology for space borne FTIR spectrometers to step tunable seed lasers for LIDAR applications. The cw-seed laser developed for the ESA AEOLUS Mission shows a 3* 10 -11 Allen variance from 1 sec time intervals up to 1000 sec. Q-switched lasers with stable beam pointing under space environments are another field of development. One important aspect of a space borne laser system is a reliable fiber coupled laser diode pump source around 808nm. A dedicated development concerning chip design and packaging yielded in a 5*10 6h MTTF (mean time to failure) for the broad area emitters. Qualification and performance test results for the different laser assemblies will be presented and their application in the different space programs.

  5. Lasers in orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Nalcaci, Ruhi; Cokakoglu, Serpil

    2013-01-01

    Many types of dental lasers are currently available that can be efficiently used for soft and hard tissue applications in the field of orthodontics. For achieving the desired effects in the target tissue, knowledge of laser characteristics such as power, wavelength and timing, is necessary. Laser therapy is advantageous because it often avoids bleeding, can be pain free, is non-invasive and is relatively quick. The high cost is its primary disadvantage. It is very important to take the necessary precautions to prevent possible tissue damage when using laser dental systems. Here, we reviewed the main types and characteristics of laser systems used in dental practice and discuss the applications of lasers in orthodontics, harmful effects and laser system safety. PMID:24966719

  6. Laser Applications in Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Somayeh; Torkan, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    A laser is a collimated single wavelength of light which delivers a concentrated source of energy. Soon after different types of lasers were invented, investigators began to examine the effects of different wavelengths of laser energy on oral tissues, routine dental procedures and experimental applications. Orthodontists, along with other specialist in different fields of dentistry, can now benefit from several different advantages that lasers provide during the treatment process, from the beginning of the treatment, when separators are placed, to the time of resin residues removal from the tooth surface at the end of orthodontic treatment. This article outlines some of the most common usages of laser beam in orthodontics and also provides a comparison between laser and other conventional method that were the standard of care prior to the advent of laser in this field. PMID:25606324

  7. Laser aircraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Sun, K.

    1978-01-01

    The concept of using a high energy continuous wave laser beam from a power satellite in geosynchronous orbit to power a commercial air transport during cruise, i.e., a laser-powered airplane, is examined. These studies indicate that a laser powered airplane is a nearly fuelless and pollution-free flight transportation system which is cost competitive with the fuel conservative air transport of the future. This laser flight system involves the integration of a conventional aircraft with a laser power satellite and a set of laser driven turbofans, all of which can be fabricated with existing or projected technology. The dominant cost of the laser-powered flight transportation system is the cost of the power satellite.

  8. Lasers in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Ulrich

    1991-11-01

    The infrared-laser systems like the Er:YAG, the cw CO2, the Nd:YAG, and the UV- excimer lasers are being investigated for preparing tooth-hard substances. The infrared lasers cause thermal damage to the enamel, the dentin, and the pulp with the exception of the Er:YAG laser. No thermal damage occurs using the Er:YAG laser under practical conditions because of the special thermomechanical ablation process. The ablation rates of the UV- excimer lasers are to low for practical use. Enhancing the ablation efficiency by high- repetition rates causes thermal side effects to occur. Therefore, only the Er:YAG laser has the potential to partially replace the mechanical drill.

  9. Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprangle, Philip; Ting, Antonio; Esarey, Eric; Fisher, Amon; Mourou, Gerald

    1993-02-01

    The Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS) utilizes a high peak power or high average power laser to generate within a vacuum chamber a laser beam travelling in one direction to interact with an electron beam traveling in an opposite direction in order to generate high-power x-rays. A ring resonator formed by a plurality of mirrors directs the laser beam in a closed loop to impact with the electron beam to produce x-rays. Concave mirrors in the ring resonator focus the laser beam upon the point where the laser beam interacts with the electron beam to intensify the laser energy at that point. When a Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator (RF linac) is used to produce the electron beam, x-rays having a short pulse length are generated. When a betatron is used as an electron source, x-rays having a long pulse length are generated.

  10. Lasers in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Mavrogiannis, M; Thomason, J M; Seymour, R A

    2004-11-01

    Since the development of the ruby laser by Maiman in 1960, lasers have been widely employed in medicine for a number of years. The purpose of this paper is to summarize potential applications for lasers in dentistry, with special regard to periodontology. This article briefly describes clinical applications of lasers and laser safety. Particularly, the use of a diode laser seems to be promising, especially in already compromised transplant patients, who need to be treated with a technique where the operative and post-operative blood loss, post-operative discomfort and the recurrence of drug-induced gingival overgrowth need to be kept to a minimum or eliminated. Therefore, the use of lasers in periodontology may lead to an alteration in present clinical practice and help to establish the best management strategy because, by maintaining periodontal health, the life quality of patients can be improved.

  11. Laser physics and physiology.

    PubMed

    Pierce, L A

    1997-01-01

    Laser light begins when an excited and unstable electron moves from its unstable state back to a more stable state producing energy in the form of a photon. Laser light is coherent which means that the light waves move in phase together in space and time. Laser light is monochromatic which means it is comprised of only one color or wavelength. Laser light is also collimated which means it is perfectly parallel and travels in a single direction with very little divergence. Medical lasers fall in the infrared and visible as well as ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and are available at different wavelengths. The wavelength of each laser partially determines the effect it will have on tissue. A specific wavelength or color can be used to selectively target a specific tissue such as hemoglobin, water, or melanin. Heat is produced by the laser, destroying the targeted tissues.

  12. Lasers in oral surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Ulrich; Hibst, Raimund

    1994-12-01

    The indications of lasers in oral surgery are defined by the laser-tissue interaction types. These are mainly thermal effects depending especially on the absorption of laser light in varying biological tissues. In histological sections different laser effects are demonstrated on oral mucosa, bone and cartilage, which have a great influence on wound healing and subsequently on clinical indications of the different wavelengths. On the one hand the good coagulation effect of the Nd:YAG laser is wanted for hemostasis in soft tissue surgery. On the other hand, for the treatment of precancerous dysplasias or neoplasias an effective cutting with a coagulation effect like using the CO2 laser is necessary. However, the excision of benign mucosal lesions as well as performing osteotomies or shaping of cartilage should be undertaken with the Er:YAG laser without greater coagulation and consequently without any delay of wound healing.

  13. Nanofabrication with pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Kabashin, Av; Delaporte, Ph; Pereira, A; Grojo, D; Torres, R; Sarnet, Th; Sentis, M

    2010-02-24

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser-matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics.

  14. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  15. Laser safety in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.

    1997-05-01

    One of the major causes of anxiety in the dental clinic is the dental handpiece. Because dentists wish to provide a method which can replace the drill there has often been a premature use of the laser in dentistry. Various lasers have been introduced into the clinic before research has shown the laser used is of clinical benefit. Any new treatment method must not compromise the health of the patient being treated. Thus a method of evaluating the clinical abilities of dentists and their understanding the limitations of the laser used must be developed. Dentist must be trained in the basic interaction of the laser on oral tissues. The training has to concentrate on the variation of the laser wavelength absorption in the different tissues of the oral cavity. Because of the differences in the optical properties of these tissues great care must be exercised by practitioners using lasers on patients.

  16. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  17. Laser surgery: using the carbon dioxide laser.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V. C.

    1982-01-01

    In 1917 Einstein theorized tha through an atomic process a unique kind of electromagnetic radiation could be produced by stimulated emission. When such radiation is in the optical or infrared spectrum it is termed laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) light. A laser, a high-intensity light source, emits a nearly parallel electromagnetic beam of energy at a given wavelength that can be captured by a lens and concentrated in the focal spot. The wavelength determines how the laser will be used. The carbon dioxide laser is now successfully employed for some surgical procedures in gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, neurosurgery, and plastic and general surgery. The CO2 laser beam is directed through the viewing system of an operating microscope or through a hand-held laser component. Its basic action in tissue is thermal vaporization; it causes minimal damage to adjacent tissues. Surgeons require special training in the basic methods and techniques of laser surgery, as well as in the safety standards that must be observed. Images FIG. 5 PMID:7074503

  18. Lasers in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Forbes, A.; Bingham, R.; Kellett, B. J.; Mathye, A.

    2008-05-01

    A variety of laser applications in space, past, present, future and far future are reviewed together with the contributions of some of the scientists and engineers involved, especially those that happen to have South African connections. Historically, two of the earliest laser applications in space, were atmospheric LIDAR and lunar ranging. These applications involved atmospheric physicists, several astronauts and many of the staff recruited into the Soviet and North American lunar exploration programmes. There is a strong interest in South Africa in both LIDAR and lunar ranging. Shortly after the birth of the laser (and even just prior) theoretical work on photonic propulsion and space propulsion by laser ablation was initiated by Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz and Eugen Saenger. Present or near future experimental programs are developing in the following fields: laser ablation propulsion, possibly coupled with rail gun or gas gun propulsion; interplanetary laser transmission; laser altimetry; gravity wave detection by space based Michelson interferometry; the de-orbiting of space debris by high power lasers; atom laser interferometry in space. Far future applications of laser-photonic space-propulsion were also pioneered by Carl Sagan and Robert Forward. They envisaged means of putting Saenger's ideas into practice. Forward also invented a laser based method for manufacturing solid antimatter or SANTIM, well before the ongoing experiments at CERN with anti-hydrogen production and laser-trapping. SANTIM would be an ideal propellant for interstellar missions if it could be manufactured in sufficient quantities. It would be equally useful as a power source for the transmission of information over light year distances. We briefly mention military lasers. Last but not least, we address naturally occurring lasers in space and pose the question: "did the Big Bang lase?"

  19. Na+ recirculation and isosmotic transport.

    PubMed

    Larsen, E H; Møbjerg, N

    2006-01-01

    The Na(+) recirculation theory for solute-coupled fluid absorption is an expansion of the local osmosis concept introduced by Curran and analyzed by Diamond & Bossert. Based on studies on small intestine the theory assumes that the observed recirculation of Na(+) serves regulation of the osmolarity of the absorbate. Mathematical modeling reproducing bioelectric and hydrosmotic properties of small intestine and proximal tubule, respectively, predicts a significant range of observations such as isosmotic transport, hyposmotic transport, solvent drag, anomalous solvent drag, the residual hydraulic permeability in proximal tubule of AQP1 (-/-) mice, and the inverse relationship between hydraulic permeability and the concentration difference needed to reverse transepithelial water flow. The model reproduces the volume responses of cells and lateral intercellular space (lis) following replacement of luminal NaCl by sucrose as well as the linear dependence of volume absorption on luminal NaCl concentration. Analysis of solvent drag on Na(+) in tight junctions provides explanation for the surprisingly high metabolic efficiency of Na(+) reabsorption. The model predicts and explains low metabolic efficiency in diluted external baths. Hyperosmolarity of lis is governed by the hydraulic permeability of the apical plasma membrane and tight junction with 6-7 mOsm in small intestine and < or = 1 mOsm in proximal tubule. Truly isosmotic transport demands a Na(+) recirculation of 50-70% in small intestine but might be barely measurable in proximal tubule. The model fails to reproduce a certain type of observations: The reduced volume absorption at transepithelial osmotic equilibrium in AQP1 knockout mice, and the stimulated water absorption by gallbladder in diluted external solutions. Thus, it indicates cellular regulation of apical Na(+) uptake, which is not included in the mathematical treatment.

  20. Pump-probe imaging of nanosecond laser-induced bubbles in distilled water solutions: Observations of laser-produced-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.; Camacho-Lopez, S.

