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Sample records for laser vaporization methods

  1. Novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.B.; Ching, H.; Bosch, R.; Brake, M.; Gilgenbach, R.

    1990-12-31

    Microwave and intense electron beam excitation of copper vapor are being investigated to be used in copper vapor lasers for isotope separation. Both methods use copper chloride vapor by heating copper chloride. Helium was used as the buffer gas at 2 to 100 torr. In the microwave system, intense copperlines at 510 nm and 578 nm were observed. Initial electron beam results indicate that light emission follows the beam current.

  2. Self-tuning method for monitoring the density of a gas vapor component using a tunable laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, Karla; Berzins, Leon; Galkowski, Joseph; Seng, Rita

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a vapor density monitor and laser atomic absorption spectroscopy method for highly accurate, continuous monitoring of vapor densities, composition, flow velocity, internal and kinetic temperatures and constituent distributions. The vapor density monitor employs a diode laser, preferably of an external cavity design. By using a diode laser, the vapor density monitor is significantly less expensive and more reliable than prior art vapor density monitoring devices. In addition, the compact size of diode lasers enables the vapor density monitor to be portable. According to the method of the present invention, the density of a component of a gas vapor is calculated by tuning the diode laser to a frequency at which the amount of light absorbed by the component is at a minimum or a maximum within about 50 MHz of that frequency. Laser light from the diode laser is then transmitted at the determined frequency across a predetermined pathlength of the gas vapor. By comparing the amount of light transmitted by the diode laser to the amount of light transmitted after the laser light passes through the gas vapor, the density of the component can be determined using Beer's law.

  3. Self-tuning method for monitoring the density of a gas vapor component using a tunable laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, K.; Berzins, L.; Galkowski, J.; Seng, R.

    1996-08-27

    The present invention relates to a vapor density monitor and laser atomic absorption spectroscopy method for highly accurate, continuous monitoring of vapor densities, composition, flow velocity, internal and kinetic temperatures and constituent distributions. The vapor density monitor employs a diode laser, preferably of an external cavity design. By using a diode laser, the vapor density monitor is significantly less expensive and more reliable than prior art vapor density monitoring devices. In addition, the compact size of diode lasers enables the vapor density monitor to be portable. According to the method of the present invention, the density of a component of a gas vapor is calculated by tuning the diode laser to a frequency at which the amount of light absorbed by the component is at a minimum or a maximum within about 50 MHz of that frequency. Laser light from the diode laser is then transmitted at the determined frequency across a predetermined pathlength of the gas vapor. By comparing the amount of light transmitted by the diode laser to the amount of light transmitted after the laser light passes through the gas vapor, the density of the component can be determined using Beer`s law. 6 figs.

  4. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1986-01-01

    The generation of energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin indium-tin oxide (ITO) films is reported. Mass spectroscopy is used in the mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films, and a peak flux of 3 x 10 to the 20th/sq m per sec at 10 eV is found. Analysis of the time-of-flight data suggests that several processes contribute to the formation of the oxygen beam. Results show the absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3)3s(1)(5S) level of atomic oxygen blown-off from the ITO films. The present process has application to the study of the oxygen degradation problem of LEO materials.

  5. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1987-01-01

    Energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams were generated by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin films of indium-tin oxide (ITO). Mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films were carried out by mass spectrometry. The peak flux, found to occur at 10 eV, is estimated from this data to be 3 x 10(20) m(-2) s(-1). Analysis of the time-of-flight data indicates a number of processes contribute to the formation of the atomic oxygen beam. The absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3) 3s(1) (5S) level of atomic oxygen blown off from ITO films is supported by the failure to observe emission at 777.3 nm from the 2p(3) 3p(1) (5P sub J) levels. Reactive scattering experiments with polymer film targets for atomic oxygen bombardment are planned using a universal crossed molecular beam apparatus.

  6. Multiwavelength Strontium Vapor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Yudin, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    Based on an analysis of experimental and theoretical works, modern notion on conditions of forming of population density inversion on self-terminating IR transitions of alkali-earth metals is given. It is demonstrated that there is a significant difference in the inversion formation in lasers on self-terminating transitions in the visible and near-IR ranges and lasers on self-terminating transitions of alkali-earth metals lasing IR lines in the mid-IR range. It is shown that in the discharge circuit of lasers on self-terminating metal atom transitions (LSMT) there are processes strengthening the influence of the known mechanism limiting the frequency and energy characteristics (FEC) of radiation caused by the presence of prepulse electron concentration. The mechanism of influence of these processes on FEC of the LSMT and technical methods of their neutralization are considered. The possibility of obtaining average lasing power of ~200 W from one liter volume of the active medium of the strontium vapor laser is demonstrated under conditions of neutralization of these processes.

  7. Method and apparatus for convection control of metallic halide vapor density in a metallic halide laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed in which a reservoir containing copper chloride is heated so that the copper chloride is maintained in a liquid form. The apparatus includes a means for flowing a buffer gas (which in the exemplary embodiment is neon) over the liquid copper chloride to provide a mixture of copper chloride vapor and neon above the liquid copper chloride. A conduit provides fluid communication between the reservoir containing the copper chloride vapor/neon mixture and the laser. The copper chloride vapor density in the laser is related to the liquid copper chloride temperature and the neon flow rate through the reservoir. In accordance with a further feature of the exemplary embodiment, neon is also provided directly to the laser in order to provide a further means of controlling the copper chloride vapor density in the laser.

  8. Efficient multiple time scale method for modeling compressible vapor plume dynamics inside transient keyhole during fiber laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Xin; Li, Wen; Shao, Xinyu; Gong, Shuili

    2016-03-01

    Efficient coupling modeling of multiple time scale interactions between keyhole, weld pool and compressible vapor plume during laser welding has long been limited. To address this problem, we present a highly efficient multiple time scale method combining a novel dual-time stepping and Ghost Fluid interpolation strategy with incompressible and compressible fluid solvers, which allows us predicting the compressible plume dynamics inside transient keyhole in fiber laser welding for the first time. In our method, the compressible dynamic vapor inside the transient keyhole is solved with a Roe scheme based algorithm and the incompressible molten liquid of weld pool is calculated by a Projection method. A novel temperature dependent boundary condition of vapor plume is also proposed for the consideration of the dynamic evaporation phenomena on the transient keyhole wall. It is found that the time dependent distributions of vapor plume characteristics, including temperature, pressure, velocity, density and Mach number distributions inside the transient keyhole induced by laser welding can be reasonably predicted by comparing to experimental and literature data. It is also shown that the proposed multiple time scale method is around 60 times faster than the vapor plume modeling method using a single nanosecond scale time step. For the vapor plume in a typical fiber laser welding process, the results indicate that the peak pressure can be greater than 2.0 atmospheric pressures; the average density is around 0.15-0.3 kg/m3 which is much smaller than the air density; and the local Mach number can be greater than 0.8 or even 1.0 Mach which demonstrates the necessity to treat the vapor plume as a compressible fluid.

  9. Iron bromide vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, V. B.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Trigub, M. V.; Dimaki, V. A.; Evtushenko, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the characteristics of a pulsed gas-discharge laser on iron bromide vapor generating radiation with a wavelength of 452.9 nm at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5-30 kHz. The maximum output power amounted to 10 mW at a PRF within 5-15 kHz for a voltage of 20-25 kV applied to electrodes of the discharge tube. Addition of HBr to the medium produced leveling of the radial profile of emission. Initial weak lasing at a wavelength of 868.9 nm was observed for the first time, which ceased with buildup of the main 452.9-nm line.

  10. Polarization switching detection method using a ferroelectric liquid crystal for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock frequency stabilization techniques.

    PubMed

    Dudzik, Grzegorz; Rzepka, Janusz; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2015-04-01

    We present a concept of the polarization switching detection method implemented for frequency-stabilized lasers, called the polarization switching dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (PSDAVLL) technique. It is a combination of the well-known dichroic atomic vapor laser lock method for laser frequency stabilization with a synchronous detection system based on the surface-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal (SSFLC).The SSFLC is a polarization switch and quarter wave-plate component. This technique provides a 9.6 dB better dynamic range ratio (DNR) than the well-known two-photodiode detection configuration known as the balanced polarimeter. This paper describes the proposed method used practically in the VCSEL laser frequency stabilization system. The applied PSDAVLL method has allowed us to obtain a frequency stability of 2.7×10⁻⁹ and a reproducibility of 1.2×10⁻⁸, with a DNR of detected signals of around 81 dB. It has been shown that PSDAVLL might be successfully used as a method for spectra-stable laser sources.

  11. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  12. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  13. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  14. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  15. Vapor spill monitoring method

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, Gregory M.; McRae, Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

  16. Wick for metal vapor laser

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, David B.

    1992-01-01

    An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

  17. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-11-08

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

  18. Coupling apparatus for a metal vapor laser

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Miller, John L.

    1993-01-01

    Coupling apparatus for a large bore metal vapor laser is disclosed. The coupling apparatus provides for coupling high voltage pulses (approximately 40 KV) to a metal vapor laser with a high repetition rate (approximately 5 KHz). The coupling apparatus utilizes existing thyratron circuits and provides suitable power input to a large bore metal vapor laser while maintaining satisfactory operating lifetimes for the existing thyratron circuits.

  19. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisner, J. A.

    1988-07-01

    Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique applicable to many elements. A major present application to the enrichement of uranium for lightwater power reactor fuel has been under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since 1973. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet future U.S. needs for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. Major features of the AVLIS process will be discussed with consideration of the process figures of merit.

  20. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.W.; Ault, E.R.; Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment. 2 figs.

  1. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.; Ault, Earl R.; Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

  2. Atomic-vapor-laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.I.

    1982-10-01

    This paper gives a brief history of the scientific considerations leading to the development of laser isotope separation (LIS) processes. The close relationship of LIS to the broader field of laser-induced chemical processes is evaluated in terms of physical criteria to achieve an efficient production process. Atomic-vapor LIS processes under development at Livermore are reviwed. 8 figures.

  3. Copper vapor laser acoustic thermometry system

    DOEpatents

    Galkowski, Joseph J.

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser (CVL) acoustic thermometry system is disclosed. The invention couples an acoustic pulse a predetermined distance into a laser tube by means of a transducer and an alumina rod such that an echo pulse is returned along the alumina rod to the point of entry. The time differential between the point of entry of the acoustic pulse into the laser tube and the exit of the echo pulse is related to the temperature at the predetermined distance within the laser tube. This information is processed and can provide an accurate indication of the average temperature within the laser tube.

  4. Physico-technical background of metal vapor laser systems and their application in oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armichev, A. V.; Ivanov, Andrei V.; Kazaryan, Mishik A.

    1996-01-01

    Some results of the copper and gold vapor lasers and of helium-cadmium lasers used in medical practice are presented. The most in medical use copper vapor laser is commonly applied for low-intensity laser therapy and endoscopic surgery. A universal capability of dye lasers oscillating in 600 - 670 red region for excitation of the preparates used in photodynamic therapy is demonstrated. The copper vapor lasers are shown also to effectively coagulate pre- tumor neoplasms. A new method of laser beams shaping fitted to tumor configuration basing on quantum optical systems including image brightness amplifiers is described. Variability of the irradiating beam contrast is displayed, including the contrast inversion. Possibilities of the copper vapor lasers use for tumors drugless phototherapy and the two-step and two-stage methods of the photodynamic therapy are discussed. Some Russian medical systems based on the copper vapor lasers and dye lasers pumped by them are specified in parameters.

  5. Metal vapor lasers with increased reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Sabotinov, N. V.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Shumeiko, A. S.; Kostadinov, I. K.; Vasilieva, A. V.; Reimer, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    Results of investigation and development of an excitation pulse generator with magnetic pulse compression by saturation chokes for pumping of active media of CuBr, Sr, and Ca vapor lasers are presented. A high-power IGBT transistor is used as a commutator. The generator can operate at excitation pulse repetition frequencies up to 20 kHz. The total average power for all laser lines of the CuBr laser pumped by this generator is ~6.0 W; it is ~1.3-1.7 W for the Sr and Ca lasers.

  6. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  7. New Medical Applications Of Metal Vapor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert S.; McIntosh, Alexander I.

    1989-06-01

    The first medical application for metal vapor lasers has been granted marketing approval by the FDA. This represents a major milestone for this technology. Metalaser Technologies recently received this approval for its Vasculase unit in the treatment of vascular lesions such as port wine stains, facial telangiectasia and strawberry hemangiomas.

  8. Monitoring PVD metal vapors using laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.G.; Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Hagans, K.G.

    1994-04-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used by the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program for over 10 years to monitor the co-vaporization of uranium and iron in its separators. During that time, LAS has proven to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both the density and composition of the vapor. It has distinct advantages over other rate monitors, in that it is completely non-obtrusive to the vaporization process and its accuracy is unaffected by the duration of the run. Additionally, the LAS diagnostic has been incorporated into a very successful process control system. LAS requires only a line of sight through the vacuum chamber, as all hardware is external to the vessel. The laser is swept in frequency through an absorption line of interest. In the process a baseline is established, and the line integrated density is determined from the absorption profile. The measurement requires no hardware calibration. Through a proper choice of the atomic transition, a wide range of elements and densities have been monitored (e.g. nickel, iron, cerium and gadolinium). A great deal of information about the vapor plume can be obtained from the measured absorption profiles. By monitoring different species at the same location, the composition of the vapor is measured in real time. By measuring the same density at different locations, the spatial profile of the vapor plume is determined. The shape of the absorption profile is used to obtain the flow speed of the vapor. Finally, all of the above information is used evaluate the total vaporization rate.

  9. Precision micro drilling with copper vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.J.; Martinez, M.W.; Warner, B.E.; Dragon, E.P.; Huete, G.; Solarski, M.E.

    1994-09-02

    The authors have developed a copper vapor laser based micro machining system using advanced beam quality control and precision wavefront tilting technologies. Micro drilling has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratio up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled on a variety of metals with good quality. For precision trepanned holes, the hole-to-hole size variation is typically within 1% of its diameter. Hole entrance and exit are both well defined with dimension error less than a few microns. Materialography of sectioned holes shows little (sub-micron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone with surface roughness within 1--2 microns.

  10. Copper vapor laser prospects in glaucoma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, Arcady P.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Egorov, Alexey E.; Shaban, Naim; Ponomarev, Igor V.

    1996-05-01

    New advances of copper vapor laser (CVL-laser) have been studied. Two wavelength radiation of the laser (511 nm and 578 nm) gives deeper permeability into organic tissues. Besides, the short pulse prevents the warm relaxation of small vessels. The technical data of CVL-laser: operating regime -- pulse, pulse duration -- 20 ns, pulse frequency 15000 pulse/sec. The shutter works in intervals from 0.05 to 2.0 sec. The power varies in accordance with wavelength: 511 nm (green) -- 1.5 W, 578 nm (yellow) -- 1, 2 W. The diameter of coagulate may be different: 100, 150, 400, 1000 mkm. We chose CVL-laser 'Femta,' created by P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, for ophthalmological use. Thirty eight eyes of 37 patients with different types and stages of glaucoma were studied and treated with CVL-laser. The operations of photomydriasis, gonioplasty and trabeculoplasty have been performed. CVL- laser demonstrated efficient application in treatment of interior eye segment of glaucoma patients. The advantages and disadvantages of the CVL-laser application in glaucoma surgery were discussed.

  11. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  12. Water vapor-nitrogen absorption at CO2 laser frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Nordstrom, R. J.; Damon, E. K.; Long, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a series of pressure-broadened water vapor absorption measurements at 27 CO2 laser frequencies between 935 and 1082 kaysers. Both multiple traversal cell and optoacoustic (spectrophone) techniques were utilized together with an electronically stabilized CW CO2 laser. Comparison of the results obtained by these two methods shows remarkable agreement, indicating a precision which has not been previously achieved in pressure-broadened studies of water vapor. The data of 10.59 microns substantiate the existence of the large (greater than 200) self-broadening coefficients determined in an earlier study by McCoy. In this work, the case of water vapor in N2 at a total pressure of 1 atm has been treated.

  13. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1988-01-01

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  14. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Earl R.; Alger, Terry W.

    1995-01-01

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube.

  15. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOEpatents

    Ault, E.R.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-03-07

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube. 5 figs.

  16. Tunable lasers for water vapor measurements and other lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, R. W.; Mcilrath, T. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1977-01-01

    A tunable dye laser suitable for differential absorption (DIAL) measurements of water vapor in the troposphere was constructed. A multi-pass absorption cell for calibration was also constructed for use in atmospheric DIAL measurements of water vapor.

  17. Quasi-dynamical analysis and real-time tissue temperature monitoring during laser vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Ray, Aditi; Jebens, Dave; Chia, Ray; Hasenberg, Tom

    2014-03-01

    Vaporization and coagulation are two fundamental processes that can be performed during laser-tissue ablation. We demonstrated a method allowing quasi-dynamically observing of the cross-sectional images of tissue response during ablation. The results showed that coagulation depth is relatively constant during vaporization, which supports the excellent hemostasis of green laser benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) treatment. We also verified a new technology for real-time, in situ tissue temperature monitoring, which may be promising for in vivo tissue vaporization degree feedback during laser ablation to improve the vaporization efficiency and avoid complications.

  18. Formation of output in copper vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Coutts, D W; Brown, D J

    1995-03-20

    Detailed mechanisms that control the formation of output from copper vapor laser (CVL) oscillators are investigated. Measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution of gain in a CVL amplifier and a CVL oscillator show that a short period of high gain that occurs at the beginning of the inversion period is the dominant feature. This leads to the formation of a burst of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), whose subsequent propagation and amplification leads to all observable CVL output. The spatial characteristics of this initial burst of ASE are shown to be strongly dependent on the operating conditions of the laser. The implications of this description of CVL output for the design of unstable resonators and oscillator-amplifier systems is discussed. PMID:21037687

  19. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  20. Method and apparatus for vapor detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Melvin (Inventor); Hood, Lyal V. (Inventor); Rommel, Marjorie A. (Inventor); Pettitt, Bruce C. (Inventor); Erikson, Charles M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The method disclosed herein may be practiced by passing the vapors to be sampled along a path with halogen vapor, preferably chlorine vapor, heating the mixed vapors to halogenate those of the sampled vapors subject to halogenation, removing unreacted halogen vapor, and then sensing the vapors for organic halogenated compounds. The apparatus disclosed herein comprises means for flowing the vapors, both sample and halogen vapors, into a common path, means for heating the mixed vapors to effect the halogenation reaction, means for removing unreacted halogen vapor, and a sensing device for sensing halogenated compounds. By such a method and means, the vapors of low molecular weight hydrocarbons, ketones and alcohols, when present, such as methane, ethane, acetone, ethanol, and the like are converted, at least in part, to halogenated compounds, then the excess halogen removed or trapped, and the resultant vapors of the halogenated compounds sensed or detected. The system is highly sensitive. For example, acetone in a concentration of 30 parts per billion (volume) is readily detected.

  1. Laser absorption spectroscopy system for vaporization process characterization and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkowski, Joseph J.; Hagans, Karla G.

    1994-03-01

    In support of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program, a laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (LAS) system has been developed. This multilaser system is capable of simultaneously measuring the line densities of 238U ground and metastable states, 235U ground and metastable states, iron, and ions at up to nine locations within the separator vessel. Supporting enrichment experiments that last over one hundred hours, this laser spectroscopy system is employed to diagnose and optimize separator system performance, control the electron beam vaporizer and metal feed systems, and provide physics data for the validation of computer models. As a tool for spectroscopic research, vapor plume characterization, vapor deposition monitoring, and vaporizer development, LLNL's LAS laboratory with its six argon-ion-pumped ring dye lasers and recently added Ti:Sapphire and external-cavity diode- lasers has capabilities far beyond the requirements of its primary mission.

  2. Application of laser Doppler velocimeter to chemical vapor laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, Luther R.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Lee, Ja H.; Fletcher, Mark T.; Tabibi, Bagher M.

    1993-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was used to measure iodide vapor flow fields inside two different-sized tubes. Typical velocity profiles across the laser tubes were obtained with an estimated +/-1 percent bias and +/-0.3 to 0.5 percent random uncertainty in the mean values and +/-2.5 percent random uncertainty in the turbulence-intensity values. Centerline velocities and turbulence intensities for various longitudinal locations ranged from 13 to 17.5 m/sec and 6 to 20 percent, respectively. In view of these findings, the effects of turbulence should be considered for flow field modeling. The LDV system provided calibration data for pressure and mass flow systems used routinely to monitor the research laser gas flow velocity.

  3. Vapor bubble formation during erbium:YAG laser vitrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrochen, Michael; Donitzky, Christof; Riedel, Peter; Wenig, Micaela; Reindl, Max; Seiler, Theo

    1999-06-01

    Background: The formation of evaporation bubbles and pressure waves during Erbium:YAG laser vitrectomy might cause intraocular damages. Methods: In water, the formation of the evaporation bubbles was observed by high-speed photography. The output energy of the quartz tip ranges from 5 to 50 mJ and the laser pulse duration from 50 μsec to 300 μsec. The dynamic of the evaporation bubbles were investigated for different diameters, various angles and radii of the quartz fiber tip. Furthermore, the spread out of the evaporation bubbles was observed for various geometries of the microsurgery probe. The induced stress waves were measured with a PVDF-hydrophone. Results: The evaporation bubble size increases semi-logarithmic with the pulse energy and reduces with the increase of the pulse duration. The diameter of the tip has no significant influence in the vapor bubble size. The expansion of the vapor bubble can be controlled by the geometry of the tip. The spread out of the vapor bubble can reduced by a slit geometry of the aspiration hole. The maximum pressure amplitude as found to be < 2 MPa. Conclusions: The evolution of evaporation bubbles and the induced pressure amplitudes from the microsurgery probe can be minimized for Erbium:YAG laser vitrectomy.

  4. Laser Prostatectomy: Holmium Laser Enucleation and Photoselective Laser Vaporization of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Bostanci, Yakup; Kazzazi, Amir; Djavan, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Historically, transurethral resection of the prostate has been the gold standard for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Laser technology has been used to treat BPH for > 15 years. Over the past decade, it has gained wide acceptance by experienced urologists. This review provides an evidence-based update on laser surgery for BPH with a focus on photoselective laser vaporization and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate surgeries and assesses the safety, efficacy, and durability of these techniques. PMID:23671400

  5. Laser action of optically pumped atomic titanium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, H.; Hirata, K.

    1989-09-01

    Laser action has been observed on the titanium 551.4 nm, 3D0(1)-F2, transition. A nitrogen laser is used to produce the titanium vapor by irradiating a metal plate, and the titanium atoms are optically pumped by another nitrogen laser.

  6. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  7. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Hadi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  8. Water vapor isotopes measurements at Mauna Loa, Hawaii: Comparison of laser spectroscopy and remote sensing with traditional methods, and the need for ongoing monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galewsky, J.; Noone, D.; Sharp, Z.; Worden, J.

    2009-04-01

    The isotopic composition of water vapor (2H/1H and 18O/16 ratios) provides unique information on the transport pathways that link water sources to regional sinks, and thus proves useful in understanding large scale atmospheric humidity budgets. Recent advances in measurement technology allow the monitoring of water vapor isotope composition in ways which has can revolutionize investigations of atmospheric hydrology. Traditional measurement of isotopic composition requires trapping of samples with either large volume vacuum flasks or by trapping liquid samples with cryogens for later analyses using mass spectrometry, and are laborious and seldom span more than just short dedicated observational periods. On the other hand, laser absorption spectroscopy can provide almost continuous and autonomous in situ measurements of isotope abundances with precision almost that of traditional mass spectrometry, and observations from spacecraft can make almost daily maps of the global isotope distributions. In October of 2008 three laser based spectrometers were deployed at the Mauna Loa Laboratory in Hawaii to make continuous measurement of the 2H and 18O abundance of free tropospheric water vapor. These results are compared with traditional measurements and with measurements from two satellite platforms. While providing field validation of the new methodologies, the data show variability which captures the transport processes in the region. The data are used to characterize the role of large scale mixing of dry air, the influence of the boundary layer and the importance of moist convection in controlling the low humidity of subtropical air near Hawaii. Although the record is short, it demonstrates the usefulness of using robust isotope measurements to understand the budgets of the most important greenhouse gas. This work motivates establishing a continuous record of isotopes measurement at baseline sites, like Mauna Loa, such that the changes in water cycle can be understood and

  9. Water vapor isotopes measurements at Mauna Loa, Hawaii: Comparison of laser spectroscopy and remote sensing with traditional methods, and the need for ongoing monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noone, D.; Galewsky, J.; Sharp, Z.; Worden, J.

    2008-12-01

    The isotopic composition of water vapor (2H/1H and 18O/16 ratios) provides unique information on the transport pathways that link the water sources to regional sinks, and thus proves useful in understanding the large scale humidity budgets. Recent advances in measurement technology allow the monitoring of water vapor isotope composition in ways which has can revolutionize investigations of atmospheric hydrology. Traditional measurement of isotopic composition requires trapping of samples with either large volume vacuum flasks or by trapping liquid samples with cryogens for later analyses using mass spectrometry, and are laborious and seldom span more than just short dedicated observational periods. On the other hand, laser absorption spectroscopy can provide almost continuous and autonomous in situ measurements of isotope abundances with precision almost that of traditional mass spectrometry, and observations from spacecraft can make almost daily maps of the global isotope distributions. In October of 2008 three laser based spectrometers were deployed at the Mauna Loa Laboratory in Hawaii to make continuous measurement of the 2H and 18O abundance of free tropospheric water vapor. These results are compared with traditional measurements and with measurements from two satellite platforms. While providing field validation of the new methodologies, the data show variability which captures the transport processes in the region. The data are used to characterize the role of large scale mixing of dry air, the influence of the boundary layer and the importance of moist convection in controlling the low humidity of subtropical air near Hawaii. Although the record is short, it demonstrates the usefulness of using robust isotope measurements to understand the budgets of the most important greenhouse gas. This work motivates establishing a continuous record of isotopes measurement at baseline sites, like Mauna Loa, such that the changes in water cycle can be understood and

  10. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  11. Alexandrite laser transmitter development for airborne water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas H.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    In the DIAL technique, the water vapor concentration profile is determined by analyzing the lidar backscatter signals for laser wavelengths tuned 'on' and 'off' a water vapor absorption line. Desired characteristics of the on-line transmitted laser beam include: pulse energy greater than or equal to 100 mJ, high-resolution tuning capability (uncertainty less than 0.25 pm), good spectral stability (jitter less than 0.5 pm about the mean), and high spectral purity (greater than 99 percent). The off-line laser is generally detuned less than 100 pm away from the water vapor line. Its spectral requirements are much less stringent. In our past research, we developed and demonstrated the airborne DIAL technique for water vapor measurements in the 720-nm spectral region using a system based on an alexandrite laser as the transmitter for the on-line wavelength and a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser for the off-line wavelength. This off-line laser has been replaced by a second alexandrite laser. Diode lasers are used to injection seed both lasers for frequency and linewidth control. This eliminates the need for the two intracavity etalons utilized in our previous alexandrite laser and thereby greatly reduces the risk of optical damage. Consequently, the transmitted pulse energy can be substantially increased, resulting in greater measurement range, higher data density, and increased measurement precision. In this paper, we describe the diode injection seed source, the two alexandrite lasers, and the device used to line lock the on-line seed source to the water vapor absorption feature.

  12. Contact laser vaporization of the prostate for benign prostatic hypertrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomella, Leonard G.; Lotfi, M. A.; Milam, Douglas F.; Albala, David; Reagan, Gary

    1994-05-01

    The contact laser applications for the removal of the enlarged prostate are distinctly different than the majority of non-contact Nd:YAG lasers that rely on coagulation necrosis and delayed sloughing. Contact Nd:YAG laser allows cutting, coagulation and vaporization of tissue with minimal penetration beyond the contact surface. Using the contact laser prostatectomy technique, the contact laser probe directly touches and immediately vaporizes the prostatic tissue under the probe. The net result is the immediate removal of the obstructing tissue, in a manner similar to the standard electrosurgical TURP. This immediate removal of tissue offers the patient treated with the contact laser the potential for decreased catheter time and a more rapid resolution of symptoms. Our initial experience suggests that the contact technique may be better suited for the smaller prostate gland (i.e. less than 30 gm). The contact laser may also be used for a procedure termed the `laser assisted TURP': a standard electrosurgical TURP is performed and the contact laser is used for hemostasis. Several investigators have reported non-randomized results of the contact technique with good outcomes. A prospective randomized trial of the contact laser prostatectomy vrs the electrosurgical TURP is underway. The contact laser vaporization of the prostate holds great promise for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hypertrophy: it is virtually bloodless and allows immediate visualization of the TUR defect.

  13. Profiling atmospheric water vapor using a fiber laser lidar system.

    PubMed

    De Young, Russell J; Barnes, Norman P

    2010-02-01

    A compact, lightweight, and efficient fiber laser lidar system has been developed to measure water vapor profiles in the lower atmosphere of Earth or Mars. The line narrowed laser consist of a Tm:germanate fiber pumped by two 792 nm diode arrays. The fiber laser transmits approximately 0.5 mJ Q- switched pulses at 5 Hz and can be tuned to water vapor lines near 1.94 microm with linewidth of approximately 20 pm. A lightweight lidar receiver telescope was constructed of carbon epoxy fiber with a 30 cm Fresnel lens and an advanced HgCdTe APD detector. This system has made preliminary atmospheric measurements.

  14. Application of unstable resonators for copper-vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Baogen; Yin Xianhua

    1987-07-01

    An analysis is made of the possibility of using unstable resonators in reducing the divergence of radiation from a high-gain, short inversion lifetime copper vapor laser. The output laser beam characteristics of telescopic resonators are compared with those of plane-concave resonators. It is shown that to obtain an output beam with low divergence in such a laser, unstable resonators must be used.

  15. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  16. Selective laser vaporization of polypropylene sutures and mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, David; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Kennelly, Michael J.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-02-01

    Complications from polypropylene mesh after surgery for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) may require tedious surgical revision and removal of mesh materials with risk of damage to healthy adjacent tissue. This study explores selective laser vaporization of polypropylene suture/mesh materials commonly used in SUI. A compact, 7 Watt, 647-nm, red diode laser was operated with a radiant exposure of 81 J/cm2, pulse duration of 100 ms, and 1.0-mm-diameter laser spot. The 647-nm wavelength was selected because its absorption by water, hemoglobin, and other major tissue chromophores is low, while polypropylene absorption is high. Laser vaporization of ~200-μm-diameter polypropylene suture/mesh strands, in contact with fresh urinary tissue samples, ex vivo, was performed. Non-contact temperature mapping of the suture/mesh samples with a thermal camera was also conducted. Photoselective vaporization of polypropylene suture and mesh using a single laser pulse was achieved with peak temperatures of 180 and 232 °C, respectively. In control (safety) studies, direct laser irradiation of tissue alone resulted in only a 1 °C temperature increase. Selective laser vaporization of polypropylene suture/mesh materials is feasible without significant thermal damage to tissue. This technique may be useful for SUI procedures requiring surgical revision.

  17. Exploratory laser experiments. [measurement of atmospheric water vapor via optical radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Experiments are described which were undertaken to explore the application of various dye laser methods for generating laser pulses which could be tuned over H2O absorption lines in the visible and near infrared. Specific topics discussed include: operation of a long pulse dye laser with a tunable, narrow band output at high energies near the 5915 A water vapor absorption bands; assembly and operation of a short duration dye laser near the 5915 A water vapor absorption bands; construction of a dye laser to be pumped to operate in the red and near infrared; and preliminary studies of the beam divergence of the output of the a laser-pumped system. Results are summarized.

  18. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  19. Laser-induced contained-vaporization in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-03-01

    When a transparent liquid or solid medium is present in front of an opaque target being irradiated by an intense laser beam, then the expansion of hot vapors generated (at the interface between the medium and the target) by the irradiant heating of the target is restrained by the medium. The tamping effect of the overlying liquid or solid can cause a much larger fraction of the deposited energy to go into kinetic energy, which leads to enhanced tissue disruption, compared to when a gas or vacuum is in front of the target. Condensable vapors and high thermal conductivity in the surrounding material facilitate rapid energy transport out of the vapor, which can cause a major reduction in the tamping enhancements. This contained-vaporization process is likely important in laser-medical applications such as, for example, laser angioplasty and laser lithotripsy. The work enhancement by the process is probably advantageous for lithotripsy in providing the necessary energy to break urinary stones; however, for angioplasty, the enhancement may provide little aid in removing plaque but may cause significant damage to arterial walls. If gas could be introduced into the artery proceeding irradiation of the plaque, then the enhancements could be avoided. In summary, careful management of the tamping conditions during tissue irradiations in the clinical applications of lasers should lead to significant improvements in the overall desired outcome.

  20. Laser-induced contained-vaporization in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    When a transparent liquid or solid medium is present in front of an opaque target being irradiated by an intense laser beam, then the expansion of hot vapors generated (at the interface between the medium and the target) by the irradiant heating of the target is restrained by the medium. The tamping effect of the overlying liquid or solid can cause a much larger fraction of the deposited energy to go into kinetic energy, which leads to enhanced tissue disruption, compared to when a gas or vacuum is in front of the target. Condensable vapors and high thermal conductivity in the surrounding material facilitate rapid energy transport out of the vapor, which can cause a major reduction in the tamping enhancements. This contained-vaporization process is likely important in laser-medical applications such as, for example, laser angioplasty and laser lithotripsy. The work enhancement by the process is probably advantageous for lithotripsy in providing the necessary energy to break urinary stones; however, for angioplasty, the enhancement may provide little aid in removing plaque but may cause significant damage to arterial walls. If gas could be introduced into the artery proceeding irradiation of the plaque, then the enhancements could be avoided. In summary, careful management of the tamping conditions during tissue irradiations in the clinical applications of lasers should lead to significant improvements in the overall desired outcome.

  1. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J; Kanz, V K

    2005-08-22

    We report the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser--Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm resonance transition. Peak output of {approx}1 Watt was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  2. Carbon dioxide laser vaporization of facial siliconomas: flash in the pan or way of the future?

    PubMed

    Chui, Christopher Hoe Kong; Fong, Poh Him

    2008-03-01

    In 1988, Becker first described the "laser silicone flash" encountered while using the CO2 laser to remove breast siliconosis, but no subsequent use of the CO2 laser to remove siliconomas has been reported since. To our knowledge, lasers have not been described to treat facial silicone granulomas. Three cases of facial silicone granuloma (cheek, upper eyelids, and chin) were treated using the technique of CO2 laser vaporization.We describe a novel and effective method to remove facial siliconomas. This technique could avoid the need for radical resection of functional facial tissues such as nerves. Tiny globules of injected silicone in the face were vaporized without any untoward effects. Whether larger siliconomas can be treated in the same way remains to be seen and is an area of potential study.

  3. Laser bladder perforation from photoselective vaporization of prostate resulting in rhabdomyolysis induced acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Farag, E; Baccala, A A; Doutt, R F; Ulchaker, J; O'Hara, J

    2008-06-01

    Hyponatremia and its related comorbidities remain a concern after traditional transurethral resection of the prostrate (TURP). Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) laser coagulation therapy is a new, relatively bloodless procedure for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Perceived benefits with PVP laser TURP include excellent visualization of the operative field during urethral prostatic tissue vaporization and the reduced incidence of laser penetration through the prostatic capsular fibers once the capsule is reached. Theoretically, this would provide a low risk method of perforation during laser TURP. After literature review, we report this as the first case of laser bladder perforation as a complication arising from PVP therapy. This case report discusses the management of acute hyponatremic induced rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure (ARF) and the recommendation to use sodium chloride vs. sterile water for bladder irrigation during PVP TURP procedures. PMID:18327155

  4. Treatment of digital myxoid cysts with carbon dioxide laser vaporization.

    PubMed

    Huerter, C J; Wheeland, R G; Bailin, P L; Ratz, J L

    1987-07-01

    Digital myxoid cysts represent a relatively uncommon cutaneous disorder which have often proven refractory to conservative management. We report a series of ten patients with this condition who were effectively treated with carbon dioxide (CO2) laser vaporization. There has been no recurrence of cysts during a follow-up period ranging from 14 to 44 months.

  5. Method for laser machining explosives and ordnance

    DOEpatents

    Muenchausen, Ross E.; Rivera, Thomas; Sanchez, John A.

    2003-05-06

    Method for laser machining explosives and related articles. A laser beam is directed at a surface portion of a mass of high explosive to melt and/or vaporize the surface portion while directing a flow of gas at the melted and/or vaporized surface portion. The gas flow sends the melted and/or vaporized explosive away from the charge of explosive that remains. The method also involves splitting the casing of a munition having an encased explosive. The method includes rotating a munition while directing a laser beam to a surface portion of the casing of an article of ordnance. While the beam melts and/or vaporizes the surface portion, a flow of gas directed at the melted and/or vaporized surface portion sends it away from the remaining portion of ordnance. After cutting through the casing, the beam then melts and/or vaporizes portions of the encased explosive and the gas stream sends the melted/vaporized explosive away from the ordnance. The beam is continued until it splits the article, after which the encased explosive, now accessible, can be removed safely for recycle or disposal.

  6. Application of G criterion in metal vapor ion laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Chen; Bailiang, Pan; Yi, Jin; Kun, Chen; Zhixin, Yao

    2003-09-01

    Application of G criterion to efficient operation of pulsed discharge-excited R-M transition metal vapor laser was successfully extended to univalent ionic lasing medium from neutral atomic lasing medium on the basis of analyzing the simulation results of 1.09 μm Sr + lasing process. All of the known 17 R-M transition laser lines of univalent ions follow the G criterion except one, to which an interpretation is given. Furthermore, we suggest that only 69 lines among 212 possible R-M transition laser lines predicted by S.V. Markova, which satisfy the G criterion, should be explored first.

  7. Mechanism of resonant infrared laser vaporization of intact polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, R. F., Jr.; Belmont, R. J.; Bubb, D. M.; Dygert, N. L.; Johnson, S. L., Jr.; Schriver, K. E.

    2006-05-01

    Experiments on pulsed laser vaporization of many different kinds of polymers have demonstrated that it is possible to eject intact polymers into the ambient, whether air or vacuum, by resonant pulsed laser excitation, using both neat and matrix targets. Two recent studies of resonant infrared ablation - one on polystyrene, the other on poly(amic acid), the precursor for the thermoset polyimide - show moreover that the ablation process is both wavelength selective and surprisingly non-energetic, especially compared to ultraviolet laser ablation. We propose a wavelength-selective photothermal mechanism involving breaking of intermolecular hydrogen bonds that is consistent with these observations.

  8. Laser vaporization in treatment of superficial endometriosis of the uterine cervix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Jakub; Wilczak, Maciej; Opala, Tomasz; Pisarska-Krawczyk, Magdalena; Cwojdzinski, Marek; Pisarski, Tadeusz

    1996-03-01

    The study shows the treatment of superficial endometriosis of the uterine cervix in 79 patients. After first vaporization 74 patients were cured successfully. In two cases the laser procedure should be repeated and in 3 women the operation should be performed for the third time. All patients are still under control in our department and there is no recurrence observed. Carbon- dioxide laser vaporization under colposcopic control is an efficient method of treatment of superficial endometriosis of the uterine cervix that requires no anaesthesia. The healing process after laser procedures is fast and without complications. The number of recurrences is low. Use of carbon-dioxide laser under colposcopic control because of precise destruction of lesions, fast healing and a low number of recurrences seems to be the method of choice.

  9. Isotope separation using metallic vapor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, G. R.; Chen, C. J.; Harstad, K. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The isotope U235 is separated from a gasified isotope mixture of U235 and U238 by selectively exciting the former from the ground state utilizing resonant absorption of radiation from precisely tuned lasers. The excited isotope is then selectively ionized by electron bombardment. It then is separated from the remaining isotope mixture by electromagnetic separation.

  10. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  11. Vaporization behavior of non-stoichiometric refractory carbide materials and direct observations of the vapor phase using laser diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, D.P.; Wantuck, P.J.; Rehse, S.J.; Wallace, T.C. Sr.

    1993-09-01

    Transition metal and actinide carbides, such as ZrC or NbC and UC or ThC, exhibit a wide range of stoichiometry, and therefore vaporize incongruently. At long times, steady state vaporization can be achieved where relative concentrations of atomic species on solid surface equals that in the gas phase. The surface composition under these steady state conditions is termed the congruently vaporizing composition, (CVC). Modeling the vaporization or corrosion behavior of this dynamic process is complex and requires an understanding of how the surface composition changes with time and a knowledge of CVC, which is both temperature and atmosphere dependent. This paper describes vaporization and corrosion behavior of non-stoichiometric refractory carbide materials and, as an example, describes a thermokinetic model that characterizes the vaporization behavior of the complex carbide U{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}C{sub y} in hydrogen at 2500 to 3200 K. This model demonstrates that steady state corrosion of U{sub x}Zr{sub l-x}C{sub y} is rate limited by gaseous transport of Zr where partial pressure of Zr is determined by CVC. This paper also briefly describes efforts to image and characterize the vapor phase above the surface of ZrC in static and flowing gas environments using planar laser induced fluorescence. We have developed the method for monitoring and controlling the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuels in nuclear thermal rockets. However, the techniques described can be used, to image boundary layers, and could be used verifying corrosion models.

  12. Axicon based conical resonators with high power copper vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijendra; Subramaniam, V V; Daultabad, S R; Chakraborty, Ashim

    2010-07-01

    We report for the first time the performance of axicon based conical resonators (ABCRs) in a copper vapor laser, with novel results. The unstable conical resonator comprising of conical mirror (reflecting axicon) with axicon angle approximately pi/18, cone angle approximately 160 degrees, and a convex mirror of 60 cm radius of curvature was effective in reducing the average beam divergence to approximately 0.15 mrad (approximately 25 fold reduction compared to standard multimode plane-plane cavity) with output power of approximately 31 W. Extraction efficiency of approximately 50%-60% and beam divergence of <1 mrad was achieved in other stable ABCR configurations using flat and concave mirrors with the axicon. This is a significant improvement compared to 4-5 mrad normally observed in conventional stable resonators in copper vapor lasers. The conical resonators with copper vapor laser provide high misalignment tolerance beta approximately 4-5 mrad where beta is the tilt angle of the conical mirror from optimum position responsible for approximately 20% decline in laser power. The depth of focus d was approximately three times larger in case of conical resonator as compared to that of standard spherical unstable resonator under similar beam divergence and focusing conditions. PMID:20687708

  13. Laser device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J. D.

    1985-06-25

    A simplified, relatively inexpensive laser device, wherein the laser elements are fixed in a body exoskeleton of electrical insulating material having a low coefficient of thermal expansion. The preferred embodiment includes a shotgun type laser filter having parallel bores which receive the laser flashlamp and laser rod in fixed relation in a body chamber. The reflector surrounds the laser filter and retains the filter within the body chamber. In the preferred method of this invention, several controlled lasing pulses are generated with each illumination pulse of the flashlamp, substantially increasing the efficiency of the laser device. The number of pulses is generally controlled by increasing the voltage to the flashlamp. The rapid multiple lasing pulses generate an elongated plasma in a fluid medium, such as the vitreous fluid body of an eye which makes the laser device extemely efficient for treating glaucoma and other medical treatments.

  14. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, S.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Murnane, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethrough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate. 7 figs.

  15. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, Sterling; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-01-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate.

  16. Small-sized dichroic atomic vapor laser lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changmin; Iwata, G. Z.; Corsini, E.; Higbie, J. M.; Knappe, S.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.

    2011-04-01

    Two, lightweight diode laser frequency stabilization systems designed for experiments in the field are described. A significant reduction in size and weight in both models supports the further miniaturization of measurement devices in the field. Similar to a previous design, magnetic field lines are contained within a magnetic shield enclosing permanent magnets and a Rb cell, so that these dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) systems may be used for magnetically sensitive instruments. The mini-DAVLL system (49 mm long) uses a vapor cell (20 mm long) and does not require cell heaters. An even smaller micro-DAVLL system (9 mm long) uses a microfabricated cell (3 mm square) and requires heaters. These new systems show no degradation in performance with regard to previous designs while considerably reducing dimensions.

  17. Diode laser based water vapor DIAL using modulated pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong Le Hoai; Abo, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring lower-tropospheric water vapor profile using the modulated pulse technique. The transmitter is based on single-mode diode laser and tapered semiconductor optical amplifier with a peak power of 10W around 800nm absorption band, and the receiver telescope diameter is 35cm. The selected wavelengths are compared to referenced wavelengths in terms of random error and systematic errors. The key component of modulated pulse technique, a macropulse, is generated with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, and the modulation within the macropulse is coded according to a pseudorandom sequence with 100ns chip width. As a result, we evaluate both single pulse modulation and pseudorandom coded pulse modulation technique. The water vapor profiles conducted from these modulation techniques are compared to the real observation data in summer in Japan.

  18. Raman-shifted dye laser for water vapor DIAL measurements.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, B E; Singh, U N; Higdon, N S; Cotnoir, L J; Wilkerson, T D; Browell, E V

    1987-05-01

    For improved DIAL measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, we have generated narrowband (~0.03-cm(-1)) laser radiation at 720- and 940-nm wavelengths by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) using the narrow linewidth (~0.02-cm(-1)) output of a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser. For a hydrogen pressure of 350 psi, the first Stokes conversion efficiencies to 940 nm were 20% and 35% when using a conventional and waveguide Raman cell, respectively. We measured the linewidth of the first Stokes line at high cell pressures and inferred collisional broadening coefficients that agree well with those previously measured in spontaneous Raman scattering.

  19. Raman-shifted dye laser for water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, B. E.; Singh, U. N.; Cotnoir, L. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.; Higdon, N. S.; Browell, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    For improved DIAL measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, narrowband (about 0.03/cm) laser radiation at 720- and 940-nm wavelengths was generated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), using the narrow linewidth (about 0.02/cm) output of a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser. For a hydrogen pressure of 350 psi, the first Stokes conversion efficiencies to 940 nm were 20 percent and 35 percent, when using a conventional and waveguide Raman cell, respectively. The linewidth of the first Stokes line at high cell pressures, and the inferred collisional broadening coefficients, agree well with those previously measured in spontaneous Raman scattering.

