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Sample records for laser wakefield simulation

  1. Wakefield Simulations for the Laser Acceleration Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny

    2012-04-18

    Laser-driven acceleration in dielectric photonic band gap structures can provide gradients on the order of GeV/m. The small transverse dimension of the structure, on the order of the laser wavelength, presents interesting wakefield-related issues. Higher order modes can seriously degrade beam quality, and a detailed understanding is needed to mitigate such effects. On the other hand, wakefields also provide a direct way to probe the interaction of a relativistic bunch with the synchronous modes supported by the structure. Simulation studies have been carried out as part of the effort to understand the impact on beam dynamics, and to compare with data from beam experiments designed to characterize candidate structures. In this paper, we present simulation results of wakefields excited by a sub-wavelength bunch in optical photonic band gap structures.

  2. Filamentation in Laser Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, Eva; Trines, Raoul; Silva, Luis; Bingham, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Laser filamentation instability is observed in plasma wakefields with sub-critical densities, and in high density inertial fusion plasmas. This leads to non-uniform acceleration or compression respectively. Here, we present simulation results on laser filamentation in plasma wakefields. The 2-D simulations are carried out using the particle-in-cell code Osiris. The filament intensity was found to increase exponentially before saturating. The maximum amplitude to which the highest intensity filament grew for a specific set of parameters was also recorded, and plotted against a corresponding parameter value. Clear, positively correlated linear trends were established between plasma density, transverse wavenumber k, laser pulse amplitude and maximum filament amplitude. Plasma density and maximum filament amplitude also showed a positive correlation, which saturated after a certain plasma density. Pulse duration and interaction length did not affect either filament intensity or transverse k value in a predictable manner. There was no discernible trend between pulse amplitude and filament width.

  3. Simulation study of wakefield generation by two color laser pulses propagating in homogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Mishra, Rohit; Saroch, Akanksha; Jha, Pallavi

    2013-09-15

    This paper deals with a two-dimensional simulation of electric wakefields generated by two color laser pulses propagating in homogeneous plasma, using VORPAL simulation code. The laser pulses are assumed to have a frequency difference equal to the plasma frequency. Simulation studies are performed for two similarly as well as oppositely polarized laser pulses and the respective amplitudes of the generated longitudinal wakefields for the two cases are compared. Enhancement of wake amplitude for the latter case is reported. This simulation study validates the analytical results presented by Jha et al.[Phys. Plasmas 20, 053102 (2013)].

  4. Laser wakefield simulation using a speed-of-light frame envelope model

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.; Messmer, P.; Paul, K.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.

    2009-01-22

    Simulation of laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) experiments is computationally intensive due to the disparate length scales involved. Current experiments extend hundreds of laser wavelengths transversely and many thousands in the propagation direction, making explicit PIC simulations enormously expensive and requiring massively parallel execution in 3D. We can substantially improve the performance of laser wakefield simulations by modeling the envelope modulation of the laser field rather than the field itself. This allows for much coarser grids, since we need only resolve the plasma wavelength and not the laser wavelength, and therefore larger timesteps. Thus an envelope model can result in savings of several orders of magnitude in computational resources. By propagating the laser envelope in a frame moving at the speed of light, dispersive errors can be avoided and simulations over long distances become possible. Here we describe the model and its implementation, and show simulations and benchmarking of laser wakefield phenomena such as channel propagation, self-focusing, wakefield generation, and downramp injection using the model.

  5. Simulation of electron post-acceleration in a two-stage laser Wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, A.J.W.; Leemans, W.P.; Esarey, E.; Kamp, L.P.J.; Schep, T.J.

    2002-04-01

    Electron bunches produced in self-modulated laser wakefield experiments usually have a broad energy spectrum, with most electrons at low energy (1-3 MeV) and only a small fraction at high energy. We propose and investigate further acceleration of such bunches in a channel-guided resonant laser wakefield accelerator. Two-dimensional simulations with and without the effects of self-consistent beam loading are performed and compared. These results indicate that it is possible to trap about 40 percent of the injected bunch charge and accelerate this fraction to an average energy of about 50 MeV in a plasma channel of a few mn.