    2010-11-15

    This article presents the analysis of the laser-produced-plasma (LPP) formed by the focusing of a 9 ns laser pulse, {lambda}=532 nm, with a NA=0.6 aspherical lens using energies between 100-1500 {mu}J, into distilled water with varying solutions of table salt. Observations of the filamentation plasma were made, which are explained by self-focusing of the laser pulse by the LPP through ponderomotive cavitation of the electron plasma in the center of the beam. The filamentation of the beam through a low density plasma wave guide explains why the transmission of the pump laser through the interaction region was notably higher on previous experiments that we performed [R. Evans et al., Opt. Express 16, 7481 (2008)], than a very similar set of experiments performed by Noack and Vogel [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 35, 1156 (1999)].

  1. Pump-probe imaging of nanosecond laser-induced bubbles in distilled water solutions: Observations of laser-produced-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R.; Camacho-López, S.

    2010-11-01

    This article presents the analysis of the laser-produced-plasma (LPP) formed by the focusing of a 9 ns laser pulse, λ =532 nm, with a NA=0.6 aspherical lens using energies between 100-1500 μJ, into distilled water with varying solutions of table salt. Observations of the filamentation plasma were made, which are explained by self-focusing of the laser pulse by the LPP through ponderomotive cavitation of the electron plasma in the center of the beam. The filamentation of the beam through a low density plasma wave guide explains why the transmission of the pump laser through the interaction region was notably higher on previous experiments that we performed [R. Evans et al., Opt. Express 16, 7481 (2008)], than a very similar set of experiments performed by Noack and Vogel [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 35, 1156 (1999)].

  2. Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity by Diode Laser: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Umberto, Romeo; Claudia, Russo; Gaspare, Palaia; Gianluca, Tenore; Alessandro, Del Vecchio

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is characterized by pain after stimuli that usually provoke no symptoms. This study compared the effectiveness of GaAlAs diode laser alone and with topical sodium fluoride gel (NaF). Materials and Methods. The study was conducted on 10 patients (8 F/2 M, age 25–60) and 115 teeth with DH assessed by air and tactile stimuli measured by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Teeth were randomly divided into G1 (34 teeth) treated by 1.25% NaF; G2 (33 teeth) lased at 0.5 W PW (T on 100 m and T off 100 ms), fluence 62.2 J/cm2 in defocused mode with a 320 μ fiber. Each tooth received three 1′ applications; G3 (48 teeth) received NaF gel plus laser at same G2 parameters. NRS was checked at each control. Results. Significant pain reduction was showed. The NRS reduction percentages were calculated, and there was a concrete decrease of DH above all in G3 than G2 and G1. Conclusion. Diode laser is a useful device for DH treatment if used alone and mainly if used with NaF gel. PMID:22792109

  3. Treatment of dentine hypersensitivity by diode laser: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Umberto, Romeo; Claudia, Russo; Gaspare, Palaia; Gianluca, Tenore; Alessandro, Del Vecchio

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is characterized by pain after stimuli that usually provoke no symptoms. This study compared the effectiveness of GaAlAs diode laser alone and with topical sodium fluoride gel (NaF). Materials and Methods. The study was conducted on 10 patients (8 F/2 M, age 25-60) and 115 teeth with DH assessed by air and tactile stimuli measured by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Teeth were randomly divided into G1 (34 teeth) treated by 1.25% NaF; G2 (33 teeth) lased at 0.5 W PW (T on 100 m and T off 100 ms), fluence 62.2 J/cm(2) in defocused mode with a 320 μ fiber. Each tooth received three 1' applications; G3 (48 teeth) received NaF gel plus laser at same G2 parameters. NRS was checked at each control. Results. Significant pain reduction was showed. The NRS reduction percentages were calculated, and there was a concrete decrease of DH above all in G3 than G2 and G1. Conclusion. Diode laser is a useful device for DH treatment if used alone and mainly if used with NaF gel.

  4. Femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, Alexey A.; Golik, Sergey S.

    2013-09-01

    The composition of the line and band spectra of the plasma induced by a femtosecond laser pulse on the surface of sea water is determined. The temporal behaviors of the intensity of the continuum and the Ca II, Mg II and Na I lines are investigated. It is shown that the time dependence of the intensity of the Na I line is described by a monoexponential function. The characteristic decay times of the line intensities of Mg II and Na I were used to estimate the three-body recombination times. Using these values, we estimate the electron number density and the feasibility of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) criterion. A method involving excitation rate constants is proposed for the comparison of detection limits. For a plasma generated on a liquid surface, the following relation among detection limits will be obtained: LOD(Na) < LOD(K) < LOD(Ca) < LOD(Al) < LOD(Mg) < LOD(Zn).

  5. Tunable Plasma-Wave Laser Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromage, J.; Haberberger, D.; Davies, A.; Bucht, S.; Zuegel, J. D.; Froula, D. H.; Trines, R.; Bingham, R.; Sadler, J.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Raman amplification is a process by which a long energetic pump pulse transfers its energy to a counter-propagating short seed pulse through a resonant electron plasma wave. Since its conception, theory and simulations have shown exciting results with up to tens of percent of energy transfer from the pump to the seed pulse. However, experiments have yet to surpass transfer efficiencies of a few percent. A review of past literature shows that largely chirped pump pulses and finite temperature wave breaking could have been the two most detrimental effects. A Raman amplification platform is being developed at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics where a combination of a high-intensity tunable seed laser with sophisticated plasma diagnostics (dynamic Thomson scattering) will make it possible to find the optimal parameter space for high-energy transfer. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  6. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Comstock, Matthew

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  7. Laser Channeling in an Inhomogeneous Plasma for Fast-Ignition Laser Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, S.; Haberberger, D.; Theobald, W.; Anderson, K. S.; Froula, D. H.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Tanaka, K.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.

    2014-10-01

    The evacuation of a plasma cavity by a high-intensity laser beam is of practical importance to the channeling fast-ignition concept. The channel in the plasma corona of an imploded inertial confinement fusion capsule provides a clear path through the plasma so that the energy from a second high-intensity laser can be deposited close to the dense core of the assembled fuel to achieve ignition. This study reports on experiments that demonstrate the transport of high-intensity (>1017 W/cm2) laser light through an inhomogeneous kilojoule-laser-produced plasma up to overcritical density. The multikilojoule high-intensity light evacuates a cavity inside the focal spot, leaving a parabolic trough that is observed using a novel optical probing technique--angular filter refractometery. The cavity forms in less than 100 ps using a 20-TW laser pulse and bores at a velocity of ~ 2 μm/ps. The experimentally measured depths of the cavity are consistent with a ponderomotive hole-boring model. The experiments show that 100-ps IR pulses with an intensity of ~ 5 ×1017 W/cm2 produced a channel up to the critical density, while 10-ps pulses with the same energy but higher intensity did not propagate as far. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Laser Shock-Induced Spalling in Tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Tane; Wehrenberg, Christopher; Maddox, Brian; Swift, Damien; Remington, Bruce; Meyers, Marc; UCSD Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    The processes of dynamic failure by spalling were established in nano, poly, and mono crystalline tantalum in recovery experiments following laser compression and release. Samples were compressed over a range of energies varying from 50 to 120 J/mm2 and initial duration of 3 ns. The waves were allowed to reflect at the back surface (specimen thickness: 250 um) and the process of separation was characterized by different techniques: optical microscopy, SEM, and microcomputerized tomography. Additionally, the pull back signal was measured by VISAR and the pressure decay compared with HYADES simulations. There are clear differences in the microscopic fracture mechanisms, dictated by the grain sizes. In the nano and polycrystals, spalling occurred by ductile fracture favoring grain boundaries. In the monocrystals, these are absent, and the process was of ductile failure by void initiation, growth and coalescence. The spall strengths in laser experiments are compared with those in experiments at much larger durations (us regime). Work performed at the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This research is funded by the UC Research Laboratories Grant (09-LR-06-118456-MEYM) and the National Laser Users Facility (NLUF) Grant (PE-FG52-09NA-29043).

  9. Laser Absorption by Over-Critical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J.; Tonge, J.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Mori, W. B.

    2015-11-01

    Absorption of high intensity laser light by matter has important applications to emerging sciences and technology, such as Fast Ignition ICF and ion acceleration. As such, understanding the underlying mechanisms of this absorption is key to developing these technologies. Critical features which distinguish the interaction of high intensity light - defined here as a laser field having a normalized vector potential greater than unity - are that the reaction of the material to the fields results in sharp high-density interfaces; and that the movement of the electrons is in general relativistic, both in a fluid and a thermal sense. The results of these features are that the absorption mechanisms are qualitatively distinct from those at lower intensities. We will review previous work, by our group and others, on the absorption mechanisms, and highlight current research. We will show that the standing wave structure of the reflected laser light is key to particle dynamics for normally incident lasers. The authors acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy under contract DE-NA 0001833 and the National Science Foundation under contract ACI 1339893.

  10. Photobiomodulation in laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Rong, Dong-Liang; Huang, Jin; Deng, Xiao-Yuan; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    Laser surgery provides good exposure with clear operating fields and satisfactory preliminary functional results. In contrast to conventional excision, it was found that matrix metalloproteinases and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases -1 mRNA expression is higher, myofibroblasts appeared and disappeared slower in laser excision wounds. It has been suggested that the better anatomical and functional results achieved following laser cordectomy may be explained by the fact that such procedures result in better, more rapid healing processes to recover vocal cord for early glottic tumors and better. In this paper, the role of photobiomodulation in laser surgery will be discussed by the cultured monolayer normal human skin fibroblast model of the photobiomodulation of marginal irradiation of high intensity laser beam, the photobiomodulation related to the irradiated tissue, the biological information model of photobiomodulation and the animal models of laser surgery. Although high intensity laser beam is so intense that it destroys the irradiated cells or tissue, its marginal irradiation intensity is so low that there is photobiomodulation on non-damage cells to modulate the regeneration of partly damaged tissue so that the surgery of laser of different parameters results in different post-surgical recovery. It was concluded that photobiomodulation might play an important role in the long-term effects of laser surgery, which might be used to design laser surgery.

  11. Frequency comb swept lasers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2009-11-09

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a approximately -1.2dB sensitivity roll off over approximately 3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have -10dB and -5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0-3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed.

  12. Laser treatment in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2004-07-01

    This presentation is designed as a brief overview of laser use in gynecology, for non-medical researchers involved in development of new laser techniques. The literature of the past decade is reviewed. Differences in penetration, absorption, and suitable delivery media for the beams dictate clinical application. The use of CO2 laser in the treatment of uterine cervical intraepithelial lesions is well established and indications as well as techniques have not changed over 30 years. The Cochrane Systematic Review from 2000 suggests no obviously superior technique. CO2 laser ablation of the vagina is also established as a safe treatment modality for VAIN. CO2 laser permits treatment of lesions with excellent cosmetic and functional results. The treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding by destruction of the endometrial lining using various techniques has been the subject of a 2002 Cochran Database Review. Among the compared treatment modalities are newer and modified laser techniques. Conclusion by reviewers is that outcomes and complication profiles of newer techniques compare favorably with the gold standard of endometrial resection. The ELITT diode laser system is one of the new successful additions. CO2 laser is also the dominant laser type used with laparoscopy for ablation of endometriotic implants. Myoma coagulation or myolysis with Nd:Yag laser through the laparoscope or hysteroscope is a conservative treatment option. Even MRI guided percutaneous approaches have been described. No long-term data are available.