  20. Copper-vapor laser in medical practice: gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvykov, Vladimir V.; Zazulya, O. I.; Zemskov, Konstantin I.

    1993-10-01

    About 100 patients were treated for cervical erosion, cervical leukoplakia, and vulval warts in the Gynecology Department of the adult polyclinic of the Zelenograd Center of Medicine. Copper vapor laser (CVL) was used with output average power up to 4 W in two lines (510 nm, 578 nm). Pulse repetition rate was about 10 kHz, pulselength approximately 20 - 40 ns. Four to twelve procedures were sufficient to recover.

  1. Negative-branch unstable-resonator copper-vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Dixit, S K; Singh, B; Nakhe, S V; Mittal, J K; Bhatnagar, R

    1990-04-15

    Copper-vapor lasers (CVL's) with positive-branch unstable resonators have been used extensively for reducing output-beam divergence. In contrast, the negative-branch unstable resonator has not been applied to CVL's. Here we study the performance of a negative-branch unstable-resonator CVL with various magnifications. A divergence of approximately 3.25 times the diffraction limit was obtained. PMID:19767965

  2. High average power magnetic modulator for metal vapor lasers

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Daniel L.; Cook, Edward G.; Miller, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A three-stage magnetic modulator utilizing magnetic pulse compression designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper vapor laser at a 4.5 kHz repetition rate is disclosed. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power. The circuit includes a step up auto transformer and utilizes a rod and plate stack construction technique to achieve a high packing factor.

  3. Apparatus and method to control atmospheric water vapor composition and concentration during dynamic cooling of biological tissues in conjunction with laser irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.S.; Anvari, B.; Tanenbaum, B.S.; Milner, T.E.

    1999-12-07

    Cryogen spray cooling of skin surface with millisecond cryogen spurts is an effective method for establishing a controlled temperature distribution in tissue and protecting the epidermis from nonspecific thermal injury during laser mediated dermatological procedures. Control of humidity level, spraying distance and cryogen boiling point is material to the resulting surface temperature. Decreasing the ambient humidity level results in less ice formation on the skin surface without altering the surface temperature during the cryogen spurt. For a particular delivery nozzle, increasing the spraying distance to 85 millimeters lowers the surface temperature. The methodology comprises establishing a controlled humidity level in the theater of operation of the irradiation site of the biological tissues before and/or during the cryogenic spray cooling of the biological tissue. At cold temperatures calibration was achieved by mounting a thermistor on a thermoelectric cooler. The thermal electric cooler was cooled from 20 C to about {minus}20 C while measuring its infrared emission.

  4. Apparatus and method to control atmospheric water vapor composition and concentration during dynamic cooling of biological tissues in conjunction with laser irradiations

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, J. Stuart; Anvari, Bahman; Tanenbaum, B. Samuel; Milner, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling of skin surface with millisecond cryogen spurts is an effective method for establishing a controlled temperature distribution in tissue and protecting the epidermis from nonspecific thermal injury during laser mediated dermatological procedures. Control of humidity level, spraying distance and cryogen boiling point is material to the resulting surface temperature. Decreasing the ambient humidity level results in less ice formation on the skin surface without altering the surface temperature during the cryogen spurt. For a particular delivery nozzle, increasing the spraying distance to 85 millimeters lowers the surface temperature. The methodology comprises establishing a controlled humidity level in the theater of operation of the irradiation site of the biological tissues before and/or during the cryogenic spray cooling of the biological tissue. At cold temperatures calibration was achieved by mounting a thermistor on a thermoelectric cooler. The thermal electric cooler was cooled from from 20.degree. C. to about -20.degree. C. while measuring its infrared emission.

  5. Tm:germanate Fiber Laser for Planetary Water Vapor Atmospheric Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; De Young, Russell

    2009-01-01

    The atmospheric profiling of water vapor is necessary for finding life on Mars and weather on Earth. The design and performance of a water vapor lidar based on a Tm:germanate fiber laser is presented.

  6. Laser vaporization of trace explosives for enhanced non-contact detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Kendziora, Christopher A.; Bubb, Daniel M.; Corgan, Jeffrey; McGill, R. Andrew

    2010-04-01

    Trace explosives contamination is found primarily in the form of solid particulates on surfaces, due to the low vapor pressure of most explosives materials. Today, the standard sampling procedure involves physical removal of particulate matter from surfaces of interest. A variety of collection methods have been used including air-jetting or swabbing surfaces of interest. The sampled particles are typically heated to generate vapor for analysis in hand held, bench top, or portal detection systems. These sampling methods are time-consuming (and hence costly), require a skilled technician for optimal performance, and are inherently non-selective, allowing non-explosives particles to be co-sampled and analyzed. This can adversely affect the sensitivity and selectivity of detectors, especially those with a limited dynamic range. We present a new approach to sampling solid particles on a solid surface that is targeted, non-contact, and which selectively enhances trace explosive signatures thus improving the selectivity and sensitivity of existing detectors. Our method involves the illumination of a surface of interest with infrared laser light with a wavelength that matches a distinctive vibrational mode of an explosive. The resonant coupling of laser energy results in rapid heating of explosive particles and rapid release of a vapor plume. Neighboring particles unrelated to explosives are generally not directly heated as their vibrational modes are not resonant with the laser. As a result, the generated vapor plume includes a higher concentration of explosives than if the particles were heated with a non-selective light source (e.g. heat lamp). We present results with both benchtop infrared lasers as well as miniature quantum cascade lasers.

  7. Combined weak-current discharge in a copper-vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V. F.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Fedorov, K. V.; Evtushenko, G. S.; Torgaev, S. N.; Kulagin, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    We have considered the application of a new method of pumping of active media on metal vapors by a combined weak-current discharge. A distinguishing feature of a weak-current discharge compared to the method for the traditional pumping of self-contained lasers is the regime of lower energy input to the discharge. Using this regime, it is possible to realize a pulsed-periodic form of the discharge with laser pulses of various shapes and durations at low current amplitudes (several amperes). Additional pulsed-periodic discharge is used to heat the active zone.

  8. Method and Apparatus for Concentrating Vapors for Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Baldwin, David L.; Anheier, Jr., Norman C.

    2008-10-07

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for pre-concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the apparatus can be thermally desorbed achieving at least partial separation of vapor mixtures. The apparatus is suitable, e.g., for preconcentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than for direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications.

  9. From a metal vapor laser projection microscope to a laser monitor (by the 50 year-anniversary of metal vapor lasers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the history of active optical systems development from a laser projection microscope to a laser monitor. The examples of object visualization and diagnostics of high speed processes hidden by the intense background radiation are discussed. These are the processes of laser-surface interaction, self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), the corona discharge in the air, the nanoparticle production process using a high-power fiber laser, and etc. The results obtained by different research groups suggest that high-speed metal vapor brightness amplifiers and active optical systems based on them need further research, development and novel applications.

  10. Analysis of temporal jitter in a copper vapor laser system.

    PubMed

    Durga Praveen Kumar, D; Gantayet, L M; Singh, Sunita; Rawat, A S; Rana, Paramjit; Rajasree, V; Agarwalla, Sandeep K; Chakravarthy, D P

    2012-02-01

    Temporal jitter in a magnetic pulse compression based copper vapor laser (CVL) system is analyzed by considering ripple present in the input dc power supply and ripple present in the magnetic core resetting power supply. It is shown that the jitter is a function of the ratio of operating voltage to the designed voltage, percentage ripple, and the total propagation delay of the magnetic pulse compression circuit. Experimental results from a CVL system operating at a repetition rate of 9 kHz are presented. PMID:22380123

  11. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Crane, J.; Erbert, G.; Haynam, C.; Johnson, M.; Morris, J.; Paisner, J.; Solarz, R.; Worden, E.

    1986-09-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power-reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is the heart of the AVLIS process. We discuss those fundamental atomic parameters that are necessary for describing isotope-selective resonant multistep photoionization along with the measurement techniques that we use. We illustrate the methodology adopted with examples of other elements that are under study in our program.

  12. Explosive vaporization of metallic sodium microparticles by CW resonant laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Atutov, S N; Baldini, W; Biancalana, V; Calabrese, R; Guidi, V; Mai, B; Mariotti, E; Mazzocca, G; Moi, L; Pod'yachev, S P; Tomassetti, L

    2001-11-19

    Explosive vaporization of metallic Na microparticles stimulated by resonant cw laser radiation has been observed in a glass cell. Vaporization occurs at low laser-power density. The effect consists in the generation of optically thick and sharply localized Na vapor clouds propagating in the cell against the laser beam. The effect is explained by laser excitation of Na atoms, which collide onto the surface of the microparticles and transfer their internal energy. This causes other atoms to be vaporized and to continue the avalanche process. PMID:11736344

  13. Explosive vaporization of metallic sodium microparticles by CW resonant laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Atutov, S N; Baldini, W; Biancalana, V; Calabrese, R; Guidi, V; Mai, B; Mariotti, E; Mazzocca, G; Moi, L; Pod'yachev, S P; Tomassetti, L

    2001-11-19

    Explosive vaporization of metallic Na microparticles stimulated by resonant cw laser radiation has been observed in a glass cell. Vaporization occurs at low laser-power density. The effect consists in the generation of optically thick and sharply localized Na vapor clouds propagating in the cell against the laser beam. The effect is explained by laser excitation of Na atoms, which collide onto the surface of the microparticles and transfer their internal energy. This causes other atoms to be vaporized and to continue the avalanche process.

  14. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, L.W.

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid - starting as feedwater heating where no vapors are present, progressing to nucleate heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with film heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10 to 30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  15. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid--starting as "feedwater" heating where no vapors are present, progressing to "nucleate" heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with "film" heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10-30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  16. Development of a single-mode dye laser pumped by a copper vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yasushi; Niki, Hideaki; Adachi, Satoru; Takeda, Tetsuya; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1986-10-01

    An efficient high power single mode dye laser was developed for a study of uranium enrichment. The oscillation and amplification properties were studied experimentally and theoretically. The obtained band width was narrower than 100 MHz. When rhodamine 6 G chloride was used, the average output power and efficiency of the oscillator-amplifier system were 300 mW and 5%, respectively, at 575 nm for the total copper vapor laser pumping power of 4 W.

  17. 80-W green KTP laser used in photoselective laser vaporization of the prostrate by frequency doubling of Yb 3+ -doped large-mode area fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hongxing; Li, Zhengjia

    2007-05-01

    Photoselective laser vaporization of the prostate (PVP) is the most promising method for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but KTP lasers used in PVP with lamp-pumped are low efficient .To increase the efficiency , we develop a 80-W, 400kHz, linearly polarized green laser based on a frequency-doubled fiber laser. A polarization-maintaining large-mode area (LMA) fiber amplifier generate polarized 1064nm fundamental wave by amplifying the seed signal from a composite Cr 4+:YAG-Nd 3+:YAG crystal fiber laser. The fundamental wave is injected into a KTP crystal with confined temperature management to achieve second harmonic generation (SHG). The overall electrical efficiency to the green portion of the spectrum is 10%.80-W maintenance-free long-lifetime KTP laser obtained can well satisfy the need of PVP.

  18. Raman-shifted dye laser for water vapor DIAL measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, B.E.; Singh, U.N.; Higdon, N.S.; Cotnoir, L.J.; Wilkerson, T.D.; Browell, E.V.

    1987-05-01

    For improved DIAL measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, we have generated narrowband (--0.03-cm/sup -1/) laser radiation at 720- and 940-nm wavelengths by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) using the narrow linewidth (--0.02-cm/sup -1/) output of a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser. For a hydrogen pressure of 350 psi, the first Stokes conversion efficiencies to 940 nm were 20% and 35% when using a conventional and waveguide Raman cell, respectively. We measured the linewidth of the first Stokes line at high cell pressures and inferred collisional broadening coefficients that agree well with those previously measured in spontaneous Raman scattering.

  19. Single frequency and wavelength stabilized near infrared laser source for water vapor DIAL remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti; Walters, Brooke; Shuman, Tim; Losee, Andrew; Schum, Tom; Puffenberger, Kent; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-02-01

    Fibertek has demonstrated a single frequency, wavelength stabilized near infrared laser transmitter for NASA airborne water vapor DIAL application. The application required a single-frequency laser transmitter operating at 935 nm near infrared (NIR) region of the water vapor absorption spectrum, capable of being wavelength seeded and locked to a reference laser source and being tuned at least 100 pm across the water absorption spectrum for DIAL on/off measurements. Fibertek is building a laser transmitter system based on the demonstrated results. The laser system will be deployed in a high altitude aircraft (ER-2 or UAV) to autonomously perform remote, long duration and high altitude water vapor measurements.

  20. High intensity vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet production by noncollinear mixing in laser vaporized media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, Michael A.; Albert, Daniel R.; Davis, H. Floyd

    2016-06-01

    A method is described for generating intense pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser radiation by resonance enhanced four-wave mixing of commercial pulsed nanosecond lasers in laser vaporized mercury under windowless conditions. By employing noncollinear mixing of the input beams, the need of dispersive elements such as gratings for separating the VUV/XUV from the residual UV and visible beams is eliminated. A number of schemes are described, facilitating access to the 9.9-14.6 eV range. A simple and convenient scheme for generating wavelengths of 125 nm, 112 nm, and 104 nm (10 eV, 11 eV, and 12 eV) using two dye lasers without the need for dye changes is described.

  1. Explosive vaporization of a large transparent droplet irradiated by a high intensity laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J Z; Lam, J K; Wood, C F; Chu, B T; Chang, R K

    1987-11-15

    Shadowgraph studies of the explosive vaporization of a transparent water droplet after irradiation by a high intensity beam show that dielectric breakdown occurs within the droplet shadow face and generates a dense plasma, which absorbs the laser pulse. The convective forces expel the vapor from the droplet shadow face. We have deduced (1) the vapor propagation velocities, (2) the recoil velocity of the remaining droplet, and (3) the deformation rate of the illuminated face. Droplets are noted to eject fingerlike material from the surface facing the single laser-vaporized droplet when the asymmetrical vapor intercepts the neighboring droplets.

  2. Alexandrite laser characterization and airborne lidar developments for water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, P.; Higdon, N. S.; Grossmann, B. E.; Browell, E. V.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of an Alexandrite laser used for making water vapor DIAL measurements have been evaluated. The optical servo-system used to lock the laser wavelength on a water vapor absorption line is described. A brief description of the DIAL system is given and the data obtained with this lidar during flight tests in March 1990 are also presented.

  3. Stabilization and spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    A description of an optical system used to lock the alexandrite laser frequency on a water vapor absorption line is presented. The laser spectral characteristics, which include the spectral purity, the effect of the laser linewidth on the absorption, and the laser wavelength stability, are evaluated.

  4. Gas and metal vapor lasers and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 22, 23, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    Various papers on gas and metal vapor lasers and applications are presented. Individual topics addressed include: high-power copper vapor laser development, modified off-axis unstable resonator for copper vapor laser, industrial applications of metal vapor lasers, newly developed excitation circuit for kHz pulsed lasers, copper vapor laser precision processing, development of solid state pulse power supply for copper vapor laser, multiple spectral structure of the 578.2-nm line for copper vapor laser, adsorption of bromine in CuBr laser, processing of polytetrafluoroethylene with high-power VUV laser radiation, characterization of a subpicosecond XeF(C - A) excimer laser, X-ray preionization for high-repetition-rate discharge excimer lasers. Also discussed are: investigation of microwave-pumped excimer and rare-gas laser transitions, influence of gas composition of XeCl laser performance, output power stabilization of a XeCl excimer laser by HCl gas injection, excimer laser machining of optical fiber taps, diagnostics of a compact UV-preionized XeCl laser with BCl3 halogen donor, blackbody-pumped CO32 lasers using Gaussian and waveguide cavities, chemical problems of high-power sealed-off CO lasers, laser action of Xe and Ne pumped by electron beam, process monitoring during CO2 laser cutting, double-pulsed TEA CO2 laser, superhigh-gain gas laser, high-power ns-pulse iodine laser provided with SBS mirror. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  5. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  6. Multiphoton laser ionization for energy conversion in barium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Y.; Kokaj, J.; Afrousheh, K.; Mathew, J.; Nair, R.; Pichler, G.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the ion detection of barium atoms in special heated ovens with a tungsten rod in the middle of the stainless steel tube. The tungsten rod was heated indirectly by the oven body heaters. A bias voltage between the cell body and the tungsten rod of 9 V was used to collect electrons, after the barium ions had been created. However, we could collect the electrons even without the bias voltage, although with ten times less efficiency. We studied the conditions for the successful bias-less thermionic signal detection using excimer/dye laser two-photon excitation of Rydberg states below and above the first ionization limit (two-photon wavelength at 475.79 nm). We employed a hot-pipe oven and heat-pipe oven (with inserted mesh) in order to generate different barium vapor distributions inside the oven. The thermionic signal increased by a factor of two under heat-pipe oven conditions.

  7. Gas dynamics of UV-laser produced vapor plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, S.I.; Lukyanchuk, B.S.; Luches, A.

    1996-05-01

    Dynamics of dense laser-produced vapor plume are studied. The analysis is based on the well-known special solution of gas dynamics equations that describes the expansion of an ellipsoidal gas cloud into vacuum. This solution is employed to explain the apparent {open_quote}{open_quote}rotation{close_quote}{close_quote} of the cloud (so called {open_quote}{open_quote}flip-over effect{close_quote}{close_quote}). The flux of atoms to the substrate and the film thickness profiles are calculated using the model. It is shown that the cloud expansion into vacuum and into an ambient gas both are unstable. For short-wavelength perturbations, estimates of the instability growth rate are presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. The use of laser diodes for control of uranium vaporization rates

    SciTech Connect

    Hagans, K.; Galkowski, J.

    1993-09-01

    Within the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program we have successfully used the laser absorption spectroscopy technique (LAS) to diagnose process physics performance and control vaporization rate. In the LAS technique, a narrow line-width laser is tuned to an absorption line of the species to be measured. The laser light that is propagated through the sample is and, from this data, the density of the species can be calculated. These laser systems have exclusively consisted of expensive, cumbersome, and difficult to maintain argon-ion-pumped ring dye lasers. While the wavelength flexibility of dye lasers is very useful in a laboratory environment, these laser systems are not well suited for the industrial process control system under development for an AVLIS plant. Diode-lasers offer lower system costs, reduced man power requirements, reduced space requirements, higher system availability, and improved operator safety. We report the. successful deployment and test of a prototype laser diode based uranium vapor rate control system. Diode-laser generated LAS data was used to control the uranium vaporization rate in a hands-off mode for greater than 50 hours. With one minor adjustment the system successfully controlled the vaporization rate for greater than 147 hours. We report excellent agreement with ring dye laser diagnostics and uranium weigh-back measurements.

  9. Collinear laser spectroscopy of francium using online rubidium vapor neutralization and amplitude modulated lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sell, J. F.; Gulyuz, K.; Sprouse, G. D.

    2009-12-15

    Performing collinear laser spectroscopy on low intensity radioactive beams requires sensitive detection techniques. We explain our apparatus to detect atomic resonances in neutralized {sup 208-210}Fr ion beams at beam energies of 5 keV and intensities of 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}. Efficient neutralization ({>=}80%) is accomplished by passing the beam through a dense Rb vapor. Increased detection efficiency is achieved by amplitude modulating the exciting laser to decrease the scattered light background, allowing fluorescence detection only when the laser is near its minimum in the modulation cycle. Using this technique in a collinear geometry we achieve a background reduction by a factor of 180 and a signal-to-noise increase of 2.2, with the lifetime of the atomic state playing a role in the efficiency of this process. Such laser modulation will also produce sidebands on the atomic spectra which we illustrate.

  10. Collinear laser spectroscopy of francium using online rubidium vapor neutralization and amplitude modulated lasers.

    PubMed

    Sell, J F; Gulyuz, K; Sprouse, G D

    2009-12-01

    Performing collinear laser spectroscopy on low intensity radioactive beams requires sensitive detection techniques. We explain our apparatus to detect atomic resonances in neutralized (208-210)Fr ion beams at beam energies of 5 keV and intensities of 10(5) s(-1). Efficient neutralization (> or = 80%) is accomplished by passing the beam through a dense Rb vapor. Increased detection efficiency is achieved by amplitude modulating the exciting laser to decrease the scattered light background, allowing fluorescence detection only when the laser is near its minimum in the modulation cycle. Using this technique in a collinear geometry we achieve a background reduction by a factor of 180 and a signal-to-noise increase of 2.2, with the lifetime of the atomic state playing a role in the efficiency of this process. Such laser modulation will also produce sidebands on the atomic spectra which we illustrate. PMID:20059132

  11. Collinear laser spectroscopy of francium using online rubidium vapor neutralization and amplitude modulated lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, J. F.; Gulyuz, K.; Sprouse, G. D.

    2009-12-01

    Performing collinear laser spectroscopy on low intensity radioactive beams requires sensitive detection techniques. We explain our apparatus to detect atomic resonances in neutralized F208-210r ion beams at beam energies of 5 keV and intensities of 105 s-1. Efficient neutralization (≥80%) is accomplished by passing the beam through a dense Rb vapor. Increased detection efficiency is achieved by amplitude modulating the exciting laser to decrease the scattered light background, allowing fluorescence detection only when the laser is near its minimum in the modulation cycle. Using this technique in a collinear geometry we achieve a background reduction by a factor of 180 and a signal-to-noise increase of 2.2, with the lifetime of the atomic state playing a role in the efficiency of this process. Such laser modulation will also produce sidebands on the atomic spectra which we illustrate.

  12. Laser vaporization of extravasation type of mucocele of the lower lip with 940-nm diode laser.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, G; Mehra, A; Agarwal, A

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old male presented with an asymptomatic swelling of the lower labial mucosa. Examination revealed that the tip of maxillary canine was causing trauma on the affected side. A diagnosis of extravasation type of mucocele was established clinically. Vaporization of the mucocele was done with a 940-nm diode laser in contact mode. The lesion healed uneventfully and there has been no recurrence for 3 months. PMID:23965466

  13. Method for controlling corrosion in thermal vapor injection gases

    DOEpatents

    Sperry, John S.; Krajicek, Richard W.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in the method for producing high pressure thermal vapor streams from combustion gases for injection into subterranean oil producing formations to stimulate the production of viscous minerals is described. The improvement involves controlling corrosion in such thermal vapor gases by injecting water near the flame in the combustion zone and injecting ammonia into a vapor producing vessel to contact the combustion gases exiting the combustion chamber.

  14. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; London, R.A.; Strauss, M.

    1997-10-26

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks.

  15. Fragmentation methods in laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi X.; Whitehurst, Colin; King, Terence A.

    1991-07-01

    Following a series of opto-acoustic-mechanical and spectroscopic studies into the basic mechanisms of laser lithotripsy, a plasma-mediated opto-mechanical energy transfer model is presented. Laser energy, first absorbed by the calculi material at the surface and couples into the initiated plasma following ionization of vaporized material, is finally transformed into destructive mechanical energy via a shock wave induced by the impulsive expansion of the resulting plasma. This leads to the fragmentation of the calculi. The laser-plasma energy coupling gives a new definition for the fluence threshold to laser induced breakdown, which agrees with shock wave detection and analysis. A laser pulse shape with initial low intensity and sufficient fluence to vaporize a required amount of target material (lasting a few microsecond(s) ) and terminating in a short, intense pulse of about 1microsecond(s) or less, to couple most of the laser energy into the dense young plasma and so create high pressures, is required to produce optimum effect for laser lithotripsy. An opto-mechanical coupler has been designed which transfers the maximum laser energy into mechanically destructive energy, and successfully fragments various types of urinary and biliary calculi even including those calculi with poor surface absorptance, like pure white cystine. A solid state laser, Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers wavelength and 150 microsecond(s) pulse width), has also been tested as an alternative to the flashlamp-excited dye laser. The underwater shock wave induced by this laser has been measured and has successfully fragmented calculi with poor absorptance in the visible region.

  16. The threshold of vapor channel formation in water induced by pulsed CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenqing; Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Water plays an important role in laser ablation. There are two main interpretations of laser-water interaction: hydrokinetic effect and vapor phenomenon. The two explanations are reasonable in some way, but they can't explain the mechanism of laser-water interaction completely. In this study, the dynamic process of vapor channel formation induced by pulsed CO2 laser in static water layer was monitored by high-speed camera. The wavelength of pulsed CO2 laser is 10.64 um, and pulse repetition rate is 60 Hz. The laser power ranged from 1 to 7 W with a step of 0.5 W. The frame rate of high-speed camera used in the experiment was 80025 fps. Based on high-speed camera pictures, the dynamic process of vapor channel formation was examined, and the threshold of vapor channel formation, pulsation period, the volume, the maximum depth and corresponding width of vapor channel were determined. The results showed that the threshold of vapor channel formation was about 2.5 W. Moreover, pulsation period, the maximum depth and corresponding width of vapor channel increased with the increasing of the laser power.

  17. Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry

    1988-01-01

    A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself.

  18. Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.

    1988-03-15

    A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself. 4 figs.

  19. Method and apparatus for concentrating vapors for analysis

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W.; Baldwin, David L.; Anheier, Jr., Norman C.

    2012-06-05

    A pre-concentration device and a method are disclosed for concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the pre-concentration device are thermally desorbed, achieving at least partial separation of the vapor mixtures. The pre-concentration device is suitable, e.g., for pre-concentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable.

  20. Theoretical analysis of the semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of two new pump-couplings: semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped configurations in alkali vapor lasers is reported, which mainly includes the numerical approaches for evaluation of the pump intensity and temperature distribution in the cell of these two configurations. Comparison between the simulated results of the semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped Cs vapor lasers and the experimental results of the single-side pumped Cs vapor lasers with a cylindrical white diffuse reflector and a stable or unstable resonator is made. Dependencies of laser power on pump power and flowed velocity for semi-ring, trapezoid, single and double side-pumped configurations are calculated, demonstrating the advantages of the semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped configurations. Thus the model is very helpful for designing high-power side-pumped alkali vapor lasers.

  1. Internal Energy Deposition for Low Energy, Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanospray Post-ionization Mass Spectrometry using Thermometer Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Paul M.; Shi, Fengjian; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    The internal energy of p-substituted benzylpyridinium ions after laser vaporization using low energy, femtosecond duration laser pulses of wavelengths 800 and 1042 nm was determined using the survival yield method. Laser vaporization of dried benzylpyridinium ions from metal slides into a buffered nanospray with 75 μJ, 800 nm laser pulses resulted in a higher extent of fragmentation than conventional nanospray due to the presence of a two-photon resonance fragmentation pathway. Using higher energy 800 nm laser pulses (280 and 505 μJ) led to decreased survival yields for the four different dried benzylpyridinium ions. Analyzing dried thermometer ions with 46.5 μJ, 1042 nm pulse-bursts resulted in little fragmentation and mean internal energy distributions equivalent to nanospray, which is attributable to the absence of a two-photon resonance that occurs with higher energy, 800 nm laser pulses. Vaporization of thermometer ions from solution with either 800 nm or 1042 nm laser pulses resulted in comparable internal energy distributions to nanospray ionization.

  2. Method and apparatus for conducting variable thickness vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Nesslage, G.V.

    1984-08-03

    A method of vapor depositing metal on a substrate in variable thickness comprises conducting the deposition continuously without interruption to avoid formation of grain boundaries. To achieve reduced deposition in specific regions a thin wire or ribbon blocking body is placed between source and substrate to partially block vapors from depositing in the region immediately below.

  3. Retrieval of water vapor mixing ratios from a laser-based sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, George F.

    1995-01-01

    Langley Research Center has developed a novel external path sensor which monitors water vapor along an optical path between an airplane window and reflective material on the plane's engine. An infrared tunable diode laser is wavelength modulated across a water vapor absorption line at a frequency f. The 2f and DC signals are measured by a detector mounted adjacent to the laser. The 2f/DC ratio depends on the amount of wavelength modulation, the water vapor absorption line being observed, and the temperature, pressure, and water vapor content of the atmosphere. The present work concerns efforts to quantify the contributions of these factors and to derive a method for extracting the water vapor mixing ratio from the measurements. A 3 m cell was fabricated in order to perform laboratory tests of the sensor. Measurements of 2f/DC were made for a series of pressures and modulation amplitudes. During my 1994 faculty fellowship, a computer program was created which allowed 2f/DC to be calculated for any combination of the variables which effect it. This code was used to generate 2f/DC values for the conditions measured in the laboratory. The experimental and theoretical values agreed to within a few percent. As a result, the laser modulation amplitude can now be set in the field by comparing the response of the instrument to the calculated response as a function of modulation amplitude. Once the validity of the computer code was established, it was used to investigate possible candidate absorption lines. 2f/DC values were calculated for pressures, temperatures, and water vapor mixing ratios expected to be encountered in future missions. The results have been incorporated into a database which will be used to select the best line for a particular mission. The database will also be used to select a retrieval technique. For examples under some circumstances there is little temperature dependence in 2f/DC so temperature can be neglected. In other cases, there is a dependence

  4. Characteristics of a dye laser amplifier transversely pumped by copper vapor lasers with a two-dimensional calculation model

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, A.; Nakayama, T.; Kato, M.; Maruyama, Y.

    1997-08-01

    A two-dimensional rate equation model, taking into consideration the transverse absorption loss of pump laser power, is proposed to evaluate the characteristics of a dye laser amplifier with a large input laser beam diameter pumped by high average power copper vapor lasers. The calculations are in good agreement with the measurements taken with a Rhodamine 6G dye, and the model can be used for evaluation of the dye concentration at any wavelength. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  5. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Yu-chen

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent.

  6. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, Y.C.

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent. 8 figs.

  7. Note: A novel and robust circuit for jitter reduction in copper vapor laser system.

    PubMed

    Mishra, R K; Raju, D V S; Nakhe, S V

    2015-11-01

    A novel circuit scheme is presented to improve timing jitter performance of high voltage pulse power supply utilizing semiconductor switches and magnetic pulse compressors, for pumping pulsed copper vapor lasers. The circuit effectively handles reflected energy from the laser load and achieves better jitter performance. The proposed circuit scheme had typical jitter value of ±2 ns whereas the standard circuit used earlier had jitter of more than ±10 ns under similar conditions. Performance of the circuit scheme is studied on a copper vapor laser operating at average laser power of 40 W. PMID:26628188

  8. Note: A novel and robust circuit for jitter reduction in copper vapor laser system.

    PubMed

    Mishra, R K; Raju, D V S; Nakhe, S V

    2015-11-01

    A novel circuit scheme is presented to improve timing jitter performance of high voltage pulse power supply utilizing semiconductor switches and magnetic pulse compressors, for pumping pulsed copper vapor lasers. The circuit effectively handles reflected energy from the laser load and achieves better jitter performance. The proposed circuit scheme had typical jitter value of ±2 ns whereas the standard circuit used earlier had jitter of more than ±10 ns under similar conditions. Performance of the circuit scheme is studied on a copper vapor laser operating at average laser power of 40 W.

  9. Note: A novel and robust circuit for jitter reduction in copper vapor laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. K.; Raju, D. V. S.; Nakhe, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    A novel circuit scheme is presented to improve timing jitter performance of high voltage pulse power supply utilizing semiconductor switches and magnetic pulse compressors, for pumping pulsed copper vapor lasers. The circuit effectively handles reflected energy from the laser load and achieves better jitter performance. The proposed circuit scheme had typical jitter value of ±2 ns whereas the standard circuit used earlier had jitter of more than ±10 ns under similar conditions. Performance of the circuit scheme is studied on a copper vapor laser operating at average laser power of 40 W.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septic trapezo-metacarpal arthritis after prostate laser vaporization.

    PubMed

    Lepetit, C; Le Gal, S; Michon, J; Collon, S; Tillou, X

    2015-08-01

    Prostatic laser vaporization resection is a new and fast growing technique. Most publications compare this technique to the standard diathermic snare prostate resection without considering its particular complications. Septic arthritis of the trapezio-metacarpal joint is particularly rare if it has a haematogenous origin. We present here the case of a 65-year-old man with an isolated trapezio-metacarpal Pseudomonas aeruginosa arthritis with a haematogenous origin following a laser vaporization prostate resection.

  11. Comparison of the treatment of vascular lesions with the copper-vapor laser and flashlamp-pumped dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Stephen T.; Waner, Milton; McGrew, Ben; Colvin, G. B.; Montague, Donna

    1992-08-01

    Vascular lesions such as port-wine stains and telangiectases are sometimes treated with carbon-dioxide lasers, argon lasers or argon-pumped dye lasers; however these lasers are non- specific in their thermal effect on tissues and as a result often cause significant scarring. Recently, evidence has accumulated that the flashlamp-pumped dye (585 nm) and copper- vapor (578 nm) lasers, which produce pulsed light that is efficiently absorbed by hemoglobin, are more selective in coagulating abnormal vascular tissue and as a result give a superior clinical result. It is not yet clear what the most important physical and biological mechanisms are during the light-tissue interaction mediated by these two lasers. The post-treatment sequence of events is different for tissue irradiated by each laser; most significantly, the flashlamp-pumped dye laser causes significant transient purpura, whereas the copper vapor laser causes blanching and eschar formation. The clinical outcome, that is regression of the lesion, is equally successful with either laser although some evidence has accumulated showing that the flashlamp-pumped dye laser is best suited to the treatment of small vessel disease while the copper-vapor laser is better for the treatment of large vessel disease. In this paper, we will discuss our observations of the treatment of vascular lesions on humans with the copper-vapor and flashlamp-pumped dye lasers using empirically derived efficacious treatment parameters. Mathematical models of light and heat propagation and in vivo experiments involving mice ears and rat skin flaps will be used to elucidate what we feel are the important underlying mechanisms of this vascular lesion laser therapy.

  12. Pulsed CO2 laser for intra-articular cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Alan J.; Roth, Jerry E.; Krook, Lennart P.

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed carbon dioxide laser was used to vaporize articular cartilage in four horses, and perforate the cartilage and subchondral bone in four horses. Both intercarpal joints were examined arthroscopically and either a 1 cm cartilage crater or a series of holes was created in the third carpal bone of one joint. The contralateral carpus served as a control. The horses were evaluated clinically for 8 weeks, euthanatized and the joints examined radiographically, grossly, and histologically. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser vaporized cartilage readily but penetrated bone poorly. Cartilage vaporization resulted in no greater swelling, heat, pain on flexion, lameness, or synovial fluid reaction than the sham procedure. Laser drilling resulted in a shallow, charred hole with a tenacious carbon residue, and in combination with the thermal damage to deeper bone, resulted in increased swelling, mild lameness and a low-grade, but persistent synovitis. Cartilage removal by laser vaporization resulted in rapid regrowth with fibrous and fibrovascular tissue and occasional regions of fibrocartilage at week 8. The subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and draining lymph nodes appeared essentially unaffected by the laser cartilage vaporization procedure. Conversely, carbon dioxide laser drilling of subchondral bone resulted in poor penetration, extensive areas of thermal necrosis of bone, and significant secondary damage to the apposing articular surface of the radial carpal bone. The carbon dioxide laser is a useful intraarticular instrument for removal of cartilage and has potential application in inaccessible regions of diarthrodial joints. It does not penetrate bone sufficiently to have application in subchondral drilling.

  13. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  14. Preliminary results on diode-laser assisted vaporization of prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Seitz, Michael; Reich, Oliver; Bachmann, Alexander; Steinbrecher, Verena; Ackermann, Alexander; Stief, Christian

    2007-07-01

    Introduction and objectives: The aim was to identify the capability and the laser parameter of under water tissue vaporisation by means of a diode laser (1470 nm). Afterwards the feasibility and postoperative clinical outcome of vaporization of the prostate was investigated. Method: After acquiring suitable laser parameters in in-vitro experiments using a perfused tissue model patients (n=10) suffering from bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were treated by diode laser. Their clinical outcome, in terms of acceptance and post-operatively voiding were evaluated. The diode laser emitted light of the wavelength of 1470 nm at 50 W (Biolitec GmbH) and delivered to the tissue by means of a side-fire fibre introduced through a 24F continuous-flow cystoscope. Normal saline was used for irrigation with an additive of 1% ethanol. The prostatic lobes (volume range 35-80ml) were vaporized within the prostatic capsular using sweeping and push and pull technique. The mean time of laser application was 2400 sec (1220-4000 sec) resulting in applied energies of 121 kJ in the mean (range: 61-200kJ). Results: During laser treatment none of the 10 patients showed any significant blood loss or any fluid absorption (no ethanol uptake). Foley catheters were removed between 18 and 168 hours postoperatively (mean: 49.8h+/-46h). After removal of the catheter the mean peak urine flow rate increased from 8.9ml/s +/- 2.9ml/s pre-operatively in comparison to 15.7ml/s +/- 5 ml/s (p=0.049) post-operatively. 8/10 patients were satisfied with their voiding outcome. None of the patients showed appearance of urgency, dysuria, hematuria, or incontinence but two patients required re-catheterization. After a follow-up of 1month, 8/10 patients showed evidence of good results and are satisfied with the outcome. Two patients required consecutive TUR-P. After a follow-up of 6-month the 8 patients are still satisfied. Conclusions: This very early and limited experience using

  15. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  16. Histologic comparison of the pulsed dye laser and copper vapor laser effects on pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, O.T.; Stafford, T.J.; Murray, S.; Kurban, A.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Albino pig skin was exposed to the copper vapor (CVL) and flash-lamp pulsed dye (PDL) lasers at 578 nm with a 3 mm diameter spotsize over a range of fluences until purpura and whitening were first established. The total irradiation time was the parameter that was varied in order for the CVL to reach the desired fluence. The lowest fluence producing each clinical endpoint was designated the threshold fluence: 34 J/cm{sup 2} was required to produce purpura using the CVL compared to 7.5 J/cm{sup 2} with the PDL laser. Histologically, skin exposed to purpura fluences from the CVL revealed the presence of constricted, disrupted papillary dermal blood vessels with trapped RBC's within them which were unlike those exposed to PDL where the irradiated vessels were dilated and packed with masses of intravascular agglutinated RBC's. The whitening threshold fluences for the CVL and PDL lasers were 67 J/cm{sup 2} and 29 J/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Streaming of epidermal cells and dermal collagen denaturation were observed in CVL irradiated skin, compared to occasional dyskeratotic epidermal cells and focal dermal collagen denaturation following PDL exposure. The mechanisms responsible for the clinical and histologic changes produced by the two laser systems are discussed.

  17. Quantitative liquid and vapor distribution measurements in evaporating fuel sprays using laser-induced exciplex fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fansler, Todd D.; Drake, Michael C.; Gajdeczko, Boguslaw; Düwel, Isabell; Koban, Wieland; Zimmermann, Frank P.; Schulz, Christof

    2009-12-01

    Fully quantitative two-dimensional measurements of liquid- and vapor-phase fuel distributions (mass per unit volume) from high-pressure direct-injection gasoline injectors are reported for conditions of both slow and rapid vaporization in a heated, high-pressure spray chamber. The measurements employ the coevaporative gasoline-like fluorobenzene (FB)/diethylmethylamine (DEMA)/hexane exciplex tracer/fuel system. In contrast to most previous laser-induced exciplex-fluorescence (LIEF) experiments, the quantitative results here include regions in which liquid and vapor fuel coexist (e.g. near the injector exit). A unique aspect is evaluation of both vapor- and liquid-phase distributions at varying temperature and pressure using only in situ vapor-phase fluorescence calibration measurements at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. This approach draws on recent extensive measurements of the temperature-dependent spectroscopic properties of the FB-DEMA exciplex system, in particular on knowledge of the quantum efficiencies of the vapor-phase and liquid-phase (exciplex) fluorescence. In addition to procedures necessary for quantitative measurements, we discuss corrections for liquid-vapor crosstalk (liquid fluorescence that overlaps the vapor-fluorescence bandpass), the unknown local temperature due to vaporization-induced cooling, and laser-sheet attenuation by scattering and absorption.

  18. Laser vaporization of cirrus-like ice particles with secondary ice multiplication.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Mary; Pomel, François; Wender, Christiane; Kiselev, Alexei; Duft, Denis; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the interaction of ultrashort laser filaments with individual 90-μm ice particles, representative of cirrus particles. The ice particles fragment under laser illumination. By monitoring the evolution of the corresponding ice/vapor system at up to 140,000 frames per second over 30 ms, we conclude that a shockwave vaporization supersaturates the neighboring region relative to ice, allowing the nucleation and growth of new ice particles, supported by laser-induced plasma photochemistry. This process constitutes the first direct observation of filament-induced secondary ice multiplication, a process that strongly modifies the particle size distribution and, thus, the albedo of typical cirrus clouds. PMID:27386537

  19. Laser vaporization of cirrus-like ice particles with secondary ice multiplication.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Mary; Pomel, François; Wender, Christiane; Kiselev, Alexei; Duft, Denis; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the interaction of ultrashort laser filaments with individual 90-μm ice particles, representative of cirrus particles. The ice particles fragment under laser illumination. By monitoring the evolution of the corresponding ice/vapor system at up to 140,000 frames per second over 30 ms, we conclude that a shockwave vaporization supersaturates the neighboring region relative to ice, allowing the nucleation and growth of new ice particles, supported by laser-induced plasma photochemistry. This process constitutes the first direct observation of filament-induced secondary ice multiplication, a process that strongly modifies the particle size distribution and, thus, the albedo of typical cirrus clouds.

  20. Laser vaporization of cirrus-like ice particles with secondary ice multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Mary; Pomel, François; Wender, Christiane; Kiselev, Alexei; Duft, Denis; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of ultrashort laser filaments with individual 90-μm ice particles, representative of cirrus particles. The ice particles fragment under laser illumination. By monitoring the evolution of the corresponding ice/vapor system at up to 140,000 frames per second over 30 ms, we conclude that a shockwave vaporization supersaturates the neighboring region relative to ice, allowing the nucleation and growth of new ice particles, supported by laser-induced plasma photochemistry. This process constitutes the first direct observation of filament-induced secondary ice multiplication, a process that strongly modifies the particle size distribution and, thus, the albedo of typical cirrus clouds. PMID:27386537

  1. Integrated Rig for the Production of Boron Nitride Nanotubes via the Pressurized Vapor-Condenser Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

  2. Integrated rig for the production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor-condenser method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C

    2014-03-25

    An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

  3. Space Debris-de-Orbiting by Vaporization Impulse using Short Pulse Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J; Bibeau, C; Claude, P

    2003-09-16

    Space debris constitutes a significant hazard to low earth orbit satellites and particularly to manned spacecraft. A quite small velocity decrease from vaporization impulses is enough to lower the perigee of the debris sufficiently for atmospheric drag to de-orbit the debris. A short pulse (picosecond) laser version of the Orion concept can accomplish this task in several years of operation. The ''Mercury'' short pulse Yb:S-FAP laser being developed at LLNL for laser fusion is appropriate for this task.

  4. Method and apparatus for precision laser micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim; Warner, Bruce E.; Dragon, Ernest P.

    2000-05-02

    A method and apparatus for micromachining and microdrilling which results in a machined part of superior surface quality is provided. The system uses a near diffraction limited, high repetition rate, short pulse length, visible wavelength laser. The laser is combined with a high speed precision tilting mirror and suitable beam shaping optics, thus allowing a large amount of energy to be accurately positioned and scanned on the workpiece. As a result of this system, complicated, high resolution machining patterns can be achieved. A cover plate may be temporarily attached to the workpiece. Then as the workpiece material is vaporized during the machining process, the vapors condense on the cover plate rather than the surface of the workpiece. In order to eliminate cutting rate variations as the cutting direction is varied, a randomly polarized laser beam is utilized. A rotating half-wave plate is used to achieve the random polarization. In order to correctly locate the focus at the desired location within the workpiece, the position of the focus is first determined by monitoring the speckle size while varying the distance between the workpiece and the focussing optics. When the speckle size reaches a maximum, the focus is located at the first surface of the workpiece. After the location of the focus has been determined, it is repositioned to the desired location within the workpiece, thus optimizing the quality of the machined area.

  5. A vapor-assisted method for adhering polydimethylsiloxane and glass.

    PubMed

    Sofla, Aarash Y N; Martin, Cristina

    2010-01-21

    A straightforward and inexpensive method to increase the adhesion strength of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and glass is described. In this method the targeted PDMS-glass sample is exposed to a fluoroalkyl trichlorosilane vapor in an enclosed container for a certain time. It is experimentally shown that the adhesion strength of the resulted interface depends on the exposure duration. Permanently bonded PDMS-glass interfaces were reliably achieved upon sufficient exposure to the vapor. This vapor-assisted method for adhering PDMS and glass does not require any special skill or equipment and therefore can be implemented at any laboratory. This method can be used for the simultaneous bonding of components and is suitable for the mass production of microfluidic devices.

  6. Nucleation and ultrafast vaporization dynamics of laser-activated polymeric microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoinie, Guilaume; Gelderblom, Erik; Chlon, Ceciel; Boehmer, Marcel; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; de Jong, Nico; Manohar, Srirang; Versluis, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Precision control of vaporization, both in space and time, has many potential applications; however, the physical mechanisms underlying controlled boiling are not well understood. The reason is the combined microscopic length scales and ultra-short timescales associated with the initiation and subsequent dynamical behavior of the vapor bubbles formed. Here we study the nanoseconds vapor bubble dynamics of laser-heated single oil-filled microcapsules using coupled optical and acoustic detection. Pulsed laser excitation leads to vapor formation and collapse, and a simple physical model captures the observed radial dynamics and resulting acoustic pressures. Continuous wave laser excitation leads to a sequence of vaporization and condensation cycles, the result of absorbing microcapsule fragments moving in and out of the laser beam. A model incorporating thermal diffusion from the capsule shell into the oil core and surrounding water reveals the mechanisms behind the onset of vaporization. Excellent agreement is observed between the modeled dynamics and experiment. This work is supported by NanoNextNL, a micro and nanotechnology consortium of the Government of the Netherlands and 130 partners.

  7. Dichroic atomic vapor laser lock with multi-gigahertz stabilization range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustelny, S.; Schultze, V.; Scholtes, T.; Budker, D.