  6. Benchmarking the codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC with Laser Wakefield Acceleration Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Cowan, B.; Cary, J. R.; Huang, C.; Mori, W. B.; Tsung, F. S.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Fonseca, R. A.; Martins, S. F.; Silva, L. O.

    2009-01-22

    Three-dimensional laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulations have recently been performed to benchmark the commonly used particle-in-cell (PIC) codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC. The simulations were run in parallel on over 100 processors, using parameters relevant to LWFA with ultra-short Ti-Sapphire laser pulses propagating in hydrogen gas. Both first-order and second-order particle shapes were employed. We present the results of this benchmarking exercise, and show that accelerating gradients from full PIC agree for all values of a{sub 0} and that full and reduced PIC agree well for values of a{sub 0} approaching 4.

  7. Stable boosted-frame simulations of laser-wakefield acceleration using Galilean coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehe, Remi; Kirchen, Manuel; Godfrey, Brendan; Maier, Andreas; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2016-10-01

    While Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of laser-wakefield acceleration are typically very computationally expensive, it is well-known that representing the system in a well-chosen Lorentz frame can reduce the computational cost by orders of magnitude. One of the limitation of this ``boosted-frame'' technique is the Numerical Cherenkov Instability (NCI) - a numerical instability that rapidly grows in the boosted frame and must be eliminated in order to obtain valid physical results. Several methods have been proposed in order to eliminate the NCI, but they introduce additional numerical corrections (e.g. heavy smoothing, unphysical modification of the dispersion relation, etc.) which could potentially alter the physics. By contrast, here we show that, for boosted-frame simulations of laser-wakefield acceleration, the NCI can be eliminated simply by integrating the PIC equations in Galilean coordinates (a.k.a comoving coordinates), without additional numerical correction. Using this technique, we show excellent agreement between simulations in the laboratory frame and Lorentz-boosted frame, with more than 2 orders of magnitude speedup in the latter case. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Simulating the effects of timing and energy stability in a laser wakefield accelerator with external injection

    SciTech Connect

    Dijk, W. van; Corstens, J. M.; Stragier, X. F. D.; Brussaard, G. J. H.; Geer, S. B. van der

    2009-01-22

    One of the most compelling reasons to use external injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator is to improve the stability and reproducibility of the accelerated electrons. We have built a simulation tool based on particle tracking to investigate the expected output parameters. Specifically, we are simulating the variations in energy and bunch charge under the influence of variations in laser power and timing jitter. In these simulations a a{sub 0} = 0.32 to a{sub 0} = 1.02 laser pulse with 10% shot-to-shot energy fluctuation is focused into a plasma waveguide with a density of 1.0x10{sup 24} m{sup -3} and a calculated matched spot size of 50.2 {mu}m. The timing of the injected electron bunch with respect to the laser pulse is varied from up to 1 ps from the standard timing (1 ps ahead or behind the laser pulse, depending on the regime). The simulation method and first results will be presented. Shortcomings and possible extensions to the model will be discussed.

  9. Developing high energy, stable laser wakefield accelerators: particle simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron

    2006-10-01

    Laser driven wakefield accelerators produce accelerating fields thousands of times those achievable in conventional radiofrequency accelerators, and recent experiments have produced high energy electron bunches with low emittance and energy spread. Challenges now include control and reproducibility of the electron beam, further improvements in energy spread, and scaling to higher energies. We present large-scale particle in cell simulations together with recent experiments towards these goals. In LBNL experiments the relativistically intense drive pulse was guided over more than 10 diffraction ranges by plasma channels. Guiding beyond the diffraction range improved efficiency by allowing use of a smaller laser spot size (and hence higher intensities) over long propagation distances. At a drive pulse power of 9 TW, electrons were trapped from the plasma and beams of percent energy spread containing > 200pC charge above 80 MeV with normalized emittance estimated at < 2 π-mm-mrad were produced. Energies have now been scaled to 1 GeV using 40 TW of laser power. Particle simulations and data showed that the high quality bunch in recent experiments was formed when beam loading turned off injection after initial self trapping, creating a bunch of electrons isolated in phase space. A narrow energy spread beam was then obtained by extracting the bunch as it outran the accelerating phase of the wake. Large scale simulations coupled with experiments are now under way to better understand the optimization of such accelerators including production of reproducible electron beams and scaling to energies beyond a GeV. Numerical resolution and two and three dimensional effects are discussed as well as diagnostics for application of the simulations to experiments. Effects including injection and beam dynamics as well as pump laser depletion and reshaping will be described, with application to design of future experiments. Supported by DOE grant DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by an INCITE

