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Sample records for laser pulse parameters

  1. Optimizing chirped laser pulse parameters for electron acceleration in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Akhyani, Mina; Jahangiri, Fazel; Niknam, Ali Reza; Massudi, Reza

    2015-11-14

    Electron dynamics in the field of a chirped linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated. Variations of electron energy gain versus chirp parameter, time duration, and initial phase of laser pulse are studied. Based on maximizing laser pulse asymmetry, a numerical optimization procedure is presented, which leads to the elimination of rapid fluctuations of gain versus the chirp parameter. Instead, a smooth variation is observed that considerably reduces the accuracy required for experimentally adjusting the chirp parameter.

  2. Optimisation of thulium fibre laser parameters with generation of pulses by pump modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Obronov, I V; Larin, S V; Sypin, V E

    2015-07-31

    The formation of relaxation pulses of a thulium fibre laser (λ = 1.9 μm) by modulating the power of a pump erbium fibre laser (λ = 1.55 μm) is studied. A theoretical model is developed to find the dependences of pulse duration and peak power on different cavity parameters. The optimal cavity parameters for achieving the minimal pulse duration are determined. The results are confirmed by experimental development of a laser emitting pulses with a duration shorter than 10 ns, a peak power of 1.8 kW and a repetition rate of 50 kHz. (control of radiation parameters)

  3. Various Ambiguities in Re-constructing Laser Pulse Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar; Prasa, Narasimha

    2006-01-01

    We think that mode lock laser pulses are generated by the summation process that take place between the monochromatic EM filed frequencies as if they interact with each other as shown in equation 1. In reality, the pulse generation is a collaborative interaction process between EM fields and various material medium. When we carry out the actual mode lock analysis, we do take into account of interpaly between all the temporal dynamics of the cavity gain medium, cavity round trip time and the response time of the intra cavity element (saturable absorber, Kerr medium, etc.). that really enforces the locking of the phase of the cavity spontaneous emissions. On a conceptual level, this simplistic representation of the mode locking by Eq.1 ignores all these critical physical processes. When we try to analyze a pulsed field, again we start by representing it very much like this equation, even though we can only detect the square modulus of this complex field and loose a lot of phase related information to the detectors quantum whims and their time constants. The key parameters for a light pulse are as follows. Foremost is the (i) carrier frequency, which cannot be described or imagined without its state of undulation expressed as its (ii) phase. Next is our imagined time finite (iii) carrier envelope that provides the temporal boundary of the field amplitude strength of the undulating E-field. The final parameter is the (iv) state of polarization or the unique plane along which the strength of the E-field gradient undulates. None of these filed characteristics are made self-evident to us by the fields themselves. We do not see light. Light does not see light. Light beams pass through each other without altering each others energy distribution unless there are interacting material molecules (dipoles) within the physical volume of superposition of the beams. In contrast, we can sense the material particles. Material particles sense each other and they cannot pass through

  4. Pulsed hollow-cathode ion lasers: pumping and lasing parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zinchenko, S P; Ivanov, I G

    2012-06-30

    Optimal discharge conditions have been experimentally found for ion lasers excited in the hollow-cathode discharge plasma by microsecond current pulses by pumping working atoms in secondkind collisions with ions and metastable buffer-gas atoms. Measurements of the output power of krypton ion and zinc-, cadmium-, mercury-, thallium-, copper-, and gallium-vapour lasers in tubes with cathodes of different diameters showed that the pulse power reaches several tens of watts, and the average power obtained with cathodes 2 cm in diameter and a length of 40 cm or more approaches 1 W. Lasing in most media is observed simultaneously at several lines (the multi-wavelength regime). Lasing on a three-component (He - Kr - Hg) mixture is realised in the multi-wavelength regime at blue, red, and IR lines.

  5. Optimizatin Of Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Parameters For Titanium Seam-Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akman, E.; Canel, T.; Demir, A.; Sinmazcelik, T.

    2007-04-01

    Titanium alloys are the most advantageous metals for the medical and aerospace industry because of their light weight and excellent corrosion resistance. Several techniques were investigated to achieve reliable welds with optimal distortion for the fabrication components used in industry. Laser welding is the most important joining technique because of its precision, rapid processing. For pulse mode Nd:YAG laser; pulse shape, energy, duration, repetition rate and peak power are the most important parameters effects the weld quality. And also the combinations of these parameters are very important for pulsed laser seam-welding. In this study, an experimental work has been done to determine the pulsed laser seam-welding parameters for 3mm thick titanium alloys using the Lumonics JK760TR Nd:YAG pulsed laser.

  6. Effects of Technical Parameters on the Pulsed Laser Deposited Ferroelectric Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yafan; Chen, Chuanzhong; Song, Mingda; Ma, Jie; Wang, Diangang

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is a novel technique in producing thin films in the recent years, shows unique advantages for the deposition of ferroelectric films. Effects of technical parameters on the pulsed laser deposited ferroelectric films, including substrate temperature, oxygen pressure, post-annealing, buffer layer, target composition, energy density, wavelength, target-to-substrate distance, and laser pulse rate, are systematically reviewed in order to optimize these parameters. Processing-microstructure-property relationships of ferroelectric films by PLD are discussed. The application prospect is pointed as well.

  7. CO2 Laser Microchanneling Process: Effects of Compound Parameters and Pulse Overlapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Shashi; Kumar, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate) is commonly used in many microfluidic devices like Lab-on-a-chip devices, bioanalytical devices etc. CO2 lasers provide easy and cost effective solution for micromachining needs on PMMA. Microchannels are an integral part of most of these microfluidic devices. CO2 laser beams have been successfully applied by many authors to fabricate microchannels on PMMA substrates. Laser beam power and scanning speed are the most important laser input parameters affecting the output parameters like microchannel depth, width and heat affected zone (HAZ). The effect of these individual parameters on output parameters are well known and already elaborated by many authors. However, these output parameters can more significantly be described by some compound parameters (combination of direct input laser parameters) like laser fluence, specific point energy, interaction time and P/U (power/scanning speed) ratio. The explanation of effect of these compound parameters was not found in earlier researches. In this work, several experiments were carried out to determine the effects of these compound parameters on output parameters i.e. microchannel width, depth and heat affected zone. The effect of pulse overlapping was also determined by performing experiments at different pulse overlaps and with two different energy deposition settings. The concept of actual pulse overlapping has been introduced by considering actual beam spot diameter instead of using theoretical beam diameter. Minimum pulse overlapping was determined experimentally in order to ensure smooth microchannel edges.

  8. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Picosecond pulse generation in a passively mode-locked Bi-doped fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Aleksandr A.; Kryukov, P. G.; Dianov, Evgenii M.; Okhotnikov, Oleg G.

    2009-10-01

    CW passive mode locking is achieved in a bismuth-doped fibre laser using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror optimised for operation in the range 1100-1200 nm. The pump source is a cw ytterbium fibre laser (1075 nm, maximum output power of 2.7 W), and the pulse parameters can be tuned by varying the intracavity group velocity dispersion using a diffraction grating pair. Stable laser pulses are obtained with a duration down to τp approx 1.1 ps.

  9. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    PubMed

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach.

  10. Temporal pulse shaping: a key parameter for the laser welding of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Caroline; Poulon-Quintin, Angeline

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to describe the effect of pulse shaping on the prevention of internal defects during laser welding for two dental alloys mainly used in prosthetic dentistry. Single spot, weld beads, and welds with 80 % overlapping were performed on Co-Cr-Mo and Pd-Ag-Sn cast plates with a pulsed neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. A specific welding procedure using adapted parameters to each alloy was completed. All the possibilities for pulse shaping were tested: (1) the square pulse shape as a default setting, (2) a rising edge slope for gradual heating, (3) a falling edge slope to slow the cooling process, and (4) a combination of rising and falling edges. The optimization of the pulse shape is supposed to produce defect-free welds (crack, pores, voids). Cross-section SEM observations and Vickers microhardness measurements were made. Pd-Ag-Sn was highly sensitive to hot cracking, and Co-Cr-Mo was more sensitive to voids and small porosities (sometimes combined with cracks). Using a slow cooling ramp allowed a better control on the solidification process for those two alloys always preventing internal defects. A rapid slope should be preferred for Co-Cr-Mo alloys due to its low-laser beam reflectivity. On the opposite, for Pd-Ag-Sn alloy, a slow rising slope should be preferred because this alloy has a high-laser beam reflectivity.

  11. Process optimization in high-average-power ultrashort pulse laser microfabrication: how laser process parameters influence efficiency, throughput and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Loeschner, Udo

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser processing of technical grade stainless steel and copper using high-average-power ultrashort pulse lasers is studied in order to gain deeper insight into material removal for microfabrication. A high-pulse repetition frequency picosecond and femtosecond laser is used in conjunction with high-performance galvanometer scanners and an in-house developed two-axis polygon scanner system. By varying the processing parameters such as wavelength, pulse length, fluence and repetition rate, cavities of standardized geometry are fabricated and analyzed. From the depths of the cavities produced, the ablation rate and removal efficiency are estimated. In addition, the quality of the cavities is evaluated by means of scanning electron microscope micrographs or rather surface roughness measurements. From the results obtained, the influence of the machining parameters on material removal and machining quality is discussed. In addition, it is shown that both material removal rate and quality increase by using femtosecond compared to picosecond laser pulses. On stainless steel, a maximum throughput of 6.81 mm3/min is achieved with 32 W femtosecond laser powers; if using 187 W picosecond laser powers, the maximum is 15.04 mm3/min, respectively. On copper, the maximum throughputs are 6.1 mm3/min and 21.4 mm3/min, obtained with 32 W femtosecond and 187 W picosecond laser powers. The findings indicate that ultrashort pulses in the mid-fluence regime yield most efficient material removal. In conclusion, from the results of this analysis, a range of optimum processing parameters are derived feasible to enhance machining efficiency, throughput and quality in high-rate micromachining. The work carried out here clearly opens the way to significant industrial applications.

  12. Influence of lasing parameters on the cleaning efficacy of laser-activated irrigation with pulsed erbium lasers.

    PubMed

    Meire, Maarten A; Havelaerts, Sophie; De Moor, Roeland J

    2016-05-01

    Laser-activated irrigation (LAI) using erbium lasers is an irrigant agitation technique with great potential for improved cleaning of the root canal system, as shown in many in vitro studies. However, lasing parameters for LAI vary considerably and their influence remains unclear. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the influence of pulse energy, pulse frequency, pulse length, irradiation time and fibre tip shape, position and diameter on the cleaning efficacy of LAI. Transparent resin blocks containing standardized root canals (apical diameter of 0.4 mm, 6% taper, 15 mm long, with a coronal reservoir) were used as the test model. A standardized groove in the apical part of each canal wall was packed with stained dentin debris. The canals were filled with irrigant, which was activated by an erbium: yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser (2940 nm, AT Fidelis, Fotona, Ljubljana, Slovenia). In each experiment, one laser parameter was varied, while the others remained constant. In this way, the influence of pulse energy (10-40 mJ), pulse length (50-1000 μs), frequency (5-30 Hz), irradiation time (5-40 s) and fibre tip shape (flat or conical), position (pulp chamber, canal entrance, next to groove) and diameter (300-600 μm) was determined by treating 20 canals per parameter. The amount of debris remaining in the groove after each LAI procedure was scored and compared among the different treatments. The parameters significantly (P < 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis) affecting debris removal from the groove were fibre tip position, pulse length, pulse energy, irradiation time and frequency. Fibre tip shape and diameter had no significant influence on the cleaning efficacy.

  13. Effect of pulsed laser parameters on in-situ TiC synthesis in laser surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi, M. J.; Torkamany, M. J.; Sabbaghzadeh, J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial titanium sheets pre-coated with 300-μm thick graphite layer were treated by employing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser in order to enhance surface properties such as wear and erosion resistance. Laser in-situ alloying method produced a composite layer by melting the titanium substrate and dissolution of graphite in the melt pool. Correlations between pulsed laser parameters, microstructure and microhardness of the synthesized composite coatings were investigated. Effects of pulse duration and overlapping factor on the microstructure and hardness of the alloyed layer were deduced from Vickers micro-indentation tests, XRD, SEM and metallographic analyses of cross sections of the generated layer. Results show that the composite cladding layer was constituted with TiC intermetallic phase between the titanium matrix in particle and dendrite forms. The dendritic morphology of composite layer was changed to cellular grain structure by increasing laser pulse duration and irradiated energy. High values of the measured hardness indicate that deposited titanium carbide increases in the conditions with more pulse duration and low process speed. This occurs due to more dissolution of carbon into liquid Ti by heat input increasing and positive influence of the Marangoni flow in the melted zone.

  14. Effects of Pulse Parameters on Weld Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Extra Pulse Current Aided Laser Welded 2219 Aluminum Alloy Joints.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinge; Li, Liqun; Chen, Yanbin; Yang, Zhaojun; Chen, Yanli; Guo, Xinjian

    2017-09-15

    In order to expand the application range of laser welding and improve weld quality, an extra pulse current was used to aid laser-welded 2219 aluminum alloy, and the effects of pulse current parameters on the weld microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. The effect mechanisms of the pulse current interactions with the weld pool were evaluated. The results indicated that the coarse dendritic structure in the weld zone changed to a fine equiaxed structure using an extra pulse current, and the pulse parameters, including medium peak current, relatively high pulse frequency, and low pulse duty ratio benefited to improving the weld structure. The effect mechanisms of the pulse current were mainly ascribed to the magnetic pinch effect, thermal effect, and electromigration effect caused by the pulse current. The effect of the pulse parameters on the mechanical properties of welded joints were consistent with that of the weld microstructure. The tensile strength and elongation of the optimal pulse current-aided laser-welded joint increased by 16.4% and 105%, respectively, compared with autogenous laser welding.

  15. Effects of Pulse Parameters on Weld Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Extra Pulse Current Aided Laser Welded 2219 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinge; Li, Liqun; Chen, Yanbin; Yang, Zhaojun; Chen, Yanli; Guo, Xinjian

    2017-01-01

    In order to expand the application range of laser welding and improve weld quality, an extra pulse current was used to aid laser-welded 2219 aluminum alloy, and the effects of pulse current parameters on the weld microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. The effect mechanisms of the pulse current interactions with the weld pool were evaluated. The results indicated that the coarse dendritic structure in the weld zone changed to a fine equiaxed structure using an extra pulse current, and the pulse parameters, including medium peak current, relatively high pulse frequency, and low pulse duty ratio benefited to improving the weld structure. The effect mechanisms of the pulse current were mainly ascribed to the magnetic pinch effect, thermal effect, and electromigration effect caused by the pulse current. The effect of the pulse parameters on the mechanical properties of welded joints were consistent with that of the weld microstructure. The tensile strength and elongation of the optimal pulse current-aided laser-welded joint increased by 16.4% and 105%, respectively, compared with autogenous laser welding. PMID:28914825

  16. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Generation of diffraction-limited nanosecond and subnanosecond pulses in a XeCl laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu N.; Losev, V. F.; Dudarev, V. V.

    2008-04-01

    The generation of nanosecond and subnanosecond pulses in a XeCl laser is studied. The short radiation pulses are generated in a resonator with a SBS mirror. By focusing laser radiation inside and on the surface of a nonlinear medium, it is possible to generate pulses of duration 3 ns and 150 ps, respectively. The laser beams obtained in this way contain more than 70% of energy within the diffraction angle and have the signal-to-noise ration exceeding 104.

  17. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.; Demchuk, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H2 - F2(NF3 or SF66) and He(Ne) - H2 - F2(NF3 or SF6) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% - 6%.

  18. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Application of deformable mirrors in industrial CO2 lasers. II. Intracavity power control and repetitively pulsed modulation of output radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinevich, B. S.; Evdokimovich, L. N.; Safronov, A. G.; Smirnov, S. N.

    2004-04-01

    Industrial CO2 lasers of various types with stable cavities, which contain deformable mirrors with a controllable curvature of the reflecting surface, are studied experimentally. Stable and reproducible control of the output power of industrial CO2 lasers is achieved in both single-mode and multimode regimes until the complete lasing quenching. Stable repetitively pulsed lasing regimes with a pulse repetition rate varied from a few to several hundred hertz are obtained in cw CO2 lasers. The shapes of the output laser pulses and the dependence of the mean output power on the frequency — time parameters of the control voltage applied to the intracavity deformable mirror are studied.

  19. Anomalous dependence of the lasing parameters of dye solutions on the spectrum of microsecond pump laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tarkovsky, V V; Kurstak, V Yu; Anufrik, S S

    2003-10-31

    The anomalous dependence of the lasing parameters of ethanol solutions of coumarin, rhodamine, oxazine, and laser dyes of other classes on the spectrum of microsecond pump laser pulses is found. The dependence is determined by the shape of the induced singlet - singlet absorption spectra and absorption spectra of short-lived photoproducts. The elucidation of the influence of these factors makes it possible to choose optimal pump spectra and to enhance the efficiency and stability of microsecond dye lasers. (active media)

  20. Influences of pulse laser parameters on properties of AISI316L stainless steel thin-walled part by laser material deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinlin; Deng, Dewei; Yi, Hongli; Xu, Haiyan; Yang, Shuhua; Zhang, Hongchao

    2017-07-01

    Laser material deposition (LMD) which combines laser cladding and rapid prototyping technique has been widely used to build full density metal parts directly without using modules or tools. There are many parameters affecting the quality and properties of the LMD parts through changing the energy distribution. Pulse laser provides the user an added degree of controlling over the energy distribution which seriously affects the solidification of molten pool and eventual part formation. In the present study, a series of AISI316L stainless steel thin-walled parts are successfully produced by LMD with different pulse laser parameters to investigate the effects of energy distribution on characteristics (microstructure, hardness, residual stress and tensile properties). The results show that the characteristics of LMD parts are obviously influenced by laser mode (pulse or continuous wave laser) and pulse laser parameters (T_pulse and T_pause). The microstructure of parts presents various grain sizes with the different pulse laser parameters. The different value (D-value) between the hardness of edge and central region varies considerably with the pulse laser parameters. The maximum D-value of hardness is presented in the part deposited by continuous wave laser. The maximum hardness is presented in item 4 (T_pulse=10 ms, T_pause=10 ms) and the minimum hardness is presented in part fabricated by continuous wave laser where the residual stress on Z-component presents tensile stress at the edge region and compress stress at the central region but opposite trend happens to the residual stress on Y-component. Tensile stress on Z-component at the edge region increases even presents compress tensile with the decrease of T_pulse. The stress on Y-component presents a periodic variation between tensile stress and compress stress in the Y-direction of the part fabricated by pulse laser. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the part fabricated using pulse laser is higher than the

  1. Optimization of the parameters for intrastromal refractive surgery with ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisterkamp, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo; Lubatschowski, Holger; Welling, Herbert; Dommer, Wolfgang; Luetkefels, Elke; Mamom, Thanongsak; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2001-06-01

    Focussing femtosecond laser pulses into a transparent media, such as corneal tissue, leads to optical breakdown, generation of a micro-plasma and, thus, a cutting effect inside the tissue. To proof the potential of fs-lasers in refractive surgery, three-dimensional cutting within the corneal stroma was evaluated. With the use of ultrashort laser pulses within the LASIK procedure (laser in situ keratomileusis) possible complications in handling of a mechanical knife, the microkeratome, can be reduced by using the treatment laser as the keratome itself. To study woundhealing effects, animal studies were carried out in rabbit specimen. The surgical outcome was analyzed by means of histological sections, as well as light and scanning electron microscopy. Dependencies on the dispersion caused by focussing optics were evaluated and optimized. Thus, pulse energies well below 1 (mu) J were sufficient to perform the intrastromal cuts. The laser pulses with a duration of 180 fs and energies of 0.5-100 (mu) J were provided by a modelocked frequency doubled erbium fiber-laser with subsequent chirped pulse amplification in a titanium sapphire amplifier at up to 3 kHz.

  2. Analysis of process parameter for the ablation of optical glasses with femto- and picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Christian; Friedrich, Maria; Bliedtner, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Experiments with an ultrashort pulsed laser system emitting pulses ranging from 350 fs to 10 ps and a maximum average power of 50 W at 1030 nm are presented. The laser beam gets deflected by a galvanometric scan-system with maximum scan speed of 2500 mm/s and focused by F-theta lenses onto the substrates. By experiments the influences of pulse energy, fluence, laser wavelength, pulse length and material conditions on the target figures is analyzed. These are represented by the material characteristics mean squared roughness, ablation depths as well as the microcrack distribution in depth. The experimental procedure is applied onto a series of fused silica and SF6 samples.

  3. Parameters effects study on pulse laser for the generation of surface acoustic waves in human skin detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tingting; Fu, Xing; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Chen, Kun; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen

    2015-10-01

    Laser-induced Surface Acoustic Waves (LSAWs) has been promisingly and widely used in recent years due to its rapid, high accuracy and non-contact evaluation potential of layered and thin film materials. For now, researchers have applied this technology on the characterization of materials' physical parameters, like Young's Modulus, density, and Poisson's ratio; or mechanical changes such as surface cracks and skin feature like a melanoma. While so far, little research has been done on providing practical guidelines on pulse laser parameters to best generate SAWs. In this paper finite element simulations of the thermos-elastic process based on human skin model for the generation of LSAWs were conducted to give the effects of pulse laser parameters have on the generated SAWs. And recommendations on the parameters to generate strong SAWs for detection and surface characterization without cause any damage to skin are given.

  4. Plasma Parameter of a Capillary Discharge-Produced Plasma Channel to Guide an Ultrashort Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bai, Jin-xiang; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-01-22

    We have observed the optical guiding of a 100-fs laser pulse with the laser intensity in the range of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} using a 1.5-cm long capillary discharge-produced plasma channel for compact electron acceleration applications. The optical pulse propagation using the plasma channel is achieved with the electron densities of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and the electron temperatures of 0.5-4 eV at a discharge time delay of around 150 ns and a discharge current of 500 A with a pulse duration of 100-150 ns. An energy spectrum of the accelerated electrons from a laser-plasma acceleration scheme showed a peak at 1.3 MeV with a maximum energy tail of 1.6 MeV.

  5. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Razhev, A M; Kargapol'tsev, E S; Churkin, D S; Demchuk, S V

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF6{sub 6}) and He(Ne) – H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF{sub 6}) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% – 6%. (lasers)

  6. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Jitter and the minimal pulse repetition rate of a diode-pumped passively Q-switched solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belovolov, M. I.; Shatalov, A. F.

    2008-10-01

    The jitter of radiation pulses from diode-pumped passively Q-switched Nd3+:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) and Nd3+:Ca3Ga2Ge3O12 (Nd:CGGG) crystal lasers is studied. It is found that the jitter j depends on the laser pulse repetition rate f as j = A/fγ. It is shown that the minimal pulse repetition rate fL of the laser is determined by the jitter parameters A and γ and is equal to A1/(γ-1). For the Nd:YAG and Nd:CGGG lasers, fL was 14 Hz and 5 Hz, respectively.

  7. Experimental Study of Direct Laser Deposition of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 by Using Pulsed Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kamran; Haq, Izhar Ul; Shah, Shaukat Ali; Khan, Farid Ullah; Khan, Sikander

    2014-01-01

    Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD) has developed from a prototyping to a single metal manufacturing tool. Its potential for creating multimaterial and functionally graded structures is now beginning to be explored. This work is a first part of a study in which a single layer of Inconel 718 is deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Single layer tracks were built at a range of powder mass flow rates using a coaxial nozzle and 1.5 kW diode laser operating in both continuous and pulsed beam modes. This part of the study focused on the experimental findings during the deposition of Inconel 718 powder on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed for characterization and phase identification. Residual stress measurement had been carried out to ascertain the effects of laser pulse parameters on the crack development during the deposition process. PMID:24592190

  8. Experimental study of direct laser deposition of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 by using pulsed parameters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kamran; Izhar Ul Haq; Shah, Shaukat Ali; Khan, Farid Ullah; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Khan, Sikander

    2014-01-01

    Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD) has developed from a prototyping to a single metal manufacturing tool. Its potential for creating multimaterial and functionally graded structures is now beginning to be explored. This work is a first part of a study in which a single layer of Inconel 718 is deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Single layer tracks were built at a range of powder mass flow rates using a coaxial nozzle and 1.5 kW diode laser operating in both continuous and pulsed beam modes. This part of the study focused on the experimental findings during the deposition of Inconel 718 powder on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed for characterization and phase identification. Residual stress measurement had been carried out to ascertain the effects of laser pulse parameters on the crack development during the deposition process.

  9. Process and parameter optimisation for micro structuring of 3D freeform metallic surfaces: a comparative study of short-pulse (nanosecond) and ultrafast (picosecond, femtosecond) laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Steffen G.; Sampaio, Daniel J. B. S.; Mangang, Melanie; Pfleging, Wilhelm

    2017-02-01

    Layer-based laser ablation of three dimensional micro structured freeform surfaces has become of significant importance for technical applications such as biomimetic surfaces in recent years. In order to identify the optimum set of process parameters for a complex laser ablation operation, a design of experiments (DoE) study has been carried out with laser sources covering pulse durations regime of femtosecond (fs), picosecond (ps) and nanosecond (ns). The aim was to identify the optimum parameter set for achieving best surface roughness and, as a second criteria, for machining time to be reduced to a minimum. In a first step, rectangular pockets have been machined and a DoE based parameter variation was performed. In particular, the parameters wavelength (1030 nm, 515 nm, 343 nm), machining speed, laser power, and laser pulse duration (fs, ps, ns) have been modified. Surface roughness and ablated depth were measured and an optimum set of parameters was calculated. The results show that the ultraviolet laser type (343nm) has the best performance to achieve lowest surface roughness and with a laser pulse duration of 3445 fs reaches also the best ablation efficiency in relation to machining time. While machining speed and laser power have an almost linear influence on achievable roughness, laser pulse duration has a quadratic influence in relation to a global minimum on the surface roughness result. For the ablated depth, machining speed and laser power have an almost linear influence while laser pulse duration has a quadratic influence in relation to a global maximum.

  10. Exploring the parameter space for ionization and dissociation of H2^+ in an intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudnev, Vladimir

    2005-05-01

    We explore the dissociation and ionization of H2^+ ions aligned with a 790 nm laser field of peak intensity in the range 1.0x10^13 to 7.0x10^14 W/cm ^2 . Calculated dissociation and ionization probabilities are reported for different initial vibrational states and for the initial state averaged over the Franck-Condon distribution. The dependence on the carrier-envelope phase difference for different initial states and for pulse durations from 5 to 30 fs FWHM is presented. These results --- from direct solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation --- are compared with solutions in the Born-Oppenheimer representation with two-channels for low peak laser intensities.

  11. Pulsed IR inductive lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed inductive discharge is a new alternative method of pumping active gas laser media. The work presents results of experimental investigations of near, mid, and far IR inductive gas lasers (H2, HF, and CO2) operating at different transitions of atoms and molecules with different mechanisms of formation of inversion population. The excitation systems of a pulsed inductive cylindrical discharge (pulsed inductively coupled plasma) and pulsed RF inductive discharge in the gases are developed. Various gas mixtures including H2, N2, He, Ne, F2, NF3, and SF6 are used. Characteristics of near IR H2 laser radiation are investigated. Maximal pulse peak power of 7 kW is achieved. The possibility of using a pulsed inductive discharge as a new method of pumping HF laser active medium is demonstrated. The pulsed RF inductive CO2 laser is created and a total efficiency of 17% is achieved.

  12. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter.

  13. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  14. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  15. Effect of laser cavity parameters on saturation of light – current characteristics of high-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Veselov, D A; Pikhtin, N A; Lyutetskiy, A V; Nikolaev, D N; Slipchenko, S O; Sokolova, Z N; Shamakhov, V V; Shashkin, I S; Kapitonov, V A; Tarasov, I S

    2015-07-31

    We report an experimental study of power characteristics of semiconductor lasers based on MOVPE-grown asymmetric separate-confinement heterostructures with a broadened waveguide as functions of cavity length, stripe contact width and mirror reflectivities. It is shown that at high current pump levels, the variation of the cavity parameters of a semiconductor laser (width, length and mirror reflectivities) influences the light – current (L – I) characteristic saturation and maximum optical power by affecting such laser characteristics, as the current density and the optical output loss. A model is elaborated and an optical power of semiconductor lasers is calculated by taking into account the dependence of the internal optical loss on pump current density and concentration distribution of charge carriers and photons along the cavity axis of the cavity. It is found that only introduction of the dependence of the internal optical loss on pump current density to the calculation model provides a good agreement between experimental and calculated L – I characteristics for all scenarios of variations in the laser cavity parameters. (lasers)

  16. Pulsed Laser Propulsion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    afforded by a pulsed laser propulsion system over a CW laser propulsion system are 1) simplicity in engine design as a result of permitting the laser...to engineering and weight considerations. The lower boundary of the corridor is set by propellant feed considerations. To the right of this boundary...example, a OOJ -5 per pulse laser operating at 7 x 10 sec between pulses (14, 285 pps) is capable of powering a 30 lb (135 Nt)thrust rocket engine that has

  17. Effect of process parameters on the mechanical properties of carbon nitride thin films synthesized by plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbal, M.; Mérel, P.; Chaker, M.

    We present an investigation of the effect of the process parameters, namely deposition pressure and laser intensity, on the growth and mechanical properties of carbon nitride (CNx) thin films synthesized by plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition. Deposition at high remote plasma pressure (200 mTorr) enhances both growth rate and nitrogen incorporation (up to 40 at.%), but nano-indentation measurements indicate that these films are very soft and have poor mechanical properties. At low remote plasma pressure (0.5 mTorr), the nitrogen content varies from 24 to 16 at.% with increasing laser intensity as the films become much harder and more elastic, with hardness and Young's modulus values reaching 24 GPa and 230 GPa, respectively. These effects are explained in terms of a thermalization of the laser plasma at 200 mTorr and indicate that plasma activation of nitrogen does not provide any particular benefit to the film properties when deposition is performed at high pressure. However, at low pressure, the benefit of plasma activation is evidenced through enhanced nitrogen incorporation in the films while preserving the highly energetic species in the ablation plume. Such conditions lead to the synthesis, at room temperature, of hard and elastic films having properties close to those of fullerene-like CNx.

  18. Effects of the laser pulse irradiation point on a double layer target on the accelerated ion beam parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Koga, J.; Yamagiwa, M.

    2009-07-25

    In proton acceleration by a laser pulse obliquely incident on a double layer target, it is shown by PIC simulations that the energy spread of the generated protons can be reduced by irradiating the laser pulse on to the off-center position of the target. This provides a way to control the proton energy spectrum. High energy protons are found to come from an area shifted from the initial target center towards the propagation direction of the laser pulse. We show that high energy protons with much smaller energy spread can be obtained by appropriately adjusting the size and position of the second proton layer.

  19. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Transformation of pulses with the help of thin-layer interference structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovnikov, Yu A.; Gorokhov, P. M.; Kozar', A. V.

    2003-11-01

    The propagation of phase-modulated optical pulses through thin-layer interference antireflection structures is studied. An analytic expression relating the parameters of the incident and reflected pulses is obtained. The time dependence of the phase modulation of the incident pulse was obtained using this expression together with experimental data. The splitting of the pulse after its reflection from the interference structure into two pulses with different spectra allows the use of these pulses in compressors to obtain ultrashort pulses with different carrier frequencies.

  20. Effect of the combination of different welding parameters on melting characteristics of grade 1 titanium with a pulsed Nd-Yag laser.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C; Laplanche, O; Rocca, J P; Le Petitcorps, Y; Nammour, S

    2007-11-01

    The laser is a very attractive tool for joining dental metallic alloys. However, the choice of the setting parameters can hardly influence the welding performances. The aim of this research was to evaluate the impact of several parameters (pulse shaping, pulse frequency, focal spot size...) on the quality of the microstructure. Grade 1 titanium plates have been welded with a pulsed Nd-Yag laser. Suitable power, pulse duration, focal spot size, and flow of argon gas were fixed by the operator. Five different pulse shapes and three pulse frequencies were investigated. Two pulse shapes available on this laser unit were eliminated because they considerably hardened the metal. As the pulse frequency rose, the metal was more and more ejected, and a plasma on the surface of the metal increased the oxygen contamination in the welded area. Frequencies of 1 or 2 Hz are optimum for a dental use. Three pulse shapes can be used for titanium but the rectangular shape gives better results.

  1. Pulsed excimer laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D.

    1985-06-01

    The status of pulsed excimer laser processing of PV cells is presented. The cost effective feasibility of fabricating high efficiency solar cells on Czochralski wafers using a pulsed excimer laser for junction formation, surface passivation, and front metallization. Laser annealing results were promising with the best AR coated cell having an efficiency of 16.1%. Better results would be expected with larger laser spot size because there was some degradation in open circuit voltage caused by laser spot overlap and edge effects. Surface heating and photolytic decomposition by the laser was used to deposit tungsten from the reaction of tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen. The line widths were 5 to 10 mils, and the depositions passed the tape adhesion test. Thinner lines are practical using an optimized optical system.

  2. Pulsed excimer laser processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, D.

    1985-01-01

    The status of pulsed excimer laser processing of PV cells is presented. The cost effective feasibility of fabricating high efficiency solar cells on Czochralski wafers using a pulsed excimer laser for junction formation, surface passivation, and front metallization. Laser annealing results were promising with the best AR coated cell having an efficiency of 16.1%. Better results would be expected with larger laser spot size because there was some degradation in open circuit voltage caused by laser spot overlap and edge effects. Surface heating and photolytic decomposition by the laser was used to deposit tungsten from the reaction of tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen. The line widths were 5 to 10 mils, and the depositions passed the tape adhesion test. Thinner lines are practical using an optimized optical system.

  3. Laser surgery of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos using femtosecond laser pulses: Optimal parameters for exogenous material delivery, and the laser's effect on short- and long-term development

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Vikram; Elezzabi, Abdulhakem Y

    2008-01-01

    Background Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have recently received wide interest as an alternative tool for manipulating living biological systems. In various model organisms the excision of cellular components and the intracellular delivery of foreign exogenous materials have been reported. However, the effect of the applied fs laser pulses on cell viability and development has yet to be determined. Using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as our animal model system, we address both the short- and long-term developmental changes following laser surgery on zebrafish embryonic cells. Results An exogenous fluorescent probe, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was successfully introduced into blastomere cells and found to diffuse throughout all developing cells. Using the reported manipulation tool, we addressed whether the applied fs laser pulses induced any short- or long-term developmental effects in embryos reared to 2 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf). Using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy we compared key developmental features of laser-manipulated and control samples, including the olfactory pit, dorsal, ventral and pectoral fins, notochord, pectoral fin buds, otic capsule, otic vesicle, neuromast patterning, and kinocilia of the olfactory pit rim and cristae of the lateral wall of the ear. Conclusion In our study, no significant differences in hatching rates and developmental morphologies were observed in laser-manipulated samples relative to controls. This tool represents an effective non-destructive technique for potential medical and biological applications. PMID:18230185

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Dependence of pressure in a compressed condensed matter on parameters of high-power laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebo, A. I.; Lebo, I. G.; Batani, D.

    2008-08-01

    Based on analysis of two-dimensional numerical calculations and experiments performed on the PALS setup, the similarity relations are obtained for determining pressure in a condensed matter irradiated by a short laser pulse of intensity 5×1013-5×1014 W cm-2.

  5. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: New stretcher scheme for a parametric amplifier of chirped pulses with frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidman, Gennadii I.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2007-02-01

    The properties of hybrid prism-grating dispersion systems are studied. The scheme of a prism-grating stretcher matched to a standard compressor in the phase dispersion up to the fourth order inclusive is developed for a petawatt laser complex based on the optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification. The stretcher was used to obtain the ~200-TW peak power of laser radiation.

  6. Nanofabrication with pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Kabashin, Av; Delaporte, Ph; Pereira, A; Grojo, D; Torres, R; Sarnet, Th; Sentis, M

    2010-02-24

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser-matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics.

  7. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Transformation of the spatial coherence of pulsed laser radiation transmitted in the nonlinear regime through a multimode graded-index fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsak, A. I.; Kitsak, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    A method is proposed for transformation of the spatial coherence of pulsed laser radiation upon nonlinear interaction in a multimode fibre. The specific features of the transmission of correlation properties of radiation in a graded-index fibre with regular and irregular profiles of the refractive index of the fibre core are analysed. A comparative analysis of the parameter of global degree of radiation coherence at the output of inhomogeneous waveguide and non-waveguide media is performed. It is shown that the most efficient mechanism of decorrelation of pulsed radiation in an optical fibre is fluctuations of the phase of radiation scattered by inhomogeneities of the refractive index of the fibre core induced due to nonlinear interaction with radiation with the spatially inhomogeneous intensity distribution.

  8. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Pulse synchronisation in passively Q-switched lasers emitting at 1.053 and 1.064 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasarov, V. Kh; Denisov, N. N.; Malyutin, A. A.; Chigaev, I. A.

    2009-10-01

    Pulse synchronisation with an accuracy of no worse than ±5 ns is demonstrated in passively Q-switched neodymium phosphate glass and Nd:YAG lasers. Two operating regimes are realised: the 'sub-threshold' regime (when the slave Nd:YAG laser does not generate a giant pulse if its passive Q switch is not irradiated by the master Nd:glass laser) and the 'above-threshold' regime (when the pulse irradiating the passive Q switch of the slave laser advances its generation).

  9. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Device for enhancing the time contrast of utrashort laser pulses based on a polarisation Mach—Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitin, Andrey V.

    2009-02-01

    A polarisation Mach—Zehnder interferometer is considered containing identical cells with a nonlinear medium in different arms. A parallel wave beam propagates through one cell and a converging-diverging wave beam propagates through the other. It is shown that the interferometer transmission depends on the power of the laser pulse propagated through it. It is proposed to use this effect to enhance the time contrast of ultrashort and superhigh-power laser pulses, i.e. to suppress side (background) pulses.

  10. Long pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser treatment for wrinkle reduction and skin laxity: evaluation of new parameters.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jong Soo; Park, Song Youn; Seo, Kyle K; Goo, Boncheol L; Hwang, Eun Jung; Park, Gyeong Yul; Eun, Hee Chul

    2015-09-01

    Among non-ablative devices for wrinkle reduction and skin laxity, long pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser (LPND) has considerable effectiveness. It can penetrate to deep dermis due to its longer wavelength. This study assesses the efficacy and safety of LPND applying new parameters for skin rejuvenation in Korean subjects. A prospective randomized split-faced study was done (n = 20). Half of the face was treated with three passes of LPND at a spot size of 12 mm, 20-24 J/cm(2) fluence, 12 ms width, and frequency of 2 Hz, for three sessions, every four weeks. Outcomes were measured by wrinkle evaluation of blinded investigators, subjects' self-assessment, objective measurements of elasticity, and skin biopsy. Four weeks after the final treatment sessions, the average wrinkle grades of the treated side were reduced by 45.1%. Skin elasticity was significantly increased. The increment of collagen and elastic fiber in papillary dermis was confirmed histologically. No adverse reaction was reported. Pain on the treated side was mild without needing anesthesia. The authors studied new parameters for LPND for improvement of wrinkles and skin laxity with fewer treatment sessions without serious complications. Histologic findings corresponded to clinical improvement. New parameters of LPND can achieve wrinkle improvement with few side effects. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  11. Pulsed laser beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, C.M.; Jones, R.W.

    1982-07-13

    A pulsed laser beam intensity monitor measures the peak power within a selectable cross section of a test laser beam and measures integrated energy of the beam during the pulse period of a test laser. A continuous wave laser and a pulsed ruby laser are coaxially arranged for simultaneously transmitting optical output energy through a crystal flat during the time a test laser pulse is transmitted through the flat. Due to stress birefringence in the crystal, the ruby laser pulse transmitted through the flat is recorded and analyzed to provide peak power information about the test laser output pulse, and the continuous wave laser output reflected from the crystal flat provides a measurement of energy during the test laser pulse.

  12. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser–matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics. PMID:20672069

  13. Pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Louis W.; Fitzsimmons, William A.

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

  14. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Study of the self-phase-locking of a pulsed three-channel holographic Nd:YAG laser by gain gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Gavrilov, A. V.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Smetanin, S. N.; Fedin, A. V.

    2007-02-01

    The conditions of phase locking of a three-channel holographic Nd:YAG laser system based on self-pumped phase-conjugate oscillators emitting giant 100-mJ, 60-ns monopulses in each of the channels are investigated experimentally. The pulse-to-pulse stable self-phase-locking of the laser system with a pulse repetition rate up to 20 Hz is obtained. The mutual coherence of laser channels was increased up to 0.87 by separating the controlling channel which initiates lasing in a set of controllable channels generating synchronous monopulses.

  15. Laser pulse sampler

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera.

  16. Laser pulse sampler

    DOEpatents

    Vann, C.

    1998-03-24

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera. 5 figs.

  17. Laser pulse detector

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Akerman, M. Alfred

    1981-01-01

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  18. Laser pulse detector

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.; Akerman, M.A.

    1979-08-13

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  19. Chemical aerosol detection using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Dennis R.; Rohlfs, Mark L.; Stauffer, John C.

    1997-07-01

    Many chemical warfare agents are dispersed as small aerosol particles. In the past, most electro-optical excitation and detection schemes have used continuous or pulsed lasers with pulse lengths ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. In this paper, we present interesting ongoing new results on femtosecond imaging and on the time dependent solutions to the scattering problem of a femtosecond laser pulse interacting with a single small aerosol particle. Results are presented for various incident pulse lengths. Experimental imaging results using femtosecond pulses indicate that the diffraction rings present when using nanosecond laser pulses for imaging are greatly reduced when femtosecond laser pulses are used. Results are presented in terms of the internal fields as a function of time and the optical size parameter.

  20. Influence of the input radiation pulse characteristics on the parameters of a XeF(C - A) amplifier in a THL-100 laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastremskii, A. G.; Ivanov, N. G.; Losev, V. F.

    2016-11-01

    We report the results of experimental and theoretical investigations on the influence of spatial and energy parameters of input radiation with a pulse duration of 50 {\\text{ps}} on output characteristics of a XeF(C - A) amplifier in a visible-range, multi-terawatt THL-100 laser system. Dynamics of the energy density radial distribution for laser radiation passing through the amplifier is studied. Results of numerical simulation are presented for amplification of laser beams with Gaussian and super-Gaussian radial energy density distributions. It is shown that the laser energy of 3.2 {\\text{J}} obtained experimentally is not the limiting value. According to calculations, the output energy of the amplifier with such mirror configuration may reach 4.1 {\\text{J}}, which in the case of a pulse compressed down to 50 {\\text{fs}} corresponds to the radiation power of 82 {\\text{TW}}.

  1. Effect of ablation parameters on infrared pulsed laser deposition of poly(ethylene glycol) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Daniel M.; Papantonakis, M. R.; Toftmann, B.; Horwitz, J. S.; McGill, R. A.; Chrisey, D. B.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2002-06-01

    Polymer thin films were deposited by laser ablation using infrared radiation both resonant (2.90, 3.40, 3.45, and 8.96 mum) and nonresonant (3.30, 3.92, and 4.17 mum) with vibrational modes in the starting material, polyethylene glycol. The chemical structure of the films was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, while the molecular weight distribution was investigated using gel permeation chromatography. The films deposited by resonant irradiation are superior to those deposited with nonresonant radiation with respect to both the chemical structure and the molecular weight distribution of the films. However, the molecular-weight distributions of films deposited at nonresonant infrared wavelengths show marked polymer fragmentation. Fluence and wavelength dependence studies show that the effects may be related to the degree of thermal confinement, and hence to the relative absorption strengths of the targeted vibrational modes.

  2. Composition variations in pulsed-laser-deposited Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films as a function of deposition parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M. C.; Jones, B. B.; Hunt, B. D.; Barner, J. B.; Vasquez, R. P.; Bajuk, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The composition of pulsed-ultraviolet-laser-deposited Y-Ba-Cu-O films was examined as a function of position across the substrate, laser fluence, laser spot size, substrate temperature, target conditioning, oxygen pressure and target-substrate distance. Laser fluence, laser spot size, and substrate temperature were found to have little effect on composition within the range investigated. Ablation from a fresh target surface results in films enriched in copper and barium, both of which decrease in concentration until a steady state condition is achieved. Oxygen pressure and target-substrate distance have a significant effect on film composition. In vacuum, copper and barium are slightly concentrated at the center of deposition. With the introduction of an oxygen background pressure, scattering results in copper and barium depletion in the deposition center, an effect which increases with increasing target-substrate distance. A balancing of these two effects results in stoichiometric deposition.

  3. Composition variations in pulsed-laser-deposited Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films as a function of deposition parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M. C.; Jones, B. B.; Hunt, B. D.; Barner, J. B.; Vasquez, R. P.; Bajuk, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The composition of pulsed-ultraviolet-laser-deposited Y-Ba-Cu-O films was examined as a function of position across the substrate, laser fluence, laser spot size, substrate temperature, target conditioning, oxygen pressure and target-substrate distance. Laser fluence, laser spot size, and substrate temperature were found to have little effect on composition within the range investigated. Ablation from a fresh target surface results in films enriched in copper and barium, both of which decrease in concentration until a steady state condition is achieved. Oxygen pressure and target-substrate distance have a significant effect on film composition. In vacuum, copper and barium are slightly concentrated at the center of deposition. With the introduction of an oxygen background pressure, scattering results in copper and barium depletion in the deposition center, an effect which increases with increasing target-substrate distance. A balancing of these two effects results in stoichiometric deposition.