    2016-06-01

    A dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) system exploiting buffer-gas-filled millimeter-scale vapor cells is presented. This system offers similar stability as achievable with conventional DAVLL system using bulk vapor cells, but has several important advantages. In addition to its compactness, it may provide continuous stabilization in a multi-gigahertz range around the optical transition. This range may be controlled either by changing the temperature of the vapor or by application of a buffer gas under an appropriate pressure. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate the ability of the system to lock the laser frequency between two hyperfine components of the 85Rb ground state or as far as 16 GHz away from the closest optical transition.

  8. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  9. Dichroic atomic vapor laser lock with multi-gigahertz stabilization range.

    PubMed

    Pustelny, S; Schultze, V; Scholtes, T; Budker, D

    2016-06-01

    A dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) system exploiting buffer-gas-filled millimeter-scale vapor cells is presented. This system offers similar stability as achievable with conventional DAVLL system using bulk vapor cells, but has several important advantages. In addition to its compactness, it may provide continuous stabilization in a multi-gigahertz range around the optical transition. This range may be controlled either by changing the temperature of the vapor or by application of a buffer gas under an appropriate pressure. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate the ability of the system to lock the laser frequency between two hyperfine components of the (85)Rb ground state or as far as 16 GHz away from the closest optical transition. PMID:27370426

  10. Computer modeling of the sensitivity of a laser water vapor sensor to variations in temperature and air speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, George F.

    1994-01-01

    Currently, there is disagreement among existing methods of determining atmospheric water vapor concentration at dew-points below -40 C. A major source of error is wall effects which result from the necessity of bringing samples into the instruments. All of these instruments also have response times on the order of seconds. NASA Langley is developing a water vapor sensor which utilizes the absorption of the infrared radiation produced by a diode laser to estimate water vapor concentration. The laser beam is directed through an aircraft window to a retroreflector located on an engine. The reflected beam is detected by an infrared detector located near the laser. To maximize signal to noise, derivative signals are analyzed. By measuring the 2f/DC signal and correcting for ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure and air speed (which results in a Doppler shifting of the laser beam), the water vapor concentration can be retrieved. Since this is an in situ measurement there are no wall effects and measurements can be made at a rate of more than 20 per second. This allows small spatial variations of water vapor to be studied. In order to study the sensitivity of the instrument to variations in temperature and air speed, a computer program which generated the 2f, 3f, 4f, DC and 2f/DC signals of the instrument as a function of temperature, pressure and air speed was written. This model was used to determine the effect of errors in measurement of the temperature and air speed on the measured water vapor concentration. Future studies will quantify the effect of pressure measurement errors, which are expected to be very small. As a result of these studied, a retrieval algorithm has been formulated, and will be applied to data taken during the PEM-West atmospheric science field mission. Spectroscopic studies of the water vapor line used by the instrument will be used to refine this algorithm. To prepare for these studies, several lasers have been studied to determine their

  11. Development of Field-deployable Diode-laser-based Water Vapor Dial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Le Hoai, Phong; Abo, Makoto; Sakai, Tetsu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for lower-tropospheric water vapor observation in Tokyo, Japan. A photoacoustic cell is used for spectroscopy experiment around absorption peaks of 829.022 nm and 829.054 nm. The water vapor density extracted from the observational data agrees with the referenced radiosonde data. Furthermore, we applied modulated pulse technique for DIAL transmitter. It enables DIAL to measure water vapor profile for both low and high altitude regions.

  12. Nano structured physical vapor deposited coatings by means of picosecond laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Bobzin, K; Bagcivan, N; Ewering, M; Gillner, A; Beckemper, S; Hartmann, C; Theiss, S

    2011-10-01

    Molding of nano structures by injection molding leads to special requirements for the tools e.g., wear resistance and as low as possible release forces of the molded components. On the other hand it is not allowed to affect the replication precision. Physical vapor deposition is one of the promising technologies for applying coatings with adapted properties like high hardness, low roughness, low Young's modulus and less adhesion to the plastics melt. Although physical vapor deposition technology allows the deposition of films on micro structures without changing the structure significantly, film deposition on nano structures and small micro structures leads to a relevant change in surface topography. For this reason direct structuring of physical vapor deposition coatings might be beneficial. In this paper structuring was done using a picoseconds ultraviolet laser, Lumera Laser "Rapid," with a master oscillator power amplifier system at 355 nm. Two different coatings were deposited by magnetron sputter ion plating physical vapor deposition technology for laser structuring tests ((Cr, Al)N, (Cr, Al,Si)N). After deposition, the coatings were analyzed by common techniques regarding hardness, Young's modulus and morphology. The structures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show a high potential for laser structuring of coatings deposited via physical vapor deposition. Linear structures with sizes between 400 nm and 10microm were realized.

  13. High-energy transversely pumped alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the results from our transversely pumped alkali laser. This system uses an Alexandrite laser to pump a stainless steel laser head. The system uses methane and helium as buffer gasses. Using rubidium, the system produced up to 40 mJ of output energy when pumped with 63 mJ. Slope efficiency was 75%. Using potassium as the lasing species the system produced 32 mJ and a 53% slope efficiency.

  14. Containerless laser-induced flourescence study of vaporization and optical properties for sapphire and alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Evaporation of aluminum oxide was studied from 1800 to 2327 K by laser-induced flourescence (LIF) detection of Al atom vapor over sapphire and alumina spheres that were levitated in an argon gas jet and heated with a continuous wave CO2 laser. Optical properties were determined from apparent specimen temperatures measured with an optical pyrometer and true temperatures deduced from the LIF intensity versus temperature measurements using the known temperature dependence of the Al atom vapor concentration in equilibrium with Al2O3. The effects of impurities and dissolved oxygen on the high-temperature optical properties of aluminum oxide were discussed.

  15. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joulaei, A.; Moody, J.; Berti, N.; Kasparian, J.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  16. Expansion of the laser ablation vapor plume into a background gas:Part A, Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-06-06

    A study of the gas dynamics of the vapor plume generatedduring laser ablation was conducted including a counterpropagatinginternal shock wave. The density, pressure, and temperature distributionsbetween the external shock wave front and the sample surface weredetermined by solving the integrated conservation equations of mass,momentum, and energy. The positions of the shock waves and the contactsurface (boundary that separates the compressed ambient gas and the vaporplume) were obtained when the incident laser energy that is transferredto the vapor plume and to the background gas, E, and the vaporized samplemass, M, are specified. The values for E and M were obtained from acomparison of the calculated trajectories of the external shock wave andthe contact surface with experimental results for a copper sample underdifferent laser fluences. Thus E and M, which are the two dominantparameters for laser ablation and which cannot be measured directly, canbe determined. In addition, the internal shock wave propagation withinthe vapor plume was determined; the interaction of the internal shockwave with the sample may be one of the mechanisms inducing liquid sampleejection during laser ablation. (c) 2007 American Institute ofPhysics.

  17. Ex vivo evaluation of safety and efficacy of vaporization of the prostate using a 300 W high-power laser diode with the wavelength of 980 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Junya; Honda, Norihiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-03-01

    Laser vaporization of the prostate is one of the promising technique for less-invasive treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, shorter operative duration and higher hemostatic ability are expected. The wavelength of 980 nm offers a high simultaneous absorption by water and hemoglobin, so that it combines the efficient vaporization with good hemostasis. Therefore, we have evaluated the safety and efficacy of vaporization of the prostate using a recently developed 300 W high-power laser diode with the wavelength of 980 nm. First, validity of bovine prostate tissue as the sample was confirmed by measuring the optical properties of bovine and human prostate tissue using a double integrating sphere optical system. Next, contact and non-contact ex vivo irradiations were performed for various irradiation powers and times, and vaporized and coagulated depths were measured. In the contact irradiation, the vaporized depth at the power of 300 W was significantly deeper than that at the power of 100 W, while the difference was relatively smaller for the coagulated depths at 300 and 100 W. In the non-contact irradiation, coagulation as thick as that in the contact irradiation was observed almost without vaporization. Therefore, it is suggested that the treatment in the contact irradiation using the high-power laser diode can vaporize the prostate more efficiently without increasing the risk of perforation. Hemostasis with the coagulation would be possible in both irradiation methods. To prevent the postoperative perforation, operators need to understand the relationship between the coagulated depth and the irradiation conditions.

  18. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  19. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  20. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  1. Anesthesia Methods in Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Gaitan, Sergio; Markus, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Laser resurfacing technology offers the ability to treat skin changes that are the result of the aging process. One of the major drawbacks of laser resurfacing technologies is the pain associated with the procedure. The methods of anesthesia used in laser resurfacing to help minimize the pain include both noninvasive and invasive procedures. The noninvasive procedures can be divided into topical, cryoanesthesia, and a combination of both. The invasive methods of anesthesia include injected forms (infiltrative, nerve blocks, and tumescent anesthesia) and supervised anesthesia (monitored anesthesia care and general anesthesia). In this review, the authors summarize the types of anesthesia used in laser resurfacing to aid the provider in offering the most appropriate method for the patient to have as painless a procedure as possible. PMID:23904819

  2. Probing laser induced metal vaporization by gas dynamics and liquid pool transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, T.; Basu, S.; Mundra, K. )

    1991-08-01

    During laser beam welding of many important engineering alloys, an appreciable amount of alloying element vaporization takes place from the weld pool surface. As a consequence, the composition of the solidified weld pool is often significantly different from that of the alloy being welded. Currently there is no comprehensive theoretical model to predict, from first principles, laser induced metal vaporization rates and the resulting weld pool composition changes. The weld pool heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena have been coupled with the velocity distribution functions of the gas molecules at various locations above the weld pool to determine the rates of the laser induced element vaporization for pure metals. The procedure allows for calculations of the condensation flux based on the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in both the vapor and the liquid phases. Computed values of the rates of vaporization of pure metals were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally determined values. The synthesis of the principles of gas dynamics and weld pool transport phenomena can serve as a basis for weld metal composition control.

  3. Ablation of biological tissues by radiation of strontium vapor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, A. N. Vasilieva, A. V.

    2015-11-17

    A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on sources of self- contained transitions in pairs SrI and SrII has been developed. The radiation spectrum contains 8 laser lines generating in the range of 1 – 6.45 μm, with a generation pulse length of 50 – 150 ns, and pulse energy of ∼ 2.5 mJ. The divergence of the output beam was close to the diffraction and did not exceed 0.5 mrad. The control range of the laser pulse repetition rate varied from 10 to 15 000 Hz. The given laser system has allowed to perform ablation of bone tissue samples without visible thermal damage.

  4. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser.

  5. Laser Desorption of Explosives Traces with Low Vapors Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmalov, A. E.; Chistyakov, A. A.; Kotkovskii, G. E.

    In this work comparison of the desorption effectiveness of picosecond and nanosecond laser sources (λ = 266, 532 nm) were carried out to investigate the possibility of creating a non-contact sampling device for detectors of explosives on the principles of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). The results of mass spectrometric studies of TNT (2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene), HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine), RDX (1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane) laser desorption from a quartz substrate are presented. It is shown that the most effective laser source is a Nd:YAG3+ laser (λ = 266 nm; E = 1 mJ; τ = 5-10 ns; q = 108 W/cm2). The typical desorbed mass is 2 ng for RDX, 4-6 ng for TNT and 0.02 ng HMX per single laser pulse. The results obtained make it possible to create a non-contact portable laser sampling device operating in frequency mode with high efficiency.

  6. Single Frequency, Pulsed Laser Diode Transmitter for Dial Water Vapor Measurements at 935nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, Gregg W.; Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.; Rall, Johnathan A. R.

    1998-01-01

    We report a tunable, single frequency, narrow linewidth, pulsed laser diode transmitter at 935.68nm for remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. The transmitter consists of a CW, tunable, external cavity diode laser whose output is amplified 2OdB using a tapered diode amplifier. The output is pulsed for range resolved DIAL lidar by pulsing the drive current to the diode amplifier at 4kHz with a .5% duty cycle. The output from the transmitter is 36OnJ/pulse and is single spatial mode. It maintains a linewidth of less than 25MHz as its wavelength is tuned across the water vapor absorption line at 935.68nm. The transmitter design and its use in a water vapor measurement will be discussed.

  7. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  8. High-power high-repetition-rate copper-vapor-pumped dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.; Dasgupta, K.; Kumar, S.; Manohar, K.G.; Nair, L.G.; Chatterjee, U.K. . Laser and Plasma Technology Div.)

    1994-06-01

    The design and development of an efficient high average power dye laser oscillator-amplifier system developed at the Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, is reported. The dye laser is pumped by a 6.5-kHz repetition rate copper vapor laser. The signal beam to the dye amplifier is obtained from an efficient narrow-band grazing incidence grating (GIG) dye laser oscillator incorporating a multiple prism beam expander. Amplifier extraction efficiency up to 40% was obtained in a single amplifier stage, using rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in ethanol. The authors have also demonstrated simultaneous amplification of two laser beams at different wavelengths in the same dye amplifier cell.

  9. An automated dynamic water vapor permeation test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Phillip; Kendrick, Cyrus; Rivin, Donald; Charmchii, Majid; Sicuranza, Linda

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an automated apparatus developed to measure the transport of water vapor through materials under a variety of conditions. The apparatus is more convenient to use than the traditional test methods for textiles and clothing materials, and allows one to use a wider variety of test conditions to investigate the concentration-dependent and nonlinear transport behavior of many of the semipermeable membrane laminates which are now available. The dynamic moisture permeation cell (DMPC) has been automated to permit multiple setpoint testing under computer control, and to facilitate investigation of transient phenomena. Results generated with the DMPC are in agreement with and of comparable accuracy to those from the ISO 11092 (sweating guarded hot plate) method of measuring water vapor permeability.

  10. A new mass spectrometer system for investigating laser-induced vaporization phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    A laser has been combined with a mass spectrometer in a new configuration developed for studies of high-temperature materials. A vacuum-lock, solid-sample inlet is mounted at one end of a cylindrical, high-vacuum chamber one meter in length with a nude ion-source, time-of-flight mass spectrometer at the opposite end. The samples are positioned along the axis of the chamber at distances up to one meter from the ion source, and their surfaces are vaporized by a pulsed laser beam entering via windows on one side of the chamber. The instrumentation along with its capabilities is described, and results from laser-induced vaporization of several graphites are presented.

  11. Infectious papillomavirus in the vapor of warts treated with carbon dioxide laser or electrocoagulation: Detection and protection

    SciTech Connect

    Sawchuk, W.S.; Weber, P.J.; Lowy, D.R.; Dzubow, L.M.

    1989-07-01

    Papillomavirus DNA has been reported recently in the vapor (smoke plume) derived from warts treated with carbon dioxide laser; this raises concerns for operator safety. We therefore have studied a group of human and bovine warts to define further the potential risk of wart therapy and to test whether a surgical mask could reduce exposure. Half of each wart was treated with carbon dioxide laser and the other half with electrocoagulation. The vapor produced by each form of therapy was collected with a dry filter vacuum apparatus and analyzed for the presence of papillomavirus. Vapor from human plantar warts was analyzed for the presence of human papillomavirus DNA, because there is no infectivity assay for human papillomavirus. Of plantar warts treated, five of eight laser-derived vapors and four of seven electrocoagulation-derived vapors were positive for human papillomavirus DNA. Greater amounts of papillomavirus DNA were usually recovered in the laser vapor than in the electrocoagulation vapor from the same wart. Bioassay readily detected infectious bovine papillomavirus in the vapor from bovine warts treated with either modality; more virus was present in laser-derived material. A surgical mask was found capable of removing virtually all laser- or electrocoagulation-derived virus, strongly suggesting that such masks can protect operators from potential inhalation exposure to papillomavirus.

  12. Theoretical study on temperature features of a sealed cesium vapor cell pumped by laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, You; Cai, He; Xue, Liangping; Han, Juhong; Wang, Hongyuan; Liao, Zhiye

    2014-07-01

    The diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) is a new type of laser source which has been widely studied in the recent years. The temperature distribution of a sealed vapor cell, which is the crucial component in a DPAL system, produces an important effect on the output performance of a DPAL. In this paper, the strict solution of the heat conduction equation for a cesium vapor cell is obtained by using a finite difference procedure. The temperature distribution of a dummy open cell is first analyzed, and then the temperature distributions of two independent windows, regarded as the boundary conditions of solving a sealed cell, are evaluated in detail. By combining the results of the two steps together, we finally acquire the temperature distribution of a real sealed cesium vapor cell. The results reveal that the temperature gradients on both radial and longitudinal directions change with the pump power, cell radius, and absorption coefficient when the sealed cesium vapor cell is heated or pumped with the laser diodes. The conclusions are helpful for accurately evaluating the output characteristics of a DPAL.

  13. Piston pump and method of reducing vapor lock

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Harvey, Michael N.

    2001-01-30

    A pump includes a housing defining a cavity, at least one bore, a bore inlet, and a bore outlet. The bore extends from the cavity to the outlet and the inlet communicates with the bore at a position between the cavity and the outlet. A crankshaft is mounted in supports and has an eccentric portion disposed in the cavity. The eccentric portion is coupled to a piston so that rotation of the crankshaft reciprocates the piston in the bore between a discharge position an intake position. The bore may be offset from an axis of rotation to reduce bending of the piston during crankshaft rotation. During assembly of the pump, separate parts of the housing can be connected together to facilitate installation of internal pumping components. Also disclosed is a method of reducing vapor lock by mixing vapor and liquid portions of a substance and introducing the mixture into a piston bore.

  14. Piston pump and method of reducing vapor lock

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Harvey, Michael N.

    2000-02-15

    A pump includes a housing defining a cavity, at least one bore, a bore inlet, and a bore outlet. The bore extends from the cavity to the outlet and the inlet communicates with the bore at a position between the cavity and the outlet. A crankshaft is mounted in supports and has an eccentric portion disposed in the cavity. The eccentric portion is coupled to a piston so that rotation of the crankshaft reciprocates the piston in the bore between a discharge position an intake position. The bore may be offset from an axis of rotation to reduce bending of the piston during crankshaft rotation. During assembly of the pump, separate parts of the housing can be connected together to facilitate installation of internal pumping components. Also disclosed is a method of reducing vapor lock by mixing vapor and liquid portions of a substance and introducing the mixture into a piston bore.

  15. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, Charles R.; Hammond, Robert B.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  16. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, C.R.; Hammond, R.B.

    The disclosure related to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  17. Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; Biblarz, Oscar

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process.

  18. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope

    DOEpatents

    Scheibner, Karl F.; Haynam, Christopher A.; Johnson, Michael A.; Worden, Earl F.

    1999-01-01

    An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207.

  19. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope

    DOEpatents

    Scheibner, K.F.; Haynam, C.A.; Johnson, M.A.; Worden, E.F.

    1999-08-31

    An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207. 5 figs.

  20. Laser photoacoustic detection of the essential oil vapors of thyme, mint, and anise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kahlout, A. M.; Al-Jourani, M. M.; Abu-Taha, M. I.; Laine, Derek C.

    1998-07-01

    Photoacoustic studies of the vapors of the essential oils of thyme, mint and anise have been made using a line-tunable waveguide CO2 laser in conjunction with a heat-pipe type of photoacoustic vapor sample cell operated over the temperature range 20 - 180 degree(s)C. Identifying spectral fingerprint features are found in the 9 - 10 micrometers spectral region for each of the three essential oils investigated. The principal features of the photoacoustic spectrum of each essential oil are associated with the dominant chemicals present i.e. thymol in thyme oil, menthol in mint and anethole in anise.

  1. Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Loren D.; Cerni, Todd A.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavlength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to: ##EQU1## where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4)+K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation.

  2. Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, L.D.; Cerni, T.A.

    1989-10-17

    Apparatus and method are disclosed which determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to an equation given in the patent where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4) + K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation. 11 figs.

  3. Identification of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and rocket fuels using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, Jaime A.; McElman, Sarah E.; Dodd, James A.

    2010-05-01

    Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the identification of security threats is a growing area of research. This work presents LIBS spectra of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and typical rocket fuels. A large dataset of spectra was acquired using a variety of gas mixtures and background pressures and processed using partial least squares analysis. The five compounds studied were identified with a 99% success rate by the best method. The temporal behavior of the emission lines as a function of chamber pressure and gas mixture was also investigated, revealing some interesting trends that merit further study.

  4. Numerical simulation of transient, incongruent vaporization induced by high power laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.H.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model and numerical calculations were developed to solve the heat and mass transfer problems specifically for uranum oxide subject to laser irradiation. It can easily be modified for other heat sources or/and other materials. In the uranium-oxygen system, oxygen is the preferentially vaporizing component, and as a result of the finite mobility of oxygen in the solid, an oxygen deficiency is set up near the surface. Because of the bivariant behavior of uranium oxide, the heat transfer problem and the oxygen diffusion problem are coupled and a numerical method of simultaneously solving the two boundary value problems is studied. The temperature dependence of the thermal properties and oxygen diffusivity, as well as the highly ablative effect on the surface, leads to considerable non-linearities in both the governing differential equations and the boundary conditions. Based on the earlier work done in this laboratory by Olstad and Olander on Iron and on Zirconium hydride, the generality of the problem is expanded and the efficiency of the numerical scheme is improved. The finite difference method, along with some advanced numerical techniques, is found to be an efficient way to solve this problem.

  5. Kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of uranium dioxide by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.

    1981-11-01

    Safety analyses of nuclear reactors require knowledge of the evaporation behavior of UO/sub 2/ at temperatures well above the melting point of 3140 K. In this study, rapid transient heating of a small spot on a UO/sub 2/ specimen was accomplished by a laser pulse, which generates a surface temperature excursion. This in turn vaporizes the target surface and the gas expands into vacuum. The surface temperature transient was monitored by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The maximum surface temperatures investigated range from approx. 3700 K to approx. 4300 K. A computer program was developed to simulate the laser heating process and calculate the surface temperature evolution. The effect of the uncertainties of the high temperature material properties on the calculation was included in a sensitivity study for UO/sub 2/ vaporization. The measured surface temperatures were in satisfactory agreements.

  6. Upper Tropospheric and Lower Stratospheric Measurements of Water Vapor by the JPL Laser Hygrometer Mark 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troy, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    The concentration of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere has a significant impact on climate. Over the last sixteen years, the JPL Laser Hygrometers have collected a significant data record of atmospheric humidity from several platforms, including the NASA ER-2, WB-57, DC-8, and Global Hawk. Here, we describe the observed relation between atmospheric humidity and temperature in-cloud and out of cloud near the tropopause. The relation between cloud microphysical properties and humidity is also explored. We feature measurements of water vapor from a substantially improved instrument, JPL Laser Hygrometer Mark 2, made during the 2013 NASA SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) field mission.

  7. Dual-axis vapor cell for simultaneous laser frequency stabilization on disparate optical transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, Anupriya Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Jamison, Alan O.; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2015-07-15

    We have developed a dual-axis ytterbium (Yb) vapor cell and used it to simultaneously address the two laser cooling transitions in Yb at wavelengths 399 nm and 556 nm, featuring the disparate linewidths of 2π × 29 MHz and 2π × 182 KHz, respectively. By utilizing different optical paths for the two wavelengths, we simultaneously obtain comparable optical densities suitable for saturated absorption spectroscopy for both the transitions and keep both the lasers frequency stabilized over several hours. We demonstrate that by appropriate control of the cell temperature profile, two atomic transitions differing in relative strength across a large range of over three orders of magnitude can be simultaneously addressed, making the device adaptable to a variety of spectroscopic needs. We also show that our observations can be understood with a simple theoretical model of the Yb vapor.

  8. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-04-15

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  9. Laser/Plasma/Chemical-Vapor Deposition Of Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George C.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed process for deposition of diamond films includes combination of plasma induced in hydrocarbon feed gas by microwave radiation and irradiation of plasma and substrate by lasers. Deposition of graphite suppressed. Reaction chamber irradiated at wavelength favoring polymerization of CH2 radical into powders filtered out of gas. CH3 radicals, having desired sp3 configuration, remains in gas to serve as precursors for deposition. Feed gas selected to favor formation of CH3 radicals; candidates include CH4, C2H4, C2H2, and C2H6. Plasma produced by applying sufficient power at frequency of 2.45 GHz and adjusting density of gas to obtain electron kinetic energies around 100 eV in low-pressure, low-temperature regime.

  10. Modification and simulation of the power supply of a metal vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikov, D. N.; Trigub, M. V.; Torgaev, S. N.; Vasnev, N. A.; Evtushenko, T. G.

    2016-04-01

    The modification of a power supply circuit used for pumping metal vapor lasers is analyzed. The results of OrCAD simulation of the processes that occur in the power supply are presented. The effect of the capacitance ratio on the charging process of a storage capacitor is described. The mode which provides more time for the recovery of the thyratron is discussed. The results of the development of the small-size high pulse repetition frequency laser with up to 3 W average output power are presented.

  11. Method and apparatus for producing thermal vapor stream

    DOEpatents

    Cradeur, Robert R.; Sperry, John S.; Krajicek, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing a thermal vapor stream for injecting into a subterranean formation for the recovery of liquefiable minerals therefrom, including a pressure vessel containing a high pressure combustion chamber for producing a heating gas for introduction into a heating gas injector. The heating gas injector is partly immersed in a steam generating section of the pressure vessel such that the heating gas is passed through the steam generating section to produce steam and combustion products which are directed between the pressure vessel and the combustion chamber for simultaneously cooling of the combustion chamber by further heating of the steam and combustion gases.

  12. Double-discharge copper vapor laser with copper chloride as a lasant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. J.; Nerheim, N. M.; Russell, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    A copper vapor laser utilizing copper chloride as a lasant in a heated discharge tube has been studied. The lasing action was observed only when two successive discharge current pulses at suitable time intervals were applied. The first pulse is considered to be a dissociation pulse to produce copper and chlorine atoms; the second to be a pumping pulse to produce population inversion. The maximum energy density measured to date was 17 microjoule/cu cm.

  13. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Haniam, P.; Kunsombat, C.; Chiangga, S.; Songsasen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  14. Synthesis of cobalt oxides thin films fractal structures by laser chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Haniam, P; Kunsombat, C; Chiangga, S; Songsasen, A

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  15. Spatial coherence of the generalized diffraction-filtered resonator copper vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Prakash, O; Shukla, P K; Dixit, S K; Chatterjee, S; Vora, H S; Bhatnagar, R

    1998-11-20

    The results of a study on the spatial coherence of a generalized diffraction-filtered resonator (GDFR) copper vapor laser (CVL) for various magnifications are presented. The coherence width and output power are compared with that of unstable resonators (UR's) of equivalent magnifications. It is established, by use of reversal shear interferometry, that the GDFR CVL beam has better spatial coherence and average power characteristics than the UR CVL beam for equivalent resonator magnifications. PMID:18301614

  16. Urethral stricture vaporization with the KTP laser provides evidence for a favorable impact of laser surgery on wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, Franz R.; Venzi, Giordano; Jichlinski, Patrice; Oswald, Michael; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Gabbiani, Giulio; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Graber, Peter

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the safety and efficacy of the KTP 532 laser to direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU) in the management of urethral strictures. A total of 32 patients were randomized prospectively in this study, 14 DVIU and 18 KTP 532 laser. Patients were evaluated postoperatively with flowmetry and in the case of recurrence with cystourethrography at 3, 12, 24 weeks. With the KTP 532 laser complete symptomatic and uredynamic success was achieved in 15 (83%) patients at 12 and 24 weeks. Success rate was lower in the DVIU group with 9 (64%) patients at 12 weeks and 8 (57%) patients at 24 weeks. Mean preoperative peak-flow was improved from 6 cc/s to 20 cc/s at 3, 12 and 24 weeks with the KTP laser. With DVIU mean preoperative peak-flow was improved from 5.5 cc/s to 20 cc/s at 3 weeks followed by a steady decrease to 13 cc/s at 12 weeks and to 12 cc/s 24 weeks. No complication was observed in either group of patients. Our results confirm that stricture vaporization with the KTP 532 laser is a safe and efficient procedure. The better results after laser surgery make it also a valuable alternative in the endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures. These findings suggest a favorable influence of laser surgery on wound healing with less wound contraction and scarring. The lack of contraction of laser wounds might be related to the absence and the lack of organization of myofibroblasts in laser induced lesions.

  17. Efficient copper vapor laser using metal (Cu, Ag) chlorides in thermal insulation and performance with new prism resonator configurations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijendra

    2012-12-01

    A copper vapor laser based on the use of copper chloride and silver chloride mixture embedded inside the laser head thermal insulation is successfully demonstrated. The use of external HCl generator cell containing zirconium chloride normally used for its kinetically enhanced mode of operation is completely eliminated. With this new configuration laser power of ~70 W was achieved from a wide aperture ~47-50 mm bore discharge tube with input power of ~5 kW and overall high efficiency of ~1.4% without external supply of HCl vapors to the laser head. In a typical operational cycle the laser initially operates as low temperature CuCl laser with startup time of few minutes and output power of ~10 W during low tube temperature range of ~300-500 °C. Thereafter, the laser transforms itself into efficient kinetically enhanced copper vapor laser (CVL) at high temperature range of ~1200-1600 °C with maximum laser output power of ~70 W. This dual mode of operation observed in a single CVL system is unique and has not been reported so far in any high temperature copper vapor laser. New resonator configurations, namely, the prism resonator in stable and unstable form are successfully demonstrated for the first time in a copper vapor laser to achieve low divergence beam with dramatic increase in misalignment tolerance to ~25 mrad, which is an improvement of about ~50 times compared to standard CVLs with conventional spherical or plane-plane resonators. With these new resonator configurations the CVL functions almost as an "alignment free laser" system with significantly reduced beam divergence of ~0.2 mrad and high optical extraction efficiency of ~70%-80%. PMID:23277966

  18. Efficient copper vapor laser using metal (Cu, Ag) chlorides in thermal insulation and performance with new prism resonator configurations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijendra

    2012-12-01

    A copper vapor laser based on the use of copper chloride and silver chloride mixture embedded inside the laser head thermal insulation is successfully demonstrated. The use of external HCl generator cell containing zirconium chloride normally used for its kinetically enhanced mode of operation is completely eliminated. With this new configuration laser power of ~70 W was achieved from a wide aperture ~47-50 mm bore discharge tube with input power of ~5 kW and overall high efficiency of ~1.4% without external supply of HCl vapors to the laser head. In a typical operational cycle the laser initially operates as low temperature CuCl laser with startup time of few minutes and output power of ~10 W during low tube temperature range of ~300-500 °C. Thereafter, the laser transforms itself into efficient kinetically enhanced copper vapor laser (CVL) at high temperature range of ~1200-1600 °C with maximum laser output power of ~70 W. This dual mode of operation observed in a single CVL system is unique and has not been reported so far in any high temperature copper vapor laser. New resonator configurations, namely, the prism resonator in stable and unstable form are successfully demonstrated for the first time in a copper vapor laser to achieve low divergence beam with dramatic increase in misalignment tolerance to ~25 mrad, which is an improvement of about ~50 times compared to standard CVLs with conventional spherical or plane-plane resonators. With these new resonator configurations the CVL functions almost as an "alignment free laser" system with significantly reduced beam divergence of ~0.2 mrad and high optical extraction efficiency of ~70%-80%.

  19. Method of physical vapor deposition of metal oxides on semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Norton, David P.

    2001-01-01

    A process for growing a metal oxide thin film upon a semiconductor surface with a physical vapor deposition technique in a high-vacuum environment and a structure formed with the process involves the steps of heating the semiconductor surface and introducing hydrogen gas into the high-vacuum environment to develop conditions at the semiconductor surface which are favorable for growing the desired metal oxide upon the semiconductor surface yet is unfavorable for the formation of any native oxides upon the semiconductor. More specifically, the temperature of the semiconductor surface and the ratio of hydrogen partial pressure to water pressure within the vacuum environment are high enough to render the formation of native oxides on the semiconductor surface thermodynamically unstable yet are not so high that the formation of the desired metal oxide on the semiconductor surface is thermodynamically unstable. Having established these conditions, constituent atoms of the metal oxide to be deposited upon the semiconductor surface are directed toward the surface of the semiconductor by a physical vapor deposition technique so that the atoms come to rest upon the semiconductor surface as a thin film of metal oxide with no native oxide at the semiconductor surface/thin film interface. An example of a structure formed by this method includes an epitaxial thin film of (001)-oriented CeO.sub.2 overlying a substrate of (001) Ge.

  20. Subnatural linewidth in room-temperature Rb vapor using a control laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapol, Umakant D.; Wasan, Ajay; Natarajan, Vasant

    2003-05-01

    We demonstrate two ways of obtaining subnatural linewidth for probe absorption through room-temperature Rb vapor. Both techniques use a control laser that drives the transition from a different ground state. The coherent drive splits the excited state into two dressed states (Autler-Townes doublet), which have asymmetric linewidths when the control laser is detuned from resonance. In the first technique, the laser has a large detuning of 1.18 GHz to reduce the linewidth to 5.1 MHz from the Doppler width of 560 MHz. In the second technique, we use a counterpropagating pump beam to eliminate the first-order Doppler effect. The unperturbed probe linewidth is about 13 MHz, which is reduced below 3 MHz (0.5Γ) at a detuning of 11.5 MHz.

  1. New multiplexed all solid state pulser for high power wide aperture kinetically enhanced copper vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Ghodke, D V; Muralikrishnan, K; Singh, Bijendra

    2013-11-01

    A novel multiplexed scheme is demonstrated to combine two or more pulsed solid state pulsers of moderate capabilities. Pulse power supply comprising of two solid state pulsers of ~6 kW rating each in multiplexed mode with common magnetic pulse compression stage was demonstrated and optimized for operating with a wide aperture kinetically enhanced copper vapor laser. Using this new configuration, the multiplexed pulsed power supply was capable of operating efficiently at net repetition-rate of ~13 kHz, 12 kW (wall plug average power), 18-20 kV discharge voltage and pulse rise-time of ~80 ns. The laser under multiplexed configuration delivered un-interrupted output power of about ~80 W with scope of further increase in laser output power in excess of 100 W. PMID:24289383

  2. Double-pulse dual-wavelength alexandrite laser for atmospheric water vapor measurement.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, D; Cazeneuve, H; Loth, C; Pelon, J

    1991-09-20

    We describe a new alexandrite laser source arrangement designed to measure atmospheric water vapor using the differential absorption lidar technique. This laser is capable of emitting two pulses at two appropriately selected wavelengths within a single flash lamp discharge. A narrow spectral linewidth of Deltalambda < 1 pm is obtained for each pulse by intracavity filtering with a birefringent filter and two Fabry-Perot interferometers. Wavelength commutation between the two pulses is performed by electro-optically tuning the birefringent filter. The temporal separation between the two pulses can be chosen between 50 and 70 micros and each pulse duration is <250-ns (full width at half-maximum). Typical output energies of 50 mJ/pulse at each wavelength are obtained with this laser system at a 10-Hz repetition rate for a 1.3-kW input electrical power.

  3. Relationship between 578-nm (copper vapor) laser beam geometry and heat distribution within biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyasov, Ildar K.; Prikhodko, Constantin V.; Nevorotin, Alexey J.

    1995-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model and the thermoindicative tissue phantom were applied for evaluation of a depth of tissue necrosis (DTN) as a result of quasi-cw copper vapor laser (578 nm) irradiation. It has been shown that incident light focusing angle is essential for DTN. In particular, there was a significant rise in DTN parallel to elevation of this angle up to +20 degree(s)C and +5 degree(s)C for both the MC simulation and tissue phantom models, respectively, with no further increase in the necrosis depth above these angles. It is to be noted that the relationship between focusing angles and DTN values was apparently stronger for the real target compared to the MC-derived hypothetical one. To what extent these date are applicable for medical practice can be evaluated in animal models which would simulate laser-assisted therapy for PWS or related dermatologic lesions with converged 578 nm laser beams.

  4. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  5. Soft-Bake Purification of SWCNTs Produced by Pulsed Laser Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yowell, Leonard; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga; Allada, Rama Kumar; Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2013-01-01

    The "soft-bake" method is a simple and reliable initial purification step first proposed by researchers at Rice University for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) produced by high-pressure carbon mon oxide disproportionation (HiPco). Soft-baking consists of annealing as-produced (raw) SWCNT, at low temperatures in humid air, in order to degrade the heavy graphitic shells that surround metal particle impurities. Once these shells are cracked open by the expansion and slow oxidation of the metal particles, the metal impurities can be digested through treatment with hydrochloric acid. The soft-baking of SWCNT produced by pulsed-laser vaporization (PLV) is not straightforward, because the larger average SWCNT diameters (.1.4 nm) and heavier graphitic shells surrounding metal particles call for increased temperatures during soft-bake. A part of the technology development focused on optimizing the temperature so that effective cracking of the graphitic shells is balanced with maintaining a reasonable yield, which was a critical aspect of this study. Once the ideal temperature was determined, a number of samples of raw SWCNT were purified using the soft-bake method. An important benefit to this process is the reduced time and effort required for soft-bake versus the standard purification route for SWCNT. The total time spent purifying samples by soft-bake is one week per batch, which equates to a factor of three reduction in the time required for purification as compared to the standard acid purification method. Reduction of the number of steps also appears to be an important factor in improving reproducibility of yield and purity of SWCNT, as small deviations are likely to get amplified over the course of a complicated multi-step purification process.

  6. Elucidating the Structure of Sugars: MW Spectroscopy Combined with Ultrafast UV Laser Vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Ecija, Patricia; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Fernandez, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando; Lesarri, Alberto; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Cimas, Alvaro

    2013-06-01

    Carbohydrates are one of the most versatile biochemicalbuilding blocks, widely acting in energetic, structural or recognition processes. Even the small monosaccharides display unique structural and conformational freedom and may coexist in many open-chain or cyclic forms. We recently initiated the investigation of a series of monosaccharides using a combination of ultrafast laser vaporization and microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jet expansions. We present several structural studies on carbohydrates of aldoses and ketoses of five and six carbon sugars vaporized by UV ultrafast laser vaporization and stabilized in a jet expansion. The experimental evidence confirms that sugars exhibits a α-/β-pyranose conformation (6-membered ring), sharply contrasting with the furanose form (5-membered ring) found in the nature (as component of RNA, sucrose). In addition, thanks to the use of enriched samples, we have experimentally determined the substitution and effective structures. Finally, the structure of several monosaccharides was compared and common structural patterns of their conformational landscape will be showed. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J. U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51, 3119-3124, 2012. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, Á. Cimas, B. G. Davis, F. J. Basterretxea, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 2845-2852, 2013.

  7. Cumulative and Continuous Laser Vaporization Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes and Nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Styers-Barnett, David J; Rouleau, Christopher M; Hu, Hui; Zhao, Bin; Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David B

    2008-01-01

    The conditions for the scaled synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and single wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) by laser vaporization at high temperatures are investigated and compared using in situ diagnostics. An industrial Nd:YAG laser (600 W, 1-500 Hz repetition rate) with tunable pulse widths (0.5-50 ms) is utilized to explore conditions for high yield production. High-speed videography (50,000 frames/s) of the laser plume and pyrometry of the target surface are correlated with ex situ high resolution TEM analysis of the products for pure carbon targets and carbon/catalyst targets to understand the effects of the processing conditions on the resulting nanostructures. Carbon is shown to self-assemble into single-wall nanohorn structures at rates of ~ 1 nm/ms which is comparable to the catalystassisted SWNT growth rates. Two regimes of laser ablation, cumulative ablation by multiple pulses, and continuous ablation by individual pulses, were explored. Cumulative ablation with spatially overlapping 0.5 ms pulses is favorable for the high yield and production rate of SWNTs at ~ 6 g/h while continuous ablation by individual long laser pulses (~ 20 ms) at high temperatures results in the highest yield of SWNHs without graphitic impurities at ~ 10 g/h. Adjustment of the laser pulse width is shown to control SWNH morphology.

  8. Cumulative and continuous laser vaporization synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes and nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puretzky, A. A.; Styers-Barnett, D. J.; Rouleau, C. M.; Hu, H.; Zhao, B.; Ivanov, I. N.; Geohegan, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The conditions for the scaled synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and single wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) by laser vaporization at high temperatures are investigated and compared using in situ diagnostics. An industrial Nd:YAG laser (600 W, 1-500 Hz repetition rate) with tunable pulse widths (0.5-50 ms) is utilized to explore conditions for high-yield production. High-speed videography (50000 frames/s) of the laser plume and pyrometry of the target surface are correlated with ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the products for pure carbon targets and carbon/catalyst targets to understand the effects of the processing conditions on the resulting nanostructures. Carbon is shown to self-assemble into single-wall nanohorn structures at rates of ˜1 nm/ms, which is comparable to the catalyst-assisted SWNT growth rates. Two regimes of laser ablation, cumulative ablation by multiple pulses and continuous ablation by individual pulses, were explored. Cumulative ablation with spatially overlapping 0.5-ms pulses is favorable for the high yield and production rate of SWNTs at ˜6 g/h while continuous ablation by individual long laser pulses (˜20 ms) at high temperatures results in the highest yield of SWNHs at ˜10 g/h. Adjustment of the laser pulse width is shown to control SWNH morphology.

  9. Tissue ablation after 120W greenlight laser vaporization and bipolar plasma vaporization of the prostate: a comparison using transrectal three-dimensional ultrasound volumetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranzbühler, Benedikt; Gross, Oliver; Fankhauser, Christian D.; Hefermehl, Lukas J.; Poyet, Cédric; Largo, Remo; Müntener, Michael; Seifert, Hans-Helge; Zimmermann, Matthias; Sulser, Tullio; Müller, Alexander; Hermanns, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Introduction and objectives: Greenlight laser vaporization (LV) of the prostate is characterized by simultaneous vaporization and coagulation of prostatic tissue resulting in tissue ablation together with excellent hemostasis during the procedure. It has been reported that bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) of the prostate might be an alternative for LV. So far, it has not been shown that BPV is as effective as LV in terms of tissue ablation or hemostasis. We performed transrectal three-dimensional ultrasound investigations to compare the efficiency of tissue ablation between LV and BPV. Methods: Between 11.2009 and 5.2011, 50 patients underwent pure BPV in our institution. These patients were matched with regard to the pre-operative prostate volume to 50 LV patients from our existing 3D-volumetry-database. Transrectal 3D ultrasound and planimetric volumetry of the prostate were performed pre-operatively, after catheter removal, 6 weeks and 6 months. Results: Median pre-operative prostate volume was not significantly different between the two groups (45.3ml vs. 45.4ml; p=1.0). After catheter removal, median absolute volume reduction (BPV 12.4ml, LV 6.55ml) as well as relative volume reduction (27.8% vs. 16.4%) were significantly higher in the BPV group (p<0.001). After six weeks (42.9% vs. 33.3%) and six months (47.2% vs. 39.7%), relative volume reduction remained significantly higher in the BPV group (p<0.001). Absolute volume reduction was non-significantly higher in the BPV group after six weeks (18.4ml, 13.8ml; p=0.051) and six months (20.8ml, 18ml; p=0.3). Clinical outcome parameters improved significantly in both groups without relevant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both vaporization techniques result in efficient tissue ablation with initial prostatic swelling. BPV seems to be superior due to a higher relative volume reduction. This difference had no clinical impact after a follow-up of 6M.

  10. Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase

    DOEpatents

    Kunnmann, Walter; Larese, John Z.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

  11. Method and apparatus for detection of chemical vapors

    DOEpatents

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Caja, Josip

    2007-05-15

    The present invention is a gas detector and method for using the gas detector for detecting and identifying volatile organic and/or volatile inorganic substances present in unknown vapors in an environment. The gas detector comprises a sensing means and a detecting means for detecting electrical capacitance variance of the sensing means and for further identifying the volatile organic and volatile inorganic substances. The sensing means comprises at least one sensing unit and a sensing material allocated therein the sensing unit. The sensing material is an ionic liquid which is exposed to the environment and is capable of dissolving a quantity of said volatile substance upon exposure thereto. The sensing means constitutes an electrochemical capacitor and the detecting means is in electrical communication with the sensing means.

  12. Combustion chamber and thermal vapor stream producing apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Sperry, John S.; Krajicek, Richard W.; Cradeur, Robert R.

    1978-01-01

    A new and improved method and apparatus for burning a hydrocarbon fuel for producing a high pressure thermal vapor stream comprising steam and combustion gases for injecting into a subterranean formation for the recovery of liquefiable minerals therefrom, wherein a high pressure combustion chamber having multiple refractory lined combustion zones of varying diameters is provided for burning a hydrocarbon fuel and pressurized air in predetermined ratios injected into the chamber for producing hot combustion gases essentially free of oxidizing components and solid carbonaceous particles. The combustion zones are formed by zones of increasing diameters up a final zone of decreasing diameter to provide expansion zones which cause turbulence through controlled thorough mixing of the air and fuel to facilitate complete combustion. The high pressure air and fuel is injected into the first of the multiple zones where ignition occurs with a portion of the air injected at or near the point of ignition to further provide turbulence and more complete combustion.

  13. Waterproof Silicone Coatings of Thermal Insulation and Vaporization Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation composed of porous ceramic material can be waterproofed by producing a thin silicone film on the surface of the insulation by exposing it to volatile silicone precursors at ambient conditions. When the silicone precursor reactants are multi-functional siloxanes or silanes containing alkenes or alkynes carbon groups higher molecular weight films can be produced. Catalyst are usually required for the silicone precursors to react at room temperature to form the films. The catalyst are particularly useful in the single component system e.g. dimethylethoxysilane (DNMS) to accelerate the reaction and decrease the time to waterproof and protect the insulation. In comparison to other methods, the chemical vapor technique assures better control over the quantity and location of the film being deposited on the ceramic insulation to improve the waterproof coating.

  14. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, Nabil M.

    1987-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for three different sets of relaxation rates. These rates correspond to: (1) Far Infrared (FIR) Raman lasers in the diabatic collision regime without consideration of coupled population decay in a closed system, (2) Raman FIR lasers in the diabatic collision regime with coupled population conserving decay, and (3) IR Raman gain in cesium vapor. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  15. Reduction of degradation in vapor phase transported InP/InGaAsP mushroom stripe lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, H.; Burkhardt, E.G.; Pfister, W.

    1988-10-03

    The rapid degradation rate generally observed in InP/InGaAsP mushroom stripe lasers can be considerably decreased by regrowing the open sidewalls of the active stripe with low-doped InP in a second epitaxial step using the hydride vapor phase transport technique. This technique does not change the fundamental laser parameters like light-current and current-voltage characteristics. Because of this drastic reduction in degradation, the vapor phase epitaxy regrown InP/InGaAsP mushroom laser seems to be an interesting candidate for application in optical communication.