  13. Frequency comb swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a ~−1.2dB sensitivity roll off over ~3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have −10dB and −5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0–3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed. PMID:19997365

  14. Metallic Clusters in Strong Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suraud, Eric; Reinhard, P.-G.; Ullrich, Carsten A.

    1998-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electron response of a Na_9^+ cluster excited by strong femtosecond laser pulses.(C. A. Ullrich, P.-G. Reinhard, and E. Suraud, J. Phys. B 30), 5043 (1997) Our approach is based on time-dependent density functional theory within the adiabatic local density approximation, including a recently developed self-interaction correction scheme. We investigate numerically the full electronic dipolar response and multiphoton ionization of the cluster and discuss the ionization mechanism. A strong correlation between induced electronic dipole oscillations and electron emission is observed, leading to a pronounced resonant enhancement of ionization at the frequency of the Mie plasmon.

  15. In vitro assessment of the acid resistance of demineralized enamel irradiated with Er, Cr:YSGG and Nd:YAG lasers.

    PubMed

    Santos, Diones M; Nogueira, Ruchele D; Lepri, Cesar P; Gonçalves, Luciano S; Palma-Dibb, Regina G; Geraldo-Martins, Vinícius R

    2014-01-01

    This study's purpose was to evaluate the acid resistance of demineralized enamel irradiated with high-intensity lasers. Enamel fragments were demineralized and treated as follows (N=10): Group 1-no treatment; Group 2-five percent sodium fluoride (NaF) varnish; Group 3-Er, Cr:YSGG laser (8.92 J/cm2, 0.5 W, 20 Hz, 30 seconds); Group 4-NaF and Er, Cr:YSGG laser; Group 5-Er, Cr:YSGG laser and NaF; Group 6-Nd:YAG laser (84.9 J/cm2, 0.5 W, 10 Hz, 30 seconds); Group 7-NaF and Nd:YAG laser; and Group 8-Nd:YAG laser and NaF. The samples were subjected to pH-cycling and assessed by microhardness (analysis of variance; α equals five percent) at different depths from the outer enamel surface. Samples were observed using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). There were no significant differences among the experimental groups in any of the subsurface layers evaluated. PLM observation revealed that the extent of demineralization of the irradiated samples was similar to the samples for Group 1 (control). SEM observation showed that irradiated surfaces were ablated and presented areas of melting. Laser irradiation, with or without applying five percent sodium fluoride, was not capable of increasing the enamel white spot lesions' acid resistance.

  16. Lasers in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qian; Juzeniene, Asta; Chen, Jiyao; Svaasand, Lars O.; Warloe, Trond; Giercksky, Karl-Erik; Moan, Johan

    2008-05-01

    It is hard to imagine that a narrow, one-way, coherent, moving, amplified beam of light fired by excited atoms is powerful enough to slice through steel. In 1917, Albert Einstein speculated that under certain conditions atoms could absorb light and be stimulated to shed their borrowed energy. Charles Townes coined the term laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) in 1951. Theodore Maiman investigated the glare of a flash lamp in a rod of synthetic ruby, creating the first human-made laser in 1960. The laser involves exciting atoms and passing them through a medium such as crystal, gas or liquid. As the cascade of photon energy sweeps through the medium, bouncing off mirrors, it is reflected back and forth, and gains energy to produce a high wattage beam of light. Although lasers are today used by a large variety of professions, one of the most meaningful applications of laser technology has been through its use in medicine. Being faster and less invasive with a high precision, lasers have penetrated into most medical disciplines during the last half century including dermatology, ophthalmology, dentistry, otolaryngology, gastroenterology, urology, gynaecology, cardiology, neurosurgery and orthopaedics. In many ways the laser has revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of a disease. As a surgical tool the laser is capable of three basic functions. When focused on a point it can cauterize deeply as it cuts, reducing the surgical trauma caused by a knife. It can vaporize the surface of a tissue. Or, through optical fibres, it can permit a doctor to see inside the body. Lasers have also become an indispensable tool in biological applications from high-resolution microscopy to subcellular nanosurgery. Indeed, medical lasers are a prime example of how the movement of an idea can truly change the medical world. This review will survey various applications of lasers in medicine including four major categories: types of lasers, laser

  17. Ultra-relativistic laser-plasma interaction and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Yuan

    2011-10-01

    Relativistic laser-plasma interaction (LPI) is of broad interest in modern physics, with applications ranging from particle acceleration, laboratory astrophysics, to fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion. LPI is a highly dynamic process, especially in the relativistic regime. The plasma conditions evolve rapidly upon intense laser irradiation, which modifies laser absorption and energy partition. This talk summarizes recent advances in understanding laser absorption and dynamics of ultra-relativistic LPI. It is found that the total absorption of laser pulses by solid targets is strongly enhanced in the ultra-relativistic regime, reaching a surprisingly high level of ~90% at intensities above 1020 W / cm2 . Both presence of preplasma and hole boring contribute to the high absorption. The dynamics of hole boring is studied with a novel single-shot time-resolved diagnostic based on Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG). Time history of the Doppler shift in the reflected light indicates that ponderomotive steepening occurs rapidly and majority of the laser pulse interacts with a sharpened density profile. Two-dimensional (2D) Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation results agree well with measurements for short pulses (<5 ps), however discrepancy showing up after 5ps for longer pulses, indicating 3D effect starts to play a role. In case of high-contrast laser pulses interacting with solid targets, the preplasma is minimal and the delicate competition between plasma creation and ponderomotive pushing results in a snake-like structure in the reflected spectrum. Finally, the talk will briefly cover potential schemes utilizing LPI as an amplification process of laser pulses for next-generation laser systems, which could enable ``vacuum boiling'' laser intensities for future experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Mid-infrared high-power diode lasers and modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, Márc T.; Gilly, Juergen; Rattunde, Marcel; Wagner, Joachim; Ahlert, Sandra; Biesenbach, Jens

    2010-02-01

    High-power diode lasers in the mid-infrared wavelength range between 1.8μm and 2.3μm have emerged new possibilities for applications like processing and accelerated drying of materials, medical surgery, infrared countermeasures or for pumping of solid-state and semiconductor disc lasers. We will present results on MBE grown (AlGaIn)(AsSb) quantum-well diode laser single emitters with emitter widths between 90μm and 200μm. In addition laser bars with 20% or 30% fill factor have been processed. More than 30% maximum wall-plug efficiency in cw operation for single emitters and laser bars has been reached. Even at 2200nm more than 15W have been demonstrated with a 30% fill factor bar. Due to an increasing interest in pulsed operation modes for these mid-infrared lasers, we have investigated single emitters and laser bars at 1940nm for different pulse times and duty cycles. More than 9W have been measured at 30A with 500ns pulse time and 1% duty cycle without COMD for a single emitter. Most applications mentioned before need fiber coupled output power, therefore fiber coupled modules based on single emitters or laser bars have been developed. Single-emitter based modules show 600mW out of a 200μm core fiber with NA=0.22 at different wavelengths between 1870nm and 1940nm. At 2200nm an output power of 450mW ex fiber impressively demonstrates the potential of GaSb based diode lasers well beyond wavelengths of 2μm. Combining several laser bars, 20W out of a 600μm core fiber have been established at 1870nm. Finally for a 7 bar stack at 1870nm we have demonstrated more than 85W at 50A in qcw mode.

  19. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 88, March - April 1987.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-03

    Effects ; Laser Communications,’ Laser Beam Propagation; Adaptive Optics,’ Laser Computer Technology; Holography,; Laser Chemical Effects ; Laser...Parameters, Laser Measuremen Applications; Laser4Excited Optical Effects , Laser Spectroscopy, Laser Be :Target Interaction; Laser Plasma , 20. ABSTRACT This...theoretical aspects of advanced lasers; and general laser theory. Laser applications are listed under biological effects ; communications systems; beam

  20. Laser refrigeration of rare-earth doped sodium-yttrium-fluoride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xuezhe; Roder, Paden B.; Smith, Bennett E.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2017-02-01

    Hexagonal sodium yttrium fluoride (β-NaYF4) crystals are currently being studied for a wide range of applications including color displays, solar cells, photocatalysis, and bio-imagβing. β-NaYF4 has also been predicted to be a promising host material for laser refrigeration of solids. However, due to challenges with growing Czochralski β- NaYF4 single-crystals, laser refrigeration of bulk β-NaYF4 has not yet been achieved6. Recently hydrothermal processing has been reported to produce Yb-doped β-NaYF4 nanowires (NWs) that undergo laser refrigeration during single-beam optical trapping experiments in heavy water. The local refrigeration of the individual nanowire is quantified through the analysis of its Brownian motion through the analysis of forward scattered light that is focused onto a quadrant photodiode. The individual β-NaYF4 nanowires show maximum local cooling of 9°C below ambient conditions. Here we present the emission lifetime for the 4S3/2 - 4I15/2 transition for Er(III) ions in Yb/Er-codoped -NaYF4 NW ensembles was measured to be (220 +/- 6) μs using a an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) as a detector with high spatial resolution. This lifetime is consistent with values reported in the literature.

  1. Laser Safety Inspection Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2005-02-11

    A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser safety audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe use of Lasers references this requirement in several sections: (1) Section 1.3.2 LSO Specific Responsibilities states under Hazard Evaluation, ''The LSO shall be responsible for hazards evaluation of laser work areas''; (2) Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''; and (3) Appendix D, under Survey and Inspections, it states, ''the LSO will survey by inspection, as considered necessary, all areas where laser equipment is used''. Therefore, for facilities using Class 3B and or Class 4 lasers, audits for laser safety compliance are expected to be conducted. The composition, frequency and rigueur of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms. In many institutions, a sole Laser Safety Officer (LSO) or a number of Deputy LSO's perform these audits. For that matter, there are institutions that request users to perform a self-assessment audit. Many items on the common audit list and the associated findings are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the LSO or auditor in particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage is an example; to one set of eyes a particular arrangement might be completely adequate, while to another the installation may be inadequate. In order to provide more consistency, the National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (NIF-LLNL) has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. These criteria are distributed to laser users, and they serve two broad purposes: first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor, and second, it is an

  2. Photodynamic Therapy Mediated by a Novel Chlorin Derivative, TONS 501-Na, in EMT6 cells.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Tomohiro; Sakata, Isao; Uto, Yoshihiro; Azuma, Kazuo; Murahata, Yusuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Itoh, Norihiko; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2017-04-01

    The lipophilic photosensitizer, TONS 501, is a novel porphyrin-derived methyl ester that was developed for photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy. This study developed a hydrophilic and anionic porphyrin salt of this compound (TONS 501-Na) for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT). This chlorin derivative is synthesized from the protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester. We investigated the in vitro cytotoxic effects of TONS 501-Na-mediated PDT on EMT6 mouse breast cancer cells. EMT6 cells were incubated with 0-100 μg/ml TONS 501-Na for 24 h prior to replacing the culture medium and exposing the cells to 6 mW/cm(2) diode laser irradiation at 0-13 J/cm(2) to induce PDT. Morphological changes and cell viability were evaluated 24 h after PDT. The percentages of apoptotic cells were evaluated 4 h and 24 h after PDT. The concentrations of TONS 501-Na that killed 50% of EMT6 cells after exposure to light doses of 0, 0.4, 3, 6, or 13 J/cm(2) were 84.6, 33.2, 18, 8.2, and 2.2 μg/ml, respectively. Tumor cells exposed to PDT showed chromatin condensation and fragmentation. The percentages of apoptotic cells increased in a TONS 501-Na concentration-dependent manner in the PDT group, and were significantly higher than those in the control group or in cells treated with TONS 501-Na or laser irradiation alone. TONS 501-Na-mediated PDT induced mouse breast cancer cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Future studies should evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and photodynamic effects of TONS 501-Na. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser–matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics. PMID:20672069

  4. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser.