  4. Shack - Hartmann wavefront sensor for measuring the parameters of high-power pulsed solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, A G; Zavalova, V E; Kudryashov, A V; Rukosuev, A L; Sheldakova, Yu V; Samarkin, V V; Romanov, P N

    2010-06-23

    The wavefront of the radiation of two types from high-power solid-state (Ti:sapphire and Nd:glass) lasers is experimentally studied. The measurements are performed using a Shack - Hartmann wavefront sensor. The technical and functional potential of this sensor in measuring laser-based schemes is demonstrated. The results of measuring both static and dynamic wavefront aberrations are discussed. The estimated dynamics of defocus aberration is in agreement with the experimental data. (measurement of laser radiation parameters)

  5. Pulsed Laser Cladding of Ni Based Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, A.; Stanciu, E. M.; Croitoru, C.; Roata, I. C.; Tierean, M. H.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize the operational parameters and quality of one step Metco Inconel 718 atomized powder laser cladded tracks, deposited on AISI 316 stainless steel substrate by means of a 1064 nm high power pulsed laser, together with a Precitec cladding head manipulated by a CLOOS 7 axes robot. The optimization of parameters and cladding quality has been assessed through Taguchi interaction matrix and graphical output. The study demonstrates that very good cladded layers with low dilution and increased mechanical proprieties could be fabricated using low laser energy density by involving a pulsed laser.

  6. Dependence of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy results on pulse energies and timing parameters using soil simulants.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Lauren; Najarian, Maya L; Cremers, David A; Chinni, Rosemarie C

    2013-09-23

    The dependence of some LIBS detection capabilities on lower pulse energies (<100 mJ) and timing parameters were examined using synthetic silicate samples. These samples were used as simulants for soil and contained minor and trace elements commonly found in soil at a wide range of concentrations. For this study, over 100 calibration curves were prepared using different pulse energies and timing parameters; detection limits and sensitivities were determined from the calibration curves. Plasma temperatures were also measured using Boltzmann plots for the various energies and the timing parameters tested. The electron density of the plasma was calculated using the full-width half maximum (FWHM) of the hydrogen line at 656.5 nm over the energies tested. Overall, the results indicate that the use of lower pulse energies and non-gated detection do not seriously compromise the analytical results. These results are very relevant to the design of field- and person-portable LIBS instruments.

  7. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Evolution of the shape and spectrum of ultrashort pulses upon active mode locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaporozhchenko, V. A.

    2003-11-01

    Time sweeps of the autocorrelation function and the emission spectrum of an actively mode-locked Nd:YAG laser are recorded during the development of quasi-continuous pre-lasing maintained by a negative feedback loop. It is found that higher Hermitian—Gaussian supermodes are present at the transient stage of radiation, and the ultrashort pulse shortening is accompanied by the shift of the lasing spectrum to the red wing of the gain band of the active medium.

  8. Propagation of chirped laser pulses in a plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Malviya, Amita; Upadhyay, Ajay K.

    2009-06-15

    Propagation of an initially chirped, Gaussian laser pulse in a preformed parabolic plasma channel is analyzed. A variational technique is used to obtain equations describing the evolution of the phase shift and laser spot size. The effect of initial chirp on the laser pulse length and intensity of a matched laser beam propagating in a plasma channel has been analyzed. The effective pulse length and chirp parameter of the laser pulse due to its interaction with plasma have been obtained and graphically depicted. The resultant variation in laser frequency across the laser pulse is discussed.

  9. Physical Parameters, Modeling, and Methodological Details in Using IR Laser Pulses to Warm Frozen or Vitrified Cells Ultra-Rapidly†

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhans, F.W.; Mazur, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We report additional details of the thermal modeling, selection of the laser, and construction of the Cryo Jig used for our ultra-rapid warming studies of mouse oocytes (B Jin, FW Kleinhans, Peter Mazur, Cryobiology 68 (2014) 419–430). A Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm was selected to deliver short 1 msec pulses of sufficient power to produce a warming rate of 1 × 107 °C/min from –190°C to 0°C. A special Cryo Jig was designed and built to rapidly remove the sample from LN2 and expose it to the laser pulse. India ink carbon black particles were required to increase the laser energy absorption of the sample. The thermal model reported here is more general than that previously reported. The modeling reveals that the maximum warming rate achievable via external warming across the cell membrane is proportional to (1/R2) where R is the cell radius. PMID:25724528

  10. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  11. Micro pulse laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  12. Note: Characterization of the plasma parameters of a capillary discharge-produced plasma channel waveguide to guide an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Hikida, Masafumi; Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bai Jinxiang; Kikuchi, Takashi; Tao Yezheng

    2010-04-15

    We demonstrated the production of an optical waveguide in a capillary discharge-produced plasma using a cylindrical capillary. Plasma parameters of its waveguide were characterized by use of both a Nomarski laser interferometer and a hydrogen plasma line spectrum. A space-averaged maximum temperature of 3.3 eV with electron densities of the order of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} was observed at a discharge time of 150 ns and a maximum discharge current of 400 A. An ultrashort, intense laser pulse was guided by use of this plasma channel.

  13. Double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with ambient gas in the vacuum ultraviolet: Optimization of parameters for detection of carbon and sulfur in steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Hayden, P.; Costello, J. T.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2014-11-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) has been applied to calibrated steel samples for the low concentration level detection of the light elements, carbon and sulfur in steel. Experimental optimization parameters, aimed at enhancing the sensitivity of the technique, included short wavelength spectral detection, double-pulse (DP) operation, variable focusing conditions and different ambient environments in terms of gas type and pressure. Two lasers were employed respectively as an ablation laser (Spectron: 1.06 μm/200 mJ/15 ns) and a reheating laser (Surelite: 1.06 μm/665 mJ/6 ns) in a collinear geometry. The results include insight into the most salient experimental variables and limits of detection in the parts per million range.

  14. Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures.

  15. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Cross modulation method of transformation of the spatial coherence of pulsed laser radiation in a nonlinear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsak, M. A.; Kitsak, A. I.

    2008-04-01

    The cross modulation method of transformation of the spatial coherence of low-power pulsed laser radiation in a nonlinear medium is proposed. The method is realised experimentally in a multimode optical fibre. The estimates of the degree of spatial coherence of radiation subjected to the phase cross modulation demonstrated the high efficiency of this radiation decorrelation mechanism.

  16. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  17. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Comstock, Matthew

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  18. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  19. Photoemission using femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Fischer, J.

    1991-10-01

    Successful operation of short wavelength FEL requires an electron bunch of current >100 A and normalized emittance < 1 mm-mrad. Recent experiments show that RF guns with photocathodes as the electron source may be the ideal candidate for achieving these parameters. To reduce the emittance growth due to space charge and RF dynamics effects, the gun may have to operate at high field gradient (hence at high RF frequency) and a spot size small compared to the aperture. This may necessitate the laser pulse duration to be in the subpicosecond regime to reduce the energy spread. We will present the behavior of metal photocathodes upon irradiation with femtosecond laser beams, comparison of linear and nonlinear photoemission, and scalability to high currents. Theoretical estimate of the intrinsic emittance at the photocathode in the presence of the anomalous heating of the electrons, and the tolerance on the surface roughness of the cathode material will be discussed.

  20. Laser pulse shaping for high gradient accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Galletti, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Moreno, M.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    In many high gradient accelerator schemes, i.e. with plasma or dielectric wakefield induced by particles, many electron pulses are required to drive the acceleration of one of them. Those electron bunches, that generally should have very short duration and low emittance, can be generated in photoinjectors driven by a train of laser pulses coming inside the same RF bucket. We present the system used to shape and characterize the laser pulses used in multibunch operations at Sparc_lab. Our system gives us control over the main parameter useful to produce a train of up to five high brightness bunches with tailored intensity and time distribution.

  1. Frequency modulation of semiconductor disk laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Okhotnikov, O G

    2015-07-31

    A numerical model is constructed for a semiconductor disk laser mode-locked by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), and the effect that the phase modulation caused by gain and absorption saturation in the semiconductor has on pulse generation is examined. The results demonstrate that, in a laser cavity with sufficient second-order dispersion, alternating-sign frequency modulation of pulses can be compensated for. We also examine a model for tuning the dispersion in the cavity of a disk laser using a Gires–Tournois interferometer with limited thirdorder dispersion. (control of radiation parameters)

  2. PHYSICAL PROCESSES IN LASER MEDIA: Influence of the chemical composition of the hydrogen-containing component in an RH active medium and of the initiation method on the parameters of a pulsed chemical SF6-RH laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal', A. V.; Dodonov, A. A.; Rusanov, V. D.; Shiryaevskiĭ, V. L.; Sholin, G. V.

    1992-02-01

    The influence of the composition of the active medium on the lasing characteristics and energy deposition efficiency was studied under conditions of electron-beam and electric-discharge initiation in SF6-H2 and SF6-HI pulsed hydrogen fluoride chemical lasers.The best radiation energy characteristics were achieved for an SF6-HI active medium using electron-beam initiation and for an SF6-H2 active medium when the pump reaction was initiated by a self-sustained volume discharge. The following pulse parameters were obtained for an SF6-HI laser:energy 1.5 J, half-height pulse duration 60 ns,and leading edge duration 20 ns.

  3. Short-pulse Laser Processing of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Rudolf; Freitag, Christian; Kononenko, Taras V.; Hafner, Margit; Onuseit, Volkher; Berger, Peter; Graf, Thomas

    Short-pulse lasers allow processing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with very high quality, i.e. showing thermal damage in the range of only a few micrometers. Due to the usually high intensities and the short interaction times of such short pulses, only a small fraction of the incident laser energy is converted to residual heat which does not contribute to the ablation process. However, if the next pulse arrives before the material had time to cool down, i.e. this residual thermal energy did not sufficiently flow out of the interaction region, it encounters material which is still hot. This remaining energy and temperature is summing up during the sequence of pulses and is commonly referred to as "heat accumulation". Thermal damage in addition to the damage created by the process itself is induced, if the resulting temperature sum exceeds the damage temperatures of either the fibre or the plastic. The current paper presents the influence of the laser parameters such as pulse energy and repetition rate on this heat accumulation. An analytical model was used to describe the heat accumulation for different laser parameters. It describes the heat accumulation process and allows estimating the maximum number of pulses allowed at the same place before a detrimental temperature increase occurs.

  4. Concerted manipulation of laser plasma dynamics with two laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braenzel, J.; Andreev, A. A.; Ehrentraut, L.; Sommer, D.; Schnürer, M.

    2017-05-01

    In this article we present experimental results from a counter-propagating two laser pulse experiment at high intensity and using ultrathin gold and plastic foil targets. We applied one laser pulse as a pre-pulse with an intensity of up to 1x1018 W/cm2. By this method we manipulated the pre-plasma of the foil target with which the stronger laser pulse with an intensity of 6x1019W/cm2 interacts. This alters significantly subsequent processes from the laser plasma interaction which we show the ion acceleration and high harmonic generation. On the one hand, the maximum kinetic ion energy and the maximum charge state for gold ions decline due to the pre-heating of the target in the time range of few ps, on the other hand the number of accelerated ions is increased. For the same parameter range we detected a significant raise of the high harmonic emission. Moreover, we present first experimental observations, that when the second laser pulse is applied as a counter-propagating post-pulse the energy distribution of accelerated carbon ions is charge selective altered. Our findings indicate that using this method a parametric optimization can be achieved, which promises new insights about the concurrent processes of the laser plasma dynamics.

  5. Dual-Laser-Pulse Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Early, James W.; Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.

    2006-01-01

    A dual-pulse laser (DPL) technique has been demonstrated for generating laser-induced sparks (LIS) to ignite fuels. The technique was originally intended to be applied to the ignition of rocket propellants, but may also be applicable to ignition in terrestrial settings in which electric igniters may not be suitable.

  6. Pulse shape control in a dual cavity laser: numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkir, Yuri

    2006-04-01

    We present a numerical model of the laser system for generating a special shape of the pulse: a steep peak at the beginning followed by a long pulse tail. Laser pulses of this nature are required for various applications (laser material processing, optical breakdown spectroscopy, etc.). The laser system consists of two "overlapped" cavities with different round-trip times. The laser crystal, the Q-switching element, the back mirror, and the output coupler are shared. A shorter pulse is generated in a short cavity. A small fraction of this pulse is injected into the long cavity as a seed. It triggers generation of the longer pulse. The output emission from this hybrid laser produces a required pulse shape. Parameters of the laser pulse (ratios of durations and energies of short- and long- pulse components) can be controlled through cavity length and the output coupler reflection. Modelling of the laser system is based on a set of coupled rate equations for dynamic variables of the system: the inverse population in an active laser media and photon densities in coupled cavities. Numerical experiments were provided with typical parameters of a Nd:YAG laser to study the system behaviour for different combinations of parameters.

  7. Pulsed infrared laser ablation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kin Foong

    Sufficient light energy deposited in tissue can result in ablation and excessive thermal and mechanical damage to adjacent tissues. The goals of this research are to investigate the mechanisms of pulsed infrared laser ablation of tissue, to optimize laser parameters for minimizing unnecessary damage to healthy tissue, and to explore the potential of using pulsed infrared lasers for clinical applications, especially laser lithotripsy. A dual-channel optical low coherence reflectometer was implemented to measure the expansion and collapse velocities of a Q-switched Ho:YAG (λ = 2.12 μm) laser-induced cavitation in water. Cavitation wall velocities up to 11 m/s were measured with this technique, and the results were in fair agreement with those calculated from fast-flash photographic images. The dependence of ablation threshold fluence on calculus absorption was examined. Preliminary results indicated that the product of optical absorption and ablation threshold fluence, which is the heat of ablation, remained constant for a given urinary calculus type and laser pulse duration. An extended study examined the influence of optical absorption on pulsed infrared laser ablation. An analytical photothermal ablation model was applied and compared to experimental ablation results using an infrared free-electron laser at selected wavelengths between 2.12 μm and 6.45 μm Results were in good agreement with the model, and the ablation depths of urinary calculi were highly dependent upon the calculus optical absorption as well as light attenuation within the intrapulse ablation plume. An efficient wavelength for ablation corresponded to the wavelength of the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm) suggested this laser should be examined for laser lithotripsy. Schlieren flash photography, acoustic transient measurements with a piezoelectric polyvinylidene-fluoride needle-hydrophone, mass loss measurements, and chemical analyses were employed to study the ablation mechanisms of the free

  8. Ultrashort laser pulse beam shaping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyan; Ren, Yuhang; Lüpke, Gunter

    2003-02-01

    We calculated the temporal and spatial characteristics of an ultrashort laser pulse propagating through a diffractive beam-shaping system that converts a Gaussian beam into a beam with a uniform irradiance profile that was originally designed for continuous waves [Proc. SPIE 2863, 237(1996)]. The pulse front is found to be considerably curved for a 10-fs pulse, resulting in a temporal broadening of the pulse that increases with increasing radius. The spatial intensity distribution deviates significantly from a top-hat profile, whereas the fluence shows a homogeneous radial distribution.

  9. Modeling Pulsed Laser Melting of Embedded Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Carolyn Anne

    A model of pulsed laser melting of embedded nanoparticles is introduced. Pulsed laser melting (PLM) is commonly used to achieve a fast quench rate in nanoparticles; this model enables a better understanding of the influence of PLM on the size distribution of nanoparticles, which is crucial for studying or using their size-dependent properties. The model includes laser absorption according to the Mie theory, a full heat transport model, and rate equations for nucleation, growth, coarsening, and melting and freezing of nanoparticles embedded in a transparent matrix. The effects of varying the laser parameters and sample properties are studied, as well as combining PLM and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) processing steps on the same sample. A general theory for achieving narrow size distributions of nanoparticles is presented, and widths as narrow as 12% are achieved using PLM and RTA.

  10. Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Banks, Paul S.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2002-01-01

    Short pulse PLD is a viable technique of producing high quality films with properties very close to that of crystalline diamond. The plasma generated using femtosecond lasers is composed of single atom ions with no clusters producing films with high Sp.sup.3 /Sp.sup.2 ratios. Using a high average power femtosecond laser system, the present invention dramatically increases deposition rates to up to 25 .mu.m/hr (which exceeds many CVD processes) while growing particulate-free films. In the present invention, deposition rates is a function of laser wavelength, laser fluence, laser spot size, and target/substrate separation. The relevant laser parameters are shown to ensure particulate-free growth, and characterizations of the films grown are made using several diagnostic techniques including electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors. (auth)

  12. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  13. X-ray spectral measurement of high-temperature plasma parameters in porous targets irradiated with high-power laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V V; Gol'tsov, A Yu; Koval'skii, N G; Koptyaev, S N; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A; Skobelev, I Yu; Faenov, A Ya

    2001-12-31

    The X-ray spectra of multiply charged ions were recorded from planar agar (C{sub 12}H{sub 18}O{sub 9}){sub n} based targets with an average density of 2 mg cm{sup -3} irradiated by high-power laser pulses ({lambda}=1.054 {mu}m, {tau}=2.5 ns, I {approx} 5 x10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}). The spectra were recorded with a high spectral and spatial resolution employing spherically bent (focusing) crystals of mica and quartz. An analysis of the experimental data obtained by the irradiation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped agar samples allowed us to determine the main parameters of the plasma produced inside the targets. The ion temperature of plasma in low-density porous targets was estimated for the first time to be 1.5 - 2 times higher than the electron temperature. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  14. Evolution of chirped laser pulses in a magnetized plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Hemlata,; Mishra, Rohit Kumar

    2014-12-15

    The propagation of intense, short, sinusoidal laser pulses in a magnetized plasma channel has been studied. The wave equation governing the evolution of the radiation field is set up and a variational technique is used to obtain the equations describing the evolution of the laser spot size, pulse length and chirp parameter. Numerical methods are used to analyze the simultaneous evolution of these parameters. The effect of the external magnetic field on initially chirped as well as unchirped laser pulses on the spot size, pulse length and chirping has been analyzed.

  15. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.

  16. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Direct amplification of picosecond pulses in neodymium glass with a power density above 100 GW cm-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir V.; Kutsenko, A. V.; Matsveiko, A. A.; Mikhailov, Yu A.; Popov, A. I.; Sklizkov, G. V.; Starodub, Aleksandr N.; Chekmarev, Alexander M.

    2003-09-01

    A scheme for amplification of ultrashort laser pulses is studied, which is used in experiments on symmetrisation of ablation pressure with the help of a prepulse upon acceleration of foils by laser radiation of high brightness. The possibility of direct amplification of short pulses before their expansion in order to increase the energy contrast is considered. In experiments performed on the PICO facility, the amplification of a 10-ps pulse with a power density exceeding 100 GW cm-2 is demonstrated with the gain equal to 1.2 and the inversion drop above 30 %.

  17. Ultrashort-pulse laser machining

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S; Feit, M D; Nguyen, H T; Perry, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Sefcik, J A; Stuart, B C

    1998-09-01

    A new type of material processing is enabled with ultrashort (t < 10 ps) laser pulses. Cutting, drilling, sculpting of all materials (biologic materials, ceramics, sapphire, silicon carbide, diamond, metals) occurs by new mechanisms that eliminate thermal shock or collateral damage. High-precision machining to submicron tolerances is enabled resulting in high surface quality and negligible heat affected zone.

  18. Ultrashort-pulse lasers machining

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S; Feit, M D; Nguyen, H T; Perry, M D, Stuart, B C

    1999-01-22

    A new type of material processing is enabled with ultrashort (t < 10 psec) laser pulses. Cutting, drilling, sculpting of all materials (biologic materials, ceramics, sapphire, silicon carbide, diamond, metals) occurs by new mechanisms which eliminate thermal shock or collateral damage. High precision machining to submicron tolerances is enabled resulting in high surface quality and negligible heat affected zone.

  19. Laser zona dissection using short-pulse ultraviolet lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph; Tadir, Yona; Ho, Peter D.; Whalen, William E.; Asch, Richardo H.; Ord, Teri; Berns, Michael W.

    1992-06-01

    The interaction of pulsed ultraviolet radiation with the zona pellucida of human oocytes which had failed to fertilize in standard IVF cycles, was investigated. Two lasers were studied: a 100 ps pulsed Nd:YAG with a nonlinear crystal emitting light at 266 nm, and a 15 ns XeCl excimer laser with 308 nm radiation. Incisions in the zona were made by aiming the beam tangentially to the oocyte. The results indicate superior, high precision performance by the excimer laser creating trenches as narrow as 1 micrometers and as shallow as 1 micrometers . The incision size was found to be sensitive to the laser's energy and to the position of the microscope's objective focal plane, but relatively insensitive to the laser pulse repetition rate. Once the minimum spot size was defined by the system parameters, the laser beam was used to curve out any desired zona shape. This laser microsurgery technique as applied to partial zone dissection or zona drilling could prove very useful as a high-precision, non-contact method for treatments of low fertilization rate and for enhancing embryo implantation rates in patients undergoing IVF treatments.

  20. Nanosecond laser ablation for pulsed laser deposition of yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sucharita

    2013-09-01

    A thermal model to describe high-power nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of yttria (Y2O3) has been developed. This model simulates ablation of material occurring primarily through vaporization and also accounts for attenuation of the incident laser beam in the evolving vapor plume. Theoretical estimates of process features such as time evolution of target temperature distribution, melt depth and ablation rate and their dependence on laser parameters particularly for laser fluences in the range of 6 to 30 J/cm2 are investigated. Calculated maximum surface temperatures when compared with the estimated critical temperature for yttria indicate absence of explosive boiling at typical laser fluxes of 10 to 30 J/cm2. Material ejection in large fragments associated with explosive boiling of the target needs to be avoided when depositing thin films via the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique as it leads to coatings with high residual porosity and poor compaction restricting the protective quality of such corrosion-resistant yttria coatings. Our model calculations facilitate proper selection of laser parameters to be employed for deposition of PLD yttria corrosion-resistive coatings. Such coatings have been found to be highly effective in handling and containment of liquid uranium.

  1. Pulsed Submillimeter Laser Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-15

    flouride (CH3 F) located in a 7 cm absorption cell. The signal derived from the interaction occurring in this cell is used in conjunction with phase...methyl flouride it appears this technique can be generally applied to optimize the pump frequency for many other optically pumped FIR laser transitions...line of the 9 pm band with CH3 F. In Figure 37 is shown a simplified energy- level diagram of the prolate symmetric top methyl flouride molecule. The

  2. Developing Pulsed Fiber Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-15

    moving pupil imaging system. Y. Kawagoe et al. furthered the research in the early 80’s by using a rotating aperture at the Fourier ...dependent terms in Eq. 16 by their respective Fourier Series Eq. 16 can be written in the following form, ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )( ) ( ) ( ) ( )( )( ) 1 2 0...Asakura, “Speckle reduction by a rotating aperture at the Fourier transform plane,” Opt. Lasers in Eng., 3 197-218, (1982) [8] T. Iwai, N. Takai

  3. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordienko, A V; Mavritskii, O B; Egorov, A N; Pechenkin, A A; Savchenkov, D V

    2014-12-31

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Nanosecond component in a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Semak, V. V.; Zhang Zhili

    2012-11-15

    Experimental and computational results show that the coherent microwave scattering from a laser-induced plasma can be used for measuring the quality of a fs laser pulse. The temporal dynamics of the microwave scattered signal from the fs-laser induced plasma can be related to the effect of nanosecond tail of the fs laser pulse.

  5. Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmaux, S.; Gnedyuk, S.; Lassonde, P.; Payeur, S.; Pepin, H.; Kieffer, J. C.; Buffechoux, S.; Albertazzi, B.; Capelli, D.; Antici, P.; Levy, A.; Fuchs, J.; Lecherbourg, L.; Marjoribanks, R. S.

    2013-01-15

    We report optimization of laser-driven proton acceleration, for a range of experimental parameters available from a single ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser system. We have characterized laser-generated protons produced at the rear and front target surfaces of thin solid targets (15 nm to 90 {mu}m thicknesses) irradiated with an ultra-intense laser pulse (up to 10{sup 20} W Dot-Operator cm{sup -2}, pulse duration 30 to 500 fs, and pulse energy 0.1 to 1.8 J). We find an almost symmetric behaviour for protons accelerated from rear and front sides, and a linear scaling of proton energy cut-off with increasing pulse energy. At constant laser intensity, we observe that the proton cut-off energy increases with increasing laser pulse duration, then roughly constant for pulses longer than 300 fs. Finally, we demonstrate that there is an optimum target thickness and pulse duration.

  6. Pulse transformer for GaAs laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    High-radiance gallium arsenide (GaAs) laser operating at room temperature is utilized in optical navigation system. For efficient transformer-to-laser impedance match, laser should be connected directly to pulse transformer secondary winding.

  7. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  8. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability.

  9. Selective laser melting of copper using ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, Lisa; Matthäus, Gabor; Ullsperger, Tobias; Engelhardt, Hannes; Rettenmayr, Markus; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Within the field of laser-assisted additive manufacturing, the application of ultrashort pulse lasers for selective laser melting came into focus recently. In contrast to conventional lasers, these systems provide extremely high peak power at ultrashort interaction times and offer the potential to control the thermal impact at the vicinity of the processed region by tailoring the pulse repetition rate. Consequently, materials with extremely high melting points such as tungsten or special composites such as AlSi40 can be processed. In this paper, we present the selective laser melting of copper using 500 fs laser pulses at MHz repetition rates emitted at a center wavelength of about 1030 nm. To identify an appropriate processing window, a detailed parameter study was performed. We demonstrate the fabrication of bulk copper parts as well as the realization of thin-wall structures featuring thicknesses below 100 {μ }m. With respect to the extraordinary high thermal conductivity of copper which in general prevents the additive manufacturing of elements with micrometer resolution, this work demonstrates the potential for sophisticated copper products that can be applied in a wide field of applications extending from microelectronics functionality to complex cooling structures.

  10. Ultrashort-pulse laser system for hard dental tissue procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Feit, Michael D.; Perry, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Stuart, Brent C.

    1996-04-01

    In spite of intensive research, lasers have not replaced conventional tools in many hard tissue applications. Ultrashort pulse lasers offer several advantages in their highly per-pulse-efficient operation, negligible thermal and mechanical damage and low noise operation. Possible development of optimal laser systems to replace the high-speed dental drill is discussed. Applications of ultrashort pulse systems for dental procedures are outlined. Selection criteria and critical parameters are considered, and are compared to the conventional air-turbine drill and to long and short pulsed systems.

  11. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETER: Temporal evolution of a coherent stimulated radiation pulse in the three-level system in a Pr3+ : LaF3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonov, Aleksandr I.; Grigoryan, Grigorii G.; Znamenskiy, Nikolay V.; Manykin, Eduard A.; Orlov, Yurii V.; Petrenko, Evgenii A.; Shashkov, Andrei Yu

    2004-09-01

    The temporal characteristics of coherent stimulated radiation at the 3P0— 3H6 transition in the Pr3+ ion in a LaF3 matrix are studied by tuning the pump frequency in the vicinity of the 3H4— 3P0 transition. It is found that in the case of the exact tuning to the resonance, a laser pulse, consisting of a train of picosecond spikes of total duration about 10 ns, was delayed by 3-4 ns with respect to the pump pulse onset. As the pump pulse detuning was increased, the shape of the coherent laser pulse changes and its delay increased up to 10 ns. The experimental results are interpreted theoretically.

  12. Parameters of a trigatron-driven low-pulse-repetition-rate TEA CO{sub 2} laser preionised by a surface corona discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Aram, M; Shabanzadeh, M; Mansori, F; Behjat, A

    2007-01-31

    The design of a TEA CO{sub 2} laser with UV preionisation by a surface corona discharge is described and the dependences of its average output energy on the gas-flow rate, discharge voltage and pulse repetition rate are presented. The scheme of the electric circuit and the geometry of the pre-ionisation system are considered. The electric circuit is designed to produce only impulse voltage difference between the laser electrodes. The triggering system of the trigatron is used to prevent the appearance of the arc. The dependences of the current, voltage and average output energy on the gas-mixture composition and applied voltages at a low pulse repetition rate are presented. The central output wavelength of the laser was measured with an IR spectrometer. Lasing at two adjacent vibrational-rotational transitions of the CO{sub 2} molecule was observed, which demonstrates the possibility of simultaneous lasing at several lines. (lasers)

  13. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. V.; Mavritskii, O. B.; Egorov, A. N.; Pechenkin, A. A.; Savchenkov, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed.

  14. Simultaneous phase, amplitude, and polarization control of femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindinger, A.; Weber, S. M.; Plewicki, M.; Weise, F.

    2012-12-01

    We present a serial pulse shaper design which allows us to shape the phase, amplitude, and polarization of fs laser pulses independently and simultaneously. The capabilities of this setup are demonstrated by implementing a method for generating parametrically tailored laser pulses. This method is applied on the ionization of NaK molecules by feedback loop optimization, employing a temporal sub pulse encoding. Moreover, we introduce and characterize a further development of this common path pulse shaper scheme for full control of all light field parameters.

  15. Dark pulse emission of a fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Tang, D. Y.; Zhao, L. M.; Wu, X.

    2009-10-15

    We report on the dark pulse emission of an all-normal dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser with a polarizer in cavity. We found experimentally that apart from the bright pulse emission, under appropriate conditions the fiber laser could also emit single or multiple dark pulses. Based on numerical simulations we interpret the dark pulse formation in the laser as a result of dark soliton shaping.

  16. Ultrashort-pulse laser calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weijia; Kazansky, Peter G.; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2008-10-01

    Control of structural modifications inside silica glass by changing the front tilt of an ultrashort pulse is demonstrated, achieving a calligraphic style of laser writing. The phenomena of anisotropic bubble formation at the boundary of an irradiated region and modification transition from microscopic bubbles formation to self-assembled form birefringence are observed, and the physical mechanisms are discussed. The results provide the comprehensive evidence that the light beam with centrosymmetric intensity distribution can produce noncentrosymmetric material modifications.

  17. Wakefield generation via two color laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Saroch, Akanksha; Kumar Verma, Nirmal

    2013-05-15

    The analytical study for the evolution of longitudinal as well as transverse electric wakefields, generated via passage of two color laser pulses through uniform plasma, has been presented in the mildly relativistic regime. The frequency difference between the two laser pulses is assumed to be equal to the plasma frequency, in the present analysis. The relative angle between the directions of polarization of the two laser pulses is varied and the wakefield amplitudes are compared. Further, the amplitude of the excited wakes by two color pulses are compared with those generated by a single laser pulse.

  18. Laser ablation of borosilicate glass with high power shaped UV nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Witzendorff, Philipp; Bordin, Andrea; Suttmann, Oliver; Patel, Rajesh S.; Bovatsek, James; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-03-01

    The application of thin borosilicate glass as interposer material requires methods for separation and drilling of this material. Laser processing with short and ultra-short laser pulses have proven to enable high quality cuts by either direct ablation or internal glass modification and cleavage. A recently developed high power UV nanosecond laser source allows for pulse shaping of individual laser pulses. Thus, the pulse duration, pulse bursts and the repetition rate can be set individually at a maximum output power of up to 60 W. This opens a completely new process window, which could not be entered with conventional Q-switched pulsed laser sources. In this study, the novel pulsed UV laser system was used to study the laser ablation process on 400 μm thin borosilicate glass at different pulse durations ranging from 2 - 10 ns and a pulse burst with two 10 ns laser pulses with a separation of 10 ns. Single line scan experiments were performed to correlate the process parameters and the laser pulse shape with the ablation depth and cutting edge chipping. Increasing the pulse duration within the single pulse experiments from 2 ns to longer pulse durations led to a moderate increase in ablation depth and a significant increase in chipping. The highest material removal was achieved with the 2x10 ns pulse burst. Experimental data also suggest that chipping could be reduced, while maintaining a high ablation depth by selecting an adequate pulse overlap. We also demonstrate that real-time combination of different pulse patterns during drilling a thin borosilicate glass produced holes with low overall chipping at a high throughput rate.

  19. Analytic study of the chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides - atomic iodine donors - in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser: 2. Limiting parameters of the branching chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, Aleksandr I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2009-08-31

    The final stages in the development of a branching chain decomposition reaction of iodide in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) are analysed. Approximate expressions are derived to calculate the limiting parameters of the chain reaction: the final degree of iodide decomposition, the maximum concentration of excited iodine atoms, the time of its achievement, and concentrations of singlet oxygen and iodide at that moment. The limiting parameters, calculated by using these expressions for a typical composition of the active medium of a pulsed COIL, well coincide with the results of numerical calculations. (active media)

  20. All-fiber ring Raman laser generating parabolic pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglov, V. I.; Mechin, D.; Harvey, J. D.

    2010-02-15

    We present theoretical and numerical results for an all-fiber laser using self-similar parabolic pulses ('similaritons') designed to operate using self-similar propagation regimes. The similariton laser features a frequency filter and a Sagnac loop which operate together to generate an integrated all-fiber mode-locked laser. Numerical studies show that this laser generates parabolic pulses with linear chirp in good agreement with analytical predictions. The period for propagating similariton pulses in stable regimes can vary from one to two round trips for different laser parameters. Two-round-trip-period operation in the mode-locked laser appears at bifurcation points for certain cavity parameters. The stability of the similariton regimes has been confirmed by numerical simulations for large numbers of round trips.

  1. Pulse shaping on the Nova laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.K.; Speck, D.R.; Bibeau, C.; Weiland, T.L.

    1989-02-06

    Inertial confinement fusion requires temporally shaped pulses to achieve high gain efficiency. Recently, we demonstrated the ability to produce complex temporal pulse shapes at high power at 0.35 microns on the Nova laser system. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Generation of modulated microchip laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almabouada, F.; Aiadi, K. E.; Louhibi, D.

    2015-01-01

    Modulated 532 nm laser pulses were generated by a Nd:YVO4 microchip laser and a KTP crystal end-pumped by a 808 nm laser diode. The interest in such works arise from the efficiency of this type of laser in several applications. To obtain the desired type of the modulated laser pulses, the electrical circuit of the laser diode was designed so as to enable varying their driving signal and current values. Different modulated signals were used, such as square wave, sine wave, and burst mode pulses. Varying the peak drive current, the duty cycle, and the number of pulses allowed us to adjust the laser energy. For the burst mode experiment, the pulse energy obtained was about 1.2 μJ.

  3. Efficient photoassociation with a train of asymmetric laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wei; Wang Gaoren; Cong Shulin

    2011-04-15

    The photoassociation (PA) dynamics implemented by a train of asymmetric slowly turned-on and rapidly turned-off (STRT) laser pulses is investigated theoretically with Cs{sub 2} as an example. A higher PA efficiency is achieved by optimizing the parameters of the STRT pulse train. The PA reaction goes partly beyond the scope of the PA window. Numerical calculations show that an efficient population accumulation in the PA process can be realized with the STRT laser-pulse train which is available in the current experiment based on laser mode-lock and shaping technology.

  4. Generation of skewed laser pulses for laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, C.; Faure, J.; Geddes, C. G. R.; van Tilborg, J.; Leemans, W. P.

    2002-11-01

    The effect of asymmetric laser pulses on electron yield from a laser wakefield accelerator has been experimentally studied (W.P. Leemans et al., submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett.) using > 10^19 cm-3 plasmas and a 10 TW, > 45 fs, Ti:Al_2O3 laser. The non-Gaussian laser pulse shapes were controlled through non-linear chirp with a grating pair compressor. Pulses (76 fs FWHM) with a steep rise (positive skew) were found to significantly enhance the electron yield compared to pulses with a gentle rise (negative skew). These results demonstrate that laser wakefield accelerator can be optimized using skewed laser pulses. Controlling the skewness of laser pulses can be done by appropriate choice of the higher order spectral phase coefficients. Details on how this is done using non-linear chirp using grating compressor, as well as an acousto-optic system (DAZZLER) will be presented.

  5. Schwinger vacuum pair production in chirped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dumlu, Cesim K.

    2010-08-15

    The recent developments of high intensity ultrashort laser pulses have raised the hopes of observing Schwinger vacuum pair production which is one of the important nonperturbative phenomena in QED. The quantitative analysis of realistic high intensity laser pulses is vital for understanding the effect of the field parameters on the momentum spectrum of the produced particles. In this study, we analyze chirped laser pulses with a subcycle structure, and investigate the effects of the chirp parameter on the momentum spectrum of the produced particles. The combined effect of the chirp and carrier phase of the laser pulse is also analyzed. These effects are qualitatively explained by investigating the turning-point structure of the potential within the framework of the complex WKB scattering approach to pair production.

  6. Pulsed infrared laser irradiation of biological tissue: effect of pulse duration and repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, E. Duco; Chundru, Ravi K.; Samanani, Salim A.; Tibbetts, Todd A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-07-01

    Pulsed laser ablation is a trade off between minimizing thermal damage (for relatively long pulses) and mechanical damage (for relatively short pulses) to tissue adjacent to the ablation crater. Often it is not known what the optimal laser parameters are for a specific application, since clinically used parameters have at least partially been dictated by physical limitations of the laser devices. We recently obtained a novel type of cryogenic continuous wave holmium:YAG laser ((lambda) equals 2.09 micrometers ) with a galvanometric drive outcouple mirror that acts as a Q-switch. This unique device provides pulse repetition rates from a few Hz up to kHz and the pulse length is variable from microsecond(s) to ms. The effect of pulse duration and repetition rate on the thermal response of chicken breast is documented using temperature measurements with a thermal camera. We varied the pulse width from 10 microsecond(s) to 5 ms and fond that these pulse durations can be considered impulses of thermalized optical energy. In this paper some theoretical considerations of the pulse length will be described that support the experimental data. It was also found that even at 1 pulse per second thermal superposition occurs, indicating a much longer thermal relaxation time than predicted by a simple time constant model.

  7. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  8. Transient thermal analysis of semiconductor diode lasers under pulsed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerabathran, G. K.; Sprengel, S.; Karl, S.; Andrejew, A.; Schmeiduch, H.; Amann, M.-C.

    2017-02-01

    Self-heating in semiconductor lasers is often assumed negligible during pulsed operation, provided the pulses are `short'. However, there is no consensus on the upper limit of pulse width for a given device to avoid-self heating. In this paper, we present an experimental and theoretical analysis of the effect of pulse width on laser characteristics. First, a measurement method is introduced to study thermal transients of edge-emitting lasers during pulsed operation. This method can also be applied to lasers that do not operate in continuous-wave mode. Secondly, an analytical thermal model is presented which is used to fit the experimental data to extract important parameters for thermal analysis. Although commercial numerical tools are available for such transient analyses, this model is more suitable for parameter extraction due to its analytical nature. Thirdly, to validate this approach, it was used to study a GaSb-based inter-band laser and an InP-based quantum cascade laser (QCL). The maximum pulse-width for less than 5% error in the measured threshold currents was determined to be 200 and 25 ns for the GaSb-based laser and QCL, respectively.

  9. High-charge energetic ions generated by intersecting laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Deng, Z. G.; Yu, M. Y.; Wang, X. G.

    2016-08-15

    Ion acceleration from the interaction of two intersecting intense laser pulses with an overdense plasma is investigated using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that, comparing with the single-pulse case, the charge of the resulting energetic ion bunch can be increased by more than an order of magnitude without much loss of quality. Dependence of the ion charge on the interaction parameters, including separation distance and incidence angles of the lasers, is considered. It is shown that the charge of the accelerated ion bunch can be optimized by controlling the degree of laser overlapping. The improved performance can be attributed to the enhanced laser intensity as well as stochastic heating of the accelerated electrons. Since at present the intensity of readily available lasers is limited, the two pulse scheme should be useful for realizing higher laser intensity in order to achieve higher-energy target normal sheath acceleration ions.

  10. A comparative study of single and double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Rizwan; Baig, M. Aslam

    2009-08-01

    A comparative study of single and double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using the fundamental (1064 nm) and the second harmonics (532 nm) of Nd:YAG lasers is presented. The double pulse collinear configuration yields more than three hundred times signal enhancement in the singly ionized aluminum lines as compared to the single pulse LIBS spectrum. The effect of interpulse delay between the two laser pulses and the laser pulses energies ratio in the double pulse spectrum are studied. A comparison of variations of plasma parameters along the plume axis in the single and the double pulse has also been studied.

  11. Metal Processing with Ultra-Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S; Feit, M D; Komashko, A M; Perry, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Stuart, B C

    2000-05-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation has been shown to produce well-defined cuts and holes in metals with minimal heat effect to the remaining material. Ultrashort laser pulse processing shows promise as an important technique for materials processing. We will discuss the physical effects associated with processing based experimental and modeling results. Intense ultra-short laser pulse (USLP) generates high pressures and temperatures in a subsurface layer during the pulse, which can strongly modify the absorption. We carried out simulations of USLP absorption versus material and pulse parameters. The ablation rate as function of the laser parameters has been estimated. Since every laser pulse removes only a small amount of material, a practical laser processing system must have high repetition rate. We will demonstrate that planar ablation is unstable and the initially smooth crater bottom develops a corrugated pattern after many tens of shots. The corrugation growth rate, angle of incidence and the polarization of laser electric field dependence will be discussed. In the nonlinear stage, the formation of coherent structures with scales much larger than the laser wavelength was observed. Also, there appears to be a threshold fluence above which a narrow, nearly perfectly circular channel forms after a few hundred shots. Subsequent shots deepen this channel without significantly increasing its diameter. The role of light absorption in the hole walls will be discussed.

  12. Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Physics and Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Naskrecki, Ryszard

    2007-11-26

    Study of physical and chemical events accompanying light-matter interaction in pico- and femtosecond time scale have become possible with the use of ultrashort laser pulses. With the progress in generation of ultrashort laser pulses, the ultrafast optical spectroscopy, as a tool for dynamic study, is still evolving rapidly.

  13. Flexible pulse-controlled fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Controlled flexible pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber telecommunication, optical sensing, metrology, and microscopy. Here, we report a compact pulse-controlled all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity fiber Bragg grating (FBG) system as a flexible filter. The width and wavelength of pulses can be tuned independently by vertically and horizontally translating a cantilever beam, respectively. The pulse width of the laser can be tuned flexibly and accurately from ~7 to ~150 ps by controlling the bandwidth of FBG. The wavelength of pulse can be tuned precisely with the range of >20 nm. The flexible laser is precisely controlled and insensitive to environmental perturbations. This fiber-based laser is a simple, stable, and low-cost source for various applications where the width-tunable and/or wavelength-tunable pulses are necessary. PMID:25801546

  14. Flexible pulse-controlled fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong

    2015-03-01

    Controlled flexible pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber telecommunication, optical sensing, metrology, and microscopy. Here, we report a compact pulse-controlled all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity fiber Bragg grating (FBG) system as a flexible filter. The width and wavelength of pulses can be tuned independently by vertically and horizontally translating a cantilever beam, respectively. The pulse width of the laser can be tuned flexibly and accurately from ~7 to ~150 ps by controlling the bandwidth of FBG. The wavelength of pulse can be tuned precisely with the range of >20 nm. The flexible laser is precisely controlled and insensitive to environmental perturbations. This fiber-based laser is a simple, stable, and low-cost source for various applications where the width-tunable and/or wavelength-tunable pulses are necessary.

  15. Heating of solid targets with laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the heat-conduction equation are obtained for the heating of absorbing media with pulsed lasers. The spatial and temporal form of the temperature is determined using several different models of the laser irradiance. Both surface and volume generation of heat are discussed. It is found that if the depth of thermal diffusion for the laser-pulse duration is large compared to the optical-attenuation depth, the surface- and volume-generation models give nearly identical results. However, if the thermal-diffusion depth for the laser-pulse duration is comparable to or less than the optical-attenuation depth, the surface-generation model can give significantly different results compared to the volume-generation model. Specific numerical results are given for a tungsten target irradiated by pulses of different temporal durations and the implications of the results are discussed with respect to the heating of metals by picosecond laser pulses.

  16. Relativistic laser pulse compression in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yun; Sang, Hai-Bo Wan, Feng; Lv, Chong; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-07-15

    The self-compression of a weak relativistic Gaussian laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the laser pulse amplitude evolution, is deduced and solved numerically. The pulse compression is observed in the cases of both left- and right-hand circular polarized lasers. It is found that the compressed velocity is increased for the left-hand circular polarized laser fields, while decreased for the right-hand ones, which is reinforced as the enhancement of the external magnetic field. We find a 100 fs left-hand circular polarized laser pulse is compressed in a magnetized (1757 T) plasma medium by more than ten times. The results in this paper indicate the possibility of generating particularly intense and short pulses.

  17. Pulse shaper assisted short laser pulse characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, A.; Feurer, T.

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate that a pulse shaper is able to simultaneously act as an optical waveform generator and a short pulse characterization device when combined with an appropriate nonlinear element. We present autocorrelation measurements and their frequency resolved counterparts. We show that control over the carrier envelope phase allows continuous tuning between an intensity-like and an interferometric autocorrelation. By changing the transfer function other measurement techniques, for example STRUT, are easily realized without any modification of the optical setup.

  18. Vector self-pulsing in erbium-doped fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, Sergey V

    2016-10-15

    Insight into instabilities of fiber laser regimes leading to complex self-pulsing operations is an opportunity to unlock the high power and dynamic operation tunability of lasers. Though many models have been suggested, there is no complete covering of self-pulsing complexity observed experimentally. Here, I further generalized our previous vector model of erbium-doped fiber laser and, for the first time, to the best of my knowledge, map tunability of complex vector self-pulsing on Poincare sphere (limit cycles and double scroll polarization attractors) for laser parameters, e.g., power, ellipticity of the pump wave, and in-cavity birefringence. Analysis validated by extensive numerical simulations demonstrates good correspondence to the experimental results on complex self-pulsing regimes obtained by many authors during the last 20 years.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of additive pulse modelocked lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sucha, G.; Bolton, S.R.; Chemla, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamics have been studied in a number of modelocked laser systems, primarily in actively modelocked systems. However, less attention has been paid to the dynamics of passively modelocked laser systems. With the recent revolutionary advances in femtosecond modelocked laser technology, the understanding of instabilities and dynamics in passively modelocked lasers is an important issue. Here, the authors present experimental and numerical studies of the dynamics of an additive-pulse modelocked (APM) color-center laser.