  16. Spectral and temporal features of the pumping of rhodamine 6G by radiation from a copper vapor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, A.N.; Sukhanov, V.B.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the influence of the relative delay time tau and of the intensity ratio R/sub 21/ of the spectral components emitted by a copper vapor laser on the energy and spectral characteristics of lasing in rhodamine 6G. For certain values of tau and P/sub 21/, lasing in the dye was disrupted. A clamping effect was discovered between the rhodamine 6G laser emission spectrum and the yellow line of the copper vapor laser. The results obtained were used to determine the parameters of an interference filter for suppressing the yellow line from the copper vapor laser, and this made it possible to raise the efficiency of conversion of the pump radiation into lasing in the dye.

  17. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm(3)) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiO(x), or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H(2) gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000 °C were achieved even in 200 Torr H(2). We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  18. Vapor Corrosion Cell and Method of Using Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a vapor corrosion cell for a real-time and quantitative measurement of corrosion of conductive materials in atmospheres containing chemically reactive gases and water vapor. Two prototypes are provided. Also provided are various applications of this apparatus in industry.

  19. Convection and mass-transport in laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S.; Brown, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Gas flow and energy and species transport in laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LICVD) of amorphous silicon films by silane pyrolysis are analyzed by finite element analysis of a two-dimensional model for the process. Spatial nonuniformity of the deposited film is shown to result from diffusion controlled transport of products between the beam and substrate. Deposition profiles are affected by buoyancy-driven convection only at increased gas pressures. Horizontal orientation of the reactor with respect to gravity is optimal because the stagnation-like flow, that results adjacent to the substrate, enhances mixing, and smoothes the film profile.

  20. Optimization of the alexandrite laser tuning elements for a water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of some of the developments completed on an alexandrite laser for making water vapor DIAL measurements is presented in this paper. A computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons has been implemented and recently tested in an aircraft environment. Long-term frequency drift (i.e., 2 hours) of less than 0.7 pm has been observed in the laboratory. An alignment technique to get the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons is also developed.

  1. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-02

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ∼2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  2. Application of atomic vapor laser isotope separation to the enrichment of mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.K.; Erbert, G.V.; Paisner, J.A.; Chen, H.L.; Chiba, Z.; Beeler, R.G.; Combs, R.; Mostek, S.D.

    1986-09-01

    Workers at GTE/Sylvania have shown that the efficiency of fluorescent lighting may be markedly improved using mercury that has been enriched in the /sup 196/Hg isotope. A 5% improvement in the efficiency of fluorescent lighting in the United States could provide a savings of approx. 1 billion dollars in the corresponding reduction of electrical power consumption. We will discuss the results of recent work done at our laboratory to develop a process for enriching mercury. The discussion will center around the results of spectroscopic measurements of excited state lifetimes, photoionization cross sections and isotope shifts. In addition, we will discuss the mercury separator and supporting laser mesurements of the flow properties of mercury vapor. We will describe the laser system which will provide the photoionization and finally discuss the economic details of producing enriched mercury at a cost that would be attractive to the lighting industry.

  3. Two-photon dichroic atomic vapor laser lock using electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Becerra, F. E.; Willis, R. T.; Rolston, S. L.; Orozco, L. A.

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate a technique to lock the frequency of a laser to a transition between two excited states in Rb vapor using a two-photon process in the presence of a weak magnetic field. We use a ladder configuration from specific hyperfine sublevels of the 5S{sub 1/2}, 5P{sub 3/2}, and 5D{sub 5/2} levels. This atomic configuration can show electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption processes. The error signal comes from the difference in the transparency or absorption felt by the two orthogonal polarizations of the probe beam. A simplified model is in good quantitative agreement with the observed signals for the experimental parameters. We have used this technique to lock the frequency of the laser up to 1.5 GHz off atomic resonance.

  4. The mode-matching model of diode-end-pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Xie, Jijiang; Chen, Fei; Yang, Guilong; Li, Dianjun; Wang, Chunrui; Zhang, Kuo; Zheng, Changbin; He, Yang; Gao, Fei

    2015-02-01

    Diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers are famous in the field of laser for their significant advantages such as very high quantum efficiency (Cs 99.5%, Rb 98.1%, K 95.2%), good thermal management performance and excellent beam output quality etc. A rate equation model fully considering the spatial distributions of pumping light and oscillating light is established under the hypothesis of quasi-two-level energy system of DPALs in this paper. Meanwhile, expressions of threshold pumping power, mode-matching efficiency and output power and slop efficiency in low pumping and strong pumping, respectively, are obtained. Then, the influences of mode-matching efficiency on working performance of DPALs are discussed and analyzed. Results show that mode-matching efficiency mainly impacts on threshold pumping power, output power and slop efficiency in low pumping but that nearly has no effects in strong pumping. Therefore, this model benefits the further research of DPALs.

  5. Investigations of single-wall carbon nanotube growth by time-restricted laser vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puretzky, Alex A.; Schittenhelm, Henrik; Fan, Xudong; Lance, Michael J.; Allard, Larry F.; Geohegan, David B.

    2002-06-01

    The growth times of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT's) within a high-temperature laser-vaporization (LV) reactor were measured and adjusted through in situ imaging of the plume of laser-ablated material using Rayleigh-scattered light induced by time-delayed, 308-nm laser pulses. Short SWNT's were synthesized by restricting the growth time to less than 20 ms for ambient growth temperatures of 760-1100 °C. Statistical analysis of transmission electron microscope photographs indicated most-probable lengths of 35-77 nm for these conditions. Raman spectra (Eex=1.96 and 2.41 eV) of the short nanotubes indicate that they are well-formed SWNT's. The temperature of the particles in the vortex-ring-shaped plume during its thermalization to the oven temperature was estimated by collecting its blackbody emission spectra at different spatial positions inside the oven and fitting them to Planck's law. These data, along with detailed oven temperature profiles, were used to deduce a complete picture of the time spent by the plume at high growth temperatures (760-1100 °C). The upper and lower limits of the growth rates of SWNT's were estimated as 0.6 and 5.1 μm/s for the typical nanosecond Nd:YAG laser-vaporization conditions used in this study. These measurements permit the completion of a general picture of SWNT growth by LV based on imaging, spectroscopy, and pyrometry of ejected material at different times after ablation, which confirms our previous measurements that the majority of SWNT growth occurs at times greater than 20 ms after LV by the conversion of condensed phase carbon.

  6. Modeling of Laser Vaporization and Plume Chemistry in a Boron Nitride Nanotube Production Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Fay, Catharine C.

    2012-01-01

    Flow in a pressurized, vapor condensation (PVC) boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) production rig is modeled. A laser provides a thermal energy source to the tip of a boron ber bundle in a high pressure nitrogen chamber causing a plume of boron-rich gas to rise. The buoyancy driven flow is modeled as a mixture of thermally perfect gases (B, B2, N, N2, BN) in either thermochemical equilibrium or chemical nonequilibrium assuming steady-state melt and vaporization from a 1 mm radius spot at the axis of an axisymmetric chamber. The simulation is intended to define the macroscopic thermochemical environment from which boron-rich species, including nanotubes, condense out of the plume. Simulations indicate a high temperature environment (T > 4400K) for elevated pressures within 1 mm of the surface sufficient to dissociate molecular nitrogen and form BN at the base of the plume. Modifications to Program LAURA, a finite-volume based solver for hypersonic flows including coupled radiation and ablation, are described to enable this simulation. Simulations indicate that high pressure synthesis conditions enable formation of BN vapor in the plume that may serve to enhance formation of exceptionally long nanotubes in the PVC process.

  7. Review of Various Air Sampling Methods for Solvent Vapors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maykoski, R. T.

    Vapors of trichloroethylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl cellosolve in air were collected using Scotchpac and Tedlar bags, glass prescription bottles, and charcoal adsorption tubes. Efficiencies of collection are reported. (Author/RH)

  8. The melanosome: threshold temperature for explosive vaporization and internal absorption coefficient during pulsed laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, S L; McAuliffe, D J

    1991-06-01

    The explosive vaporization of melanosomes in situ in skin during pulsed laser irradiation (pulse duration less than 1 microsecond) is observed as a visible whitening of the superficial epidermal layer due to stratum corneum disruption. In this study, the ruby laser (694 nm) was used to determine the threshold radiant exposure, H0 (J/cm2), required to elicit whitening for in vitro black (Negroid) human skin samples which were pre-equilibrated at an initial temperature, Ti, of 0, 20, or 50 degrees C. A plot of H0 vs Ti yields a straight line whose x-intercept indicates the threshold temperature of explosive vaporization to be 112 +/- 7 degrees C (SD, N = 3). The slope, delta H0/delta Ti, specifies the internal absorption coefficient, mua, within the melanosome: mua = -rho C/(slope(1 + 7.1 Rd)), where rho C is the product of density and specific heat, and Rd is the total diffuse reflectance from the skin. A summary of the absorption spectrum (mua) for the melanosome interior (351-1064 nm) is presented based on H0 data from this study and the literature. The in vivo absorption spectrum (380-820 nm) for human epidermal melanin was measured by an optical fiber spectrophotometer and is compared with the melanosome spectrum. PMID:1886936

  9. Formation of nanooctahedra in molybdenum disulfide and molybdenum diselenide using pulsed laser vaporization.

    PubMed

    Parilla, Philip A; Dillon, Anne C; Parkinson, Bruce A; Jones, Kim M; Alleman, Jeff; Riker, Gerald; Ginley, David S; Heben, Michael J

    2004-05-20

    Pulsed laser vaporization has been used to produce nanooctahedra of MoS2 and MoSe2. The nanooctahedra primarily form in two- or three-layer nested octahedra, although nesting up to five layers has been observed. Tilting the TEM sample stage and mapping how the images of single particles transformed provided the evidence to verify their octahedral geometry. Analysis of 30 two- and three-layered octahedra showed that their outer edge lengths clustered at approximately 3.8 nm and approximately 5.1 nm, respectively. This discreet sizing and the high symmetry of these closed nanooctahedra represent the closest inorganic analogy yet to the carbon fullerenes. The geometrical implications for forming octahedra from these layered compounds are investigated by considering different atomic arrangements assuming either trigonal prismatic or octahedral coordination around the Mo atom and yields two possible configurations for the actual structure of the nanooctahedra. A preliminary survey of pulsed laser vaporization of other layered metal chalcogenides shows that these dichalcogenides differ in their tendency to form small closed layered fullerene-like structures. These materials can be ranked from highest tendency to lowest as follows: NbSe2, WS2, WSe2, SnS2, TaS2, GaS, ReS2, and MoTe2. PMID:18950101

  10. The melanosome: threshold temperature for explosive vaporization and internal absorption coefficient during pulsed laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, S L; McAuliffe, D J

    1991-06-01

    The explosive vaporization of melanosomes in situ in skin during pulsed laser irradiation (pulse duration less than 1 microsecond) is observed as a visible whitening of the superficial epidermal layer due to stratum corneum disruption. In this study, the ruby laser (694 nm) was used to determine the threshold radiant exposure, H0 (J/cm2), required to elicit whitening for in vitro black (Negroid) human skin samples which were pre-equilibrated at an initial temperature, Ti, of 0, 20, or 50 degrees C. A plot of H0 vs Ti yields a straight line whose x-intercept indicates the threshold temperature of explosive vaporization to be 112 +/- 7 degrees C (SD, N = 3). The slope, delta H0/delta Ti, specifies the internal absorption coefficient, mua, within the melanosome: mua = -rho C/(slope(1 + 7.1 Rd)), where rho C is the product of density and specific heat, and Rd is the total diffuse reflectance from the skin. A summary of the absorption spectrum (mua) for the melanosome interior (351-1064 nm) is presented based on H0 data from this study and the literature. The in vivo absorption spectrum (380-820 nm) for human epidermal melanin was measured by an optical fiber spectrophotometer and is compared with the melanosome spectrum.

  11. Kinetics of laser-pulse vaporization of uranium carbide by mass spectrometry. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Tehranian, F.

    1983-06-01

    The kinetics of uranium carbide vaporization in the temperature range 3000 K to 5200 K was studied using a Nd-glass laser with peak power densities from 1.6 x 10/sup 5/ to 4.0 x 10/sup 5/ watts/cm/sup 2/. The vapor species U, UC/sub 2/, C/sub 1/ and C/sub 3/ were detected and analyzed by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. From the mass spectrometer signals number densities of the various species in the ionizer were obtained as functions of time. The surface of the irradiated uranium carbide was examined by scanning electron microscope and the depth profile of the crater was obtained. In order to aid analysis of the data, the heat conduction and species diffusion equations for the solid (or liquid) were solved numerically by a computer code to obtain the temperature and composition transients during laser heating. A sensitivity analysis was used to study the effect of uncertainties in the input parameters on the computed surface temperatures.

  12. Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, G.

    1990-05-01

    A method and means are disclosed for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived. 15 figs.

  13. Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chen, Guoying

    1990-05-01

    A method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived.

  14. Laser absorption spectroscopy of water vapor confined in nanoporous alumina: wall collision line broadening and gas diffusion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Tomas; Lewander, Märta; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate high-resolution tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) of water vapor confined in nanoporous alumina. Strong multiple light scattering results in long photon pathlengths (1 m through a 6 mm sample). We report on strong line broadening due to frequent wall collisions (gas-surface interactions). For the water vapor line at 935.685 nm, the HWHM of confined molecules are about 4.3 GHz as compared to 2.9 GHz for free molecules (atmospheric pressure). Gas diffusion is also investigated, and in contrast to molecular oxygen (that moves rapidly in and out of the alumina), the exchange of water vapor is found very slow.

  15. Study of water molecule decomposition in plasma by diode laser spectroscopy and optical actinometry methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskiy, A. V.; Lagunov, V. V.; Ochkin, V. N.; Tskhai, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    The methods of diode laser radiation absorption at vibrational–rotational molecule transitions and optical actinometry with measurements of its electron emission spectra are used independently to study water molecule dissociation in glow discharge plasma in a mixture of water vapor and inert gases at reduced pressure. The methods yield close results. The dissociation reaches 98%.

  16. Critical Fluences And Modeling Of CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Of Polyoxymethylene From Vaporization To The Plasma Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Tsukiyama, Yosuke; Ogita, Naoya; Sasoh, Akihiro; Umehara, Noritsugu; Gregory, Don A.

    2010-05-06

    A CO{sub 2} laser was operated at pulse energies up to 10 J to ablate polyoxymethylene targets in air and vacuum conditions. Critical effects predicted by ablation models are discussed in relation to the experimental data, including specifically the threshold fluences for vaporization and critical plasma formation, and the fluence at which the optimal momentum coupling coefficient is found. Finally, we discuss a new approach for modeling polymers at long wavelengths, including a connection formula that links the vaporization and plasma regimes for laser ablation propulsion.

  17. Spectral diagnostics of a vapor-plasma plume produced during welding titanium with a high-power ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspenskiy, S. A.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Bykovskiy, D. P.; Mironov, V. D.; Prokopova, N. M.; Tret'yakov, E. V.

    2015-03-01

    This work is devoted to the research of welding plume during high power ytterbium fiber laser welding of a titanium alloy in the Ar shielding gas environment. High speed video observation of a vapor-plasma plume for visualization of processes occurring at laser welding was carried out. The coefficient of the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation is calculated for a plasma welding plume by results of spectrometer researches. The conclusion deals with the impact of plasma on a high-power fiber laser radiation.

  18. Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; Biblarz, O.

    1991-10-15

    The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process. 2 figures.

  19. The influence of water vapor on atmospheric exchange measurements with an ICOS* based Laser absorption analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Quan, Zhi; Wandel, Matthias; Yi, Zhigang; Bozem, Heiko; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide and carbon monoxide are both atmospheric trace gases of high interest. Recent advances in the field of spectroscopy have enabled instruments that measure the concentration of the above and other trace gases very fast and with good precision. Increasing the effective path length by reflecting the light between two mirrors in a cavity, these instruments reach impressive sensitivities. Often it is possible to measure the concentration of more than one trace gas at the same time. The OCS/CO2 Analyzer by LGR (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measures the concentration of water vapor [H2O], carbonyl sulfide [COS], carbon dioxide [CO2] and carbon monoxide [CO] simultaneously. For that the cavity is saturated with light, than the attenuation of light is measured as in standard absorption spectroscopy. The instrument proved to be very fast with good precision and to be able to detect even very low concentrations, especially for COS (as low as 30ppt in the case of COS). However, we observed a rather strong cross sensitivity to water vapor. Altering the water vapor content of the sampled air with two different methods led to a change in the perceived concentration of COS, CO and CO2. This proved especially problematic for enclosure (cuvette) measurements, where the concentrations of one of the above species in an empty cuvette are compared to the concentration of another cuvette containing a plant whose exchange of trace gases with the atmosphere is of interest. There, the plants transpiration leads to a large difference in water vapor content between the cuvettes and that in turn produces artifacts in the concentration differences between the cuvettes for the other above mentioned trace gases. For CO, simultaneous measurement with a UV-Emission Analyzer (AL 5002, Aerolaser) and the COS/CO Analyzer showed good agreement of perceived concentrations as long as the sample gas was dry and an increasing difference in perceived concentration when the sample gas was

  20. Long-laser-pulse method of producing thin films

    DOEpatents

    Balooch, Mehdi; Olander, Donald K.; Russo, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A method of depositing thin films by means of laser vaporization employs a long-pulse laser (Nd-glass of about one millisecond duration) with a peak power density typically in the range 10.sup.5 -10.sup.6 W/cm.sup.2. The method may be used to produce high T.sub.c superconducting films of perovskite material. In one embodiment, a few hundred nanometers thick film of YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x is produced on a SrTiO.sub.3 crystal substrate in one or two pulses. In situ-recrystallization and post-annealing, both at elevated temperature and in the presence of an oxidizing agen The invention described herein arose in the course of, or under, Contract No. DE-C03-76SF0098 between the United States Department of Energy and the University of California.

  1. Dynamic characteristics and mechanisms of compressible metallic vapor plume behaviors in transient keyhole during deep penetration fiber laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Li, Wen; Chen, Xin; Gong, Shuili

    2016-07-01

    The compressible metallic vapor plume or plasma plume behaviors in the keyhole during deep penetration laser welding have significant effects on the joint quality. However, these behaviors and their responses to process parameter variations have not been well understood. In this paper, we first systematically study the dynamic characteristics and mechanisms of compressible metallic vapor plume behaviors in transient keyhole during fiber laser welding of 304 stainless steels based on a multiple timescale multiphase model. The time-dependent temperature, pressure, velocity and Mach number distributions of vapor plume under different process parameters are theoretically predicted. It is found that the distributions of the main physical characteristics of vapor plume such as pressure, velocity as well as Mach number in keyhole are usually highly uneven and highly time dependent. The peak difference of the velocity, pressure, temperature and Mach number of the vapor plume in a keyhole could be greater than 200 m/s, 20 kPa, 1000 K and 0.6 Mach, respectively. The vapor plume characteristics in a transient keyhole can experience significant changes within several hundreds of nanoseconds. The formation mechanisms of these dynamic characteristics are mainly due to the mesoscale keyhole hump (sized in several tens of microns) dynamics. It is also demonstrated that it is possible to suppress the oscillations of compressible vapor plume in the keyhole by improving the keyhole stability through decreasing the heat input. However, stabilizing the keyhole could only weaken, but not eliminate, the observed highly uneven and transient characteristics. This finding may pose new challenges for accurate experimental measurements of vapor plume induced by laser welding.

  2. Retrieval of water vapor mixing ratio from a multiple channel Raman-scatter lidar using an optimal estimation method.

    PubMed

    Sica, R J; Haefele, A

    2016-02-01

    Lidar measurements of the atmospheric water vapor mixing ratio provide an excellent complement to radiosoundings and passive, ground-based remote sensors. Lidars are now routinely used that can make high spatial-temporal resolution measurements of water vapor from the surface to the stratosphere. Many of these systems can operate during the day and night, with operation only limited by clouds thick enough to significantly attenuate the laser beam. To enhance the value of these measurements for weather and climate studies, this paper presents an optimal estimation method (OEM) to retrieve the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol optical depth profile, Ångstrom exponent, lidar constants, detector dead times, and measurement backgrounds from multichannel vibrational Raman-scatter lidars. The OEM retrieval provides the systematic uncertainties due to the overlap function, calibration factor, air density and Rayleigh-scatter cross sections, in addition to the random uncertainties of the retrieval due to measurement noise. The OEM also gives the vertical resolution of the retrieval as a function of height, as well as the height to which the contribution of the a priori is small. The OEM is applied to measurements made by the Meteoswiss Raman Lidar for Meteorological Observations (RALMO) in the day and night for clear and cloudy conditions. The retrieved water vapor mixing ratio is in excellent agreement with both the traditional lidar retrieval method and coincident radiosoundings. PMID:26836078

  3. Retrieval of water vapor mixing ratio from a multiple channel Raman-scatter lidar using an optimal estimation method.

    PubMed

    Sica, R J; Haefele, A

    2016-02-01

    Lidar measurements of the atmospheric water vapor mixing ratio provide an excellent complement to radiosoundings and passive, ground-based remote sensors. Lidars are now routinely used that can make high spatial-temporal resolution measurements of water vapor from the surface to the stratosphere. Many of these systems can operate during the day and night, with operation only limited by clouds thick enough to significantly attenuate the laser beam. To enhance the value of these measurements for weather and climate studies, this paper presents an optimal estimation method (OEM) to retrieve the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol optical depth profile, Ångstrom exponent, lidar constants, detector dead times, and measurement backgrounds from multichannel vibrational Raman-scatter lidars. The OEM retrieval provides the systematic uncertainties due to the overlap function, calibration factor, air density and Rayleigh-scatter cross sections, in addition to the random uncertainties of the retrieval due to measurement noise. The OEM also gives the vertical resolution of the retrieval as a function of height, as well as the height to which the contribution of the a priori is small. The OEM is applied to measurements made by the Meteoswiss Raman Lidar for Meteorological Observations (RALMO) in the day and night for clear and cloudy conditions. The retrieved water vapor mixing ratio is in excellent agreement with both the traditional lidar retrieval method and coincident radiosoundings.

  4. Measurement of vapor/liquid distributions in a binary-component fuel spray using laser imaging of droplet scattering and vapor absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiyan; Zhang, Yuyin; Wu, Shenqi; Xu, Bin

    2014-08-01

    Fuel volatility has a great effect on its evaporation processes and the mixture formation and thus combustion and emissions formation processes in internal combustion engines. To date, however, instead of the actual gasoline or diesel fuel, many researchers have been using single-component fuel in their studies, because the composition of the former is too complicated to understand the real physics behind the evaporation and combustion characteristics. Several research groups have reported their results on droplets evaporation in a spray of multi-component fuel, carried out both numerically and experimentally. However, there are plenty of difficulties in quantitative determination of vapor concentration and droplet distributions of each component in a multicomponent fuel spray. In this study, to determine the vapor phase concentration and droplet distributions in an evaporating binary component fuel spray, a laser diagnostics based on laser extinction by droplet scattering and vapor absorption was developed. In practice, measurements of the vapor concentration distributions of the lower (n-tridencane) and higher (n-octane) volatility components in the binary component fuel sprays have been carried out at ambient temperatures of 473K and 573K, by substituting p-xylene for noctane or α-methylnaphthalene for n-tridecane. p-Xylene and α-methylnaphthalene were selected as the substitutes is because they have strong absorption band near 266nm and transparent near 532nm and, their thermo-physical properties are similar to those of the original component. As a demonstration experiment, vapor/liquid distribution of the lower boiling point (LBP) and higher boiling point (HBP) components in the binary component fuel spray have been obtained.

  5. Spectral diagnostics of a vapor-plasma plume produced during welding with a high-power ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspenskiy, S. A.; Shcheglov, P. Yu.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Gumenyuk, A. V.; Rethmeier, M.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted spectroscopic studies of the welding plasma formed in the process of welding with an ytterbium fiber laser delivering output power of up to 20 kW. The influence of shielding gases (Ar, He) on different parts of the welding plume is investigated. The absorption coefficient of the laser radiation by the welding-plume plasma is estimated. Scattering of 532-nm probe radiation from particles of the condensed metal vapor within the caustic of a high-power fiber laser beam is measured. Based on the obtained results, conclusions are made on the influence of the plasma formation and metal vapor condensation on the radiation of the high-power fiber laser and the stability of the welding process.

  6. Enhanced Haze Ratio on Glass by Novel Vapor Texturing Method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghwan; Balaji, Nagarajan; Ju, Minkyu; Park, Cheolmin; Kim, Jungmo; Chung, Sungyoun; Lee, Youn-Jung

    2016-05-01

    State-of-the-art optical trapping designs are required to enhance the light trapping capabilities of tandem thin film silicon solar cells. The wet etch process is used to texture the glass surface by dipping in diluted acidic solutions such as HNO3 (nitric acid) and HF (hydrofluoric acid). For vapor texturing, the vapor was generated by adding silicon to HF:HNO3 acidic solution. The anisotropic etching of vapor textured wafers resulted in an etching depth of about 2.78 μm with reduced reflectance of 5%. We achieved a high haze value of 74.6% at a 540 nm wavelength by increasing the etching time and HF concentration. PMID:27483862

  7. Water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, R.; Mcilrath, T.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of measuring atmospheric water vapor by means of a tunable lidar operated from the space shuttle. The specific method evaluated was differential absorption, a two-color method in which the atmospheric path of interest is traversed by two laser pulses. Results are reported.

  8. A three-beam water vapor sensor system for combustion diagnostics using a 1390 nm tunable diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.G.; Vay, S.

    1995-12-31

    H{sub 2}O(v) is an important species in combustion and hypersonic flow measurements because it is a primary combustion product. Measurements of water vapor can be used to determine performance parameters, such as extent and efficiency of combustion in propulsion and aerodynamics facilities. Water vapor concentration measurement in these high-temperature hypervelocity combustion conditions requires very high sensitivity and fast time response. A three-beam diode laser H{sub 2}O(v) measurement system for nonintrusive combustion diagnostics has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center and successfully tested and installed at GASL NASA HYPULSE facility for routine operation. The system was built using both direct laser absorption spectroscopy and frequency modulation laser spectroscopy. The output beam from a distributed feedback (DFB) InGaAsP diode laser (emitting around 1.39 {micro}m) is split into three equal-powered equal-distanced parallel beams with separation of 9 mm. With three beams, the authors are able to obtain water vapor number densities at three locations. Frequency modulation spectroscopy technique is used to achieve high detection sensitivity. The diode laser is modulated at radio frequency (RF), while the wavelength of the diode laser is tuned to scan over a strong water vapor absorption line. The detected RF signal is then demodulated at the fundamental frequency of the modulation (one-F demodulation). A working model and a computer software code have been developed for data process and data analysis. Water vapor number density measurements are achieved with consideration of temperature dependence. Experimental results and data analysis will be presented.

  9. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1996-04-02

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines. 13 figs.

  10. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Im, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines.

  11. Mw Spectroscopy Coupled with Ultrafast UV Laser Vaporization: {RIBOSE} Found in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Ecija, Patricia; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Fernandez, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando; Lesarri, Alberto; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2012-06-01

    Sugars are aldoses or ketoses with multiple hydroxy groups which have been elusive to spectroscopic studies. Here we report a rotational study of the aldopentose ribose. According to any standard textbook aldopentoses can exhibit either linear forms, cyclic five-membered (furanose) structures or six-membered (pyranose) rings, occurring either as α- or β- anomers depending on the orientation of the hydroxy group at C-1 (anomeric carbon). β-Furanose is predominant in ribonucleosides, RNA, ATP and other biochemically relevant derivatives, but is β-furanose the native form also of free ribose? Recent condensed-phase X-ray and older NMR studies delivered conflicting results. In order to solve this question we conducted a microwave study on D-ribose that, owing to ultrafast UV laser vaporization, has become the first C-5 sugar observed with rotational resolution. The spectrum revealed six conformations of free ribose, preferentially adopting β-pyranose chairs as well as higher-energy α-pyranose forms. The method also allowed for unambiguous distinction between different orientations of the hydroxy groups, which stabilize the structures by cooperative hydrogen-bond networks. No evidence was observed of the α-/β-furanoses or linear forms found in the biochemical derivatives. i) D. Šišak, L. B. McCusker, G. Zandomeneghi, B. H. Meier, D. Bläser, R. Boese, W. B. Schweizer, R. Gylmour and J. D. Dunitz Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 4503, 2010. ii) W. Saenger Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 6487, 2010. i) M. Rudrum, and D. F. Shaw, J. Chem. Soc. 52, 1965. ii) R. U. Lemieux and J. D. Stevens Can. J. Chem. 44, 249, 1966. iii) E. Breitmaier and U. Hollstein Org. Magn. Reson. 8, 573, 1976. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J. U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. in press: DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107973, 2012.

  12. Comparison of vapor sampling system (VSS) and in situ vapor sampling (ISVS) methods on Tanks C-107, BY-108, and S-102. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Edwards, J.A.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-08-01

    This report discusses comparison tests for two methods of collecting vapor samples from the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank headspaces. The two sampling methods compared are the truck-mounted vapor sampling system (VSS) and the cart-mounted in-situ vapor sampling (ISVS). Three tanks were sampled by both the VSS and ISVS methods from the same access risers within the same 8-hour period. These tanks have diverse headspace compositions and they represent the highest known level of several key vapor analytes.

  13. Method for the separation of acid from acid-laden vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.J.

    1992-02-11

    This patent describes a method for the removal of hydrochloric or sulfuric acid from vapor laden with the acid. It comprises: contacting the acid-laden vapors with packing materials in a zone containing the packing materials wherein the packing materials are formed of polyester resin containing from about 5 to 40 weight percent aluminum sulfate crystals.

  14. Diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S.; Weckwerth, T.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carbone, R.

    2012-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating the performance of an eye-safe, low-cost, diode-laser-based, water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler. This class of instrument may be capable of providing continuous water vapor and aerosol backscatter profiles at high vertical resolution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for periods of months to years. The technology potentially fills a national long term observing facility gap and could greatly benefit micro- and meso-meteorology, water cycle, carbon cycle and, more generally, biosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere interaction research at both weather and climate variability time scales. For the evaluation, the Montana State University 3rd generation water vapor DIAL was modified to enable unattended operation for a period of several weeks. The performance of this V3.5 version DIAL was tested at MSU and NCAR in June and July of 2012. Further tests are currently in progress with Howard University at Beltsville, Maryland; and with the National Weather Service and Oklahoma University at Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The presentation will include a comparison of DIAL profiles against meteorological "truth" at the aforementioned locations including: radiosondes, Raman lidars, microwave and IR radiometers, AERONET and SUOMINET systems. Instrument reliability, uncertainty, systematic biases, detection height statistics, and environmental complications will be evaluated. Performance will be judged in the context of diverse scientific applications that range from operational weather prediction and seasonal climate variability, to more demanding climate system process studies at the land-canopy-ABL interface. Estimating the extent to which such research and operational applications can be satisfied with a low cost autonomous network of similar instruments is our principal objective.

  15. Droplet sizes and velocities in vaporizing sprays. [using laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Ereaut, P. R.; Ungut, A.

    1983-01-01

    A pulse height laser Doppler anemometer particle sizing technique has been refined to permit simultaneous particle size and velocity measurements in sprays. The improvements include (1) the use of a specially tailored 'top hat' light distribution, to provide unambiguous particle diameter-signal amplitude relations, (2) the use of back scattered light collection, and (3) the utilization of Mie theory to compute the relations between signal amplitude and particle diameter, in the backscatter mode. Twin-fluid atomized kerosene sprays have been investigated using the new technique. In these sprays distributions have been mapped of mean droplet diameters, droplet size distributions, and the local correlations between droplet diameters and velocities. The data show the variation of spray structure with atomizer input parameters, the preferential vaporization of smaller droplets, and the differing trajectories of the large and small droplets.

  16. Comparison of three methods to find the vapor activity of a hydration step.

    PubMed

    Wadsö, L; Markova, N

    2001-01-01

    The formation of a stochiometric salt hydrate takes place at a well defined vapor activity. We have compared three methods to measure this vapor activity. In two of the methods we used a sorption balance in step mode and in ramp mode, respectively, and in one method we used a newly developed sorption microcalorimeter. The tests were made with the formation of morphine sulphate pentahydrate from its dihydrate at 25 degrees C. With all three methods this transition was found to take place at a vapor activity close to 0.21.

  17. Method for splitting low power laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pierscionek, B.K. )

    1990-04-01

    A new method for producing parallel rays from a laser beam using a cylindrical lens and pinholes is presented. This method can produce a greater number of emergent rays than using a {ital beam} {ital splitter}.

  18. Root-growth mechanism for single-walled boron nitride nanotubes in laser vaporization technique.

    SciTech Connect

    Arenal, R.; Stephan, O.; Cochon, J.-L.; Loiseau, A.

    2007-12-26

    We present a detailed study of the growth mechanism of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes synthesized by laser vaporization, which is the unique route known to the synthesis of this kind of tube in high quantities. We have performed a nanometric chemical and structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (high-resolution mode (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy) of the synthesis products. Different boron-based compounds and other impurities were identified in the raw synthesis products. The results obtained by the TEM analysis and from the synthesis parameters (temperature, boron, and nitrogen sources) combined with phase diagram analysis to provide identification of the fundamental factors determining the nanotube growth mechanism. Our experiments strongly support a root-growth model that involves the presence of a droplet of boron. This phenomenological model considers the solubility, solidification, and segregation phenomena of the elements present in this boron droplet. In this model, we distinguish three different steps as a function of the temperature: (1) formation of the liquid boron droplet from the decomposition of different boron compounds existing in the hexagonal boron nitride target, (2) reaction of these boron droplets with nitrogen gas present in the vaporization chamber and recombination of these elements to form boron nitride, and (3) incorporation of the nitrogen atoms at the root of the boron particle at active reacting sites that achieves the growth of the tube.

  19. DPAL: a new class of CW near-infrared high-power diode-pumped alkali (vapor) lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupke, William F.; Beach, Raymond J.; Kanz, Vernon K.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2004-05-01

    DPAL, a new class of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers, offers the prospect for high efficiency cw laser radiation at near-infrared wavelengths: cesium 895 nm, rubidium 795 nm, and potassium 770 nm. The physics of DPAL lasers are outlined, and the results of laboratory demonstrations using a titanium sapphire surrogate pump are summarized, along with benchmarked device models. DPAL electrical efficiencies of 25-30% are projected and near-diffraction-limited DPAL device power scaling into the multi-kilowatt regime from a single aperture is also projected.

  20. Exposure to copper-vapor laser as prophylaxis of radiative aggravations in patients treated for head or neck tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, V.A.; Popovich, V.I.; Soldatov, A.N.; Kitsmanyuk, Z.D.

    1993-06-01

    Possibilities are studied of using radiation of a copper vapor laser for prophylaxis of radiative aggravations in patients suffering from head and/or neck tumours. 114 Such patients were treated. A Malakhit laser was used for this study. It was shown that treating patients with laser radiation significantly reduces radiation reactions of skin and mucous membranes, so that a full course of radiation therapy may be performed without any forced breaks and treatment of maladies of epidermis and epithelium caused by radiation may be shortened.

  1. Improved method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1994-09-19

    This invention relates to a process for gas cleanup to remove one or more metallic contaminants present as vapor. More particularly, the invention relates to a gas cleanup process using mass transfer to control the saturation levels such that essentially no particulates are formed, and the vapor condenses on the gas passage surfaces. It addresses the need to cleanup an inert gas contaminated with cadmium which may escape from the electrochemical processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel in a hot cell. The IFR is a complete, self-contained, sodium-cooled, pool-type fast reactor fueled with a metallic alloy of uranium, plutonium and zirconium, and is equipped with a close-coupled fuel cycle. Tests with a model have shown that removal of cadmium from argon gas is in the order of 99.99%. The invention could also apply to the industrial cleanup of air or other gases contaminated with zinc, lead, or mercury. In addition, the invention has application in the cleanup of other gas systems contaminated with metal vapors which may be toxic or unhealthy.

  2. Injection-seeded alexandrite ring laser: performance and application in a water-vapor differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Wulfmeyer, V; Bösenberg, J; Lehmann, S; Senff, C; Schmitz, S

    1995-03-15

    A new laser system for use of differential absorption lidar (DIAL) in measurements of tropospheric water vapor and temperature is introduced. This system operates in the 720-780-nm region and is configured as an alexandrite ring laser injection seeded by a cw Ti:sapphire ring laser. This combination provides for the necessary narrow-bandwidth, high-frequency stability and excellent spectral purity. A bandwidth of <5.0 x 10(-3) cm(-1), a frequency stability of 2.1 x 10(-3) cm(-1) rms, and a spectral purity of 99.995% at 726 nm have been achieved during extended periods of operation. A comparison of a DIAL water-vapor measurement with a radiosonde in the boundary layer between 500 and 2000 m was performed. The maximum deviation between the humidity profiles is 15%, the standard deviation 1.6%, and the difference between the mean values 1%.

  3. Algorithm for evaluation of temperature distribution of a vapor cell in a diode-pumped alkali laser system: part I.

    PubMed

    Han, Juhong; Wang, You; Cai, He; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Liangping; Wang, Hongyuan

    2014-06-01

    A diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) is one of the most hopeful candidates to achieve high power performances. As the laser medium is in a gas-state, populations of energy-levels of a DPAL are strongly dependent on the vapor temperature. Thus, the temperature distribution directly determines the output characteristics of a DPAL. In this report, we developed a systematic model by combining the procedures of heat transfer and laser kinetics together to explore the radial temperature distribution in the transverse section of a cesium vapor cell. A cyclic iterative approach is adopted to calculate the population densities. The corresponding temperature distributions have been obtained for different beam waists and pump powers. The conclusion is thought to be useful for realizing a DPAL with high output power.

  4. Primary Vaginal Adenocarcinoma Arising in Vaginal Adenosis After CO2 Laser Vaporization and 5-Fluorouracil Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Paczos, Tamera A.; Ackers, Stacey; Odunsi, Kunle; Lele, Shashikant; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present a case of a 45-year-old woman with a long-standing history of persistent cervical dysplasia that resulted in a hysterectomy. Subsequent vaginal smears revealed high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN III) on Pap smear with positive human papilloma virus (HPV) testing. Over the course of 2 years, the patient underwent 2 CO2 laser vaporization procedures of the upper vagina and intermittent 5-fluorouracil therapy. A biopsy performed at the time of the second laser procedure revealed endocervical-type well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, associated with VAIN III. HPV in situ hybridization for HPV types 16 and 18 was positive in both the glandular and squamous mucosa. The patient has no known history of intrauterine diethylstilbestrol exposure or mullerian developmental abnormalities. Subsequently, the patient underwent a radical upper vaginetcomy with bilateral pelvic lymph nodes dissection and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The vaginectomy specimen showed residual adenocarcinoma associated with VAIN-III and extensive vaginal adenosis with free resection margins. This is the second reported case in the literature of adenocarcinoma arising in vaginal adenosis after 5-fluorouracil. Herein, we highlight these important findings and shed some light on the pathogenesis of vaginal adenosis and the subsequent development of vaginal adenocarcinoma. PMID:20173507

  5. Observation of picosecond superfluorescent pulses in rubidium atomic vapor pumped by 100-fs laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Kash, Michael M.; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Li, Hebin; Welch, George R.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-10-15

    We study the superfluorescence (SF) from a gas of rubidium atoms. The atoms of a dense vapor are excited to the 5D state from the 5S state by a two-photon process driven by 100-fs laser pulses. The atoms decay to the 6P state and then to the 5S state. The SF emission at 420 nm on the 6P-5S transition is recorded by a streak camera with picosecond time resolution. The time duration of the generated SF is tens of picoseconds, which is much shorter than the time scale of the usual relaxation processes, including spontaneous emission and atomic coherence dephasing. The dependence of the time delay between the reference input pulse and SF is measured as a function of laser power. The experimental data are described quantitatively by a simulation based on the semiclassical atom-field interaction theory. The observed change in scaling laws for the peak intensity and delay time can be elucidated by an SF theory in which the sample length is larger than the cooperation length.

  6. Time-resolved beam-quality characterization of copper-vapor lasers with unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Chang, J J

    1994-04-20

    Beam quality (BQ) of a 4-cm copper-vapor laser (CVL) with unstable resonators of different magnifications was characterized based on time-resolved far-field measurement. It was found that the BQ improvement after each round trip of the cavity cannot be predicted correctly from resonator theory. With a cavity Fresnel number of ~ 300, the achievable CVL BQ at the later part of the pulse was limited to approximately 4 times diffraction limited (×DL), even with a cavity magnification of 130. A pronounced temporal BQ oscillation, which is synchronized with the temporal pulse modulation, was also observed throughout the entire pulse. Examination of the temporal evolution of the far-field spot with use of a gated camera revealed that the strong presence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in the cavity during the entire laser pulse severely limited the achievable BQ because of consecutive cavity feedback that included this highly divergent ASE. BQ deterioration caused by intense ASE throughout the pulse was reduced when a cavity with a smaller Fresnel number was used. PMID:20885572

  7. Effects of carrier gas dynamics on single wall carbon nanotube chiral distributions during laser vaporization synthesis.

    PubMed

    Landi, Brian J; Raffaelle, Ryne P

    2007-03-01

    We report on the utility of modifying the carrier gas dynamics during laser vaporization synthesis to alter the single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) chiral distribution. SWNTs produced from an Alexandrite laser using conventional Ni/Co catalysts demonstrate marked differences in chiral distributions due to effects of helium gas and reactor chamber pressure, in comparison to conventional subambient pressures and argon gas. Optical absorption and Raman spectroscopies confirm that the SWNT diameter distribution decreases under higher pressure and with helium gas as opposed to argon. Fluorescence mapping of the raw soots in sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS)-D2O was used to estimate the relative (n, m)-SWNT content of the semiconducting types. A predominance of type II structures for each synthesis condition was observed. The distribution of SWNT chiral angles was observed to shift away from near-armchair configurations under higher pressure and with helium gas. These results illustrate the importance of gas type and pressure on the condensation/cooling rate, which allows for synthesis of specific SWNT chiral distributions.

  8. Temperature engineered growth of low-threshold quantum well lasers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dzurko, K.M.; Menu, E.P.; Beyler, C.A.; Osinski, J.S.; Dapkus, P.D.

    1989-01-09

    A new technique is demonstrated for the formation of narrow active regions in quantum well lasers. In temperature engineered growth (TEG), the substrate temperature is varied during the growth of epitaxial layers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on nonplanar substrates, allowing two-dimensional control of device features. Buried heterostructure designs with submicron active region stripe widths are obtained without the need for fine process control of lateral dimensions. The contact area above the active region is coplanar with the surrounding surface and wide enough to allow easy contacting and heat sinking. Carrier confinement is accomplished by lateral thickness variation of the quantum well active region resulting in a local strip of minimum band gap. Lasers grown in this manner exhibit cw threshold currents as low as 3.8 mA (3.4 mA pulsed), having an as-grown active region width of 0.5 ..mu..m. The near-field optical profile indicates stable, single transverse mode operation and minimal current leakage in these devices.

  9. A COMPARISON OF FOUR METHODS FOR DETERMINING PRECIPITABLE WATER VAPOR CONTENT FROM MULTI-SPECTRAL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    K. HIRSCH; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    Determining columnar water vapor is a fundamental problem in remote sensing. This measurement is important both for understanding atmospheric variability and also from removing atmospheric effects from remotely sensed data. Therefore discovering a reliable and if possible automated method for determining water vapor column abundance is important. There are two standard methods for determining precipitable water vapor during the daytime from multi-spectral data. The first method is the Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) (see for example King et al. 1996). This method assumes a baseline and measures the depth of a water vapor feature as compared to this baseline. The second method is the Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption technique (APDA) (see Schlaepfer et al. 1998); this method accounts for the path radiance contribution to the top of atmosphere radiance measurement which is increasingly important at lower and lower reflectance values. We have also developed two methods of modifying CIBR. We use a simple curve fitting procedure to account for and remove any systematic errors due to low reflectance while still preserving the random spread of the CIBR values as a function of surface reflectance. We also have developed a two-dimensional look-up table for CIBR; CIBR using this technique is a function of both water vapor (as with all CIBR techniques) and surface reflectance. Here we use data recently acquired with the Multi-spectral Thermal Imager spacecraft (MTI) to compare these four methods of determining columnar water vapor content.

  10. A simple method to incorporate water vapor absorption in the 15 microns remote temperature sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallu, G.; Prabhakara, C.; Conhath, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    The water vapor absorption in the 15 micron CO2 band, which can affect the remotely sensed temperatures near the surface, are estimated with the help of an empirical method. This method is based on the differential absorption properties of the water vapor in the 11-13 micron window region and does not require a detailed knowledge of the water vapor profile. With this approach Nimbus 4 IRIS radiance measurements are inverted to obtain temperature profiles. These calculated profiles agree with radiosonde data within about 2 C.