    PubMed

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-29

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M(2) reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  5. Photonic crystal microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, D.; Koliadenko, V.; Purlys, V.; Peckus, M.; Taranenko, V.; Staliunas, K.

    2017-02-01

    The microchip lasers, being sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam, strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here we propose that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. We experimentally show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by factor of 2, and thus increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 4. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial high brightness radiation.

  6. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  7. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, Stanley E.

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  8. Lasers in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-01-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20th century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics. PMID:23066266

  9. Laser plasmadynamic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1976-01-01

    The generation of electrons ions by interacting an intense laser beam with cesium vapor is considered. Theoretical calculation shows that the conversion efficiency is as high as 40 percent if the entire photon energy is utilized in ionizing the cesium vapor that is generated initially by the incoming laser beam. An output voltage is expected to be generated across two electrodes, one of which is the liquid cesium, by keeping the other electrode at a different work function. Evaluation of the laser plasmadynamic (LPD) converter was performed using pulsed ruby and Nd-glass lasers. Although the results obtained to date indicate an efficiency smaller than that of theoretical predictions, an unoptimized LPD converter did demonstrate the capability of converting laser energy at large power levels. The limitations in the performance may by due to converter geometry, the types of lasers used, and other limitations inherent to the cesium plasma.

  10. Pulsed excimer laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D.

    1985-06-01

    The status of pulsed excimer laser processing of PV cells is presented. The cost effective feasibility of fabricating high efficiency solar cells on Czochralski wafers using a pulsed excimer laser for junction formation, surface passivation, and front metallization. Laser annealing results were promising with the best AR coated cell having an efficiency of 16.1%. Better results would be expected with larger laser spot size because there was some degradation in open circuit voltage caused by laser spot overlap and edge effects. Surface heating and photolytic decomposition by the laser was used to deposit tungsten from the reaction of tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen. The line widths were 5 to 10 mils, and the depositions passed the tape adhesion test. Thinner lines are practical using an optimized optical system.

  11. Pulsed excimer laser processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, D.

    1985-01-01

    The status of pulsed excimer laser processing of PV cells is presented. The cost effective feasibility of fabricating high efficiency solar cells on Czochralski wafers using a pulsed excimer laser for junction formation, surface passivation, and front metallization. Laser annealing results were promising with the best AR coated cell having an efficiency of 16.1%. Better results would be expected with larger laser spot size because there was some degradation in open circuit voltage caused by laser spot overlap and edge effects. Surface heating and photolytic decomposition by the laser was used to deposit tungsten from the reaction of tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen. The line widths were 5 to 10 mils, and the depositions passed the tape adhesion test. Thinner lines are practical using an optimized optical system.

  12. Laser materials production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianinoni, I.; Musci, M.

    1985-09-01

    The characteristics and the perspectives of the new photochemical laser techniques for materials production will be briefly analysed and some recent experimental results both on large area deposition of thin films and on synthesis of powders will be reported. As an example of an IR laser process, the cw CO 2 laser-induced deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon will be described in some detail. The results of some UV experiments for semiconductor, metal and insulating film depositions will also be discussed. The features of the process for laser-driven synthesis of powders and the characteristics of the produced particles will be evidenced, and some of their technological applications will be outlined. The requirements of the laser sources suitable for this kind of applications are in general the same as in gas-phase laser chemistry, however it will be pointed out how some parameters are more significant for this specific use.

  13. Laser rocket system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. S.; Forsyth, J. B.; Skratt, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The laser rocket systems investigated in this study were for orbital transportation using space-based, ground-based and airborne laser transmitters. The propulsion unit of these systems utilizes a continuous wave (CW) laser beam focused into a thrust chamber which initiates a plasma in the hydrogen propellant, thus heating the propellant and providing thrust through a suitably designed nozzle and expansion skirt. The specific impulse is limited only by the ability to adequately cool the thruster and the amount of laser energy entering the engine. The results of the study showed that, with advanced technology, laser rocket systems with either a space- or ground-based laser transmitter could reduce the national budget allocated to space transportation by 10 to 345 billion dollars over a 10-year life cycle when compared to advanced chemical propulsion systems (LO2-LH2) of equal capability. The variation in savings depends upon the projected mission model.

  14. Holosteric Nd : YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrie, Callum

    A miniature Nd:YAG laser that was transversely pumped by a quasi-cw laser-diode array has been designed and constructed. This laser was injection seeded by a continuous wave single-frequency Nd:YAG laser that was also pumped by a laser- diode array. This was the first reported holosteric, or all-solid-state, laser that was capable of generating single frequency pulses in a high quality single transverse mode beam which it achieved at peak powers up to 7 kW. Two different types of laser-diode array were used in this work, and both have been characterised with respect to their use as pump sources for solid-state lasers. A fibre-coupled type SDL-2430-H2 laser-diode array, which emitted 100 mW from the end of a 100 mum core diameter fibre at the Nd:YAG absorption wavelength of 809 nm, was used to longitudinally pump a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser. Spatial hole-burning encouraged this laser to operate on several longitudinal modes, with an output power of up to 31 mW. With the addition of an etalon and a Brewster angled plate to the cavity of this laser, single longiuidinal mode operation was achieved at an output power level of 10 mW. The frequency from this laser was stabilised against thermal drift by phase sensitive locking to the resonance of an external reference cavity. The pump source for the transversely pumped Nd:YAG laser was an SDL-922-J quasi-cw laser-diode bar, which emitted from its 1 cm wide aperture pulses of 200 mus duration with energies up to 5 mJ at reperition rates between 10 - 100 pps. The characteristics of this laser-bar that were measured include a frequency chirp of 5 nm through the pulse, which was found to have a significant effect on the pumping of the Nd:YAG medium. An analysis of the pump-rate distribution throughout the Nd:YAG laser-rod was undertaken with reference to the transverse mode structure of this laser. This was used as the basis of a full rate-equation-based model of the transversely pumped laser. Fundamental transverse mode

  15. Micro-laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Richards, Roger K.

    2003-07-22

    A micro-laser is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide and at least one amplifying medium in the waveguide. PBG features are positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings and allow introduction of amplifying mediums into the highly resonant guided micro-laser microcavity. The micro-laser may be positioned on a die of a bulk substrate material with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a micro-laser is disclosed. A method for tuning the micro-laser is also disclosed. The micro-laser may be used as an optical regenerator, or a light source for data transfer or for optical computing.

  16. Laser/tissue interaction.

    PubMed

    Dederich, D N

    1991-01-01

    When laser light impinges on tissue, it can reflect, scatter, be absorbed, or transmit to the surrounding tissue. Absorption controls to a great degree the extent to which reflection, scattering and transmission occur, and wavelength is the primary determinant of absorption. The CO2 laser is consistently absorbed by most materials and tissues and the Nd-YAG laser wavelength is preferentially absorbed in pigmented tissues. The factors which determine the initial tissue effect include the laser wavelength, laser power, laser waveform, tissue optical properties, and tissue thermal properties. There are almost an infinite number of combinations of these factors possible, many of which would result in unacceptable damage to the tissues. This underscores the need to thoroughly test any particular combination of these factors on the conceptual, in-vitro, and in-vivo level before a treatment is offered.

  17. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  18. Simultaneous phase, amplitude, and polarization control of femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindinger, A.; Weber, S. M.; Plewicki, M.; Weise, F.

    2012-12-01

    We present a serial pulse shaper design which allows us to shape the phase, amplitude, and polarization of fs laser pulses independently and simultaneously. The capabilities of this setup are demonstrated by implementing a method for generating parametrically tailored laser pulses. This method is applied on the ionization of NaK molecules by feedback loop optimization, employing a temporal sub pulse encoding. Moreover, we introduce and characterize a further development of this common path pulse shaper scheme for full control of all light field parameters.

  19. Above-threshold ionization by chirped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Takashi

    2007-05-15

    We theoretically investigate above-threshold ionization by chirped laser pulses. By comparing the photoelectron energy spectra and the photoelectron angular distributions of Na for the laser pulses with different chirp rates but with the identical spectral profile, we find that the ionization processes have a clear dependence on the chirp rate. Further calculations without excited bound states during the time propagation of the wave function reveal practically no chirp dependence, which is clear evidence that the origin of the chirp dependence in above-threshold ionization is the excited bound states.

  20. Na Deposition on MnO(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xu; Cox, David F.

    2016-03-01

    Na deposition on the MnO(100) surface was investigated by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Na TPD and XPS results indicate that adsorbed Na interacts strongly with the MnO substrate to form an irreversibly-adsorbed, oxidic Na compound on the surface for coverages up to 1 monolayer (ML). This strongly-bound Na diffuses into the MnO subsurface and bulk at elevated temperatures above 500 K. For Na coverages above 1 ML, metallic Na is present and desorbs from the surface below 500 K. The deposition of Na on MnO(100) follows a Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth mode, with the formation of metallic Na islands following completion of the first Na monolayer. After Na deposition, the surface exhibits a diffuse (1 × 1) LEED pattern, suggesting the formation of disordered Na overlayers. After heating to 1000 K, the surface presents a (2 × 2) LEED pattern indicating that a surface reconstruction is induced by the diffusion of Na into the near surface region. CO2 can be used as a probe molecule in TPD to distinguish between metallic Na islands and oxidic Na in the first ML, and to indicate when Na that is still observable by XPS goes subsurface.

  1. Lasers and Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-05

    Develop in-house Quantum Cascade Laser technology at 4-5µm wavelength range – Generate high power from broad-area QCL devices – Explore novel novel...schemes to produce high brightness – Advance beam-combining strategies in QCLs – Transition high brightness QCL technology to AF and DoD users...DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 22 • Quantum Cascade Laser ( QCL ) technology can produce compact laser sources

  2. Portable Laser Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.T.

    1994-07-01

    A Portable Laser Laboratory (PLL) is being designed and built for the CALIOPE Program tests which will begin in October of 1994. The PLL is designed to give maximum flexibility for evolving laser experiments and can be readily moved by loading it onto a standard truck trailer. The internal configuration for the October experiments will support a two line DIAL system running in the mid-IR. Brief descriptions of the laser and detection systems are included.

  3. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  4. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  5. Precision laser aiming system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, Brandon R.; Todd, Steven N.

    2009-04-28

    A precision laser aiming system comprises a disrupter tool, a reflector, and a laser fixture. The disrupter tool, the reflector and the laser fixture are configurable for iterative alignment and aiming toward an explosive device threat. The invention enables a disrupter to be quickly and accurately set up, aligned, and aimed in order to render safe or to disrupt a target from a standoff position.

  6. Ultraviolet Polariton Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    Ultraviolet Polariton Laser Significant progress was achieved in the epitaxy of deep UV AlN/ AlGaN Bragg mirrors and microcavity structures paving...the way to the successful fabrication of vertical cavity emitting laser structures and polariton lasers. For the first time DBRs providing sufficient...high reflectivity for polariton emission were demonstrated. Thanks to a developed strain balanced Al0.85Ga0.15N template, the critical thickness

  7. Laser cutting plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  8. Pumped up Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Cutting Edge Optronics released the first of potentially three products to result from an SBIR contract with Goddard Space Flight Center. The first commercial result is the WhisperMiniSlab, a diode pump for high performance laser systems. The slab uses a zig-zag path through the laser crystal which eliminates the need for thermal lensing. The result is smaller lasers with better beam quality for use in medical and industrial applications.