  20. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High-Energy Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Liao, Z M; Mitchell, S; Messerly, M; Beach, R; Jovanovic, I; Brown, C; Payne, S A; Barty, C J

    2005-01-18

    We are developing an all fiber laser system optimized for providing input pulses for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal solutions for these systems as they are highly reliable and once constructed they can be operated with ease. Furthermore, they offer an additional benefit of significantly reduced footprint. In most labs containing equivalent bulk laser systems, the system occupies two 4'x8' tables and would consist of 10's if not a 100 of optics which would need to be individually aligned and maintained. The design requirements for this application are very different those commonly seen in fiber lasers. High energy lasers often have low repetition rates (as low as one pulse every few hours) and thus high average power and efficiency are of little practical value. What is of high value is pulse energy, high signal to noise ratio (expressed as pre-pulse contrast), good beam quality, consistent output parameters and timing. Our system focuses on maximizing these parameters sometimes at the expense of efficient operation or average power. Our prototype system consists of a mode-locked fiber laser, a compressed pulse fiber amplifier, a ''pulse cleaner'', a chirped fiber Bragg grating, pulse selectors, a transport fiber system and a large flattened mode fiber amplifier. In our talk we will review the system in detail and present theoretical and experimental studies of critical components. We will also present experimental results from the integrated system.

  1. Component temperature versus laser-welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Applications have arisen in which the component temperature near a laser weld is critical because of possible damage to the explosive powder adjacent to the member being welded. To evaluate the thermal excursion experienced at the powder cavity wall, a study was conducted using assemblies that had been equipped with 0.05 mm diameter thermocouple wires. The main goal of the study was to determine how changes in the laser welding parameters owuld affect the powder cavity wall temperature. The objective lens-to-work distance, pulse rate, and beam power parameters were varied. The peak temperature varied from 117/sup 0/C to 311/sup 0/C in response to welding parameter changes. The study concluded that by utilizing a selected set of welding parameters, the design requirement of a 160/sup 0/C maximum powder cavity wall temperature could easily be satisfied.

  2. Useful Scaling Parameters for the Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Kittel, P.; Timmerhaus, K. D.; Radebaugh, R.; Cheng, Pearl L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A set of eight non-dimensional scaling parameters for use in evaluating the performance of Pulse Tube Refrigerators is presented. The parameters result after scaling the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations for an axisymmetric, two-dimensional system. The physical interpretation of the parameters are described, and their usefulness is outlined for the enthalpy flow tube (open tube of the pulse tube). The scaling parameters allow the experimentalist to characterize three types of transport: enthalpy flow, mass streaming and heat transfer between the gas and the tube. Also reported are the results from a flow visualization experiment in which steady mass streaming in compressible oscillating flow is observed.

  3. Pulsed laser nitriding of uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbin; Meng, Daqiao; Xu, Qinying; Zhang, Youshou

    2010-02-01

    Pulsed laser nitriding offers several advantages such as high nitrogen concentration, low matrix temperature, fast treatment, simple vacuum chamber and precise position control compare to ion implantation, which is favorable for radioactive material passivation. In this work, uranium metal was nitrided using an excimer laser for the first time. The nitrided layers are characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The nitride layer is composed mainly of UN and U 2N 3 and depends on nitriding process. The amount of nitride increases with energy density and pressure. The irradiated area has a wavy structure which increases the roughness, while scratches and asperities caused by sand paper polishing were eliminated. Scan speed has a profound influence on the nitride layer, at low speed U 2N 3 is more likely to form and the nitride layer tends to crack. XPS analysis shows that nitrogen has diffused into interior, while oxygen is only present on the surface. Ambient and humid-hot corrosion tests show the nitrided sample has good anticorrosion property.

  4. Ultrashort pulsed fiber laser welding and sealing of transparent materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Liu, Jian

    2012-05-20

    In this paper, methods of welding and sealing optically transparent materials using an ultrashort pulsed (USP) fiber laser are demonstrated which overcome the limit of small area welding of optical materials. First, the interaction of USP fiber laser radiation inside glass was studied and single line welding results with different laser parameters were investigated. Then multiline scanning was used to obtain successful area bonding. Finally, complete four-edge sealing of fused silica substrates with a USP laser was demonstrated and the hermetic seal was confirmed by water immersion test. This laser microwelding technique can be extended to various applications in the semiconductor industry and precision optic manufacturing.

  5. Propagation characteristics of two-color laser pulses in homogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hemlata,; Saroch, Akanksha; Jha, Pallavi

    2015-11-15

    An analytical and numerical study of the evolution of two-color, sinusoidal laser pulses in cold, underdense, and homogeneous plasma has been presented. The wave equations for the radiation fields driven by linear as well as nonlinear contributions due to the two-color laser pulses have been set up. A variational technique is used to obtain the simultaneous equations describing the evolution of the laser spot size, pulse length, and chirp parameter. Numerical methods are used to graphically analyze the simultaneous evolution of these parameters due to the combined effect of the two-color laser pulses. Further, the pulse parameters are compared with those obtained for a single laser pulse. Significant focusing, compression, and enhanced positive chirp is obtained due to the combined effect of simultaneously propagating two-color pulses as compared to a single pulse propagating in plasma.

  6. Pulse circuit apparatus for gas discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, Laird P.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method using a unique pulse circuit for a known gas discharge laser apparatus to provide an electric field for preconditioning the gas below gas breakdown and thereafter to place a maximum voltage across the gas which maximum voltage is higher than that previously available before the breakdown voltage of that gas laser medium thereby providing greatly increased pumping of the laser.

  7. Electron acceleration by a chirped Gaussian laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sohbatzadeh, F.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Ghasemi, M.

    2006-12-15

    Electron acceleration by a chirped Gaussian laser pulse is investigated numerically. A linear and negative chirp is employed in this study. At first, a simple analytical description for the chirp effect on the electron acceleration in vacuum is provided in one-dimensional model. The chirp mechanism is then extended to the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse and electron. The electron final energy is obtained as a function of laser beam waist, laser intensity, chirp parameter, and initial phase of the laser pulse. It is shown that the electron final energy depends strongly on the chirp parameter and the initial phase of the laser pulse. There is an optimal value for the chirp parameter in which the electron acceleration takes place effectively. The energy gain increases with laser beam waist and intensity. It is also shown that the electron is accelerated within a few degrees to the axial direction. Emphasis is on the important aspect of the chirp effect on the energy gained by an electron from the electromagnetic wave.

  8. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  9. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  10. Intense isolated attosecond pulse generation from relativistic laser plasmas using few-cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Guangjin; Dallari, William; Borot, Antonin; Tsakiris, George D.; Veisz, Laszlo; Krausz, Ferenc; Yu, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We have performed a systematic study through particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the generation of attosecond pulse from relativistic laser plasmas when laser pulse duration approaches the few-cycle regime. A significant enhancement of attosecond pulse energy has been found to depend on laser pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and plasma scale length. Based on the results obtained in this work, the potential of attaining isolated attosecond pulses with ∼100 μJ energy for photons >16 eV using state-of-the-art laser technology appears to be within reach.

  11. Generation of laser pulse trains for tests of multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalloo, R. J.; Corner, L.; Arran, C.; Cowley, J.; Cheung, G.; Thornton, C.; Walczak, R.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    In multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration (MP-LWFA) a plasma wave is driven by a train of low-energy laser pulses separated by the plasma period, an approach which offers a route to driving plasma accelerators with high efficiency and at high pulse repetition rates using emerging technologies such as fibre and thin-disk lasers. Whilst these laser technologies are in development, proof-of-principle tests of MP-LWFA require a pulse train to be generated from a single, high-energy ultrafast pulse. Here we demonstrate the generation of trains of up to 7 pulses with pulse separations in the range 150-170 fs from single 40 fs pulses produced by a Ti:sapphire laser.

  12. MOPA pulsed fiber laser for silicon scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Limei; Huang, Wei; Deng, Mengmeng; Li, Feng

    2016-06-01

    A 1064 nm master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) pulsed fiber laser is developed with flexible control over the pulse width, repetition frequency and peak power, and it is used to investigate the dependence of mono-crystalline silicon scribe depth on the laser pulse width, scanning speed and repeat times. Experimental results indicate that long pulses with low peak powers lead to deep ablation depths. We also demonstrate that the ablation depth grows fast with the scanning repeat times at first and progressively tends to be saturated when the repeat times reach a certain level. A thermal model considering the laser pulse overlapping effect that predicts the silicon temperature variation and scribe depth is employed to verify the experimental conclusions with reasonably close agreement. These conclusions are of great benefits to the optimization of the laser material processing with high efficiency.

  13. Curvature aided long range propagation of short laser pulses in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Yedierler, Burak

    2013-03-15

    The pre-filamentation regime of propagation of a short and intense laser pulse in the atmosphere is considered. Spatiotemporal self-focusing dynamics of the laser beam are investigated by calculating the coupled differential equations for spot size, pulse length, phase, curvature, and chirp functions of a Gaussian laser pulse via a variational technique. The effect of initial curvature parameter on the propagation of the laser pulse is taken into consideration. A method relying on the adjustment of the initial curvature parameter can expand the filamentation distance of a laser beam of given power and chirp is proposed.

  14. Ultrashort-pulsed laser microstructuring of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirk, Michael D.; Molian, Pal; Wang, Cai; Ho, Kai M.; Malshe, Ajay P.

    2000-11-01

    Precision microfabrication of diamond has many applications in the fields of microelectronics and cutting tools. In this work, and ultra-short pulsed Ti: Sapphire laser was used to perform patterning, hold drilling, and scribing of synthetic and CVD diamonds. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, profilometry, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the microstructures. A tight-binding molecular dynamics (TBMD) model was used to investigate atomic movements during ablation and predict thresholds for ablation. The ultra- short pulsed laser generated holes and grooves that were nearly perfect with smooth edges, little collateral thermal damage and recast layer. The most exciting observation was the absence of graphite residue that always occurs in the longer-pulsed laser machining. The ablation threshold for ultra-short pulsed laser was two orders of magnitude lower than that of longer-pulsed laser. Finite-difference thermal modeling showed that ultra-short pulses raised the electron temperatures of diamond in excess of 100,ooo K due to multiphoton absorption, absence of hydrodynamic motion, and lack of time for energy transfer from electrons to the lattice during the pulse duration. TBMD simulations, carried out on (111) and (100) diamond surfaces, revealed that ultra-short pulses peel carbon atoms layer-by -layer from the surface, leaving a smooth surface after ablation. However, longer pulses cause thermal melting resulting in graphite residue that anchors to the diamond surface following ablation.

  15. Picosecond pulsed diode ring laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Rosker, M.J.; Christian, W.R.; McMichael, I.C.

    1994-12-31

    An external ring cavity containing as its active medium a pair of InGaAsP diodes is modelocked to produce picosecond pulses. In such a laser, a small frequency difference proportional to the nonreciprocal phase shift (resulting from, e.g., the Sagnac effect) can be observed by beating together the counter propagating laser arms; the device therefore acts as a rotating sensor. In contrast to a conventional (cw) ring laser gyroscope, the pulsed gyroscope can avoid gain competition, thereby enabling the use of homogeneously broadened gain media like semiconductor diodes. Temporal separation of the pulses within the cavity also discriminates against frequency locking of the lasers. The picosecond pulsed diode ring laser gyroscope is reviewed. Both active and passive modelocking are discussed.

  16. Pulsed laser surface hardening of ferrous alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Reed, C. B.; Leong, K. H.; Hunter, B. V.

    1999-09-30

    A high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser and special optics were used to produce surface hardening on 1045 steel and gray cast iron by varying the process parameters. Unlike CO{sub 2} lasers, where absorptive coatings are required, the higher absorptivity of ferrous alloys at the Nd:YAG laser wavelength eliminates the necessity of applying a coating before processing. Metallurgical analysis of the treated tracks showed that very fine and hard martensitic microstructure (1045 steel) or inhomogeneous martensite (gray cast iron) were obtained without surface melting, giving maximum hardness of HRC 61 and HRC 40 for 1045 steel and gray cast iron respectively. The corresponding maximum case depths for both alloys at the above hardness are 0.6 mm. Gray cast iron was more difficult to harden without surface melting because of its lower melting temperature and a significantly longer time-at-temperature required to diffuse carbon atoms from the graphite flakes into the austenite matrix during laser heating. The thermal distortion was characterized in term of flatness changes after surface hardening.

  17. Pulsed CO laser for isotope separation of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, Igor Y.; Koptev, Andrey V.

    2012-07-30

    This article proposes a technical solution for using a CO laser facility for the industrial separation of uranium used in the production of fuel for nuclear power plants, employing a method of laser isotope separation of uranium with condensation repression in a free jet. The laser operation with nanosecond pulse irradiation can provide an acceptable efficiency in the separating unit and a high efficiency of the laser with the wavelength of 5.3 {mu}m. In the present work we also introduce a calculation model and define the parameters of a mode-locked CO laser with a RF discharge in the supersonic stream. The average pulsed CO laser power of 3 kW is sufficient for efficient industrial isotope separation of uranium in one stage.

  18. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, Christine Ann

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 1016 W/cm2 laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by Lplasma ≥ 2LRayleigh > cτ. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (no ≤ 0.05ncr). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in ω-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  19. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1988-01-01

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  20. Electron yield enhancement in a laser wakefield accelerator driven by asymmetric laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Catravas, P.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, C.; Trines, R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Shadwick, B.A.; van Tilborg, J.; Faure, J.

    2002-08-01

    The effect of asymmetric laser pulses on electron yield from a laser wakefield accelerator has been experimentally studied using > 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} plasmas and a 10 TW, > 45 fs, Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laser. Laser pulse shape was controlled through non-linear chirp with a grating pair compressor. Pulses (76 fs FWHM) with a steep rise and positive chirp were found to significantly enhance the electron yield compared to pulses with a gentle rise and negative chirp. Theory and simulation show that fast rising pulses can generate larger amplitude wakes that seed the growth of the self-modulation instability and that frequency chirp is of minimal importance for the experimental parameters.

  1. Classical effect for enhanced high harmonic yield in ultrashort laser pulses with a moderate laser intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y. Z.; Wang, S.; Dong, F. L.; Li, Y. P.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-03-01

    We study the influence of pulse duration on high harmonic generation (HHG) by exploring a wide laser-parameter region theoretically. Previous studies have shown that for high laser intensities close to saturation ionization intensity, the HHG inversion efficiency is higher for shorter pulses since the ground-state depletion is weaker in short pulses. Our simulations show that this high efficiency also appears for a moderate laser intensity at which the ionization is not very strong. A classical effect relating to shorter travel distances of the rescattering electron in shorter pulses is shown to contribute importantly to this high efficiency. The effect can be amplified significantly if a two-color laser field is used, suggesting a potential approach to increasing the HHG yield and generating short and bright attosecond pulses.

  2. Simulation of Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Itina, Tatian E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R.

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the physical reasons of a strange decrease in the ablation depth observed in femtosecond double-pulse experiments with increasing delay between the pulses. Two ultrashort pulses of the same energy produce the crater which is less than that created by a single pulse. Hydrodynamicsimulation shows that the ablation mechanism is suppressed when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The modeling of the double-pulse ablation for different delays between pulses confirms this explanation.

  3. Fabrication of micro-convex domes using long pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingsheng; Zhang, Yongnian; Wang, Ling; Xian, Jieyu; Jin, Meifu; Kang, Min

    2017-01-01

    Micro-convex domes inspired from nature can be machined by chemical and physical routes to achieve specific functions. Laser surface texturing (LST) is the front runner among the current material micro-processing technologies. However, most of the studies relating to LST dealt with the formation of micro-dimples. In this paper, LST using long pulse laser was used to create micro-convex domes on 304L stainless steel. Spherical-cap-shaped domes with diameters of 30-75 μm and height of 0.9-5.5 μm were created through LST. The effects of laser-processing parameters on surface morphologies of the created convex domes were investigated. The height of the convex dome increased at first and then decreased with the increasing laser power. The change tendency of the height with the pulse duration varied at different laser powers. The diameter of the convex dome increased almost linearly with the laser power or pulse duration. The superior micro-convex domes were achieved at a pulse energy of 5.6 mJ with a laser power of 80 W and pulse duration of 70 μs.

  4. Impact of pulse duration on Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy: treatment aspects on the single-pulse level.

    PubMed

    Sroka, Ronald; Pongratz, Thomas; Scheib, Gabriel; Khoder, Wael; Stief, Christian G; Herrmann, Thomas; Nagele, Udo; Bader, Markus J

    2015-04-01

    Holmium-YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotripsy is a multi-pulse treatment modality with stochastic effects on the fragmentation. In vitro investigation on the single-pulse-induced effects on fiber, repulsion as well as fragmentation was performed to identify potential impacts of different Ho:YAG laser pulse durations. A Ho:YAG laser system (Swiss LaserClast, EMS S.A., Nyon, Switzerland) with selectable long- or short-pulse mode was tested with regard to fiber burn back, the repulsion capacity using an underwater pendulum setup and single-pulse-induced fragmentation capacity using artificial (BEGO) stones. The laser parameters were chosen in accordance with clinical application modes (laser fiber: 365 and 200 µm; output power: 4, 6 and 10 W in different combinations of energy per pulse and repetition rate). Evaluation parameters were reduction in fiber length, pendulum deviation and topology of the crater. Using the long-pulse mode, the fiber burn back was nearly negligible, while in short-pulse mode, an increased burn back could be observed. The results of the pendulum test showed that the deviation induced by the momentum of short pulses was by factor 1.5-2 higher compared to longer pulses at identical energy per pulse settings. The ablation volumes induced by single pulses either in short-pulse or long-pulse mode did not differ significantly although different crater shapes appeared. Reduced stone repulsion and reduced laser fiber burn back with longer laser pulses may result in a more convenient handling during clinical application and thus in an improved clinical outcome of laser lithotripsy.

  5. Dependence of the molecular iodine B-state predissociation induced by a femtosecond laser pulse on pulse phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyukevich, Yu I; Umanskii, Stanislav Ya

    2011-12-31

    The processes of pumping and laser-induced predissociation of B-states of the I{sub 2} molecule under the action of femtosecond laser pulses are considered theoretically. An analytical formula is derived, which describes the dependence of the predissociation on such parameters of femtosecond pulses as spectral chirp, spectral width and delay time between pulses. The formula is used to calculate numerically the dependence of the predissociation yield on the parameters of the phase modulation of the pump pulse and coupling pulse.

  6. Nanosecond pulsed laser texturing of optical diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqurashi, Tawfiq; Sabouri, Aydin; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider

    2017-02-01

    High-quality optical glass diffusers have applications in aerospace, displays, imaging systems, medical devices, and optical sensors. The development of rapid and accurate fabrication techniques is highly desirable for their production. Here, a micropatterning method for the fast fabrication of optical diffusers by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation is demonstrated (λ=1064 nm, power=7.02, 9.36 and 11.7 W and scanning speed=200 and 800 mm s-1). The experiments were carried out by point-to-point texturing of a glass surface in spiral shape. The laser machining parameters, the number of pulses and their power had significant effect on surface features. The optical characteristics of the diffusers were characterized at different scattering angles. The features of the microscale structures influenced average roughness from 0.8 μm to 1.97 μm. The glass diffusers scattered light at angles up to 20° and their transmission efficiency were measured up to ˜97% across the visible spectrum. The produced optical devices diffuse light less but do so with less scattering and energy losses as compared to opal diffusing glass. The presented fabrication method can be applied to any other transparent material to create optical diffusers. It is anticipated that the optical diffusers presented in this work will have applications in the production of LED spotlights and imaging devices.

  7. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

    2007-06-21

    We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

  8. Zitterbewegung of electrons in carbon nanotubes created by laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Rusin, T M; Zawadzki, W

    2014-05-28

    We describe a possibility of creating non-stationary electron wave packets in zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNT) illuminated by short laser pulses. After the disappearance of the pulse the packet experiences a trembling motion (Zitterbewegung, ZB). The band structure of CNT is calculated using the tight-binding approximation generalized for the presence of radiation. By employing realistic pulse and CNT parameters we obtain the ZB oscillations with interband frequencies corresponding to specific pairs of energy bands. A choice of optimal parameters is presented in order to observe the phenomenon of ZB experimentally. The use of Gaussian wave packets to trigger the electron Zitterbewegung, as used in the literature, is critically reexamined.

  9. Short Pulse Laser Applications Design

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R J; Clark, D S; Kemp, A J; Lasinski, B F; Tabak, M

    2008-02-11

    We are applying our recently developed, LDRD-funded computational simulation tool to optimize and develop applications of Fast Ignition (FI) for stockpile stewardship. This report summarizes the work performed during a one-year exploratory research LDRD to develop FI point designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These results were sufficiently encouraging to propose successfully a strategic initiative LDRD to design and perform the definitive FI experiment on the NIF. Ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will begin in 2010 using the central hot spot (CHS) approach, which relies on the simultaneous compression and ignition of a spherical fuel capsule. Unlike this approach, the fast ignition (FI) method separates fuel compression from the ignition phase. In the compression phase, a laser such as NIF is used to implode a shell either directly, or by x rays generated from the hohlraum wall, to form a compact dense ({approx}300 g/cm{sup 3}) fuel mass with an areal density of {approx}3.0 g/cm{sup 2}. To ignite such a fuel assembly requires depositing {approx}20kJ into a {approx}35 {micro}m spot delivered in a short time compared to the fuel disassembly time ({approx}20ps). This energy is delivered during the ignition phase by relativistic electrons generated by the interaction of an ultra-short high-intensity laser. The main advantages of FI over the CHS approach are higher gain, a lower ignition threshold, and a relaxation of the stringent symmetry requirements required by the CHS approach. There is worldwide interest in FI and its associated science. Major experimental facilities are being constructed which will enable 'proof of principle' tests of FI in integrated subignition experiments, most notably the OMEGA-EP facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory of Laser Energetics and the FIREX facility at Osaka University in Japan. Also, scientists in the European Union have recently proposed the construction of a new FI

  10. Deterministic processing of alumina with ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, J; Rubenchik, A M; Shirk, M D; Stuart, B C

    2007-06-27

    Ultrashort pulsed lasers can accurately ablate materials which are refractory, transparent, or are otherwise difficult to machine by other methods. The typical method of machining surfaces with ultrashort laser pulses is by raster scanning, or the machining of sequentially overlapping linear trenches. Experiments in which linear trenches were machined in alumina at various pulse overlaps and incident fluences are presented, and the dependence of groove depth on these parameters established. A model for the machining of trenches based on experimental data in alumina is presented, which predicts and matches observed trench geometry. This model is then used to predict optimal process parameters for the machining of trenches for maximal material removal rate for a given laser.

  11. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Petrov, Todor

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry.

  12. High-performance laser processing using manipulated ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Hanada, Yasutaka; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2012-07-01

    We employ manipulated ultrafast laser pulses to realize microprocessing with high-performance. Efficient microwelding of glass substrates by irradiation by a double-pulse train of ultrafast laser pulses is demonstrated. The bonding strength of two photostructurable glass substrates welded by double-pulse irradiation was evaluated to be 22.9 MPa, which is approximately 22% greater than that of a sample prepared by conventional irradiation by a single pulse train. Additionally, the fabrication of hollow microfluidic channels with a circular cross-sectional shape embedded in fused silica is realized by spatiotemporally focusing the ultrafast laser beam. We show both theoretically and experimentally that the spatiotemporal focusing of ultrafast laser beam allows for the creation of a three-dimensionally symmetric spherical peak intensity distribution at the focal spot.

  13. Pulsed laser irradiation of metal multilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David Price; McDonald, Joel Patrick

    2010-11-01

    Vapor-deposited, exothermic metal-metal multilayer foils are an ideal class of materials for detailed investigations of pulsed laser-ignited chemical reactions. Created in a pristine vacuum environment by sputter deposition, these high purity materials have well-defined reactant layer thicknesses between 1 and 1000 nm, minimal void density and intimate contact between layers. Provided that layer thicknesses are made small, some reactive metal-metal multilayer foils can be ignited at a point by laser irradiation and exhibit subsequent high-temperature, self-propagating synthesis. With this presentation, we describe the pulsed laser-induced ignition characteristics of a single multilayer system (equiatomic Al/Pt) that exhibits self-propagating synthesis. We show that the thresholds for ignition are dependent on (i) multilayer design and (ii) laser pulse duration. With regard to multilayer design effects on ignition, there is a large range of multilayer periodicity over which ignition threshold decreases as layer thicknesses are made small. We attribute this trend of decreased ignition threshold to reduced mass transport diffusion lengths required for rapid exothermic mixing. With regard to pulse duration effects, we have determined how ignition threshold of a single Al/Pt multilayer varies with pulse duration from 10{sup -2} to {approx} 10{sup -13} sec (wavelength and spot size are held constant). A higher laser fluence is required for ignition when using a single laser pulse {approx} 100 fs or 1 ps compared with nanosecond or microsecond exposure, and we attribute this, in part, to the effects of reactive material being ablated when using the shorter pulse durations. To further understand these trends and other pulsed laser-based processes, our discussion concludes with an analysis of the heat-affected depths in multilayers as a function of pulse duration.

  14. Laser glass marking: influence of pulse characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolo, Ana; Coelho, João; Pires, Margarida

    2005-09-01

    Laser glass marking is currently used in several glass materials for different purposes, such as bar codes for product tracking, brand logos or just decoration. Systems with a variety of different laser sources, with inherent power ranges, wavelengths and pulse regimes have been used, namely CO2, Nd:YAG, Excimer, Ti-Sapphire lasers. CO2 Lasers systems, although being a reliable tool for materials processing, and very compact in the case of sealed low power lasers, are usually associated with a localized thermal loading on the material, causing brittle materials like glass to crack around the irradiated area. In this experimental study a pulsed CO2 laser was used to direct marking the glass surface. The temporal characteristics of the laser pulse--pulse length, period and duty cycle were varied, and glass materials with different thermal properties were used in order to correlate the marking process--cracking or softening with or without material removal with the laser and material characteristics. Glass materials with major industrial application, such as soda-lima, borosilicate (PYREX) glasses and crystal have been investigated. Laser marked areas have been characterized in terms of surface optical properties, like diffuse and direct reflectance and transmittance for white light, directly related with marked surface quality.

  15. Pulsed lasers in dentistry: sense or nonsense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.; Frentzen, Matthias

    1991-05-01

    The great interest in the field of laser applications in dentistry provokes the question, if all these new techniques may really fulfill advantages, which are expected after initial in-vitro studies. Whereas laser surgery of soft oral tissues has been developed to a standard method, laser treatment of dental hard tissues and the bone are attended with many unsolved problems. Different laser types, especially pulsed lasers in a wide spectrum of wavelengths have been proofed for dental use. Today neither the excimer lasers, emitting in the far uv-range from 193 to 351 nm, nor the mid-infrared lasers like Nd:YAG (1,064 μm), Ho:YAG (2,1 μm) and Er:YAG (2,96 μm) or the C02-laser (10,6 μm) show mechanism of interaction more carefully and faster than a preparation of teeth with diamond drillers. The laser type with the most precise and considerate treatment effects in the moment is the short pulsed (15 ns) ArF-excimer laser with a wavelength of 193 nm. However this laser type has not yet the effectivity of mechanical instruments and it needs a mirror system to deliver the radiation. Histological results point out, that this laser shows no significant pathological alterations in the adjacent tissues. Another interesting excimer laser, filled with XeCI and emitting at a wavelength of 308 nm has the advantage to be good to deliver through quartz fibers. A little more thermal influence is to be seen according to the longer wavelength. Yet the energy density, necessary to cut dental hard tissues will not be reached with the laser systems available now. Both the pulsed Er:YAG- (2,94 μm, pulse duration 250 s) and the Ho:YAG -laser (2,1 μm, pulse duration 250 μs) have an effective coupling of the laser energy to hydrogeneous tissues, but they do not work sufficient on healthy enamel and dentine. The influence to adjacent healthy tissue is not tolerable, especially in regard of the thermal damage dentine and pulp tissues. Moreover, like the 193 nm ArF-excimer laser

  16. Evolution of laser pulse shape in a parabolic plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, M.; Gupta, D. N.; Suk, H.

    2017-01-01

    During high-intensity laser propagation in a plasma, the group velocity of a laser pulse is subjected to change with the laser intensity due to alteration in refractive index associated with the variation of the nonlinear plasma density. The pulse front sharpened while the back of the pulse broadened due to difference in the group velocity at different parts of the laser pulse. Thus the distortion in the shape of the laser pulse is expected. We present 2D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrating the controlling the shape distortion of a Gaussian laser pulse using a parabolic plasma channel. We show the results of the intensity distribution of laser pulse in a plasma with and without a plasma channel. It has been observed that the plasma channel helps in controlling the laser pulse shape distortion. The understanding of evolution of laser pulse shape may be crucial while applying the parabolic plasma channel for guiding the laser pulse in plasma based accelerators.

  17. Ultrashort pulse generation in semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auyeung, J.; Johnston, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques to generate picosecond optical pulses from semiconductor lasers are reviewed. Experimental methods and results of theoretical analysis of active modelocking are presented. It is shown that modelocking will achieve the shortest pulses; but the use of a cumbersome external cavity will probably limit its practical use. Short pulses produced by direct modulation such as gain switching are considerably broader than those obtained by passive modelocking. However, no external cavity is needed; and the simplicity of this method makes it important to be explored further. Recent experimental results are discussed where picosecond pulses from a buried heterostructure laser diode with ultrashort current pulses obtained from a comb generator are generated. Also, 28 ps pulses were obtained at 2.5 GHz repetition frequency, using the gain switching method. An analytical analysis based on the rate equations shows qualitative agreement with our experimental results.

  18. Measuring the effective pulse duration of nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses for laser-induced damage experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorila, Alexandru; Rusen, Laurentiu; Stratan, Aurel; Nemes, George

    2013-05-01

    We report on our approach to measure the quantity named effective pulse duration as defined in the ISO 21254-1:2011 standard, which deals with laser-induced damage (LID) threshold measurements. The approach is applied to measure pulses from two laser sources: an injection-seeded electro-optically Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond system with 10-Hz pulse repetition frequency, and a fully integrated Ti:sapphire laser with 150-400 fs and 2-kHz pulse repetition frequency. For comparison, the full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the same pulses is also measured. The analysis and description of the measurement process, the experimental results, and the corresponding uncertainties are presented. A smaller combined uncertainty is obtained for the effective pulse duration than for the FWHM-defined pulse duration for each time scale involved in experiments. This suggests that the effective pulse duration is the appropriate parameter to characterize the pulse duration in LID experiments.

  19. Short pulse generation by laser slicing at NSLSII

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Blednykh, A.; Guo, W.; Krinsky, S.; Li, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Tchoubar, O.; Wang, G.; Willeke, F.; Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    We discuss an upgrade R&D project for NSLSII to generate sub-pico-second short x-ray pulses using laser slicing. We discuss its basic parameters and present a specific example for a viable design and its performance. Since the installation of the laser slicing system into the storage ring will break the symmetry of the lattice, we demonstrate it is possible to recover the dynamical aperture to the original design goal of the ring. There is a rapid growth of ultrafast user community interested in science using sub-pico-second x-ray pulses. In BNL's Short Pulse Workshop, the discussion from users shows clearly the need for a sub-pico-second pulse source using laser slicing method. In the proposal submitted following this workshop, NSLS team proposed both hard x-ray and soft x-ray beamlines using laser slicing pulses. Hence there is clearly a need to consider the R&D efforts of laser slicing short pulse generation at NSLSII to meet these goals.

  20. Solitary Nanostructures Produced by Ultrashort Laser Pulse.

    PubMed

    Inogamov, Nail A; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V; Khokhlov, Viktor A; Petrov, Yury V; Migdal, Kirill P

    2016-12-01

    Laser-produced surface nanostructures show considerable promise for many applications while fundamental questions concerning the corresponding mechanisms of structuring are still debated. Here, we present a simple physical model describing those mechanisms happened in a thin metal film on dielectric substrate irradiated by a tightly focused ultrashort laser pulse. The main ingredients included into the model are (i) the film-substrate hydrodynamic interaction, melting and separation of the film from substrate with velocity increasing with increase of absorbed fluence; (ii) the capillary forces decelerating expansion of the expanding flying film; and (iii) rapid freezing into a solid state if the rate of solidification is comparable or larger than hydrodynamic velocities. The developed model and performed simulations explain appearance of microbump inside the focal spot on the film surface. The model follows experimental findings about gradual transformation of the bump from small parabolic to a conical shape and to the bump with a jet on its tip with increasing fluence. Disruption of the bump as a result of thinning down the liquid film to a few interatomic distances or due to mechanical break-off of solid film is described together with the jetting and formation of one or many droplets. Developed theory opens door for optimizing laser parameters for intended nanostructuring in applications.

  1. Pulsed Laser Illumination of Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland; Jenkins, Philip; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. The induction FEL and the radio-frequency (RF) FEL both produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work, we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format, producing 50 ps pulses at a frequency of 78 MHz. A variety of Si, GaAs, CaSb and CdInSe2 (CIS) solar cells are tested at average incident powers between 4 mW/sq cm and 425 mW/sq cm. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced by using a pulsed laser source compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. Because the pulse separation is less than or approximately equal to the minority carrier lifetime, the illumination conditions are effectively those of a continuous wave laser. The time dependence of the voltage and current response of the cells are also measured using a sampling oscilloscope equipped with a high frequency voltage probe and current transformer. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments shows that the RF FEL pulse format yields much more efficient photovoltaic conversion of light than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  2. Pulsed Laser Illumination of Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland; Jenkins, Philip; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. The induction FEL and the radio-frequency (RF) FEL both produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work, we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format, producing 50 ps pulses at a frequency of 78 MHz. A variety of Si, GaAs, CaSb and CdInSe2 (CIS) solar cells are tested at average incident powers between 4 mW/sq cm and 425 mW/sq cm. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced by using a pulsed laser source compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. Because the pulse separation is less than or approximately equal to the minority carrier lifetime, the illumination conditions are effectively those of a continuous wave laser. The time dependence of the voltage and current response of the cells are also measured using a sampling oscilloscope equipped with a high frequency voltage probe and current transformer. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments shows that the RF FEL pulse format yields much more efficient photovoltaic conversion of light than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  3. Pulse laser assist optical tweezers (PLAT) with long-duration pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Saki; Sugiura, Tadao; Minato, Kotaro

    2011-07-01

    Optical tweezers is a technique to trap and to manipulate micron sized objects under a microscope by radiation pressure force exerted by a laser beam. Optical tweezers has been utilized for single-molecular measurements of force exerted by molecular interactions and for cell palpation. To extend applications of optical tweezers we have developed a novel optical tweezers system combined with a pulse laser. We utilize a pulse laser (Q-switched Nd: YAG laser, wavelength of 1064 nm) to assist manipulations by conventional optical tweezers with a continuous wave (CW) laser. The pulse laser beam is introduced into the same optics for conventional optical tweezers. In principle, instantaneous radiation force is proportional to instantaneous power of laser beam. As a result, pulse laser beam generates strong instantaneous force on an object to be manipulated. If the radiation force becomes strong enough to get over an obstacle structure and/or to be released from adhesion, the object will be free from these difficulties. We investigate the effect of pulse laser assistance with changing pulse duration of the laser. We report optimum pulse duration of 100 ns to 200 ns deduced from motion analysis of a particle in a beam spot. Our goal is to realize in-vivo manipulation and operation of a cell. For this purpose we need to reduce light energy of pulse laser beam and to avoid laser induced breakdown caused by strong light field. So we have developed a pulse laser with 160-ns pulse duration and have confirmed that availability on manipulation of living cells.

  4. Pulse-shaping circuit for laser excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Narrower, impedence-matched pulses initiate stabler electric discharges for gas lasers. Discharges are more efficient, more compact, capable of high repetition rate, and less expensive than conventional electron-beam apparatus, but gas tends to break down and form localized arcs. Pulse-shaping circuit compresses width of high-voltage pulses from relatively-slow rise-time voltage generator and gradually grades circuit impedance from inherent high impedance of generator to low impedence of gas.

  5. Nanosecond pulsed laser generation of holographic structures on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Ardron, Marcus; Weston, Nick J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    A laser-based process for the generation of phase holographic structures directly onto the surface of metals is presented. This process uses 35ns long laser pulses of wavelength 355nm to generate optically-smooth surface deformations on a metal. The laser-induced surface deformations (LISDs) are produced by either localized laser melting or the combination of melting and evaporation. The geometry (shape and dimension) of the LISDs depends on the laser processing parameters, in particular the pulse energy, as well as on the chemical composition of a metal. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the LISDs formation on various metals, such as stainless steel, pure nickel and nickel-chromium Inconel® alloys. In addition, we provide information about the design and fabrication process of the phase holographic structures and demonstrate their use as robust markings for the identification and traceability of high value metal goods.

  6. Pressure wave charged repetitively pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarny, Vijay A.

    1982-01-01

    A repetitively pulsed gas laser in which a system of mechanical shutters bracketing the laser cavity manipulate pressure waves resulting from residual energy in the cavity gas following a lasing event so as to draw fresh gas into the cavity and effectively pump spent gas in a dynamic closed loop.

  7. Quantifying pulsed laser induced damage to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Marc; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Bezares, Francisco J.; Robinson, Jeremy; Anderson, Travis; Chun, Hayden; Tadjer, Marko

    2011-11-21

    As an emerging optical material, graphene's ultrafast dynamics are often probed using pulsed lasers yet the region in which optical damage takes place is largely uncharted. Here, femtosecond laser pulses induced localized damage in single-layer graphene on sapphire. Raman spatial mapping, SEM, and AFM microscopy quantified the damage. The resulting size of the damaged area has a linear correlation with the optical fluence. These results demonstrate local modification of sp{sup 2}-carbon bonding structures with optical pulse fluences as low as 14 mJ/cm{sup 2}, an order-of-magnitude lower than measured and theoretical ablation thresholds.

  8. Investigation of Early Plasma Evolution Induced by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen B.

    2012-01-01

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment1-11. Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy1-3 and interferometry1,4-7. However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number densities within a delay time of 100 picosecond (ps) with respect to the laser pulse peak are still very few, especially for the ultrashort pulse of a duration around 100 femtosecond (fs) and a low power density around 1014 W/cm2. Early plasma generated under these conditions has only been captured recently with high temporal and spatial resolutions12. The detailed setup strategy and procedures of this high precision measurement will be illustrated in this paper. The rationale of the measurement is optical pump-probe shadowgraphy: one ultrashort laser pulse is split to a pump pulse and a probe pulse, while the delay time between them can be adjusted by changing their beam path lengths. The pump pulse ablates the target and generates the early plasma, and the probe pulse propagates through the plasma region and detects the non-uniformity of electron number density. In addition, animations are generated using the calculated results from the simulation model of Ref. 12 to illustrate the plasma formation and evolution with a very high resolution (0.04 ~ 1 ps). Both the experimental method and the simulation method can be applied to a broad range of time frames and laser parameters. These methods can be used to examine the early plasma generated not only from metals, but also from semiconductors and insulators. PMID:22806170

  9. Investigation of early plasma evolution induced by ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C; King, Galen B

    2012-07-02

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment(1-11). Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy(1-3) and interferometry(1,4-7). However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number densities within a delay time of 100 picosecond (ps) with respect to the laser pulse peak are still very few, especially for the ultrashort pulse of a duration around 100 femtosecond (fs) and a low power density around 10(14) W/cm(2). Early plasma generated under these conditions has only been captured recently with high temporal and spatial resolutions(12). The detailed setup strategy and procedures of this high precision measurement will be illustrated in this paper. The rationale of the measurement is optical pump-probe shadowgraphy: one ultrashort laser pulse is split to a pump pulse and a probe pulse, while the delay time between them can be adjusted by changing their beam path lengths. The pump pulse ablates the target and generates the early plasma, and the probe pulse propagates through the plasma region and detects the non-uniformity of electron number density. In addition, animations are generated using the calculated results from the simulation model of Ref. (12) to illustrate the plasma formation and evolution with a very high resolution (0.04 ~ 1 ps). Both the experimental method and the simulation method can be applied to a broad range of time frames and laser parameters. These methods can be used to examine the early plasma generated not only from metals, but also from semiconductors and insulators.

  10. 25 years of pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Michael; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    decade, large-area PLD grown YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films became a reality for applications in microwave filters for satellite and mobile communication. The material systems that could be covered under the PLD gamut extended to almost all oxides, nitrides and even organics. A second textbook exclusively dedicated to PLD was edited by Rob Eason in 2007 [4], reviewing many possible modifications and extensions of the method. To celebrate 25 years of pulsed laser deposition, Venkatesan organized a symposium on 'Recent Advances in the Pulsed Laser Deposition of Thin Films and Nanostructures' in 2013 [5]. Besides dielectric, ferroelectric and magnetic oxides, the wide-bandgap group II-VI semiconductor ZnO is among the most intensively researched compounds during the last decade. Therefore, this material has become the subject of two introductory reviews in this issue by Opel et al and Tsukazaki et al , to show the state-of-the-art work carried out on ZnO thin films to 2013. The detailed insights into growth parameter control and their impact on the ZnO film performance make both reviews highly instructional not only for specialists, but also for beginners in PLD. The perspective of PLD towards industrial applications largely depends, first, on the ability of the excimer laser suppliers to further increase the laser power and, second, on the deposition schemes to distribute the ablated material homogeneously on technologically relevant substrate areas (8-inch diameter). These developments are explained here by the leading companies dealing with high-power excimer lasers and large-area PLD equipment, such as Coherent Laser Systems GmbH, PVD Products, Inc., and SolMateS B.V. It is also important to note the efforts made by Blank and Rijnders for atomic layer control of PLD by in situ high-pressure reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), which is now adopted by many groups worldwide. The potential of multi-beam PLD for advanced optical waveguides and of advanced design

  11. Pulsed solid state lasers for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertesz, Ivan; Danileiko, A. Y.; Denker, Boris I.; Kroo, Norbert; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.

    1994-02-01

    The effect on living tissues of different pulsed solid state lasers: Nd:YAG ((lambda) equals 1.06 micrometers ) Er:glass (1.54 micrometers ), Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers ) and Er:YAG (2.94 micrometers ) is compared with the continuous wave Nd:YAG- and CO2-lasers used in operating theaters. Portable Er:glass- and Er:YAG-lasers are developed for surgery/cosmetics and HIV-safe blood testing.

  12. Classical dynamics of free electromagnetic laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, S.; Tucker, R. W.; Walton, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a class of exact finite energy solutions to the vacuum source-free Maxwell field equations as models for multi- and single cycle laser pulses in classical interaction with relativistic charged test particles. These solutions are classified in terms of their chiral content based on their influence on particular charge configurations in space. Such solutions offer a computationally efficient parameterization of compact laser pulses used in laser-matter simulations and provide a potential means for experimentally bounding the fundamental length scale in the generalized electrodynamics of Bopp, Landé and Podolsky.

  13. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-05

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived.

  14. A power ramped pulsed mode laser piercing technique for improved CO 2 laser profile cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirumala Rao, B.; Ittoop, M. O.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2009-11-01

    Laser piercing is one of the inevitable requirements of laser profile cutting process and it has a direct bearing on the quality of the laser cut profiles. We have developed a novel power ramped pulsed mode (PRPM) laser piercing technique to produce much finer pierced holes and to achieve a better control on the process parameters compared to the existing methodology based on normal pulsed mode (NPM). Experiments were carried out with both PRPM and NPM laser piercing on 1.5-mm-thick mild steel using an in-house developed high-power transverse flow continuous wave (CW)-CO 2 laser. Significant improvements in the spatter, circularity of the pierced hole and reproducibility were achieved through the PRPM technique. We studied, in detail, the dynamics of processes involved in PRPM laser piercing and compared that with those of the NPM piercing.

  15. RF synchronized short pulse laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Fuwa, Yasuhiro Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Tongu, Hiromu; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Okamura, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi

    2016-02-15

    A laser ion source that produces shortly bunched ion beam is proposed. In this ion source, ions are extracted immediately after the generation of laser plasma by an ultra-short pulse laser before its diffusion. The ions can be injected into radio frequency (RF) accelerating bucket of a subsequent accelerator. As a proof-of-principle experiment of the ion source, a RF resonator is prepared and H{sub 2} gas was ionized by a short pulse laser in the RF electric field in the resonator. As a result, bunched ions with 1.2 mA peak current and 5 ns pulse length were observed at the exit of RF resonator by a probe.

  16. Excimer laser lead extraction catheter with increased laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, M. Sean; Taylor, Kevin D.; Lippincott, Rebecca A.; Sorokoumov, Oleg; Papaioannou, Thanassis

    2001-05-01

    A fiber optic catheter connected to a pulsed excimer laser (308 nm) is currently used to extract chronically implanted pacemaker and defibrillator leads at Fluence of 60 mJ/mm2 and repetition rate of 40 Hz. The object of this study was to determine the effect of higher repetition rates (80 Hz) in the catheter's cutting performance. The penetration rate (micrometers /sec), and the associated mechanical and thermal effects were measured in soft (porcine myocardium) and hard tissue (bovine tendon) at 60 mJ/mm2-80 Hz, and were compared to the corresponding values at commercially available laser parameters (60 mJ/mm2-40 Hz). Ablation rates were measured with perforation experiments and the extent of thermal and mechanical damage was measured under polarized light microscopy. For hard (soft) tissue, the laser catheter demonstrated penetration speed of 106 +/- 32 (302 +/- 101) micrometers /sec at 40 Hz and 343 +/- 120 (830 +/- 364) micrometers /sec at 80 Hz. Maximum extent of thermal effects at 40 Hz and 80 Hz was 114 +/- 35 micrometers (72 +/- 18) and 233 +/- 63 micrometers (71 +/- 16) respectively. Maximum extent of mechanical effects at 40 Hz and 80 Hz was 188 +/- 63 micrometers (590 +/- 237) and 386 +/- 100 micrometers (767 +/- 160) respectively. In vitro testing of the laser catheter with 80 Hz laser parameters has demonstrated increased penetration speed in both soft and hard fibrous tissue, while maintaining associated thermal and mechanical effects within limited ranges.