  11. High rate, large area laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition of nickel from nickel carbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paserin, Vlad

    High-power diode lasers (HPDL) are being increasingly used in industrial applications. Deposition of nickel from nickel carbonyl (Ni(CO)4 ) precursor by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied with emphasis on achieving high deposition rates. An HPDL system was used to provide a novel energy source facilitating a simple and compact design of the energy delivery system. Nickel deposits on complex, 3-dimensional polyurethane foam substrates were prepared and characterized. The resulting "nickel foam" represents a novel material of high porosity (>95% by volume) finding uses, among others, in the production of rechargeable battery and fuel cell electrodes and as a specialty high-temperature filtration medium. Deposition rates up to ˜19 mum/min were achieved by optimizing the gas precursor flow pattern and energy delivery to the substrate surface using a 480W diode laser. Factors affecting the transition from purely heterogeneous decomposition to a combined hetero- and homogeneous decomposition of nickel carbonyl were studied. High quality, uniform 3-D deposits produced at a rate more than ten times higher than in commercial processes were obtained by careful balance of mass transport (gas flow) and energy delivery (laser power). Cross-flow of the gases through the porous substrate was found to be essential in facilitating mass transport and for obtaining uniform deposits at high rates. When controlling the process in a transient regime (near the onset of homogenous decomposition), unique morphology features formed as part of the deposits, including textured surface with pyramid-shape crystallites, spherical and non-spherical particles and filaments. Operating the laser in a pulsed mode produced smooth, nano-crystalline deposits with sub-100 nm grains. The effect of H2S, a commonly used additive in nickel carbonyl CVD, was studied using both polyurethane and nickel foam substrates. H2S was shown to improve the substrate coverage and deposit

  12. Vapor pressure measurements on low-volatility terpenoid compounds by the concatenated gas saturation method.

    PubMed

    Widegren, Jason A; Bruno, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of monoterpenes plays a central role in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), which have important effects on the weather and climate. However, models of SOA formation have large uncertainties. One reason for this is that SOA formation depends directly on the vapor pressures of the monoterpene oxidation products, but few vapor pressures have been reported for these compounds. As a result, models of SOA formation have had to rely on estimated values of vapor pressure. To alleviate this problem, we have developed the concatenated gas saturation method, which is a simple, reliable, high-throughput method for measuring the vapor pressures of low-volatility compounds. The concatenated gas saturation method represents a significant advance over traditional gas saturation methods. Instead of a single saturator and trap, the concatenated method uses several pairs of saturators and traps linked in series. Consequently, several measurements of vapor pressure can be made simultaneously, which greatly increases the rate of data collection. It also allows for the simultaneous measurement of a control compound, which is important for ensuring data quality. In this paper we demonstrate the use of the concatenated gas saturation method by determination of the vapor pressures of five monoterpene oxidation products and n-tetradecane (the control compound) over the temperature range 283.15-313.15 K. Over this temperature range, the vapor pressures ranged from about 0.5 Pa to about 70 Pa. The standard molar enthalpies of vaporization or sublimation were determined by use of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation.

  13. Process development for the manufacture of an integrated dispenser cathode assembly using laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ryan William

    2005-07-01

    Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition (LCVD) has been shown to have great potential for the manufacture of small, complex, two or three dimensional metal and ceramic parts. One of the most promising applications of the technology is in the fabrication of an integrated dispenser cathode assembly. This application requires the deposition of a boron nitride-molybdenum composite structure. In order to realize this structure, work was done to improve the control and understanding of the LCVD process and to determine experimental conditions conducive to the growth of the required materials. A series of carbon fiber and line deposition studies were used to characterize process-shape relationships and study the kinetics of carbon LCVD. These studies provided a foundation for the fabrication of the first high aspect ratio multi-layered LCVD wall structures. The kinetics studies enabled the formulation of an advanced computational model in the FLUENT CFD package for studying energy transport, mass and momentum transport, and species transport within a forced flow LCVD environment. The model was applied to two different material systems and used to quantify deposition rates and identify rate-limiting regimes. A computational thermal-structural model was also developed using the ANSYS software package to study the thermal stress state within an LCVD deposit during growth. Georgia Tech's LCVD system was modified and used to characterize both boron nitride and molybdenum deposition independently. The focus was on understanding the relations among process parameters and deposit shape. Boron nitride was deposited using a B3 N3H6-N2 mixture and growth was characterized by sporadic nucleation followed by rapid bulk growth. Molybdenum was deposited from the MoCl5-H2 system and showed slow, but stable growth. Each material was used to grow both fibers and lines. The fabrication of a boron nitride-molybdenum composite was also demonstrated. In sum, this work served to both advance the

  14. SIMPOL.1: A simple group contribution method for predicting vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of multifunctional organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, J. F.; Asher, W. E.

    2007-08-01

    The SIMPOL.1 group contribution method is developed for predicting the liquid vapor pressure pLo (atm) and enthalpy of vaporization ΔHvap (kJ mol-1) of organic compounds as functions of temperature (T). For each compound i, the method assumes log10pL,io(T)=Σkνk,ibk(T) where νk,i is the number of groups of type k, and bk(T) is the contribution to log10 pL,io(T) by each group of type k. A zeroeth group is included that uses b0(T) with ν0,i=1 for all i. A total of 30 structural groups are considered: molecular carbon, alkyl hydroxyl, aromatic hydroxyl, alkyl ether, alkyl ring ether, aromatic ether, aldehyde, ketone, carboxylic acid, ester, nitrate, nitro, alkyl amine (primary, secondary, and tertiary), aromatic amine, amide (primary, secondary, and tertiary), peroxide, hydroperoxide, peroxy acid, C=C, carbonylperoxynitrate, nitro-phenol, nitro-ester, aromatic rings, non-aromatic rings, C=C-C=O in a non-aromatic ring, and carbon on the acid-side of an amide. The T dependence in each of the bk(T) is assumed to follow b(T)=B1/T+B2+B3T+B4lnT. Values of the B coefficients are fit using an initial basis set of 272 compounds for which experimentally based functions pL,io=fi(T) are available. The range of vapor pressure considered spans fourteen orders of magnitude. The ability of the initially fitted B coefficients to predict pLo values is examined using a test set of 161 compounds and a T range that is as wide as 273.15 to 393.15 K for some compounds. σFIT is defined as the average over all points of the absolute value of the difference between experimental and predicted values of log10pL,io(T). After consideration of σFIT for the test set, the initial basis set and test set compounds are combined, and the B coefficients re-optimized. For all compounds and temperatures, σFIT=0.34: on average, pL,io(T) values are predicted to within a factor of 2. Because d(log10pL,io(T))/d(1/T) is related to the enthalpy of vaporization ΔHvap,i, the fitted B provide predictions of

  15. SIMPOL.1: a simple group contribution method for predicting vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of multifunctional organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, J. F.; Asher, W. E.

    2008-05-01

    The SIMPOL.1 group contribution method is developed for predicting the liquid vapor pressure poL (atm) and enthalpy of vaporization Δ Hvap (kJ mol-1) of organic compounds as functions of temperature (T). For each compound i, the method assumes log10poL,i (T)=∑kνk,ibk(T) where νk,i is the number of groups of type k, and bk (T) is the contribution to log10poL,i (T) by each group of type k. A zeroeth group is included that uses b0 (T) with ν0,i=1 for all i. A total of 30 structural groups are considered: molecular carbon, alkyl hydroxyl, aromatic hydroxyl, alkyl ether, alkyl ring ether, aromatic ether, aldehyde, ketone, carboxylic acid, ester, nitrate, nitro, alkyl amine (primary, secondary, and tertiary), aromatic amine, amide (primary, secondary, and tertiary), peroxide, hydroperoxide, peroxy acid, C=C, carbonylperoxynitrate, nitro-phenol, nitro-ester, aromatic rings, non-aromatic rings, C=C-C=O in a non-aromatic ring, and carbon on the acid-side of an amide. The T dependence in each of the bk (T) is assumed to follow b(T)=B1/T+B2+B3T+B4ln T. Values of the B coefficients are fit using an initial basis set of 272 compounds for which experimentally based functions po L,i=fi (T) are available. The range of vapor pressure considered spans fourteen orders of magnitude. The ability of the initially fitted B coefficients to predict poL values is examined using a test set of 184 compounds and a T range that is as wide as 273.15 to 393.15 K for some compounds. σFIT is defined as the average over all points of the absolute value of the difference between experimental and predicted values of log10poL,i (T). After consideration of σFIT for the test set, the initial basis set and test set compounds are combined, and the B coefficients re-optimized. For all compounds and temperatures, σFIT=0.34: on average, poL,i (T) values are predicted to within a factor of 2. Because d(log10 poL,i (T))d(1/T) is related to the enthalpy of vaporization ΔHvap,i, the fitted B provide

  16. A new direct absorption tunable diode laser spectrometer for high precision measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, M. R.; Sayres, D. S.; Smith, J. B.; Witinski, M.; Allen, N. T.; Demusz, J. N.; Rivero, M.; Tuozzolo, C.; Anderson, J. G.

    2013-07-01

    We present a new instrument for the measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS), the Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). HHH employs a tunable diode near-IR laser to measure water vapor via direct absorption in a Herriott cell. The direct absorption technique provides a direct link between the depth of the observed absorption line and the measured water vapor concentration, which is calculated based on spectroscopic parameters in the HITRAN database. While several other tunable diode laser (TDL) instruments have been used to measure water vapor in the UT/LS, HHH is set apart by its use of an optical cell an order of magnitude smaller than those of other direct absorption TDLs in operation, allowing for a more compact, lightweight instrument. HHH is also unique in its integration into a common duct with the Harvard Lyman-α hygrometer, an independent photo-fragment fluorescence instrument which has been thoroughly validated over 19 years of flight measurements. The instrument was flown for the first time in the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) on NASA's WB-57 aircraft in spring, 2011, during which it demonstrated in-flight precision of 0.1 ppmv (1 s) with 1-sigma uncertainty of 5% ± 0.7 ppmv. Since the campaign, changes to the instrument have lead to improved accuracy of 5% ± 0.2 ppmv as demonstrated in the laboratory. During MACPEX, HHH successfully measured water vapor at concentrations from 3.5 to 600 ppmv in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. HHH and Lyman-α, measuring independently but under the same sampling conditions, agreed on average to within 1% at water vapor mixing ratios above 20 ppmv and to within 0.3 ppmv at lower mixing ratios. HHH also agreed with a number of other in situ water vapor instruments on the WB-57 to within their stated uncertainties, and to within 0.7 ppmv at low water. This agreement constitutes a significant improvement over past in situ comparisons, in

  17. A new direct absorption tunable diode laser spectrometer for high precision measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Sargent, M R; Sayres, D S; Smith, J B; Witinski, M; Allen, N T; Demusz, J N; Rivero, M; Tuozzolo, C; Anderson, J G

    2013-07-01

    We present a new instrument for the measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT∕LS), the Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). HHH employs a tunable diode near-IR laser to measure water vapor via direct absorption in a Herriott cell. The direct absorption technique provides a direct link between the depth of the observed absorption line and the measured water vapor concentration, which is calculated based on spectroscopic parameters in the HITRAN database. While several other tunable diode laser (TDL) instruments have been used to measure water vapor in the UT∕LS, HHH is set apart by its use of an optical cell an order of magnitude smaller than those of other direct absorption TDLs in operation, allowing for a more compact, lightweight instrument. HHH is also unique in its integration into a common duct with the Harvard Lyman-α hygrometer, an independent photo-fragment fluorescence instrument which has been thoroughly validated over 19 years of flight measurements. The instrument was flown for the first time in the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) on NASA's WB-57 aircraft in spring, 2011, during which it demonstrated in-flight precision of 0.1 ppmv (1 s) with 1-sigma uncertainty of 5% ± 0.7 ppmv. Since the campaign, changes to the instrument have lead to improved accuracy of 5% ± 0.2 ppmv as demonstrated in the laboratory. During MACPEX, HHH successfully measured water vapor at concentrations from 3.5 to 600 ppmv in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. HHH and Lyman-α, measuring independently but under the same sampling conditions, agreed on average to within 1% at water vapor mixing ratios above 20 ppmv and to within 0.3 ppmv at lower mixing ratios. HHH also agreed with a number of other in situ water vapor instruments on the WB-57 to within their stated uncertainties, and to within 0.7 ppmv at low water. This agreement constitutes a significant improvement over past in situ comparisons

  18. Intra-operative power measurement of laser fibers during photoselective vaporization of the prostate using the 80W-KTP-Greenlight laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Thomas; Sulser, Tullio; Baumgartner, Martin K.; Fatzer, Markus; Rey, Julien M.; Sigrist, Markus W.; Seifert, Hans-Helge

    2008-02-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the Prostate (PVP) using the 80W-Greenlight-PV (R) Laser System (Laserscope (R), San Jose, USA) has been established as a treatment option for patients suffering from obstructive symptoms caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, longer operation time compared to standard trans-urethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the high costs of the laser fibers are specific problems of this technique. In addition, many clinicians performing PVP complain about a reduced effectiveness of vaporization during treatment. Therefore, power measurement was performed during PVP using the 80W-Greenlight-PV (R) Laser System. Power output was measured at the beginning and also regularly throughout the operation. A total of 40 fibers were investigated in 35 patients. Damage to the tip of the fibers was regularly visible and increased as more energy was supplied. Additionally, in 90% of all fibers a decrease of power output was detectable during the operation. This became pronounced after the application of 200kJ, resulting in an end of lifespan (i.e. 275kJ) median power output of only 20% of the starting value. Corresponding to the clinical observations the impressive damage to the emission window was associated with a substantial decrease of power output during PVP. These observations might explain the impaired vaporization during PVP and a longer operation time compared to conventional TURP. Hence, improvements in the quality of the laser fibers are necessary to advance the efficiency of this promising technology.

  19. Analysis of Amphiphilic Lipids and Hydrophobic Proteins Using Nonresonant Femtosecond Laser Vaporization with Electrospray Post-Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2011-04-01

    Amphiphilic lipids and hydrophobic proteins are vaporized at atmospheric pressure using nonresonant 70 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses followed by electrospray post-ionization prior to being transferred into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for mass analysis. Measurements of molecules on metal and transparent dielectric surfaces indicate that vaporization occurs through a nonthermal mechanism. The molecules analyzed include the lipids 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol, 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and the hydrophobic proteins gramicidin A, B, and C. Vaporization of lipids from blood and milk are also presented to demonstrate that lipids in complex systems can be transferred intact into the gas phase for mass analysis.

  20. Reinjection laser oscillator and method

    DOEpatents

    McLellan, Edward J.

    1984-01-01

    A uv preionized CO.sub.2 oscillator with integral four-pass amplifier capable of providing 1 to 5 GW laser pulses with pulse widths from 0.1 to 0.5 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM) is described. The apparatus is operated at any pressure from 1 atm to 10 atm without the necessity of complex high voltage electronics. The reinjection technique employed gives rise to a compact, efficient system that is particularly immune to alignment instabilities with a minimal amount of hardware and complexity.

  1. Characteristics of a real time monitor using the interference enhanced reflection method for organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hajime; Ishimatsu, Sumiyo; Fueta, Yukiko; Hinoue, Mitsuo; Ishidao, Toru

    2013-12-01

    Performance and sensor characteristics of a monitor for volatile organic compounds (VOC monitor) using the interference enhanced reflection (IER) method were investigated for 52 organic solvent vapors that are designated as class 1 and class 2 organic solvents by the Ordinance of Organic Solvent Poisoning Prevention in Japan. Test vapors were prepared by injecting 1 to 3 μl of liquid solvent into a 20 l Tedlar(®) bag and perfectly vaporizing them. The vapor concentration was simultaneously measured with the monitor and a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with flame ionization detector, and both values were compared. The monitor could detect all the solvent vapors that we used. Linear response was obtained between the concentration measured by the monitor and those by the GC. The monitor could detect 1/10 of the administrative control level for 37 of 52 solvent vapors, including toluene and xylenes. For 15 vapors, on the other hand, the monitor could not be used for the working environment measurement because the sensor response was low or the regression lines did not pass through the origin. PMID:24334693

  2. Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Robert; Loomis, Gary E.; Thomas, Ian M.

    1999-01-01

    Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (.about.1.10-1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm.

  3. Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer

    DOEpatents

    Chow, R.; Loomis, G.E.; Thomas, I.M.

    1999-03-16

    Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (ca. 1.10--1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm. 2 figs.

  4. Algorithm for evaluation of temperature distribution of a vapor cell in a diode-pumped alkali laser system (part II).

    PubMed

    Han, Juhong; Wang, You; Cai, He; An, Guofei; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Liangping; Wang, Hongyuan; Zhou, Jie; Jiang, Zhigang; Gao, Ming

    2015-04-01

    With high efficiency and small thermally-induced effects in the near-infrared wavelength region, a diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) is regarded as combining the major advantages of solid-state lasers and gas-state lasers and obviating their main disadvantages at the same time. Studying the temperature distribution in the cross-section of an alkali-vapor cell is critical to realize high-powered DPAL systems for both static and flowing states. In this report, a theoretical algorithm has been built to investigate the features of a flowing-gas DPAL system by uniting procedures in kinetics, heat transfer, and fluid dynamic together. The thermal features and output characteristics have been simultaneously obtained for different gas velocities. The results have demonstrated the great potential of DPALs in the extremely high-powered laser operation.

  5. Regularly arranged indium islands on glass/molybdenum substrates upon femtosecond laser and physical vapor deposition processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringleb, F.; Eylers, K.; Teubner, Th.; Boeck, T.; Symietz, C.; Bonse, J.; Andree, S.; Krüger, J.; Heidmann, B.; Schmid, M.; Lux-Steiner, M.

    2016-03-01

    A bottom-up approach is presented for the production of arrays of indium islands on a molybdenum layer on glass, which can serve as micro-sized precursors for indium compounds such as copper-indium-gallium-diselenide used in photovoltaics. Femtosecond laser ablation of glass and a subsequent deposition of a molybdenum film or direct laser processing of the molybdenum film both allow the preferential nucleation and growth of indium islands at the predefined locations in a following indium-based physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. A proper choice of laser and deposition parameters ensures the controlled growth of indium islands exclusively at the laser ablated spots. Based on a statistical analysis, these results are compared to the non-structured molybdenum surface, leading to randomly grown indium islands after PVD.

  6. Laser-drilled micro-hole arrays on polyurethane synthetic leather for improvement of water vapor permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Wang, A. H.; Zheng, R. R.; Tang, H. Q.; Qi, X. Y.; Ye, B.

    2014-06-01

    Three kinds of lasers at 1064, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths respectively were adopted to construct micro-hole arrays on polyurethane (PU) synthetic leather with an aim to improve water vapor permeability (WVP) of PU synthetic leather. The morphology of the laser-drilled micro-holes was observed to optimize laser parameters. The WVP and slit tear resistance of the laser-drilled leather were measured. Results show that the optimized pulse energy for the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers are 0.8, 1.1 and 0.26 mJ, respectively. The diameters of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized laser pulse energy were about 20, 15 and 10 μm, respectively. The depths of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized pulse energy were about 21, 60 and 69 μm, respectively. Compared with the untreated samples, the highest WVP growth ratio was 38.4%, 46.8% and 53.5% achieved by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. And the highest decreasing ratio of slit tear resistance was 11.1%, 14.8%, and 22.5% treated by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Analysis of the interaction mechanism between laser beams at three kinds of laser wavelengths and the PU synthetic leather revealed that laser micro-drilling at 355 nm wavelength displayed both photochemical ablation and photothermal ablation, while laser micro-drilling at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths leaded to photothermal ablation only.

  7. Method for forming electrically charged laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1979-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  8. Treatment of bladder cancer by HPD and gold vapor laser in seventy patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Dai, Shen-guo

    1994-05-01

    Seventy patients with 316 tumors of urinary bladder have been treated by high power gold vapor laser with HPD photodynamic therapy in this hospital. All cases were histopathologically diagnosed as transitional cell carcinoma, T1-T3 stage and all are recurrent ones. HPD was administered intravenously 48 hours before the treatment (5 mg per kg of patient weight) and irrigated into bladder 2 to 4 hours (2.5 mg per kg of patient weight) before the treatment. The power calculated was 70.8 - 509.6 mw/cm per pulse. The pulse energy was 0.5 mJ per pulse and the repetition rate was 6000 - 9000 Hz. Both the tumors and whole bladder were irradiated through the fiber inserted in the bladder by cystoscope. The results of a follow-up from 4 to 46 months are as follows: cured 54 (77.14%); good effect 12 (17.14%); improved 4 (5.7%). Regrowth occurred in only 8 cases (11.43%) between 3 to 14 months.

  9. MW Spectroscopy Coupled with Ultrafast UV Laser Vaporization: Succinic Acid in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Estibaliz; Ecija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Castano, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Godfrey, Peter D.; McNaughton, Don; Jahn, Michaela K.; Nair, K. P. Rajappan; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2013-06-01

    Recent lab and field measurements have indicated critical roles of organic acids in enhancing new atmospheric aerosol formation. In order to understand the nucleation process, here we report an experimental and theoretical investigation of chemical structure of succinic acid. We have used the technique of Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy (FTMW). Succinic acid was vaporized by UV ultrafast laser ablation to suppress thermal decomposition processes^a and seeded into an expanding stream of Ne forming a supersonic jet. The rotational spectrum detected the presence of a single most stable conformation in the cm- mm- wave regions for which accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters have been determined. The study was extended to all monosubstituted isotopic species (^{13}C, ^{18}O, D(O)), which were positively identified, leading to an accurate determination of the effective and substitution structures of the molecule. The experimental study was supplemented by ab initio (MP2) and DFT (M06-2X and B3LYP) calculations. ^{a} E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J. U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 51, 3119-3124, 2012.

  10. Field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for profiling water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Morley, B.; Moen, D.; Hayman, M.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    A field-deployable water vapor profiling instrument that builds on the foundation of the preceding generations of diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laboratory prototypes was constructed and tested. Significant advances are discussed, including a unique shared telescope design that allows expansion of the outgoing beam for eye-safe operation with optomechanical and thermal stability; multistage optical filtering enabling measurement during daytime bright-cloud conditions; rapid spectral switching between the online and offline wavelengths enabling measurements during changing atmospheric conditions; and enhanced performance at lower ranges by the introduction of a new filter design and the addition of a wide field-of-view channel. Performance modeling, testing, and intercomparisons are performed and discussed. In general, the instrument has a 150 m range resolution with a 10 min temporal resolution; 1 min temporal resolution in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere is demonstrated. The instrument is shown capable of autonomous long-term field operation - 50 days with a > 95% uptime - under a broad set of atmospheric conditions and potentially forms the basis for a ground-based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments needed for the atmospheric sciences research and forecasting communities.

  11. [Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program]. Final report, [January--July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-04

    This report summarizes work performed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program from January through July, 1992. Each of the tasks assigned during this period is described, and results are presented. Section I details work on sensitivity matrices for the UDS relay telescope. These matrices show which combination of mirror motions may be performed in order to effect certain changes in beam parameters. In Section II, an analysis is given of transmission through a clipping aperture on the launch telescope deformable mirror. Observed large transmission losses could not be simulated in the analysis. An EXCEL spreadsheet program designed for in situ analysis of UDS optical systems is described in Section III. This spreadsheet permits analysis of changes in beam first-order characteristics due to changes in any optical system parameter, simple optimization to predict mirror motions needed to effect a combination of changes in beam parameters, and plotting of a variety of first-order data. Optical systems may be assembled directly from OSSD data. A CODE V nonsequential model of the UDS optical system is described in Section IV. This uses OSSD data to build the UDS model; mirror coordinates may thus be verified. Section V summarizes observations of relay telescope performance. Possible procedures which allow more accurate assessment of relay telescope performance are given.

  12. Vapor pressures of the fluorinated telomer alcohols--limitations of estimation methods.

    PubMed

    Stock, Naomi L; Ellis, David A; Deleebeeck, Lisa; Muir, Derek C G; Mabury, Scott A

    2004-03-15

    The influence of the unique, physical properties of poly- and perfluorinated chemicals on vapor pressure was investigated. Vapor pressures of a suite of fluorinated telomer alcohols (FTOHs) (CF3(CF2)nCH2CH2OH, where n = 3, 5, 7, or 9) were measured using the boiling point method and ranged from 144 to 992 Pa. Comparison of experimental and literature values indicate that perfluorocarbons (CF3(CF2)nCF3, where n = 0-6) and fluorinated telomer alcohols have vapor pressures equal to or greater than that of their hydrogen analogues. These chemically counterintuitive results can be explained by the unique geometry of poly- and perfluorinated chemicals--in particular the stiff, helical perfluorinated chain and the significant intramolecular hydrogen bonding of the FTOHs. The majority of models investigated for the estimation of vapor pressure did not compensate for this unique geometry and consistently underpredicted the vapor pressures of the FTOHs. Calculation of partitioning constants using both experimental and estimated vapor pressures indicate that both the Antoine and Modified Grain models, and to a lesser degree the Mackay model, are insufficiently accurate for estimating the vapor pressures of the FTOHs, particularly the longer chain FTOHs. Future models should consider parameters such as geometry, strength, and location of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and otherfunction groups in the molecule in order to improve vapor pressure estimation accuracy. It appears likely that the unique molecular geometry of the FTOHs influences not only their vapor pressure but also other physical properties and hence environmental fate and dissemination.

  13. Research remote laser methods for radionuclides monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kascheev, S. V.; Elizarov, Valentin V.; Grishkanich, Alexander S.; Bespalov, V. G.; Vasil'ev, Sergey K.; Zhevlakov, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Laser sensing can serve as a highly effective method of searching and monitoring of radioactive contamination. The first method is essence consists in definition the Sr90 and Сs137 concentration by excitation and registration of fluorescence at wavelength of λ = 0.347÷7.0 μm at laser sounding. The second method experiments were carried out under the Raman-scattering circuit. Preliminary results of investigation show the real possibility to register of leakage of a radionuclide with concentration at level of 108÷109 сm-3 on a safe distance from the infected object.

  14. An Accurate Method for Computing the Absorption of Solar Radiation by Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The method is based upon molecular line parameters and makes use of a far wing scaling approximation and k distribution approach previously applied to the computation of the infrared cooling rate due to water vapor. Taking into account the wave number dependence of the incident solar flux, the solar heating rate is computed for the entire water vapor spectrum and for individual absorption bands. The accuracy of the method is tested against line by line calculations. The method introduces a maximum error of 0.06 C/day. The method has the additional advantage over previous methods in that it can be applied to any portion of the spectral region containing the water vapor bands. The integrated absorptances and line intensities computed from the molecular line parameters were compared with laboratory measurements. The comparison reveals that, among the three different sources, absorptance is the largest for the laboratory measurements.

  15. Methods to Characterize Vapor Cell Performance for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirijanian, James; Larsen, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The Advanced Sensors Development team at Northrop Grumman, Navigation Systems Division is developing a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG). Various methods to measure atomic spin lifetimes in vapor cells for predicting NMRG performance have been investigated. Certain methods show clear advantages over others by reducing required testing times and improving test data resolution. New modifications of methods were also developed to study and improve the precision and repeatability of test results. These methods help correlate vapor cell performance to cell filling and sealing methods for cell fabrication process improvement. The vapor cells produced in conjunction with these techniques have exhibited significant and consistent increases in both the noble gas spin lifetimes and the NMR signal strengths compared to previous cell fabrication processes, providing more precise insight into cell development techniques.

  16. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements by Airborne Sun Photometer and Diode Laser Hygrometer on the NASA DC-8

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Podolske, James R.; Redemann, Jens; Diskin, G. S.

    2008-10-29

    In January-February 2003 the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer 30 (AATS) and the NASA Langley/Ames Diode Laser Hygrometer (DLH) were flown on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. AATS measured column water vapor on the aircraft-to-sun path, while DLH measured local water vapor in the free stream between the aircraft fuselage and an outboard engine cowling. The AATS and DLH measurements were compared for two DC-8 vertical profiles by differentiating the AATS column measurement and/or integrating the DLH local measurement over the altitude range of each profile (7.7-10 km and 1.2-12.5 km). These comparisons extend, for the first time, tests of AATS water vapor retrievals to altitudes >~6 km and column contents <0.1 g cm-2. To our knowledge this is the first time suborbital spectroscopic water vapor measurements using the 940-nm band have been tested in conditions so high and dry. For both profiles layer water vapor (LWV) from AATS and DLH were highly correlated, with r2 0.998, rms difference 7.2% and bias (AATS minus DLH) 0.9%. For water vapor densities AATS and DLH had r2 0.968, rms difference 27.6%, and bias (AATS minus DLH) -4.2%. These results compare favorably with previous comparisons of AATS water vapor to in situ results for altitudes <~6 km, columns ~0.1 to 5 g cm-2 and densities ~0.1 to 17 g m-3.

  17. Simple Method To Measure the Vapor Pressure of Phthalates and Their Alternatives.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaoxing; Eichler, Clara M A; Chen, Shengyang; Little, John C

    2016-09-20

    Phthalates and alternative plasticizers are semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), an important class of indoor pollutants that may have significant adverse effects on human health. Unfortunately, models that predict emissions of and the resulting exposure to SVOCs have substantial uncertainties. One reason is that the characteristics governing emissions, transport, and exposure are usually strongly dependent on vapor pressure. Furthermore, available data for phthalates exhibit significant variability, and vapor pressures for the various alternatives are usually unavailable. For these reasons, a new approach based on modeling of the evaporation process was developed to determine vapor pressures of phthalates and alternate plasticizers. A laminar flow forced convection model was used in the design of a partial saturator (PS) tube. The mass transfer mechanisms in the PS tube are accurately modeled and enable the determination of vapor pressure even when the carrier gas is not completely saturated, avoiding the complicated procedure to establish vapor saturation. The measured vapor pressures ranged from about 10(-2) to 10(-7) Pa. Compared to the traditional gas saturation method, the model-based approach is advantageous in terms of both predictability and simplicity. The knowledge provides new insight into experimental design and a sound basis for further method development.

  18. Simple Method To Measure the Vapor Pressure of Phthalates and Their Alternatives.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaoxing; Eichler, Clara M A; Chen, Shengyang; Little, John C

    2016-09-20

    Phthalates and alternative plasticizers are semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), an important class of indoor pollutants that may have significant adverse effects on human health. Unfortunately, models that predict emissions of and the resulting exposure to SVOCs have substantial uncertainties. One reason is that the characteristics governing emissions, transport, and exposure are usually strongly dependent on vapor pressure. Furthermore, available data for phthalates exhibit significant variability, and vapor pressures for the various alternatives are usually unavailable. For these reasons, a new approach based on modeling of the evaporation process was developed to determine vapor pressures of phthalates and alternate plasticizers. A laminar flow forced convection model was used in the design of a partial saturator (PS) tube. The mass transfer mechanisms in the PS tube are accurately modeled and enable the determination of vapor pressure even when the carrier gas is not completely saturated, avoiding the complicated procedure to establish vapor saturation. The measured vapor pressures ranged from about 10(-2) to 10(-7) Pa. Compared to the traditional gas saturation method, the model-based approach is advantageous in terms of both predictability and simplicity. The knowledge provides new insight into experimental design and a sound basis for further method development. PMID:27571317

  19. Comparison of Photoselective Vaporization versus Holmium Laser Enucleation for Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Small Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Jin Bong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes < 40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at 1 month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P< 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusion Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume. PMID:27227564

  20. Vapor pressure measurements by mass loss transpiration method with a thermogravimetric apparatus.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, R; Narasimhan, T S Lakshmi; Nalini, S

    2009-06-18

    Thermobalances are used for equilibrium vapor pressure measurements based on both effusion and transpiration methods. In the case of the transpiration method, however, despite the numerous advantages a thermogravimetric apparatus can offer, it is not as widely used as is the conventional apparatus. In this paper, the difference that can exist in the vapor phase compositions in an effusion cell and in a transpiration cell is shown first with two examples. Subsequently, how a commercial thermobalance was utilized to perform transpiration experiments that conform to the basic principle of the transpiration method and yield vapor pressures consistent with the Knudsen effusion mass spectrometric method is described. The three systems investigated are CsI(s), TeO(2)(s), and Te(s), each known to vaporize congruently, but in different manner. A critical analysis was performed on the information available in the literature on transpiration measurements using thermogravimetric apparatuses, and the salient findings are discussed. Smaller plateau regions than with conventional transpiration apparatuses and the lack of evidence for perfect transpiration conditions in some transpiration thermogravimetric investigations are shown with a few examples. A recommendation is made for the use of the rate of mass loss versus flow rate plot to ascertain that the usual apparent vapor pressure versus flow rate plot corresponds to a meaningful transpiration experiment.

  1. A review-application of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and related methods in the textile industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahidi, Sheila; Moazzenchi, Bahareh; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2015-09-01

    Physical vapor deposition (PVD) is a coating process in which thin films are deposited by the condensation of a vaporized form of the desired film material onto the substrate. The PVD process is carried out in a vacuum. PVD processes include different types, such as: cathode arc deposition, electron beam physical vapor deposition, evaporative deposition, sputtering, ion plating and enhanced sputtering. In the PVD method, the solid coating material is evaporated by heat or by bombardment with ions (sputtering). At the same time, a reactive gas is also introduced; it forms a compound with the metal vapor and is deposited on the substrate as a thin film with highly adherent coating. Such coatings are used in a wide range of applications such as aerospace, automotive, surgical, medical, dyes and molds for all manner of material processing, cutting tools, firearms, optics, thin films and textiles. The objective of this work is to give a comprehensive description and review of the science and technology related to physical vapor deposition with particular emphasis on their potential use in the textile industry. Physical vapor deposition has opened up new possibilities in the modification of textile materials and is an exciting prospect for usage in textile design and technical textiles. The basic principle of PVD is explained and the major applications, particularly sputter coatings in the modification and functionalization of textiles, are introduced in this research.

  2. Orientation-dependent metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy regrowth on GaInAsP/InP laser structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fidorra, F.; Harde, P.; Venghaus, H. ); Grutzmacher, D.

    1989-09-25

    GaInAsP/InP lasers made by low-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy regrowth on patterned surfaces exhibit yield and performance dependent on laser stripe orientation. Structures with stripes parallel to the {l angle}011{r angle} and {l angle}0{bar 1}1{r angle} directions are investigated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Three-dimensional SIMS profiles taken with high horizontal resolution using the checkerboard matrix gate technique yield unexpected results for structures with stripes parallel to the {l angle}0{bar 1}1{r angle} direction: phosphorus is found in the nominal GaInAs layer, its distribution is strongly inhomogeneous. Zn diffused into the GaInAs layer exhibits also pronounced spatial variations. Unwanted P outdiffusion and anomalous Zn diffusion are attributed to reduced crystalline perfection of the InP above {l angle}0{bar 1}1{r angle} oriented laser stripes.

  3. Study of Doped ZnO Films Synthesized by Combining Vapor Gases and Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.; George, M. A.

    2000-01-01

    The properties and structure of the ZnO material are similar to those of the GaN. Since an excitonic binding energy of ZnO is about 60 meV, it has strong potential for excitonic lasing at the room temperature. This makes synthesizing ZnO films for applications attractive. However, there are several hurdles in fabricating electro-optical devices from ZnO. One of those is in growing doped p-type ZnO films. Although techniques have been developed for the doping of both p-type and n-type ZnO, this remains an area that can be improved. In this presentation, we will report the experimental results of using both thermal vapor and pulsed laser deposition to grow doped ZnO films. The films are deposited on (0001) sapphire, (001) Si and quartz substrates by ablating a ZnO target. The group III and V elements are introduced into the growth chamber using inner gases. Films are characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning probe microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electrical measurements. The full width at half maximum of theta rocking curves for epitaxial films is less than 0.5 deg. In textured films, it rises to several degrees. Film surface morphology reveals an island growth pattern, but the size and density of these islands vary with the composition of the reactive gases. The electrical resistivity also changes with the doped elements. The relationship between the doping elements, gas composition, and film properties will be discussed.

  4. Method of increasing biodegradation of sparingly soluble vapors

    DOEpatents

    Cherry, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    A method for increasing biodegradation of sparingly soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a bioreactor is disclosed. The method comprises dissolving in the aqueous phase of the bioreactor a water soluble, nontoxic, non-biodegradable polymer having a molecular weight of at least 500 and operable for decreasing the distribution coefficient of the VOCs. Polyoxyalkylene alkanols are preferred polymers. A method of increasing the growth rate of VOC-degrading microorganisms in the bioreactor and a method of increasing the solubility of sparingly soluble VOCs in aqueous solution are also disclosed.

  5. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Stanton, Philip L.; Sweatt, William C.; Crump, Jr., O. B.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    1993-09-14

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  6. Method for laser induced isotope enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Pronko, Peter P.; Vanrompay, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2004-09-07

    Methods for separating isotopes or chemical species of an element and causing enrichment of a desired isotope or chemical species of an element utilizing laser ablation plasmas to modify or fabricate a material containing such isotopes or chemical species are provided. This invention may be used for a wide variety of materials which contain elements having different isotopes or chemical species.

  7. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  8. Investigation on 447.3 nm blue-violet laser by extra-cavity frequency doubling of a diode-pumped cesium vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongdong; Chen, Fei; Guo, Jin; Shao, Mingzhen; Xie, Jijiang

    2016-09-01

    447.3 nm blue-violet lasers are investigated by extra-cavity single-pass second harmonic generation (SHG) of diode-pumped cesium vapor lasers (Cs-DPALs) using a LBO crystal. Two types of 894.6 nm Cs-DPAL are constructed, and the beam quality factors are Mx2=1.02, My2=1.13 and Mx2=2.13, Mx2=2.66, respectively. The maximum output powers for the two types of Cs-DPAL operating in pulsed mode are 0.692 W and 2.6 W, and the corresponding maximum second harmonics (SH) powers are 9.5 μW and 11.2 μW at optimal focusing parameter of 1.68, respectively. The relative insensitivity of SH power to the LBO crystal temperature and the influence of Cs laser beam quality on the SHG efficiency are analyzed qualitatively.

  9. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor. Progress report, January-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for three different sets of relaxation rates. These rates correspond to: (1) Far Infrared (FIR) Raman lasers in the diabatic collision regime without consideration of coupled population decay in a closed system, (2) Raman FIR lasers in the diabatic collision regime with coupled population conserving decay, and (3) IR Raman gain in cesium vapor. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  10. Apparatus and method for laser beam diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, Jr., Joseph T.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for accurate, real time monitoring of the wavefront curvature of a coherent laser beam. Knowing the curvature, it can be quickly determined whether the laser beam is collimated, or focusing (converging), or de-focusing (diverging). The apparatus includes a lateral interferometer for forming an interference pattern of the laser beam to be diagnosed. The interference pattern is imaged to a spatial light modulator (SLM), whose output is a coherent laser beam having an image of the interference pattern impressed on it. The SLM output is focused to obtain the far-field diffraction pattern. A video camera, such as CCD, monitors the far-field diffraction pattern, and provides an electrical output indicative of the shape of the far-field pattern. Specifically, the far-field pattern comprises a central lobe and side lobes, whose relative positions are indicative of the radius of curvature of the beam. The video camera's electrical output may be provided to a computer which analyzes the data to determine the wavefront curvature of the laser beam.

  11. Apparatus and method for laser beam diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, J.T. Jr.

    1991-08-27

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for accurate, real time monitoring of the wavefront curvature of a coherent laser beam. Knowing the curvature, it can be quickly determined whether the laser beam is collimated, or focusing (converging), or de-focusing (diverging). The apparatus includes a lateral interferometer for forming an interference pattern of the laser beam to be diagnosed. The interference pattern is imaged to a spatial light modulator (SLM), whose output is a coherent laser beam having an image of the interference pattern impressed on it. The SLM output is focused to obtain the far-field diffraction pattern. A video camera, such as CCD, monitors the far-field diffraction pattern, and provides an electrical output indicative of the shape of the far-field pattern. Specifically, the far-field pattern comprises a central lobe and side lobes, whose relative positions are indicative of the radius of curvature of the beam. The video camera's electrical output may be provided to a computer which analyzes the data to determine the wavefront curvature of the laser beam. 11 figures.

  12. Power scaling of a wavelength-narrowed diode laser system for pumping alkali vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersman, F. W.; Distelbrink, J. H.; Ketel, J.; Wilson, J.; Watt, D. W.

    2016-03-01

    We report a method for locking the output wavelength and reducing the spectral linewidth of diode lasers by feeding back light to the emitters from a wavelength selective external optical cavity. Ten years ago our team developed a stepped-mirror that allowed a single external cavity to lock the wavelength of a stack of diode array bars by equalizing path lengths between each emitter and the grating. Here we report combining one such step-mirror external cavity with an array of power dividers, each sending a portion of this feedback power to a separate diode array bar stack.

  13. Influence of the pump-to-laser beam overlap on the performance of optically pumped cesium vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Tom; Lebiush, Eyal; Auslender, Ilya; Barmashenko, Boris D; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2016-06-27

    Experimental and theoretical study of the influence of the pump-to-laser beam overlap, a crucial parameter for optimization of optically pumped alkali atom lasers, is reported for Ti:Sapphire pumped Cs laser. Maximum laser power > 370 mW with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 43% and slope efficiency ~55% was obtained. The dependence of the lasing power on the pump power was found for different pump beam radii at constant laser beam radius. Non monotonic dependence of the laser power (optimized over the temperature of the Cs cell) on the pump beam radius was observed with a maximum achieved at the ratio ~0.7 between the pump and laser beam radii. The optimal temperature decreased with increasing pump beam radius. A simple optical model of the laser, where Gaussian spatial shapes of the pump and laser intensities in any cross section of the beams were assumed, was compared to the experiments. Good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated dependence of the laser power on the pump power at different pump beam radii and also of the laser power, threshold pump power and optimal temperature on the pump beam radius. The model does not use empirical parameters such as mode overlap efficiency and can be applied to different Ti:Sapphire and diode pumped alkali lasers with arbitrary spatial distributions of the pump and laser beam widths. PMID:27410591

  14. Measurement of partial vapor pressure of ammonia over acid ammonium sulfate solutions by an integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutrakis, P.; Aurian-BlǎJeni, B.

    1993-02-01

    We present a simple, integral, passive method for measuring partial vapor pressure. Integral methods are useful tools when dealing with very low concentrations because collection over extended periods increases the analytical sensitivity. Passive methods have the advantage of not introducing constraints external to the system. The principle of the method used here is to selectively react the substance in the atmosphere over a solution with an immobilized coating on an appropriate support. The reaction product is not volatile, but is soluble and can be extracted in an appropriate solvent and analyzed. The method has been applied to measuring the vapor pressure of ammonia over aqueous solutions. The vapor pressure over ammonium sulfate solutions depends on the acidity of the solutions as well as on the salt concentration. The dependence can be explained with a simple model. Furthermore, using the same model, we calculated the ammonia vapor pressure above different ammonium sulfate/sulfuric acid aqueous solutions as a function of sulfate molarity and percentage of sulfuric acid. The results from the calculations suggest that for ambient ammonia concentrations less than 10 ppb, acid sulfate aerosols are not completely neutralized.

  15. Repetitive output laser system and method using target reflectivity

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Roy R.

    1978-01-01

    An improved laser system and method for implosion of a thermonuclear fuel pellet in which that portion of a laser pulse reflected by the target pellet is utilized in the laser system to initiate a succeeding target implosion, and in which the energy stored in the laser system to amplify the initial laser pulse, but not completely absorbed thereby, is used to amplify succeeding laser pulses initiated by target reflection.

  16. Solid vapor pressure for five heavy PAHs via the Knudsen effusion method

    PubMed Central

    Suuberg, Eric M.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds resulting from incomplete combustion and many fuel processing operations, and they are commonly found as subsurface environmental contaminants at sites of former manufactured gas plants. Knowledge of their vapor pressures is the key to predict their fate and transport in the environment. The present study involves five heavy PAHs, i.e. benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[ghi]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, which are all as priority pollutants classified by the US EPA. The vapor pressures of these heavy PAHs were measured by using Knudsen effusion method over the temperature range of 364 K to 454 K. The corresponding values of the enthalpy of sublimation were calculated from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The enthalpy of fusion for the 5 PAHs was also measured by using differential scanning calorimetry and used to convert earlier published sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure data to solid vapor pressure in order to compare with the present results. These adjusted values do not agree with the present measured actual solid vapor pressure values for these PAHs, but there is good agreement between present results and other earlier published sublimation data. PMID:22021935

  17. Solid vapor pressure for five heavy PAHs via the Knudsen effusion method.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M

    2011-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds resulting from incomplete combustion and many fuel processing operations, and they are commonly found as subsurface environmental contaminants at sites of former manufactured gas plants. Knowledge of their vapor pressures is the key to predict their fate and transport in the environment. The present study involves five heavy PAHs, i.e. benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[ghi]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, which are all as priority pollutants classified by the US EPA. The vapor pressures of these heavy PAHs were measured by using Knudsen effusion method over the temperature range of 364 K to 454 K. The corresponding values of the enthalpy of sublimation were calculated from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The enthalpy of fusion for the 5 PAHs was also measured by using differential scanning calorimetry and used to convert earlier published sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure data to solid vapor pressure in order to compare with the present results. These adjusted values do not agree with the present measured actual solid vapor pressure values for these PAHs, but there is good agreement between present results and other earlier published sublimation data.

  18. Retrofit device and method to improve humidity control of vapor compression cooling systems

    DOEpatents

    Roth, Robert Paul; Hahn, David C.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    2016-08-16

    A method and device for improving moisture removal capacity of a vapor compression system is disclosed. The vapor compression system is started up with the evaporator blower initially set to a high speed. A relative humidity in a return air stream is measured with the evaporator blower operating at the high speed. If the measured humidity is above the predetermined high relative humidity value, the evaporator blower speed is reduced from the initially set high speed to the lowest possible speed. The device is a control board connected with the blower and uses a predetermined change in measured relative humidity to control the blower motor speed.

  19. Materials, methods and devices to detect and quantify water vapor concentrations in an atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D; Robinson, Alex L

    2014-12-09

    We have demonstrated that a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor coated with a nanoporous framework material (NFM) film can perform ultrasensitive water vapor detection at concentrations in air from 0.05 to 12,000 ppmv at 1 atmosphere pressure. The method is extendable to other MEMS-based sensors, such as microcantilevers, or to quartz crystal microbalance sensors. We identify a specific NFM that provides high sensitivity and selectivity to water vapor. However, our approach is generalizable to detection of other species using NFM to provide sensitivity and selectivity.

  20. Investigation of the lasing characteristics of a barium vapor laser with pulse repetition frequencies up to 320 kHz for navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Polunin, Yu. P.

    2015-11-01

    Results of experimental investigations into the characteristics of a laser on self-terminating transitions of the barium atom with λ = 1499 nm are presented for high pulse repetition frequencies (PRF). The frequency-energy characteristics are investigated in the self-heating mode of laser operation. Record values of PRF for the barium vapor laser, equal to ~320 kHz, have been attained.

  1. Kinetics of water vapor sorption on porous glass as a method of porometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreisberg, V. A.; Rakcheev, V. P.