  9. Dental laser technology.

    PubMed

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2008-10-01

    Dental technology is rapidly affecting the treatment options available to patients. Dental lasers are an innovative technology for both hard- and soft-tissue treatment applications. The ability to recontour soft tissues efficiently and predictably with immediate hemostatsis and minimal postoperative sequelae is of value to both the dentist and the patient. This article reviews the principles of dental lasers, criteria to consider when selecting a dental laser, and some of their clinical applications.

  10. Excimer laser chemical problems

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.; Peterson, N.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques need to be developed to maintain XeF and XeCl laser performance over long periods of time without degradation resulting from chemical processes occurring within the laser. The dominant chemical issues include optical damage, corrosions of laser materials, gas contamination, and control of halogen concentration. Each of these issues are discussed and summarized. The methods of minimizing or controlling the chemical processes involved are presented.

  11. Rare earth lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    In this brief survey, some of the key spectroscopic properties of rare earths are reviewed that account for their versatility, examine recent research trends and developments, and comment upon future projects for rare earth lasers. For gaseous and liquid lasers, other elements and molecules have thus far demonstrated lasing properties more attractive than those available using rare earths. Therefore, remarks shall be limited to solid state lasers.

  12. Laser Cooling of Solids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    journal.org) Schematic of an optical refrigeration system. Pump light is efficiently generated by a semicon- ductor diode laser. The laser light en- ters...efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs). Various methods have been devised to remedy this prob- lem for LEDs but not all are applicable to laser...cooling: light quanta in the red tail of the absorption spectrum are absorbed from a monochro- matic source followed by spontaneous emission of more

  13. Thallium Mercury Laser Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    THALLIUM MERCURY LASER DEVELOPMENT C. S. Liu and D. W. Feldman FINAL REPORT (PHASE III) (Period between Feb. 1, 1980 and Jan. 31, 1981) 0 Contract No...Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15235 Approved for public release;IDistribution Unlimited 1/i;THALLIUM MERCURY LASER DEVELOPMENT * , , IS C. S./Liu tRD. W /eldman...9 ’ t4 THALLIUM MERCURY LASER DEVELOPMENT C. S. Liu and D. W. Feldman Westinghouse R&D Center Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15235 1

  14. Portable laser laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, J. T.

    1994-07-01

    A Portable Laser Laboratory (PLL) is being designed and built for the CALIOPE Program tests which will begin in October of 1994. The PLL is designed to give maximum flexibility for evolving laser experiments and can be readily moved by loading it onto a standard truck trailer. The internal configuration for the October experiments will support a two line DIAL system running in the mid-IR. Brief descriptions of the laser and detection systems are included.

  15. Etalon laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.B.; Koenig, H.G.; Rice, R.R.

    1981-08-18

    A laser diode is disclosed that is suitable for integrated and fiber optic applications requiring single transverse and single longitudinal mode operation. The single transverse mode is provided by making a gallium arsenide double heterostructural laser diode with a narrow stripe width and a relatively long length. The single longitudinal mode operation is provided by cracking the diode transverse to the stripe at one or more locations to form internal etalons in the laser cavity.

  16. Laser aircraft. [using kerosene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Sun, K.; Jones, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of a laser-powered aircraft is discussed. Laser flight would be completely compatible with existing airports and air-traffic control, with the airplane using kerosene only power, up to a cruising altitude of 9 km where the laser satellite would lock on and beam laser energy to it. Two major components make up the laser turbofan, a heat exchanger for converting laser radiation into thermal energy, and conventional turbomachinery. The laser power satellite would put out 42 Mw using a solar-powered thermal engine to generate electrical power for the closed-cycle supersonic electric discharge CO laser, whose radiators, heat exchangers, supersonic diffuser, and ducting will amount to 85% of the total subsystem mass. Relay satellites will be used to intercept the beam from the laser satellite, correct outgoing beam aberrations, and direct the beam to the next target. A 300-airplane fleet with transcontinental range is projected to save enough kerosene to equal the energy content of the entire system, including power and relay satellites, in one year.

  17. The Texas Petawatt Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Mikael; Gaul, Erhard; Ditmire, Todd; Douglas, Skyler; Gorski, Dan; Henderson, Watson; Blakeney, Joel; Hammond, Doug; Gerity, Michael; Caird, John; Erlandson, Al; Iovanovic, Igor; Ebbers, Chris; Molander, Bill

    2005-12-01

    We report on the design and construction of the Texas Petawatt Laser. This research facility will consist of two, synchronized laser systems that will be used for a wide variety of high intensity laser and high energy density science experiments. The first laser is a novel, high energy (200 J), short pulse (150 fs) petawatt-class laser that is based on hybrid, broadband optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) and mixed silicate and phosphate Nd:glass amplification. The second laser will provide 500 J at 527 nm (>1 kJ @1053 nm) with pulse widths selectable from 2-20 ns. Design and construction began in early 2003 and is scheduled to complete in 2007. In this report we will briefly discuss some of the important applications of this system, present the design of the laser and review some of the technology used to achieve pulse durations approaching 100 fs. Currently, the facility has been renovated for laser construction. The oscillator and stretcher are operational with the first stage of gain measured at 2×106. Output energies of 500μJ have been achieved with good near field image quality. Delivery has been taken for Nova components that will compose the main amplifier chain of the laser system.

  18. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  19. Balloon borne laser transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wischnia, H. F.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon borne laser transceiver (BBLT) which was carried to an altitude of 80,000 feet, was used to measure the turbulence effect of the atmosphere in daylight on laser beams going both up and down through the intervening atmosphere. The principles of operation of the BBLT are discussed. The instrument must acquire an up-going argon laser beam, lock onto it, and transmit back to the ground observatory a helium-neon laser beam. Questions of system operation for the down-going and the up-going beam are considered along with a servo system analysis.

  20. Laser treatment of tattoos.

    PubMed

    Kilmer, S L

    1997-07-01

    All three Q-switched laser systems can effectively remove most tattoos with minimal scarring or other adverse sequelae. Despite advances in laser technology, all tattoos cannot be completely eliminated, and several wavelengths remain necessary to optimally treat multicolored tattoos. The major advantage of Q-switched laser irradiation to effect tattoo removal is the low risk of scarring associated with treatment. Limitations include the need for multiple treatment sessions, minimal to incomplete responses in some cases, and the possibility of pigmentary and textural changes. Research continues in an effort to perfect laser removal of tattoos.

  1. Deep space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Srinivasan, Meera; Shaw, Matthew; Piazzolla, Sabino; Wright, Malcolm W.; Farr, William H.

    2016-03-01

    A number of laser communication link demonstrations from near Earth distances extending out to lunar ranges have been remarkably successful, demonstrating the augmented channel capacity that is accessible with the use of lasers for communications. The next hurdle on the path to extending laser communication and its benefits throughout the solar system and beyond is to demonstrate deep-space laser communication links. In this paper, concepts and technology development being advanced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in order to enable deep-space link demonstrations to ranges of approximately 3 AU in the next decade, will be discussed.

  2. Pulsed Laser Propulsion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    afforded by a pulsed laser propulsion system over a CW laser propulsion system are 1) simplicity in engine design as a result of permitting the laser...to engineering and weight considerations. The lower boundary of the corridor is set by propellant feed considerations. To the right of this boundary...example, a OOJ -5 per pulse laser operating at 7 x 10 sec between pulses (14, 285 pps) is capable of powering a 30 lb (135 Nt)thrust rocket engine that has

  3. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    d AFWU.-TR-83-niO 00 H CO CO iH <^ DIODE PUMPED FIBER LASER Edward L. Glnzton Laboratory Stanford University Stanford, California 94305...RECIPIf NT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE Cand Sub(i(/e; DIODE PUMPED FIBER LASER 5 TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Interim Report...external optical cavity made of two miniature flat mirrors, and end- pumped either at 514.5 nm (argon-ion laser ) or near 818 nm ( laser diode ). Coherent

  4. Optofluidic random laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakiran Bhaktha, B. N.; Bachelard, Nicolas; Noblin, Xavier; Sebbah, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Random lasing is reported in a dye-circulated structured polymeric microfluidic channel. The role of disorder, which results from limited accuracy of photolithographic process, is demonstrated by the variation of the emission spectrum with local-pump position and by the extreme sensitivity to a local perturbation of the structure. Thresholds comparable to those of conventional microfluidic lasers are achieved, without the hurdle of state-of-the-art cavity fabrication. Potential applications of optofluidic random lasers for on-chip sensors are discussed. Introduction of random lasers in the field of optofluidics is a promising alternative to on-chip laser integration with light and fluidic functionalities.

  5. Trends in laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Frank; van Nunen, Joris; Held, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Laser Micromachining is well established in industry. Depending on the application lasers with pulse length from μseconds to femtoseconds and wavelengths from 1064nm and its harmonics up to 5μm or 10.6μm are used. Ultrafast laser machining using pulses with pico or femtosecond duration pulses is gaining traction, as it offers very precise processing of materials with low thermal impact. Large-scale industrial ultrafast laser applications show that the market can be divided into various sub segments. One set of applications demand low power around 10W, compact footprint and are extremely sensitive to the laser price whilst still demanding 10ps or shorter laser pulses. A second set of applications are very power hungry and only become economically feasible for large scale deployments at power levels in the 100+W class. There is also a growing demand for applications requiring fs-laser pulses. In our presentation we would like to describe these sub segments by using selected applications from the automotive and electronics industry e.g. drilling of gas/diesel injection nozzles, dicing of LED substrates. We close the presentation with an outlook to micromachining applications e.g. glass cutting and foil processing with unique new CO lasers emitting 5μm laser wavelength.

  6. SYMMETRICAL LASER CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTAL GROWTH , SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), LASERS, SYNTHESIS, FERROELECTRIC CRYSTALS , FLUORESCENCE, IMPURITIES, BARIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONATES...STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS, TITANATES, STANNATES, SAMARIUM, MANGANESE, REFRACTORY MATERIALS, OXIDES, SINGLE CRYSTALS .

  7. Laser Surface Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanamuthu, D. S.

    1980-10-01

    Experimental procedures and current state-of-the-art are presented for laser surface treating methods such as alloying, cladding, grain refining, and transformation hardening using a cw CO2 laser. Microstructural and x-ray analyses of the treated surfaces indicate that a laser beam can locally enhance surface properties. Laser alloying offers the possibility to selectively modify a low cost workpiece surface so that it has the desired high quality surface properties characteristic of high performance alloys. Laser cladding offers feasibility to apply high melting cladding alloys on low melting workpieces, to reduce the amount of dilution of cladding alloy with the workpieces, and the potential to apply dense ceramic claddings to metallic workpieces. Laser grain refining offers potential to either minimize or eliminate surface defects such as inclusions, intermetallic compounds, and pores, and to provide a refined grain structure. Laser transformation hardening provides the treated workpieces with a hard martensitic surface that has compressive stresses for enhanced fatigue life; in addition, reduction in wear rate of treated surfaces is achieved. This experimental study indicates that the use of lasers for surface treatment has several limitations. Further studies will provide better understanding for maximum utilization of laser surface treating processes.

  8. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R. J.