  10. Laser-wakefield accelerators for medical phase contrast imaging: Monte Carlo simulations and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipiccia, S.; Reboredo, D.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Welsh, G. H.; Grant, P.; Grant, D. W.; Brunetti, E.; Wiggins, S. M.; Olivo, A.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging (X-PCi) is a very promising method of dramatically enhancing the contrast of X-ray images of microscopic weakly absorbing objects and soft tissue, which may lead to significant advancement in medical imaging with high-resolution and low-dose. The interest in X-PCi is giving rise to a demand for effective simulation methods. Monte Carlo codes have been proved a valuable tool for studying X-PCi including coherent effects. The laser-plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA) is a very compact particle accelerator that uses plasma as an accelerating medium. Accelerating gradient in excess of 1 GV/cm can be obtained, which makes them over a thousand times more compact than conventional accelerators. LWFA are also sources of brilliant betatron radiation, which are promising for applications including medical imaging. We present a study that explores the potential of LWFA-based betatron sources for medical X-PCi and investigate its resolution limit using numerical simulations based on the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, and present preliminary experimental results.

  11. Giga-electronvolt electrons due to a transition from laser wakefield acceleration to plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Masson-Laborde, P. E. Teychenné, D.; Mo, M. Z.; Ali, A.; Fedosejevs, R.; Fourmaux, S.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J. C.; Rozmus, W.

    2014-12-15

    We show through experiments that a transition from laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) regime to a plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) regime can drive electrons up to energies close to the GeV level. Initially, the acceleration mechanism is dominated by the bubble created by the laser in the nonlinear regime of LWFA, leading to an injection of a large number of electrons. After propagation beyond the depletion length, leading to a depletion of the laser pulse, whose transverse ponderomotive force is not able to sustain the bubble anymore, the high energy dense bunch of electrons propagating inside bubble will drive its own wakefield by a PWFA regime. This wakefield will be able to trap and accelerate a population of electrons up to the GeV level during this second stage. Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations support this analysis and confirm the scenario.

  12. Wakefield generation via two color laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Saroch, Akanksha; Kumar Verma, Nirmal

    2013-05-15

    The analytical study for the evolution of longitudinal as well as transverse electric wakefields, generated via passage of two color laser pulses through uniform plasma, has been presented in the mildly relativistic regime. The frequency difference between the two laser pulses is assumed to be equal to the plasma frequency, in the present analysis. The relative angle between the directions of polarization of the two laser pulses is varied and the wakefield amplitudes are compared. Further, the amplitude of the excited wakes by two color pulses are compared with those generated by a single laser pulse.

  13. Role of Direct Laser Acceleration of Electrons in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator with Ionization Injection.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J L; Lemos, N; Amorim, L D; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Marsh, K A; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2017-02-10

    We show the first experimental demonstration that electrons being accelerated in a laser wakefield accelerator operating in the forced or blowout regimes gain significant energy from both the direct laser acceleration (DLA) and the laser wakefield acceleration mechanisms. Supporting full-scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations elucidate the role of the DLA of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator when ionization injection of electrons is employed. An explanation is given for how electrons can maintain the DLA resonance condition in a laser wakefield accelerator despite the evolving properties of both the drive laser and the electrons. The produced electron beams exhibit characteristic features that are indicative of DLA as an additional acceleration mechanism.