  17. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL provide FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  18. Self-compression of intense short laser pulses in relativistic magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Olumi, M.; Maraghechi, B.

    2014-11-15

    The compression of a relativistic Gaussian laser pulse in a magnetized plasma is investigated. By considering relativistic nonlinearity and using non-linear Schrödinger equation with paraxial approximation, a second-order differential equation is obtained for the pulse width parameter (in time) to demonstrate the longitudinal pulse compression. The compression of laser pulse in a magnetized plasma can be observed by the numerical solution of the equation for the pulse width parameter. The effects of magnetic field and chirping are investigated. It is shown that in the presence of magnetic field and negative initial chirp, compression of pulse is significantly enhanced.

  19. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Control of the radiation parameters of a copper vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polunin, Yu P.; Yudin, Nikolai A.

    2003-09-01

    The possibility of controlling the pulse shape and duration and the beam divergence of a copper vapour laser operating in the mode of double pump pulses, when the first pulse excites lasing in the active medium and the second amplifies it. It is shown that a change in the delay of the second pump pulse relative to the laser pulse initiated by the first pump pulse allows an efficient control of the laser-radiation characteristics. In this case, the coefficient of laser-radiation conversion into a beam with a diffraction-limited divergence may reach ~80 %.

  20. Ultrafast pulse lasers jump to macro applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griebel, Martin; Lutze, Walter; Scheller, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast Lasers have been proven for several micro applications, e.g. stent cutting, for many years. Within its development of applications Jenoptik has started to use ultrafast lasers in macro applications in the automotive industry. The JenLas D2.fs-lasers with power output control via AOM is an ideal tool for closed loop controlled material processing. Jenoptik enhanced his well established sensor controlled laser weakening process for airbag covers to a new level. The patented process enables new materials using this kind of technology. One of the most sensitive cover materials is genuine leather. As a natural product it is extremely inhomogeneous and sensitive for any type of thermal load. The combination of femtosecond pulse ablation and closed loop control by multiple sensor array opens the door to a new quality level of defined weakening. Due to the fact, that the beam is directed by scanning equipment the process can be split in multiple cycles additionally reducing the local energy input. The development used the 5W model as well as the latest 10W release of JenLas D2.fs and achieved amazing processing speeds which directly fulfilled the requirements of the automotive industry. Having in mind that the average cycle time of automotive processes is about 60s, trials had been done of processing weakening lines in genuine leather of 1.2mm thickness. Parameters had been about 15 cycles with 300mm/s respectively resulting in an average speed of 20mm/s and a cycle time even below 60s. First samples had already given into functional and aging tests and passed successfully.

  1. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  2. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  3. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    DOE PAGES

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; ...

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled bymore » the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.« less

  4. Efficient compression of the femtosecond pulses of an ytterbium laser in a gas-filled capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Losev, Leonid L; Tenyakov, S Yu

    2011-07-31

    A 290-fs radiation pulse of an ytterbium laser system with a central wavelength of 1028 nm and an energy of 145 {mu}J was compressed to a 27-fs pulse with an energy of 75 {mu}J. The compression was realised on the basis of the effect of pulse spectrum broadening in a xenon-filled glass capillary for a pulse repetition rate of 3kHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  5. Predictability of extreme intensity pulses in optically injected semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Nuria Martinez; Borkar, Saurabh; Masoller, Cristina

    2017-06-01

    The predictability of extreme intensity pulses emitted by an optically injected semiconductor laser is studied numerically, by using a well-known rate equation model. We show that symbolic ordinal time-series analysis allows to identify the patterns of intensity oscillations that are likely to occur before an extreme pulse. The method also gives information about patterns which are unlikely to occur before an extreme pulse. The specific patterns identified capture the topology of the underlying chaotic attractor and depend on the model parameters. The methodology proposed here can be useful for analyzing data recorded from other complex systems that generate extreme fluctuations in their output signals.

  6. Effects of pulsed CO2 laser in caries selective ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colojoara, Carmen; David, Ion; Marinovici, Mariana

    1995-03-01

    We have evaluated the effect of pulsed carbon dioxide laser in the treatment for deep carious decay. The so called `caries profonda' is still a problem for conservative dentistry. A `Valvfivre' Master 20S carbon dioxide laser was pulsed to determine the effects on dentine and for testing the properties of softened dentine in selective ablation. Laser treatment parameters were from 1 to 2 W, 50 to 150 ms, 200 to 320 Hz. Fifteen human teeth samples were exposed to irradiation: extracted third molar were exposed to CO2 pulsed laser to determine in vitro the effects on pulp morphology. The tissue samples were analyzed histologically and by means of scanning electron microscopy for evidence of thermal damage. Next, we have evaluated the morphologic changes in vivo on 10 cases in patients with deep carious decay. Pulsed infrared lasers are capable of inducing physical and chemical changes in dentine structure. The results showed an artificially sclerosing and micro-hardness on the remaining dentine. CO2 laser can vaporized carious dentine.

  7. Ophthalmic applications of ultrashort pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Tibor; Spooner, Greg; Sacks, Zachary S.; Suarez, Carlos G.; Raksi, Ferenc; Zadoyan, Ruben; Sarayba, Melvin; Kurtz, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses can be used to create high precision incision in transparent and translucent tissue with minimal damage to adjacent tissue. These performance characteristics meet important surgical requirements in ophthalmology, where femtosecond laser flap creation is becoming a widely used refractive surgery procedure. We summarize clinical findings with femtosecond laser flaps as well as early experiments with other corneal surgical procedures such as corneal transplants. We also review laser-tissue interaction studies in the human sclera and their consequences for the treatment of glaucoma.

  8. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Alger, Terry W.

    1985-01-01

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  9. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Alger, T.W.

    1982-09-29

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  10. Nonequilibrium Interlayer Transport in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Eres, Gyula; Larson, Ben C; Rouleau, Christopher M; Zschack, P.; Lowndes, Douglas H

    2006-01-01

    We use time-resolved surface x-ray diffraction measurements with microsecond range resolution to study the growth kinetics of pulsed laser deposited SrTiO3. Time-dependent surface coverages corresponding to single laser shots were determined directly from crystal truncation rod intensity transients. Analysis of surface coverage evolution shows that extremely fast nonequilibrium interlayer transport, which occurs concurrently with the arrival of the laser plume, dominates the deposition process. A much smaller fraction of material, which is governed by the dwell time between successive laser shots, is transferred by slow, thermally driven interlayer transport processes.

  11. Laser and intense pulsed light management of couperose and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Dahan, S

    2011-11-01

    Management of couperosis and rosacea has been totally renewed by laser and vascular laser techniques, with efficacy targeted on the telangiectases and to a lesser extent on the erythrosis. Laser management of hypertrophic rosacea or rhinophyma depends on surgical treatment with decortication, continuous CO(2) ablative laser or Erbium, fractionated at high power, then vascular laser treatment for the telangiectases: lasers with pulsed dye, KTP, or pulsed lights for red laser telangiectases and long pulse Nd-Yag laser for blue telangiectases. For papulopustular rosacea, vascular laser treatment (pulsed dye and KTP) and intense pulsed light will be begun once the inflammation has been treated. The major indication for vascular lasers and intense pulsed light is found in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with high efficacy for the telangiectases. Diffuse erythrosis is difficult to treat, requiring a high number of laser and/or intense pulsed light sessions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [Laser and intense pulsed light management of couperose and rosacea].

    PubMed

    Dahan, S

    2011-09-01

    Management of couperosis and rosacea has been totally renewed by laser and vascular laser techniques, with efficacy targeted on the telangiectases and to a lesser extent on the erythrosis. Laser management of hypertrophic rosacea or rhinophyma depends on surgical treatment with decortication, continuous CO(2) ablative laser or Erbium, fractionated at high power, then vascular laser treatment for the telangiectases: lasers with pulsed dye, KTP, or pulsed lights for red laser telangiectases and long pulse Nd-Yag laser for blue telangiectases. For papulopustular rosacea, vascular laser treatment (pulsed dye and KTP) and intense pulsed light will be begun once the inflammation has been treated. The major indication for vascular lasers and intense pulsed light is found in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with high efficacy for the telangiectases. Diffuse erythrosis is difficult to treat, requiring a high number of laser and/or intense pulsed light sessions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Power limitations and pulse distortions in an Yb : KGW chirped-pulse amplification laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G H; Yang, J; Kulik, A V; Sall, E G; Chizhov, S A; Kang, U; Yashin, V E

    2013-08-31

    We have studied self-action effects (self-focusing and self-phase modulation) and stimulated Raman scattering in an Yb : KGW chirped-pulse amplification laser system. The results demonstrate that self-focusing in combination with thermal lensing may significantly limit the chirped pulse energy in this system (down to 200 μJ) even at a relatively long pulse duration (50 ps). Nonlinear lenses in the laser crystals in combination with thermal lenses bring the regenerative amplifier cavity in the laser system to the instability zone and limit the average output power at pulse repetition rates under 50 kHz. Self-phase modulation, a manifestation of self-action, may significantly distort a recompressed femtosecond pulse at energies near the self-focusing threshold. Stimulated Raman scattering in such a laser has a weaker effect on output parameters than do self-focusing and thermal lensing, and Raman spectra are only observed in the case of pulse energy instability. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  14. Measurements of multiple gas parameters in a pulsed-detonation combustor using time-division-multiplexed Fourier-domain mode-locked lasers.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Andrew W; Roy, Sukesh; An, Xinliang; Sanders, Scott T; Schauer, Frederick R; Gord, James R

    2013-04-20

    Hyperspectral absorption spectroscopy is being used to monitor gas temperature, velocity, pressure, and H(2)O mole fraction in a research-grade pulsed-detonation combustor (PDC) at the Air Force Research Laboratory. The hyperspectral source employed is termed the TDM 3-FDML because it consists of three time-division-multiplexed (TDM) Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers. This optical-fiber-based source monitors sufficient spectral information in the H(2)O absorption spectrum near 1350 nm to permit measurements over the wide range of conditions encountered throughout the PDC cycle. Doppler velocimetry based on absorption features is accomplished using a counterpropagating beam approach that is designed to minimize common-mode flow noise. The PDC in this study is operated in two configurations: one in which the combustion tube exhausts directly to the ambient environment and another in which it feeds an automotive-style turbocharger to assess the performance of a detonation-driven turbine. Because the enthalpy flow [kilojoule/second] is important in assessing the performance of the PDC in various configurations, it is calculated from the measured gas properties.

  15. Femtosecond Pulse Generation in Solid-State Lasers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paye, Malini

    Femtosecond laser technology has seen rapid advances over the last five years due to the emergence of reliable, broad-band solid-state laser media in particular the Ti:sapphire gain medium. This thesis deals with various aspects of femtosecond pulse generation in solid-state lasers, with particular emphasis on the Ti:sapphire laser system. A novel passive modelocking technique called Microdot mirror modelocking was implemented. It is a passive, all -solid-state, intracavity modelocking mechanism based on self-focussing due to the Kerr nonlinearity. This technique was applied to the modelocking of a medium power, laser -pumped Ti:sapphire system, to produce 190fs pulses. It was also extended to a higher power, arc-lamp-pumped Nd:YLF laser system to produce 2.3 ps pulses. A numerical procedure for modeling the nonlinear behaviour of resonators was implemented. This iterative procedure solves for self-consistent nonlinear resonator modes using a description of self-focussing as a nonlinear scaling of the Gaussian beam q parameter. It was used to provide an exemplary, intuitive understanding of nonlinear effects in a simple resonator closely related to the high -repetition rate femtosecond source that was subsequently implemented. A novel, compact, femtosecond, Kerr Lens Modelocked laser geometry was designed and implemented. 111 fs pulses were produced from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at a repetition rate of 1 GHz and 54 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 385 MHz. To realize this source, a novel method for dispersion compensation was conceived, analyzed and implemented. Negative dispersion was shown to be achievable using resonator geometries that enforce the spatial separation of propagation axes corresponding to monochromatic Gaussian modes that compose the total broad-band beam in a femtosecond oscillator. This work serves to demonstrate the scalability of Kerr lens modelocking techniques to very high repetition rates. The compact, high-repetition rate source has

  16. Cornea surgery with nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Wang, Bagui; Riemann, Iris; Kobow, Jens

    2005-04-01

    We report on a novel optical method for (i) flap-generation in LASIK procedures as well as (ii) for flap-free intrastromal refractive surgery based on nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses. The near infrared 200 fs pulses for multiphoton ablation have been provided by ultracompact turn-key MHz laser resonators. LASIK flaps and intracorneal cavities have been realized with high precision within living New Zealand rabbits using the system FemtoCutO (JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany) at 800 nm laser wavelength. Using low-energy sub-2 nJ laser pulses, collateral damage due to photodisruptive and self-focusing effects was avoided. The laser ablation system consists of fast galvoscanners, focusing optics of high numerical aperture as well as a sensitive imaging system and provides also the possibility of 3D multiphoton imaging of fluorescent cellular organelles and SHG signals from collagen. Multiphoton tomography of the cornea was used to determine the exact intratissue beam position and to visualize intraocular post-laser effects. The wound healing process has been investigated up to 90 days after instrastromal laser ablation by histological analysis. Regeneration of damaged collagen structures and the migration of inflammation cells have been detected.

  17. Spontaneously excited pulses in an optically driven semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Sebastian; Lenstra, Daan

    2004-01-01

    In optically injected semiconductor lasers, intrinsic quantum noise alone, namely, the spontaneous emission and the shot noise, are capable of exciting intensity multipulses from a steady state operation. Noisy lasers exhibit self-pulsations in the locking region of the corresponding deterministic system. The interpulse time statistics are studied in parameter regions near k-homoclinic (Shilnikov) bifurcations where the corresponding deterministic model exhibits single-, double-, and triple-pulse excitability. These statistics differ significantly among each other, and they could be used to characterize regions of different multipulse excitability in a real laser device.

  18. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL format.

  19. Investigation on the impact of pulse duration for laser induced lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Kiris, Tugba; Fiedler, Sebastian; Scheib, Gabriel; Kuznetsova, Julia; Pongratz, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Objective: In-vitro investigation of Ho:YAG-laser induced stone fragmentation was performed to identify potential impacts of different pulse durations on stone fragmentation characteristics. Materials and Methods: An innovative Ho:YAG laser system (Swiss LaserClast, EMS S.A., Nyon, Switzerland) with selectable long- or short pulse mode was tested with regard to its fragmentation properties. The pulse duration depends on the specific laser parameter used. Fragmentation tests (hand held, hands free, single pulse induced crater) on artificial BEGO-Stones and fiber burn back tests were performed under reproducible experimental conditions. Additionally, the repulsion of long versus short laser pulses was compared using the pendulum set-up. Results: Differences in fragmentation rates between the two pulse duration regimes were seen. The difference was, however, not statistically significant. Using long pulse mode, the fiber burn back is nearly negligible while in short pulse mode an increased burn back was seen. The results of the pendulum test showed that the deviation induced by the momentum of shorter pulses is increased compared to longer pulses. Conclusion: Long pulse-mode showed reduced side effects like repulsion and fiber burn back in comparison to short pulse-mode while fragmentation rates remained at a comparable level. Lower push back and reduced burn back of longer laser pulses may results in better clinical outcome of laser lithotripsy and more convenient handling during clinical use.

  20. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Moody, J. T.; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; ...

    2016-02-29

    In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient Inverse Free Electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gra- dients exceeding 200 MV/m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti:Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, non destructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with < 100 fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected tomore » pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.« less

  1. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. T.; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Tremaine, A.; Musumeci, P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200 MV /m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti :Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100 fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  2. Ultrashort pulsed laser technology development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manke, Gerald C.

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Navy has been pursuing a technology development program for advanced, all-fiber, Ultra Short Pulsed Laser (USPL) systems via Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) programs. Multiple topics have been published to promote and fund research that encompasses every critical component of a standard USPL system and enable the demonstration of mJ/pulse class systems with an all fiber architecture. This presentation will summarize published topics and funded programs.

  3. Spatiotemporal dynamics of Gaussian laser pulse in a multi ions plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari Milani, M. R.

    2016-08-15

    Spatiotemporal evolutions of Gaussian laser pulse propagating through a plasma with multiple charged ions are studied, taking into account the ponderomotive nonlinearity. Coupled differential equations for beam width and pulse length parameters are established and numerically solved using paraxial ray approximation. In one-dimensional geometry, effects of laser and plasma parameters such as laser intensity, plasma density, and temperature on the longitudinal pulse compression and the laser intensity distribution are analyzed for plasmas with singly and doubly charged ions. The results demonstrate that self-compression occurs in a laser intensity range with a turning point intensity in which the self-compression process has its strongest extent. The results also show that the multiply ionized ions have different effect on the pulse compression above and below turning point intensity. Finally, three-dimensional geometry is used to analyze the simultaneous evolution of both self-focusing and self-compression of Gaussian laser pulse in such plasmas.

  4. Pulsed Laser Deposition of the Ni-Base Superalloy Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joonghan; Mazumder, Jyotirmoy

    2016-03-01

    Ni-base superalloy films were deposited on single-crystal (SC) Ni-base superalloy substrates from a target with the same alloy composition by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Microstructure and growth behavior of the films deposited were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope. The homoepitaxial growth of the SC Ni-base superalloy film occurred at the 1123 K (850 °C) substrate temperature and 2 J/cm2 pulse energy. Films generally exhibited a strong polycrystalline characteristic as the substrate temperature and pulse energy increased. The SC film had a smooth surface. The measured root mean square roughness of the SC film surface was ~6 nm. Based on the Taguchi analysis, the substrate temperature and pulse energy were the most significant process parameters influencing the structural characteristics of the films. Also, the influence of the pulse repletion rate and deposition time was not found to be significant.

  5. Pulse repetition rate in a self-contained strontium ion laser

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, Anatolii N; Vasil'eva, Anna V; Polunin, Yurii P; Yudin, Nikolai A; Chebotarev, Gennady D; Latush, Evgeny L; Fesenko, A A

    2008-11-30

    The frequency and energy parameters of self-contained strontium ion laser ({lambda} = 1.033 and 1.091 {mu}m) are studied upon excitation by an additional pulse before each excitation pulse. The kinetics of processes in the active medium of this laser is numerically simulated. It is shown that the pulse repetition rate of the self-contained strontium laser can achieve {approx}1 MHz. It is found that the laser pulse energy in the first pulse and the average output power and efficiency increase in a certain range of time delays between the additional and excitation pulses, which is caused by the significant prepulse concentration of strontium ions which had no time to recombine. The outlook for the application of pulse trains to excite self-contained IR transitions in strontium ions is shown. (lasers)

  6. Influence of laser parameters on nanoparticle-induced membrane permeabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Cuiping; Qu, Xiaochao; Zhang, Zhenxi; Hüttmann, Gereon; Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin

    2009-09-01

    Light-absorbing nanoparticles that are heated by short laser pulses can transiently increase membrane permeability. We evaluate the membrane permeability by flow cytometry assaying of propidium iodide and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-D) using different laser sources. The dependence of the transfection efficiency on laser parameters such as pulse duration, irradiant exposure, and irradiation mode is investigated. For nano- and also picosecond irradiation, we show a parameter range where a reliable membrane permeabilization is achieved for 10-kDa FITC-D. Fluorescent labeled antibodies are able to penetrate living cells that are permeabilized using these parameters. More than 50% of the cells are stained positive for a 150-kDa IgG antibody. These results suggest that the laser-induced permeabilization approach constitutes a promising tool for targeted delivery of larger exogenous molecules into living cells.

  7. Compact pulsed laser having improved heat conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A highly efficient, compact pulsed laser having high energy to weight and volume ratios is provided. The laser utilizes a cavity reflector that operates as a heat sink and is essentially characterized by having a high heat conductivity, by being a good electrical insulator and by being substantially immune to the deleterious effects of ultra-violet radiation. Manual portability is accomplished by eliminating entirely any need for a conventional circulating fluid cooling system.

  8. Laser Cooling with Ultrafast Pulse Trains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-08

    of the electron cutoff energy for a laser intensity of ~5.3 x 1014 W/cm2. Record-breaking atomic imaging resolution and first absorption imaging...unprecedented agreement between ab initio theory and experiment in this field by investigating ionisation of atomic hydrogen with few-cycle pulses [1]. Figure 1...2a). We have made a systematic study of the electron energy and laser intensity dependence of the CEP modulation depth and relative phase offset

  9. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, E.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Afarideh, H.; Riazi, Z.; Hora, H.

    2014-09-01

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a0 = 5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about ne ≈ 6nc, where nc is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  10. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdani, E.; Afarideh, H.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Riazi, Z.; Hora, H.

    2014-09-14

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a₀=5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about n{sub e}≈6n{sub c}, where n{sub c} is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  11. Effects of pulse duration and overlapping factor on melting ratio in preplaced pulsed Nd:YAG laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnia, Amirreza; Malek Ghaini, Farshid; Sabbaghzadeh, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    Melting ratio is known as a suitable factor to illustrate the effects of process parameters on the clad profile in order to provide a proper process design. However, the definition of melting ratio based on continuous irradiation of energy does not accommodate for pulse parameters. Hence, in order to study the effects of pulse parameters, such as pulse duration and overlapping factor, the definition of melting ratio is restated for pulsed laser process based on energy density concept. Carbon steel was cladded with Stellite 6 by scanning a 400 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser over a preplaced layer of powder paste. The results show that the trends of clad profiles variations can be explained using the restated definition. The results also show two different ranges for the effects of pulse duration and overlapping factor on melting ratio.

  12. Tunable pulsed carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megie, G. J.; Menzies, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    Transverse electrically-excited-atmosphere (TEA) laser is continuously tunable over several hundred megahertz about centers of spectral lines of carbon dioxide. It is operated in single longitudinal mode (SLM) by injection of beam from continuous-wave, tunable-waveguide carbon dioxide laser, which serves as master frequency-control oscillator. Device measures absorption line of ozone; with adjustments, it is applicable to monitoring of atmospheric trace species.

  13. Propagation of ultrashort laser pulses through water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianchao; Alexander, Dennis R; Zhang, Haifeng; Parali, Ufuk; Doerr, David W; Bruce, John C; Wang, Hao

    2007-02-19

    In this paper, propagation of ultrashort pulses through a long 3.5 meter water channel was studied. Of particular interest was the attenuation of the beam at various lengths along the variable path length and to find an explanation of why the attenuation deviates from typical Beer Lambert law around 3 meters for ultrashort laser pulse transmission. Laser pulses of 10 fs at 75 MHz, 100 fs at 80 MHz and 300 fs at 1 KHz were employed to investigate the effects of pulse duration, spectrum and repetition rate on the attenuation after propagating through water up to 3 meters. Stretched pulse attenuation measurements produced from 10 fs at a frequency of 75 MHz were compared with the 10 fs attenuation measurements. Results indicate that the broad spectrum of the ultrashort pulse is the dominant reason for the observed decrease in attenuation after 3 meters of travel in a long water channel. The repetition rate is found not to play a significant role at least for the long pulse scenario in this reported attenuation studies.

  14. Electron energy enhancement by frequency chirped axicon Gaussian laser pulse in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, Jyoti; Kant, Niti; Singh, Arvinder

    2017-07-01

    Electron acceleration by a frequency - chirped lowest axicon Gaussian laser pulse in vacuum is studied. Terawatt RP laser can be focussed down by an axicon optical element, which produces a very strong longitudinal electric field. A linear frequency chirp increases the time duration of interaction of laser pulse with electron and hence, influences electron motion significantly. It is noticed that an electron with initial energy of few MeV, accelerates upto GeV energy under optimized laser parameters. Significant higher energy gain is observed with intense chirped laser pulse in vacuum.

  15. Pulsed Nd-YAG laser welding of A SiC particulate reinforced aluminium alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, T. M.; Xu, J. H.; Man, H. C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the laser welding behaviour of a SiC particulate reinforced Al-alloy 2124 composite using a pulsed Nd-YAG laser. The influences of laser welding parameters of laser intensity, pulse duration and the beam's focus position on the depth of weld penetration as well as the size of fusion zone were investigated. These investigations have led to an optimum welding condition proposed for pulsed laser welding of SiC particulate reinforced aluminium alloy composites with minimum defects.

  16. Modeling of ablation threshold dependence on pulse duration for dielectrics with ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingying; Zhu, Jianqiang; Lin, Zunqi

    2017-01-01

    We present a numerical model of plasma formation in ultrafast laser ablation on the dielectrics surface. Ablation threshold dependence on pulse duration is predicted with the model and the numerical results for water agrees well with the experimental data for pulse duration from 140 fs to 10 ps. Influences of parameters and approximations of photo- and avalanche-ionization on the ablation threshold prediction are analyzed in detail for various pulse lengths. The calculated ablation threshold is strongly dependent on electron collision time for all the pulse durations. The complete photoionization model is preferred for pulses shorter than 1 ps rather than the multiphoton ionization approximations. The transition time of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption needs to be considered when pulses are shorter than 5 ps and it can also ensure the avalanche ionization (AI) coefficient consistent with that in multiple rate equations (MREs) for pulses shorter than 300 fs. The threshold electron density for AI is only crucial for longer pulses. It is reasonable to ignore the recombination loss for pulses shorter than 100 fs. In addition to thermal transport and hydrodynamics, neglecting the threshold density for AI and recombination could also contribute to the disagreements between the numerical and the experimental results for longer pulses.

  17. First-principles electron dynamics control simulation of diamond under femtosecond laser pulse train irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Li, Xin; Yuan, Yanping; Xiao, Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Lu, Yongfeng

    2012-07-11

    A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional is applied to simulate the nonlinear electron-photon interactions during shaped femtosecond laser pulse train ablation of diamond. Effects of the key pulse train parameters such as the pulse separation, spatial/temporal pulse energy distribution and pulse number per train on the electron excitation and energy absorption are discussed. The calculations show that photon-electron interactions and transient localized electron dynamics can be controlled including photon absorption, electron excitation, electron density, and free electron distribution by the ultrafast laser pulse train.

  18. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOEpatents

    Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.

    1997-09-02

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules. 7 figs.

  19. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    1997-01-01

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P.sub.2 O.sub.5, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules.

  20. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2007-08-28

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dots and D-dots, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetic codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a corresponding broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  1. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2008-02-04

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dot and D-dot probes, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from several hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetics codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a correspondingly broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  2. Dynamics of pulsed holmium:YAG laser photocoagulation of albumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefer, T. Joshua; Foong Chan, Kin; Hammer, Daniel X.; Welch, A. J.

    2000-05-01

    The pulsed holmium:YAG laser (λ = 2.12 µm, τp = 250 µs) has been investigated as a method for inducing localized coagulation for medical procedures, yet the dynamics of this process are not well understood. In this study, photocoagulation of albumen (egg white) was analysed experimentally and results compared with optical-thermal simulations to investigate a rate process approach to thermal damage and the role of heat conduction and dynamic changes in absorption. The coagulation threshold was determined using probit analysis, and coagulum dynamics were documented with fast flash photography. The nonlinear computational model, which included a Beer's law optical component, a finite difference heat transfer component and an Arrhenius equation-based damage calculation, was verified against data from the literature. Moderate discrepancies between simulation results and our experimental data probably resulted from the use of a laser beam with an irregular spatial profile. This profile produced a lower than expected coagulation threshold and an irregular damage distribution within a millisecond after laser onset. After 1 ms, heat conduction led to smoothing of the coagulum. Simulations indicated that dynamic changes in absorption led to a reduction in surface temperatures. The Arrhenius equation was shown to be effective for simulating transient albumen coagulation during pulsed holmium:YAG laser irradiation. Greater understanding of pulsed laser-tissue interactions may lead to improved treatment outcome and optimization of laser parameters for a variety of medical procedures.

  3. Dynamics of pulsed holmium:YAG laser photocoagulation of albumen.

    PubMed

    Pfefer, T J; Chan, K F; Hammer, D X; Welch, A J

    2000-05-01

    The pulsed holmium:YAG laser (lambda = 2.12 microm, tau(p) = 250 micros) has been investigated as a method for inducing localized coagulation for medical procedures, yet the dynamics of this process are not well understood. In this study, photocoagulation of albumen (egg white) was analysed experimentally and results compared with optical-thermal simulations to investigate a rate process approach to thermal damage and the role of heat conduction and dynamic changes in absorption. The coagulation threshold was determined using probit analysis, and coagulum dynamics were documented with fast flash photography. The nonlinear computational model, which included a Beer's law optical component, a finite difference heat transfer component and an Arrhenius equation-based damage calculation, was verified against data from the literature. Moderate discrepancies between simulation results and our experimental data probably resulted from the use of a laser beam with an irregular spatial profile. This profile produced a lower than expected coagulation threshold and an irregular damage distribution within a millisecond after laser onset. After 1 ms, heat conduction led to smoothing of the coagulum. Simulations indicated that dynamic changes in absorption led to a reduction in surface temperatures. The Arrhenius equation was shown to be effective for simulating transient albumen coagulation during pulsed holmium:YAG laser irradiation. Greater understanding of pulsed laser-tissue interactions may lead to improved treatment outcome and optimization of laser parameters for a variety of medical procedures.

  4. Modulated Pulsed Laser Sources for Imaging Lidars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    manufactured by QPC. This C-mount device has a monolithic semiconductor amplifier allowing the package to output up to 1.5 Watts at 1064 nm with linewidths ɘ.1...pulsed driver based on the avalanche transistor circuit being used for gain switching, a 1064 nm DFB laser manufactured by QPC and a DBR -style laser...available now that may provide the needed power. An example of such a laser is the QPC C-mount monolithic oscillator/amplifier which can output 1.5

  5. Chemically-Assisted Pulsed Laser-Ramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kaneko, Tomoki; Tamada, Kazunobu

    2010-10-01

    A preliminary study of a chemically-assisted pulsed laser-ramjet was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in chemically-augmented operation.

  6. Lasers and Intense Pulsed Light Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Saunte, Ditte M; Lapins, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment are useful for the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Carbon dioxide lasers are used for cutting or vaporization of the affected area. It is a effective therapy for the management of severe and recalcitrant HS with persistent sinus tract and scarring, and can be performed under local anesthesia. HS has a follicular pathogenesis. Lasers and IPL targeting the hair have been found useful in treating HS by reducing the numbers of hairs in areas with HS. The methods have few side effects, but the studies are preliminary and need to be repeated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemically-Assisted Pulsed Laser-Ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kaneko, Tomoki; Tamada, Kazunobu

    2010-10-13

    A preliminary study of a chemically-assisted pulsed laser-ramjet was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in chemically-augmented operation.

  8. Selective laser melting of metal micropowders with short-pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wałpuski, B.

    2016-09-01

    Selective laser melting is a unique additive technique which can manufacture solid metal objects but it require expensive, high power lasers. The primary aim of this work was to check is it possible to carry out this process by using lower power and high energy pulse laser. The secondary goal was to examine the influence of main technological parameters of selective laser melting on the quality and the thickness of produced layer. The requirements of metal powder, which allowed to obtain a layer with microthickness, were developed.

  9. Picosecond optical pulse generation at gigahertz rates by direct modulation of a semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auyeung, J.

    1981-01-01

    We report the generation of picosecond pulses by the direct modulation of a buried heterostructure GaAlAs diode laser. Pulse width of 28 ps is achieved at a repetition frequency of 2.5 GHz. Pulse width dependence on the experimental parameters is described.

  10. Pulse solid state lasers in aesthetic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobryakov, Boris S.; Greben'kova, Ol'ga B.; Gulev, Valerii S.

    1996-04-01

    The emission of a pulse-periodic laser on alumo-ittrium garnet applied for preventive and medical treatment of a capsule contracture round implanted prostheses in xenoplastics is described in the present paper. The results obtained testify to a high efficiency of suggested method.

  11. Pulsed cyclic laser based on dissociative excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Celto, J.E.; Schimitschek, E.J.

    1980-10-14

    A pulsed laser produces emitted laser energy by dissociative excitation of metal dihalide and cyclic recombination. A metal dihalide selected from subgroup ii-b of the periodic table of elements is contained within an elongate sealed enclosure. Two elongate electrodes having external terminals are supported in parallel relationship within the enclosure, forming a gap parallel to the principal axis of the enclosure. A source of pulsed electric power is connected to the terminals of the two electrodes, producing repetitive transverse electric discharges across the gap. An inert buffer gas is included within the enclosure for aiding electric discharge uniformity, and to provide vibrational relaxation of the lasing medium in its electronic states. The buffer gas is ionized by a third electrode within the enclosure connected to a source of pulses which immediately precede the pulses applied to the first and second electrode so that the lasing medium is preionized immediately prior to the principal electric discharge. Two reflective surfaces, one of which is only partially reflective, are aligned with the principal axis of the laser assembly for producing an optical resonator for the emitted laser energy.

  12. Ultrashort Pulse (USP) Laser-Matter Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-05

    unlimited 2D electron wavepacket quantum simulation Source: Luis Plaja, U Salamanca 31 Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy in the Extreme...intensity short pulse laser interacting with structured targets yields an enhancement in the number and energy of hot electron. • Monte Carlo

  13. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  14. Modeling of pulsed Cs vapor lasers in transversely pumped configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zi, Fei; Zhang, Xian; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Kaikai; Lu, Xuanhui

    2017-06-01

    By means of combining the transverse differential equation of pump intensity and the longitudinal differential equation of laser power, an optical model for transversely pumped diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPALs) is established. The spatial distributions of both radius and intensities are considered in the model for pump and laser beams. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experiment ones as compared to the reported pulsed transversely pumped Cs DPALs. Influences of pump power, temperature, cell length, and beam waist on output performance are investigated, which suggests a set of parameters for efficient DPAL operation. In particular, the optimal ratio of the beam waist between the laser and pump beam is demonstrated to be 0.81, which can increase the laser power by 85% larger than the current experimental result.

  15. Spatially modulated laser pulses for printing electronics.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Kim, Heungsoo; Mathews, Scott; Piqué, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    The use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is reviewed. Combining this technique with high-viscosity donor ink (silver nanopaste) results in laser-printed features that are highly congruent in shape and size to the incident laser beam spatial profile. The DMD empowers LIFT to become a highly parallel, rapidly reconfigurable direct-write technology. By adapting half-toning techniques to the DMD bitmap image, the laser transfer threshold fluence for 10 μm features can be reduced using an edge-enhanced beam profile. The integration of LIFT with this beam-shaping technique allows the printing of complex large-area patterns with a single laser pulse.

  16. High power parallel ultrashort pulse laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillner, Arnold; Gretzki, Patrick; Büsing, Lasse

    2016-03-01

    The class of ultra-short-pulse (USP) laser sources are used, whenever high precession and high quality material processing is demanded. These laser sources deliver pulse duration in the range of ps to fs and are characterized with high peak intensities leading to a direct vaporization of the material with a minimum thermal damage. With the availability of industrial laser source with an average power of up to 1000W, the main challenge consist of the effective energy distribution and disposition. Using lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz region can cause thermal issues like overheating, melt production and low ablation quality. In this paper, we will discuss different approaches for multibeam processing for utilization of high pulse energies. The combination of diffractive optics and conventional galvometer scanner can be used for high throughput laser ablation, but are limited in the optical qualities. We will show which applications can benefit from this hybrid optic and which improvements in productivity are expected. In addition, the optical limitations of the system will be compiled, in order to evaluate the suitability of this approach for any given application.

  17. Pulsed laser deposition of anatase thin films on textile substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, André; Kunz, Clemens; Gräf, Stephan; Müller, Frank A.

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a highly versatile tool to prepare functional thin film coatings. In our study we utilised a Q-switched CO2 laser with a pulse duration τ ≈ 300 ns, a laser wavelength λ = 10.59 μm, a repetition frequency frep = 800 Hz and a peak power Ppeak = 15 kW to deposit crystalline anatase thin films on carbon fibre fabrics. For this purpose, preparatory experiments were performed on silicon substrates to optimise the anatase deposition conditions including the influence of different substrate temperatures and oxygen partial pressures. Processing parameters were then transferred to deposit anatase on carbon fibres. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analyses, Raman spectroscopy and tactile profilometry were used to characterise the samples and to reveal the formation of phase pure anatase without the occurrence of a secondary rutile phase. Methanol conversion test were used to prove the photocatalytic activity of the coated carbon fibres.

  18. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary D.; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parameter dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  19. Group velocity and pulse lengthening of mismatched laser pulses in plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-07

    Analytic solutions are presented to the non-paraxial wave equation describing an ultra-short, low-power, laser pulse propagating in aplasma channel. Expressions for the laser pulse centroid motion and laser group velocity are derived, valid for matched and mismatchedpropagation in a parabolic plasma channel, as well as in vacuum, for an arbitrary Laguerre-Gaussian laser mode. The group velocity of amismatched laser pulse, for which the laser spot size is strongly oscillating, is found to be independent of propagation distance andsignificantly less than that of a matched pulse. Laser pulse lengthening of a mismatched pulse owing to laser mode slippage isexamined and found to dominate over that due to dispersive pulse spreading for sufficiently long pulses. Analytic results are shown tobe in excellent agreement with numerical solutions of the full Maxwell equations coupled to the plasma response. Implications for plasmachannel diagnostics are discussed.

  20. Laser-pulse compression using magnetized plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Yuan; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-02-28

    Proposals to reach the next generation of laser intensities through Raman or Brillouin backscattering have centered on optical frequencies. Higher frequencies are beyond the range of such methods mainly due to the wave damping that accompanies the higher-density plasmas necessary for compressing higher frequency lasers. However, we find that an external magnetic field transverse to the direction of laser propagation can reduce the required plasma density. Using parametric interactions in magnetized plasmas to mediate pulse compression, both reduces the wave damping and alleviates instabilities, thereby enabling higher frequency or lower intensity pumps to produce pulses at higher intensities and longermore » durations. Finally, in addition to these theoretical advantages, our method in which strong uniform magnetic fields lessen the need for high-density uniform plasmas also lessens key engineering challenges or at least exchanges them for different challenges.« less

  1. Laser-pulse compression using magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuan; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Proposals to reach the next generation of laser intensities through Raman or Brillouin backscattering have centered on optical frequencies. Higher frequencies are beyond the range of such methods mainly due to the wave damping that accompanies the higher-density plasmas necessary for compressing higher frequency lasers. However, we find that an external magnetic field transverse to the direction of laser propagation can reduce the required plasma density. Using parametric interactions in magnetized plasmas to mediate pulse compression, both reduces the wave damping and alleviates instabilities, thereby enabling higher frequency or lower intensity pumps to produce pulses at higher intensities and longer durations. In addition to these theoretical advantages, our method in which strong uniform magnetic fields lessen the need for high-density uniform plasmas also lessens key engineering challenges or at least exchanges them for different challenges.

  2. Phase Noise Comparision of Short Pulse Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zhang; S. V. Benson; J. Hansknecht; D. Hardy; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the phase noise measurement on several different mode-locked laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on the state of the art short pulse lasers, especially the drive lasers for photocathode injectors. A comparison between the phase noise of the drive laser pulses, electron bunches and FEL pulses will also be presented.

  3. Effective post-acceleration of ion bunches in foils irradiated by ultra-intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. A.; Nickles, P. V.; Platonov, K. Yu

    2014-08-15

    Two-step laser acceleration of protons with two foils and two laser pulses is modelled and optimized. It is shown that a nearly mono-energetic distribution of proton bunches can be realized by a suitable parameter choice. Two-step acceleration schemes make it possible to obtain both higher efficiency and energy as compared to the acceleration with only one laser pulse of an energy equal to the sum of the energy of the two pulses. With the aid of our analytical model, the optimal distance between the two targets, the delay between the two laser pulses, and the parameters of the laser pulses are determined. Estimates and results of the modelling are proven with 2D PIC simulations of the acceleration of proton bunches moving through the second target.

  4. Pair annihilation in laser pulses: Optical versus x-ray free-electron laser regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Ilderton, Anton; Johansson, Petter; Marklund, Mattias

    2011-09-15

    We discuss the theory and phenomenology of pair annihilation, within an ultrashort laser pulse, to a single photon. The signature of this process is the unidirectional emission of single photons with a fixed energy. We show that the cross section is significantly larger than for two-photon pair annihilation in vacuum, with x-ray free-electron laser parameters admitting a much clearer signal than optical beams.

  5. Laser-pulse compression in a collisional plasma under weak-relativistic ponderomotive nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mamta; Gupta, D. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present theory and numerical analysis which demonstrate laser-pulse compression in a collisional plasma under the weak-relativistic ponderomotive nonlinearity. Plasma equilibrium density is modified due to the ohmic heating of electrons, the collisions, and the weak relativistic-ponderomotive force during the interaction of a laser pulse with plasmas. First, within one-dimensional analysis, the longitudinal self-compression mechanism is discussed. Three-dimensional analysis (spatiotemporal) of laser pulse propagation is also investigated by coupling the self-compression with the self-focusing. In the regime in which the laser becomes self-focused due to the weak relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity, we provide results for enhanced pulse compression. The results show that the matched interplay between self-focusing and self-compression can improve significantly the temporal profile of the compressed pulse. Enhanced pulse compression can be achieved by optimizing and selecting the parameters such as collision frequency, ion-temperature, and laser intensity.

  6. Laser-pulse compression in a collisional plasma under weak-relativistic ponderomotive nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mamta; Gupta, D. N.

    2016-05-15

    We present theory and numerical analysis which demonstrate laser-pulse compression in a collisional plasma under the weak-relativistic ponderomotive nonlinearity. Plasma equilibrium density is modified due to the ohmic heating of electrons, the collisions, and the weak relativistic-ponderomotive force during the interaction of a laser pulse with plasmas. First, within one-dimensional analysis, the longitudinal self-compression mechanism is discussed. Three-dimensional analysis (spatiotemporal) of laser pulse propagation is also investigated by coupling the self-compression with the self-focusing. In the regime in which the laser becomes self-focused due to the weak relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity, we provide results for enhanced pulse compression. The results show that the matched interplay between self-focusing and self-compression can improve significantly the temporal profile of the compressed pulse. Enhanced pulse compression can be achieved by optimizing and selecting the parameters such as collision frequency, ion-temperature, and laser intensity.

  7. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Veiko, V. P.; Samokhvalov, A. A. Yakovlev, E. B.; Zhitenev, I. Yu.; Kliushin, A. N.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.

    2016-06-15

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential “opening” radio pulses with a delay of 0.2–1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode.

  8. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.; Samokhvalov, A. A.; Yakovlev, E. B.; Zhitenev, I. Yu.; Kliushin, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential "opening" radio pulses with a delay of 0.2-1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode.

  9. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-02-14

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes.

  10. Vacuum electron acceleration by using two variable frequency laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Saberi, H.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-12-15

    A method is proposed for producing a relativistic electron bunch in vacuum via direct acceleration by using two frequency-chirped laser pulses. We consider the linearly polarized frequency-chiped Hermit-Gaussian 0, 0 mode lasers with linear chirp in which the local frequency varies linearly in time and space. Electron motion is investigated through a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional particle trajectory code in which the relativistic Newton's equations of motion with corresponding Lorentz force are solved. Two oblique laser pulses with proper chirp parameters and propagation angles are used for the electron acceleration along the z-axis. In this way, an electron initially at rest located at the origin could achieve high energy, γ=319 with the scattering angle of 1.02{sup ∘} with respect to the z-axis. Moreover, the acceleration of an electron in different initial positions on each coordinate axis is investigated. It was found that this mechanism has the capability of producing high energy electron microbunches with low scattering angles. The energy gain of an electron initially located at some regions on each axis could be greatly enhanced compared to the single pulse acceleration. Furthermore, the scattering angle will be lowered compared to the acceleration by using laser pulses propagating along the z-axis.

  11. Dark and bright pulse passive mode-locked laser with in-cavity pulse-shaper.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Jochen B; Coen, Stéphane; Sylvestre, Thibaut; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2010-10-25

    We demonstrate the integration of a spectral pulse-shaper into a passive mode-locked laser cavity for direct control of the output pulse-shape of the laser. Depending on the dispersion filter applied with the pulse-shaper we either observe a bright or dark "soliton-like" pulse train. The results demonstrate the strong potential of an in-cavity spectral pulse-shaper as an experimental tool for controlling the dynamics of passively mode-locked lasers.

  12. Isolated short attosecond pulse generation in an orthogonally polarized multicycle chirped laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Junjie

    2011-03-15

    We theoretically demonstrate the generation of a high-order harmonic and isolated attosecond pulse in an orthogonally polarized laser field, which is synthesized by an 800-nm chirped laser pulse and an 800-nm chirp-free laser pulse. Owing to the instantaneous frequency increasingly reducing close to the center of the driving pulse, the extreme ultraviolet supercontinuum for the chirped synthesized field is even broader than that for an orthogonal chirp-free two-color laser field. It is found that the broadband supercontinuum spectrum can be achieved for the driving pulse with ten and above optical cycles. After phase compensation an isolated attosecond pulse with a duration of {approx}16 as is produced. Furthermore, the optimization of the chirping rate parameters is investigated to achieve cutoff extension and an isolated short attosecond pulse.

  13. Computational model for time development of the EM field in pulsed laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrabelj, D.; Marincek, M.; Drevensek-Olenik, I.; Leskovar, M.; Copic, M.