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  9. A quantum laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Treps, Nicolas; Grosse, Nicolai; Bowen, Warwick P; Fabre, Claude; Bachor, Hans-A; Lam, Ping Koy

    2003-08-15

    The measurement sensitivity of the pointing direction of a laser beam is ultimately limited by the quantum nature of light. To reduce this limit, we have experimentally produced a quantum laser pointer, a beam of light whose direction is measured with a precision greater than that possible for a usual laser beam. The laser pointer is generated by combining three different beams in three orthogonal transverse modes, two of them in a squeezed-vacuum state and one in an intense coherent field. The result provides a demonstration of multichannel spatial squeezing, along with its application to the improvement of beam positioning sensitivity and, more generally, to imaging.

  10. Laser welding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  11. Laser eye protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Ralph G.; Labo, Jack A.; Mayo, Michael W.

    1990-07-01

    Laser applications have proliferated in recent years and as to be expected their presence is no longer confined to the laboratory or places where access to their radiation can be easily controlled. One obvious application where this is so is in military operations where various devices such as laser range finders target designators and secure communications equipment elevate the risk of exposure specifically eye exposure to unacceptable levels. Although the need for eye protection in the laboratory and other controlled areas has been appreciated since the invention of the laser the use of lasers in circumstances where safety or the risk of temporary loss of vision which can not always be ensured by administrative procedures has made adequate eye protection essential. It is the critical nature of many military operations that has driven the search for eye protection against both nuclear and laser radiation. At the same time the requirement to maintain useful vision during irradiation as well as advances in laser technology have complicated the problem enormously. Pertinent aspects of the problem such as laser characteristics- -pulse width repetition rate laser wavelength tunability or agility as well as laser power or energy have been placed in perspective. In addition possible effects on vision for various exposures have been estimated as have the characteristics required of eye protective devices. Various classes of devices are discussed and advantages and disadvantages noted. 1.

  12. Liquid-crystal lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Harry; Morris, Stephen

    2010-10-01

    Liquid-crystal lasers are a burgeoning area in the field of soft-matter photonics that may herald a new era of ultrathin, highly versatile laser sources. Such lasers encompass a multitude of remarkable features, including wideband tunability, large coherence area and, in some cases, multidirectional emission. They have the potential to combine large output powers with miniature cavity dimensions - two properties that have traditionally been incompatible. Their potential applications are diverse, ranging from miniature medical diagnostic tools to large-area holographic laser displays. Here we discuss the scientific origins of this technology and give a brief synopsis of the cutting-edge research currently being carried out worldwide.

  13. Spaceborne laser radar.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, T.

    1972-01-01

    Development of laser systems to acquire and track targets in applications such as the rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft. A scan technique is described whereby a narrow laser beam is simultaneously scanned with an equally narrow receiver field-of-view without the aid of mechanical gimbals. Equations are developed in order to examine the maximum acquisition and tracking rates, and the maximum target range for a scanning laser radar system. A recently built prototype of a small, lightweight, low-power-consuming scanning laser radar is described.

  14. Lasers for Frontier Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchini, Giuseppe

    The first laser has been invented in 1960 by using the red light from a ruby crystal, and since then the laser field exploded almost exponentially, and thousands of different materials, in the state of solids, liquids, vapors, gases, plasmas, and elementary particles have lased up to now from less than I Å to more than 1 mm. Many of them have been used with outstanding results both in basic science, and in industrial and commercial applications, by changing for ever the same lifestyle of humankind. As far as spectroscopy is concerned, the laser light has started an unprecedented revolution because of its unique properties as monochromaticity, coherence, power, brightness and short-pulse regime, unrivaled by any other natural and artificial light source. Spectroscopy applications increased qualitatively and quantitatively with the laser sources themselves, and they are still proceeding in parallel with the moving of the laser field towards new territories. Apart the opening up of new regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, like the terahertz gap, and the outstanding increase of the output power which is giving rise to completely new spectroscopic effects, the improvement of laser sources and auxiliary equipment is producing a growth of traditional laser spectroscopy with superior resolution and sensitivity. Moreover, spectroscopic techniques and laser light contributed to the development of new chemical and physical processes which have been used to fabricate photonic materials with new spectroscopic properties enriching the laser field itself, in a virtuous cycle spectroscopy→aser→material and back to spectroscopy with no end in sight.

  15. Dental lasers and science.

    PubMed

    Zakariasen, K L; Dederich, D N

    1991-07-01

    We have attempted to accomplish two purposes in this article. First, we have presented the case that extensive scientific investigation must form the base of our profession, that it must be an ongoing, continuous process and that laser dentistry must be developed through extensive scientific inquiry--as all of our treatment modalities should be. Second, we have presented many examples of the science involved in the development of laser dentistry. Lasers do have far-reaching potential for application to dentistry. We, as a profession, must insist that such laser development is done properly, not foisted upon us based on anecdotal reports and incomplete research.

  16. Laser adaptive holographic hydrophone

    SciTech Connect

    Romashko, R V; Kulchin, Yu N; Bezruk, M N; Ermolaev, S A

    2016-03-31

    A new type of a laser hydrophone based on dynamic holograms, formed in a photorefractive crystal, is proposed and studied. It is shown that the use of dynamic holograms makes it unnecessary to use complex optical schemes and systems for electronic stabilisation of the interferometer operating point. This essentially simplifies the scheme of the laser hydrophone preserving its high sensitivity, which offers the possibility to use it under a strong variation of the environment parameters. The laser adaptive holographic hydrophone implemented at present possesses the sensitivity at a level of 3.3 mV Pa{sup -1} in the frequency range from 1 to 30 kHz. (laser hydrophones)

  17. Shuttle Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, Jack L.; Harding, David J.; Garvin, James B.

    1999-01-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment that has flown twice; first on STS-72 in January 1996 and then on STS-85 in August 1997. Both missions produced successful laser altimetry and surface lidar data products from approximately 80 hours per mission of SLA data operations. A total of four Shuttle missions are planned for the SLA series. This paper documents SLA mission results and explains SLA pathfinder accomplishments at the mid-point in this series of Hitchhiker missions. The overall objective of the SLA mission series is the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for NASA operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future laser altimeter sensors will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA, including the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA) and the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). MBLA is the land and vegetation laser sensor for the NASA Earth System Sciences Pathfinder Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) Mission, and GLAS is the Earth Observing System facility instrument on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). The Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter, now well into a multi-year mapping mission at the red planet, is also directly benefiting from SLA data analysis methods, just as SLA benefited from MOLA spare parts and instrument technology experience [5] during SLA construction in the early 1990s.

  18. Laser applications in phlebology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Mancini, S.; Postiglione, Marco; Postiglione, M. G.

    2001-06-01

    PURPOSE: review of laser used in phlebology METHOD: critical analysis of scientific data taken from the literature and based on 25 years personal experience. RESULTS: we have three groups of laser applications in phlebology: for the diagnosis, as physical therapy and as surgical therapy. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: the laser-doppler studies the microcirculations, the no-surgical therapy shown positive results in the treatment of venous ulcers and for the wound healing. It could be indicate also as antiphlogistic and anti-edema therapy, in superficial thrombophlebitis. The surgical laser is useful for the surgical cleaning of ulcers, for haemorroids, angiomas and telangiectases.

  19. Lighting with laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Chandrajit; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are much more efficient than compact fluorescent lamps and hence are rapidly capturing the market for general illumination. LEDs are also replacing halogen lamps or even newer xenon based lamps in automotive headlamps. Because laser diodes are inherently much brighter and often more efficient than corresponding LEDs, there is great research interest in developing laser diode based illumination systems. Operating at higher current densities and with smaller form factors, laser diodes may outperform LEDs in the future. This article reviews the possibilities and challenges in the integration of visible laser diodes in future illumination systems.

  20. Lasers and avionic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willams, J. S.

    1983-07-01

    Interrogative applications of laser technology are considered, taking into account the extent to which a centralized source of information can be used to service a number of functions which need to be performed in an airframe, and, in addition, also the potential of the laser as probing device. Aspects of laser technology and air vehicle communications are discussed along with laser based techniques for processing and storage of information. Attention is given to data transmission within the aircraft, communications external to the air vehicle, Fourier optics, holographic methods, real-time processing, Bragg cells and spectrum analysis, optical bistable devices, and optical data storage.

  1. [Types of medical lasers].

    PubMed

    Takac, S; Stojanović, S; Muhi, B

    1998-01-01

    The knowledge about different types of lasers and their potential use in medicine is presented. A very rapid development of laser technology in the world imposes a need for up-to-date information about the characteristics of different laser instruments. Without this kind of information it would be difficult to keep in touch with the latest developments in the world's technology. Different types of lasers have different indication range in the medical practice. An inquiry into the fundamental principles of lasers physics is an important prerequisite for successful application of this technology in medicine. Laser as a surgical knife has shown certain advantages over scalpel, electrocautery and cryosurgery, as the laser surgery is a noncontact method, bloodless, precise, with better visualization, minimal postoperative edema, painless healing, without complications. Although laser cannot entirely replace conventional surgical instruments, it is still the instrument of choice for treatment of numerous pathological conditions. The carbon dioxide laser is a highly precise, bloodless light scalpel used for incising and excising tissues and sealing small blood vessels. The infrared beam at 10,600 nm wavelength is absorbed by water and tissue destruction is due to the instantaneous vaporization at relatively low temperature of 100 degrees C. The beam seals blood vessels of up to 0.5 mm in diameter and if the beam is defocused, larger vessels may be controlled. The beam also seals lymphatics, possibly reducing the spread of tumour cells by this route, and seals nerve endings: there is no incidence of neuroma formation. Carbon dioxide laser has shown a great efficiency in otorhinolaryngology, in maxillo-facial surgery and plastic surgery, in urology and gynecology. Provides true "no touch" surgery, and is used increasingly in neurosurgery for the precise atraumatic removal of tissue and for creation of precise lesions for the control of pain. The carbon dioxide laser beam

  2. Materials processing with a tightly focused femtosecond laser vortex pulse.

    PubMed

    Hnatovsky, Cyril; Shvedov, Vladlen G; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Rode, Andrei V

    2010-10-15

    In this Letter we present the first (to our knowledge) demonstration of material modification using tightly focused single femtosecond laser vortex pulses. Double-charge femtosecond vortices were synthesized with a polarization-singularity beam converter based on light propagation in a uniaxial anisotropic medium and then focused using moderate- and high-NA optics (viz., NA=0.45 and 0.9) to ablate fused silica and soda-lime glass. By controlling the pulse energy, we consistently machine micrometer-size ring-shaped structures with <100nm uniform groove thickness.

  3. Millisecond laser machining of transparent materials assisted by nanosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunxiang; Zhang, Hongchao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2015-01-26

    A new form of double pulse composed of a nanosecond laser and a millisecond laser is proposed for laser machining transparent materials. To evaluate its advantages and disadvantages, experimental investigations are carried out and the corresponding results are compared with those of single millisecond laser. The mechanism is discussed from two aspects: material defects and effects of modifications induced by nanosecond laser on thermal stress field during millisecond laser irradiation. It is shown that the modifications of the sample generated by nanosecond laser improves the processing efficiency of subsequent millisecond laser, while limits the eventual size of modified region.