  14. Role of Direct Laser Acceleration of Electrons in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator with Ionization Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. L.; Lemos, N.; Amorim, L. D.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    2017-02-01

    We show the first experimental demonstration that electrons being accelerated in a laser wakefield accelerator operating in the forced or blowout regimes gain significant energy from both the direct laser acceleration (DLA) and the laser wakefield acceleration mechanisms. Supporting full-scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations elucidate the role of the DLA of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator when ionization injection of electrons is employed. An explanation is given for how electrons can maintain the DLA resonance condition in a laser wakefield accelerator despite the evolving properties of both the drive laser and the electrons. The produced electron beams exhibit characteristic features that are indicative of DLA as an additional acceleration mechanism.

  15. Relativistic quantum corrections to laser wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Ji, Peiyong

    2010-03-01

    The influence of quantum effects on the interaction of intense laser fields with plasmas is investigated by using a hydrodynamic model based on the framework of the relativistic quantum theory. Starting from the covariant Wigner function and Dirac equation, the hydrodynamic equations for relativistic quantum plasmas are derived. Based on the relativistic quantum hydrodynamic equations and Poisson equation, the perturbations of electron number densities and the electric field of the laser wakefield containing quantum effects are deduced. It is found that the corrections generated by the quantum effects to the perturbations of electron number densities and the accelerating field of the laser wakefield cannot be neglected. Quantum effects will suppress laser wakefields, which is a classical manifestation of quantum decoherence effects, however, the contribution of quantum effects for the laser wakefield correction will been partially counteracted by the relativistic effects. The analysis also reveals that quantum effects enlarge the effective frequencies of plasmas, and the quantum behavior appears a screening effect for plasma electrons.

  16. Relativistic quantum corrections to laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jun; Ji Peiyong

    2010-03-15

    The influence of quantum effects on the interaction of intense laser fields with plasmas is investigated by using a hydrodynamic model based on the framework of the relativistic quantum theory. Starting from the covariant Wigner function and Dirac equation, the hydrodynamic equations for relativistic quantum plasmas are derived. Based on the relativistic quantum hydrodynamic equations and Poisson equation, the perturbations of electron number densities and the electric field of the laser wakefield containing quantum effects are deduced. It is found that the corrections generated by the quantum effects to the perturbations of electron number densities and the accelerating field of the laser wakefield cannot be neglected. Quantum effects will suppress laser wakefields, which is a classical manifestation of quantum decoherence effects, however, the contribution of quantum effects for the laser wakefield correction will been partially counteracted by the relativistic effects. The analysis also reveals that quantum effects enlarge the effective frequencies of plasmas, and the quantum behavior appears a screening effect for plasma electrons.

  17. Role of direct laser acceleration of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator with ionization injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Jessica; Lemos, Nuno; Amorim, Ligia Diana; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Marsh, Ken; Tsung, Frank; Froula, Dustin; Mori, Warren; Josh, Chan

    2016-10-01

    We show through experiments and supporting simulations the role of direct laser acceleration (DLA) of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator when ionization injection of electrons is employed. The laser pulse is intense enough to create a nonlinear wakefield and long enough to overlap the electrons trapped in the first accelerating potential well (bucket) of the wakefield. The betatron oscillations of the trapped electrons in the plane of the laser polarization in the presence of an ion column lead to an energy transfer from the laser pulse to the electrons through DLA. We show that the produced electron beams exhibit characteristic features that are indicative of DLA as an additional acceleration mechanism when the laser pulse overlaps the trapped electrons. Experimental work supported by NSF Grant PHY-1415306 and DOE Grant DE-SC0010064. Simulation work done on the Fermi Cluster at Cineca.