    2007-05-01

    A computational model, which describes EM field formation in a pulsed laser from a randomly generated initial spontaneous field inside the laser cavity has been developed. The model is based on a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform and describes a real laser system taking into account a lensing and a diaphragm effect of the laser rod. The laser cavity is described by five effective planes, which represent different laser cavity elements-the back and the front mirror, the Q-switch element and the laser rod. At each plane the EM field is calculated in real space and propagation between the planes is achieved in Fourier space by multiplication with an appropriate phase factor. The computational time needed for simulation of a realistic pulse formation is in order of minutes. The model can predict the shape and the integral energy of the pulse, its transverse profile at different distances from the front mirror (including near and far field) and beam divergence. The results of the model were found to be in good agreement with measured parameters for a Q-switched ruby laser system running in stable as well as unstable cavity configurations. The temporal shape of a laser pulse was measured and calculated not only for the ruby laser, but also for a Nd:YAG laser. It was found that FWHM of a pulse produced by ruby laser is three times longer than FWHM of a pulse produced by Nd:YAG laser.

  14. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, W; Albrecht, G; Trenholme, J; Newton, M

    2007-04-19

    Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNL annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has

  15. Laser-Induced Damage with Femtosecond Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Kyle R. P.

    The strong electric fields of focused femtosecond laser pulses lead to non-equilibrium dynamics in materials, which, beyond a threshold intensity, causes laser-induced damage (LID). Such a strongly non-linear and non-perturbative process renders important LID observables like fluence and intensity thresholds and damage morphology (crater) extremely difficult to predict quantitatively. However, femtosecond LID carries a high degree of precision, which has been exploited in various micro/nano-machining and surface engineering applications, such as human eye surgery and super-hydrophobic surfaces. This dissertation presents an array of experimental studies which have measured the damage behavior of various materials under femtosecond irradiation. Precision experiments were performed to produce extreme spatio-temporal confinement of the femtosecond laser-solid damage interaction on monocrystalline Cu, which made possible the first successful direct-benchmarking of LID simulation with realistic damage craters. A technique was developed to produce laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) in a single pulse (typically a multi-pulse phenomenon), and was used to perform a pump-probe study which revealed asynchronous LIPSS formation on copper. Combined with 1-D calculations, this new experimental result suggests more drastic electron heating than expected. Few-cycle pulses were used to study the LID performance and morphology of commercial ultra-broadband optics, which had not been systematically studied before. With extensive surface analysis, various morphologies were observed, including LIPSS, swelling (blisters), simple craters, and even ring-shaped structures, which varied depending on the coating design, number of pulses, and air/vacuum test environment. Mechanisms leading to these morphologies are discussed, many of which are ultrafast in nature. The applied damage behavior of multi-layer dielectric mirrors was measured and compared between long pulse (150 ps

  16. Post pulse shutter for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, Laird P. [Livermore, CA; Carder, Bruce M. [Antioch, CA; Gagnon, William L. [Berkeley, CA

    1981-03-17

    Apparatus and method for quickly closing off the return path for an amplified laser pulse at the output of an amplifier so as to prevent damage to amplifiers and other optical components appearing earlier in the chain by the return of an amplified pulse. The apparatus consists of a fast retropulse or post pulse shutter to suppress target reflection and/or beam return. This is accomplished by either quickly placing a solid across the light transmitting aperture of a component in the chain, such as a spatial filter pinhole, or generating and directing a plasma with sufficiently high density across the aperture, so as to, in effect, close the aperture to the returning amplified energy pulse.

  17. Post pulse shutter for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, L.P.; Carder, B.M.; Gagnon, W.L.

    1981-03-17

    Disclosed are an apparatus and method for quickly closing off the return path for an amplified laser pulse at the output of an amplifier so as to prevent damage to amplifiers and other optical components appearing earlier in the chain by the return of an amplified pulse. The apparatus consists of a fast retropulse or post pulse shutter to suppress target reflection and/or beam return. This is accomplished by either quickly placing a solid across the light transmitting aperture of a component in the chain, such as a spatial filter pinhole, or generating and directing a plasma with sufficiently high density across the aperture, so as to, in effect, close the aperture to the returning amplified energy pulse. 13 figs.

  18. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J. )

    1990-07-30

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition of the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the Program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research question still outstanding in this area.

  19. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition if the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research questions still outstanding in this area. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Welding of transparent materials with ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Sören; Döring, Sven; Zimmermann, Felix; Lescieux, Ludovic; Eberhardt, Ramona; Nolte, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    The realization of stable bonds between different glasses has attracted a lot interest in recent years. However, conventional bonding techniques are often problematic due to required thermal annealing steps which may lead to induced stress, whereas glue and other adhesives tend to degrade over time. These problems can be overcome by using ultrashort laser pulses. When focussed at the interface, the laser energy is deposited locally in the focal volume due to nonlinear absorption processes. While even single pulses can lead to the formation of bonds between transparent glass substrates, the application of high repetition rates offers an additional degree of freedom. If the time between two pulses is shorter than the time required for heat diffusion out of the focal volume, heat accumulation of successive pulses leads to localized melting at the interface. The subsequent resolidification finally yields strong and robust bonds. Using optimized processing parameters, we achieved a breaking strength up 95% of the pristine bulk material. In this paper, we will detail the experimental background and the influence of the laser parameters on the achievable breaking strength.

  1. Theory of repetitively pulsed operation of diode lasers subject to delayed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Napartovich, A P; Sukharev, A G

    2015-03-31

    Repetitively pulsed operation of a diode laser with delayed feedback has been studied theoretically at varying feedback parameters and pump power levels. A new approach has been proposed that allows one to reduce the system of Lang–Kobayashi equations for a steady-state repetitively pulsed operation mode to a first-order nonlinear differential equation. We present partial solutions that allow the pulse shape to be predicted. (lasers)

  2. Simulation study on thermal effect of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yao; Jin, Guangyong; Yuan, Boshi

    2016-10-01

    Laser machining is one of most widely used technologies nowadays and becoming a hot industry as well. At the same time, many kinds of carbon fiber material have been used in different area, such as sports products, transportation, microelectronic industry and so on. Moreover, there is lack of the combination research on the laser interaction with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material with simulation method. In this paper, the temperature status of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP will be simulated and discussed. Firstly, a laser thermal damage model has been built considering the heat conduction theory and thermal-elasto-plastic theory. Then using COMSOL Multiphysics software to build the geometric model and to simulate the mathematic results. Secondly, the functions of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP has been introduced. Material surface temperature increased by time during the laser irradiating time and the increasing speed is faster when the laser fluence is higher. Furthermore, the peak temperature of the center of material surface is increasing by enhanced the laser fluence when the pulse length is a constant value. In this condition, both the ablation depth and the Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) is larger when increased laser fluence. When keep the laser fluence as a constant value, the laser with shorter pulse length is more easier to make the CFRP to the vaporization material. Meanwhile, the HAZ is becoming larger when the pulse length is longer, and the thermal effect depth is as the same trend as the HAZ. As a result, when long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material, the thermal effect is the significant value to analysis the process, which is mostly effect by laser fluence and pulse length. For laser machining in different industries, the laser parameter choose should be different. The shorter pulse length laser is suitable for the laser machining which requires high accuracy, and the longer one is better for the deeper or larger

  3. Specific features of metal surface processing by nanosecond laser pulse trains

    SciTech Connect

    Gornyi, S G; Grigor'ev, A M; Patrov, M I; Solov'ev, V D; Turichin, G A

    2002-10-31

    The process of melt formation upon irradiation of a metal by a train of nanosecond laser pulses is studied theoretically and experimentally. A method is developed for determining the parameters of a train at which the amount of melt is minimal, and the material is removed in the vapour state upon laser irradiation. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Precision resection of intestine using ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer J.; Gora, Wojciech S.; Jayne, David; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic resection of early colorectal neoplasms typically employs electrocautery tools, which lack precision and run the risk of full thickness thermal injury to the bowel wall with subsequent perforation. We present a means of endoluminal colonic ablation using picosecond laser pulses as a potential alternative to mitigate these limitations. High intensity ultrashort laser pulses enable nonlinear absorption processes, plasma generation, and as a consequence a predominantly non-thermal ablation regimen. Robust process parameters for the laser resection are demonstrated using fresh ex vivo pig intestine samples. Square cavities with comparable thickness to early colorectal neoplasms are removed for a wavelength of 1030 nm and 515 nm using a picosecond laser system. The corresponding histology sections exhibit in both cases only minimal collateral damage to the surrounding tissue. The ablation depth can be controlled precisely by means of the pulse energy. Overall, the application of ultrafast lasers for the resection of intestine enables significantly improved precision and reduced thermal damage to the surrounding tissue compared to conventional electrocautery.

  5. Comparison of amplified spontaneous emission pulse cleaners for use in chirped pulse amplification front end lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Siders, C; Phan, H; Kanz, V; Barty, C

    2007-07-02

    We compare various schemes for removing amplified spontaneous emission from seed laser pulses. We focus on compact schemes that are compatible with fiber laser front end systems with pulse energies in the 10nJ-1{micro}J range and pulse widths in the 100fs-10ps range. Pre-pulse contrast ratios greater than 10{sup 9} have been measured.

  6. Pulse Duration of Seeded Free-Electron Lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Finetti, Paola; Hoppner, Hauke; Allaria, Enrico; ...

    2017-06-16

    The pulse duration, and, more generally, the temporal intensity profile of free-electron laser (FEL) pulses, is of utmost importance for exploring the new perspectives offered by FELs; it is a nontrivial experimental parameter that needs to be characterized. We measured the pulse shape of an extreme ultraviolet externally seeded FEL operating in high-gain harmonic generation mode. Two different methods based on the cross-correlation of the FEL pulses with an external optical laser were used. The two methods, one capable of single-shot performance, may both be implemented as online diagnostics in FEL facilities. The measurements were carried out at the seededmore » FEL facility FERMI. The FEL temporal pulse characteristics were measured and studied in a range of FEL wavelengths and machine settings, and they were compared to the predictions of a theoretical model. Finally, the measurements allowed a direct observation of the pulse lengthening and splitting at saturation, in agreement with the proposed theory.« less

  7. Pulse energy dependence of subcellular dissection by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisterkamp, A.; Maxwell, I. Z.; Mazur, E.; Underwood, J. M.; Nickerson, J. A.; Kumar, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2005-01-01

    Precise dissection of cells with ultrashort laser pulses requires a clear understanding of how the onset and extent of ablation (i.e., the removal of material) depends on pulse energy. We carried out a systematic study of the energy dependence of the plasma-mediated ablation of fluorescently-labeled subcellular structures in the cytoskeleton and nuclei of fixed endothelial cells using femtosecond, near-infrared laser pulses focused through a high-numerical aperture objective lens (1.4 NA). We find that the energy threshold for photobleaching lies between 0.9 and 1.7 nJ. By comparing the changes in fluorescence with the actual material loss determined by electron microscopy, we find that the threshold for true material ablation is about 20% higher than the photobleaching threshold. This information makes it possible to use the fluorescence to determine the onset of true material ablation without resorting to electron microscopy. We confirm the precision of this technique by severing a single microtubule without disrupting the neighboring microtubules, less than 1 micrometer away. c2005 Optical Society of America.

  8. Laser-Material Interaction of Powerful Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Komashko, A

    2003-01-06

    Laser-material interaction of powerful (up to a terawatt) ultrashort (several picoseconds or shorter) laser pulses and laser-induced effects were investigated theoretically in this dissertation. Since the ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) duration time is much smaller than the characteristic time of the hydrodynamic expansion and thermal diffusion, the interaction occurs at a solid-like material density with most of the light energy absorbed in a thin surface layer. Powerful USLP creates hot, high-pressure plasma, which is quickly ejected without significant energy diffusion into the bulk of the material, Thus collateral damage is reduced. These and other features make USLPs attractive for a variety of applications. The purpose of this dissertation was development of the physical models and numerical tools for improvement of our understanding of the process and as an aid in optimization of the USLP applications. The study is concentrated on two types of materials - simple metals (materials like aluminum or copper) and wide-bandgap dielectrics (fused silica, water). First, key physical phenomena of the ultrashort light interaction with metals and the models needed to describe it are presented. Then, employing one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics code enhanced with models for laser energy deposition and material properties at low and moderate temperatures, light absorption was self-consistently simulated as a function of laser wavelength, pulse energy and length, angle of incidence and polarization. Next, material response on time scales much longer than the pulse duration was studied using the hydrocode and analytical models. These studies include examination of evolution of the pressure pulses, effects of the shock waves, material ablation and removal and three-dimensional dynamics of the ablation plume. Investigation of the interaction with wide-bandgap dielectrics was stimulated by the experimental studies of the USLP surface ablation of water (water is a model of

  9. Method and apparatus for the production of pre pulse free smooth laser radiation pulses of variable pulse duration

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, K. J.; Fill, E.; Scrlac, W.

    1985-04-30

    The pulse duration of an iodine laser is adjusted between 400 ps and 20 ns primarily by changing the resonator length in the range of about 2 cm to about 100 cm and secondarily by the ratio of excitation energy to threshold energy of the laser. Iodine laser pulses without pre-pulse and substructure are achieved in that the gas pressure of the laser gas of the iodine laser is adapted to the resonator length in order to limit the band width of the amplification and thus the band width of the pulse to be produced. The longer are the laser pulses to be produced the lower is the pressure chosen. A prerequisite for the above results is that the excitation of the iodine laser occurs extremely rapidly. This is advantageously achieved by photo-dissociation of a perfluoroalkyl iodide as CF/sub 3/I by means of laser providing sufficiently short output pumping pulses, e.g. an excimer laser, as a KrF laser or XeCl laser or a frequency-multiplied Nd-glass or Nd-YAG laser, or a N/sub 2/ laser (in combination with t-C/sub 4/F/sub 9/I as laser medium). In addition to the substantial advantage of the easy variability of the pulse duration the method additionally has a number of further advantages, namely pre-pulse-free rise of the laser pulse up to the maximum amplitude; exchange of the laser medium between two pulses is not necessary at pulse repetition rates below about 1 hertz; high pulse repetion rates obtainable with laser gas regeneration; switching elements for isolating a laser oscillator from a subsequent amplifier cascade for the purpose of avoiding parasitic oscillations are not as critical as with flashlamp-pumped lasers.

  10. Mode selection and frequency tuning by injection in pulsed TEA-CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, P. H.; Menzies, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model characterizing pulsed-TEA-CO2-laser injection locking by tunable CW-laser radiation is presented and used to explore the requirements for SLM pulse generation. Photon-density-rate equations describing the laser mechanism are analyzed in terms of the mode competition between photon densities emitted at two frequencies. The expression derived for pulsed dye lasers is extended to homogeneously broadened CO2 lasers, and locking time is defined as a function of laser parameters. The extent to which injected radiation can be detuned from the CO2 line center and continue to produce SLM pulses is investigated experimentally in terms of the analytical framework. The dependence of locking time on the detuning/pressure-broadened-halfwidth ratio is seen as important for spectroscopic applications requiring tuning within the TEA-laser line-gain bandwidth.

  11. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data of the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  12. Laser-driven hydrothermal process studied with excimer laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariella, Raymond; Rubenchik, Alexander; Fong, Erika; Norton, Mary; Hollingsworth, William; Clarkson, James; Johnsen, Howard; Osborn, David L.

    2017-08-01

    Previously, we discovered [Mariella et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 014904 (2013)] that modest-fluence/modest-intensity 351-nm laser pulses, with insufficient fluence/intensity to ablate rock, mineral, or concrete samples via surface vaporization, still removed the surface material from water-submerged target samples with confinement of the removed material, and then dispersed at least some of the removed material into the water as a long-lived suspension of nanoparticles. We called this new process, which appears to include the generation of larger colorless particles, "laser-driven hydrothermal processing" (LDHP) [Mariella et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 014904 (2013)]. We, now, report that we have studied this process using 248-nm and 193-nm laser light on submerged concrete, quartzite, and obsidian, and, even though light at these wavelengths is more strongly absorbed than at 351 nm, we found that the overall efficiency of LDHP, in terms of the mass of the target removed per Joule of laser-pulse energy, is lower with 248-nm and 193-nm laser pulses than with 351-nm laser pulses. Given that stronger absorption creates higher peak surface temperatures for comparable laser fluence and intensity, it was surprising to observe reduced efficiencies for material removal. We also measured the nascent particle-size distributions that LDHP creates in the submerging water and found that they do not display the long tail towards larger particle sizes that we had observed when there had been a multi-week delay between experiments and the date of measuring the size distributions. This is consistent with transient dissolution of the solid surface, followed by diffusion-limited kinetics of nucleation and growth of particles from the resulting thin layer of supersaturated solution at the sample surface.

  13. Pulsed laser radiation therapy of skin tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.P.; Moskalik, K.G.

    1980-11-15

    Radiation from a neodymium laser was used to treat 846 patients with 687 precancerous lesions or benign tumors of the skin, 516 cutaneous carcinomas, 33 recurrences of cancer, 51 melanomas, and 508 metastatic melanomas in the skin. The patients have been followed for three months to 6.5 years. No relapses have been observed during this period. Metastases to regional lymph nodes were found in five patients with skin melanoma. Pulsed laser radiation may be successfully used in the treatment of precancerous lesions and benign tumors as well as for skin carcinoma and its recurrences, and for skin melanoma. Laser radiation is more effective in the treatment of tumors inaccessible to radiation therapy and better in those cases in which surgery may have a bad cosmetic or even mutilating effect. Laser beams can be employed in conjunction with chemo- or immunotherapy.

  14. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  15. GEOS-1 laser pulse return shape analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felsentreger, T. L.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt has been made to predict the shape of the laser return pulse from the corner cube retroreflectors on the GEOS-1 spacecraft. The study is geometrical only, and neglects factors such as optical interference, atmospheric perturbations, etc. A function giving the intensity of the return signal at any given time has been derived. In addition, figures are given which show the predicted return pulse shape as a function of time, the angle between the beam and the spin axis, and an in-plane angle (designating the orientation of the intersection of the planar waves with the plane of the corner cubes).

  16. Impact of pulse duration on Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy: fragmentation and dusting performance.

    PubMed

    Bader, Markus J; Pongratz, Thomas; Khoder, Wael; Stief, Christian G; Herrmann, Thomas; Nagele, Udo; Sroka, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    In vitro investigations of Ho:YAG laser-induced stone fragmentation were performed to identify potential impacts of different pulse durations on stone fragmentation characteristics. A Ho:YAG laser system (Swiss LaserClast, EMS S.A., Nyon, Switzerland) with selectable long or short pulse mode was tested with regard to its fragmentation and laser hardware compatibility properties. The pulse duration is depending on the specific laser parameters. Fragmentation tests (hand-held, hands-free, single-pulse-induced crater) on artificial BEGO stones were performed under reproducible experimental conditions (fibre sizes: 365 and 200 µm; laser settings: 10 W through combinations of 0.5, 1, 2 J/pulse and 20, 10, 5 Hz, respectively). Differences in fragmentation rates between the two pulse duration regimes were detected with statistical significance for defined settings. Hand-held and motivated Ho:YAG laser-assisted fragmentation of BEGO stones showed no significant difference between short pulse mode and long pulse mode, neither in fragmentation rates nor in number of fragments and fragment sizes. Similarly, the results of the hands-free fragmentation tests (with and without anti-repulsion device) showed no statistical differences between long pulse and short pulse modes. The study showed that fragmentation rates for long and short pulse durations at identical power settings remain at a comparable level. Longer holmium laser pulse duration reduces stone pushback. Therefore, longer laser pulses may result in better clinical outcome of laser lithotripsy and more convenient handling during clinical use without compromising fragmentation effectiveness.

  17. High speed sampling circuit design for pulse laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Rui-hai; Gao, Xuan-yi; Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Guo, Xiao-kang; He, Shi-jie

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of digital chip, high speed sampling rate analog to digital conversion chip can be used to sample narrow laser pulse echo. Moreover, high speed processor is widely applied to achieve digital laser echo signal processing algorithm. The development of digital chip greatly improved the laser ranging detection accuracy. High speed sampling and processing circuit used in the laser ranging detection system has gradually been a research hotspot. In this paper, a pulse laser echo data logging and digital signal processing circuit system is studied based on the high speed sampling. This circuit consists of two parts: the pulse laser echo data processing circuit and the data transmission circuit. The pulse laser echo data processing circuit includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The data transmission circuit receives the processed data from the pulse laser echo data processing circuit. The sample data is transmitted to the computer through USB2.0 interface. Finally, a PC interface is designed using C# language, in which the sampling laser pulse echo signal is demonstrated and the processed laser pulse is plotted. Finally, the laser ranging experiment is carried out to test the pulse laser echo data logging and digital signal processing circuit system. The experiment result demonstrates that the laser ranging hardware system achieved high speed data logging, high speed processing and high speed sampling data transmission.

  18. Electron acceleration by a propagating laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fengchao; Shen Baifei; Zhang Xiaomei; Li Xuemei; Jin Zhangying

    2007-08-15

    Electrons accelerated by a propagating laser pulse of linear or circular polarization in vacuum have been investigated by one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and analytical modeling. A stopping target is used to stop the laser pulse and extract the energetic electrons from the laser field. The effect of the reflected light is taken into account. The maximum electron energy depends on the laser intensity and initial electron energy. There is an optimal acceleration length for electrons to gain maximum energy where electrons meet the peak of the laser pulse. The optimal acceleration length depends strongly on the laser pulse duration and amplitude.

  19. Wakefield evolution and electron acceleration in interaction of frequency-chirped laser pulse with inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Pandari, M.; Niknam, A. R.; Massudi, R.; Jahangiri, F.; Hassaninejad, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of an ultra-short intense frequency-chirped laser pulse with an underdense plasma is studied. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity and laser parameters such as chirp, pulse duration, and intensity on plasma density and wakefield evolutions, and electron acceleration are examined. It is found that a properly chirped laser pulse could induce a stronger laser wakefield in an inhomogeneous plasma and result in higher electron acceleration energy. It is also shown that the wakefield amplitude is enhanced by increasing the slope of density in the inhomogeneous plasma.

  20. Short-pulse laser formation of monatomic metallic glass in tantalum nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yong; Sun, Zheng; Shen, Yaogen

    2017-01-01

    The short-pulse laser heating of a tantalum nanowire is simulated by a hybrid method coupling the two-temperature model into the molecular dynamics. It is shown that the monatomic metallic glasses can be formed by short-pulse lasers. The critical cooling rate for vitrifying the pure metallic liquids in tantalum nanowire is estimated to be on the order of 1013 K s-1. Further simulations with different laser parameters and heated spot size are performed, demonstrating that the short-pulse laser quenching is a robust and promising alternative to the vitrification of monatomic metallic liquids into glassy state.

  1. Pulse-burst laser systems for fast Thomson scattering (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Ambuel, J. R.; Holly, D. J.; Robl, P. E.; Borchardt, M. T.; Falkowski, A. F.; Harris, W. S.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Stephens, H. D.; Yang, Y. M.

    2010-10-15

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG (YAG denotes yttrium aluminum garnet) lasers have been upgraded to ''pulse-burst'' capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to 15 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates of 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to record the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature profile and temperature fluctuations. To further these investigations, a custom pulse-burst laser system with a maximum pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz is now being commissioned.

  2. Pulse-burst laser systems for fast Thomson scattering (invited).

    PubMed

    Den Hartog, D J; Ambuel, J R; Borchardt, M T; Falkowski, A F; Harris, W S; Holly, D J; Parke, E; Reusch, J A; Robl, P E; Stephens, H D; Yang, Y M

    2010-10-01

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG (YAG denotes yttrium aluminum garnet) lasers have been upgraded to "pulse-burst" capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to 15 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates of 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to record the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature profile and temperature fluctuations. To further these investigations, a custom pulse-burst laser system with a maximum pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz is now being commissioned.

  3. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2015-12-01

    Niobium nitride (NbNx) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbNx films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ˜40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbNx films from mixed β-Nb2N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb2N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbNx deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbNx films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbNx film morphology and phase.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  5. Pulsed laser triggered high speed microfluidic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Gao, Lanyu; Chen, Yue; Wei, Kenneth; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2008-10-01

    We report a high-speed microfluidic switch capable of achieving a switching time of 10 μs. The switching mechanism is realized by exciting dynamic vapor bubbles with focused laser pulses in a microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel. The bubble expansion deforms the elastic PDMS channel wall and squeezes the adjacent sample channel to control its fluid and particle flows as captured by the time-resolved imaging system. A switching of polystyrene microspheres in a Y-shaped channel has also been demonstrated. This ultrafast laser triggered switching mechanism has the potential to advance the sorting speed of state-of-the-art microscale fluorescence activated cell sorting devices.

  6. Photostimulation of astrocytes with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Xiuli; Lv, Xiaohua; Zhou, Wei; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2009-02-02

    The involvement of astrocytes in brain functions rather than support has been identified and widely concerned. However the lack of an effective stimulation of astrocytes hampers our understanding of their essential roles. Here, we employed 800-nm near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser to induce Ca2+ wave in astrocytes. It was demonstrated that photostimulation of astrocytes with femtosecond laser pulses is efficient with the advantages of non-contact, non-disruptiveness, reproducibility, and high spatiotemporal precision. Photostimulation of astrocytes would facilitate investigations on information processing in neuronal circuits by providing effective way to excite astrocytes.

  7. Nanosecond pulsed laser blackening of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guang; Hourd, Andrew C.; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-12-01

    Nanosecond (12 ns) pulsed laser processing of copper at 532 nm resulted in the formation of homogenously distributed, highly organized microstructures. This led to the fabrication of large area black copper substrates with absorbance of over 97% in the spectral range from 250 nm to 750 nm, and a broadband absorbance of over 80% between 750 nm and 2500 nm. Optical and chemical analyses of the fabricated black metal are presented and discussed. The employed laser is an industrially adaptable source and the presented technique for fabrication of black copper could find applications in broadband thermal radiation sources, solar energy absorbers, irradiative heat transfer devices, and thermophotovoltaics.

  8. Extreme intensity pulses in a semiconductor laser with a short external cavity.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Jose A; Zamora-Munt, Jordi; Masoller, Cristina

    2013-06-01

    We present a numerical study of the pulses displayed by a semiconductor laser with optical feedback in the short-cavity regime, such that the external cavity round-trip time is shorter than the laser relaxation oscillation period. For certain parameters there are occasional pulses, which are high enough to be considered extreme events. We characterize the bifurcation scenario that gives rise to such extreme pulses and study the influence of noise. We demonstrate intermittency when the extreme pulses appear and hysteresis when the attractor that sustains these pulses is destroyed. We also show that this scenario is robust under the inclusion of noise.

  9. Microstructuring of Steel and Hard Metal using Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Manuel; Engel, Andy; Weißmantel, Steffen; Scholze, Stefan; Reisse, Guenter

    New results on three-dimensional micro-structuring of tungsten carbide hard metal and steel using femtosecond laser pulses will be presented. For the investigations, a largely automated high-precision fs-laser micromachining station was used. The fs-laser beam is focused onto the sample surface using different objectives. The investigations of the ablation behaviour of the various materials in dependence of the laser processing parameters will be presented. In the second part, complex 3D microstructures with a variety of geometries and resolutions down to a few micrometers will be presented. On of the Goal of these investigations was to create defined microstructures in tooling equipments such as cutting inserts.

  10. Control of XeF laser output by pulse injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacala, T. J.; Christensen, C. P.

    1980-01-01

    Injection locking is investigated as a means for control of optical pulse duration and polarization in a XeF laser. Intense short-pulse generation in the ultraviolet is achieved by injection of a low-level 1-ns optical pulse into a XeF oscillator. Control of laser output polarization by injection locking is demonstrated and studied as a function of injected signal level. Enhancement of XeF electric-discharge laser efficiency by injection pulse 'priming' is observed.

  11. Measurement and compensation schemes for the pulse front distortion of ultra-intensity ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fenxiang; Xu, Yi; Yu, Linpeng; Yang, Xiaojun; Li, Wenkai; Lu, Jun; Leng, Yuxin

    2016-11-01

    Pulse front distortion (PFD) is mainly induced by the chromatic aberration in femtosecond high-peak power laser systems, and it can temporally distort the pulse in the focus and therefore decrease the peak intensity. A novel measurement scheme is proposed to directly measure the PFD of ultra-intensity ultra-short laser pulses, which can work not only without any extra struggle for the desired reference pulse, but also largely reduce the size of the required optical elements in measurement. The measured PFD in an experimental 200TW/27fs laser system is in good agreement with the calculated result, which demonstrates the validity and feasibility of this method effectively. In addition, a simple compensation scheme based on the combination of concave lens and parabolic lens is also designed and proposed to correct the PFD. Based on the theoretical calculation, the PFD of above experimental laser system can almost be completely corrected by using this compensator with proper parameters.

  12. Optical reprogramming with ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans G.; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    The use of sub-15 femtosecond laser pulses in stem cell research is explored with particular emphasis on the optical reprogramming of somatic cells. The reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be evoked through the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Conventional approaches utilize retro/lenti-viruses to deliver genes/transcription factors as well as to facilitate the integration of transcription factors into that of the host genome. However, the use of viruses may result in insertional mutations caused by the random integration of genes and as a result, this may limit the use within clinical applications due to the risk of the formation of cancer. In this study, a new approach is demonstrated in realizing non-viral reprogramming through the use of ultrashort laser pulses, to introduce transcription factors into the cell so as to generate iPS cells.

  13. Plasma generated during underwater pulsed laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Chrzanowska, Justyna; Moscicki, Tomasz; Radziejewska, Joanna; Stobinski, Leszek; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2017-09-01

    The plasma induced during underwater pulsed laser ablation of graphite is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of the experiment show that the maximum plasma temperature of 25000 K is reached 20 ns from the beginning of the laser pulse and decreases to 6500 K after 1000 ns. The observed OH absorption band shows that the plasma plume is surrounded by the thin layer of dissociated water vapour at a temperature around 5500 K. The hydrodynamic model applied shows similar maximum plasma temperature at delay times between 14 ns and 30 ns. The calculations show also that already at 14th ns, the plasma electron density reaches 0.97·1027 m-3, which is the critical density for 1064 nm radiation. At the same time the plasma pressure is 2 GPa, which is consisted with earlier measurements of the peak pressure exerted on a target in similar conditions.

  14. Pulse switching for high energy lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A saturable inductor switch for compressing the width and sharpening the rise time of high voltage pulses from a relatively slow rise time, high voltage generator to an electric discharge gas laser (EDGL) also provides a capability for efficient energy transfer from a high impedance primary source to an intermediate low impedance laser discharge network. The switch is positioned with respect to a capacitive storage device, such as a coaxial cable, so that when a charge build-up in the storage device reaches a predetermined level, saturation of the switch inductor releases or switches energy stored in the capactive storage device to the EDGL. Cascaded saturable inductor switches for providing output pulses having rise times of less than ten nanoseconds and a technique for magnetically biasing the saturable inductor switch are disclosed.

  15. Short-pulse laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Myers, B.R.; Banks, P.S.; Honea, E.C.

    1997-06-18

    While there is much that we have learned about materials processing in the ultrashort-pulse regime, there is an enormous amount that we don`t know. How short does the pulse have to be to achieve a particular cut (depth, material, quality)? How deep can you cut? What is the surface roughness? These questions are clearly dependent upon the properties of the material of interest along with the short-pulse interaction physics. From a technology standpoint, we are asked: Can you build a 100 W average power system ? A 1000 W average power system? This proposal seeks to address these questions with a combined experimental and theoretical program of study. Specifically, To develop an empirical database for both metals and dielectrics which can be used to determine the pulse duration and wavelength necessary to achieve a specific machining requirement. To investigate Yb:YAG as a potential laser material for high average power short-pulse systems both directly and in combination with titanium doped sapphire. To develop a conceptual design for a lOOW and eventually 5OOW average power short-pulse system.

  16. Dentin mid-infrared laser ablation at various lasing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Marouan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study a frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) Q-switched and free-running Er:YAG laser, as well as a novel design transversally excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) oscillator-double amplifier corona preionised high beam quality Hydrogen-Fluoride (HF) laser system, all developed in our lab, were used in dentin ablation experiments. In the case of the Er:YAG laser, pulses of 190 ns in Q-switched operation and of 80 μs pulse width in free-running operation at 2.94 μm were used, while HF laser pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.6-3.1 μm in a predominantly TEM00 beam were also used to interact in vitro with dentin tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of 0.4-1.5 mm thick. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue or after being waveguided through suitable mid-IR fiber/waveguide alternatively ended with quartz end-sealing caps. The correlation between the various laser beam parameters, as wavelength, pulse duration, repetition rate, energy and spatial distribution of the beam profile and the ablative characteristics (ablation rates, tissue surface morphology) of dentin surface were investigated.

  17. Laser pulse stretcher method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hawkins, Jon K.; Williams, William A.

    1990-01-01

    The output of an oscillator stage of a laser system is monitored by a photocell which is coupled to a feedback section to control a Pockels Cell and change the light output of the oscillator stage. A synchronizing pulse is generated in timed relation to the initiation of operation of the oscillator stage and is applied to a forward feed section which cooperates with the feedback section to maintain the light output constant for an extended time interval.

  18. Magnetron Sputtered Pulsed Laser Deposition Scale Up

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-14

    2:721-726 34 S. J. P. Laube and E. F. Stark, “ Artificial Intellegence in Process Control of Pulsed Laser Deposition”, Proceedings of...The model would be based on mathematical simulation of real process data, neural-networks, or other artificial intelligence methods based on in situ...Laube and E. F. Stark, Proc. Symp. Artificial Intel. Real Time Control, Valencia, Spain, 3-5 Oct. ,1994, p.159-163. International Federation of

  19. Metal-Silicide Formation With Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luches, Armando; Leggieri, Gilberto; D'Anna, Emilia

    1989-05-01

    The most relevant results obtained in the field of the synthesis of metal suicides with pulsed lasers in the nanosecond regime are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the results obtained in our laboratories. Formation of stable and metastable compounds, their structure and the surface morphology of the irradiated materials are discussed. The reaction kinetics is investigated through a comparison of the experimental results with the temperatures of the irradiated samples, calculated by solving the heat diffusion equation.

  20. Rectangular Pulsed Laser-Electromagnetic Hybrid Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kishida, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Masahiro; Horisawa, Hideyuki

    2010-10-13

    Experimental investigation of impulse-bit and propellant consumption rate, or mass shot, per single pulse discharge was conducted to characterize the thrust performance of the rectangular laser-electromagnetic hybrid acceleration thruster with various propellant materials. From the result, alumina propellant showed significantly superior performance. The largest values of the measured impulse-bit, specific impulse and thrust efficiency were 49 {mu}Nsec, 6,200 sec and 22%, respectively.

  1. Efficient GeV ion generation by ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaomei; Shen Baifei; Li Xuemei; Jin Zhangying; Wang Fengchao; Wen Meng

    2007-12-15

    The interaction of an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse and a solid target is studied by one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Ions at the front of the target are reflected by a moving quasisteady electrostatic field and obtain a relativistic velocity. At a laser intensity of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, almost half of the laser energy is transferred to ions and GeV ions are obtained. Effects of laser polarization state and target thickness on the laser energy conversion are investigated. It is found that a circularly polarized laser pulse can accelerate ions more efficiently than a linearly polarized laser pulse at the same laser and target parameters. A monoenergetic ion bunch is obtained for the ultrathin target, which is accelerated as a single entity.

  2. Nonlinear propagation of ultraintense and ultrashort laser pulses in a plasma channel limited by metallic walls

    SciTech Connect

    Sid, A.; Debbache, D.; Bendib, A.

    2006-08-15

    The nonlinear propagation of an ultraintense and ultrashort (UIUS) laser pulse in a metallic capillary is investigated using a classical model which takes into account the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption (IBA) in the formed plasma. The attenuation of the laser pulse due to the IBA in the plasma and to the laser energy dissipation in the metallic walls is shown. The guiding length and the twist of the laser pulse temporal envelope are presented for several values of the parameters of the plasma, the laser pulse and the metal. The numerical treatment shows that the guiding length increases when the pulse duration becomes shorter. This calculus shows also that in the case of moderate electronic densities, n{sub e}<10{sup 17} m{sup -3}, the formed plasma has a negligible effect compared to that of the metallic walls.

  3. Computational Design of Short Pulse Laser Driven Iron Opacity Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madison E.; London, Richard A.; Goluoglu, Sedat; Whitley, Heather D.

    2015-11-01

    Opacity is a critical parameter in the transport of radiation in systems such as inertial confinement fusion capsules and stars. The resolution of current disagreements between solar models and helioseismological observations would benefit from experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat targets to higher temperatures and densities than long pulse lasers and pulsed power machines, thus potentially enabling access to emission spectra at conditions relevant to solar models. In order to ensure that the relevant plasma conditions are accessible and that an emission measurement is practical, we use computational design of experiments to optimize the target characteristics and laser conditions. Radiation-hydrodynamic modeling, using HYDRA, is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance, target dimensions, and dopant dilution on the plasma conditions and emission of an iron opacity target. Several optimized designs reaching temperatures and densities relevant to the radiative zone of the sun will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  4. Large capacitor performs as a distributed parameter pulse line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, T. J.

    1966-01-01

    Capacitor of extended foil construction performs as a distributed parameter pulse line in which current, amplitude, and period are readily controlled. The capacitor is used as the energy storage element in a pulsed plasma accelerator.

  5. Dependence of the ion energy on the parameters of the laser pulse and target in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime of acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Echkina, E. Yu.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pegoraro, F.; Borghesi, M.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2010-01-15

    When the dominant mechanism for ion acceleration is the laser radiation pressure, the conversion efficiency of the laser energy into the energy of relativistic ions may be very high. Stability analysis of a thin plasma layer accelerated by the radiation pressure shows that Raleigh-Taylor instability may enhance plasma inhomogeneity. In the linear stage of instability, the plasma layer decays into separate bunches, which are accelerated by the radiation pressure similarly to clusters accelerated under the action of an electromagnetic wave. The energy and luminosity of an ion beam accelerated in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime are calculated.

  6. Picosecond pulse measurements using the active laser medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardin, James P.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1990-01-01

    A simple method for measuring the pulse lengths of synchronously pumped dye lasers which does not require the use of an external nonlinear medium, such as a doubling crystal or two-photon fluorescence cell, to autocorrelate the pulses is discussed. The technique involves feeding the laser pulses back into the dye jet, thus correlating the output pulses with the intracavity pulses to obtain pulse length signatures in the resulting time-averaged laser power. Experimental measurements were performed using a rhodamine 6G dye laser pumped by a mode-locked frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The results agree well with numerical computations, and the method proves effective in determining lengths of picosecond laser pulses.

  7. Pulsed-discharge carbon dioxide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willetts, David V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to attempt a general introduction to pulsed carbon dioxide lasers of the kind used or proposed for laser radar applications. Laser physics is an excellent example of a cross-disciplinary topic, and the molecular spectroscopy, energy transfer, and plasma kinetics of the devices are explored. The concept of stimulated emission and population inversions is introduced, leading on to the molecular spectroscopy of the CO2 molecule. This is followed by a consideration of electron-impact pumping, and the pertinent energy transfer and relaxation processes which go on. Since the devices are plasma pumped, it is necessary to introduce a complex subject, but this is restricted to appropriate physics of glow discharges. Examples of representative devices are shown. The implications of the foregoing to plasma chemistry and gas life are discussed.

  8. Shock profile induced by short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couturier, S.; de Rességuier, T.; Hallouin, M.; Romain, J. P.; Bauer, F.

    1996-06-01

    Standard 25-μm-thick polyvinilydene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric gauges and new 450-μm-thick P(VDF 70%, TrFE 30%) piezoelectric copolymer have been used to record shock profiles at the back face of metallic targets irradiated by laser pulses of 2.5 and 0.6 ns duration at a 1.06 μm wavelength. The records are fully explained with simplified space-time diagram analysis. The pressure profile applied at the front face of the target has been determined from these records combined with numerical simulations of wave propagation through the target. A numerical code describing the interaction of laser with matter (FILM) has also been used for computing the applied pressure. Both methods lead to very close results. The peak pressure dependence on incident laser intensity is determined up to 30 GPa at 1012 W/cm2.

  9. Pulsed Nd-YAG laser in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragot-Roy, Brigitte; Severin, Claude; Maquin, Michel

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish an operative method in endodontics. The effect of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on root canal dentin has been examined with a scanning electron microscope. Our first experimentation was to observe the impacts carried out perpendicularly to root canal surface with a 200 micrometers fiber optic in the presence of dye. Secondarily, the optical fiber was used as an endodontic instrument with black dye. The irradiation was performed after root canal preparation (15/100 file or 40/100 file) or directly into the canal. Adverse effects are observed. The results show that laser irradiation on root canal dentin surfaces induces a nonhomogeneous modified dentin layer, melted and resolidified dentin closed partially dentinal tubules. The removal of debris is not efficient enough. The laser treatment seems to be indicated only for endodontic and periapical spaces sterilization after conventional root canal preparation.

  10. Ultrafast laser pulses for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Will, Fabian; Serbin, Jesper; Bauer, Thorsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Welling, Herbert; Mueller, Wiebke; Schwab, Burkard; Singh, Ajoy I.; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2002-04-01

    Ultrafast lasers have become a promising tool for micromachining and extremely precise ablation of all kinds of materials. Due to the low energy threshold, thermal and mechanical side effects are limited to the bu micrometers range. The neglection of side effects enables the use of ultrashort laser pulses in a broad field of medical applications. Moreover, the interaction process based on nonlinear absorption offers the opportunity to process transparent tissue three dimensionally inside the bulk. We demonstrate the feasibility of surgical procedures in different fields of medical interest: in ophthalmology intrastromal cutting and preparing of cornael flaps for refractive surgery in living animals is presented. Besides, the very low mechanical side effects enables the use of fs- laser in otoralyngology to treat ocecular bones. Moreover, the precise cutting quality can be used in fields of cardiovascular surgery for the treatment of arteriosklerosis as well as in dentistry to remove caries from dental hard tissue.

  11. Enhanced Photoacoustic Beam Profiling of Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Santiago, G.; Paz, M.; Slezak, V.; Peuriot, A.

    2013-09-01

    An improved version of a photoacoustic beam profiler of pulsed lasers is presented. The new model resorts to high-bandwidth condenser microphones to register higher-order, excited acoustic modes, thus enabling more accurate profiling. In addition, Xe was used as a buffer gas since its high atomic weight further reduces the eigenfrequencies. Furthermore, a new gas-handling system makes up for some deficiencies found in the first model. The system was calibrated using the Airy pattern generated with a pinhole illuminated by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser that excited traces. Once calibrated, the beam profile of a TEA laser was obtained, using ethylene as the absorbing species. This profiler returns more accurate profiles than thermal paper.

  12. Measurement of ablative laser propulsion parameters for aluminum, Co-Ni ferrite and polyurethane polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Yasir; Saeed, Humaima; Raza Ahmad, M.; Ahmad Khan, Shakeel; Farooq, Hashim; Shahid, Muhammad; Zia, K. M.; Amin, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation propulsion is a form of beam-powered propulsion in which a pulsed laser ablates a target material thus producing thrust. We report in this work the measurements of various parameters related to laser-induced micropropulsion in toluene diisocyanate-based polyurethane polymer, aluminum and Co-Ni ferrite. The targets were irradiated by a Q-switched pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 1064 nm (pulse duration 5 ns) under atmospheric conditions. A contact-free optical triangulation method was used to measure the laser ablation induced thrust in the samples. The measurements and calculations depict that Co-Ni ferrite is better in terms of critical propulsion parameters C m and I sp. It has been observed that the propulsion parameters depend on the energy per pulse of the incident laser beam.

  13. Above threshold dissociation in HD+ using frequency chirped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Liu, Zheng-Tang; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2011-06-01

    We have theoretically studied the dynamics of above threshold dissociation (ATD) in molecular ions HD+ using frequency chirped femtosecond laser pulses from numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation by using the three-dimensional time-dependent quantum wave packet method. Energy-dependent distributions of ATD fragments are analyzed by an asymptotic-flow expression in momentum space. Linearly positive and negative frequency chirped laser pulses are adopted. It is found that varying frequency chirped parameters can change branching ratios of the 1sσ g and 2pσ u dissociations channels. The concept of a light-induced potential is used to interpret the ATD process. The angular resolved energy distributions of the photofragments are also illustrated.

  14. Enhancement of proton acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulse in radiation pressure mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosoughian, H.; Riazi, Z.; Afarideh, H.; Yazdani, E.

    2015-07-01

    The transition from hole-boring to light-sail regime of radiation pressure acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulses is studied using particle-in-cell simulation. The penetration depth of laser into the plasma with ramped density profile increases when a negatively chirped laser pulse is applied. Because of this induced transparency, the laser reflection layer moves deeper into the target and the hole-boring stage would smoothly transit into the light-sail stage. An optimum chirp parameter which satisfies the laser transparency condition, a 0 ≈ π n e l / n c λ , is obtained for each ramp scale length. Moreover, the efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the kinetic energy of particles is maximized at the obtained optimum condition. A relatively narrow proton energy spectrum with peak enhancement by a factor of 2 is achieved using a negatively chirped pulse compared with the un-chirped pulse.

  15. Corneal and skin laser exposures from 1540-nm laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Mitchell, Michael A.; Rico, Pedro J.; Fletcher, David J.; Eurell, Thomas E.; Roach, William P.

    2000-06-01

    Mechanisms of tissue damage are investigated for skin and cornea exposures from 1540 nm ('eye safe') laser single pulses of 0.8 milli-seconds. New skin model data point out the advantages of using the Yucatan mini-pig versus the Yorkshire pig for in-vivo skin laser exposures. Major advantages found include similarities in thickness and melanin content when compared with human skin. Histology from Yucatan mini-pig skin exposures and the calculation of an initial ED50 threshold indicate that the main photon tissue interaction may not be solely due to water absorption. In-vitro corneal equivalents compared well with in-vivo rabbit cornea exposure under similar laser conditions. In-vivo and in-vitro histology show that initial energy deposition leading to damage occurs intrastromally, while epithelial cells show no direct injury due to laser light absorption.