  4. Laser processing with specially designed laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asratyan, A. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Feofanov, I. N.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Krasovskii, V. I.; Lyabin, N. A.; Pogosyan, L. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Zakharyan, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of using laser systems to form beams with special spatial configurations has been studied. The laser systems applied had a self-conjugate cavity based on the elements of copper vapor lasers (LT-5Cu, LT-10Cu, LT-30Cu) with an average power of 5, 10, or 30 W. The active elements were pumped by current pulses of duration 80-100 ns. The duration of laser generation pulses was up to 25 ns. The generator unit included an unstable cavity, where one reflector was a special mirror with a reflecting coating. Various original optical schemes used were capable of exploring spatial configurations and energy characteristics of output laser beams in their interaction with micro- and nanoparticles fabricated from various materials. In these experiments, the beam dimensions of the obtained zones varied from 0.3 to 5 µm, which is comparable with the minimum permissible dimensions determined by the optical elements applied. This method is useful in transforming a large amount of information at the laser pulse repetition rate of 10-30 kHz. It was possible to realize the high-precision micromachining and microfabrication of microscale details by direct writing, cutting and drilling (with the cutting width and through-hole diameters ranging from 3 to 100 µm) and produce microscale, deep, intricate and narrow grooves on substrate surfaces of metals and nonmetal materials. This system is used for producing high-quality microscale details without moving the object under treatment. It can also be used for microcutting and microdrilling in a variety of metals such as molybdenum, copper and stainless steel, with a thickness of up to 300 µm, and in nonmetals such as silicon, sapphire and diamond with a thickness ranging from 10 µm to 1 mm with different thermal parameters and specially designed laser beam.

  5. Population transfer of a NaH molecule via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zai, Jing-Bo; Zhan, Wei-Shen; Wang, Shuo; Dang, Hai-Ping; Han, Xiao

    2016-09-01

    The population transfer of a NaH molecule from the ground state {{X}1}{Σ+} to the target state {{A}1}{Σ+} via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) is investigated. The results show that the intensity, delay time and detuning have a significant effect on population transfer. A large population transfer is observed with increased pump and Stokes intensity, especially when the pump and Stokes intensity match. Population transfer also depends on the delay time between the pump laser pulse and the Stokes laser pulse. The detuning of the two pulses influences the population transfer. Efficient population transfer can be realized under the resonant or two-photon resonant condition.

  6. Laser Program annual report 1987

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W.

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  7. Laser diagnostics for microgravity droplet studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael

    1995-01-01

    An instrument has been designed, built, and tested for performing laser diagnostic measurements of droplet combustion in low-gravity-flight aircraft. Nonintrusive measurements are of particular importance for droplet combustion (the simplest example of non-premixed combustion) and transport in microgravity environments, where physical contact would introduce an unacceptable level of perturbations. The resolution of these diagnostics can also isolate transport to length scales much smaller than the droplet diameter. These techniques can be configured to instantaneously map an entire flow field in two and three dimensions, providing either qualitative or quantitative information on the distribution of a desired scalar or vector quantity. Detailing the gas-phase flow field and position of the flame front can be achieved using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH or another flame front marker. An alternative approach is to obtain LIF from a diagnostic seed included in the liquid phase fuel; it would be consumed at the flame front. The main advantage to this approach is that it is easier to choose the wavelength of the molecular absorption which coincides with convenient laser wavelengths rather than finding lasers which can be configured to access OH. Our present method uses a nitrogen-pumped dye laser tuned to a sodium absorption and addition of small concentrations of NaCl to the fuel. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a laser-based technique which has recently had its practicality greatly enhanced by the development of high-resolution CCD cameras and the increase in speed and capacity of computer systems. With this technique, a seeded flow is illuminated with a double-pulsed laser sheet to generate a double exposure image on a film or CCD camera. Computer analysis of the image is used to determine the particle velocity vectors and, thus, the gas velocity within the plane of the laser sheet. Our current experiment uses PIV for measuring relative droplet

  8. Laser peening with fiber optic delivery

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Herbert W.; Ault, Earl R.; Scheibner, Karl F.

    2004-11-16

    A system for processing a workpiece using a laser. The laser produces at least one laser pulse. A laser processing unit is used to process the workpiece using the at least one laser pulse. A fiber optic cable is used for transmitting the at least one laser pulse from the laser to the laser processing unit.

  9. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  10. Laser surgery of the skin.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D J

    1989-11-01

    The carbon dioxide laser, the argon laser and the pulse-dye laser are used to remove a variety of skin lesions. Advantages of laser surgery include a relatively bloodless operating field and minimal postoperative discomfort and swelling. Warts, tattoos, actinic cheilitis, skin cancer, xanthelasma, ingrown toenails, keloids and port-wine stains are among the lesions that can be removed with laser surgery. The tunable pulse-dye laser is particularly useful in the treatment of vascular lesions.

  11. High power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following subjects: trends in materials processing with laser radiation; slabs and high power systems; glasses and new crystals; solid state lasers at HOYA Corp.; lamps, resonators and transmission; glasses as active materials for high average power solid state lasers; flashlamp pumped GGG-crystals; alexandrite lasers; designing telescope resonators; mode operation of neodymium: YAG lasers; intracavity frequency doubling with KTP crystal and thermal effects in cylinder lasers.

  12. Soft tissue application of lasers.

    PubMed

    Holt, Timothy L; Mann, Fred A

    2002-05-01

    Despite increasing numbers of veterinarians incorporating lasers into their clinical practices, little information has been published about laser clinical applications in soft tissue surgery. This article reviews soft tissue interaction, describes laser equipment and accessories commonly marketed to veterinarians, and discusses clinical applications of the carbon dioxide laser in a systems-based approach. A table of recommended laser tips and settings based on the authors' experiences using a carbon dioxide laser (AccuVet Novapulse LX-20SP, Bothell, WA) is provided.

  13. Calmodulin limits pathogenic Na+ channel persistent current

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Haidun; Wang, Chaojian; Marx, Steven O.

    2017-01-01

    Increased “persistent” current, caused by delayed inactivation, through voltage-gated Na+ (NaV) channels leads to cardiac arrhythmias or epilepsy. The underlying molecular contributors to these inactivation defects are poorly understood. Here, we show that calmodulin (CaM) binding to multiple sites within NaV channel intracellular C-terminal domains (CTDs) limits persistent Na+ current and accelerates inactivation across the NaV family. Arrhythmia or epilepsy mutations located in NaV1.5 or NaV1.2 channel CTDs, respectively, reduce CaM binding either directly or by interfering with CTD–CTD interchannel interactions. Boosting the availability of CaM, thus shifting its binding equilibrium, restores wild-type (WT)–like inactivation in mutant NaV1.5 and NaV1.2 channels and likewise diminishes the comparatively large persistent Na+ current through WT NaV1.6, whose CTD displays relatively low CaM affinity. In cerebellar Purkinje neurons, in which NaV1.6 promotes a large physiological persistent Na+ current, increased CaM diminishes the persistent Na+ current, suggesting that the endogenous, comparatively weak affinity of NaV1.6 for apoCaM is important for physiological persistent current. PMID:28087622

  14. Picosecond passively mode-locked mid-infrared fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C.; Zhu, X.; Norwood, R. A.; Kieu, K.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2013-02-01

    Mode-locked mid-infrared (mid-IR) fiber lasers are of increasing interest due to their many potential applications in spectroscopic sensors, infrared countermeasures, laser surgery, and high-efficiency pump sources for nonlinear wavelength convertors. Er3+-doped ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF) fiber lasers, which can emit mid-IR light at 2.65-2.9 μm through the transition from the upper energy level 4I11/2 to the lower laser level 4I13/2, have attracted much attention because of their broad emission range, high optical efficiency, and the ready availability of diode pump lasers at the two absorption peaks of Er3+ ions (975 nm and 976 nm). In recent years, significant progress on high power Er3+- doped ZBLAN fiber lasers has been achieved and over 20 watt cw output at 2.8 μm has been demonstrated; however, there has been little progress on ultrafast mid-IR ZBLAN fiber lasers to date. We report a passively mode-locked Er3+- doped ZBLAN fiber laser in which a Fe2+:ZnSe crystal was used as the intracavity saturable absorber. Fe2+:ZnSe is an ideal material for mid-IR laser pulse generation because of its large saturable absorption cross-section and small saturation energy along with the excellent opto-mechanical (damage threshold ~2 J/cm2) and physical characteristics of the crystalline ZnSe host. A 1.6 m double-clad 8 mol% Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber was used in our experiment. The fiber core has a diameter of 15 μm and a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.1. The inner circular cladding has a diameter of 125 μm and an NA of 0.5. Both continuous-wave and Q-switched mode-locking pulses at 2.8 μm were obtained. Continuous-wave mode locking operation with a pulse duration of 19 ps and an average power of 51 mW were achieved when a collimated beam traversed the Fe2+:ZnSe crystal. When the cavity was modified to provide a focused beam at the Fe2+:ZnSe crystal, Q-switched mode-locked operation with a pulse duration of 60 ps and an average power of 4.6 mW was achieved. More powerful

  15. In situ, real-time detection of soot particles coated with NaCl using 193 nm light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Stipe, C. B.; Koshland, C. P.; Lucas, D.

    2006-09-01

    We report in situ, real-time detection of soot particles coated with NaCl using excimer laser fragmentation fluorescence spectroscopy (ELFFS). Carbon atom fluorescence at 248 nm and the Na D-line at 589 nm are used as signatures of soot and NaCl, respectively. Soot particles are encapsulated with a NaCl layer in a well-controlled inverted flame burner. NaCl particles are injected into the methane-air co-flow flame to coat the soot particles. ArF laser irradiation of the coated particles in an air stream at 1.14 J/cm2 produces fluorescence from Na, C, and CH. At 0.69 J/cm2, which is slightly above the fluorescence threshold, but not enough for considerable fragmentation of the particles, Na D-line persists with little carbon and no CH observed. These results suggest that the photolytic fragmentation-fluorescence using 193 nm excitation can be effectively used for in situ, real-time chemical analysis of core-shell nanoparticles.

  16. Phase-only shaped laser pulses in optimal control theory: application to indirect photofragmentation dynamics in the weak-field limit.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels E

    2012-01-28

    We implement phase-only shaped laser pulses within quantum optimal control theory for laser-molecule interaction. This approach is applied to the indirect photofragmentation dynamics of NaI in the weak-field limit. It is shown that optimized phase-modulated pulses with a fixed frequency distribution can substantially modify transient dissociation probabilities as well as the momentum distribution associated with the relative motion of Na and I.

  17. Beam shaping for kilowatt fiber-coupled diode lasers by using one-step beam cutting-rotating of prisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yulong; Dong, Zhiyong; Chen, Yongqi; Qi, Yaoyao; Yuan, Xiandan; Qi, Yunfei; Xu, Li; Lin, Xuechun; Zou, Yonggang; Zhao, Pengfei

    2016-12-01

    The beam quality mismatch of laser diode stacks in both axes limits many direct applications for fiber or solid laser pumping and material processing. In this paper, a one-step cutting-rotating beam shaping system has been designed to homogenize the beam quality of two polarization-multiplexing laser diode stacks. Coupling laser diode stacks consisting of eight bars into a standard fiber with a core diameter of 600 μm and an NA of 0.22 is achieved. The simulative result shows that the system will have an output power over 1056 W. By using the technique, the production of compact and high brightness fiber-coupling diode lasers can be directly used for laser cladding and laser surface hardening processes.

  18. Robot-laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Akeel, H.A.

    1987-03-17

    A robot-laser system is described for providing a laser beam at a desired location, the system comprising: a laser beam source for generating a laser beam; a robot having at least three degrees of freedom and including a base and a robot arm supported on the base, the robot arm having first and second elongated arm parts, the second arm part projecting from the first arm part. The robot arm has a wrist mechanism located at the distal end of the second arm part, the arm parts and the wrist mechanism being hollow and fluidly interconnected to define a laser beam path therewithin extending through the first arm part, along the entire projecting length of the second arm part and through the wrist mechanism. The arm parts and wrist mechanism are adapted to direct the laser beam therewithin; and at least one mirror for reflecting the laser beam, a single mirror being mounted to and supported by the arm therewithin at a position of fluid interconnection between the arm parts to move therewith and reflect the laser beam. A first one of the degrees of freedom comprises a linear movement of the first arm part along an axis coincident with the laser beam path. A second one of the degrees of freedom comprises a linear movement of the second arm part along a second axis coincident with the laser beam path through the second arm part and a third one of the degrees of freedom comprises a rotary movement of one of the arm parts about the laser beam path.