    2014-09-01

    Equilibrium low temperature nitrogen adsorption and a new method based on the kinetics of water vapor sorption at room temperature are used for a comparative study of pore morphology of high-silica porous glass. The values of the total pore volume, the specific surfaces, the effective mesopore diameters, and the fraction of each mode in the total mesopore volume are established using both techniques. It is found that the rate of water vapor sorption at constant pressure grows in inverse ratio to the diameter of cylindrical menisci in pores. The time dependence of the volume of adsorbed water is linear, while the characteristic time of filling for each pore mode varies directly with the square of the effective pore mode diameter. The proposed new kinetic porometry technique based on analyzing water vapor adsorption kinetics at room temperature is quite simple as it requires no complicated vacuum equipment and allows the simultaneous examination of large numbers of porous material samples.

  2. X-ray laser system, x-ray laser and method

    DOEpatents

    London, Richard A.; Rosen, Mordecai D.; Strauss, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is an x-ray laser system comprising a laser containing generating means for emitting short wave length radiation, and means external to said laser for energizing said generating means, wherein when the laser is in an operative mode emitting radiation, the radiation has a transverse coherence length to width ratio of from about 0.05 to 1. Also disclosed is a method of adjusting the parameters of the laser to achieve the desired coherence length to laser width ratio.

  3. Lasers and new methods of particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-02-01

    There has been a great progress in development of high power laser technology. Harnessing their potential for particle accelerators is a challenge and of great interest for development of future high energy colliders. The author discusses some of the advances and new methods of acceleration including plasma-based accelerators. The exponential increase in sophistication and power of all aspects of accelerator development and operation that has been demonstrated has been remarkable. This success has been driven by the inherent interest to gain new and deeper understanding of the universe around us. With the limitations of the conventional technology it may not be possible to meet the requirements of the future accelerators with demands for higher and higher energies and luminosities. It is believed that using the existing technology one can build a linear collider with about 1 TeV center of mass energy. However, it would be very difficult (or impossible) to build linear colliders with energies much above one or two TeV without a new method of acceleration. Laser driven high gradient accelerators are becoming more realistic and is expected to provide an alternative, (more compact, and more economical), to conventional accelerators in the future. The author discusses some of the new methods of particle acceleration, including laser and particle beam driven plasma based accelerators, near and far field accelerators. He also discusses the enhanced IFEL (Inverse Free Electron Laser) and NAIBEA (Nonlinear Amplification of Inverse-Beamstrahlung Electron Acceleration) schemes, laser driven photo-injector and the high energy physics requirements.

  4. Optical caries diagnostics: comparison of laser spectroscopic PNC method with method of laser integral fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.

    2000-11-01

    In this research we present the results of approbation of two methods of optical caries diagnostics: PNC-spectral diagnostics and caries detection by laser integral fluorescence. The research was conducted in a dental clinic. PNC-method analyses parameters of probing laser radiation and PNC-spectrums of stimulated secondary radiations: backscattering and endogenous fluorescence of caries-involved bacterias. He-Ne-laser ((lambda) =632,8 nm, 1-2mW) was used as a source of probing (stimulated) radiation. For registration of signals, received from intact and pathological teeth PDA-detector was applied. PNC-spectrums were processed by special algorithms, and were displayed on PC monitor. The method of laser integral fluorescence was used for comparison. In this case integral power of fluorescence of human teeth was measured. As a source of probing (stimulated) radiation diode lasers ((lambda) =655 nm, 0.1 mW and 630nm, 1mW) and He-Ne laser were applied. For registration of signals Si-photodetector was used. Integral power was shown in a digital indicator. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described in this research. It is disclosed that the method of laser integral power of fluorescence has the following characteristics: simplicity of construction and schema-technical decisions. However the method of PNC-spectral diagnostics are characterized by considerably more sensitivity in diagnostics of initial caries and capability to differentiate pathologies of various stages (for example, calculus/initial caries). Estimation of spectral characteristics of PNC-signals allows eliminating a number of drawbacks, which are character for detection by method of laser integral fluorescence (for instance, detection of fluorescent fillings, plagues, calculus, discolorations generally, amalgam, gold fillings as if it were caries.

  5. Temporal compression of cw diode-laser output into short pulses with cesium-vapor group-velocity dispersion.

    PubMed

    Choi, K; Menders, J; Ross, D; Korevaar, E

    1993-11-15

    Using a technique similar to chirped pulse compression, we have compressed the 50-mW cw output of a diode laser into pulses of greater than 500-mW peak power and less than 400-ps duration. By applying a small current modulation to the diode, we induced a small wavelength modulation in the vicinity of the 6s(1/2)-to-6p(3/2) cesium resonance transition at 852 nm. Group-velocity dispersion on propagation through a cesium vapor cell then led to pulse compression. We developed a simple model to make predictions of output pulse shapes by using different modulation waveforms. PMID:19829441

  6. Subscale Ship Airwake Studies Using Novel Vortex Flow Devices with Smoke, Laser-Vapor-Screen and Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Landman, Drew; Swift, Russell S.; Parikh, Paresh C.

    2007-01-01

    Ships produce vortices and air-wakes while either underway or stationary in a wind. These flow fields can be detrimental to the conduction of air operations in that they can adversely impact the air vehicles and flight crews. There are potential solutions to these problems for both frigates/destroyers and carriers through the use of novel vortex flow or flow control devices. This appendix highlights several devices which may have application and points out that traditional wind-tunnel testing using smoke, laser-vapor screen, and Particle Image Velocimetry can be useful in sorting out the effectiveness of different devices.

  7. Determination of vaporization enthalpies of the branched esters from correlation gas chromatography and transpiration methods

    SciTech Connect

    Verevkin, S.P.; Heintz, A.

    1999-12-01

    Vaporization enthalpies are indispensable for the assessment of the environmental fate and behavior of environmental contaminants. The temperature dependencies of retention indices of a set of 80 esters with branched molecular structures were measured on a nonpolar gas chromatographic column. The correlation gas chromatography method and reliable data set of 16 esters selected from the literature were used to derive a correlation for the prediction of the standard molar enthalpies of vaporization {Delta}{sub 1}{sup g}H{sub m}{sup {degree}} at the temperature T = 298.15 K. Experimental values of {Delta}{sub 1}{sup g}H{sub m}{sup {degree}} for 64 branched esters were obtained with the help of this correlation. The vaporization enthalpies of isopentyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and neopentyl pivalate were additionally obtained by the transpiration method from the temperature dependence of the vapor pressure measured in a flow system and used for checking the validity of the correlation gas chromatography method.

  8. Simultaneous visualization of water and hydrogen peroxide vapor using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence and photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Olof; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    A concept based on a combination of photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) and two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is for the first time demonstrated for simultaneous detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and water (H2O) vapor. Water detection is based on two-photon excitation by an injection-locked krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser (248.28 nm), which induces broadband fluorescence (400-500 nm) from water. The same laser simultaneously photodissociates H2O2, whereupon the generated OH fragments are probed by LIF after a time delay of typically 50 ns, by a frequency-doubled dye laser (281.91 nm). Experiments in six different H2O2/H2O mixtures of known compositions show that both signals are linearly dependent on respective species concentration. For the H2O2 detection there is a minor interfering signal contribution from OH fragments created by two-photon photodissociation of H2O. Since the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O2 is found to be at least ∼24,000 times higher than the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O at room temperature, this interference is negligible for most H2O/H2O2 mixtures of practical interest. Simultaneous single-shot imaging of both species was demonstrated in a slightly turbulent flow. For single-shot imaging the minimum detectable H2O2 and H2O concentration is 10 ppm and 0.5%, respectively. The proposed measurement concept could be a valuable asset in several areas, for example, in atmospheric and combustion science and research on vapor-phase H2O2 sterilization in the pharmaceutical and aseptic food-packaging industries. PMID:25358016

  9. [The Measuring Method of Atomic Polarization of Alkali Metal Vapor Based on Optical Rotation and the Analysis of the Influence Factors].

    PubMed

    Shang, Hui-ning; Quan, Wei; Chen, Yao; Li, Yang; Li, Hong

    2016-02-01

    High sensitivity measurements of inertia and magnetic field could be achieved by utilizing a category of devices, which manipulate the atomic spins in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free regime. The alkali cell which contains the alkali metal vapor is used to sense magnetic field and inertia. The atomic number density of alkali vapor and the polarization of alkali metal vapor are two of the most important parameters of the cell. They play an important role in the research on atomic spins in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free regime. Besides, optical polarization plays an important role in quantum computing and atomic physics. We propose a measurement of alkali vapor polarization and alkali number density by detecting the optical rotation in one system. This method simplifies existing experimental equipment and processes. A constant bias magnetic field is applied and the Faraday rotation angle is detected by a bunch of the probe beam to deduce alkali-metal density. Then the magnetic field is closed and a bunch of the pump laser is utilized to polarize alkali-metal. Again, the probe beam is utilized to obtain the polarization of alkali metal. The alkali density obtained at first is used to deduce the polarization. This paper applies a numerical method to analyze the Faraday rotation and the polarization rotation. According to the numerical method, the optimal wavelength for the experiment is given. Finally, the fluctuation of magnetic field and wavelength on signal analysis are analyzed. PMID:27209720

  10. Passively mode-locked fiber laser by using monolayer chemical vapor deposition of graphene on D-shaped fiber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Liao, Changrui; Wang, D N; Wang, Yiping

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate a monolayer graphene saturable absorber (SA) based on D-shaped fiber for operation of the mode-locked fiber laser. The monolayer graphene is grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Cu substrate and transferred onto the polymer, and then covered with D-shaped fiber, which allows light-graphene interaction via the evanescent field of the fiber. Due to the side-coupled interaction, the length of graphene is long enough to avoid optical power-induced thermal damage. Using such a graphene-based SA, stable mode-locked solitons with 4.5 nm spectral bandwidth and 713 fs pulsewidth at the 1563 nm wavelength have been obtained under 280 mW pump power. The influence of total cavity dispersion on the optical spectrum and pulse is also investigated by adding different lengths of single-mode fiber in the laser cavity.

  11. Initial alignment method for free space optics laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yuta; Tashiro, Yuki; Izumi, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Koichi; Tsujimura, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    The authors have newly proposed and constructed an active free space optics transmission system. It is equipped with a motor driven laser emitting mechanism and positioning photodiodes, and it transmits a collimated thin laser beam and accurately steers the laser beam direction. It is necessary to introduce the laser beam within sensible range of the receiver in advance of laser beam tracking control. This paper studies an estimation method of laser reaching point for initial laser beam alignment. Distributed photodiodes detect laser luminescence at respective position, and the optical axis of laser beam is analytically presumed based on the Gaussian beam optics. Computer simulation evaluates the accuracy of the proposed estimation methods, and results disclose that the methods help us to guide the laser beam to a distant receiver.

  12. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory laser-transmission method

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, H.; Novakov, T.

    1981-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory laser transmission method has been used to determine the absorption coefficients of aerosol particles generated at the First International Workshop on Light Absorption. Analysis of the results confirms that the optical attenuation measurement is insensitive to the scattering properties of the aerosol. A simple model calculation is presented which explains these observations and points out the critical role of the filter substrate as an almost perfect diffuse reflector in the technique.

  13. Combination of thermocoagulation and vaporization using an Nd:YAG/KTP laser versus TURP in BPH treatment: results of a multicenter prospective study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jichlinski, Patrice; Oswald, Michael; Schmidlin, Franz R.; Graber, Peter; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg

    1998-07-01

    Laser treatment of BPH as minimally invasive therapy has found wide employment in the last few years. The objective here was to study the effects of combined technique of coagulation and vaporization with an Nd:YAG/KTP laser on BPH compared to TURP. Thirty-eight patients presenting symptomatic BPH were randomized and treated either by a laser coagulation/vaporization using an ADD fiber at settings of 40 - 60 W for the Nd:YAG and of 36 W for the KTP alike in 21 cases or by TURP in 17 cases. Symptom score, uroflow and residual urine were assessed preoperatively at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. No transfusion in any group. Similar postoperative catheterization time. Treatment failure in 2 TURP patients and in 2 laser patients. Comparing AUA score, Qmax and residual urine, both forms of treatment were similar at 1 year. Nd:YAG/KTP laser is equivalent to TURP at 1 year for around 40 g prostates.

  14. MoXy fiber with active cooling cap for bovine prostate vaporization with high power 200W 532 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Steven Y.; Kang, Hyun Wook; Pirzadeh, Homa; Stinson, Douglas

    2011-03-01

    A novel MoXyTM fiber delivery device with Active Cooling Cap (ACCTM) is designed to transmit up to 180W of 532 nm laser light to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Under such high power tissue ablation, effective cooling is key to maintaining fiber power transmission and ensuring the reliability of the fiber delivery device To handle high power and reduce fiber degradation, the MoXy fiber features a larger core size (750 micrometer) and an internal fluid channel to ensure better cooling of the fiber tip to prevent the cap from burning, detaching, or shattering during the BPH treatment. The internal cooling channel was created with a metal cap and tubing that surrounds the optical fiber. In this study MoXy fibers were used to investigate the effect of power levels of 120 and 200 W on in-vitro bovine prostate ablation using a 532 nm XPSTM laser system. For procedures requiring more than 100 kJ, the MoXy fiber at 200W removed tissue at twice the rate of the current HPS fiber at 120W. The fiber maintained a constant tissue vaporization rate during the entire tissue ablation process. The coagulation at 200W was about 20% thicker than at 120W. In conclusion, the new fibers at 200W doubled the tissue removal rate, maintained vaporization efficiency throughout delivery of 400kJ energy, and induced similar coagulation to the existing HPS fiber at 120W.

  15. Study on energy density of gold-vapor laser and necrosis depth of mouse malignant tumor (S180)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yong; Wang, Ze-shi; Yang, Yonghua; Wang, Yongjiang

    1993-03-01

    Gold-vapor laser glass type is a new laser for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Its chief characteristics are pulse type, 6000 - 7000 Hz of frequency, 627.8 nm in wavelength, 3 - 4 watts output, etc. By changing laser energy density, we noticed changes of necrosis depth and surface temperature. The results show that the depth of groups of 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 Jol/cm2 were 0.62 +/- 0.21, 0.72 +/- 0.05, 0.97 +/- 0.10, and 1.56 +/- 0.13 cm (p < 0.05), respectively. This study indicates that the pulse laser energy density should be larger than that of a continuant one in PDT, thus photodynamic effect may be improved in the clinic. The surface tumor temperature was changed during the treatment, reaching as high as 39.13 degree(s)C, 43.78 degree(s)C, 44.16 degree(s)C, and 43.5 degree(s)C in different groups. This paper also discusses the coordinated effects of hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy.

  16. Comparison of Columnar Water Vapor Measurements During The Fall 1997 ARM Intensive Observation Period: Optical Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Michalsky, J.; Slater, D.; Barnard, J.; Halthore, R.; Liljegren, J.; Holben, B.; Eck, T.; Livingston, J.; Russell, P.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1997 the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM program conducted an intensive Observation Period (IOP) to study water vapor at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Among the large number of instruments, four sun-tracking radiometers were present to measure the columnar water vapor (CWV). All four solar radiometers retrieve CWV by measuring solar transmittance in the 0.94-micrometer water vapor absorption band. As one of the steps in the CWV retrievals the aerosol component is subtracted from the total transmittance, in the 0.94-micrometer band. The aerosol optical depth comparisons among the same four radiometers are presented elsewhere. We have used three different methods to retrieve CWV. Without attempting to standardize on the same radiative transfer model and its underlying water vapor spectroscopy we found the CWV to agree within 0.13 cm (rms) for CWV values ranging from 1 to 5 cm. Preliminary results obtained when using the same updated radiative transfer model with updated spectroscopy for all instruments will also be shown. Comparisons to the microwave radiometer results will be included in the comparisons.

  17. A field-space conformal-solution method: Binary vapor-liquid phase behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storvick, T. S.; Fox, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The field-space conformal solution method provides an entirely new thermodynamic framework for the description of fluid mixtures in terms of the properties of a pure reference fluid. The utility and performance of the method are examined in the special case of vapor-liquid equilibrium correlation for simple mixtures. This is one of several cases in which field-space methods have numerical or theoretical advantages over methods presently used in mixture property correlation; only properties along the vapor pressure curve of the purefluid reference system are required for a complete description of the mixture phase behavior. Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for three binary hydrocarbon mixtures, n-butane + n-pentane, n-butane + n-hexane, and n-butane + n-octane, are correlated with a simple implementation of the method having two independent mixture parameters. Two pure-fluid equations of state, a Peng-Robinson equation and a 32-constant modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation, are tested as reference systems. The effects of differences in the quality of the reference system and of a range of mixture component size ratios are examined.

  18. Optical method of penetration sensing for pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Essien, M.; Keicher, D.M.

    1997-04-01

    The ability to monitor and control the depth of a laser weld in real-time is critical in many laser welding applications. Consequently, the authors have investigated the use of an optical method to sense weld depth. Welds were generated on kovar samples, using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The sensing method uses digital high-speed photography to measure the velocity of the plume of vaporized metal atoms ejected from the metal surface. An energy balance equation is then used to relate the plume velocity to the size of the weld. Numerical solution of the energy balance equation yielded values for weld depth that were within 8% of the actual measured values.

  19. Method using laser irradiation for the production of atomically clean crystalline silicon and germanium surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ownby, G.W.; White, C.W.; Zehner, D.M.

    1979-12-28

    This invention relates to a new method for removing surface impurities from crystalline silicon or germanium articles, such as off-the-shelf p- or n-type wafers to be doped for use as junction devices. The principal contaminants on such wafers are oxygen and carbon. The new method comprises laser-irradiating the contaminated surface in a non-reactive atmosphere, using one or more of Q-switched laser pulses whose parameters are selected to effect melting of the surface without substantial vaporization thereof. In a typical application, a plurality of pulses is used to convert a surface region of an off-the-shelf silicon wafer to an atomically clean region. This can be accomplished in a system at a pressure below 10-/sup 8/ Torr, using Q-switched ruber-laser pulses having an energy density in the range of from about 60 to 190 MW/cm/sup 2/.

  20. Method using laser irradiation for the production of atomically clean crystalline silicon and germanium surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ownby, Gary W.; White, Clark W.; Zehner, David M.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to a new method for removing surface impurities from crystalline silicon or germanium articles, such as off-the-shelf p- or n-type wafers to be doped for use as junction devices. The principal contaminants on such wafers are oxygen and carbon. The new method comprises laser-irradiating the contaminated surface in a non-reactive atmosphere, using one or more of Q-switched laser pulses whose parameters are selected to effect melting of the surface without substantial vaporization thereof. In a typical application, a plurality of pulses is used to convert a surface region of an off-the-shelf silicon wafer to an automatically clean region. This can be accomplished in a system at a pressure below 10.sup.-8 Torr, using Q-switched ruby-laser pulses having an energy density in the range of from about 60 to 190 MW/cm.sup.2.

  1. Buried heterostructure Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As-GaAs quantum well lasers by Ge diffusion from the vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Deppe, D.G.; Plano, W.E.; Dallesasse, J.M.; Hall, D.C.; Guido, L.J.; Holonyak N. Jr.

    1988-03-07

    Data are presented on a method to diffuse Ge into quantum well Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As-GaAs crystals from a vapor source, thus effecting impurity-induced layer disordering, and shift from lower to higher gap. The Ge diffusion is characterized on undoped GaAs by using secondary ion mass spectroscopy and capacitance-voltage electrochemical profiling. The layer disordering with Ge is used to fabricate 5-..mu..m-wide buried heterostructure quantum well lasers (250 ..mu..m long) with continuous wave thresholds as low as 7 mA and output powers of greater than 90 mW (both facets).

  2. Structural properties of Alq3 nanocrystals prepared by physical vapor deposition and facile solution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wanfeng; Pang, Zhiyong; Fan, Jihui; Song, Hui; Jiang, Feng; Yuan, Huimin; Li, Jianfei; Ji, Ziwu; Han, Shenghao

    2015-09-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) nanostructures are promising materials for nanooptoelectronic devices and molecular spintronics. In this paper, we report Alq3 nanocrystals prepared by both physical vapor deposition (PVD) and facile solution method. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) measurements show that the Alq3 nanomaterials prepared by PVD technique are ɛ-Alq3 nanoflowers, while the Alq3 nanostructures prepared by solution method are α-Alq3 nanorods. Our experiments indicate that the α-Alq3 nanomaterials prepared by using solution method are more suitable for the fabrication of molecular spintronic devices than that of PVD method.

  3. Thermodynamic properties and vapor pressures of polar fluids from a four-parameter corresponding-states method

    SciTech Connect

    Wilding, W.V.; Johnson, J.K.; Rowley, R.L.

    1987-11-01

    A recently proposed extended Lee-Kesler corresponding-states method (ELK) for polar fluids which accurately predicts compressibility factors and departure functions is considered. Tables of polar deviation functions have been generated and values of the shape/size and polar parameters for 52 polar fluids have been calculated, allowing the method to be used for quick hand calculation in addition to the previous, more accurate, computer applications. Additionally, vapor pressures of 44 pure polar fluids were computed using the full version of the ELK and the equality of the Gibbs free energy criterion for phase equilibrium. An ELK vapor pressure correlation is proposed which is essentially numerically equivalent to, but computationally simpler than, the former method. Computed vapor pressures agree with experimental values as well or better than other vapor pressure equations designed exclusively for vapor pressure prediction of polar fluids.

  4. Total internal reflection laser tools and methods

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Kolachalam, Sharath K.; Grubb, Daryl L.

    2016-02-02

    There is provided high power laser tools and laser heads that utilize total internal reflection ("TIR") structures to direct the laser beam along a laser beam path within the TIR structure. The TIR structures may be a TIR prism having its hypotenuse as a TIR surface.

  5. Method for mounting laser fusion targets for irradiation

    DOEpatents

    Fries, R. Jay; Farnum, Eugene H.; McCall, Gene H.

    1977-07-26

    Methods for preparing laser fusion targets of the ball-and-disk type are disclosed. Such targets are suitable for irradiation with one or two laser beams to produce the requisite uniform compression of the fuel material.

  6. Ultrafast laser based coherent control methods for explosives detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2010-12-06

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring Optimal Dynamic Detection of Explosives (ODD-Ex), which exploits the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity to explosives signatures while dramatically improving specificity, particularly against matrix materials and background interferences. These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal non-linear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe subpulses. Recent results will be presented.

  7. Method for changing the cross section of a laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Seppala, Lynn

    1995-01-01

    A technique is disclosed herein in which a circular optical beam, for example a copper vapor laser (CVL) beam, is converted to a beam having a profile other than circular, e.g. square or triangular. This is accomplished by utilizing a single optical mirror having a reflecting surface designed in accordance with a specifically derived formula in order to make the necessary transformation, without any substantial light loss and without changing substantially the intensity profile of the circular beam which has a substantially uniform intensity profile. In this way, the output beam can be readily directed into the dye cell of a dye laser.

  8. Method for changing the cross section of a laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, W.C.; Seppala, L.

    1995-12-05

    A technique is disclosed herein in which a circular optical beam, for example a copper vapor laser (CVL) beam, is converted to a beam having a profile other than circular, e.g. square or triangular. This is accomplished by utilizing a single optical mirror having a reflecting surface designed in accordance with a specifically derived formula in order to make the necessary transformation, without any substantial light loss and without changing substantially the intensity profile of the circular beam which has a substantially uniform intensity profile. In this way, the output beam can be readily directed into the dye cell of a dye laser. 4 figs.

  9. Ambient Molecular Analysis of Biological Tissue Using Low-Energy, Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanospray Postionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fengjian; Flanigan, Paul M.; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Direct analysis of plant and animal tissue samples by laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) was investigated using low-energy, femtosecond duration laser vaporization at wavelengths of 800 and 1042 nm followed by nanospray postionization. Low-energy (<50 μJ), fiber-based 1042 nm LEMS (F-LEMS) allowed interrogation of the molecular species in fresh flower petal and leaf samples using 435 fs, 10 Hz bursts of 20 pulses from a Ytterbium-doped fiber laser and revealed comparable results to high energy (75-1120 μJ), 45 fs, 800 nm Ti:Sapphire-based LEMS (Ti:Sapphire-LEMS) measurements. Anthocyanins, sugars, and other metabolites were successfully detected and revealed the anticipated metabolite profile for the petal and leaf samples. Phospholipids, especially phosphatidylcholine, were identified from a fresh mouse brain section sample using Ti:Sapphire-LEMS without the application of matrix. These lipid features were suppressed in both the fiber-based and Ti:Sapphire-based LEMS measurements when the brain sample was prepared using the optimal cutting temperature compounds that are commonly used in animal tissue cryosections.

  10. Ambient Molecular Analysis of Biological Tissue Using Low-Energy, Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanospray Postionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fengjian; Flanigan, Paul M; Archer, Jieutonne J; Levis, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Direct analysis of plant and animal tissue samples by laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) was investigated using low-energy, femtosecond duration laser vaporization at wavelengths of 800 and 1042 nm followed by nanospray postionization. Low-energy (<50 μJ), fiber-based 1042 nm LEMS (F-LEMS) allowed interrogation of the molecular species in fresh flower petal and leaf samples using 435 fs, 10 Hz bursts of 20 pulses from a Ytterbium-doped fiber laser and revealed comparable results to high energy (75-1120 μJ), 45 fs, 800 nm Ti:Sapphire-based LEMS (Ti:Sapphire-LEMS) measurements. Anthocyanins, sugars, and other metabolites were successfully detected and revealed the anticipated metabolite profile for the petal and leaf samples. Phospholipids, especially phosphatidylcholine, were identified from a fresh mouse brain section sample using Ti:Sapphire-LEMS without the application of matrix. These lipid features were suppressed in both the fiber-based and Ti:Sapphire-based LEMS measurements when the brain sample was prepared using the optimal cutting temperature compounds that are commonly used in animal tissue cryosections. PMID:26667178

  11. Dynamics of vapor plume in transient keyhole during laser welding of stainless steel: Local evaporation, plume swing and gas entrapment into porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Xin; Shao, Xinyu; Gong, Shuili; Xiao, Jianzhong

    2016-07-01

    In order to better understand the local evaporation phenomena of keyhole wall, vapor plume swing above the keyhole and ambient gas entrapment into the porosity defects, the 3D time-dependent dynamics of the metallic vapor plume in a transient keyhole during fiber laser welding is numerically investigated. The vapor dynamical parameters, including the velocity and pressure, are successfully predicted and obtain good agreements with the experimental and literature data. It is found that the vapor plume flow inside the keyhole has complex multiple directions, and this various directions characteristic of the vapor plume is resulted from the dynamic evaporation phenomena with variable locations and orientations on the keyhole wall. The results also demonstrate that because of this dynamic local evaporation, the ejected vapor plume from the keyhole opening is usually in high frequency swinging. The results further indicate that the oscillation frequency of the plume swing angle is around 2.0-8.0 kHz, which is of the same order of magnitude with that of the keyhole depth (2.0-5.0 kHz). This consistency clearly shows that the swing of the ejected vapor plume is closely associated with the keyhole instability during laser welding. Furthermore, it is learned that there is usually a negative pressure region (several hundred Pa lower than the atmospheric pressure) of the vapor flow around the keyhole opening. This pressure could lead to a strong vortex flow near the rear keyhole wall, especially when the velocity of the ejected metallic vapor from the keyhole opening is high. Under the effect of this flow, the ambient gas is involved into the keyhole, and could finally be entrapped into the bubbles within a very short time (<0.2 ms) due to the complex flow inside the keyhole.

  12. An improved method of determining vapor-liquid equilibria for dilute organics in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kieckbusch, T G; King, C J

    1979-05-01

    Chromatographic quantitative analyses of aqueous samples containing dilute concentrations of organic solutes are frequently confounded by sorption phenomena, particularly for vapor samples and aged syringes. A novel apparatus was developed for overcoming this problem; it utilizes continual circulation of gas through a thermostated syringe for sampling, followed by a needleless injection into the chromatograph. Precision and reproducibility well under 0.5% can be obtained in this way. This method was applied to a determination of the solubility of isopentyl acetate in water (2600 ppm) by following the equilibrium vapor response for increasing liquid concentrations. It was also used to determine equilibrium partition coefficients for C1-C5 n-acetates between air and water, over a range of temperatures from 25 to 40 degrees C. PMID:19847988

  13. Estimation of sensible heat, water vapor, and CO2 fluxes using the flux-variance method.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-I; Lai, Mei-Chun; Hsia, Yue-Joe; Chang, Tsang-Jung

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the flux-variance relationships of temperature, humidity, and CO(2), and examined the performance of using this method for predicting sensible heat (H), water vapor (LE), and CO(2) fluxes (F(CO2)) with eddy-covariance measured flux data at three different ecosystems: grassland, paddy rice field, and forest. The H and LE estimations were found to be in good agreement with the measurements over the three fields. The prediction accuracy of LE could be improved by around 15% if the predictions were obtained by the flux-variance method in conjunction with measured sensible heat fluxes. Moreover, the paddy rice field was found to be a special case where water vapor follows flux-variance relation better than heat does. However, the CO(2) flux predictions were found to vary from poor to fair among the three sites. This is attributed to the complicated CO(2) sources and sinks distribution. Our results also showed that heat and water vapor were transported with the same efficiency above the grassland and rice paddy. For the forest, heat was transported 20% more efficiently than evapotranspiration.

  14. Group vector space method for estimating enthalpy of vaporization of organic compounds at the normal boiling point.

    PubMed

    Wenying, Wei; Jinyu, Han; Wen, Xu

    2004-01-01

    The specific position of a group in the molecule has been considered, and a group vector space method for estimating enthalpy of vaporization at the normal boiling point of organic compounds has been developed. Expression for enthalpy of vaporization Delta(vap)H(T(b)) has been established and numerical values of relative group parameters obtained. The average percent deviation of estimation of Delta(vap)H(T(b)) is 1.16, which show that the present method demonstrates significant improvement in applicability to predict the enthalpy of vaporization at the normal boiling point, compared the conventional group methods.

  15. Efficient laser systems for 935 and 942 nm for water vapor lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Hans Joachim; Kallmeyer, Frank; Rhee, Hanjo; Riesbeck, Thomas; Strohmaier, Stephan

    2007-05-01

    Water vapour absorption wavelengths have been directly generated by diode pumped Nd:YGG crystals emitting at 935 nm and with Nd:GSAG crystals emitting at 942 nm in cw and pulsed operation. In addition the 1064 nm fundamental wavelength from Nd:YAG pump lasers with pulse lengths of 10 or 20 ns was shifted using Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) or Ti:Sapphire (TiSa) lasers. The potential of Nd:GSAG, Nd:YGG, SRS and TiSa laser systems is compared for future incorporation into a satellite based Lidar system. High output energies are possible by recent advances of fiber coupled diode sources allowing pulsed longitudinal pumping of Q-switched solid state lasers.

  16. Comparison of vapor sampling system (VSS) and in situ vapor sampling (ISVS) methods on Tanks C-107, BY-108, and S-102

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Edwards, J.A.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the equivalency of two methods used to sample nonradioactive gases and vapors in the Hanford Site high-level waste tank headspaces. In addition to the comparison of the two sampling methods, the effects of an in-line fine particle filter on sampling results are also examined to determine whether results are adversely affected by its presence. This report discusses data from a January 1996 sampling.

  17. Optimal detection and concentration estimation of vapor materials using range-resolved lidar with frequency-agile lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Russell E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; D'Amico, Francis M.

    1999-10-01

    In previous work, we presented a methodology for optimally processing data from lidar with frequency-agile wavelength capability using techniques of multivariate statistics. Among the applications considered was the case of range- resolved lidar with short (delta function) transmitter pulses. This paper extends that analysis by deriving a method for estimating range-dependent vapor concentration for arbitrary pulse shapes. A Bayesian statistical approach leads to a MAP (maximum a posteriori) estimator for C(z), the concentration at range z. The estimates are computed iteratively for a given set of multiwavelength lidar return data using an approximation to the Gauss-Newton method. The concentration estimates are then used as the basis for a detection algorithm for the leading edge of the vapor plume based on the CUSUM approach. The detection and estimation approaches are illustrated on a combination of synthetic and field test data collected by SBCCOM at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory test site.

  18. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  19. Efficacy of a vaporization-resection of the prostate median lobe enlargement and vaporization of the prostate lateral lobe for benign prostatic hyperplasia using a 120-W GreenLight high-performance system laser: the effect on storage symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Sae Woong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2015-05-01

    GreenLight laser photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) was established as a minimally invasive procedure to treat patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, it may be difficult to achieve adequate tissue removal from a large prostate, particularly those with an enlarged median lobe. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and clinical effect of a 120-W GreenLight high-performance system laser vaporization-resection for an enlarged prostate median lobe compared with those of only vaporization. A total of 126 patients from January 2010 to January 2014 had an enlarged prostate median lobe and were included in this study. Ninety-six patients underwent vaporization only (VP group), and 30 patients underwent vaporization-resection for an enlarged median lobe (VR group). The clinical outcomes were International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), quality of life (QOL), maximum flow rate (Q max), and post-void residual urine volume (PVR) assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively between the two groups. The parameters were not significantly different preoperatively between the two groups, except for PVR. Operative time and laser time were shorter in the VR group than those in the VP group. (74.1 vs. 61.9 min and 46.7 vs. 37.8 min; P = 0.020 and 0.013, respectively) and used less energy (218.2 vs. 171.8 kJ, P = 0.025). Improved IPSS values, increased Q max, and a reduced PVR were seen in the two groups. In particular, improved storage IPSS values were higher at 1 and 3 months in the VR group than those in the VP group (P = 0.030 and 0.022, respectively). No significant complications were detected in either group. Median lobe tissue vaporization-resection was complete, and good voiding results were achieved. Although changes in urinary symptoms were similar between patients who received the two techniques, shorter operating time and lower energy were superior with the vaporization-resection technique. In

  20. Self-generating magnetometer with laser pumping employment in “end resonance” wall coated vapor cell atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of two double resonance signals correlation investigation. These signals were observed synchronously in optically oriented Rb87 vapors with laser pumping in a dual scheme: low frequency Mx-magnetometer and microwave frequency discriminator. Analytical studies of the scalar and vector light shift components contribution to the frequency instability of the end resonance microwave transitions are presented. An experimental demonstration of the light shift components mutual compensation in optically pumped Rb87 atoms was provided. The results were processed in terms of Allan variance, which demonstrated an effect of decreasing frequency variation at averaging times more than 100 s for a joint scheme of the end resonance microwave transition and selfgenerating (Mx) magnetometer.

  1. Application of a static quadrupole deviator to the deposition of size-selected cluster ions from a laser vaporization source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alayan, R.; Arnaud, L.; Bourgey, A.; Broyer, M.; Cottancin, E.; Huntzinger, J. R.; Lermé, J.; Vialle, J. L.; Pellarin, M.; Guiraud, G.

    2004-07-01

    An electrostatic quadrupole deviator is used to separate charged from neutral clusters produced by a laser vaporization source. Because of their rather constant velocity, this device which is basically an energy selector also acts as an efficient mass filter. We have simulated and studied its capability to generate beams of size-selected charged clusters. Typical beam currents of a few tens of pA allow the formation of two-dimensional cluster deposits within a few minutes. Platinum and indium clusters are deposited on electron microscopy grids coated with an amorphous carbon film. For low-density assemblies of particles in the nanometer range, size histograms are discussed in relation with the mass selectivity of the apparatus. An upper limit for the dispersion of selected cluster diameters is found to be of the order of ±8% which is at least five times better than the dispersion of neutral species.

  2. Real-time vapor detection of nitroaromatic explosives by catalytic thermal dissociation blue diode laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Youssef M.; Odame-Ankrah, Charles A.; Osthoff, Hans D.

    2013-09-01

    A compact blue diode laser catalytic thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer (cTD-CRDS) to detect vapors of nitroaromatic explosives is described. The instrument uses heated platinum(IV) oxide catalyst to convert nitroaromatic compounds to NO2, which is detected at 405 nm. Using the relatively volatile nitrobenzene as a test compound, we show by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in off-line experiments that nitroaromatics can be quantitatively converted to NO2. The cTD-CRDS detection limit was 0.3 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv) and sufficiently low to allow the detection of a room temperature sample of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) without sample preconcentration.

  3. Photodynamic Therapy Combined with CO2 Laser Vaporization on Disseminated Superficial Actinic Porokeratosis: A Report of 2 Cases on the Face

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hei Sung; Baek, Ji Hye; Park, Young Min; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2011-01-01

    Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is a skin condition that usually shows a poor response to different modalities of treatment. Herein we describe 2 patients with DSAP on the face, each treated with 3 to 4 sessions of photodynamic therapy combined with laser vaporization. PMID:22148053

  4. Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Baucom, Kevin C.

    2000-01-01

    A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition techniques and related methods for manufacturing microminiature thermionic converters

    DOEpatents

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2002-06-25

    Methods of manufacturing microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs made using the methods of the invention incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices can be fabricated at modest costs.

  6. Ionic liquids: differential scanning calorimetry as a new indirect method for determination of vaporization enthalpies.

    PubMed

    Verevkin, Sergey P; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Ralys, Ricardas V; Schick, Christoph

    2012-04-12

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to measure enthalpies of synthesis reactions of the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide [C(n)mim][Br] ionic liquids from 1-methylimidazole and n-alkyl bromides (with n = 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8). The optimal experimental conditions have been elaborated. Enthalpies of formation of these ionic liquids in the liquid state have been determined using the DSC results according to the Hess Law. The ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of [C(n)mim][Br] were calculated using the methods of quantum chemistry. They were used together with the DSC results to derive indirectly the enthalpies of vaporization of the ionic liquids under study. In order to validate the indirect determination, the experimental vaporization enthalpy of [C(4)mim][Br] was measured by using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The combination of reaction enthalpy measurements by DSC with modern high-level first-principles calculations opens valuable indirect thermochemical options to obtain values of vaporization enthalpies of ionic liquids. PMID:22435356

  7. Equation of state of ethylene vapor between 223 and 273 K by the Burnett method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengers, J. M. H. Levelt; Hastings, J. R.

    1981-09-01

    Measurements are reported of the equation of state of ethylene in the vapor phase between 223 and 273 K by the Burnett method. ( P, ρ, T) values are reported on six isotherms at 10 K intervals. Virial coefficients have been obtained in this range both for ethylene and for helium. The Burnett isotherms were coupled isochorically; this revealed a small but noticeable adsorption effect. Isochoric intersections with the phase boundary were performed to obtain values for the vapor pressure and the vapor density. Again, clear indications of surface effects were found. Our results have been compared with recent work by Douslin and Harrison, by Waxman and Davis, and by Thomas and Zander. The agreement with the work of Douslin and Harrison is striking: better than 2 parts in 104 in pressure and better than 1 cm3 · mol-1 in the second virial coefficient. The agreement with the McCarty-Jacobsen formulation is somewhat less satisfactory. A discussion of the various factors determining the reliability of our results is given.

  8. Studies on Aspirin Crystals Generated by a Modified Vapor Diffusion Method.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amit; Malhotra, Deepak; Jain, Preeti; Kalia, Anupama; Shunmugaperumal, Tamilvanan

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of the current investigation were (1) to study the influence of selected two different non-solvents (diethylether and dichloromethane) on the drug crystal formation of a model drug, aspirin (ASP-I) by the modified vapor diffusion method and (2) to characterize and compare the generated crystals (ASP-II and ASP-III) using different analytical techniques with that of unprocessed ASP-I. When compared to the classical vapor diffusion method which consumes about 15 days to generate drug crystals, the modified method needs only 12 h to get the same. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that the internal structures of ASP-II and ASP-III crystals were identical when compared with ASP-I. Although the drug crystals showed a close similarity in X-ray diffraction patterns, the difference in the relative intensities of some of the diffraction peaks (especially at 2θ values of around 7.7 and 15.5) could be attributed to the crystal habit or crystal size modification. Similarly, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study speculates that only the crystal habit modifications might occur but without involving any change in internal structure of the generated drug polymorphic form I. This is further substantiated from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures that indicated the formation of platy shape for the ASP-II crystals and needle shape for the ASP-III crystals. In addition, the observed slow dissolution of ASP crystals should indicate polymorph form I formation. Thus, the modified vapor diffusion method could routinely be used to screen and legally secure all possible forms of other drug entities too.

  9. Effects of copper vapor laser (CVL) on mice skin: histologic evaluation of damage and tissue stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Syllene; Moreno, E.; Oliveira, H.; Osaka, J.; Salvador, G.; Michalany, N.; Tolosa, E.

    2002-10-01

    This study was to evaluate the effects of the CVL with low energy and short pulse widths. 18 female mice, C57BL/6 (9-11 weeks old) were distributed into four groups. The control group (CG) wasn't exposed to laser beam . Group L1 had 2 laser expositions with 24 hours gap between them (0.5W). Group L2 had 3 expositions (0.5W and 0.25W) and group L3 had 4 expositions (0.25 W). It was used a CVL prototype (5lOnm, 13 Khz, pulse width of 20 ms and spot size of 0.8cm). 7 days after last laser pulse no groups presented actinic keratosis, tumors or collagen changes. CVL had effective action on pilosebaceous units. High energy with few short pulses induced hair follicles proliferation while low energy with many repetitive short pulses showed increased and specific tissue damage besides hair plugging.

  10. Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1976-08-31

    Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

  11. Relativistic mirrors in laser plasmas (analytical methods)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh; Kando, M.; Koga, J.

    2016-10-01

    Relativistic flying mirrors in plasmas are realized as thin dense electron (or electron-ion) layers accelerated by high-intensity electromagnetic waves to velocities close to the speed of light in vacuum. The reflection of an electromagnetic wave from the relativistic mirror results in its energy and frequency changing. In a counter-propagation configuration, the frequency of the reflected wave is multiplied by the factor proportional to the Lorentz factor squared. This scientific area promises the development of sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses in the attosecond range. The expected intensity will reach the level at which the effects predicted by nonlinear quantum electrodynamics start to play a key role. We present an overview of theoretical methods used to describe relativistic flying, accelerating, oscillating mirrors emerging in intense laser-plasma interactions.

  12. Optimization methods of the net emission computation applied to cylindrical sodium vapor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hadj Salah, S. Hajji, S.; Ben Hamida, M. B.; Charrada, K.

    2015-01-15

    An optimization method based on a physical analysis of the temperature profile and different terms in the radiative transfer equation is developed to reduce the time computation of the net emission. This method has been applied for the cylindrical discharge in sodium vapor. Numerical results show a relative error of spectral flux density values lower than 5% with an exact solution, whereas the computation time is about 10 orders of magnitude less. This method is followed by a spectral method based on the rearrangement of the lines profile. Results are shown for Lorentzian profile and they demonstrated a relative error lower than 10% with the reference method and gain in computation time about 20 orders of magnitude.

  13. Development of Solid State Laser Materials for Application in Lasers for Atmospheric Ozone and Water Vapor Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noginov, Makhail A.; Loutts, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    We have grown neodymium doped mixed apatite crystals, (Sr(x)Ba(l-x)5(PO4)3F, Sr5(P(1-x)V(x)O4)3F, and Ba5(P(1-x)V(x)O4)3F, and spectroscopically studied them as potential gain media for a laser source for atmospheric water sensing operating at 944.11 nm0. We conclude that an appropriate apatite host material for a 944.11 nm laser should be a mixture of Sr5(PO4)3F with a small fraction of Ba5(PO4)3F. The precise wavelength tuning around 944.11 nm can be accomplished by varying the host composition, temperature, and threshold population inversion. In apatite crystals of mixed composition, the Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) loss at 1.06 microns is predicted to be significantly smaller than that in the end members.

  14. Laser ablation system, and method of decontaminating surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Russell L.; Edelson, Martin C.; Pang, Ho-ming

    1998-07-14

    A laser ablation system comprising a laser head providing a laser output; a flexible fiber optic cable optically coupled to the laser output and transmitting laser light; an output optics assembly including a nozzle through which laser light passes; an exhaust tube in communication with the nozzle; and a blower generating a vacuum on the exhaust tube. A method of decontaminating a surface comprising the following steps: providing an acousto-optic, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light ablation system having a fiber optically coupled output optics assembly; and operating the laser light ablation system to produce an irradiance greater than 1.times.10.sup.7 W/cm.sup.2, and a pulse width between 80 and 170 ns.

  15. Simultaneous atmospheric nitrous oxide, methane and water vapor detection with a single continuous wave quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yingchun; Sanchez, Nancy P; Jiang, Wenzhe; Griffin, Robert J; Xie, Feng; Hughes, Lawrence C; Zah, Chung-en; Tittel, Frank K

    2015-02-01

    A continuous wave (CW) quantum cascade laser (QCL) based absorption sensor system was demonstrated and developed for simultaneous detection of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N(2)O), methane (CH(4)), and water vapor (H(2)O). A 7.73-µm CW QCL with its wavelength scanned over a spectral range of 1296.9-1297.6 cm(-1) was used to simultaneously target three neighboring strong absorption lines, N(2)O at 1297.05 cm(-1), CH(4) at 1297.486 cm(-1), and H(2)O at 1297.184 cm(-1). An astigmatic multipass Herriott cell with a 76-m path length was utilized for laser based gas absorption spectroscopy at an optimum pressure of 100 Torr. Wavelength modulation and second harmonic detection was employed for data processing. Minimum detection limits (MDLs) of 1.7 ppb for N(2)O, 8.5 ppb for CH(4), and 11 ppm for H(2)O were achieved with a 2-s integration time for individual gas detection. This single QCL based multi-gas detection system possesses applications in environmental monitoring and breath analysis.

  16. Method of forming ultra thin film devices by vacuum arc vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for providing an ultra thin electrical circuit integral with a portion of a surface of an object, including using a focal Vacuum Arc Vapor Deposition device having a chamber, a nozzle and a nozzle seal, depressing the nozzle seal against the portion of the object surface to create an airtight compartment in the chamber and depositing one or more ultra thin film layer(s) only on the portion of the surface of the object, the layers being of distinct patterns such that they form the circuit.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V; Lutz, Victoriya A; Dontsova, Tatiana A; Astrelin, Igor M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated. PMID:27456501

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V.; Lutz, Victoriya A.; Dontsova, Tatiana A.; Astrelin, Igor M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V; Lutz, Victoriya A; Dontsova, Tatiana A; Astrelin, Igor M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated.