  16. Laser welding of nylon thin films using a pulsed CO2 waveguide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagomez, R.; Valenzuela, Rogelio; Camacho-Mesa, Roxana B.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we present an experimental investigation for welding Nylon: Bi-Oriented Polyamide (BOPA) thin films using a CO2 waveguide laser in a pulsed configuration. The material used in this study is Nylon 6, all set in square sheet thin films samples of 100 cm2 with 15 µm thickness. Our optical setup is based on deliver the laser beam all the way through the work piece using X-Y scanning mirrors mounted on galvo-like motors and an f-theta lens with 15 cm focal length and 50 µm focal spot sizes. The fluence (laser energy) is controlled by a pulse signal generator having the possibility to change the pulse repetition rate (PRR) and the pulse width (PW) of the laser beam. Our results show the best weld seam for scanning speeds of 20mm/s and the pulsed laser beam with 2 KHz PRR and 80 µs for the PW time. The scanning speed and trajectory for the welding process are all controlled by a computer in which one can modify the weld parameters. The irradiance at the focal point is set to 1.146 MW/cm2 while the average optical power was set to 22.5W. Our experimental parameters are previously modeled by using COMSOL Multiphysics software were the laser heat source is modeled on the selected material. This model is based on the heat transfer partial differential equation and solved by finite elements procedure. Model results show a perfect agreement with the experiments. Finally, the quality of the welded seam is studied by means of sealed tight and share force critical mechanical test.

  17. Laser pulse peak holding circuit for low cost laser tracking applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, He; Zhang, Xiangjin; Chen, Yong

    2016-10-01

    In the low cost laser tracking applications, the width of the laser echo pulses received by four-quadrant photodetector from an illuminated target are narrow, and are only a few hundred or dozens of nanoseconds. In order to obtain the peak of these narrow laser pulses of nS level, by using peak holding technique, a simplified transconductance peak holding circuit model is constructed, taking into account of low cost applications with large number of requirements. The key parameters of the transconductance peak holding circuit such as response time, droop rate and bandwidth are analyzed for narrow laser pulse signals. The transconductance peak holding circuit is designed using a low-cost integrated chip OPA615, then is simulated by the software PSpice tools. Finally, a circuit board is manufactured for further tests. The results show that: the bandwidth of the circuit is about 76.4 MHz, response time is about 7 ns, and droop rate is about 5.7 mV/μs. The peaks of narrow laser pulses are effectively acquired, meeting the needs for the subsequent low speed and low cost A/D converter.

  18. Electron beam switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, Lyn D.; Murray, John R.; Goldhar, Julius; Bradley, Laird P.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  19. Ultrashort-pulse laser generated nanoparticles of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Welle, Eric J.; Tappan, Alexander S.; Palmer, Jeremy A.

    2010-08-03

    A process for generating nanoscale particles of energetic materials, such as explosive materials, using ultrashort-pulse laser irradiation. The use of ultrashort laser pulses in embodiments of this invention enables one to generate particles by laser ablation that retain the chemical identity of the starting material while avoiding ignition, deflagration, and detonation of the explosive material.

  20. Pulse mode of laser photodynamic treatment induced cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Klimenko, Vladimir V; Knyazev, Nickolay A; Moiseenko, Fedor V; Rusanov, Anatoliy A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Dubina, Michael V

    2016-03-01

    One of the factors limiting photodynamic therapy (PDT) is hypoxia in tumor cells during photodynamic action. PDT with pulse mode irradiation and appropriate irradiation parameters could be more effective in the singlet oxygen generation and tissue re-oxygenation than continuous wave (CW) mode. We theoretically demonstrate differences between the cumulative singlet oxygen concentration in PDT using pulse mode and CW mode of laser irradiation. In vitro experimental results show that photodynamic treatment with pulse mode irradiation has similar cytotoxicity to CW mode and induces mainly cell apoptosis, whereas CW mode induces necrotic cell death. We assume that the cumulative singlet oxygen concentration and the temporal distribution of singlet oxygen are important in photodynamic cytotoxicity and apoptosis initiation. We expect our research may improve irradiation protocols and photodynamic therapy efficiency.

  1. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Laser microprocessing in a gas environment at a high repetition rate of ablative pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, Sergei M.; Pivovarov, Pavel A.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Breitling, D.; Dausinger, F.

    2004-06-01

    The parameters of laser ablation of channels in steel are studied in a wide range of nanosecond pulse repetition rates f (5 Hz <= f <= 200 kHz). It is found that for f >= 4 kHz, the results of ablation in air are identical to those obtained under the action of single laser pulses in vacuum. The experimental data as well as the estimates of the parameters of laser plasma and the gas environment in the region of the laser action lead to the conclusion that there exists a long-lived region of hot rarefied gas, known as a fire ball in the theory of explosions. The emerging rarefaction reduces the screening effect of the surface plasma formed under the action of subsequent pulses. This makes it possible to use lasers with a high pulse repetition rate for attaining ablation conditions close to the conditions in vacuum without complicating the technology of microprocessing by using vacuum chambers and evacuating pumps.

  2. Plasma channels during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse with wavefront astigmatism in air

    SciTech Connect

    Dergachev, A A; Kandidov, V P; Shlenov, S A; Ionin, A A; Mokrousova, D V; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Shustikova, A P

    2014-12-31

    We have demonstrated experimentally and numerically the possibility of controlling parameters of plasma channels formed during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse by introducing astigmatism in the laser beam wavefront. It is found that weak astigmatism increases the length of the plasma channel in comparison with the case of aberration-free focusing and that strong astigmatism can cause splitting of the plasma channel into two channels located one after another on the filament axis. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  3. High precision laser direct microstructuring system based on bursts of picosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mur, Jaka; Petelin, Jaka; Osterman, Natan; Petkovšek, Rok

    2017-08-01

    We have developed an efficient, high precision system for direct laser microstructuring using fiber laser generated bursts of picosecond pulses. An advanced opto-mechanical system for beam deflection and sample movement, precise pulse energy control, and a custom built fiber laser with the pulse duration of 65 ps have been combined in a compact setup. The setup allows structuring of single-micrometer sized objects with a nanometer resolution of the laser beam positioning due to a combination of acousto-optical laser beam deflection and tight focusing. The precise synchronization of the fiber laser with the pulse burst repetition frequency of up to 100 kHz allowed a wide range of working parameters, including a tuneable number of pulses in each burst with the intra-burst repetition frequency of 40 MHz and delivering exactly one burst of pulses to every chosen position. We have demonstrated that tightly focused bursts of pulses significantly increase the ablation efficiency during the microstructuring of a copper layer and shorten the typical processing time compared to the single pulse per spot regime. We have used a simple short-pulse ablation model to describe our single pulse ablation data and developed an upgrade to the model to describe the ablation with bursts. Bursts of pulses also contribute to a high quality definition of structure edges and sides. The increased ablation efficiency at lower pulse energies compared to the single pulse per spot regime opens a window to utilize compact fiber lasers designed to operate at lower pulse energies, reducing the overall system complexity and size.

  4. Pulsed laser micromachining of Mg-Cu-Gd bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsuan-Kai; Lee, Ching-Jen; Hu, Ting-Ting; Li, Chun-Han; Huang, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    Micromachining of Mg-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is performed using two kinds of pulsed nanosecond lasers: a 355 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser and a 1064 nm infrared (IR) laser. Precision machining on the micrometer scale and the preservation of amorphous or short-range order characteristics are important for the application of BMGs in micro-electro-mechanical systems. A higher micromachining rate is achieved using the UV laser than using the IR laser due to a better absorption rate of the former by Mg-based BMGs and a higher photon energy. The cutting depth of Mg-based BMGs ranges from 1 to 80 μm depending on the laser parameters. By appropriate adjustment of the laser power and scan speed, successful machining of the Mg-based BMG with preservation of the amorphous phase is achieved after the laser irradiation process. Short-pulse laser cutting represents a suitable alternative for machining of micro components.

  5. Tailored terahertz pulses from a laser-modulated electron beam.

    PubMed

    Byrd, J M; Hao, Z; Martin, M C; Robin, D S; Sannibale, F; Schoenlein, R W; Zholents, A A; Zolotorev, M S

    2006-04-28

    We present a new method to generate steady and tunable, coherent, broadband terahertz radiation from a relativistic electron beam modulated by a femtosecond laser. We have demonstrated this in the electron storage ring at the Advanced Light Source. Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse copropagating through a wiggler modulates the electron energies within a short slice of the electron bunch with about the same duration of the laser pulse. The bunch develops a longitudinal density perturbation due to the dispersion of electron trajectories, and the resulting hole emits short pulses of temporally and spatially coherent terahertz pulses synchronized to the laser. We present measurements of the intensity and spectra of these pulses. This technique allows tremendous flexibility in shaping the terahertz pulse by appropriate modulation of the laser pulse.

  6. Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Hao, Z.; Martin, M.C.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2006-04-28

    We present a new method to generate steady and tunable, coherent, broadband terahertz radiation from a relativistic electron beam modulated by a femtosecond laser. We have demonstrated this in the electron storage ring at the Advanced Light Source. Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse copropagating through a wiggler modulates the electron energies within a short slice of the electron bunch with about the same duration of the laser pulse. The bunch develops a longitudinal density perturbation due to the dispersion of electron trajectories, and the resulting hole emits short pulses of temporally and spatially coherent terahertz pulses synchronized to the laser. We present measurements of the intensity and spectra of these pulses. This technique allows tremendous flexibility in shaping the terahertz pulse by appropriate modulation of the laser pulse.

  7. Pulsed laser fluorometry for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, G. C.; Martin, J. C.; Jett, J. H.; Wilder, M. E.; Martinez, A.; Bentley, B. F.; Lopez, J.; Hutson, L.

    1990-01-01

    A compact pulsed laser fluorometer has been incorporated into a continuous flow system developed to detect acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors and/or primary amine compounds in air and water. A pulsed nitrogen laser pumped dye laser excites fluorescent reactants which flow continuously through a quartz flow cell. Data are collected, analyzed, and displayed using a Macintosh II personal computer. For detection of cholinesterase inhibitors the fluorogenic substrate N methylindoxyl acetate is used to monitor the activity of immobilized enzyme. Presence of inhibitors results in a decrease of steady state fluorescence. Detection of compounds containing primary amines is based on their reaction with fluorescamine to rapidly produce intensely fluorescent products. Compounds of interest to our research were amino acids, peptides, and proteins. An increase in steady state fluorescence could be cause to evaluate the reasons for the change. The detection limit of the protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) in water is 10 ppT. Nebulized BSA concentrated by the LANL air sampler can be detected at sub ppT original air concentration. 16 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Landau damping of a driven plasma wave from laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bu Zhigang; Ji Peiyong

    2012-01-15

    The interaction between a laser pulse and a driven plasma wave with a phase velocity approaching the speed of light is studied, and our investigation is focused on the Gaussian laser pulse. It is demonstrated that when the resonance condition between the plasma wave and the laser pulse is satisfied, the Landau damping phenomenon of the plasma wave originated from the laser pulse will emerge. The dispersion relations for the plasma waves in resonance and non-resonance regions are obtained. It is proved that the Landau damping rate for a driven plasma wave is {gamma}>0 in the resonance region, so the laser pulse can produce an inverse damping effect, namely Landau growth effect, which leads an instability for the plasma wave. The Landau growth means that the energy is transmitted from the laser pulse to the plasma wave, which could be an effective process for enhancing the plasma wave.

  9. Pulsed Tm:YAG laser ablation of knee joint tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Qiang; Vari, Sandor G.; Duffy, J. T.; Miller, J. M.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effect of a free-running 2.01 micron pulsed Tm:YAG laser on bovine knee joint tissues. Ablation rates of fresh fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone were measured in saline as a function of laser fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and fiber core size (400 and 600 microns). All tissues could be effectively ablated and the ablation rate increased linearly with the increasing fluence. Use of fibers of different core sizes, while maintaining constant energy fluence, did not result in significant difference in ablation rate. Histology analyses of the ablated tissue samples reveal average Tm:YAG radiation induced thermal damage (denatunalization) zones ranging between 130 and 540 microns, depending on the laser parameters and the tissue type.

  10. Femtosecond laser pulse induced desorption: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lončarić, Ivor; Alducin, Maite; Saalfrank, Peter; Juaristi, J. Iñaki

    2016-09-01

    In recent simulations of femtosecond laser induced desorption of molecular oxygen from the Ag(110) surface, it has been shown that depending on the properties (depth and electronic environment) of the well in which O2 is adsorbed, the desorption can be either induced dominantly by hot electrons or via excitations of phonons. In this work we explore whether the ratios between the desorption yields from different adsorption wells can be tuned by changing initial surface temperature and laser pulse properties. We show that the initial surface temperature is an important parameter, and that by using low initial surface temperatures the electronically mediated process can be favored. In contrast, laser properties seem to have only a modest influence on the results.

  11. Nanosecond double-pulse fiber laser with arbitrary sub-pulse combined based on a spectral beam combining system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Man; Zheng, Ye; Yang, Yifeng; Chen, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Wang, Jianhua; Qi, Yunfeng; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun

    2017-05-01

    In order to improve the processing efficiency and quality of nanosecond pulse laser drilling, a new double-pulse technique is put forward. Two single pulse lasers with different pulse duration or different repetition rate are spectrally combined by a home-made polarization-independent multilayer dielectric reflective diffraction grating. The pulse energy of single lasers and the inter-pulse separation can both be set at one's option. Then, double-pulse lasers represent two closely conjoint pulses with tunable pulse duration and tunable repetition rate and tunable pulse energy and tunable inter-pulse separation are obtained.

  12. Transportation of megawatt millijoule laser pulses via optical fibers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauer, Johannes; Kofler, Heinrich; Schwarz, Elisabeth; Wintner, Ernst

    2010-04-01

    Laser ignition is considered to be one of the most promising future concepts for internal combustion engines. It combines the legally required reduction of pollutant emissions and higher engine efficiencies. The igniting plasma is generated by a focused pulsed laser beam. Having pulse durations of a few nanoseconds, the pulse energy E p for reliable ignition amounts to the order of 10 mJ. Different methods of laser ignition with an emphasis on fiber-based systems will be discussed and evaluated.

  13. Pulsed holmium laser ablation of cardiac valves

    SciTech Connect

    Lilge, L.; Radtke, W.; Nishioka, N.S. )

    1989-01-01

    Ablation efficiency and residual thermal damage produced by pulsed holmium laser radiation were investigated in vitro for bovine mitral valves and human calcified and noncalcified cardiac valves. Low-OH quartz fibers (200 and 600 microns core diameter) were used in direct contact perpendicular to the specimen under saline or blood. Etch rate was measured with a linear motion transducer. Radiant exposure was varied from 0 to 3 kJ/cm{sup 2}. For 200-microns fibers, the energy of ablation was approximately 5 kJ/cm{sup 3} in noncalcified and 15 kJ/cm{sup 3} in calcified valves. Etch rates were dependent on mechanical tissue properties. Maximum etch rate at 1,000 J/cm{sup 2} was 1-2 mm/pulse at 3 Hz repetition rate. Microscopic examination revealed a zone of thermal damage extending 300 microns lateral into adjacent tissue. Thermal damage was independent of radiant exposure beyond twice threshold.

  14. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular, we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond(s) pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of- cavity pulse-stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two- photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two-photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond lasers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  15. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy with a pulsed quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manne, Jagadeeshwari; Lim, Alan; Jäger, Wolfgang; Tulip, John

    2010-12-01

    A pulsed distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating near 957 cm-1 was employed in wavelength modulation mode for spectroscopic trace gas sensing applications. The laser was excited with short current pulses (5-10 ns) with < 2% duty cycle. The pulse amplitude was modulated with a linear sub-threshold current ramp at 20 Hz resulting in a ~ 2.5 cm-1 frequency scan, which is typically wider than what has been reported for these lasers, and would allow one to detect molecular absorption features with line widths up to 1 cm-1. A demodulation approach followed by numerical filtering was utilized to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We then superimposed a sine wave current modulation at 10 kHz onto the 20 Hz current ramp. The resulting high frequency temperature modulation of the distributed feedback (DFB) structure results in wavelength modulation (WM). The set-up was tested by recording relatively weak absorption lines of carbon dioxide. We demonstrated a minimum detectable absorbance of 10-5 for this spectrometer. Basic instrument performance and optimization of the experimental parameters for sensitivity improvement are discussed.

  16. Investigation of a Pulsed 1550 nm Fiber Laser System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-15

    14. ABSTRACT There is a strong need for a pulsed laser system at eye safe wavelengths for illuminator applications . High power pulsed 1550 nm fiber...system at eye safe wavelengths for illuminator applications . High power pulsed 1550 nm fiber lasers systems are able to generate, shaped, pulses at...for illuminator applications . Considerations which impact the wavelength to be used are the transmissivity of the atmosphere and the responsivity of

  17. Standardization of Rocket Engine Pulse Time Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larin, Max E.; Lumpkin, Forrest E.; Rauer, Scott J.

    2001-01-01

    Plumes of bipropellant thrusters are a source of contamination. Small bipropellant thrusters are often used for spacecraft attitude control and orbit correction. Such thrusters typically operate in a pulse mode, at various pulse lengths. Quantifying their contamination effects onto spacecraft external surfaces is especially important for long-term complex-geometry vehicles, e.g. International Space Station. Plume contamination tests indicated the presence of liquid phase contaminant in the form of droplets. Their origin is attributed to incomplete combustion. Most of liquid-phase contaminant is generated during the startup and shutdown (unsteady) periods of thruster pulse. These periods are relatively short (typically 10-50 ms), and the amount of contaminant is determined by the thruster design (propellant valve response, combustion chamber size, thruster mass flow rate, film cooling percentage, dribble volume, etc.) and combustion process organization. Steady-state period of pulse is characterized by much lower contamination rates, but may be lengthy enough to significantly conh'ibute to the overall contamination effect. Because there was no standard methodology for thruster pulse time division, plume contamination tests were conducted at various pulse durations, and their results do not allow quantifying contaminant amounts from each portion of the pulse. At present, the ISS plume contamination model uses an assumption that all thrusters operate in a pulse mode with the pulse length being 100 ms. This assumption may lead to a large difference between the actual amounts of contaminant produced by the thruster and the model predictions. This paper suggests a way to standardize thruster startup and shutdown period definitions, and shows the usefulness of this approach to better quantify thruster plume contamination. Use of the suggested thruster pulse time-division technique will ensure methodological consistency of future thruster plume contamination test programs

  18. Use of a long-pulse alexandrite laser in the treatment of superficial pigmented lesions.

    PubMed

    Trafeli, John Paul; Kwan, Julia M; Meehan, Kenneth J; Domankevitz, Yacov; Gilbert, Sandra; Malomo, Kenneth; Ross, Edward Victor

    2007-12-01

    Although the alexandrite 755-nm-wavelength laser is effective in the treatment of unwanted hair, there are no published studies gauging the efficacy of the variable long-pulse alexandrite laser in the treatment of superficial pigmented lesions. Eighteen patients underwent a single treatment session using a variable pulse-width alexandrite laser. Test sites were performed using a 10-mm spot size and up to four pulse widths (3, 20, 40, 60 ms) with and without epidermal cooling. Full treatments were performed 3 weeks later using optimum test parameters. The patients were evaluated at 3 and 6 weeks. Patients with darker lentigines had greater lesion clearance than those patients with lighter colored lentigines. Shorter pulse widths and treatment without cryogen cooling both, independently, lowered the fluence threshold for lentigo clearance. A long-pulse alexandrite laser is effective in clearing solar lentigines in a single pass with minimal adverse effects.

  19. Large-scale structures produced on metal surfaces by multiple laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kirichenko, N A

    2009-05-31

    A mathematical model is constructed to describe the formation of inhomogeneous surface structures 10-50 {mu}m in height on metal surfaces exposed to repetitive laser pulses with the following parameters: pulse duration of {approx}20 ns, pulse repetition rate of {approx}10 kHz, pulse intensity in the range 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} W cm{sup -2} and beam diameter from 50 to 100 {mu}m. The model takes into account melting of the metal and melt flow over a distorted surface. The surface profile amplitude evaluated in the model agrees with experimental data. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  20. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Essien, Marcelino; Keicher, David M.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Jellison, James L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  1. Pulsed laser deposition—invention or discovery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of pulsed laser deposition had been an exciting process of invention and discovery, with the development of high Tc superconducting films as the main driver. It has become the method of choice in research and development for rapid prototyping of multicomponent inorganic materials for preparing a variety of thin films, heterostructures and atomically sharp interfaces, and has become an indispensable tool for advancing oxide electronics. In this paper I will give a personal account of the invention and development of this process at Bellcore/Rutgers, the opportunity, challenges and mostly the extraordinary excitement that was generated, typical of any disruptive technology.

  2. Metallic Clusters in Strong Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suraud, Eric; Reinhard, P.-G.; Ullrich, Carsten A.

    1998-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electron response of a Na_9^+ cluster excited by strong femtosecond laser pulses.(C. A. Ullrich, P.-G. Reinhard, and E. Suraud, J. Phys. B 30), 5043 (1997) Our approach is based on time-dependent density functional theory within the adiabatic local density approximation, including a recently developed self-interaction correction scheme. We investigate numerically the full electronic dipolar response and multiphoton ionization of the cluster and discuss the ionization mechanism. A strong correlation between induced electronic dipole oscillations and electron emission is observed, leading to a pronounced resonant enhancement of ionization at the frequency of the Mie plasmon.

  3. Generating Submillimeter-Wave Frequencies From Laser Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael G.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    Semiconductor photoconductive switches generate electrical pulses containing submillimeter-wavelength carrier signals (frequency between 300 and 3,000 GHz) and harmonics thereof when illuminated with short-rise-time pulses from lasers. Device of this type used as local oscilator in heterodyne submillimeter-wave receiver. Electrical output of device coupled via transmission line, waveguide, or antenna to mixer circuitry of receiver. Phase delays between optically activated semiconductor switches determine output carrier frequencies. N electrical pulses generated by each laser pulse. Thus, fundamental output frequency is N times laser-pulse-repetition rate.

  4. Improved pulse laser ranging algorithm based on high speed sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuan-yi; Qian, Rui-hai; Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; He, Shi-jie; Guo, Xiao-kang

    2016-10-01

    Narrow pulse laser ranging achieves long-range target detection using laser pulse with low divergent beams. Pulse laser ranging is widely used in military, industrial, civil, engineering and transportation field. In this paper, an improved narrow pulse laser ranging algorithm is studied based on the high speed sampling. Firstly, theoretical simulation models have been built and analyzed including the laser emission and pulse laser ranging algorithm. An improved pulse ranging algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines the matched filter algorithm and the constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. After the algorithm simulation, a laser ranging hardware system is set up to implement the improved algorithm. The laser ranging hardware system includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. Subsequently, using Verilog HDL language, the improved algorithm is implemented in the FPGA chip based on fusion of the matched filter algorithm and the CFD algorithm. Finally, the laser ranging experiment is carried out to test the improved algorithm ranging performance comparing to the matched filter algorithm and the CFD algorithm using the laser ranging hardware system. The test analysis result demonstrates that the laser ranging hardware system realized the high speed processing and high speed sampling data transmission. The algorithm analysis result presents that the improved algorithm achieves 0.3m distance ranging precision. The improved algorithm analysis result meets the expected effect, which is consistent with the theoretical simulation.

  5. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  6. Experimental Study on Micro Hole Drilling Using Ultrashort Pulse Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Andreas; Schille, Joerg; Loeschner, Udo

    This paper discusses latest results obtained in micro hole percussion drilling in stainless steel. In the investigations a femtosecond laser source was used emitting 220 fs pulses at 1.03μm wavelength, whereas the spot size amounted to 31μm. Thereby, important process parameters like pulse energy, pulse repetition frequency, and pulse number were varied over a wide range in order to evaluate their influence both on the micro hole geometry like hole diameter, roundness, taper angle, and on the drilling quality such as thermal modification and melting residues. First, the required number of pulses for through hole drilling was estimated for material thicknesses ranging between 25μm and 1mm. It was found, that the polarization state of the laser beam has a considerable impact on micro hole formation. Therefore, linear and circular polarized laser radiation was applied. Finally, optimum parameters for highest available drilling quality and speed were identified.

  7. On the design of pulsed dye laser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Hnilo, A.A.; Martinez, O.E.

    1987-05-01

    The authors apply a formula for the small signal gain of a dye laser amplifier (obtained and verified in a previous work) to the case of a transverse pumped R6G amplifier. They trace a set of curves as a function of dimensionless parameters which give the gain for any combination of the parameters characterizing the amplifier (dye concentration, active length, etc.) The curves can be applied to design dye laser amplifiers for ultrashort pulses, both with saturated or unsaturated gain. They give numerical examples of the use of those curves that suggest that the new designs would require much lower pumping energies than the previous ones. Similar sets of curves can be easily obtained for other dyes or pumping configurations.

  8. Long pulse chemical laser. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardon, R.L.; Breidenthal, R.E.; Buonadonna, V.R.

    1989-02-01

    This report covers the technical effort through February, 1989. This effort was directed towards the technology associated with the development of a large scale, long pulse DF-CO{sub 2} chemical laser. Optics damage studies performed under Task 1 assessed damage thresholds for diamond-turned salt windows. Task 2 is a multi-faceted task involving the use of PHOCL-50 for laser gain measurements, LTI experiments, and detector testing by LANL personnel. To support these latter tests, PHOCL-50 was upgraded with Boeing funding to incorporate a full aperture outcoupler that increased its energy output by over a factor of 3, to a full kilojoule. The PHOCL-50 carbon block calorimeter was also recalibrated and compared with the LANL Scientech meter. Cloud clearing studies under Task 3 initially concentrated on delivering a Boeing built Cloud Simulation Facility to LANL, and currently involves design of a Cold Cloud Simulation Facility. A Boeing IRAD funded theoretical study on cold cloud clearing revealed that ice clouds may be easier to clear then warm clouds. Task 4 involves the theoretical and experimental study of flow system design as related to laser beam quality. Present efforts on this task are concentrating on temperature gradients induced by the gas filling process. General support for the LPCL field effort is listed under Task 5, with heavy emphasis on assuring reliable operation of the Boeing built Large Slide Valve and other device related tests. The modification of the PHOCL-50 system for testing long pulse DF (4{mu}m only) chemical laser operation is being done under Task 6.

  9. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  10. Laser-Based Pulsed Photoacoustic Ammonia Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallespi, Arturo; Slezak, Verónica; Peuriot, Alejandro; Santiago, Guillermo

    2013-09-01

    Detecting ammonia traces is relevant in health, manufacturing, and security areas, among others. As ammonia presents a strong absorption band (the mode) around 10 m, some of the physical properties which may influence its detection by means of pulsed photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy with a TEA laser have been studied. The characteristics of the ammonia molecule and the laser intensity may result in a nonlinear dependence of the PA signal amplitude on the laser fluence. Ammonia absorption can be described as a simple two-level system with power broadening. As is a polar molecule, it strongly undergoes adsorption phenomena in contact with different surfaces. Therefore, physical adsorption-desorption at the cell’s wall is studied. A theoretical model, based on Langmuir’s assumptions, fits well to the experimental results with stainless steel. Related to these studies, measurements led to the conclusion that, at the used fluenced values, dissociation by multiphotonic absorption at the 10P(32) laser line may be discarded. A calibration of the system was performed, and a detection limit around 190 ppb (at 224 ) was achieved.

  11. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of-cavity pulse- stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two-photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two- photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond layers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  12. Stimulated Raman scattering of light absorbing media excited by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchevskiy, F. N.; Strizhevskiy, V. L.; Feshchenko, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theory of spontaneous and stimulated vibration Raman scattering is worked out taking into account the dissipation losses at frequencies of laser pump and scattering radiation. General expressions are found, which describe the absolute intensities and shape, energy and duration of scattered pulses in terms of the parameters of the medium and the the input laser pulses. The general regularities are analyzed in detail. Conditions are found for the realization of spontaneous or stimulated Raman scattering and its dependence on absorption, pulse duration and other parameters of the problem.

  13. An ultra short pulse reconstruction software applied to the GEMINI high power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, Mario; Galimberti, Marco; Hooker, Chris; Chekhlov, Oleg; Tang, Yunxin; Bisesto, Fabrizio Giuseppe; Curcio, Alessandro; Anania, Maria Pia; Giulietti, Danilo

    2016-09-01

    The GRENOUILLE traces of Gemini pulses (15 J, 30 fs, PW, shot per 20 s) were acquired in the Gemini Target Area PetaWatt at the Central Laser Facility (CLF), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). A comparison between the characterizations of the laser pulse parameters made using two different types of algorithms: Video Frog and GRenouille/FrOG (GROG), was made. The temporal and spectral parameters came out to be in great agreement for the two kinds of algorithms. In this experimental campaign it has been showed how GROG, the developed algorithm, works as well as VideoFrog algorithm with the PetaWatt pulse class.

  14. Self-mode locking of pulsed solid-state lasers due to self-focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnikov, V.L.; Kalosha, V.P.; Mikhailov, V.P.

    1995-02-01

    The possibility of effective self-mode locking of a pulsed solid-state laser due to self-focusing in an active element is studied on the basis of the eigenmode analysis of a four-mirror cavity and of the simulations of lasing dynamics. The optimal parameters of a laser system were found allowing one to generate ultrashort pulses (USP), the duration being determined by the transmittance bandwidth of intracavity frequency-selective elements. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Steady-state 2. pi. pulses under conditions of passive locking of laser modes

    SciTech Connect

    Komarov, K.P.; Ugozhaev, V.D.

    1984-06-01

    A theoretical study is made of laser mode locking in the regime of self-induced transparency of a passive filter. It is shown that there is a solution in the form of ultrashort steady-state 2..pi.. pulses. The range of stability of this regime and its characteristics are determined. By way of example, estimates are obtained of parameters of a steady-state pulse emitted by an alexandrite laser with a potassium absorption cell.

  16. PHASE NOISE COMPARISON OF SHORT PULSE LASER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang; Stephen Benson; John Hansknecht; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    This paper describes phase noise measurements of several different laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on state-of-the-art short pulse lasers, especially drive lasers for photocathode injectors. Phase noise comparison of the FEL drive laser, electron beam and FEL laser output also will be presented.

  17. PALS — The optimal laser for determining optimal ablative laser propulsion parameters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boody, Frederick P.

    2005-04-01

    Ablative laser propulsion (ALP) could revolutionize space travel by reducing the 30:1 propellant/payload ratio needed for near-earth orbit 50-fold. To date, experiments have demonstrated the necessary efficiency, coupling coefficient, and specific impulse for application, but were performed at pulse energies and spot sizes much smaller than required and at wavelengths not usable in the atmosphere. Also, most experiments have not simultaneously measured the properties of the ions produced or of the ablated surface, properties that would allow full understanding of the propulsion properties in terms of ion characteristics. Realistic measurement of laser propulsion parameters is proposed using PALS (Prague Asterix Laser System), whose parameters, except for pulse rate and wavelength — pulse energy (˜1kJ), pulse length (400ps), beam diameter (˜29cm), and flat beam profile — equal those required for application. PALS wavelength is a little short (1.3μm vs. >1.5μm) but is closer than any other laser available and, due to PALS 2ω / 3ω capability, wavelength dependence can be studied and results extrapolated to application values. PALS' proven infrastructure for measuring laser-driven ion properties means that only an instrument for measuring momentum transfer, such as a ballistic pendulum, will have to be added.

  18. Intrusive effects of repetitive laser pulsing in high-speed tracer-LIF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorge, M.; Sutton, J. A.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of repetitive laser pulsing on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals from three popular organic flow tracers, acetone, 3-pentanone, and biacetyl are examined experimentally in the context of high-speed PLIF imaging. The effects of varying the incident laser fluence, laser repetition rates, tracer mole fractions, and carrier gas (air or N2) are investigated. Repetitive laser pulsing leads to changes in the measured LIF signal as a function of laser pulse number for all three tracers. For biacetyl/air mixtures, the LIF signal increases as a function of pulse number and the LIF signal increase per pulse is observed to be a function of the incident laser fluence. For biacetyl/air mixtures at room temperature, the increase in LIF signal during repetitive laser pulsing is attributed solely to absorptive heating of the probe volume, which is confirmed by Rayleigh scattering thermometry measurements. For acetone and 3-pentanone mixtures in the air, the LIF signal decreases with increasing pulse number and the LIF signal depletion per pulse is a linear function of incident laser fluence. This allows the signal depletion per pulse from acetone and 3-pentanone to be normalized by laser fluence and generalized to a single parameter of 0.002%/pulse/(mJ/cm2). There is no discernable effect of varying the tracer mole fraction or the laser repetition rate over the range of values investigated. The substitution of N2 for the air as a carrier gas leads to a significant decrease in the signal depletion per pulse. The potential mechanisms for the enhanced signal depletion in the presence of oxygen are discussed. A likely source is "photo-oxidation", where the products of laser photolysis react with the surrounding O2 to form the highly reactive hydroxyl (OH) radical, which then oxidizes the tracer. Overall, the current results indicate that under repetitive laser pulsing conditions (i.e., high-speed imaging), the tracer-LIF measurement techniques can be considered

  19. Modification of semiconductor materials with the use of plasma produced by low intensity repetitive laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolowski, J.; Rosiński, M.; Badziak, J.; Czarnecka, A.; Parys, P.; Turan, R.; Yerci, S.

    2008-03-01

    This work reports experiments concerning specific application of laser-produced plasma at IPPLM in Warsaw. A repetitive pulse laser system of parameters: energy up to 0.8 J in a 3.5 ns-pulse, wavelength of 1.06 μm, repetition rate of up to 10 Hz, has been employed in these investigations. The characterisation of laser-produced plasma was performed with the use of "time-of-flight" ion diagnostics simultaneously with other diagnostic methods. The results of laser-matter interaction were obtained in dependence on laser pulse parameters, illumination geometry and target material. The modified SiO2 layers and sample surface properties were characterised with the use of different methods at the Middle-East Technological University in Ankara and at the Warsaw University of technology. The production of the Ge nanocrystallites has been demonstrated for annealed samples prepared in different experimental conditions.

  20. Computational design of short pulse laser driven iron opacity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. E.; London, R. A.; Goluoglu, S.; Whitley, H. D.

    2017-02-01

    The resolution of current disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations would benefit from the experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Iron's complex ionic structure and large contribution to the opacity in the radiative zone of the sun make iron a good candidate for validation. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat buried layer targets to plasma conditions comparable to the radiative zone of the sun, and the frequency dependent opacity can be inferred from the target's measured x-ray emission. Target and laser parameters must be optimized to reach specific plasma conditions and meet x-ray emission requirements. The HYDRA radiation hydrodynamics code is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance and target dimensions on the plasma conditions, x-ray emission, and inferred opacity of iron and iron-magnesium buried layer targets. It was determined that plasma conditions are dominantly controlled by the laser energy and the tamper thickness. The accuracy of the inferred opacity is sensitive to tamper emission and optical depth effects. Experiments at conditions relevant to the radiative zone of the sun would investigate the validity of opacity theories important to resolving disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations.

  1. Computational design of short pulse laser driven iron opacity experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, M. E.; London, R. A.; Goluoglu, S.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Here, the resolution of current disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations would benefit from the experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Iron's complex ionic structure and large contribution to the opacity in the radiative zone of the sun make iron a good candidate for validation. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat buried layer targets to plasma conditions comparable to the radiative zone of the sun, and the frequency dependent opacity can be inferred from the target's measured x-ray emission. Target and laser parameters must be optimized to reach specific plasma conditions and meet x-ray emissionmore » requirements. The HYDRA radiation hydrodynamics code is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance and target dimensions on the plasma conditions, x-ray emission, and inferred opacity of iron and iron-magnesium buried layer targets. It was determined that plasma conditions are dominantly controlled by the laser energy and the tamper thickness. The accuracy of the inferred opacity is sensitive to tamper emission and optical depth effects. Experiments at conditions relevant to the radiative zone of the sun would investigate the validity of opacity theories important to resolving disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations.« less

  2. Metal oxide hollow nanoparticles formation by a single nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Zhen; Hwang, David J.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the trend of metal oxide hollow nanoparticles formation is experimentally inspected by a single nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a bulk metal material in water and/or ethanol. Analysis results by transmission electron microscope indicate that the hollow formation can be completed or initiated by a single nanosecond laser pulse, dictated by the diffusive thermo-chemical and/or bubble-assisted assembly mechanisms, depending on the surrounding liquid medium and laser parameters. The results not only provide experimental clues to unveiling complex mechanisms involved with the hollow formation by the multiple laser shots but also will contribute to improving the hollow particle production efficiency.

  3. Reshaping of intense laser pulse with a capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Lihua; Yu Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Wang Xin; Gu Yuqiu; He, X. T.

    2009-09-15

    The reshaping of intense laser pulse by vacuum capillary is studied by particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that as an intense laser pulse propagates from free space into a capillary, its profile is reshaped due to laser-plasma interaction near the entrance of capillary. As a result, the free-space mode is self-consistently converted into a capillary mode. Only the relatively low-intensity periphery of the reshaped pulse interacts with the capillary-wall plasma, so that the high-intensity center of the pulse can propagate in the narrow vacuum channel over a distance much larger than the Rayleigh length. The mechanism is then applied to reshape a radially imperfect laser pulse having two wings around the center spot. Most of the output light energy is concentrated in the center spot, and the wings are almost completely removed. That is, the quality of the laser pulse can be greatly improved by a capillary.

  4. Stabilization of CO2 laser short-pulse oscillation by tickle pulse for dot processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Daisaku; Sakurada, Noriyo; Ishii, Yoshio; Kubota, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2005-03-01

    Image drawing using a laser system has been attempted by Segmented Pixel Drawing (SPD) method and Laser Plastic Coloring (LPC) method in our laboratory. Laser dot processing by a short pulse oscillation of a CO2 laser is used for these laser methods. Stable short pulse oscillation is required for an accurate image drawing. That oscillation has a tendency to be unstable because of its long oscillation interval. A tickle pulse is known as one of a technique which is conventionally used for a continuous pulse oscillation of a CO2 laser in order to make rising rate of laser oscillation quick. In this study, this tickle pulse has been improved and applied to the short pulse oscillation in order to stable short pulse oscillation and high accurate laser dot processing. In the result, processed dots are appeared bigger with less variation in their sizes with the improved tickle pulse case compared with the conventional case. Short pulse oscillation is stabilized by these improved tickle pulse. Reproducibility and accuracy ofthe SPD method and LPC method might be realized by this stabilized dot processing.

  5. Production of Picosecond, Kilojoule, and Petawatt Laser Pulses via Raman Amplification of Nanosecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Trines, R. M. G. M.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P. A.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2011-09-02

    Raman amplification in plasma has been promoted as a means of compressing picosecond optical laser pulses to femtosecond duration to explore the intensity frontier. Here we show for the first time that it can be used, with equal success, to compress laser pulses from nanosecond to picosecond duration. Simulations show up to 60% energy transfer from pump pulse to probe pulse, implying that multikilojoule ultraviolet petawatt laser pulses can be produced using this scheme. This has important consequences for the demonstration of fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion.

  6. Temperature studies of optical parameters of (Ag3AsS3)0.6(As2S3)0.4 thin films prepared by rapid thermal evaporation and pulse laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenyak, I. P.; Kutsyk, M. M.; Buchuk, M. Yu.; Rati, Y. Y.; Neimet, Yu. Yu.; Izai, V. Yu.; Kökényesi, S.; Nemec, P.

    2016-02-01

    (Ag3AsS3)0.6(As2S3)0.4 thin films were deposited using rapid thermal evaporation (RTE) and pulse laser deposition (PLD) techniques. Ag-enriched micrometre-sized cones (RTE) and bubbles (PLD) were observed on the thin film surface. Optical transmission spectra of the thin films were studied in the temperature range 77-300 K. The Urbach behaviour of the optical absorption edge in the thin films due to strong electron-phonon interaction was observed, the main parameters of the Urbach absorption edge were determined. Temperature dependences of the energy position of the exponential absorption edge and the Urbach energy are well described in the Einstein model. Dispersion and temperature dependences of refractive indices were analysed; a non-linear increase of the refractive indices with temperature was revealed. Disordering processes in the thin films were studied and compared with bulk composites, the differences between the thin films prepared by RTE and PLD were analysed.

  7. Pulsed laser deposition of pepsin thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecskeméti, G.; Kresz, N.; Smausz, T.; Hopp, B.; Nógrádi, A.

    2005-07-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of organic and biological thin films has been extensively studied due to its importance in medical applications among others. Our investigations and results on PLD of a digestion catalyzing enzyme, pepsin, are presented. Targets pressed from pepsin powder were ablated with pulses of an ArF excimer laser ( λ = 193 nm, FWHM = 30 ns), the applied fluence was varied between 0.24 and 5.1 J/cm 2. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 2.7 × 10 -3 Pa. The thin layers were deposited onto glass and KBr substrates. Our IR spectroscopic measurements proved that the chemical composition of deposited thin films is similar to that of the target material deposited at 0.5 and 1.3 J/cm 2. The protein digesting capacity of the transferred pepsin was tested by adapting a modified "protein cube" method. Dissolution of the ovalbumin sections proved that the deposited layers consisted of catalytically active pepsin.

  8. Processing parameter optimization for the laser dressing of bronze-bonded diamond wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H.; Chen, G. Y.; Zhou, C.; Li, S. C.; Zhang, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a pulsed fiber-laser dressing method for bronze-bonded diamond wheels was studied systematically and comprehensively. The mechanisms for the laser dressing of bronze-bonded diamond wheels were theoretically analyzed, and the key processing parameters that determine the results of laser dressing, including the laser power density, pulse overlap ratio, ablation track line overlap ratio, and number of scanning cycles, were proposed for the first time. Further, the effects of these four key parameters on the oxidation-damaged layer of the material surface, the material removal efficiency, the material surface roughness, and the average protrusion height of the diamond grains were explored and summarized through pulsed laser ablation experiments. Under the current experimental conditions, the ideal values of the laser power density, pulse overlap ratio, ablation track line overlap ratio, and number of scanning cycles were determined to be 4.2 × 107 W/cm2, 30%, 30%, and 16, respectively. Pulsed laser dressing experiments were conducted on bronze-bonded diamond wheels using the optimized processing parameters; next, both the normal and tangential grinding forces produced by the dressed grinding wheel were measured while grinding alumina ceramic materials. The results revealed that the normal and tangential grinding forces produced by the laser-dressed grinding wheel during grinding were smaller than those of grinding wheels dressed using the conventional mechanical method, indicating that the pulsed laser dressing technology provides irreplaceable advantages relative to the conventional mechanical dressing method.

  9. Relation Between Discharge Length and Laser Pulse Characteristics in Longitudinally Excited CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Dobashi, Kazuma; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2013-04-01

    A longitudinally excited CO2 laser pumped by a fast discharge emits a short laser pulse, similarly to TEA and Q-switched CO2 lasers. We investigated the relation between the discharge length and the laser pulse characteristics to develop a longitudinally excited CO2 laser producing a high spike laser pulse. We examined discharge lengths of 30, 45, and 60 cm, using the same mirrors and the same excitation circuit with the same input energy. A longer discharge length increased the discharge volume and improved the laser output energy. However, the longer discharge length caused a long discharge formation time (a slow fall time of the discharge voltage) due to the higher discharge impedance, which resulted in a long laser pulse tail. Therefore, the longitudinally excited CO2 laser had optimum conditions for obtaining a high spike laser pulse effectively.

  10. Controlling light-matter interactions and spatio-temporal properties of ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan, Matthew A.

    The SPECIFIC method a fast and accurate method for generating shaped femtosecond laser pulses. The femtosecond pulses are user specified from pulse parameters in the temporal domain. The measured spectral and recovered temporal phase and amplitudes from SEA TADPOLE are compared with the theoretical pulse profile from the user specified input. The SPECIFIC method has been shown to be a technique that can generate a diverse array of spectral/temporal phase and amplitude as well as polarization pulse shapes for numerous scientific applications. The spatio-temporal-spectral properties of focusing femtosecond laser pulses are studied for several pulse shapes that are important for non-linear spectroscopic studies. We have shown with scanning SEA TADPOLE that the spatio-spectral phase of focusing double pulse profile changes across the laterally across the beam profile. The spectral features of the sinusoidal spectral phase shaped pulse has been shown to tilt at with a changing angle away from the focus of the lens. Using spatio-spectral coupling, we have shown that multiple spatio-temporal foci can be generated along and perpendicular to the focusing direction of a femtosecond laser pulse. The spatial position of the spatio-temporal foci is controlled optically. Using sinusoidal spectral phase modulated pulse trains fragment ion production from Benzonitrile parent molecule can be controlled. A spectral transmission window perturbed the temporal pulse amplitudes resulting in fragment ion production dependant on spectral window position. The spectral window ion production was shown to also be dependant on temporal phase sequence.

  11. Stimulated brillouin backscatter of a short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D.E.; Williams, E.A.; Berger, R.L.

    1994-11-03

    Stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) from a short-pulse laser, where the pulse length is short compared to the plasma length, is found to be qualitatively different than in the long pulse regime, where the pulse length is long compared to the plasma length. We find that after an initial transient of order the laser pulse length transit time, the instability reaches a steady state in the variables x{prime} = x {minus} V{sub g}t, t{prime} = t, where V{sub g} is the pulse group velocity. In contrast, SBBS in a long pulse can be absolutely unstable and grows indefinitely, or until nonlinearities intervene. We find that the motion of the laser pulse induces Doppler related effects that substantially modify the backscattered spectrum at higher intensities, where the instability is strongly coupled (i.e. , has a growth rate large compared to the ion acoustic frequency).

  12. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: Scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.; Jansen, M.; Fuente, G. F. de la

    2012-04-15

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 deg. C.

  13. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C.