  19. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  20. Spectroscopic features of laser-induced breakdown in water and aqueous solutions in ultrasonic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, A. V.; Nagorny, I. G.; Sosedko, E. V.

    2017-08-01

    It is established that the action of ultrasound leads to both sharp enhancement of the acoustic emission and increase in the intensity of spectral lines of laser-excited elements dissolved in aqueous salt solutions (NaCl, NaHCO3, CaCl2), which provides a new method of combined laser-ultrasonic spark spectroscopy. The task of synchronization of the acoustic and optical emission has been solved, which reveals dependence of the intensity of spectral lines on the phase of ultrasonic wave action.

  1. Lasers '83. Proceedings of the international conference

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of the semiconductor diode laser, laser material processing, nonlinear spectroscopy, recent advancements in diode lasers, laser-driven particle accelerators, laser applications in the atmospheric sciences, laser-assisted collisions, novel (garnet and alexandrite) solid state laser materials, IR molecular lasers, devices and components for fiber-optic communications, free-electron lasers and masers, and picosecond optical phenomena. Also covered are laser-stimulated materials surface processes, color center laser developments, blue-green and metal vapor lasers, laser chemistry, nonlinear effects, high energy lasers, excimer lasers, laser trapping of ions, optical cavities and propagation, laser isotope separation, laser trapping of atoms, laser applications in biochemistry, tunable coherent short wavelength radiation, laser spectroscopy, picosecond studies of condensed phase molecular systems, and combustion and plasma diagnostics.

  2. Monotonically chirped pulse evolution in an ultrashort pulse thulium-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Haxsen, Frithjof; Wandt, Dieter; Morgner, Uwe; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2012-03-15

    We report on monotonically positively chirped pulse operation of a hybridly mode-locked thulium fiber laser. Dispersion management was realized with a small-core, high-NA fiber providing normal dispersion in the 2 μm wavelength region. The laser delivered pulses with 0.7 nJ energy at the 1927 nm center wavelength and sub-500-fs pulse duration after compression.

  3. Corrosion resistant nickel superalloy coatings laser-clad with a 6 kW high power diode laser (HPDL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuominen, Jari; Honkanen, Mari; Hovikorpi, Jari; Vihinen, Jorma; Vuoristo, Petri; Maentylae, Tapio

    2003-03-01

    A series of exerpiments were performed to investigate the one-step laser cladding of Inconel 625 powder, injected off-axially onto Fe37 and 42CrMo4 substrates. The experiments were carried out using a 6 kW high power diode laser (HPDL) mounted to a 6 axis robot system. The rectangular shape of the delivering beam was focused to a spot size of 22 x 5 mm on the work piece. The coating samples were produced using different levels of powder feed rate (77 - 113 g/min), traveling speed (300 - 400 mm/min) and laser power (4.8 - 6 kW). Hot corrosion resistance of laser-clad Inconel 625 coatings were tested in Na2SO4 - V2O5 at 650°C for 1000 hours. Wet corrosion properties of the obtained coatings were tested in immersion tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Diode laser power of 6 kW (808 and 940 nm) was high enough to produce 20 mm wide laser-clad tracks with a thickness of 2.5 mm in a single pass, when powder feed rate was more than 6 kg/h and traverse speed was 400 mm/min. Wet corrosion properties of laser-clad Inconel 625 coatings were found to be superior to sprayed and welded coatings. Hot corrosion resistance was even slightly better than corresponding wrought alloy. Finally, one-step HPDL cladding was demonstrated in coating of shaft for hydraulic cylinder with Inconel 625 powder. Due to high coating quality, high deposition rate and traverse speed HPDL devices are very promising for large area cladding applications.

  4. Potassium titanyl phosphate laser welding following complete nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Neel K; Mejias, Christopher; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Gale, Derrick C; Park, Andrea M; Paniello, Randal C

    2017-07-01

    Cranial nerve transection during head and neck surgery is conventionally repaired by microsuture reanastomosis. Laser nerve welding (LNW), using CO2 laser to spot-weld the epineurium of transected nerve endings, has been shown in animal models to be a novel alternative to microsuture repair. This method avoids needle/suture material and minimizes instrumentation of the nerve. We hypothesized that potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser would be superior to CO2 laser in repairing transected nerves. Using a rat posterior tibial nerve injury model, we compared CO2 laser, KTP laser, and microsuture reanastomosis. Animal study. Animals underwent unilateral posterior tibial nerve transection. The injury was repaired by microsuture repair (n = 15), CO2 laser repair (n = 15), or KTP laser repair (n = 15). Weekly walking tracks were performed to measure functional recovery. Nerve segments were harvested for axon counting. At 6 weeks, the KTP LNW had the best functional recovery (92.4 ± 8.6%) compared to microsuture repair (84.5 ± 10.2%, difference 7.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.84%-14.96%). CO2 laser repair had a functional recovery of 86.8 ± 11.2%. KTP LNW had better axon recovery compared to transection/repair (difference 530.7 axons, 95% CI: 329.9-731.5). Operative time for the microsuture repair was 18.2 ± 6.8 minutes, compared to 5.8 ± 3.7 minutes for the LNW groups (difference 12.4 minutes, 95% CI: 8.6-16.2 minutes). KTP, CO2 , and microsuture repair all showed good functional recovery following complete transection of the posterior tibial nerve. Following complete nerve transection during head and neck surgery, KTP LNW may be a novel alternative to microsuture repair. NA Laryngoscope, 127:1525-1530, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  6. Laser biostimulation in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utz, Irina A.; Lagutina, L. E.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    1995-01-01

    In the present paper the method and apparatus for percutaneous laser irradiation of blood (PLIB) in vessels (veins) are described. Results of clinical investigations of biostimulating effects under PLIB by red laser light (633 nm) in Cubiti and Saphena Magna veins are presented.

  7. Laser hair removal pearls.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Emily P; Goldberg, David J

    2008-03-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the follicle through the targeting of melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Pearls of laser hair removal are presented in this review, focusing on four areas of recent development: 1 treatment of blond, white and gray hair; 2 paradoxical hypertrichosis; 3 laser hair removal in children; and 4 comparison of lasers and IPL. Laser and light-based technologies to remove hair represents one of the most exciting areas where discoveries by dermatologists have led to novel treatment approaches. It is likely that in the next decade, continued advancements in this field will bring us closer to the development of a more permanent and painless form of hair removal.

  8. Tunable dysprosium laser.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Matthew R; Jackson, Stuart D

    2016-10-01

    We report the demonstration of a tunable dysprosium laser. The experiment employed in-band pumping of a Dy3+-doped fluoride fiber and a simple resonator design involving a ruled diffraction grating. The laser produced tuning between 2.95 and 3.35 μm, limited by the availability of optics.

  9. Laser Programs Highlight 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.R.

    1997-01-31

    Our contributions to laser science and technology and corresponding applications range from concept to design of the National Ignition Facility, transfer of Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation technology to the private sector, and from new initiatives in industry and defense to micro-optics for improving human vision.

  10. Solid state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rines, Glen A. (Inventor); Moulton, Peter F. (Inventor); Harrison, James (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength-tunable, injection-seeded, dispersion-compensated, dispersively-pumped solid state laser includes a lasing medium; a highly reflective mirror; an output coupler; at least one isosceles Brewster prism oriented to the minimum deviation angle between the medium and the mirror for directing light of different wavelengths along different paths; means for varying the angle of the highly reflective mirror relative to the light from at least one Brewster angle for selecting a predetermined laser operating wavelength; a dispersion compensation apparatus associated with the lasing medium; a laser injection seeding port disposed between the dispersion compensation apparatus and one of the mirror and coupler and including a reflective surface at an acute non-Brewster angle to the laser beam for introducing a seed input; a dispersion compensation apparatus associated with the laser medium including opposite chirality optical elements; the lasing medium including a pump surface disposed at an acute angle to the laser beam to define a discrete path for the pumping laser beam separate from the pumped laser beam.

  11. Learning about Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Larry

    2011-01-01

    The word laser is an acronym. It stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers, invented in 1958, are used to cut and fuse materials, accurately survey long distances, communicate across fiber-optic phone lines, produce 3D pictures, make special effects, help navigation, and read bar codes for cash registers. A laser…

  12. Learning about Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Larry

    2011-01-01

    The word laser is an acronym. It stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers, invented in 1958, are used to cut and fuse materials, accurately survey long distances, communicate across fiber-optic phone lines, produce 3D pictures, make special effects, help navigation, and read bar codes for cash registers. A laser…

  13. Fine welding with lasers.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  14. Laser applications in surgery.

    PubMed

    Azadgoli, Beina; Baker, Regina Y

    2016-12-01

    In modern medicine, lasers are increasingly utilized for treatment of a variety of pathologies as interest in less invasive treatment modalities intensifies. The physics behind lasers allows the same basic principles to be applied to a multitude of tissue types using slight modifications of the system. Multiple laser systems have been studied within each field of medicine. The term "laser" was combined with "surgery," "ablation," "lithotripsy," "cancer treatment," "tumor ablation," "dermatology," "skin rejuvenation," "lipolysis," "cardiology," "atrial fibrillation (AF)," and "epilepsy" during separate searches in the PubMed database. Original articles that studied the application of laser energy for these conditions were reviewed and included. A review of laser therapy is presented. Laser energy can be safely and effectively used for lithotripsy, for the treatment of various types of cancer, for a multitude of cosmetic and reconstructive procedures, and for the ablation of abnormal conductive pathways. For each of these conditions, management with lasers is comparable to, and potentially superior to, management with more traditional methods.

  15. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors. (auth)

  16. New laser tracheal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungemach, Josef; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Hoermann, Karl; Preponis, E.

    1996-09-01

    The complication of a laser induced tube fire during surgery was first published in 1979. The protection of tracheal tubes against ignition is necessary to enable a safe laser surgery of the upper airway. in an experimental study a new compound tube was tested: this tube had a higher laser resistance than a pure metal tube. The damage threshold of this tube was tested against the emission of various lasers as CO2. The metal tube was damaged within seconds at CO2 laser power densities of 103 W/cm2 whereas the damage threshold of the compound tube was 3.106 W/cm2. We compared the compound laser tube to the so far used metal tube in a prospective clinical trial in our department of ENT in patients undergoing CO2-laser surgery of the upper airway. 66 patients were included into the study: 33 received the compound tube, 33 the metal tube. During endotracheal intubation the handling of the compound tube was better. During laser surgery high airway pressures occured more often with the metal tube. Whereas kinking was the problem of the compound tubes. Destruction of cuffs occured in both groups but did not cause any complications. No tube or cuff fire was noticed.

  17. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  18. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  19. Lasers for Training Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, C. A.

    A breadboard model of a laser display system is described in detail and its operating procedure is outlined. The system consists of: a Model 52 argon krypton ion laser and power supply; an optical breadboard comprising a pocket cell light modulator, a galvonmeter beam deflector for vertical scanning, a unique multiple reflection beam steerer for…

  20. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Miller, J.L.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-08-23

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window. 2 figs.