  20. Temperature dependent shape transformation of Ge nanostructures by the vapor-liquid-solid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, K.; Chakraborty, A. K.; NandaGoswami, M. L.; Shingha, R. K.; Dhar, A.; Coleman, K. S.; Ray, S. K.

    2007-04-01

    A vapor-liquid-solid method has been used to study the temperature dependent growth mechanism of Ge nanostructures on Au-coated Si (100) substrates. The formation of Ge nanodots, nanorods, and nanowires has been observed at different growth temperatures. The diameter of grown nanowires is found to be varying from 40 to 80 nm and that of nanorods from 70 to 90 nm, respectively. A comparative study has been done on three types of samples using x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Photoluminescence spectra of grown nanostructures exhibit a broad emission band around 2.6 eV due to oxide related defect states.

  1. Optimization of a single-drop microextraction method for multielemental determination by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following in situ vapor generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sandra; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.; Bendicho, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    A headspace single-drop microextraction (HS-SDME) method has been developed in combination with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for the simultaneous determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in aqueous solutions. Vapor generation is carried out in a 40 mL volume closed-vial containing a solution with the target analytes in hydrochloric acid and potassium ferricyanide medium. Hydrides (As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn) and Hg vapor are trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3 µL volume) containing Pd(II), followed by the subsequent injection in the ETV. Experimental variables such as medium composition, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) volume and concentration, stirring rate, extraction time, sample volume, ascorbic acid concentration and palladium amount in the drop were fully optimized. The limits of detection (LOD) (3 σ criterion) of the proposed method for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg were 0.2, 0.04, 0.01, 0.07, 0.09 and 0.8 µg/L, respectively. Enrichment factors of 9, 85, 138, 130, 37 and 72 for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg, respectively, were achieved in 210 s. The relative standard deviations ( N = 5) ranged from 4 to 8%. The proposed HS-SDME-ETV-ICP-MS method has been applied for the determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in NWRI TM-28.3 certified reference material.

  2. Experimental investigations of the kinetic processes involved in a rubidium (Rb) Optically Pumped Alkali metal vapor Laser (OPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.

    Diode or Optically Pumped Alkali metal vapor Lasers (DPALs or OPALs) are candidates for high power laser systems. These gas-phase three-level lasers are pumped on the alkali's D2 transition, 2S1/2 → 2P3/2, and support lasing on the D1 transition, 2P1/2 → 2S1/2. Collisional mixing using several hundred Torr of an additive gas such as methane or ethane transfers population from the 2P3/2 state to the 2P1/2 state. These gases are selected because of their large mixing rates (cross sections) and small quenching rates (cross sections) of the 2P states. Pressure broadening of the D1 and D2 transitions is a direct consequence of using several hundred Torr of buffer gas required for collisional mixing. The quenching kinetics (non radiative decay of excited states) of Rb 2P states by methane and ethane are reexamined with time resolved fluorescence techniques. A detailed analysis of the interplay between radiation trapping, the absorption and re-emission of resonant radiation in an atomic vapor, and quenching is carried out. Experimental results supported by theoretical simulations (calculations) bound the quenching cross sections (sigma) of methane and ethane at 40°C to sigma ≤ 0.02 A2 and sigma ≤ 0.03 A2, respectively. These values are about two orders of magnitude smaller than previously reported. The pressure broadening and collisional shift rates of the Rb D2 absorption line by methane, ethane, propane, butane, and helium are measured by using linear absorption spectroscopy at 40°C. The rates of ethane, propane, and butane are measured for the first time. The broadening rates in (MHz/Torr) for C2H6, C3H8, and n-C4H10, are 28.1 +/- 0.4, 30.5 +/- 0.6, and 31.3 +/- 0.6. The corresponding shift rates in (MHz/Torr) are -8.8 +/- 0.2, -9.7 +/- 0.2, and -10.0 +/- 0.2. A pulsed Rb-methane OPAL is demonstrated. Slope efficiencies of 72 to 76 % are obtained. A one dimensional (1D) rate equation model that includes the spectral overlap of the pump and the Rb D2

  3. Use of the selected overlap LIDAR experiment (SOLEX) system with the 248 nm krypton fluoride and the 355 nm neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet lasers for the calibration of LIDAR systems for water vapor determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, Francis Emmanuel Tofodji

    Water vapor is one of the most important atmospheric variables that play a key role in air quality, global warming, climate change and hurricane formation. In this dissertation, use was made of two laser systems, the 248-nm KrF laser and the 355 nm Nd-YAG laser, with the use of Raman scattering to measure water vapor in the atmosphere. These two systems have been calibrated more accurately, using the LIDAR approach named SOLEX (Selected Overlap LIDAR Experiment). All the experiments were carried out at the Howard University Beltsville campus located on a 107 acre research site, at Beltsville, MD, 15 miles from downtown Washington DC, near the National Agricultural Research Center (NARC), and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The geographical coordinates are: 39°04.01'N latitude, and 76°52.31'W longitude. The receiver system used during these experiments is a 30" (76.2 cm), f/ 9 Cassegranian telescope, while the detector system uses a prism spectrometer (Beckman), with a 2-meter, double-fold optical path and a variable slit width is placed at the image plane of the telescope. With the use of the SOLEX system, this dissertation provides an accurate calibration of the two LIDAR Systems for water vapor measurement in the troposphere at the following ranges: 83.7 ft, 600 ft, 800 ft, 1000 ft and 1080 ft. Data analysis shows a pretty high sensitivity of the LIDAR system for water vapor measurement and the efficiency of the SOLEX method.

  4. High-power (80-w) KTP laser vaporization of the prostate in the management of urinary retention: long-term follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleeman, M.; Nseyo, Unyime O.

    2004-07-01

    Introduction and Objectives: We have previously reported the use of high-powered photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) for patients in urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). PVP is a relatively new treatment for bladder outlet obstruction due to BPH, using laser energy to vaporize obstructing prostatic tissue. This study investigates the long-term follow up of patients treated with PVP for urinary retention. Materials and Methods: All participants signed informed consent, and were treated with high power 80 W quasi-continuous wave potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) laser. Ten patients underwent the procedure from December 2001 until the present. One patient was excluded from the study for failure to return for follow-up. Mean patient follow-up was nine months, maximum of twelve months. Results: The mean pre-operative gland size by trans-rectal ultrasound was 48 grams. Mean urethral length was 3.2 cm. Mean laser time was 48.2 minutes and the mean energy usage was 82.2 kJoules. There were no peri-operative complications such as sepsis or measurable postoperative bleeding. The preoperative AUA Symptom Score (AUASS) decreased from a mean of 22.6 preoperatively to 17 at nine months postoperatively (p = 0.032). The Quality of Life Score (QOL) decreased from 4.6 preoperatively to 3.25 at 12 months postoperatively (p = 0.26). The maximum urine flow rate increased from a mean of 7.7 cc/sec preoperatively to 14.5 cc/sec at six months follow-up (p = 0.03). Conclusions: This follow-up study suggests that HP-KTP has a durable response in patients treated specifically for retention. It significantly improved urine flow rate and symptom score, and had a trend towards improvement in subjective quality of life. HP-KTP prostatectomy should be considered in treating patients in retention, especially those with significant co-morbidities or taking anticoagulation.

  5. A search for chemical laser action in low pressure metal vapor flames. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwillenberg, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    Optical emissions were studied from low pressure (approximately 1 torr) dilute diffusion flames of Ca and Mg vapor with O2, N2O and mixtures of CCl4 and O2. The Ca flames with O2 and N2O revealed high vibrational excitation of the product CaO molecule (up to v=30). The flames with CCl4 revealed extreme nonequilibrium metal atom electronic excitation, up to the metal atom ionization limit (6.1 eV for Ca, 7.6 eV for Mg). The metal atom excited electronic state populations did not follow a Boltzmann distribution, but the excitation rates ('pumping rate') were found to obey an Arrhenius-type expression, with the electronic excitation energy playing the role of activation energy and a temperature of about 5000 K for triplet excited states and 2500 K for singlets (vs. approximately 500 K translational temperature).

  6. Far wing depolarization of light - Generalized absorption profiles. [in laser fluorescence spectroscopy of Sr vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, P.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1981-01-01

    An absorption (and/or emission) event which takes place during a strong collision is called a 'correlated event'. It is discussed how correlated events affect the far red wing depolarization of fluorescence. Attention is given to an atomic vapor which is irradiated by linearly polarized light of a frequency on the red side of the resonance line. Two limiting cases are considered, corresponding to excitation in the impact region and in the quasi-static wing. In the quasi-static wing, absorption of a photon followed by fluorescence (rather than Rayleigh scattering), occurs mostly during a collision. Correlated events dominate the scattering process. Expressions derived for the polarization of the fluorescent light are applied to far red wing depolarization. It is found that the polarization of the fluorescent light does not go to zero in the far wing, but depends crucially on the detailed nature of the anisotropy in the long-range part of the interatomic potential.

  7. Growth of high quality mercurous halide single crystals by physical vapor transport method for AOM and radiation detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasinghe, Priyanthi M.; Kim, Joo-Soo; Chen, Henry; Trivedi, Sudhir; Qadri, Syed B.; Soos, Jolanta; Diestler, Mark; Zhang, Dajie; Gupta, Neelam; Jensen, Janet L.; Jensen, James

    2016-09-01

    Single crystals of mercurous halide were grown by physical vapor transport method (PVT). The orientation and the crystalline quality of the grown crystals were determined using high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) technique. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the grown mercurous bromide crystals was measured to be 0.13 degrees for (004) reflection, which is the best that has been achieved so far for PVT grown mercurous halide single crystals. The extended defects of the crystals were also analyzed using high resolution x-ray diffraction topography. Preliminary studies were carried out to evaluate the performance of the crystals on acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and gamma-ray detector applications. The results indicate the grown mercurous halide crystals are excellent materials for acousto-optic modulator device fabrication. The diffraction efficiencies of the fabricated AOM device with 1152 and 1523 nm wavelength lasers polarizing parallel to the acoustic wave were found to be 35% and 28%, respectively. The results also indicate the grown crystals are a promising material for gamma-ray detector application with a very high energy resolution of 1.86% FWHM.

  8. Progress Toward an Autonomous Field Deployable Diode Laser Based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Profiling Water Vapor in the Lower Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasky, K. S.; Spuler, S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Moen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Water vapor is the most dominant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and plays an important role in many key atmospheric processes associated with both weather and climate. Water vapor is highly variable in space and time due to large scale transport and biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Having long-term, high-resolution, vertical profiles of water vapor will help to better understand the water vapor structure and variability and its associated impact on weather and climate. A diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for full-time water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere has been demonstrated at Montana State University. This prototype instrument has the potential to form the basis of a ground based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments that can provide important information on the spatial and temporal variability of water vapor in the lower troposphere. To achieve this potential, major improvements to the prototype instrument need to be implemented and demonstrated including developing a laser transmitter capable of long term operation and modifying the optical receiver to make measurement below 0.5 km. During the past year, work on incorporating a new laser transmitter based on two distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) diode lasers, one operating at the on-line/side-line wavelength and the second operating at the off-line wavelength to injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration has been completed. Recent work on the optical receiver is driven by the fact that the majority of the atmospheric water vapor resides below 2 km. The current single channel DIAL receiver has a narrow field of view and does not come in to full overlap until approximately 2 km. A two channel DIAL receiver has been designed that will allow the DIAL to achieve full overlap at ranges of less the 0.5 km providing significant improvement to the instrument performance. A discussion of

  9. Kr/sup +/ laser-induced chemical vapor deposition of W

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, G.Q.; Szoerenyi, T.; Baeuerle, D.

    1987-07-15

    Kr/sup +/ laser-induced pyrolytic direct writing of W stripes by H/sub 2/ reduction of WF/sub 6/ has been investigated. The reproducibility of the process and the morphology and electrical properties of deposits depend heavily on the partial pressures of both WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/; the best results have been obtained with p(WF/sub 6/) = 5 mbar and 100 mbarless than or equal top(H/sub 2/)less than or equal to800 mbar. For a laser focus of 2w/sub 0/ = 7 ..mu..m and laser powers between 30 and 200 mW, the widths of stripes varied between 1.5 and 15 ..mu..m with corresponding thicknesses between 0.1 to 3 ..mu..m. The width of stripes is independent of the scanning speed within the range 20 ..mu..m/sless than or equal toV/sub s/ less than or equal to400 ..mu..m/s. The electrical resistivities of these stripes were about a factor of 1.3--2.3 larger than the bulk value.

  10. An Interpolation Method for Obtaining Thermodynamic Properties Near Saturated Liquid and Saturated Vapor Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Huy H.; Martin, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    The two most common approaches used to formulate thermodynamic properties of pure substances are fundamental (or characteristic) equations of state (Helmholtz and Gibbs functions) and a piecemeal approach that is described in Adebiyi and Russell (1992). This paper neither presents a different method to formulate thermodynamic properties of pure substances nor validates the aforementioned approaches. Rather its purpose is to present a method to generate property tables from existing property packages and a method to facilitate the accurate interpretation of fluid thermodynamic property data from those tables. There are two parts to this paper. The first part of the paper shows how efficient and usable property tables were generated, with the minimum number of data points, using an aerospace industry standard property package. The second part describes an innovative interpolation technique that has been developed to properly obtain thermodynamic properties near the saturated liquid and saturated vapor lines.

  11. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    PubMed

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition.

  12. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    PubMed

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition. PMID:26018140

  13. A comparison between protein crystals grown with vapor diffusion methods in microgravity and protein crystals using a gel liquid-liquid diffusion ground-based method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Teresa Y.; He, Xiao-Min; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Crystals of human serum albumin have been successfully grown in a variety of gels using crystallization conditions otherwise equivalent to those utilized in the popular hanging-drop vapor-equilibrium method. Preliminary comparisons of gel grown crystals with crystals grown by the vapor diffusion method via both ground-based and microgravity methods indicate that crystals superior in size and quality may be grown by limiting solutal convection. Preliminary X-ray diffraction statistics are presented.

  14. Lasing on the electronic B--X transition of the I/sub 2/ molecule optically pumped by a copper-vapor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kaslin, V.M.; Petrash, G.G.; Yakushev, O.F.

    1980-04-01

    It is proposed to use pulsed metal-vapor lasers for optical pumping of gas lasers based on electronic transitions of molecules. This uncovers prospects for the development of effective lasers with high average and peak power, which are tunable in the visible and in the infrared. The first step in this direction are experiments on optical pumping of molecular iodine by a copper-vapor laser (lambda=5106 and 5782 A). Results of spectroscopic investigations are reported. It was found that the pumping is by five absorption lines of the X/sup 1/..sigma../sub g//sup +/-B/sup 3/Pi/sub 0//sup +//sub u/ system of the I/sub 2/ molecule, three of which give rise to lasing. The principal pumping was by the 5782 A line. Lasing was obtained on 14 vibrational transitions of the B/sup 3/Pi/sub 0//sup +//sub u/X/sup 1/..sigma../sub g//sup +/ system in the region 1.016--1.342 ..mu..m region. The average generation power in the multifrequency regime was 7 mW at an optical-energy conversion efficiency 4%. It was observed that a noticeable competition takes place between the pump channels of the 5106 and 5782 A lines, and leads to a decrease in the total lasing power. Prospects are discussed of using gas lasers on electronic transitions of molecules optically pumped by metal-vapor vapors, particularly for the development of frequency-tunable optical systems with intensity amplifiers.

  15. Method for foam encapsulating laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1977-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser fusion targets are made by positioning a fusion fuel-filled sphere within a mold cavity of suitable configuration and dimensions, and then filling the cavity with a material capable of producing a low density, microcellular foam, such as cellulose acetate dissolved in an acetone-based solvent. The mold assembly is dipped into an ice water bath to gel the material and thereafter soaked in the water bath to leach out undesired components, after which the gel is frozen, then freeze-dried wherein water and solvents sublime and the gel structure solidifies into a low-density microcellular foam, thereafter the resulting foam encapsulated target is removed from the mold cavity. The fuel-filled sphere is surrounded by foam having a thickness of about 10 to 100 .mu.m, a cell size of less than 2 .mu.m, and density of 0.065 to 0.6 .times. 10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3. Various configured foam-encapsulated targets capable of being made by this encapsulation method are illustrated.

  16. Development of polishing methods for Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, B.A.; Brown, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    Material properties of Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide (CVD SiC) make it ideal for use in mirrors for synchrotron radiation experiments. We developed methods to grind and polish flat samples of CVD SiC down to measured surface roughness values as low as 1.1 Angstroms rms. We describe the processing details, including observations we made during trial runs with alternative processing recipes. We conclude that pitch polishing using progressively finer diamond abrasive, augmented with specific water based lubricants and additives, produces superior results. Using methods based on these results, a cylindrical and a toroidal mirror, each about 100 x 300mm, were respectively finished by Continental Optical and Frank Cooke, Incorporated. WYCO Interferometry shows these mirrors have surface roughness less than 5.7 Angstroms rms. These mirrors have been installed on the LLNL/UC X-ray Calibration and Standards Facility at the Stanford Synthrotron Radiation Laboratory.

  17. Growth of well-oriented VACNTs using thermal chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Amin Termeh; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop; Ikeda, Shoichiro

    2016-07-01

    The remarkable properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them attractive for biosensor applications, especially for medical detecting devices. In this paper, we describe a process to grow high oriented ratio CNT arrays to improve the electrical properties of the devices based on CNTs. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to grow highly oriented CNT using camphor as the carbon source, and argon and hydrogen as carrier gases to grow perpendicular CNTs on the surface of the silicon substrate in presence of ferrocene as a metallic catalyst. Images were revealed by FESEM indicates that the formation mechanism of oriented CNTs with high morphological purity nanotubes, which is depends significantly on deposition time and applied temperature to the furnaces. This method might be an effective method to produce oriented MWCNT in different length.

  18. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-09-14

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm.

  19. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  20. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm.

  1. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  2. Heat Transfer And Vapor Dynamics Induced By Nanosecond Laser Ablation Of Titanium Target

    SciTech Connect

    Hamadi, F.; Amara, E. H.; Mezaoui, D.

    2008-09-23

    A numerical modelling describing a pulsed nanosecond laser interaction with a titanium target is presented, resulting in the study of the plume expansion in vacuum or in background gas, using the species transport model available in Fluent computational fluid dynamics code. The heat transfers in the solid target and the molten material are modeled using an enthalpy formulation for the solid-liquid phase changing. The effect of laser fluences is investigated, and results are presented as a function of time. Moreover, the plasma or the vapour dynamics is calculated by solving a set of Navier-Stokes equations. The plasma absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung, the ionization states and the density profiles of the Titanium ions and electrons in the plume are interactively included in the Fluent calculation process by the mean of User Defined Functions (UDFs) used in order to take into account the specificity of our problem. The ionization is computed by solving the Saha-Eggert equation assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions.

  3. A quantum cascade laser-based water vapor isotope analyzer for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. E.; Tsai, T.; Wysocki, G.; Michel, A. P. M.; Wang, L.; Baeck, M. L.; Smith, J. A.

    2014-09-15

    A field-deployable mid-infrared quantum cascade laser-based spectrometer was designed and developed for measurements of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O at 7.12 μm. H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O absorption features at 1390.52 cm{sup −1} and 1389.91 cm{sup −1}, respectively, accessible within current tuning range of the laser, were targeted. The target lines were carefully selected to assure similar absorption levels and similar temperature sensitivities of the line strength due to comparable lower state energies. A real-time spectral fitting algorithm was implemented for isotopic concentration retrieval. Detection limits for H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O of 2.2 ppm and 7.0 ppb, respectively, were achieved at a dew point of 14 °C (volume mixing ratio of 15 766 ppm) in 1 s integration time, which resulted in a δ{sup 18}O isotopic ratio measurement precision of 0.25‰. The ultimate minimum detection limits obtained after 160 s integration time for H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O, and δ{sup 18}O measurements were 0.6 ppm, 1.7 ppb, and 0.05‰, respectively.

  4. Time resolved beam divergence from a copper vapor laser with unstable resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.W.

    1995-02-01

    The temporal evolution of the far-field intensity distribution (and hence beam divergence) for the output of a CVL operating with both on-axis and off-axis unstable resonators is investigated in detail. The CVL output pulse consists of several temporally resolved components, where each successive component has lower divergence approaching the diffraction limit. A comprehensive model of the divergence of each temporal component from a CVL operating with a variety of unstable resonators is presented. In this model the resonator control the output divergence by imposing geometric constrains on the propagation of spontaneous emission on repeated round-trips through the unstable resonator equivalent lens guide. Effects of resonator asymmetry and radial gain variations on the far-field intensity distribution (and hence divergence) are evaluated. Experimental measurements of the temporal evolution of output divergence from a CVL operating with both on-axis and off-axis unstable resonators and for a variety of excitation conditions are also presented. For CVL operation at high pulse repetition frequency the ASE at the start of the laser pulse has an annular profile. This annular gain distribution is found to modify the output far-field intensity distribution of the earlier temporal components of the laser pulse. For on-axis unstable resonators these components are found to have annular far-field intensity distributions, whereas for off-axis unstable resonators they have greatly reduced but anisotropic divergence.

  5. Chemical models for simulating single-walled nanotube production in arc vaporization and laser ablation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical kinetic models for the nucleation and growth of clusters and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) growth are developed for numerical simulations of the production of SWNTs. Two models that involve evaporation and condensation of carbon and metal catalysts, a full model involving all carbon clusters up to C80, and a reduced model are discussed. The full model is based on a fullerene model, but nickel and carbon/nickel cluster reactions are added to form SWNTs from soot and fullerenes. The full model has a large number of species--so large that to incorporate them into a flow field computation for simulating laser ablation and arc processes requires that they be simplified. The model is reduced by defining large clusters that represent many various sized clusters. Comparisons are given between these models for cases that may be applicable to arc and laser ablation production. Solutions to the system of chemical rate equations of these models for a ramped temperature profile show that production of various species, including SWNTs, agree to within about 50% for a fast ramp, and within 10% for a slower temperature decay time.

  6. Preparation of platinum nanoparticles in liquids by laser ablation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh Nguyen, The; Dinh Nguyen, Thanh; Nguyen, Quang Dong; Trinh Nguyen, Thi

    2014-09-01

    Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles were prepared in solutions of ethanol and TSC (trisodium citrate—Na3C6H5O7.nH2O) in water by laser ablation method using Nd:YAG laser. The role of laser fluence, laser wavelength and concentration of surfactant liquids in laser ablation process were investigated. The morphology, size distribution and optical properties of the Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectrometer and x-ray diffraction measurements. The average diameter of Pt NPs prepared in ethanol and TSC solutions ranges around 7-9 nm and 10-12 nm, respectively. The results showed advantages of the laser ablation method.

  7. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Stuart C.; Partin, Judy K.; Grandy, Jon D.; Jeffery, Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  8. System, Apparatus and Method Employing a Dual Head Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Donald B. (Inventor); Stysley, Paul R. (Inventor); Poulios, Demetrios (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system, apparatus and method employing a laser with a split-head, V-assembly gain material configuration. Additionally, the present invention is directed to techniques to better dissipate or remove unwanted energies in laser operations. The present invention is also directed to techniques for better collimated laser beams, with single spatial mode quality (TEM00), with improved efficiency, in extreme environments, such as in outer space.

  9. Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures.

  10. 975nm high-peak power ns-diode laser based MOPA system suitable for water vapor DIAL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumpf, Bernd; Klehr, Andreas; Vu, Thi Nghiem; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2015-03-01

    Micro-DIAL (differential absorption LIDAR) systems require light sources with peak powers in the range of several 10 W together with a spectral line width smaller than the width of absorption lines under study. For water vapor at atmospheric pressure this width should be smaller than 10 pm at 975 nm. In this paper, an all semiconductor master oscillator power amplifier system at an emission wavelength of 975 nm will be presented. This spectral range was selected with respect to a targeted absorption path length of 5000 m and H2O line strengths. A distributed feedback (DFB) ridge waveguide diode laser operated in continuous wave is used as master oscillator whereas a tapered amplifier consisting of a RW section and a flared section is implemented as power amplifier. The RW section acts as optical gate. The current pulses injected into the RW part have a length of 8 ns and the tapered part is driven with 15 ns long pulses. The delay between the pulses is adjusted for optimal pulse shape. The repetition rate is in both cases 25 kHz. A maximal pulse output power of about 16 W limited by the available current supply is achieved. The spectral line width of the system determined by the properties of the DFB laser is smaller than 10 pm. The tuning range amounts 0.9 nm and a SMSR of 40 dB is observed. From the dependence of the peak power on the power injected into the tapered amplifier, the saturation power is determined to 5.3 mW.

  11. Hydrogen isotope correction for laser instrument measurement bias at low water vapor concentration using conventional isotope analyses: application to measurements from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L R; Sharp, Z D; Galewsky, J; Strong, M; Van Pelt, A D; Dong, F; Noone, D

    2011-03-15

    The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of water vapor can be measured with commercially available laser spectroscopy analyzers in real time. Operation of the laser systems in relatively dry air is difficult because measurements are non-linear as a function of humidity at low water concentrations. Here we use field-based sampling coupled with traditional mass spectrometry techniques for assessing linearity and calibrating laser spectroscopy systems at low water vapor concentrations. Air samples are collected in an evacuated 2 L glass flask and the water is separated from the non-condensable gases cryogenically. Approximately 2 µL of water are reduced to H(2) gas and measured on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In a field experiment at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), we ran Picarro and Los Gatos Research (LGR) laser analyzers for a period of 25 days in addition to periodic sample collection in evacuated flasks. When the two laser systems are corrected to the flask data, they are strongly coincident over the entire 25 days. The δ(2)H values were found to change by over 200‰ over 2.5 min as the boundary layer elevation changed relative to MLO. The δ(2)H values ranged from -106 to -332‰, and the δ(18)O values (uncorrected) ranged from -12 to -50‰. Raw data from laser analyzers in environments with low water vapor concentrations can be normalized to the international V-SMOW scale by calibration to the flask data measured conventionally. Bias correction is especially critical for the accurate determination of deuterium excess in dry air. PMID:21290447

  12. Dystrophic calcification and stone formation on the entire bladder neck after potassium-titanyl phosphate laser vaporization for the prostate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sang-Wohn; Park, Yong-Koo; Chang, Sung-Goo

    2009-08-01

    Dystrophic calcification can be defined as a calcification that occurs in degenerated or necrotic tissue. It is associated with multiple clinical conditions, such as collagen vascular diseases. It involves the deposition of calcium in soft tissues despite no generalized disturbance in the calcium or phosphorus metabolism, and this is often seen at sites of previous inflammation or damage. Potassium-titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser vaporization of the prostate is safe and relatively bloodless procedure that results in a shorter catheterization, immediate symptomatic improvement, and less severe postoperative irritative symptoms. However, longer follow-up studies or reports about complications are lacking. Here in we report a case of dystrophic calcification and stone formation on the entire bladder neck after performing KTP laser vaporization of benign prostate hyperplasia. That was treated by lithotripsy and transurethral resection.

  13. Answer to Critical Remarks or one More Time About the Mechanism of Limitation on the Energy Characteristics of a Copper Vapor Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, N. A.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents an additional analysis of the main positions of the publication by N. A. Yudin, M. R. Tret'yakova, and N. N. Yudin, "Influence of electrophysical processes in the discharge circuit on the energy characteristics of a copper vapor laser" (Russ. Phys. J., 55, No. 9, 1080 - 1090 (2013)) in response to the conclusion drawn in the work of P. A. Bokhan "On the question of the existence of high-frequency oscillations in the power supply circuits of a copper vapor laser and their influence on the lasing mechanism" (Russ. Phys. J., 57, No. 1, 124 - 127 (2014)) that the main positions of the given publication are in error. The analysis performed here confirms the validity of the main positions of publication [2].

  14. Forced convection and transport effects during hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, James L; Chavez, Craig A; Espinoza, Miguel; Black, Marcie; Maskaly, Karlene; Boman, Mats

    2009-01-01

    This work explores mass transport processes during HP-LCYD, including the transverse forced-flow of precursor gases through a nozzle to enhance fiber growth rates. The use of laser trapping and suspension of nano-scale particles in the precursor flow is also described, providing insights into the nature of the gas flow, including jetting from the fiber tip and thermodiffusion processes near the reaction zone. The effects of differing molecular-weight buffer gases is also explored in conjunction with the Soret effect, and it is found that nucleation at the deposit surface (and homogeneous nucleation in the gas phase) can be enhanced/ retarded, depending on the buffer gas molecular weight. To demonstrate that extensive microstructures can be grown simultaneously, three-dimensional fiber arrays are also grown in-parallel using diffractive optics--without delatory effects from neighboring reaction sites.

  15. Vaporization and deposition of an intact polyimide precursor by resonant infrared pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, N. L.; Schriver, K. E.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Poly(amic acid) (PAA), a precursor to polyimide, was successfully deposited on substrates without reaching curing temperature, by resonant infrared pulsed laser ablation. The PAA was prepared by dissolving pyromellitic dianhydride and 4, 4' oxidianiline in the polar solvent N-methyl pyrrolidinone (NMP). RIR-PLD transferred material showed two distinct geometries, droplets and string-like moieties. The unaltered nature of the deposited PAA was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Thermal curing was achieved by heating for one hour on a 250°C hotplate, and the transformation to polyimide was demonstrated from changes in the FTIR spectrum following curing. Plume shadowgraphy showed very clear contrasts in the ablation mechanism between ablation of the solvent alone and the ablation of the PAA, with additional contrast shown between the various resonant frequencies used.

  16. Simultaneous imaging of fuel vapor mass fraction and gas-phase temperature inside gasoline sprays using two-line excitation tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zigan, Lars; Trost, Johannes; Leipertz, Alfred

    2016-02-20

    This paper reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on the simultaneous imaging of the gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction distribution in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) spray under engine-relevant conditions using tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF). For measurements in the spray, the fluorescence tracer 3-pentanone is added to the nonfluorescent surrogate fuel iso-octane, which is excited quasi-simultaneously by two different excimer lasers for two-line excitation LIF. The gas-phase temperature of the mixture of fuel vapor and surrounding gas and the fuel vapor mass fraction can be calculated from the two LIF signals. The measurements are conducted in a high-temperature, high-pressure injection chamber. The fluorescence calibration of the tracer was executed in a flow cell and extended significantly compared to the existing database. A detailed error analysis for both calibration and measurement is provided. Simultaneous single-shot gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction fields are processed for the assessment of cyclic spray fluctuations. PMID:26906600

  17. Simultaneous imaging of fuel vapor mass fraction and gas-phase temperature inside gasoline sprays using two-line excitation tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zigan, Lars; Trost, Johannes; Leipertz, Alfred

    2016-02-20

    This paper reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on the simultaneous imaging of the gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction distribution in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) spray under engine-relevant conditions using tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF). For measurements in the spray, the fluorescence tracer 3-pentanone is added to the nonfluorescent surrogate fuel iso-octane, which is excited quasi-simultaneously by two different excimer lasers for two-line excitation LIF. The gas-phase temperature of the mixture of fuel vapor and surrounding gas and the fuel vapor mass fraction can be calculated from the two LIF signals. The measurements are conducted in a high-temperature, high-pressure injection chamber. The fluorescence calibration of the tracer was executed in a flow cell and extended significantly compared to the existing database. A detailed error analysis for both calibration and measurement is provided. Simultaneous single-shot gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction fields are processed for the assessment of cyclic spray fluctuations.

  18. Investigation of vaporization and condensation processes of thin layers of CdHgTe from laser erosion plasma in Hg atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyarchuk, B. K.; Popovych, D. I.; Savchuk, V. K.; Savitsky, V. G.

    1996-04-01

    The article sets out to investigate spatial-time and spectral characteristics of laser erosive vapour-plasma torch (EVT), formed at the time of vaporization of mercury chalcogenides targets. Its influence on the synthesis processes and electrophysical properties of HgTe and CdHgTe layers, condensed in mercury vapour, is described. It is shown, that the laser radiation flux density and Hg vapour pressure in the reaction chamber are dominating factors, which determine the character of gas-dynamic spread, EVT composition and electrophysical characteristics of condensed mercury chalcogenides layers.

  19. On the Question of the Existence of High-Frequency Oscillations in the Power Supply Circuits of a Copper Vapor Laser and Their Influence on the Lasing Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhan, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    The statement of the problem and conclusions in the publication by N. A. Yudin, M. R. Tret'yakova, and N. N. Yudin "Influence of electrophysical processes in the discharge circuit on the energy characteristics of a copper vapor laser" (Russ. Phys. J., 55, No. 9, 1080 - 1090 (2013)) is considered. It is shown that the main positions of the publication touching on relaxation of the populations of metastable states in the afterglow and their influence on the frequency-energy characteristics of lasers are mistaken.

  20. High Temperature Nanocomposites For Nuclear Thermal Propulsion and In-Space Fabrication by Hyperbaric Pressure Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, J. L.; Webb, N. D.; Espinoza, M.; Cook, S.; Houts, M.; Kim, T.

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is an indispensable technology for the manned exploration of the solar system. By using Hyperbaric Pressure Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition (HP-LCVD), the authors propose to design and build a promising next-generation fuel element composed of uranium carbide UC embedded in a latticed matrix of highly refractory Ta4HfC5 for an NTP rocket capable of sustaining temperatures up to 4000 K, enabling an Isp of up to 1250 s. Furthermore, HP-LCVD technology can also be harnessed to enable 3D rapid prototyping of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics and composites, opening up the possibility of in-space fabrication of components, replacement parts, difficult-to-launch solar sails and panels and a variety of other space structures. Additionally, rapid prototyping with HP-LCVD makes a feasible "live off the land" strategy of interplanetary and interstellar exploration ­ the precursors commonly used in the technology are found, often in abundance, on other solar system bodies either as readily harvestable gas (e.g. methane) or as a raw material that could be converted into a suitable precursor (e.g. iron oxide into ferrocene on Mars).

  1. Detection of carbon-fluorine bonds in organofluorine compounds by Raman spectroscopy using a copper-vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharts, Clay M.; Gorelik, Vladimir S.; Agoltsov, A. M.; Zlobina, Ludmila I.; Sharts, Olga N.

    1999-02-01

    The Raman spectra of fluoro-organic compounds show specific emission bands for carbon-fluorine bonds in the range 500- 800 wave numbers (cm-1)). With very limited exceptions, biological materials do not contain carbon- fluorine bonds. Fluoro-organic compounds introduced into biological samples can be detected by a Raman emission signal. Normal mode C-F bond bands are observed: (1) at 710- 785 cm -1 for trifluoromethyl groups; (2) at 530-610 cm -1 for aromatic organofluorine bonds; (3) a range centered at 690 cm -1 for difluoromethylene groups. Specific examples of normal mode C-F bond emissions for organofluorine compounds containing trifluoromethyl groups are: 1-bromoperfluorooctane, 726 cm -1; perfluorodecanoic acid, 730 cm -1; triperfluoropropylamine, 750 cm -1; 1,3,5-tris- (trifluoromethyl)-benzene, 730 cm -1; Fluoxetine (Prozac) commercial powdered pill at 782 cm -1. Compounds containing aromatic C-F bonds are: hexafluorobenzene, 569 cm MIN1; pentafluoropyridine, 589 cm -1. Difluoromethylene groups: perfluorodecalin, 692 cm-1; perfluorocyclohexane, 691 cm -1. Raman spectra were observed with a standard single monochromator. The 510.8 nm light source was a copper-vapor laser operated at 3-10 watts with 10-12 nanosecond pulses at 10 kHz repetition rate. Detection was made with a time-gated photomultiplier tube. Resonance Raman spectra were also observed at 255.4 nm, using a frequency doubling crystal. Observed spectra were free of fluorescence with very sharp strong C-F lines.

  2. Improvement of the antifungal activity of Litsea cubeba vapor by using a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser against Aspergillus flavus on brown rice snack bars.

    PubMed

    Suhem, Kitiya; Matan, Narumol; Matan, Nirundorn; Danworaphong, Sorasak; Aewsiri, Tanong

    2015-12-23

    The aim of this study was to improve the antifungal activity of the volatile Litsea cubeba essential oil and its main components (citral and limonene) on brown rice snack bars by applying He-Ne laser treatment. Different volumes (50-200 μL) of L. cubeba, citral or limonene were absorbed into a filter paper and placed inside an oven (18 L). Ten brown rice snack bars (2 cm wide × 4 cm long × 0.5 cm deep) were put in an oven and heated at 180 °C for 20 min. The shelf-life of the treated snack bars at 30 °C was assessed and sensory testing was carried out to investigate their consumer acceptability. A count of total phenolic content (TPC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) on the properties of essential oil, citral, and limonene before and after the laser treatment was studied for possible modes of action. It was found that the laser treatment improved the antifungal activity of the examined volatile L. cubeba and citral with Aspergillus flavus inhibition by 80% in comparison with those of the control not treated with the laser. L. cubeba vapor at 100 μL with the laser treatment was found to completely inhibit the growth of natural molds on the snack bars for at least 25 days; however, without essential oil vapor and laser treatment, naturally contaminating mold was observed in 3 days. Results from the sensory tests showed that the panelists were unable to detect flavor and aroma differences between essential oil treatment and the control. Laser treatment caused an increase in TPC of citral oil whereas the TPC in limonene showed a decrease after the laser treatment. These situations could result from the changing peak of the aliphatic hydrocarbons that was revealed by the FTIR spectra. PMID:26433461

  3. Improvement of the antifungal activity of Litsea cubeba vapor by using a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser against Aspergillus flavus on brown rice snack bars.

    PubMed

    Suhem, Kitiya; Matan, Narumol; Matan, Nirundorn; Danworaphong, Sorasak; Aewsiri, Tanong

    2015-12-23

    The aim of this study was to improve the antifungal activity of the volatile Litsea cubeba essential oil and its main components (citral and limonene) on brown rice snack bars by applying He-Ne laser treatment. Different volumes (50-200 μL) of L. cubeba, citral or limonene were absorbed into a filter paper and placed inside an oven (18 L). Ten brown rice snack bars (2 cm wide × 4 cm long × 0.5 cm deep) were put in an oven and heated at 180 °C for 20 min. The shelf-life of the treated snack bars at 30 °C was assessed and sensory testing was carried out to investigate their consumer acceptability. A count of total phenolic content (TPC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) on the properties of essential oil, citral, and limonene before and after the laser treatment was studied for possible modes of action. It was found that the laser treatment improved the antifungal activity of the examined volatile L. cubeba and citral with Aspergillus flavus inhibition by 80% in comparison with those of the control not treated with the laser. L. cubeba vapor at 100 μL with the laser treatment was found to completely inhibit the growth of natural molds on the snack bars for at least 25 days; however, without essential oil vapor and laser treatment, naturally contaminating mold was observed in 3 days. Results from the sensory tests showed that the panelists were unable to detect flavor and aroma differences between essential oil treatment and the control. Laser treatment caused an increase in TPC of citral oil whereas the TPC in limonene showed a decrease after the laser treatment. These situations could result from the changing peak of the aliphatic hydrocarbons that was revealed by the FTIR spectra.

  4. A method for detecting breakthrough of organic solvent vapors in a charcoal tube using semiconductor gas sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Hajime; Noritake, Yuji; Murobushi, Hisako; Higashi, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Isamu

    1999-08-01

    This study developed a method for detecting organic vapors that break through charcoal tubes, using semiconductor gas sensors as a breakthrough detector of vapors. A glass column equipped with two sensors was inserted in Teflon tubing, and air containing organic vapor was introduced at a constant flow rate. After the output signal of the sensors became stable, a charcoal tube was inserted into the tubing at the upstream of the sensors. The resistance of the sensors was collected temporally in an integrated circuit (IC) card. The vapor concentration of the air near the sensors was measured with a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID) at intervals of 5 minutes to obtain the breakthrough curve. When the relative humidity was zero, the output signals of the sensors began to change before the breakthrough point (1% breakthrough time). This tendency was almost the same for methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), toluene, and chloroform. For dichloromethane and 1,1,1-trichloroethane, the time when the sensor output signals began to rise was almost the same as the breakthrough point. When the relative humidity was 80 percent, the sensors could also detect many vapors before the breakthrough point, but they could not perceive dichloromethane and chloroform vapors. A personal sampling system with a breakthrough detector was developed and its availability is discussed.

  5. Template assisted synthesis of photocatalytic titanium dioxide nanotubes by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Mustafa; Sarıipek, Fatma; Köysüren, Özcan; Yıldız, H. Bekir

    2013-10-01

    Titanium dioxide thin films were deposited conformally over electrospun polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) fibers by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. Deposition rates were observed to be very high to allow for rapid coatings. Thermal annealing of as deposited materials leads the clean decomposition of the polymeric inner layer and formation of randomly distributed anatase TiO2 nanotubes. Nanotubular TiO2 structure was clearly identified by SEM and that structure is ideal for good photocatalytic activity because of its high surface area per unit volume ratio. FTIR and XPS results show the formation of stoichiometric TiO2, and the crystalline form of the final nanotubes was found to be anatase (1 0 1) after XRD analysis. High photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanotubes under UV irradiation was observed with an apparent rate constant of 0.74 h-1 for methyl orange decomposition.

  6. Vapor Pressure of Solid Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers Determined via Knudsen Effusion Method

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants used in a variety of consumer products. The solid vapor pressures of BDE15 and BDE209 were determined by use of the Knudsen effusion method, and the values measured extrapolated to 298.15 K are 3.12×10−3 and 9.02×10−13 Pa, respectively. The enthalpies of sublimation for these compounds have also been estimated by using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and are 102.0 ± 3.5 and 157.1 ± 3.5 kJ/mol, respectively. Additionally, the melting points and enthalpies of fusion were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. PMID:21766320

  7. Vapor Pressure of Three Brominated Flame Retardants Determined via Knudsen Effusion Method

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been used in a variety of consumer products in the past four decades. The vapor pressures for three widely used BFRs, that is, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and octabromodiphenyl ethers (octaBDEs) mixtures, were determined using the Knudsen effusion method and compared to those of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209). The values measured extrapolated to 298.15 K are 8.47 × 10−9, 7.47 × 10−10, and 2.33 × 10−9 Pa, respectively. The enthalpies of sublimation for these BFRs were estimated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and are 143.6 ± 0.4, 153.7 ± 3.1, and 150.8 ± 3.2 kJ/mole, respectively. In addition, the enthalpies of fusion and melting temperatures for these BFRs were also measured in the present study. PMID:22213441

  8. Prediction of activated carbon adsorption capacities for organic vapors using quantitative structure-activity relationship methods

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmalakhandan, N.N. ); Speece, R.E. )

    1993-08-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods were used to develop models to estimate and predict activated carbon adsorption capacities for organic vapors. Literature isothermal data from two sources for 22 organic contaminants on six different carbons were merged to form a training set of 75 data points. Two different QSAR approaches were evaluated: the molecular connectivity approach and the linear solvation energy relationship approach. The QSAR model developed in this study using the molecular connectivity approach was able to fit the experimental data with r = 0.96 and standard error of 0.09. The utility of the model was demonstrated by using predicted k values to calculate adsorption capacities of 12 chemicals on two different carbons and comparing them with experimentally determined values. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Vapor pressure of solid polybrominated diphenyl ethers determined via Knudsen effusion method.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M

    2011-10-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants used in a variety of consumer products. The solid vapor pressures of BDE 15 and BDE 209 were determined by using the Knudsen effusion method, and the values measured extrapolated to 298.15 K are 3.12 × 10(-3) and 9.02 × 10(-13) Pa, respectively. The enthalpies of sublimation for these compounds have also been estimated by using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and are 102.0 ± 3.5 and 157.1 ± 3.5 kJ/mol, respectively. In addition, the melting points and enthalpies of fusion were measured by differential scanning calorimetry.

  10. Synthesis of carbon nanowall by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rulin; Chi, Yaqing; Fang, Liang; Tang, Zhensen; Yi, Xun

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is widely used for the synthesis of carbon materials, such as diamond-like carbons (DLCs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanowalls (CNWs). Advantages of PECVD are low synthesis temperature compared with thermal CVD and the ability to grow vertically, free-standing structures. Due to its self-supported property and high specific surface area, CNWs are a promising material for field emission devices and other chemical applications. This article reviews the recent process on the synthesis of CNW by the PECVD method. We briefly introduce the structure and properties of CNW with characterization techniques. Growth mechanism is also discussed to analyze the influence of plasma conditions, substrates, temperature, and other parameters to the final film, which will give a suggestion on parameter modulation for desired film. PMID:24749447

  11. Laser furnace and method for zone refining of semiconductor wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, Donald B. (Inventor); zur Burg, Frederick W. (Inventor); Penn, Wayne M. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A method of zone refining a crystal wafer (116 FIG. 1) comprising the steps of focusing a laser beam to a small spot (120) of selectable size on the surface of the crystal wafer (116) to melt a spot on the crystal wafer, scanning the small laser beam spot back and forth across the surface of the crystal wafer (116) at a constant velocity, and moving the scanning laser beam across a predetermined zone of the surface of the crystal wafer (116) in a direction normal to the laser beam scanning direction and at a selectible velocity to melt and refine the entire crystal wafer (116).

  12. Research on method for laser beam shape parameters detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jun-hong; Bai, Zhao-feng

    2014-09-01

    The laser beam quality measurement has become a hot topic in the field of laser engineering nowadays. Based on the method of Hartmann-Shack, the four-wave lateral shearing interferometer is presented in this paper to achieve the laser beam shape parameters. The principle of shearing technology is described in detail. Parameters of semiconductor laser at 532nm and ZYGO interferometer laser are tested based on the method of four-wave lateral shearing interference and their test results are compared with the nominal parameters. As the results, the test results are basically consistent with the nominal value, which fully shows the feasibility of the four-wave lateral shearing interference method.

  13. Fiber-optic-based laser vapor screen flow visualization system for aerodynamic research in larger scale subsonic and transonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Inenaga, Andrew S.