  14. Ultlra-intense laser-matter interactions at extreme parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hegellich, Bjorn M

    2010-11-24

    The field of shortpulse lasers has seen rapid growth in the recent years with the three major boundaries of energy, pulse duration and repetition rate being pushed in ever extremer regions. At peak powers, already exceeding 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, in virtually every experiment in relativistic laser physics, the laser pulse interacts with a more or less extended and heated plasma, due to prepulses and ASE-like pedestals on ps - ns time scales. By developing a new technique for ultrahigh contrast, we were able to initiate the next paradigm shift in relativistic laser-matter interactions, allowing us to interact ultrarelativistic pulses volumetrically with overdense targets. This becomes possible by using target and laser parameters that will turn the target relativistically transparent during the few 10s-100s femtoseconds fo the interaction. Specifically, we interact an ultraintese, ultrahigh contrast pulse with solid density, free standing, nanometer diamond target. This paradigm change towards a volumetric overdense interaction in turn enables new particle acceleration mechanisms for both electrons and ions, as well as forward directed relativistic surface harmonics. We report here on first experiments done on those topics at the 200 TW Trident laser at Los Alamos as well as at the Ti:Sapphire system at MBI. We will compare the experimental data to massive large scale 3D simulations done on the prototype of LANL's new Petafiop supercomputer Roadrunner, which is leading the current top 500 list. Specifically, we developed a shortpulse OPA based pulse cleaning technique. Fielding it at the Trident 200 TW laser at Los Alamos, we were able to improve the pulse contrast by 6 orders of magnitude to better than 2 x 10{sup -12} at less than a ps. This enabled for the first time the interaction of a 100J, 200TW laser pulse with a truly solid target with virtually no expansion before the main pulse - target interaction, making possible the use of very thin targets, The

  15. Novel oral applications of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieger, V.; Wernisch, J.; Wintner, E.

    2007-02-01

    In the past decades, many efforts have been made to replace mechanical tools in oral applications by various laser systems. The reasons therefore are manifold: i) Friction causes high temperatures damaging adjacent tissue. ii) Smear layers and rough surfaces are produced. iii) Size and shape of traditional tools are often unsuitable for geometrically complicated incisions and for minimum invasive treatment. iv) Mechanical damage of the remaining tissue occurs. v) Online diagnosis for feedback is not available. Different laser systems in the µs and sub-&mrgs-pulse regime, among them Erbium lasers, have been tested in the hope to overcome the mentioned drawbacks and, to some extent, they represent the current state of the art with respect to commercial and hence practical application. In the present work the applicability of scanned ultrashort pulse lasers (USPLs) for biological hard tissue as well as dental restoration material removal was tested. It is shown that cavities with features superior to mechanically treated or Erbium laser ablated cavities can be generated if appropriate scan algorithms and optimum laser parameters are matched. Smooth cavity rims, no microcracks, melting or carbonisation and precise geometry are the advantages of scanned USLP ablation. For bone treatment better healing conditions are expected as the natural structure remains unaffected by the preparation procedure. The novelty of this work is represented by a comprehensive compilation of various experimental results intended to assess the performance of USPLs. In this context, various pulse durations in the picosecond and femtosecond regime were applied to dental and bone tissue as well as dental restoration materials which is considered to be indispensable for a complete assessment. Parameters like ablation rates describing the efficiency of the ablation process, and ablation thresholds were determined - some of them for the first time - and compared to the corresponding Erbium

  16. New methods of generation of ultrashort laser pulses for ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Hamal, Karel; Kubecek, V.; Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    To reach the millimeter satellite laser ranging accuracy, the goal for nineties, new laser ranging techniques have to be applied. To increase the laser ranging precision, the application of the ultrashort laser pulses in connection with the new signal detection and processing techniques, is inevitable. The two wavelength laser ranging is one of the ways to measure the atmospheric dispersion to improve the existing atmospheric correction models and hence, to increase the overall system ranging accuracy to the desired value. We are presenting a review of several nonstandard techniques of ultrashort laser pulses generation, which may be utilized for laser ranging: compression of the nanosecond pulses using stimulated Brillouin and Raman backscattering; compression of the mode-locked pulses using Raman backscattering; passive mode-locking technique with nonlinear mirror; and passive mode-locking technique with the negative feedback.

  17. Analysis on the characteristics of pulsed laser proximity fuze's echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Chen, Huimin

    2011-06-01

    With the rapid development of semiconductor technology and laser technology, a kind of proximity fuze named pulsed laser proximity fuze has been applied. Compared with other fuzes, pulsed laser proximity fuze has high ranging precision and strong resistance to artificial active interference. It is an important development tendency of proximity fuze. The paper analyze the characteristic of target echo of laser signal, and then make theoretical analysis and calculation on the laser signal transmission in the smog. Firstly, use the pulse width of 10ns semiconductor laser fuze to do typical targets experiment, to get the echo information of target distance is 5m; then to do smog interference experiment, by comparing the pulse width amplitude and backscattering signal amplitude of laser fuze in simulation and experiment, analyzing the effect of anti-clutter, providing the evidence for the subsequent of circuit of signal amplification and processing.

  18. Generation of ultrashort electron bunches by colliding laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C B; Lee, P B; Wurtele, J S; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    1999-05-01

    A proposed laser-plasma-based relativistic electron source [E. Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997)] using laser-triggered injection of electrons is investigated. The source generates ultrashort electron bunches by dephasing and trapping background plasma electrons undergoing fluid oscillations in an excited plasma wake. The plasma electrons are dephased by colliding two counterpropagating laser pulses which generate a slow phase velocity beat wave. Laser pulse intensity thresholds for trapping and the optimal wake phase for injection are calculated. Numerical simulations of test particles, with prescribed plasma and laser fields, are used to verify analytic predictions and to study the longitudinal and transverse dynamics of the trapped plasma electrons. Simulations indicate that the colliding laser pulse injection scheme has the capability to produce relativistic femtosecond electron bunches with fractional energy spread of order a few percent and normalized transverse emittance less than 1 mm mrad using 1 TW injection laser pulses.

  19. Formation and annihilation of laser light pulse quanta in a thermodynamic-like pathway.

    PubMed

    Vodonos, Boris; Weill, Rafi; Gordon, Ariel; Bekker, Alexander; Smulakovsky, Vladimir; Gat, Omri; Fischer, Baruch

    2004-10-08

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of multiple pulse formation in passively mode-locked lasers. Following a statistical-mechanics approach, the study yields a thermodynamic-like "phase diagram" with boundaries representing cascaded first order phase transitions. They correspond to abrupt creation or annihilation of pulses and a quantized rf power behavior, as system parameters (noise and/or pumping levels) are varied, in excellent accordance with the experiments. Remarkably, individual pulses carry an almost constant quantum of energy.

  20. Group velocity dispersion and relativistic effects on the wakefield induced by chirped laser pulse in parabolic plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Sohbatzadeh, F.; Akou, H.

    2013-04-15

    The excitation of wake field plasma waves by a short laser pulse propagating through a parabolic plasma channel is studied. The laser pulse is assumed to be initially chirped. In this regard, the effects of initial and induced chirp on the plasma wake field as well as the laser pulse parameters are investigated. The group velocity dispersion and nonlinear relativistic effects were taken into account to evaluate the excited wake field in two dimension using source dependent expansion method. Positive, negative, and un-chirped laser pulses were employed in numerical code to evaluate the effectiveness of the initial chirp on 2-D wake field excitation. Numerical results showed that for laser irradiances exceeding 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}, an intense laser pulse with initial positive chirp generates larger wake field compared to negatively and un-chirped pulses.

  1. Glass drilling by longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2015-03-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse and a pulse tail. The energy of the pulse tail was controlled by adjusting medium gas. Using three types of CO2 laser pulse with the same spike-pulse energy and the different pulse-tail energy, the characteristics of the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass was investigated. Higher pulse-tail energy gave deeper ablation depth. In the short laser pulse with the spike-pulse energy of 1.2 mJ, the spike pulse width of 162 ns, the pulse-tail energy of 24.6 mJ, and the pulse-tail length of 29.6 μs, 1000 shots irradiation produced the ablation depth of 988 μm. In the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass by the CO2 laser, a crack-free process was realized.

  2. System for rapidly tuning a low pressure pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.A.; Ahl, J.L.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes a system for rapidly tuning a low pressure pulsed laser over multiple wavelengths. The system comprising: a low pressure one electrode pair discharge region in a laser cavity having a laser trigger means connected to the electrode pair for initiating low pressure discharge within the discharge region; a quarterwave plate and a Q-switch in optical alignment with the one electrode pair discharge region along the laser optical axis; a fixed laser output coupler at the discharge region end of the laser cavity; and a rotatable grating means for wavelength switching the at least two high gain Q-switched pulses.

  3. Generating few-cycle pulses for nanoscale photoemission easily with an erbium-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sebastian; Holzwarth, Ronald; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2012-06-18

    We demonstrate a simple setup capable of generating four-cycle pulses at a center wavelength of 1700 nm for nanoscale photoemission. Pulses from an amplified erbium-doped fiber laser are spectrally broadened by propagation through a highly non-linear fiber. Subsequently, we exploit dispersion in two different types of glass to compress the pulses. The pulse length is estimated by measuring an interferometric autocorrelation trace and comparing it to a numerical simulation. We demonstrate highly non-linear photoemission of electrons from a nanometric tungsten tip in a hitherto unexplored pulse parameter range.

  4. Pulse front adaptive optics: a new method for control of ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bangshan; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J

    2015-07-27

    Ultrafast lasers enable a wide range of physics research and the manipulation of short pulses is a critical part of the ultrafast tool kit. Current methods of laser pulse shaping are usually considered separately in either the spatial or the temporal domain, but laser pulses are complex entities existing in four dimensions, so full freedom of manipulation requires advanced forms of spatiotemporal control. We demonstrate through a combination of adaptable diffractive and reflective optical elements - a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) and a deformable mirror (DM) - decoupled spatial control over the pulse front (temporal group delay) and phase front of an ultra-short pulse was enabled. Pulse front modulation was confirmed through autocorrelation measurements. This new adaptive optics technique, for the first time enabling in principle arbitrary shaping of the pulse front, promises to offer a further level of control for ultrafast lasers.

  5. Optical gene transfer by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Tirlapur, Uday K.

    2003-07-01

    Targeted transfection of cells is an important technique for gene therapy and related biomedical applications. We delineate how high-intensity (1012 W/cm2) near-infrared (NIR) 80 MHz nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses can create highly localised membrane perforations within a minute focal volume, enabling non-invasive direct transfection of mammalian cells with DNA. We suspended Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO), rat kangaroo kidney epithelial (PtK2) and rat fibroblast cells in 0.5 ml culture medium in a sterile miniaturized cell chamber (JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany) containing 0.2 μg plasmid DNA vector pEGFP-N1 (4.7 kb), which codes for green fluorescent protein (GFP). The NIR laser beam was introduced into a femtosecond laser scanning microscope (JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany; focussed on the edge of the cell membrane of a target cell for 16 ms. The integration and expression efficiency of EGFP were assessed in situ by two-photon fluorescence-lifetime imaging using time-correlated single photon counting. The unique capability to transfer foreign DNA safely and efficiently into specific cell types (including stem cells), circumventing mechanical, electrical or chemical means, will have many applications, such as targeted gene therapy and DNA vaccination.

  6. Vital parameters related low level laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Capone, Stefania

    2011-08-01

    The first work hypotesis is that biosensors on the patient detecting heart, breath rate and skin parameters, modulate laser radiation to enhance the therapeutic outcome; in the second work hypotesis: biofeedback could be effective, when integrated in the low level laser energy release.

  7. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  8. Pulse synchronisation in passively Q-switched lasers emitting at 1.053 and 1.064 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdasarov, V Kh; Denisov, N N; Malyutin, A A; Chigaev, I A

    2009-10-31

    Pulse synchronisation with an accuracy of no worse than {+-}5 ns is demonstrated in passively Q-switched neodymium phosphate glass and Nd:YAG lasers. Two operating regimes are realised: the 'sub-threshold' regime (when the slave Nd:YAG laser does not generate a giant pulse if its passive Q switch is not irradiated by the master Nd:glass laser) and the 'above-threshold' regime (when the pulse irradiating the passive Q switch of the slave laser advances its generation). (control of laser radiation parameters)

  9. Pulse-shaping of gain-switched pulse from multimode laser diode using fiber Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kenji; Takamatsu, Shuji; Watanebe, Hideyuki; Matsuyama, Tetsuya; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2008-11-24

    We propose a pulse-tail elimination and pulse shortening method using an optical interferometer, which is effective for picosecond chirped pulses from gain-switched multimode laser diodes. In a numerical simulation, when the delay distance between a chirped pulse and its replica in an optical interferometer matches two times the round-trip optical length of the laser cavity, the pulse-front and -rear tail parts are effectively eliminated from the input chirped pulse after passing through the optical interferometer. Using this method with a fiber Sagnac interferometer, a 33 ps pulse with a long-tail emitted from a gain-switched 1540 nm multimode laser diode was linearly transformed into a 20 ps pulse with a substantially reduced tail.

  10. Atomistic investigation of ablation of amorphous polystyrene under femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, YanHua; Song, ChengWei; Zhang, JunJie; Sun, Tao

    2015-03-01

    In the present work we elucidate the thermodynamic mechanisms of femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of amorphous polystyrene by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of extrinsic parameter of laser pulse intensity and intrinsic parameter of molecular architecture on the laser ablation are further studied. Simulation results show that the laser ablation-induced polymeric material removal is achieved by evaporation from the surface and expansion within the bulk. Furthermore, inter-chain sliding and intra-chain change also play important roles in the microscopic deformation of the material. It is found that both the laser pulse intensity and the arrangement of phenyl groups have significant influence on the fs laser ablation of polystyrene.

  11. Clutter discrimination algorithm simulation in pulse laser radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Su, Xuan; Zhu, Fule

    2015-10-01

    Pulse laser radar imaging performance is greatly influenced by different kinds of clutter. Various algorithms are developed to mitigate clutter. However, estimating performance of a new algorithm is difficult. Here, a simulation model for estimating clutter discrimination algorithms is presented. This model consists of laser pulse emission, clutter jamming, laser pulse reception and target image producing. Additionally, a hardware platform is set up gathering clutter data reflected by ground and trees. The data logging is as clutter jamming input in the simulation model. The hardware platform includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The laser diode transmits short laser pulses (40ns FWHM) at 12.5 kilohertz pulse rate and at 905nm wavelength. An analog-to-digital converter chip integrated in the sample circuit works at 250 mega samples per second. The simulation model and the hardware platform contribute to a clutter discrimination algorithm simulation system. Using this system, after analyzing clutter data logging, a new compound pulse detection algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines matched filter algorithm and constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. Firstly, laser echo pulse signal is processed by matched filter algorithm. After the first step, CFD algorithm comes next. Finally, clutter jamming from ground and trees is discriminated and target image is produced. Laser radar images are simulated using CFD algorithm, matched filter algorithm and the new algorithm respectively. Simulation result demonstrates that the new algorithm achieves the best target imaging effect of mitigating clutter reflected by ground and trees.

  12. Nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction of femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Vyunishev, A M; Slabko, V V; Baturin, I S; Akhmatkhanov, A R; Shur, V Ya

    2014-07-15

    We study the nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction (NRND) of femtosecond laser pulses in a 1D periodic nonlinear photonic structure. The calculated second-harmonic spectra represent frequency combs for different orders of transverse phase matching. These frequency combs are in close analogy with the well-known spectral Maker fringes observed in single crystals. The spectral intensity of the second harmonic experiences a redshift with a propagation angle, which is opposite the case of Čerenkov nonlinear diffraction. We analyze how NRND is affected by the group-velocity mismatch between fundamental and second-harmonic pulses and by the parameters of the structure. Our experimental results prove the theoretical predictions.

  13. Spectral compression of single-photon-level laser pulse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanhua; Xiang, Tong; Nie, Yiyou; Sang, Minghuang; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the bandwidth of single photons laser pulse is compressed by a factor of 58 in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide chip. A positively chirped single photons laser pulse and a negatively chirped classical laser pulse are employed to produce a narrowband single photon pulse with new frequency through sum-frequency generation. In our experiment, the frequency and bandwidth of single photons at 1550 nm are simultaneously converted. Our results mark a critical step towards the realization of coherent photonic interface between quantum communication at 1550 nm and quantum memory in the near-visible window. PMID:28240245

  14. Spectral compression of single-photon-level laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanhua; Xiang, Tong; Nie, Yiyou; Sang, Minghuang; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the bandwidth of single photons laser pulse is compressed by a factor of 58 in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide chip. A positively chirped single photons laser pulse and a negatively chirped classical laser pulse are employed to produce a narrowband single photon pulse with new frequency through sum-frequency generation. In our experiment, the frequency and bandwidth of single photons at 1550 nm are simultaneously converted. Our results mark a critical step towards the realization of coherent photonic interface between quantum communication at 1550 nm and quantum memory in the near-visible window.

  15. Tailored terahertz pulses from a laser-modulated electronbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Hao, Z.; Martin, M.C.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2006-03-06

    We present a new method to generate steady and tunable,coherent, broadband terahertz radiation from a relativistic electron beammodulated by a femtosecond laser. We have demonstrated this in theelectron storage ring at the Advanced Light Source. Interaction of anelectron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse copropagating through awiggler modulates the electron energies within a short slice of theelectron bunch with about the same duration of the laser pulse. The bunchdevelops a longitudinal density perturbation due to the dispersion ofelectron trajectories, and the resulting hole emits short pulses oftemporally and spatially coherent terahertz pulses synchronized to thelaser. We present measurements of the intensity and spectra of thesepulses. This technique allows tremendous flexibility in shaping theterahertz pulse by appropriate modulation of the laser pulse.

  16. Laser Pulse-Stretching Using Multiple Optical Ring-Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Lee, Chi-Ming (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a simple and passive nanosecond-long (ns-long) laser 'pulse-stretcher' using multiple optical ring-cavities. We present a model of the pulse-stretching process for an arbitrary number of optical ring-cavities. Using the model, we optimize the design of a pulse-stretcher for use in a spontaneous Raman scattering excitation system that avoids laser-induced plasma spark problems. From the optimized design, we then experimentally demonstrate and verify the model with a 3-cavity pulse-stretcher system that converts a 1000 mJ, 8.4 ns-long input laser pulse into an approximately 75 ns-long (FWHM) output laser pulse with a peak power reduction of 0.10X, and an 83% efficiency.

  17. Mid-ultraviolet pulsed laser micromachining of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Litao; Li, Mingxing; Lin, Haipeng; Hu, Jinping; Tang, Qingju; Liu, Chunsheng

    2014-11-01

    This paper provides an investigation of the ablation behavior of single crystal 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC wafer to improve the manufacturability and high-temperature performance of SiC using laser applications. 266nm pulsed laser micromachining of SiC was investigated. The purpose is to establish suitable laser parametric regime for the fabrication of high accuracy, high spatial resolution and thin diaphragms for high-temperature MEMS pressure sensor applications. Etch rate, ablation threshold and quality of micromachined features were evaluated. The governing ablation mechanisms, such as thermal vaporization, phase explosion, and photomechanical fragmentation, were correlated with the effects of pulse energy. The ablation threshold is obtained with ultraviolet pulsed laser ablation. The results suggested ultraviolet pulsed laser's potential for rapid manufacturing. Excellent quality of machined features with little collateral thermal damage was obtained in the lower pulse energy range. The leading material removal mechanisms under these conditions were discussed.

  18. Wavelength Effects In Femtosecond Pulsed Laser Ablation And Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Castillejo, Marta; Nalda, Rebeca de; Oujja, Mohamed; Sanz, Mikel

    2010-10-08

    Ultrafast pulsed laser irradiation of solid materials is highly attractive for the micro-and nanostructuring of substrates and for the fabrication of nanostructured deposits. Femtosecond laser pulses promote efficient material removal with reduced heat transfer and high deposition rates of nanometer scale particles free of microscopic particulates. Most of the studies to date have been performed with light pulses centered around the peak wavelength of the Titanium:Sapphire laser, around 800 nm. Analysis of the process over a broader range of wavelengths can provide important information about the processes involved and serve as experimental tests for advanced theoretical models. We report on our current investigations on the effect that laser wavelength of femtosecond pulses has on the superficial nanostructuring induced on biopolymer substrates, and on the characteristics of nanostructured deposits grown by pulsed laser deposition from semiconductor targets.

  19. Single-grating laser pulse stretcher and compressor.

    PubMed

    Lai, M; Lai, S T; Swinger, C

    1994-10-20

    Stretching and compressing of laser pulses is demonstrated with a single-grating apparatus. A laser pulse of 110 fs is stretched to 250 ps and then recompressed to 115 fs. The apparatus exploits a two-level structure: one level for stretching and the other for compressing. This single-grating configuration shows significant simplification in structure and alignment over existing multiple-grating systems. Such a stretcher-compressor is particularly suitable for use with chirped-pulse amplification in which laser wavelength tuning is desirable. Only one rotational adjustment is rquired to restore the alignment of the entire stretcher and compressor when the laser wavelength is changed.

  20. Dark pulse generation in fiber lasers incorporating carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Chow, K K

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the generation of dark pulses from carbon nanotube (CNT) incorporated erbium-doped fiber ring lasers with net anomalous dispersion. A side-polished fiber coated with CNT layer by optically-driven deposition method is embedded into the laser in order to enhance the birefringence and nonlinearity of the laser cavity. The dual-wavelength domain-wall dark pulses are obtained from the developed CNT-incorporated fiber laser at a relatively low pump threshold of 50.6 mW. Dark pulses repeated at the fifth-order harmonic of the fundamental cavity frequency are observed by adjusting the intra-cavity polarization state.

  1. Method and circuit for shaping laser output pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is a method and circuit for shaping laser pulses 17' in which a laser medium 12' in a laser resonator 10' that includes a Q-switch 14' and polarizer 13' which act in combination to control the loss of the resonator 10' and provide the laser output 17' representative of such loss. An optical diode 22' senses the level of the output pulse 17' and provides an output signal 23' that when amplified is used with a control voltage from a supply 29' provide a control signal 19' which is applied to Q-switch 14' to control the shape of the output pulse 17' by adjusting its length.

  2. A modulated pulse laser for underwater detection, ranging, imaging, and communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochenour, Brandon; Mullen, Linda; Muth, John

    2012-06-01

    A new, modulated-pulse, technique is currently being investigated for underwater laser detection, ranging, imag- ing, and communications. This technique represents a unique marriage of pulsed and intensity modulated sources. For detection, ranging, and imaging, the source can be congured to transmit a variety of intensity modulated waveforms, from single-tone to pseudorandom code. The utility of such waveforms in turbid underwater envi- ronments in the presence of backscatter is investigated in this work. The modulated pulse laser may also nd utility in underwater laser communication links. In addition to exibility in modulation format additional variable parameters, such as macro-pulse width and macro-pulse repetition rate, provide a link designer with additional methods of optimizing links based on the bandwidth, power, range, etc. needed for the application. Initial laboratory experiments in simulated ocean waters are presented.

  3. Ti : sapphire laser synchronised with femtosecond Yb pump laser via nonlinear pulse coupling in Ti : sapphire active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, N. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Konyashchenko, D. A.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Kuritsyn, I. I.; Lutsenko, A. P.; Mavritskiy, A. O.

    2017-02-01

    A laser system utilising the method of synchronous pumping of a Ti : sapphire laser by a high-power femtosecond Yb3+-doped laser is described. The pulse repetition rate of the Ti : sapphire laser is successfully locked to the repetition rate of the Yb laser for more than 6 hours without the use of any additional electronics. The measured timing jitter is shown to be less than 1 fs. A simple qualitative model addressing the synchronisation mechanism utilising the cross-phase modulation of oscillation and pump pulses within a Ti : sapphire active medium is proposed. Output parameters of the Ti : sapphire laser as functions of its cavity length are discussed in terms of this model.

  4. Laser Pulse Width Dependence and Ionization Mechanism of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sheng-Ping; Lu, I.-Chung; Tsai, Shang-Ting; Chen, Jien-Lian; Lee, Yuan Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2017-10-01

    Ultraviolet laser pulses at 355 nm with variable pulse widths in the region from 170 ps to 1.5 ns were used to investigate the ionization mechanism of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), and sinapinic acid (SA). The mass spectra of desorbed ions and the intensity and velocity distribution of desorbed neutrals were measured simultaneously for each laser shot. These quantities were found to be independent of the laser pulse width. A comparison of the experimental measurements and numerical simulations according to the multiphoton ionization, coupled photophysical and chemical dynamics (CPCD), and thermally induced proton transfer models showed that the predictions of thermally induced proton transfer model were in agreement with the experimental data, but those of the multiphoton ionization model were not. Moreover, the predictions of the CPCD model based on singlet-singlet energy pooling were inconsistent with the experimental data of CHCA and SA, but were consistent with the experimental data of DHB only when some parameters used in the model were adjusted to extreme values. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Laser Pulse Width Dependence and Ionization Mechanism of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sheng-Ping; Lu, I.-Chung; Tsai, Shang-Ting; Chen, Jien-Lian; Lee, Yuan Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2017-07-01

    Ultraviolet laser pulses at 355 nm with variable pulse widths in the region from 170 ps to 1.5 ns were used to investigate the ionization mechanism of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), and sinapinic acid (SA). The mass spectra of desorbed ions and the intensity and velocity distribution of desorbed neutrals were measured simultaneously for each laser shot. These quantities were found to be independent of the laser pulse width. A comparison of the experimental measurements and numerical simulations according to the multiphoton ionization, coupled photophysical and chemical dynamics (CPCD), and thermally induced proton transfer models showed that the predictions of thermally induced proton transfer model were in agreement with the experimental data, but those of the multiphoton ionization model were not. Moreover, the predictions of the CPCD model based on singlet-singlet energy pooling were inconsistent with the experimental data of CHCA and SA, but were consistent with the experimental data of DHB only when some parameters used in the model were adjusted to extreme values.

  6. Pulsed laser versus electrical energy for peripheral nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter; Kao, Chris; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Transient optical neural stimulation has previously been shown to elicit highly controlled, artifact-free potentials within the nervous system in a non-contact fashion without resulting in damage to tissue. This paper presents the physiologic validity of elicited nerve and muscle potentials from pulsed laser induced stimulation of the peripheral nerve in a comparative study with the standard method of electrically evoked potentials. Herein, the fundamental physical properties underlying the two techniques are contrasted. Key laser parameters for efficient optical stimulation of the peripheral nerve are detailed. Strength response curves are shown to be linear for each stimulation modality, although fewer axons can be recruited with optically evoked potentials. Results compare the relative transient energy requirements for stimulation using each technique and demonstrate that optical methods can selectively excite functional nerve stimulation. Adjacent stimulation and recording of compound nerve potentials in their entirety from optical and electrical stimulation are presented, with optical responses shown to be free of any stimulation artifact. Thus, use of a pulsed laser exhibits some advantages when compared to standard electrical means for excitation of muscle potentials in the peripheral nerve in the research domain and possibly for clinical diagnostics in the future. PMID:17537515

  7. High energy protons generation by two sequential laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin

    2015-04-15

    The sequential proton acceleration by two laser pulses of relativistic intensity is proposed to produce high energy protons. In the scheme, a relativistic super-Gaussian (SG) laser pulse followed by a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) pulse irradiates dense plasma attached by underdense plasma. A proton beam is produced from the target and accelerated in the radiation pressure regime by the short SG pulse and then trapped and re-accelerated in a special bubble driven by the LG pulse in the underdense plasma. The advantages of radiation pressure acceleration and LG transverse structure are combined to achieve the effective trapping and acceleration of protons. In a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, protons of 6.7 GeV are obtained from a 2 × 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} SG laser pulse and a LG pulse at a lower peak intensity.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition vs. matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation for growth of biodegradable polymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, A. L.; Allmond, C. E.; Hoekstra, J. G.; Fitz-Gerald, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    Thin films of poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), a biodegradable polymer, were deposited on Si wafers by both conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) using chloroform (CHCl3) as a matrix solvent. This research represents an initial study to investigate the deposition characteristics of each technique at comparable conditions to gain insight into the transport and degradation mechanisms of each approach. The deposited materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) with refractive index (RI) detection. While FTIR and NMR results do not show a measurable departure from the native, in sharp contrast GPC results show a significant change (up to 95%) in molecular weight for both deposition methods. This result makes it clear that it is possible to overlook substantial degradation when incomplete chemical analysis is conducted.

  9. Studies of Photosynthesis Using a Pulsed Laser

    PubMed Central

    De Vault, Don; Chance, Britton

    1966-01-01

    The rate of oxidation of cytochrome following absorption of a short pulse of light from a ruby laser in the photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium has been measured spectrophotometrically. The half-time is about 2 μsec at room temperature increasing to 2.3 msec at about 100°K and constant at the latter value to 35°K or below. The temperature dependence above 120°K corresponds to an activation energy of 3.3 kcal/mole; that below 100°K to less than 80 cal/mol: essentially a temperature-independent electron transport reaction. Since the slowness below 100°K indicates the presence of a barrier, the lack of activation energy is taken to mean penetration by quantum-mechanical “tunneling.” PMID:5972381

  10. Computer Modeling of Pulsed Chemical Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-31

    laser pulse was by photolysis of molecular fluorine using flashlamps. The initiation reaction pro- ceeded as: F2 + hvP = 2F (1.4) with Vp being an... MEN a~ji -U-O--- C C, ca. 04 ( i’ c4 CL viM m0 LA 04 016 166 Elm1 E FI ozF LA- 10 --- - -6’~ 167 =VE 0.ik 0ww 1 68 -wl MAIN t...# r Al w YVfaia we. a...0m NoJ IS-90I IRA -. OEM 179 180 MIN im, IUAINNE Ililm MINE 17i mmm mums NOW1911mmoImm, man .AKE-# 0 ON1 INA 0 Suffillan Ellmmm MEN IFIRM 0 W-mv- um I

  11. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Large-scale structures produced on metal surfaces by multiple laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichenko, N. A.

    2009-05-01

    A mathematical model is constructed to describe the formation of inhomogeneous surface structures 10-50 μm in height on metal surfaces exposed to repetitive laser pulses with the following parameters: pulse duration of ~20 ns, pulse repetition rate of ~10 kHz, pulse intensity in the range 107—108 W cm-2 and beam diameter from 50 to 100 μm. The model takes into account melting of the metal and melt flow over a distorted surface. The surface profile amplitude evaluated in the model agrees with experimental data.

  12. Variable pulse repetition frequency output from an optically injected solid state laser.

    PubMed

    Kane, D M; Toomey, J P

    2011-02-28

    An optically injected solid state laser (OISSL) system is known to generate complex nonlinear dynamics within the parameter space of varying the injection strength of the master laser and the frequency detuning between the master and slave lasers. Here we show that within these complex nonlinear dynamics, a system which can be operated as a source of laser pulses with a pulse repetition frequency (prf) that can be continuously varied by a single control, is embedded. Generation of pulse repetition frequencies ranging from 200 kHz up to 4 MHz is shown to be achievable for an optically injected Nd:YVO4 solid state laser system from analysis of prior experimental and simulation results. Generalizing this to other optically injected solid state laser systems, the upper bound on the repetition frequency is of order the relaxation oscillation frequency for the lasers. The system is discussed in the context of prf versatile laser systems more generally. Proposals are made for the next generation of OISSLs that will increase understanding of the variable pulse repetition frequency operation, and determine its practical limitations. Such variable prf laser systems; both low powered, and, higher powered systems achieved using one or more optical power amplifier stages; have many potential applications from interrogating resonance behaviors in microscale structures, through sensing and diagnostics, to laser processing.

  13. Moving perforation of rocks using long pulse Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfan, M. R.; Shahriar, K.; Sharifzadeh, M.; Ahmadi, M.; Torkamany, M. J.

    2017-07-01

    Laser perforating is a new method in oil and gas wells where researchers look for an alternative to explosive methods. One of the important problems with this method is the generation of uniform and cylindrical holes at a selected pitch for enhancing the permeability of rocks. In non-moving laser perforation, the nozzle of the laser and the rock do not approach each other and due to laser convergence in a point, uniform and cylindrical holes are not created. For this reason, moving laser perforation is suggested in this research. One of the important parameters in moving laser perforation is the power of the laser that can be perforated at a specific rate. In this article we predicted the laser power for a definite rate of perforation (ROP) and then the accuracy of this prediction was evaluated to support the experiments. A pulsed Nd: YAG laser, with a pulse energy around 5.5 J, pulse repetition rate of 30 Hz and pulse duration of 2 ms were used for rock perforation in this study. The results shows that the presented relation for perforation could reliably be used in practice. Furthermore, by knowing the rate of perforation, the required laser power for consistent drilling could be calculated.

  14. Effect of the chemical composition of a hydrogen-containing RH component of the working medium and the initiation method on the parameters of a pulsed chemical SF6 RH laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal', A. V.; Dodonov, A. A.; Rusanov, V. D.; Shiriaevskii, V. L.; Sholin, G. V.

    1992-02-01

    The effect of working-medium composition on the oscillation characteristics and energy-deposition efficiency for fluorohydrogen pulsed chemical SF6-H2 and SF6-HI lasers under electron beam and electric discharge initiation was investigated. It is shown that the best energy characteristics of the emission are achieved for a working medium of SF6-HI under electron-beam initiation and for SF6-H2 when the pump reaction is initiated by a bulk self-sustained discharge.

  15. Approaches to solar cell design for pulsed laser power receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a laser to beam power from Earth to a photovoltaic receiver in space could be a technology with applications to many space missions. Extremely high average-power lasers would be required in a wavelength range of 700-1000 nm. However, high-power lasers inherently operate in a pulsed format. Existing solar cells are not well designed to respond to pulsed incident power. To better understand cell response to pulsed illumination at high intensity, the PC-1D finite-element computer model was used to analyze the response of solar cells to continuous and pulsed laser illumination. Over 50 percent efficiency was calculated for both InP and GaAs cells under steady-state illumination near the optimum wavelength. The time-dependent response of a high-efficiency GaAs concentrator cell to a laser pulse was modeled, and the effect of laser intensity, wavelength, and bias point was studied. Three main effects decrease the efficiency of a solar cell under pulsed laser illumination: series resistance, L-C 'ringing' with the output circuit, and current limiting due to the output inductance. The problems can be solved either by changing the pulse shape or designing a solar cell to accept the pulsed input. Cell design possibilities discussed are a high-efficiency, light-trapping silicon cell, and a monolithic, low-inductance GaAs cell.

  16. Laser nanoablation of diamond surface at high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Pashinin, V. P.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The chemical etching of the surface of a natural diamond single crystal irradiated by subpicosecond laser pulses with a high repetition rate (f ≤slant 500 {\\text{kHz}}) in air is experimentally investigated. The irradiation has been performed by the second-harmonic (515 {\\text{nm}}) radiation of a disk Yb : YAG laser. Dependences of the diamond surface etch rate on the laser energy density and pulse repetition rate are obtained.

  17. Electron beam-switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, L.D.; Murray, J.R.; Goldhar, J.; Bradley, L.P.

    1979-12-11

    A method and apparatus are designed for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  18. Sheet metal welding using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser-robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qi; Kullberg, Gunnar; Skoog, Hans

    This paper presents a pulsed Nd: YAG laser-robot system for spot and seam welding of mild steel sheets. The study evaluates the laser beams behaviour for welding, and then investigates pulsed Nd: YAG laser spot and seam welding processes. High pulse power intensity is needed to initiate the key-hole welding process and a threshold pulse energy to reach full penetration. In seam welding, a weld consists of successive overlapping spots. Both high pulse energy and high average power are needed to keep the key-hole welding going. A 70% overlap is used to define overlapping spot welding as seam welding and to optimize process parameters because a high tensile strength joint compatible with the strength of the base material can be obtained when the overlap is ≥ 70%; at the same time a smooth seam with full penetration is obtained. In these cases, the joints in pulsed Nd: YAG laser welding are comparable in strength to those obtained with CO 2 laser welding. Robot positioning and motion accuracies can meet the demands of Nd: YAG laser sheet metal welding, but its cornering accuracy affects the welding processes. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the YAG laser-robot system for production in the automotive industry.

  19. Microstructuring of fused silica using femtosecond laser pulses of various wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Manuel; Engel, Andy; Reisse, Guenter; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results on ablation and microstructuring of fused silica (Corning 7980 HPFS Standard Grade) using femtosecond laser pulses will be presented. In particular, the ablation behavior of the material at the laser wavelengths of 775, 387 and 258 nm was investigated. The qualities of selected microstructures produced at the different wavelengths are compared with respect to roughness, crack formation and exactness. The investigations were carried out using an automated microstructuring system equipped with a femtosecond laser Clark-MXR CPA 2010 (1 mJ maximum pulse energy, 1 kHz repetition rate and 150 fs pulse duration). Layer-by-layer ablation is realized for producing 3D microstructures, where the layer thickness depends on the ablated depth per laser pulse. Those ablation depths depend on the material and the laser parameters and were determined for the three wavelengths in preparatory investigations. Therefore, the laser fluence and the pulse-to-pulse distance were varied independently. We will present the results of our fundamental studies on fs-laser ablation at the three wavelengths and show several structures, such as pyramids, half spheres and cones. Best results were obtained at 258 nm wavelength. There, the exactness was highest and the roughness of the surfaces of the structures was lowest. In addition, absolutely no crack formation occurred.

  20. Numerical simulation of temperature field in K9 glass irradiated by ultraviolet pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Fang, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    The optical component of photoelectric system was easy to be damaged by irradiation of high power pulse laser, so the effect of high power pulse laser irradiation on K9 glass was researched. A thermodynamic model of K9 glass irradiated by ultraviolet pulse laser was established using the finite element software ANSYS. The article analyzed some key problems in simulation process of ultraviolet pulse laser damage of K9 glass based on ANSYS from the finite element models foundation, meshing, loading of pulse laser, setting initial conditions and boundary conditions and setting the thermal physical parameters of material. The finite element method (FEM) model was established and a numerical analysis was performed to calculate temperature field in K9 glass irradiated by ultraviolet pulse laser. The simulation results showed that the temperature of irradiation area exceeded the melting point of K9 glass, while the incident laser energy was low. The thermal damage dominated in the damage mechanism of K9 glass, the melting phenomenon should be much more distinct.

  1. A XeCl laser with a controlled radiation pulse shape

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, A I

    2009-04-30

    The pump parameters of a three-contour excitation system are studied in a gas-discharge excimer XeCl laser using a Ne-Xe-HCl mixture. A computation model is developed for finding the parameters of multi-contour excitation systems. A setup incorporating a three-contour system for excitation and automatic UV preionisation is designed, which provides multipulse generation of 65-ns, 26-mJ laser pulses at the laser efficiency of 1%. It is shown that generation of short radiation pulses of duration 7 ns and relatively long pulses of duration 65 ns in the multipulse generation regime is possible in the excitation system under study in Xe:HCl = 20:1 mixtures containing neon as buffer gas. (lasers)

  2. Understanding Femtosecond-Pulse Laser Damage through Fundamental Physics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A., III

    It did not take long after the invention of the laser for the field of laser damage to appear. For several decades researchers have been studying how lasers damage materials, both for the basic scientific understanding of highly nonequilibrium processes as well as for industrial applications. Femtosecond pulse lasers create little collateral damage and a readily reproducible damage pattern. They are easily tailored to desired specifications and are particularly powerful and versatile tools, contributing even more industrial interest in the field. As with most long-standing fields of research, many theoretical tools have been developed to model the laser damage process, covering a wide range of complexities and regimes of applicability. However, most of the modeling methods developed are either too limited in spatial extent to model the full morphology of the damage crater, or incorporate only a small subset of the important physics and require numerous fitting parameters and assumptions in order to match values interpolated from experimental data. Demonstrated in this work is the first simulation method capable of fundamentally modeling the full laser damage process, from the laser interaction all the way through to the resolidification of the target, on a large enough scale that can capture the full morphology of the laser damage crater so as to be compared directly to experimental measurements instead of extrapolated values, and all without any fitting parameters. The design, implementation, and testing of this simulation technique, based on a modified version of the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, is presented. For a 60 fs, 1 mum wavelength laser pulse with fluences of 0.5 J/cm 2, 1.0 J/cm2, and 2.0 J/cm2 the resulting laser damage craters in copper are shown and, using the same technique applied to experimental crater morphologies, a laser damage fluence threshold is calculated of 0.15 J/cm2, consistent with current experiments performed under conditions similar

  3. CO{sub 2} laser pulse shortening by laser ablation of a metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, T.; Mazoyer, M.; Lynch, A.; O'Sullivan, G.; O'Reilly, F.; Dunne, P.; Cummins, T.

    2012-03-15

    A repeatable and flexible technique for pulse shortening of laser pulses has been applied to transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} laser pulses. The technique involves focusing the laser output onto a highly reflective metal target so that plasma is formed, which then operates as a shutter due to strong laser absorption and scattering. Precise control of the focused laser intensity allows for timing of the shutter so that different temporal portions of the pulse can be reflected from the target surface before plasma formation occurs. This type of shutter enables one to reduce the pulse duration down to {approx}2 ns and to remove the low power, long duration tails that are present in TEA CO{sub 2} pulses. The transmitted energy is reduced as the pulse duration is decreased but the reflected power is {approx}10 MW for all pulse durations. A simple laser heating model verifies that the pulse shortening depends directly on the plasma formation time, which in turn is dependent on the applied laser intensity. It is envisaged that this plasma shutter will be used as a tool for pulse shaping in the search for laser pulse conditions to optimize conversion efficiency from laser energy to useable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation for EUV source development.

  4. CO2 laser pulse shortening by laser ablation of a metal target.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, T; Mazoyer, M; Lynch, A; O'Sullivan, G; O'Reilly, F; Dunne, P; Cummins, T

    2012-03-01

    A repeatable and flexible technique for pulse shortening of laser pulses has been applied to transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) laser pulses. The technique involves focusing the laser output onto a highly reflective metal target so that plasma is formed, which then operates as a shutter due to strong laser absorption and scattering. Precise control of the focused laser intensity allows for timing of the shutter so that different temporal portions of the pulse can be reflected from the target surface before plasma formation occurs. This type of shutter enables one to reduce the pulse duration down to ~2 ns and to remove the low power, long duration tails that are present in TEA CO(2) pulses. The transmitted energy is reduced as the pulse duration is decreased but the reflected power is ~10 MW for all pulse durations. A simple laser heating model verifies that the pulse shortening depends directly on the plasma formation time, which in turn is dependent on the applied laser intensity. It is envisaged that this plasma shutter will be used as a tool for pulse shaping in the search for laser pulse conditions to optimize conversion efficiency from laser energy to useable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation for EUV source development.

  5. CO2 laser pulse shortening by laser ablation of a metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, T.; Mazoyer, M.; Lynch, A.; O'Sullivan, G.; O'Reilly, F.; Dunne, P.; Cummins, T.

    2012-03-01

    A repeatable and flexible technique for pulse shortening of laser pulses has been applied to transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser pulses. The technique involves focusing the laser output onto a highly reflective metal target so that plasma is formed, which then operates as a shutter due to strong laser absorption and scattering. Precise control of the focused laser intensity allows for timing of the shutter so that different temporal portions of the pulse can be reflected from the target surface before plasma formation occurs. This type of shutter enables one to reduce the pulse duration down to ˜2 ns and to remove the low power, long duration tails that are present in TEA CO2 pulses. The transmitted energy is reduced as the pulse duration is decreased but the reflected power is ˜10 MW for all pulse durations. A simple laser heating model verifies that the pulse shortening depends directly on the plasma formation time, which in turn is dependent on the applied laser intensity. It is envisaged that this plasma shutter will be used as a tool for pulse shaping in the search for laser pulse conditions to optimize conversion efficiency from laser energy to useable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation for EUV source development.

  6. Non-chain pulsed DF laser with an average power of the order of 100 W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qikun; Xie, Jijiang; Wang, Chunrui; Shao, Chunlei; Shao, Mingzhen; Chen, Fei; Guo, Jin

    2016-07-01

    The design and performance of a closed-cycle repetitively pulsed DF laser are described. The Fitch circuit and thyratron switch are introduced to realize self-sustained volume discharge in SF6-D2 mixtures. The influences of gas parameters and charging voltage on output characteristics of non-chain pulsed DF laser are experimentally investigated. In order to improve the laser power stability over a long period of working time, zeolites with different apertures are used to scrub out the de-excitation particles produced in electric discharge. An average output power of the order of 100 W was obtained at an operating repetition rate of 50 Hz, with amplitude difference in laser pulses <8 %. And under the action of micropore alkaline zeolites, the average power fell by 20 % after the laser continuing working 100 s at repetition frequency of 50 Hz.

  7. Dielectric breakdown induced by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1976-01-01

    The damage thresholds of transparent optical materials were investigated. Single picosecond pulses at 1.06 microns, 0.53 microns and 0.35 microns were obtained from a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator-amplifier-frequency multiplier system. The pulses were Gaussian in space and time and permitted the determination of breakdown thresholds with a reproducibility of 15%. It was shown that the breakdown thresholds are characteristic of the bulk material, which included nine alkali halides, five different laser host materials, KDP, quartz, sapphire and calcium fluoride. The extension of the damage data to the ultraviolet is significant, because some indication was obtained that two- and three-photon absorption processes begin to play a role in determining the threshold. Throughout the visible region of the spectrum the threshold is still an increasing function of frequency, indicating that avalanche ionization is the dominant factor in determining the breakdown threshold. This was confirmed by a detailed study of the damage morphology with a high resolution microscope just above the threshold. The influence of self focusing is discussed, and evidence for beam distortion below the power threshold for complete self focusing is presented, confirming the theory of Marburger.

  8. Performance study of a soft X-ray harmonic generation FEL seededwith an EUV laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Gullans, M.; Wurtele, J.S.; Penn, G.; Zholents, A.A.

    2007-02-01

    The performance of a free electron laser (FEL) using alow-power extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulse as an input seed isinvestigated. The parameters are appropriate for 30 nm seeds producedfrom high-power Ti:Sa pulses using high harmonic generation schemes. Itis found that, for reasonable beam parameters, robust FEL performance canbe obtained. Both time-independent and time-dependent simulations areperformed for varying system parameters using the GENESIS simulationcode. A comparison is made with a two-stage harmonic FEL that is seededby a high-power Ti:Sa pulse.

  9. Analysis of thermodynamic effect in Si irradiated by pulsed-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ming; Jin, Guangyong; Li, Mingxin; Ma, Yao; Yuan, Boshi; Yu, Huadong

    2014-12-01

    According to the heat conduction equation, thermoelastic equation and boundary conditions of finite, using the finite element method(FEM), established the three-dimensional finite element calculation model of thermal elastic ,numerical simulation the transient temperature field and stress field distribution of the single crystal silicon materials by the pulsing laser irradiation, and analytic solution the temperature distribution and stress distribution of laser irradiation on the silicon material , and analyzes the different parameters such as laser energy, pulse width, pulse number influence on temperature and stress, and the intrinsic damage mechanism of pulsed laser irradiation on silicon were studied. The results show that the silicon material is mainly in hot melt under the action of ablation damage.According to the irradiation of different energy and different pulse laser ,we can obtain the center temperature distribution, then get the law of the change of temperature with the variation of laser energy and pulse width in silicon material; according to the principal stress and shear stress distribution in 110 direction with different energy and different pulse, we can get the law of the change of stress distribution with the variation of laser energy and pulse width ;according to the principal stress distribution of single pulse and pulse train in 110 direction, we can get the law of the change of stress with pulse numbers in silicon.When power density of laser on optical material surface (or energy density) is the damage threshold, the optical material surface will form a spontaneous, periodic, and permanent surface ripple, it is called periodic surface structure laser induced (LIPSS).It is the condensed optical field of work to generate low dimensional quantum structures by laser irradiation on Si samples. The pioneering work of research and development and application of low dimensional quantum system has important academic value.The result of this paper

  10. TruMicro Series 2000 sub-400 fs class industrial fiber lasers: adjustment of laser parameters to process requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanal, Florian; Kahmann, Max; Tan, Chuong; Diekamp, Holger; Jansen, Florian; Scelle, Raphael; Budnicki, Aleksander; Sutter, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    The matchless properties of ultrashort laser pulses, such as the enabling of cold processing and non-linear absorption, pave the way to numerous novel applications. Ultrafast lasers arrived in the last decade at a level of reliability suitable for the industrial environment.1 Within the next years many industrial manufacturing processes in several markets will be replaced by laser-based processes due to their well-known benefits: These are non-contact wear-free processing, higher process accuracy or an increase of processing speed and often improved economic efficiency compared to conventional processes. Furthermore, new processes will arise with novel sources, addressing previously unsolved challenges. One technical requirement for these exciting new applications will be to optimize the large number of available parameters to the requirements of the application. In this work we present an ultrafast laser system distinguished by its capability to combine high flexibility and real time process-inherent adjustments of the parameters with industry-ready reliability. This industry-ready reliability is ensured by a long experience in designing and building ultrashort-pulse lasers in combination with rigorous optimization of the mechanical construction, optical components and the entire laser head for continuous performance. By introducing a new generation of mechanical design in the last few years, TRUMPF enabled its ultrashort-laser platforms to fulfill the very demanding requirements for passively coupling high-energy single-mode radiation into a hollow-core transport fiber. The laser architecture presented here is based on the all fiber MOPA (master oscillator power amplifier) CPA (chirped pulse amplification) technology. The pulses are generated in a high repetition rate mode-locked fiber oscillator also enabling flexible pulse bursts (groups of multiple pulses) with 20 ns intra-burst pulse separation. An external acousto-optic modulator (XAOM) enables linearization

  11. Laser pulsing in linear Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Krafft, G. A.; Johnson, E.; Deitrick, K.; ...

    2016-12-16

    Previous work on calculating energy spectra from Compton scattering events has either neglected considering the pulsed structure of the incident laser beam, or has calculated these effects in an approximate way subject to criticism. In this paper, this problem has been reconsidered within a linear plane wave model for the incident laser beam. By performing the proper Lorentz transformation of the Klein-Nishina scattering cross section, a spectrum calculation can be created which allows the electron beam energy spread and emittance effects on the spectrum to be accurately calculated, essentially by summing over the emission of each individual electron. Such anmore » approach has the obvious advantage that it is easily integrated with a particle distribution generated by particle tracking, allowing precise calculations of spectra for realistic particle distributions in collision. The method is used to predict the energy spectrum of radiation passing through an aperture for the proposed Old Dominion University inverse Compton source. In addition, as discussed in the body of the paper, many of the results allow easy scaling estimates to be made of the expected spectrum. A misconception in the literature on Compton scattering of circularly polarized beams is corrected and recorded.« less

  12. Laser pulsing in linear Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, G. A.; Johnson, E.; Deitrick, K.; Terzić, B.; Kelmar, R.; Hodges, T.; Melnitchouk, W.; Delayen, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Previous work on calculating energy spectra from Compton scattering events has either neglected considering the pulsed structure of the incident laser beam, or has calculated these effects in an approximate way subject to criticism. In this paper, this problem has been reconsidered within a linear plane wave model for the incident laser beam. By performing the proper Lorentz transformation of the Klein-Nishina scattering cross section, a spectrum calculation can be created which allows the electron beam energy spread and emittance effects on the spectrum to be accurately calculated, essentially by summing over the emission of each individual electron. Such an approach has the obvious advantage that it is easily integrated with a particle distribution generated by particle tracking, allowing precise calculations of spectra for realistic particle distributions "in collision." The method is used to predict the energy spectrum of radiation passing through an aperture for the proposed Old Dominion University inverse Compton source. Many of the results allow easy scaling estimates to be made of the expected spectrum.

  13. Hemocompatible, pulsed laser deposited coatings on polymers.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Juergen M; Waldhauser, Wolfgang; Major, Roman; Major, Boguslaw; Bruckert, Franz

    2010-02-01

    State-of-the-art non-thrombogenic blood contacting surfaces are based on heparin and struggle with the problem of bleeding. However, appropriate blood flow characteristics are essential for clinical application. Thus, there is increasing demand to develop new coating materials for improved human body acceptance. Materials deposited by vacuum coating techniques would be an excellent alternative if the coating temperatures can be kept low because of the applied substrate materials of low temperature resistance (polymers). Most of the recently used plasma-based deposition techniques cannot fulfill this demand. However, adequate film structure and high adhesion can be reached by the pulsed laser deposition at room temperature, which was developed to an industrial-scaled process at Laser Center Leoben. Here, this process is described in detail and the resulting structural film properties are shown for titanium, titanium nitride, titanium carbonitride, and diamond-like carbon on polyurethane, titanium and silicon substrates. Additionally, we present the biological response of blood cells and the kinetic mechanism of eukaryote cell attachment. In conclusion, high biological acceptance and distinct differences for the critical delamination shear stress were found for the coatings, indicating higher adhesion at higher carbon contents.

  14. Ablation of steel using picosecond laser pulses in burst mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lickschat, Peter; Demba, Alexander; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    Results obtained in picosecond laser processing of steel applying the burst mode are presented. Using the burst mode, pulse trains, i.e., bursts, consisting of a number of picosecond pulses with an inter-pulse delay of 12.5 ns and 10 ps pulse duration are applied for material processing. Small cavities with sizes in the range of the laser beam diameter made by single-burst ablation are compared to quadratic cavities of 0.5 × 0.5 mm² produced by multiburst ablation and simultaneous scanning of the laser beam across the steel sample surface. The ablated volume per pulse within the burst was calculated either from the ablated volume per burst or from the ablation depth of the quadratic cavities. With the second to fourth pulses in the bursts, a reduction of the ablated volume per pulse in comparison with the first pulse in the bursts (i.e., to the use of single pulses) was found for both single- and multiburst ablation, which is assumed to be due to plasma shielding. By contrast, the ablated volume per pulse within the bursts increases for the fifth to eighth pulses. Heat accumulation effect and the influence of the heated plasma can be assumed to be the reason for these higher ablation rates. SEM micrographs also show that there is a higher melt ejection out of the laser processed area. This is indicated by the formation of bulges about the ablated area.

  15. Application of a pulsed laser for measurements of bathymetry and algal fluorescence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, G. D.; Hogg, J. E.; Friedman, E. J.; Ghovanlou, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The technique of measuring water depths with an airborne pulsed dye laser is studied, with emphasis on the degrading effect of some environmental and operational parameters on the transmitted and reflected laser signals. Extrapolation of measurements of laser stimulated fluorescence, performed as a function of both the algal cell concentration and the distance between the algae and the laser/receiver, indicate that a laser system operating from a height of 500 m should be capable of detecting chlorophyll concentrations as low as 1.0 mg/cu m.-

  16. Application of a pulsed laser for measurements of bathymetry and algal fluorescence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, G. D.; Hogg, J. E.; Friedman, E. J.; Ghovanlou, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The technique of measuring water depths with an airborne pulsed dye laser is studied, with emphasis on the degrading effect of some environmental and operational parameters on the transmitted and reflected laser signals. Extrapolation of measurements of laser stimulated fluorescence, performed as a function of both the algal cell concentration and the distance between the algae and the laser/receiver, indicate that a laser system operating from a height of 500 m should be capable of detecting chlorophyll concentrations as low as 1.0 mg/cu m.-

  17. Effect of polarization and focusing on laser pulse driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-04-15

    The effect of laser polarization and focusing is theoretically studied on the final energy gain of a particle in the Auto-resonant acceleration scheme using a finite duration laser pulse with Gaussian shaped temporal envelope. The exact expressions for dynamical variables viz. position, momentum, and energy are obtained by analytically solving the relativistic equation of motion describing particle dynamics in the combined field of an elliptically polarized finite duration pulse and homogeneous static axial magnetic field. From the solutions, it is shown that for a given set of laser parameters viz. intensity and pulse length along with static magnetic field, the energy gain by a positively charged particle is maximum for a right circularly polarized laser pulse. Further, a new scheme is proposed for particle acceleration by subjecting it to the combined field of a focused finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field. In this scheme, the particle is initially accelerated by the focused laser field, which drives the non-resonant particle to second stage of acceleration by cyclotron Auto-resonance. The new scheme is found to be efficient over two individual schemes, i.e., auto-resonant acceleration and direct acceleration by focused laser field, as significant particle acceleration can be achieved at one order lesser values of static axial magnetic field and laser intensity.

  18. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters.

    PubMed

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.

  19. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator with Controllable Pulse Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10–310 μs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1–56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation by up to 82% and 57%, and decreases coil heating by up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3,000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications, and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency. PMID:21540487

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Murphy, David L.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.

  1. Monotonically chirped pulse evolution in an ultrashort pulse thulium-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Haxsen, Frithjof; Wandt, Dieter; Morgner, Uwe; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2012-03-15

    We report on monotonically positively chirped pulse operation of a hybridly mode-locked thulium fiber laser. Dispersion management was realized with a small-core, high-NA fiber providing normal dispersion in the 2 μm wavelength region. The laser delivered pulses with 0.7 nJ energy at the 1927 nm center wavelength and sub-500-fs pulse duration after compression.

  2. Optimizing Atom Probe Analysis with Synchronous Laser Pulsing and Voltage Pulsing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Normand, Antoine; Houard, Jonathan; Blum, Ivan; Delaroche, Fabien; Latry, Olivier; Ravelo, Blaise; Vurpillot, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Atom probe has been developed for investigating materials at the atomic scale and in three dimensions by using either high-voltage (HV) pulses or laser pulses to trigger the field evaporation of surface atoms. In this paper, we propose an atom probe setup with pulsed evaporation achieved by simultaneous application of both methods. This provides a simple way to improve mass resolution without degrading the intrinsic spatial resolution of the instrument. The basic principle of this setup is the combination of both modes, but with a precise control of the delay (at a femtosecond timescale) between voltage and laser pulses. A home-made voltage pulse generator and an air-to-vacuum transmission system are discussed. The shape of the HV pulse presented at the sample apex is experimentally measured. Optimizing the delay between the voltage and the laser pulse improves the mass spectrum quality.

  3. Multichannel optoacoustic spectroscopy of molecular gases with pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Iu. N.

    1989-05-01

    The linear and nonlinear absorption of laser radiation by H20 and CO2 is studied using dual-channel optoacoustic spectroscopy (OAS) with pulsed ruby and CO2 lasers. The possibility of VT-relaxation time determination is studied with allowance made for its dependence on laser radiation intensity. The advantages of the OAS method are outlined.

  4. Optical pulse generation using fiber lasers and integrated optics

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.B.; Browning, D.F.; Burkhart, S.C.; VanWonterghem, B.W.

    1995-03-27

    We have demonstrated an optical pulse forming system using fiber and integrated optics, and have designed a multiple-output system for a proposed fusion laser facility. Our approach is an advancement over previous designs for fusion lasers, and an unusual application of fiber lasers and integrated optics.

  5. Bismuth thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Teresa; Arronte, Miguel; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Ponce, Luis; Alonso, J. C.; Garcia, C.; Fernandez, M.; Haro, E.

    1999-07-01

    In the present work Bi thin films were obtained by Pulsed Laser Deposition, using Nd:YAG lasers. The films were characterized by optical microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and X-rays diffraction. It was accomplished the real time spectral emission characterization of the plasma generated during the laser evaporation process. Highly oriented thin films were obtained.

  6. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Growth of periodic structures on the surface of germanium subjected to pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, D. O.; Gusakov, G. M.; Frolov, A. I.

    1991-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the dynamics of growth of periodic surface structures due to the interaction with pulsed laser radiation. Samples of Ge were subjected to laser pulses (λ = 1.06 μm, τ = 70 ns) with energy densities in the range 0.5-5.5 J/cm2. An investigation was made of the dynamics of the first-order diffraction of probe (λ = 0.53 μm) laser pulses with a time resolution 4 ns when p- and s-polarized laser radiation was incident at angles close to normal. A strong nonlinearity of the growth of such periodic surface structures was observed. The energy density from which such growth began depended on the quality of the polished Ge surface. The parameters of the dynamics of the growth of these structures were estimated.

  7. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Gallium Arsenide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppert, Valerie Jean

    Recent applications of pulsed laser deposition to the growth of various types of thin films suggest that it may be successfully used for III-V semiconductors. The goal of this work is to characterize the growth of GaAs using PLD and to determine the scope of the technique for this material. Therefore, laser ablation of GaAs is characterized here using spectroscopic analysis of the optical emission lines from the laser plasma plume. Additionally, the influence of growth conditions on GaAs films grown on a range of substrates is examined. In-situ analysis of the GaAs plume revealed that atomic, rather than molecular, arsenic is a major constituent of the GaAs plume. This may explain why no arsenic overpressure was needed to grow stoichiometric material. Nonlinear behavior of Ga emission intensity with laser power density indicated that several ablation mechanisms may be at work. EDAX studies indicate that deposited material is stoichiometric. Single crystal GaAs was grown on GaAs, Si and InP using PLD. A deposition rate of 0.65 mu m/hr was obtained. Defects consisting of dislocations, twinning and stacking faults were observed. An increase in laser power density decreased the minimum temperature for good film growth. Films were smooth overall, but suffered from an occasional inclusion of macroparticulates. Methods for screening particles were examined. The optimum growth temperature for GaAs/GaAs growth was 470^circC, but good films could be obtained as low as 335^circ C. GaAs/Si underwent a transition from a (110) oriented film to single crystal (100) film at 470 ^circC. Photoluminescence was obtained for the GaAs/GaAs and GaAs/InP systems. Well oriented films of GaAs (110) on an amorphous substrate (fused silica) were obtained for the first time using PLD at temperatures as low as 288^ circC. The effects of deposition temperature, deposition time, background gas, annealing, MOCVD overlayer and shadow masking were examined.

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Effect of pulsed laser target cleaning on ionisation and acceleration of ions in a plasma produced by a femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Roman V.; Vorobiev, A. A.; Gordienko, Vyacheslav M.; Dzhidzhoev, M. S.; Lachko, I. M.; Mar'in, B. V.; Savel'ev, Andrei B.; Uryupina, D. S.

    2005-10-01

    The impurity layer on the surface of a solid target is shown to exert a significant effect on the characteristics of the ion current of the laser plasma produced under the action of ultrahigh-intensity femtosecond radiation on the surface of this target. The application of pulsed laser cleaning gives rise to an additional high-energy component in the ion spectrum of the target material. It is shown that the ion current parameters of the laser plasma such as the average and highest ion charge, the highest ion energy of the target material, etc., can be controlled by varying the lead time of the cleaning laser radiation.

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the effect of laser parameters on laser ablation and laser-induced plasma formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancalie, Andrei; Ciobanu, Savu-Sorin; Sporea, Dan

    2016-04-01

    We report results from a wide range of laser operating conditions, typical for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation (LA) experiments on copper metallic target, which form the basis of further systematically investigation of the effect of laser irradiance, pulse duration and wavelength, on the target, plume and plasma behavior, during and after laser-solid interaction. In the LA experiment, the laser beam was focused through a 25 cm focal length convergent lens on a plane copper target in air, at atmospheric pressure. The target was rotated in order to have fresh areas under laser irradiance. In the LIBS experiment, the Applied Photonics LIBS-6 instrument allowed modifying the laser irradiance at the sample surface by changing the pulse energy or the laser focusing distance. For the duration of the laser pulse, the power density at the surface of the target material exceeds 109 W/cm2 using only a compact laser device and simple focusing lenses. The plasma parameters were experimentally estimated from spectroscopic data generated by the plasma itself, namely by the line intensities and their ratio which reflect the relative population of neutral or ionic excited species in the plasma. The fitting of the Saha-Boltzmann plot to a straight line provides an apparent ionization temperature, whose value depends on the lines used in the plots. For the typical conditions of LA and LIBS, the temperature can be so high that Cu+ ions are formed. The first-order ionization of Cu (i.e., the ratio of Cu+/Cu0 ) is calculated.

  10. Dynamics of space-time self-focusing of a femtosecond relativistic laser pulse in an underdense plasma.

    PubMed

    Lontano, Maurizio; Murusidze, Ivane

    2003-02-10

    The propagation of femtosecond, multiterawatt, relativistic laser pulses in a transparent plasma is studied. The spatio-temporal dynamics of ultrashort, high-power laser pulses in underdense plasmas differs dramatically from that of long laser beams. We present the results of numerical studies of these dynamics within a model which systematically incorporates finite pulse length effects (i.e., dispersion) along with diffraction and nonlinear refraction in a strongly nonlinear, relativistic regime. New space-time patterns of self-compression, self-focusing and self-phase-modulation, typical of ultrashort, high-intensity laser pulses, are analyzed. The parameters of our numerical simulations correspond to a new class of high-peak-power (> 100 TW), ultrashort-pulsed laser systems, producing pulses with a duration in the 10 - 20 femtosecond range. Spatiotemporal dynamics of these self-effects and underlying physical mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Measurements of Intense Femtosecond Laser Pulse Propagation in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    Intense femtosecond pulses generated from chirped pulse amplification (CPA) lasers can deliver laser powers many times above the critical power for self-focusing in air. Catastrophic collapse of the laser pulse is usually prevented by the defocusing of the plasma column formed when the laser intensity gets above the threshold for multiphoton ionization. The resultant laser/plasma filament can extend many meters as the laser pulse propagates in the atmosphere. We have carried out a series of experiments both for understanding the formation mechanisms of the filaments and the nonlinear effects such as white light and harmonics generation associated with them. Many applications of these filaments such as remote atmospheric breakdown, laser induced electrical discharge and femtosecond laser material interactions require direct measurements of their characteristics. Direct measurements of these filaments had been difficult because the high laser intensity ( ˜10^13 W/cm^2) can damage practically any optical diagnostics. A novel technique was invented to obtain the first absolute measurements of laser energy, transverse profile, fluence and spectral content of the filaments. We are investigating a ``remote atmospheric breakdown'' concept of remotely sensing chemical and biological compounds. A short intense laser pulse can be generated at a remote position by using the group velocity dispersion (GVD) of the air to compress an initially long, frequency negatively chirped laser pulse to generate the air breakdown and filaments. We have observed that nonlinear contributions to the laser spectrum through self-phase modulation can lead to modification of the linear GVD compression. We have also observed the generation of ultraviolet (UV) radiations from these filaments in air and the induced fluorescence by the UV radiation of a surrogate biological agent. These and other results such as laser induced electrical discharges will be presented.

  12. Ultrashort laser pulse interaction with photo-thermo-refractive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siiman, Leo A.

    Photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass is an ideal photosensitive material for recording phase volume holograms. It is a homogeneous multi-component silicate glass that demonstrates all the advantages of optical glass: thermal stability, high laser damage threshold, and a wide transparency range. Moreover the ability to record phase patterns (i.e. spatial refractive index variations) into PTR glass has resulted in the fabrication of volume holograms with diffraction efficiency greater than 99%. The conventional method of recording a hologram in PTR glass relies on exposure to continuous-wave ultraviolet laser radiation. In this dissertation the interaction between infrared ultrashort laser pulses and PTR glass is studied. It is shown that photosensitivity in PTR glass can be extended from the UV region to longer wavelengths (near-infrared) by exposure to ultrashort laser pulses. It is found that there exists a focusing geometry and laser pulse intensity interval for which photoionization and refractive index change in PTR glass after thermal development occur without laser-induced optical damage. Photoionization of PTR glass by IR ultrashort laser pulses is explained in terms of strong electric field ionization. This phenomenon is used to fabricate phase optical elements in PTR glass. The interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and volume holograms in PTR glass is studied in two laser intensity regimes. At intensities below ˜10 12 W/cm2 properties such as diffraction efficiency, angular divergence, selectivity, and pulse front tilt are shown to agree with the theory of linear diffraction for broad spectral width lasers. A volume grating pair arrangement is shown to correct the laser pulse distortions arising from pulse front tilt and angular divergence. At higher intensities of irradiation, nonlinear generation and diffraction of third harmonic is observed for three types of interactions: sum-frequency generation, front-surface THG generation, and THG due to

  13. Generation of 1.5 cycle 0.3 TW laser pulses using a hollow-fiber pulse compressor.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyun; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Nam, Chang Hee

    2009-08-01

    Pulse compression in a differentially pumped neon-filled hollow fiber was used to generate high-power few-cycle laser pulses. The pulse compression process was optimized by adjusting gas pressure and laser chirp to produce the shortest laser pulses. Precise dispersion control enabled the generation of laser pulses with duration of 3.7 fs and energy of 1.2 mJ. This corresponds to an output of 1.5 cycle, 0.3 TW pulses at a 1 kHz repetition rate using positively chirped 33 fs laser pulses.

  14. Application of Yb:YAG short pulse laser system

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Biswal, Subrat; Bartolick, Joseph M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Crane, John K.; Telford, Steve; Perry, Michael D.

    2004-07-06

    A diode pumped, high power (at least 20W), short pulse (up to 2 ps), chirped pulse amplified laser using Yb:YAG as the gain material is employed for material processing. Yb:YAG is used as the gain medium for both a regenerative amplifier and a high power 4-pass amplifier. A single common reflective grating optical device is used to both stretch pulses for amplification purposes and to recompress amplified pulses before being directed to a workpiece.

  15. Fiber Optic Solutions for Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Dawson, J; Liao, Z; Jovanovic, I; Wattellier, B; Payne, S; Barty, C P

    2003-01-29

    For applications requiring high beam quality radiation from efficient, compact and rugged sources, diffraction limited fiber lasers are ideal, and to date have been demonstrated at average CW power levels exceeding 100 W with near diffraction limited: output. For conventional single-core step-index single-mode fibers, this power level represents the sealing limit because of nonlinear and laser damage considerations. Higher average powers would exceed nonlinear process thresholds such as the Raman and stimulated Brillouin scattering limit, or else damage the fiber due to the high intensity level in the fiber's core. The obvious way to increase the average power capability of fibers is to increase the area of their core. Simply expanding the core dimensions of the fiber allows a straightforward power sealing due to enhanced nonlinear and power handling characteristics that scale directly with the core area. Femtosecond, chirped-pulse, fiber lasers with pulse energies greater than 1mJ have been demonstrated in the literature [2] using this technique. This output energy was still limited by the onset of stimulated Raman scattering. We have pursued an alternative and complimentary approach which is to reduce the intensity of light propagating in the core by distributing it more evenly across the core area via careful design of the refractive index profile [3]. We have also sought to address the primary issue that results from scaling the core. The enhanced power handling capability comes at the expense of beam quality, as increasing the core diameter in standard step index fibers permits multiple transverse modes to lase simultaneously. Although this problem of multimode operation can be mitigated to some extent by appropriately designing the fiber's waveguide structure, limitations such as bend radius loss, sensitivity to thermally induced perturbations of the waveguide structure, and refractive index control, all become more stringent as the core diameter grows

  16. A laser spectrometer and wavemeter for pulsed lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, J. A.; Laufer, P. M.; Cotnoir, L. J.

    1989-01-01

    The design, construction, calibration, and evaluation of a pulsed laser wavemeter and spectral analyzer are described. This instrument, called the Laserscope for its oscilloscope-like display of laser spectral structure, was delivered to NASA Langley Research Center as a prototype of a laboratory instrument. The key component is a multibeam Fizeau wedge interferometer, providing high (0.2 pm) spectral resolution and a linear dispersion of spectral information, ideally suited to linear array photodiode detectors. Even operating alone, with the classic order-number ambiguity of interferometers unresolved, this optical element will provide a fast, real-time display of the spectral structure of a laser output. If precise wavelength information is also desired then additional stages must be provided to obtain a wavelength measurement within the order-number uncertainty, i.e., within the free spectral range of the Fizeau wedge interferometer. A Snyder (single-beam Fizeau) wedge is included to provide this initial wavelength measurement. Difficulties in achieving the required wide-spectrum calibration limit the usefulness of this function.

  17. Generation of high-power nanosecond pulses from laser diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kinpui

    1988-01-01

    Simulation results are used to compare the pulse energy levels and pulse energy widths that can be achieved with LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers for both the pulse-transmission mode (PTM) and pulse-reflection mode (PRM) Q-switching methods for pulse energy levels up to hundreds of microjoules and pulse widths as short as 1 ns. It is shown that high-power pulses with pulse widths as short as 1 ns can be generated with PTM Q-switched in LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers. With the PRM Q-switching method, pulse widths as short as 2 ns and pulse energy at the level of a few hundred microjoules can also be achieved but require pumping with 8-10-mJ AlGaAs laser diode arrays.

  18. Picosecond lasers: the next generation of short-pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Joshua R; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrea I; Green, Jeremy B

    2014-12-01

    Selective photothermolysis, first discussed in the context of targeted microsurgery in 1983, proposed that the optimal parameters for specific thermal damage rely critically on the duration over which energy is delivered to the tissue. At that time, nonspecific thermal damage had been an intrinsic limitation of all commercially available lasers, despite efforts to mitigate this by a variety of compensatory cooling mechanisms. Fifteen years later, experimental picosecond lasers were first reported in the dermatological literature to demonstrate greater efficacy over their nanosecond predecessors in the context of targeted destruction of tattoo ink. Within the last 4 years, more than a decade after those experiments, the first commercially available cutaneous picosecond laser unit became available (Cynosure, Westford, Massachusetts), and several pilot studies have demonstrated its utility in tattoo removal. An experimental picosecond infrared laser has also recently demonstrated a nonthermal tissue ablative capability in soft tissue, bone, and dentin. In this article, we review the published data pertaining to dermatology on picosecond lasers from their initial reports to the present as well as discuss forthcoming technology.

  19. Towards 'smart lasers': self-optimisation of an ultrafast pulse source using a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Woodward, R I; Kelleher, E J R

    2016-11-21

    Short-pulse fibre lasers are a complex dynamical system possessing a broad space of operating states that can be accessed through control of cavity parameters. Determination of target regimes is a multi-parameter global optimisation problem. Here, we report the implementation of a genetic algorithm to intelligently locate optimum parameters for stable single-pulse mode- locking in a Figure-8 fibre laser, and fully automate the system turn-on procedure. Stable ultrashort pulses are repeatably achieved by employing a compound fitness function that monitors both temporal and spectral output properties of the laser. Our method of encoding photonics expertise into an algorithm and applying machine-learning principles paves the way to self-optimising 'smart' optical technologies.

  20. Reference systems for laser beam quality and parameter measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Dagang; Ma Chong; Guo Zhengqiang; Lu Zheng

    1996-12-31

    Three reference systems for the calibration and comparison of beam parameter measurements and beam quality of cw and pulsed lasers at NIM are described. While the cross-sectional power/energy density distribution function of TEM{sub 00} He-Ne laser and pulsed Nd:YAG laser are detected by a CCD-camera, the power density distribution function of cw CO{sub 2} laser is scanned by a liquid nitrogen cooled TeCdHg detector. Test procedures and evaluations are refer to ISO/DIS 11146 document. From the measured cross-sectional distribution function, the first and second spatial moments as well as the beam width are calculated. The waist location and width are determined by a hyperbolic fit to different measurements of the beam width along the propagation axis. The error evaluation equations for beam parameter measurement have been derived. Measurement agreements using different test methods and instruments are studied. Varieties of beam characteristics and measurement uncertainty for two measuring apparatus are given.

  1. Pulse laser head with monolithic thermally bonded microchip operating at 1.5 μm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Młyńczak, Jarosław; Kopczyński, Krzysztof; Belghachem, Nabil; Kisielewski, Jarosław; Stepień, Ryszard; Wychowaniec, Marek; Galas, Jacek; Litwin, Dariusz; CzyŻewski, Adam

    2016-12-01

    On the basis of thermally bonded Er,Yb:glass/Co:MALO microchip a laser head pumped by fiber coupled laser diode was designed. The performance of the laser head were investigated and the main output parameters were determined. The energy over 40 μJ in 3.8 ns pulse with repetition rate of 0.735 kHz was achieved. The laser head characterized by such parameters can successfully be used in tele-detection applications.

  2. Recent progress in picosecond pulse generation from semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auyeung, J. C.; Johnston, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in producing picosecond optical pulses from semiconductor laser diodes. The discussion concentrates on the mode-locking of a semiconductor laser diode in an external resonator. Transform-limited optical pulses ranging from several picoseconds to subpicosecond durations have been observed with active and passive mode-locking. Even though continuing research on the influence of impurities and defects on the mode-locking process is still needed, this technique has good promise for being utilized in fiber-optic communication systems. Alternative methods of direct electrical and optical excitation to produce ultrashort laser pulses are also described. They can generate pulses of similar widths to those obtained by mode-locking. The pulses generated will find applications in laser ranging and detector response measurement.

  3. Prepulse effect on intense femtosecond laser pulse propagation in gas

    SciTech Connect

    Giulietti, Antonio; Tomassini, Paolo; Galimberti, Marco; Giulietti, Danilo; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Koester, Petra; Labate, Luca; Ceccotti, Tiberio; D'Oliveira, Pascal; Auguste, Thierry; Monot, Pascal; Martin, Philippe

    2006-09-15

    The propagation of an ultrashort laser pulse can be affected by the light reaching the medium before the pulse. This can cause a serious drawback to possible applications. The propagation in He of an intense 60-fs pulse delivered by a Ti:sapphire laser in the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) mode has been investigated in conditions of interest for laser-plasma acceleration of electrons. The effects of both nanosecond amplified spontaneous emission and picosecond pedestals have been clearly identified. There is evidence that such effects are basically of refractive nature and that they are not detrimental for the propagation of a CPA pulse focused to moderately relativistic intensity. The observations are fully consistent with numerical simulations and can contribute to the search of a stable regime for laser acceleration.

  4. Recent progress in picosecond pulse generation from semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auyeung, J. C.; Johnston, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in producing picosecond optical pulses from semiconductor laser diodes. The discussion concentrates on the mode-locking of a semiconductor laser diode in an external resonator. Transform-limited optical pulses ranging from several picoseconds to subpicosecond durations have been observed with active and passive mode-locking. Even though continuing research on the influence of impurities and defects on the mode-locking process is still needed, this technique has good promise for being utilized in fiber-optic communication systems. Alternative methods of direct electrical and optical excitation to produce ultrashort laser pulses are also described. They can generate pulses of similar widths to those obtained by mode-locking. The pulses generated will find applications in laser ranging and detector response measurement.

  5. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  6. Response of silicon solar cell to pulsed laser illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willowby, D.; Alexander, D.; Edge, T.; Herren, K.

    1993-01-01

    The response of silicon solar cell(s) to pulsed laser illumination is discussed. The motivation was due to the interest of Earth to space/Moon power beaming applications. When this work began, it was not known if solar cells would respond to laser light with pulse lengths in the nanosecond range and a repetition frequency in the kHz range. This is because the laser pulse would be shorter than the minority carrier lifetime of silicon. A 20-nanosecond (ns) full width half max (FWHM) pulse from an aluminum-gallium/arsenide (Al-Ga-As) diode laser was used to illuminate silicon solar cells at a wavelength of 885 nanometers (nm). Using a high-speed digital oscilloscope, the response of the solar cells to individual pulses across various resistive loads was observed and recorded.

  7. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength λ= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  8. LIBS using dual- and ultra-short laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Angel, S M; Stratis, D N; Eland, K L; Lai, T; Berg, M A; Gold, D M

    2001-02-01

    Pre-ablation dual-pulse LIBS enhancement data for copper, brass and steel using ns laser excitation are reported. Although large enhancements are observed for all samples, the magnitude of the enhancement is matrix dependent. Whereas all of the dual-pulse studies used ns laser excitation we see interesting effects when using ps and fs laser excitation for single-pulse LIBS. LIBS spectra of copper using 1.3 ps and 140 fs laser pulses show much lower background signals compared to ns pulse excitation. Also, the atomic emission decays much more rapidly with time. Because of relatively low backgrounds when using ps and fs pulses, non-gated detection of LIBS is shown to be very effective. The plasma dissipates quickly enough using ps and fs laser pulses, that high pulse rates, up to 1,000 Hz, are effective for increasing the LIBS signal, for a given measurement time. Finally, a simple near-collinear dual-pulse fiber-optic LIBS probe is shown to be useful for enhanced LIBS measurements.

  9. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with picosecond pulse train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednev, Vasily N.; Pershin, Sergey M.; Sdvizhenskii, Pavel A.; Grishin, Mikhail Ya; Davydov, Mikhail A.; Stavertiy, Anton Ya; Tretyakov, Roman S.

    2017-02-01

    Picosecond pulse train and nanosecond pulse were compared for laser ablation and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. A detailed study revealed that the picosecond pulse train ablation improved the quality of laser craters (symmetric crater walls and the absence of large redeposited droplets), which was explained by a smaller heat affected zone and suppression of melt splash. Greater plasma dimensions and brighter plasma emission were observed by gated imaging for picosecond pulse train compared to nanosecond pulse ablation. Increased intensity of atomic and ionic lines in gated and time integrated spectra provided better signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond pulse train sampling. Higher temperature and electron density were detected during first microsecond for the plasma induced by the picosecond pulse train. Improved shot-to-shot reproducibility for atomic/ionic line intensity in the case of picosecond pulse train LIBS was explained by more effective atomization of target material in plasma and better quality of laser craters. Improved precision and limits of detections were determined for picosecond pulse train LIBS due to better reproducibility of laser sampling and increased signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Synchronous pulse generation in a multicavity fiber laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Pavón, L. C.; Martí-Panameño, E.; Gómez-de la Fuente, O.; Luis-Ramos, A.

    2006-09-01

    We report the experimental synchronous pulse generation in a multicavity fiber laser system with two Erbium-doped fiber laser cavities. We have demonstrated that through the evanescent fields interaction between one cavity with active modulation and other one in continuous wave it is possible to generate more intense pulses in both cavities. Moreover, the synchronous pulse generation between cavities is achieved with an appropriate selection of pump intensity, modulation frequency and coupling ratio. We found that the pulse intensity is 2.5 times greater and the pulse duration lowers than a single Erbium-doper fiber laser. Furthermore, by means of the synchronous diagram we determined the synchronization strength in temporal pulse emission between cavities.

  11. On the applicability of arbitrarily shaped nanosecond laser pulses for high-quality, high-efficiency micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselen, Sasia; Riedel, Sebastian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Progressive developments in temporal shaping of short laser pulses offer entirely new approaches at influence and investigate laser-matter-interactions. Commonly used parameters for describing the behavior of short or ultrashort pulses or pulse trains are fluence and intensity. However, fluence does not imply any information about the temporal behavior of energy input during specific pulse duration τ while using the pulse intensity as describing parameter is more meaningful. Nevertheless it still is an averaging over pulse duration and no change in intensity can be determined if the temporal pulse shape changes within a certain combination of pulse duration and pulse energy. Using a flexible programmable MOPA fiber laser experimental studies on the impact of temporal energy distribution within one single laser pulse in micro machining applications were therefore carried out. With this laser source a direct modulation of the temporal pulse shape in the nanosecond regime can easily be controlled. Experiments were carried out with moved as well as with un-moved beam resulting in areas and dimples respectively drilling holes. The presented results clearly show that any averaging over pulse duration results in missing information about time-dependent interactions but can at the same time lead to significant differences in ablation results. Thus, resulting surface roughness Sa can be decreased up to 25 % when changing the pulse shape at constant parameters of fluence and pulse peak power at a pulse duration of 30 ns. It can be observed that the combination of an intensity peak and a lower edge within one pulse can lead to increasing ablation efficiency as well as higher ablation quality compared to the commonly used Gaussian-like temporal pulse shape.

  12. Double-pulse and single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for distinguishing between gaseous and particulate phase analytes

    SciTech Connect

    Asgill, Michael E.; Brown, Michael S.; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, William M.; Hahn, David W.

    2010-05-01

    We explore the use of a combination of double-pulse and single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) methodologies as a means of differentiating between solid-phase and gaseous-phase analytes (namely, carbon) in an aerosol stream. A range of spectral data was recorded for double-pulse and single-pulse configurations, including both ns and fs prepulse widths, while varying the gas-phase mass percentage of the carbon from about 10% to 90% for various fixed carbon concentrations. The carbon emission response, as measured by the peak-to-continuum ratio, was greater for the double-pulse configuration as compared with the single-pulse response and was also enhanced as the percentage of solid-phase carbon was increased. Using a combination of the double-pulse and single-pulse emission signals, a monotonically increasing response function was found to correlate with the percentage of gas-phase analyte. However, individual data points at the measured gas-phase percentages reveal considerable scatter from the predicted trend. Furthermore, the double-pulse to single-pulse ratio was only pronounced with the ns-ns configuration as compared with the fs-ns scheme. Overall, the LIBS methodology has been demonstrated as a potential means to discriminate between gas-phase and particulate-phase fractions of the same elemental species in an aerosol, although future optimization of the temporal parameters should be explored to improve the precision and accuracy of this approach.

  13. Surface separation investigation of ultrafast pulsed laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianyong; Carter, Richard M.; Thomson, Robert R.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    Techniques for joining materials, especially optical materials such as glass to structural materials such as metals, or to other optical materials, while maintaining their surface and optical properties are essential for a wide range of industrial applications. Adhesive bonding is commonly used but leads to many issues including optical surface contamination and outgassing. It is possible to generate welds using an ultra-short pulsed laser process, whereby two flat material surfaces are brought into close contact and the laser is focused through the optical material onto the interface. Highly localised melting and rapid resolidification form a strong bond between the two surfaces whilst avoiding significant heating of the surrounding material, which is important for joining materials with different thermal expansion coefficients. Previous reports on ultrafast laser welding have identified a requirement for the surface separation gap to be less than 500nm in order to avoid cracking or ablation at the interface. We have investigated techniques for increasing this gap (to reduce weld fit-up problems), and tested by bonding two surfaces with a weld-controlled gap. These gaps were generated either by a series of etched grooves on the surface of one of the substrates, or by using a cylindrical lens as a substrate. By careful optimisation of parameters such as laser power, process speed and focal position, we were able to demonstrate successful welding with a gap of up to 3μm.

  14. Ponderomotive acceleration of electrons by a self focused laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rohtash; Sharma, A. K.

    2010-12-15

    Ponderomotive acceleration of electrons by a short laser pulse undergoing relativistic self-focusing in a plasma is investigated. The saturation in nonlinear plasma permittivity causes periodic self-focusing of the laser. The periodicity lengths are different for different axial segments of the pulse. As a result, pulse shape is distorted. An electron initially on the laser axis and at the front of the self-focusing pulse gains energy from the pulse until it is run over by the pulse peak. By the time electron reaches the tail, if pulse begins diverging, the deceleration of the electron is slower and the electron is left with net energy gain. The electrons slightly off the laser axis see a radial ponderomotive force too. Initially, when they are accelerated by the pulse front the acceleration is strong as they are closer to the axis. When they see the tail of the pulse (after being run by the pulse), they are farther from the axis and the retardation ponderomotive force is weaker. Thus, there is net energy gain.

  15. Optimizing treatment parameters for the vascular malformations using 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Lin, He; Xie, Shusen

    2010-02-01

    Near infrared Nd:YAG pulsed laser treatment had been proved to be an efficient method to treat large-sized vascular malformations like leg telangiectasia for deep penetrating depth into skin and uniform light distribution in vessel. However, optimal clinical outcome was achieved by various laser irradiation parameters and the key factor governing the treatment efficacy was still unclear. A mathematical model in combination with Monte Carlo algorithm and finite difference method was developed to estimate the light distribution, temperature profile and thermal damage in epidermis, dermis and vessel during and after 1064 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Simulation results showed that epidermal protection could be achieved during 1064 nm Nd:YAG pulsed laser irradiation in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling. However, optimal vessel closure and blood coagulation depend on a compromise between laser spot size and pulse duration.

  16. Propagation of femtosecond laser pulses through water in the linear absorption regime.

    PubMed

    Naveira, Lucas M; Strycker, Benjamin D; Wang, Jieyu; Ariunbold, Gombojav O; Sokolov, Alexei V; Kattawar, George W

    2009-04-01

    We investigate the controversy regarding violations of the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer (BLB) law for ultrashort laser pulses propagating through water. By working at sufficiently low incident laser intensities, we make sure that any nonlinear component in the response of the medium is negligible. We measure the transmitted power and spectrum as functions of water cell length in an effort to confirm or disprove alleged deviations from the BLB law. We perform experiments at two different laser pulse repetition rates and explore the dependence of transmission on pulse duration. Specifically, we vary the laser pulse duration either by cutting its spectrum while keeping the pulse shape near transform-limited or by adjusting the pulses chirp while keeping the spectral intensities fixed. Over a wide range of parameters, we find no deviations from the BLB law and conclude that recent claims of BLB law violations are inconsistent with our experimental data. We present a simple linear theory (based on the BLB law) for propagation of ultrashort laser pulses through an absorbing medium and find our experimental results to be in excellent agreement with this theory.

  17. Delay time dependence of thermal effect of combined pulse laser machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Boshi; Jin, Guangyong; Ma, Yao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The research focused on the effect of delay time in combined pulse laser machining on the material temperature field. Aiming at the parameter optimization of pulse laser machining aluminum alloy, the combined pulse laser model based on heat conduction equation was introduced. And the finite element analysis software, COMSOL Multiphysics, was also utilized in the research. Without considering the phase transition process of aluminum alloy, the results of the numerical simulation was shown in this paper. By the simulation study of aluminum alloy's irradiation with combined pulse, the effect of the change in delay time of combined pulse on the temperature field of the aluminum alloy and simultaneously the quantized results under the specific laser spot conditions were obtained. Based on the results, several conclusions could be reached, the delay time could affect the rule of temperature changing with time. The reasonable delay time controlling would help improving the efficiency. In addition, when the condition of the laser pulse energy density is constant, the optimal delay time depends on pulse sequence.

  18. Efficient spectral-step expansion of a filamenting laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Théberge, Francis; Lassonde, Philippe; Payeur, Stéphane; Châteauneuf, Marc; Dubois, Jacques; Kieffer, Jean-Claude

    2013-05-01

    We report an efficient transfer of 800 nm energy into both the ultraviolet and the far infrared (IR) during the filamentation in air of an appropriately shaped laser pulse. The multiorder enhancement of the IR supercontinuum in the 3-5 μm atmospheric transmission windows was achieved thanks to spectral-step cascaded four-wave mixing occurring within the spectrum of the shaped femtosecond laser pulse. These results also point out the limit of the self-phase modulation model to explain the spectral broadening of a filamenting laser pulse.

  19. Airborne bathymetric charting using pulsed blue-green lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory and airborne experiments have proven the feasibility and demonstrated the techniques of an airborne pulsed laser system for rapidly mapping coastal water bathymetry. Water depths of 10 plus or minus 0.25 m were recorded in waters having an effective attenuation coefficient of 0.175 m. A 2-MW peak power Nd:YAG pulsed laser was flown at an altitude of 600 m. An advanced system, incorporating a mirror scanner, a high pulsed rate laser, and a good signal processor, could survey coastal zones at the rate of several square miles per hour.

  20. Airborne bathymetric charting using pulsed blue-green lasers.

    PubMed

    Kim, H H

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory and airborne experiments have proven the feasibility and demonstrated the techniques of an airborne pulsed laser system for rapidly mapping coastal water bathymetry. Water depths of 10 +/- 0.25 m were recorded in waters having an effective attenuation coefficient of 0.175 m(-1). A2-MW peak power Nd:YAG pulsed laser was flown at an altitude of 600 m. An advanced system, incorporating a mirror scanner, a high pulsed rate laser, and a good signal processor, could survey coastal zones at the rate of several square miles per hour.