    1994-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization systems that are fiber-optic based were developed and installed for aerodynamic research in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel and the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel. Fiber optics are used to deliver the laser beam through the plenum shell that surrounds the test section of each facility and to the light-sheet-generating optics positioned in the ceiling window of the test section. Water is injected into the wind tunnel diffuser section to increase the relative humidity and promote condensation of the water vapor in the flow field about the model. The condensed water vapor is then illuminated with an intense sheet of laser light to reveal features of the flow field. The plenum shells are optically sealed; therefore, video-based systems are used to observe and document the flow field. Operational experience shows that the fiber-optic-based systems provide safe, reliable, and high-quality off-surface flow visualization in smaller and larger scale subsonic and transonic wind tunnels. The design, the installation, and the application of the Langley Research Center (LaRC) LVS flow visualization systems in larger scale wind tunnels are highlighted. The efficiency of the fiber optic LVS systems and their insensitivity to wind tunnel vibration, the tunnel operating temperature and pressure variations, and the airborne contaminants are discussed.

  14. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  15. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  16. Optimization Method for Solution Model of Laser Tracker Multilateration Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongfang; Tan, Zhi; Shi, Zhaoyao; Song, Huixu; Yan, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Multilateration measurement using laser trackers suffers from a cumbersome solution method for high-precision measurements. Errors are induced by the self-calibration routines of the laser tracker software. This paper describes an optimization solution model for laser tracker multilateration measurement, which effectively inhibits the negative effect of this self-calibration, and further, analyzes the accuracy of the singular value decomposition for the described solution model. Experimental verification for the solution model based on laser tracker and coordinate measuring machine (CMM) was performed. The experiment results show that the described optimization model for laser tracker multilateration measurement has good accuracy control, and has potentially broad application in the field of laser tracker spatial localization.

  17. Welding method combining laser welding and MIG welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hamasaki, M.

    1985-03-26

    Welding of deep penetration is obtained in a sustrate by a method which comprises first melting the joint portion of the substrates by MIG welding and then focusing a laser beam in the bottom surface of a crater formed in consequence of the MIG welding thereby effecting laser welding of the crater.

  18. Treatment of basal-cellular skin cancer and heavy concomitant diseases by a photodynamic therapeutic method with a dye laser LITT-PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, V. A.; Soldatov, A. N.; Vusik, M. V.; Reimer, I. V.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental results of initial testing dye-laser "LITT-PDT" pumped by a copper vapor laser are presented. "LITT PDT" is a modern laser medical complex on CVL-pumped dye laser, generating radiation in a red spectrum area with a tuning wavelength of 630 - 700 nm and preserving high intensity of radiation on each wavelength, necessary for treatment by a photodynamic therapeutic method (PDM). Radiation in a red spectrum area (630 - 700 nm) enables treatment for oncological diseases by PDM using any photosensitizer. The given laser medical complex, generating radiation simultaneously on yellow and green discrete spectrum lines, makes methods of low intensive laser therapy for treatment of precancer and dermatological diseases possible.

  19. APPLICATION OF LASERS AND LASER-OPTICAL METHODS IN LIFE SCIENCES Low power cw-laser signatures on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihachev, A.; Lesinsh, J.; Jakovels, D.; Spigulis, J.

    2011-01-01

    Impact of cw laser radiation on autofluorescence features of human skin is studied. Two methods of autofluorescence detection are applied: the spectral method with the use of a fibreoptic probe and spectrometer for determining the autofluorescence recovery kinetics at a fixed skin area of ~12 mm2, and the multispectral visualisation method with the use of a multispectral imaging camera for visualising long-term autofluorescence changes in a skin area of ~4 cm2. The autofluorescence recovery kinetics after preliminary laser irradiation is determined. Skin autofluorescence images with visible long-term changes — 'signatures' of low power laser treatment are acquired.

  20. AB070. Comparison of photoselective vaporization versus holmium laser enucleation for treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia in a small prostate volume

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Bashraheel, Fahad; Choi, Sae Woong; Kim, Su Jin; Yoon, Byung Il; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes <40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at one month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusions Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume.

  1. Apparatus and method for laser deposition of durable coatings

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, J.T.; Vanier, P.; Barletta, R.E.

    1995-08-15

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for depositing durable coatings onto the surface of a substrate without heating the entire substrate to high temperatures by using lasers to heat the substrate and dissociate a deposition gas. The apparatus comprises a deposition chamber for enclosing the substrate upon which a coating is to be deposited, gas delivery means for directing a flow of deposition gas on the substrate, a first laser for heating the substrate, and a second laser for irradiating the deposition gas to dissociate the gas. The method includes placing a substrate within a vacuum deposition chamber and directing a flow of deposition gas on the substrate. Then the substrate is heated with a first laser while the deposition gas is irradiated with a second laser to dissociate the deposition gas. 1 fig.

  2. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... organic HAP emission factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart require that the vapor suppressant... into the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  3. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facility is using vapor suppressants to reduce hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions, the organic HAP... the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor test... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  4. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... organic HAP emission factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart require that the vapor suppressant... into the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facility is using vapor suppressants to reduce hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions, the organic HAP... the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor test... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... organic HAP emission factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart require that the vapor suppressant... into the appropriate organic HAP emission factor equation. The vapor suppressant effectiveness factor... organic HAP emissions factor equations in Table 1 to this subpart to generate emission factors....

  7. Apparatus and method for removing mercury vapor from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Ganesan, Kumar

    2008-01-01

    A metallic filter effectively removes mercury vapor from gas streams. The filter captures the mercury which then can be released and collected as product. The metallic filter is a copper mesh sponge plated with a six micrometer thickness of gold. The filter removes up to 90% of mercury vapor from a mercury contaminated gas stream.

  8. Apparatuses and methods for laser reading of thermoluminescent phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    Apparatuses and methods for rapidly reading thermoluminescent phosphors to determine the amount of luminescent energy stored therein. The stored luminescent energy is interpreted as a measure of the total exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphor to ionizing radiation. The thermoluminescent phosphor reading apparatus uses a laser to generate a laser beam. The laser beam power level is monitored by a laser power detector and controlled to maintain the power level at a desired value or values which can vary with time. A shutter or other laser beam interrupting means is used to control exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphor to the laser beam. The laser beam can be equalized using an opitcal equalizer so that the laser beam has an approximately uniform power density across the beam. The heated thermoluminescent phosphor emits a visible or otherwise detectable luminescent emission which is measured as an indication of the radiation exposure of the thermoluminscent phosphors. Also disclosed are preferred signal processing and control circuits including one system using a digital computer. Also disclosed are time-profiled laser power cycles for pre-anneal, read and post-anneal treatment of phosphors.

  9. Transverse-type laser assembly using induced electrical discharge excitation and method

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    A transverse-type laser assembly is disclosed herein. This assembly defines a laser cavity containing a vapor or gaseous substance which lases when subjected to specific electrical discharge excitation between a pair of spaced-apart electrodes located within the cavity in order to produce a source of light. An arrangement located entirely outside the laser cavity is provided for inducing a voltage across the electrodes within the cavity sufficient to provide the necessary electrical discharge excitation to cause a vapor substance between the electrodes to lase.

  10. Transverse-type laser assembly using induced electrical discharge excitation and method

    DOEpatents

    Ault, E.R.

    1994-04-19

    A transverse-type laser assembly is disclosed herein. This assembly defines a laser cavity containing a vapor or gaseous substance which lases when subjected to specific electrical discharge excitation between a pair of spaced-apart electrodes located within the cavity in order to produce a source of light. An arrangement located entirely outside the laser cavity is provided for inducing a voltage across the electrodes within the cavity sufficient to provide the necessary electrical discharge excitation to cause a vapor substance between the electrodes to lase. 3 figures.

  11. Native Fluorescence Detection Methods and Detectors for Naphthalene and/or Other Volatile Organic Compound Vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Naphthalene, benzene, toluene, xylene, and other volatile organic compounds have been identified as serious health hazards. This is especially true for personnel working with JP8 jet fuel and other fuels containing naphthalene as well as other hazardous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Embodiments of the invention are directed to methods and apparatus for near-real-time in-situ detection and accumulated dose measurement of exposure to naphthalene vapor and other hazardous gaseous VOCs. The methods and apparatus employ excitation of fluorophors native or endogenous to compounds of interest using light sources emitting in the ultraviolet below 300 nm and measurement of native fluorescence emissions in distinct wavebands above the excitation wavelength. The apparatus of some embodiments are cell-phone-sized sensor/dosimeter "badges" to be worn by personnel potentially exposed to naphthalene or other hazardous VOCs. The badge sensor of some embodiments provides both real time detection and data logging of exposure to naphthalene or other VOCs of interest from which both instantaneous and accumulated dose can be determined. The badges employ a new native fluorescence based detection method to identify and differentiate VOCs. The particular focus of some embodiments are the detection and identification of naphthalene while other embodiments are directed to detection and identification of other VOCs like aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, and xylene.

  12. IR and UV laser-induced chemical vapor deposition: Chemical mechanism for a-Si:H and Cr (O,C) film formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    The characteristic features of laser-induced chemical vapor deposition in the parallel and perpendicular laser beam/surface configurations are discussed. Low temperature chemical processing with directed and spatially localized energy deposition in the system is investigated. Results obtained for the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films in the parallel configuration employing CO 2 and KrFlasers and SiH 4 and Si 2H 6 as precursors are presented. As a second example, the growth of oxygen- and carbon-containing chromium films Cr(O,C) from chromium hexacarbonyl as the precursor using cw and pulse uv lasers is discussed. The chemical pathways leasing to film formation are investigated in detail.

  13. Laser pulse stretcher method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hawkins, Jon K.; Williams, William A.

    1990-01-01

    The output of an oscillator stage of a laser system is monitored by a photocell which is coupled to a feedback section to control a Pockels Cell and change the light output of the oscillator stage. A synchronizing pulse is generated in timed relation to the initiation of operation of the oscillator stage and is applied to a forward feed section which cooperates with the feedback section to maintain the light output constant for an extended time interval.

  14. Self-seeded single-frequency laser peening method

    DOEpatents

    DAne, C.Brent; Hackey, Lloyd A.; Harris, Fritz B.

    2012-06-26

    A method of operating a laser to obtain an output pulse having a single wavelength, comprises inducing an intracavity loss into a laser resonator having an amount that prevents oscillation during a time that energy from the pump source is being stored in the gain medium. Gain is built up in the gain medium with energy from the pump source until formation of a single-frequency relaxation oscillation pulse in the resonator. Upon detection of the onset of the relaxation oscillation pulse, the intracavity loss is reduced, such as by Q-switching, so that the built-up gain stored in the gain medium is output from the resonator in the form of an output pulse at a single frequency. An electronically controllable output coupler is controlled to affect output pulse characteristics. The laser acts a master oscillator in a master oscillator power amplifier configuration. The laser is used for laser peening.

  15. Self-seeded single-frequency laser peening method

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2009-08-11

    A method of operating a laser to obtain an output pulse having a single wavelength, comprises inducing an intracavity loss into a laser resonator having an amount that prevents oscillation during a time that energy from the pump source is being stored in the gain medium. Gain is built up in the gain medium with energy from the pump source until formation of a single-frequency relaxation oscillation pulse in the resonator. Upon detection of the onset of the relaxation oscillation pulse, the intracavity loss is reduced, such as by Q-switching, so that the built-up gain stored in the gain medium is output from the resonator in the form of an output pulse at a single frequency. An electronically controllable output coupler is controlled to affect output pulse characteristics. The laser acts a master oscillator in a master oscillator power amplifier configuration. The laser is used for laser peening.

  16. New laser excitation method for modal analysis of microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liangcai; Zhou, Quansheng; Wu, You; Chen, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A novel impulse laser excitation technique to determine the dynamic response of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) has been investigated. During the laser excitation experiments, MEMS structures are excited by the wide-band impact force created by the laser-target interaction, and Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) is introduced to measure the vibration velocity of MEMS structures. A distinguishing characteristic of the methodology is that both the excitation and measurement are non-contact, which is especially suitable for the testing of MEMS microstructures that are not easily accessible. This novel excitation method and MEMS modal analysis system are verified by experiments on various cantilever beams. The results show that the laser excitation is capable of exciting the first three modes of cantilevers.

  17. Antibacterial effects of allspice, garlic, and oregano essential oils in tomato films determined by overlay and vapor-phase methods.

    PubMed

    Du, W-X; Olsen, C W; Avena-Bustillos, R J; McHugh, T H; Levin, C E; Mandrell, R; Friedman, Mendel

    2009-09-01

    Physical properties as well as antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes of allspice, garlic, and oregano essential oils (EOs) in tomato puree film-forming solutions (TPFFS) formulated into edible films at 0.5% to 3% (w/w) concentrations were investigated in this study. Antimicrobial activities were determined by 2 independent methods: overlay of the film on top of the bacteria and vapor-phase diffusion of the antimicrobial from the film to the bacteria. The results indicate that the antimicrobial activities against the 3 pathogens were in the following order: oregano oil > allspice oil > garlic oil. Listeria monocytogenes was less resistant to EO vapors, while E. coli O157:H7 was more resistant to EOs as determined by both overlay and vapor-phase diffusion tests. The presence of plant EO antimicrobials reduced the viscosity of TPFFS at the higher shear rates, but did not affect water vapor permeability of films. EOs increased elongation and darkened the color of films. The results of the present study show that the 3 plant-derived EOs can be used to prepare tomato-based antimicrobial edible films with good physical properties for food applications by both direct contact and indirectly by vapors emanating from the films.

  18. Methods for calculation of engineering parameters for gas separation. [vapor pressure and solubility of gases in organic liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1979-01-01

    A group additivity method is generated which allows estimation, from the structural formulas alone, of the energy of vaporization and the molar volume at 25 C of many nonpolar organic liquids. Using these two parameters and appropriate thermodynamic relations, the vapor pressure of the liquid phase and the solubility of various gases in nonpolar organic liquids are predicted. It is also possible to use the data to evaluate organic and some inorganic liquids for use in gas separation stages or liquids as heat exchange fluids in prospective thermochemical cycles for hydrogen production.

  19. A method to improve the utilization of GNSS observation for water vapor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y. B.; Zhao, Q. Z.; Zhang, B.

    2016-01-01

    Existing water vapor tomographic methods use Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals penetrating the entire research area while they do not consider signals passing through its sides. This leads to the decreasing use of observed satellite signals and allows for no signals crossing from the bottom or edge areas especially for those voxels in research areas of interest. Consequently, the accuracy of the tomographic results for the bottom of a research area, and the overall reconstructed accuracy do not reach their full potential. To solve this issue, an approach which uses GPS data with both signals that pass the side and top of a research area is proposed. The advantages of proposed approach include improving the utilization of existing GNSS observations and increasing the number of voxels crossed by satellite signals. One point should be noted that the proposed approach needs the support of radiosonde data inside the tomographic region. A tomographic experiment was implemented using observed GPS data from the Continuously Operating Reference System (CORS) Network of Zhejiang Province, China. The comparison of tomographic results with data from a radiosonde shows that the root mean square error (RMS), bias, mean absolute error (MAE), and standard deviation (SD) of the proposed approach are superior to those of the traditional method.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of superhydrophobic surface by using water vapor impingement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kok Deng; Leo, C. P.; Chai, Siang Piao

    2012-07-01

    In this research, superhydrophobic coating with average static contact angle of 166° has been successfully prepared by using a new surface roughening method. Discussion on the applicability of Cassie and Wenzel equations used to determine surface parameters from experimental data is being included as well. This new surface roughening method uses accelerated water vapor to impinge wet film forming crater-like structure surface; analogous to meteor striking earth forming crater. Wet film is comprised of aluminium tri-sec butoxide, propan-2-ol, and ethyl acetoacetate according to molar ratio of 1:10:1. Craters with diameter distribution of 1-20 μm were formed on the roughened surface. It was then subjected to 10 min of immersion in boiling water, 20 min of immersion in fluoroalkylsilane solution, and 10 min of 100 °C hot air treatment producing superhydrophobic coating. This superhydrophobic crater-like structure surface has approximately 8% solid-to-liquid area fraction and high roughness value of 6.4. These values were obtained from both Cassie and Wenzel equations but with some minor modification in order to fit them into experimental data. Average sliding angle of 2.6° and hysteresis value of 10° were recorded.

  1. An Interpolation Method for Obtaining Thermodynamic Properties Near Saturated Liquid and Saturated Vapor Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Huy H.; Martin, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    The availability and proper utilization of fluid properties is of fundamental importance in the process of mathematical modeling of propulsion systems. Real fluid properties provide the bridge between the realm of pure analytiis and empirical reality. The two most common approaches used to formulate thermodynamic properties of pure substances are fundamental (or characteristic) equations of state (Helmholtz and Gibbs functions) and a piecemeal approach that is described, for example, in Adebiyi and Russell (1992). This paper neither presents a different method to formulate thermodynamic properties of pure substances nor validates the aforementioned approaches. Rather its purpose is to present a method to be used to facilitate the accurate interpretation of fluid thermodynamic property data generated by existing property packages. There are two parts to this paper. The first part of the paper shows how efficient and usable property tables were generated, with the minimum number of data points, using an aerospace industry standard property package (based on fundamental equations of state approach). The second part describes an innovative interpolation technique that has been developed to properly obtain thermodynamic properties near the saturated liquid and saturated vapor lines.

  2. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, Nabil M.

    1987-01-01

    The third phase of research will focus on the propagation and energy extraction of the pump and SERS beams in a variety of configurations including oscillator structures. In order to address these questions a numerical code capable of allowing for saturation and full transverse beam evolution is required. The method proposed is based on a discretized propagation energy extraction model which uses a Kirchoff integral propagator coupled to the three level Raman model already developed. The model will have the resolution required by diffraction limits and will use the previous density matrix results in the adiabatic following limit. Owing to its large computational requirements, such a code must be implemented on a vector array processor. One code on the Cyber is being tested by using previously understood two-level laser models as guidelines for interpreting the results. Two tests were implemented: the evolution of modes in a passive resonator and the evolution of a stable state of the adiabatically eliminated laser equations. These results show mode shapes and diffraction losses for the first case and relaxation oscillations for the second one. Finally, in order to clarify the computing methodology used to exploit the speed of the Cyber's computational speed, the time it takes to perform both of the computations previously mentioned to run on the Cyber and VAX 730 must be measured. Also included is a short description of the current laser model (CAVITY.FOR) and a flow chart of the test computations.

  3. Comparison of laser spectroscopic PNC method with laser integral fluorescence in optical caries diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.

    2001-05-01

    In this research we represent the results of approbation of two methods of optical caries diagnostics: PNC-spectral diagnostics and caries detection by laser integral fluorescence. The research was conducted in a dental clinic. PNC-method analyzes parameters of probing laser radiation and PNC-spectrums of stimulated secondary radiations: backscattering and endogenous fluorescence of caries- involved bacteria. Ia-Ne laser ((lambda) equals632.8 nm, 1-2 mW) was used as a source of probing (stimulated) radiation. For registration of signals, received from intact and pathological teeth PDA-detector was applied. PNC-spectrums were processed by special algorithms, and were displayed on PC monitor. The method of laser integral fluorescence was used for comparison. In this case integral power of fluorescence of human teeth was measured. As a source of probing (stimulated) radiation diode lasers ((lambda) equals655 nm, 0.1 mW and 630 nm, 1 mW) and Ia-Na laser were applied. For registration of signals Si-photodetector was used. Integral power was shown in a digital indicator. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described in this research. It is disclosed that the method of laser integral power of fluorescence has the following characteristics: simplicity of construction and schema-technical decisions. However the method of PNC-spectral diagnostics are characterized by considerably more sensitivity in diagnostics of initial caries and capability to differentiate pathologies of various stages (for example, calculus/initial caries). Estimation of spectral characteristics of PNC-signals allows eliminating a number of drawbacks, which are character for detection by method of laser integral fluorescence (for instance, detection of fluorescent fillings, plagues, calculus, discolorations generally, amalgam, gold fillings as if it were caries).

  4. Method for partially coating laser diode facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dholakia, Anil R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Bars of integral laser diode devices cleaved from a wafer are placed with their p regions abutting and n regions abutting. A thin BeCu mask having alternate openings and strips of the same width as the end facets is used to mask the n region interfaces so that multiple bars can be partially coated over their exposed p regions with a reflective or partial reflective coating. The partial coating permits identification of the emitting facet from the fully coated back facet during a later device mounting procedure.

  5. Effect of precursor supply on structural and morphological characteristics of fe nanomaterials synthesized via chemical vapor condensation method.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jong-Keun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Nam, Tae-Hyun; Cho, Kwon-Koo

    2012-01-01

    Various physical, chemical and mechanical methods, such as inert gas condensation, chemical vapor condensation, sol-gel, pulsed wire evaporation, evaporation technique, and mechanical alloying, have been used to synthesize nanoparticles. Among them, chemical vapor condensation (CVC) has the benefit of its applicability to almost all materials because a wide range of precursors are available for large-scale production with a non-agglomerated state. In this work, Fe nanoparticles and nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor condensation method using iron pentacarbonyl (Fe(CO)5) as the precursor. The effect of processing parameters on the microstructure, size and morphology of Fe nanoparticles and nanowires were studied. In particular, we investigated close correlation of size and morphology of Fe nanoparticles and nanowires with atomic quantity of inflow precursor into the electric furnace as the quantitative analysis. The atomic quantity was calculated by Boyle's ideal gas law. The Fe nanoparticles and nanowires with various diameter and morphology have successfully been synthesized by the chemical vapor condensation method. PMID:22524015

  6. Comparison of Adsorbed Mercury Screening Method With Cold-Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry for Determination of Mercury in Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterling, Donald F.; Hovanitz, Edward S.; Street, Kenneth W.

    2000-01-01

    A field screening method for the determination of elemental mercury in environmental soil samples involves the thermal desorption of the mercury from the sample onto gold and then the thermal desorption from the gold to a gold-film mercury vapor analyzer. This field screening method contains a large number of conditions that could be optimized for the various types of soils encountered. In this study, the conditions were optimized for the determination of mercury in silty clay materials, and the results were comparable to the cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometric method of determination. This paper discusses the benefits and disadvantages of employing the field screening method and provides the sequence of conditions that must be optimized to employ this method of determination on other soil types.

  7. Method and apparatus for laser scribing glass sheet substrate coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeson, Frank A.; Hanak, Joseph J.; Harju, Ricky S.; Helman, Norman L.; Hecht, Kenneth R.

    2003-05-06

    A method and apparatus (42) for laser scribing coatings on glass sheet substrates by conveying the substrate adjacent a laser source (83) that provides a pulsed laser beam (84) with a wavelength at a near-infrared fundamental frequency and having a frequency in the range of 50 to 100 kilohertz and a pulse duration in the range of 8 to 70 nanoseconds, and by reflecting the beam by an XYZ galvanometer controlled mirror system (90) toward an uncoated surface of the substrate for passage therethrough to the coating on the other surface to provide overlapping ablations through the coating and scribing at a speed of at least 1000 millimeters per second.

  8. Method and apparatus for laser scribing glass sheet substrate coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeson, Frank A.; Hanak, Joseph J.; Harju, Ricky S.; Harju, Karen M.; Helman, Norman L.; Hecht, Kenneth R.

    2005-07-19

    A method and apparatus (42) for laser scribing coatings on glass sheet substrates by conveying the substrate adjacent a laser source (83) that provides a pulsed laser beam (84) with a wavelength at a near-infrared fundamental frequency and having a frequency in the range of 50 to 100 kilohertz and a pulse duration in the range of 8 to 70 nanoseconds, and by reflecting the beam by an XYZ galvanometer controlled mirror system (90) toward an uncoated surface of the substrate for passage therethrough to the coating on the other surface to provide overlapping ablations through the coating and scribing at a speed of at least 1000 millimeters per second.

  9. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-26

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld. 5 figs.

  10. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld.

  11. Team resource management participant's handbook for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation program

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Tom

    1998-05-01

    The goal of any operation is to complete tasks efficiently and effectively. Working safely is completely consistent with efficient, reliable operations. Working in an unsafe manner is not effective or ultimately efficient. If someone is hurt, work stops. Following the steps advocated by Team Resource Management (TRM) leads to more safe, efficient, effective work habits. TRM is a method used by teams (i.e., leaders and workers) to conduct technical business. It is used by the aviation industry to improve reliability and safety through formalizing the way it does business. High reliability organizations do exist. They conduct thousands of high-consequence operations a year, essentially error-free. Naval air carriers, air traffic control, and commercial aviation are some of these kinds of organizations. How did they get that way? What kinds of people staff them? Can we become a high reliability organization? This workshop will look at these questions. When we are done, it will be up to you to determine if we have the right stuff. The goals of this workshop are to: Describe Team Resource Management and its purpose; Describe Performance Shaping Factors (PSFs) and their role in predicting and managing team performance and errors; Describe the principles for managing human error; Describe TRM's 12 rules-of-thumb (the "Dirty Dozen") and use of safety nets; Conduct Operational Risk Management (ORM); Demonstrate ways to keep TRM working.

  12. Baroreflex regulation measurement using a noninvasive laser Doppler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hast, Jukka T.; Myllylae, Risto A.; Sorvoja, Hannu; Nissilae, Seppo M.

    2001-05-01

    In this study, a noninvasive laser Doppler measurement method based on the self-mixing effect of a diode laser was used to measure baroreflex regulation, which is manifest in the blood pressure signal as a 0.1 Hz sinusoidal variation. The laser Doppler measurement system was used to measure the movement of the right radial artery of ten volunteers. Variation in blood pressure caused by the baroreflex affects the elastic properties of the arterial wall. When diastolic blood pressure increases, the elasticity of the arterial wall decreases, causing the wall to lose some of its movability. This decreased elasticity reveals itself in the Doppler signal such that when the blood pressure increases, the Doppler frequency decreases and vice versa. The results show, that the laser Doppler method can be used to measure baroreflex regulation. Finally, baroreflex regulation in the Doppler signal is approximately in the inverse phase with respect to variation in diastolic blood pressure.

  13. Method and device for controlling plume during laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W.; Jellison, James L.; Keicher, David M.; Oberkampf, William L.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for enhancing the weldment of a laser welding system is provided. The laser weld plume control device includes a cylindrical body defining an upside-down cone cavity; the upper surface of the body circumscribes the base of the cone cavity, and the vertex of the cone cavity forms an orifice concentrically located with respect to the laser beam and the plume which forms as a result of the welding operation. According to the method of the invention, gas is directed radially inward through inlets in the upper surface of the body into and through channels in the wall of the body and finally through the orifice of the body, and downward onto the surface of the weldment. The gas flow is then converted by the orifice of the device from radial flow to an axisymmetric gas jet flowing away from the weldment surface in a direction perpendicular to the surface and opposite to that of the laser.

  14. Hydrogen-free spray pyrolysis chemical vapor deposition method for the carbon nanotube growth: Parametric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Mihnea Ioan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang; Abou-Rachid, Hakima; Lussier, Louis-Simon

    2011-05-01

    Spray pyrolysis chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the absence of hydrogen at low carrier gas flow rates has been used for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A parametric study of the carbon nanotube growth has been conducted by optimizing various parameters such as temperature, injection speed, precursor volume, and catalyst concentration. Experimental observations and characterizations reveal that the growth rate, size and quality of the carbon nanotubes are significantly dependent on the reaction parameters. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterize the morphology, structure and crystallinity of the carbon nanotubes. The synthesis process can be applied to both semiconducting silicon wafer and conducting substrates such as carbon microfibers and stainless steel plates. This approach promises great potential in building various nanodevices with different electron conducting requirements. In addition, the absence of hydrogen as a carrier gas and the relatively low synthesis temperature (typically 750 °C) qualify the spray pyrolysis CVD method as a safe and easy way to scale up the CNT growth, which is applicable in industrial production.

  15. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-01-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient 'green technique', gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kg m(-2) h(-1)) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry. PMID:25819091

  16. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M. Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-03-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient `green technique', gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kgm-2h-1) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry.

  17. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M. Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-01-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient ‘green technique’, gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kgm−2h−1) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry. PMID:25819091

  18. Formation of hook-shaped and straight silica wires by a thermal vapor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chuanyi; Li, Xueming; Yang, Wenjing

    2011-12-01

    Hook-shaped and straight silica wires have been successfully synthesized on silicon wafer through a simple thermal vapor method with or without assistance of Al, respectively. The hook-shaped silica wires have amorphous structures with nearly 100 μm long and about 4 μm in average diameters, while the straight silica wires are hundreds of micrometers long and approximately 50-300 nm in diameters. The composition analysis revealed that larger Al/SiOx islands can form on the silicon substrate with Al catalysts, whereas tiny silica clusters form without Al catalysts. They could act as the nucleation centers for the growth of silica wires with different shapes. The formation process of hook-shaped silica microwire results from a thermal gradient on the silicon substrate. The thermal gradient may be caused by the cold gas flowing during the process or other factors that lead to uneven temperature. On the contrary, straight growth of silica submicrowire is unacted on the thermal gradient factor due to the tiny silica clusters as nucleation centers. The present simple and low-cost process of producing hook-shaped and straight silica wires in bulk may lead to potential applications in catalysts, electrode materials, biosensing, etc.

  19. Fabrication of efficient planar perovskite solar cells using a one-step chemical vapor deposition method

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Gu, Leilei; Gao, Yuan; Reckmeier, Claas; He, Jin; Rogach, Andrey L.; Yao, Yan; Fan, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Organometallic trihalide perovskites are promising materials for photovoltaic applications, which have demonstrated a rapid rise in photovoltaic performance in a short period of time. We report a facile one-step method to fabricate planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), with a solar power conversion efficiency of up to 11.1%. We performed a systematic optimization of CVD parameters such as temperature and growth time to obtain high quality films of CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite. Scanning electron microscopy and time resolved photoluminescence data showed that the perovskite films have a large grain size of more than 1 micrometer, and carrier life-times of 10 ns and 120 ns for CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbI3-xClx, respectively. This is the first demonstration of a highly efficient perovskite solar cell using one step CVD and there is likely room for significant improvement of device efficiency. PMID:26392200

  20. Vapor pressure of three brominated flame retardants determined by using the Knudsen effusion method.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M

    2012-03-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been used in a variety of consumer products in the past four decades. The vapor pressures for three widely used BFRs, that is, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and octabromodiphenyl ethers (octaBDEs) mixtures, were determined using the Knudsen effusion method and compared with those of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209). The values measured extrapolated to 298.15 K are 8.47 × 10⁻⁹, 7.47 × 10⁻¹⁰, and 2.33 × 10⁻⁹  Pa, respectively. The enthalpies of sublimation for these BFRs were estimated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and are 143.6 ± 0.4, 153.7 ± 3.1, and 150.8 ± 3.2 kJ/mole, respectively. In addition, the enthalpies of fusion and melting temperatures for these BFRs were also measured in the present study.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of graphenated carbon nanotubes on IONPs using acetylene by chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchudan, Raji; Perumal, Suguna; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Lee, Yong Rok

    2015-11-01

    The graphenated carbon nanotubes (G-CNTs) were synthesized on monodisperse spherical iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) using acetylene as carbon precursor by simple chemical vapor deposition method. The reaction parameters such as temperature and flow of carbon source were optimized in order to achieve G-CNTs with excellent quality and quantity. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearly illustrated that the graphene flakes are forming along the whole length on CNTs. The degree of graphitization was revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The intensity of D to G value was less than one which confirms the obtained G-CNTs have high degree of graphitization. The optimum reaction temperature for the IONPs to form metallic clusters which in turn lead to the formation of G-CNTs with high carbon deposition yield is at 900 °C. The TEM shows the CNTs diameter is 50 nm with foiled graphene flakes of diameter around 70 nm. Our results advocate for IONPs as a promising catalytic template for quantitative and qualitative productivity of nanohybrid G-CNTs. The produced G-CNTs with high degree of graphitization might be an ideal candidate for nanoelectronic application like super capacitors and so on.

  2. Purification and Crystal Growth of Lead Iodide by Physical Vapor Transport Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, G. W.; Cole, M.; Chen, Y.-F.; Chen, K.-T.; Chen, H.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Burger, A.

    1998-01-01

    Lead iodide (PbI2) is a layered compound semiconductor being developed as room temperature x- and gamma-ray detector. Compared to the more studied material, mercuric iodide, PbI2 has a higher melting temperature and no phase transition until liquid phase which are indications of better mechanical properties. In this study, the source material was purified by the zone-refining process, and the purest section was extracted from center of the the zone-refined ingot to be grown by physical vapor transport (PVT) method. The zone-refined material and as-grown crystals were characterized by optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to reveal the surface morphology, purity and stoichiometry. The results shows that both materials are near-stoichiometric composition, with the purity of the as-grown crystals higher than zone-refined materials. The resistivity of the as-grown crystal (10" Omega-cm) was derived from current-voltage (I-V) measurement, and is 10 times higher than the zone-refined materials. Detail results will be presented and discussed.

  3. A novel pre-oxidation method for elemental mercury removal utilizing a complex vaporized absorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Hao, Runlong; Guo, Qing

    2014-09-15

    A novel semi-dry integrative method for elemental mercury (Hg(0)) removal has been proposed in this paper, in which Hg(0) was initially pre-oxidized by a vaporized liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) composed of a Fenton reagent, peracetic acid (CH3COOOH) and sodium chloride (NaCl), after which Hg(2+) was absorbed by the resultant Ca(OH)2. The experimental results indicated that CH3COOOH and NaCl were the best additives for Hg(0) oxidation. Among the influencing factors, the pH of the LCA and the adding rate of the LCA significantly affected the Hg(0) removal. The coexisting gases, SO2 and NO, were characterized as either increasing or inhibiting in the removal process, depending on their concentrations. Under optimal reaction conditions, the efficiency for the single removal of Hg(0) was 91%. Under identical conditions, the efficiencies of the simultaneous removal of SO2, NO and Hg(0) were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. Finally, the reaction mechanism for the simultaneous removal of SO2, NO and Hg(0) was proposed based on the characteristics of the removal products as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), the analysis of the electrode potentials, and through data from related research references. PMID:25146096

  4. A generalized method for alignment of block copolymer films: solvent vapor annealing with soft shear.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Zhe; Zhang, Yuanzhong; Groff, Jesse A; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Vogt, Bryan D

    2014-08-28

    One of the key issues associated with the utilization of block copolymer (BCP) thin films in nanoscience and nanotechnology is control of their alignment and orientation over macroscopic dimensions. We have recently reported a method, solvent vapor annealing with soft shear (SVA-SS), for fabricating unidirectional alignment of cylindrical nanostructures. This method is a simple extension of the common SVA process by adhering a flat, crosslinked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) pad to the BCP thin film. The impact of processing parameters, including annealing time, solvent removal rate and the physical properties of the PDMS pad, on the quality of alignment quantified by the Herman's orientational factor (S) is systematically examined for a model system of polystyrene-block-polyisoprene-block-polystyrene (SIS). As annealing time increases, the SIS morphology transitions from isotropic rods to highly aligned cylinders. Decreasing the rate of solvent removal, which impacts the shear rate imposed by the contraction of the PDMS, improves the orientation factor of the cylindrical domains; this suggests the nanostructure alignment is primarily induced by contraction of PDMS during solvent removal. Moreover, the physical properties of the PDMS controlled by the crosslink density impact the orientation factor by tuning its swelling extent during SVA-SS and elastic modulus. Decreasing the PDMS crosslink density increases S; this effect appears to be primarily driven by the changes in the solubility of the SVA-SS solvent in the PDMS. With this understanding of the critical processing parameters, SVA-SS has been successfully applied to align a wide variety of BCPs including polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS), polystyrene-block-poly(N,N-dimethyl-n-octadecylammonium p-styrenesulfonate) (PS-b-PSS-DMODA), polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) and polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinlypyridine) (PS-b-P2VP). These results suggest that SVA-SS is a generalizable

  5. Laser Methods in the Study of Nuclei, Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Takashi T.

    2005-01-01

    The VIth International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research was held at Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan in Poland from May 24 to 27, 2004. Its title this year was "Laser methods in the study of nuclei, atoms and molecules". Some topics are reviewed from a viewpoint of the atomic physics contribution to nuclear physics and its applications. It is suggested how this meeting should be organized in the future by taking the new geopolitics into account.

  6. High-power Ti:sapphire laser at 820 nm for scanning ground-based water-vapor differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Späth, Florian; Schiller, Max

    2013-04-10

    The Ti:sapphire (TISA) laser transmitter of the mobile, three-dimensional-scanning water-vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim is described in detail. The dynamically-stable, unidirectional ring resonator contains a single Brewster-cut TISA crystal, which is pumped from both sides with 250 Hz using a diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The resonator is injection seeded and actively frequency-stabilized using a phase-sensitive technique. The TISA laser is operating near 820 nm, which is optimum for ground-based water-vapor DIAL measurements. An average output power of up to 6.75 W with a beam quality factor of M2<2 is reached. The pointing stability is <13 μrad (rms), the depolarization <1%. The overall optical-optical conversion efficiency is up to 19%. The pulse length is 40 ns with a pulse linewidth of <157 MHz. The short- and long-term frequency stabilities are 10 MHz (rms). A spectral purity of 99.9% was determined by pointing to a stratus cloud in low-elevation scanning mode with a cloud bottom height of ≈2.4 km. PMID:23670775

  7. Laser And Nonlinear Optical Materials For Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2005-01-01

    NASA remote sensing missions involving laser systems and their economic impact are outlined. Potential remote sensing missions include: green house gasses, tropospheric winds, ozone, water vapor, and ice cap thickness. Systems to perform these measurements use lanthanide series lasers and nonlinear devices including second harmonic generators and parametric oscillators. Demands these missions place on the laser and nonlinear optical materials are discussed from a materials point of view. Methods of designing new laser and nonlinear optical materials to meet these demands are presented.

  8. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  9. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  10. Experimental test results from an environmental protection agency test method for determination of vapor suppressant effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tock, Richard W.; Ahern, Daniel W.

    2005-04-01

    The results obtained from laboratory experiments conducted using Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) subpart WWWW of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 63 (1)-test method are discussed in this article. The original test method was developed to measure the effectiveness of wax suppressants used to reduce hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from unsaturated polyester (UP)/vinyl ester resins. Wax additions of ˜1.5% by weight to commercial UP resins suppress HAP emissions through the formation of surface barrier films. However, the tests performed in this study included the use of limestone and an adjunct, organic fiber reinforcement, rather than the wax. The addition of either commercial product to the UP formulations tested in this study was also shown to reduce HAP emissions. Suppression was a combination of absorption and an increased diffusion path barrier for the volatile organic carbon (VOC) components. Based on the limited data obtained, it was shown that the oil absorption characteristics of the two adjunct products could be used to estimate the expected level of vapor suppression for a specific resin formulation. Values reported in the literature for the oil adsorption characteristics of the adjunct limestone and the commercial biomass fiber were used in the laboratory tests. Although the oil adsorption characteristic of any ingredient added to a base resin formulation is indicative of its potential for emissions reduction, the EPA test protocol is still required to be performed for validation. Such screening tests will always be needed due to the variability associated with commercial UP resins and the evolution of customized UP/fiberglass composite formulations developed by custom molding shops.

  11. Insights in the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signal generation underwater using dual pulse excitation — Part I: Vapor bubble, shockwaves and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazic, V.; Laserna, J. J.; Jovicevic, S.

    2013-04-01

    Plasma and vapor bubble formation and evolution after a nanosecond laser pulse delivered to aluminum targets inside water were studied by fast photography. This technique was also applied to monitor the plasma produced by a second laser pulse and for different interpulse delays. The bubble growth was evident only after 3 μs from the first laser pulse and the bubble shape changed during expansion and collapse cycles. The evolution and propagation of the initial shockwave and its reflections both from the back sample surface and cell walls were detected by Schlieren photography. The primary plasma develops in two phases: violent particle expulsion and ionization during the first μs, followed by slow plasma growth from the ablation crater into the evolving vapor bubble. The shape of the secondary plasma strongly depends on the inner bubble pressure whereas the particle expulsion into the expanded bubble is much less evident. Both the primary and secondary plasma have similar duration of about 30 μs. Detection efficiency of the secondary plasma is much reduced by light refraction at the curved bubble-water interface, which behaves as a negative lens; this leads to an apparent reduction of the plasma dimensions. Defocusing power of the bubble lens increases with its expansion due to the lowering of the vapor's refraction index with respect to that of the surrounding liquid (Lazic et al., 2012 [1]). Smell's reflections of secondary plasma radiation at the expanded bubble wall redistribute the detected intensity on a wavelength-dependent way and allow gathering of the emission also from the external plasma layer that otherwise, would not enter into the optical system.

  12. Water vapor content in the polar atmosphere measured by Lyman-alpha/OH fluorescence method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaka, Y.; Saitoh, S.; Ono, A.

    1985-01-01

    The water vapor of the polar stratosphere possibly plays an important role in various aeronomical processes; for example, OH radical formation through photodissociation of H2O, formation of water cluster ions, radiative energy transfer in the lower stratosphere, condensation onto particulate matter, and so on. In addition to these, it has been speculated, from the viewpoint of global transport and/or budget of water vapor, that the polar stratosphere functions as an active sink. STANFORD (1973) emphasized the existence of the stratospheric Cist cloud in the polar stratosphere which brought a large loss rate of stratospheric water vapor through a so-called freeze-out of cloud particles from the stratosphere into the troposphere. However, these geophysically interesting problems unfortunately remain to be solved, owing to the lack of measurements on water vapor distribution and its temporal variation in the polar stratosphere. The water vapor content measured at Syowa Station (69.00 deg S, 39.35 deg E), Antarctica using a balloon-borne hygrometer (Lyman - alpha/OH fluorescence type) is discussed.

  13. Preparation of high T(c) Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O thin films by pulsed laser evaporation and Tl2O3 vapor processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johs, B.; Thompson, D.; Ianno, N. J.; Woollam, John A.; Liou, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O superconducting thin films with zero-resistance temperatures up to 115 K have been prepared using a Tl2O3 vapor process on Ba-Ca-Cu-O precursor thin films. The Ba-Ca-Cu-O thin films were made by laser deposition on Y-stabilized ZrO2 substrates. This technique minimizes problems caused by the toxicity of Tl2O3, and its subsequent decomposition to the volatile and toxic Tl2O upon heating. Therefore, it may have practical application in the fabrication of high T(c) Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O superconducting thin-film devices.

  14. Analytical methods of laser spectroscopy for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyshkin, Dmitri V.

    Different aspects of the application of laser spectroscopy in biomedical research have been considered. A growing demand for molecular sensing techniques in biomedical and environmental research has led the introduction of existing spectroscopic techniques, as well as development of new methods. The applications of laser-induced fluorescence, Raman scattering, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the monitoring of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and hemoglobin levels, the study of the characteristics of light-curing dental restorative materials, and the environmental monitoring of levels of toxic metal ion is presented. The development of new solid-state tunable laser sources based on color center crystals for these applications is presented as well.

  15. Speckle reduction methods in laser-based picture projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, M. Nadeem; Chen, Xuyuan

    2016-02-01

    Laser sources have been promised for many years to be better light sources as compared to traditional lamps or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for projectors, which enable projectors having wide colour gamut for vivid image, super brightness and high contrast for the best picture quality, long lifetime for maintain free operation, mercury free, and low power consumption for green environment. A major technology obstacle in using lasers for projection has been the speckle noise caused by to the coherent nature of the lasers. For speckle reduction, current state of the art solutions apply moving parts with large physical space demand. Solutions beyond the state of the art need to be developed such as integrated optical components, hybrid MOEMS devices, and active phase modulators for compact speckle reduction. In this article, major methods reported in the literature for the speckle reduction in laser projectors are presented and explained. With the advancement in semiconductor lasers with largely reduced cost for the red, green and the blue primary colours, and the developed methods for their speckle reduction, it is hoped that the lasers will be widely utilized in different projector applications in the near future.

  16. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  17. Method for laser welding a fin and a tube

    DOEpatents

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W.; Mahoney, A. Roderick; Milewski, John O

    2001-01-01

    A method of laser welding a planar metal surface to a cylindrical metal surface is provided, first placing a planar metal surface into approximate contact with a cylindrical metal surface to form a juncture area to be welded, the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface thereby forming an acute angle of contact. A laser beam, produced, for example, by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, is focused through the acute angle of contact at the juncture area to be welded, with the laser beam heating the juncture area to a welding temperature to cause welding to occur between the planar metal surface and the cylindrical metal surface. Both the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface are made from a reflective metal, including copper, copper alloys, stainless steel alloys, aluminum, and aluminum alloys.

  18. [Laser phacoemulsification--a method of cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Filip, M; Măgureanu, M; Barbu, C; Manga, C; Gregorian, F

    2001-01-01

    Today, ultrasound phacoemulsification is the most used method of cataract surgery. Because the side effects (injury of corneal endothelium and other nearly tissues), was tried to find alternative energy forms. Erbium laser was proven to be the most effective method among all of these. PMID:11519335

  19. [Laser phacoemulsification--a method of cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Filip, M; Măgureanu, M; Barbu, C; Manga, C; Gregorian, F

    2001-01-01

    Today, ultrasound phacoemulsification is the most used method of cataract surgery. Because the side effects (injury of corneal endothelium and other nearly tissues), was tried to find alternative energy forms. Erbium laser was proven to be the most effective method among all of these.

  20. Simulation of vapor-liquid coexistence in finite volumes: a method to compute the surface free energy of droplets.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Manuel; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2009-06-01

    When a fluid at a constant density rho in between the densities of coexisting vapor (rhov) and liquid (rhol) at temperatures below criticality is studied in a (cubic) box of finite linear dimension L , phase separation occurs in this finite volume, provided L is large enough. For a range of densities, one can observe a liquid droplet (at density rhol' slightly exceeding rhol) coexisting in stable thermal equilibrium with surrounding vapor (with density rhov'>rhov, so in the thermodynamic limit such a vapor would be supersaturated). We show, via Monte Carlo simulations of a Lennard-Jones model of a fluid and based on a phenomenological thermodynamic analysis, that via recording the chemical potential micro as function of rho, one can obtain precise estimates of the droplet surface free energy for a wide range of droplet radii. We also show that the deviations of this surface free energy from the prediction based on the "capillarity approximation" of classical nucleation theory (i.e., using the interfacial free energy of a flat liquid-vapor interface for the surface free energy of a droplet irrespective of its radius) are rather small. We also study carefully the limitation of the present method due to the "droplet evaporation/condensation transition" occurring for small volumes and demonstrate that very good equilibrium is achieved in our study, by showing that the radial profile of the local chemical potential from the droplet center to the outside is perfectly flat.