  18. Dynamics of boundary layer electrons around a laser wakefield bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Chen, M.; Zhang, G.-B.; Yuan, T.; Yu, J.-Y.; Shen, Z.-C.; Yu, L.-L.; Weng, S.-M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of electrons forming the boundary layer of a highly nonlinear laser wakefield driven in the so called bubble or blowout regime is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that when the driver pulse intensity increases or the focal spot size decreases, a significant amount of electrons initially pushed by the laser pulse can detach from the bubble structure at its tail, middle, or front and form particular classes of waves locally with high densities, referred to as the tail wave, lateral wave, and bow wave. The tail wave and bow wave correspond to real electron trajectories, while the lateral wave does not. The detached electrons can be ejected transversely, containing considerable energy, and reducing the efficiency of the laser wakefield accelerator. Some of the transversely emitted electrons may obtain MeV level energy. These electrons can be used for wake evolution diagnosis and producing high frequency radiation.

  19. Effect of pulse profile and chirp on a laser wakefield generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaomei; Shen Baifei; Ji Liangliang; Wang Wenpeng; Xu Jiancai; Yu Yahong; Yi Longqing; Wang Xiaofeng; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Kulagin, V.

    2012-05-15

    A laser wakefield driven by an asymmetric laser pulse with/without chirp is investigated analytically and through two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For a laser pulse with an appropriate pulse length compared with the plasma wavelength, the wakefield amplitude can be enhanced by using an asymmetric un-chirped laser pulse with a fast rise time; however, the growth is small. On the other hand, the wakefield can be greatly enhanced for both positively chirped laser pulse having a fast rise time and negatively chirped laser pulse having a slow rise time. Simulations show that at the early laser-plasma interaction stage, due to the influence of the fast rise time the wakefield driven by the positively chirped laser pulse is more intense than that driven by the negatively chirped laser pulse, which is in good agreement with analytical results. At a later time, since the laser pulse with positive chirp exhibits opposite evolution to the one with negative chirp when propagating in plasma, the wakefield in the latter case grows more intensely. These effects should be useful in laser wakefield acceleration experiments operating at low plasma densities.

  20. Emittance control in Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshkov, S.; Tajima, T.; Chiu, C.; Breitling, F.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper we summarize our recent effort and results in theoretical study of the emittance issues of multistaged Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) in TeV energy range. In such an energy regime the luminosity and therefore the emittance requirements become very stringent and tantamount to the success or failure of such an accelerator. The system of such a machine is very sensitive to jitters due to misalignment between the beam and the wakefield. In particular, the effect of jitters in the presence of a strong focusing wakefield and initial longitudinal phase space spread of the beam leads to severe transverse emittance degradation of the beam. To improve the emittance we introduce several methods: a mitigated wakefield focusing by working with a plasma channel, an approximately synchronous acceleration in a superunit setup, the "horn" model based on exactly synchronous acceleration achieved through plasma density variation and lastly an algorithm based on minimization of the final beam emittance to actively control the stage displacement of such an accelerator.

  1. Ultrafast science using Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have considerable benefits for ultrafast science. Laser wakefield acceleration provides radiation pulses that have femtosecond duration and intrinsic synchronisation with the laser source, allowing for pump-probe measurements with unprecedented temporal resolution. These pulses can be used to study ultrafast dynamical phenomena in plasma and dense material, such as transient magnetic fields, rapidly evolving plasma dynamics and crystal lattice oscillations. In this talk, I will review recent experiments in laser wakefield acceleration and energetic photon generation using the laser systems HERCULES and Lambda-Cubed at the University of Michigan and their use for capturing the dynamics of laser-pumped samples. Studies of the electron beam hosing instability and the generation of annular phase space distributions increase X-ray flux while maintaining its femtosecond duration. Single-shot, spectrally resolved absorption measurements in laser pumped foils can be made on ultrafast timescales using this broadband photon source. Ultrafast electron radiography is able to temporally resolve relativistically expanding magnetic fields in high-intensity laser-solid interactions and the evolution of electric fields in low density plasma. Time-resolved electron diffraction captures structural dynamics in crystalline silicon. I will also discuss the technological needs for and potential impact of such revolutionary compact radiation sources for ultrafast science in the future. US Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-12-1-0310, the US National Science Foundation Grants No. 1054164, 0935197, 1535628 and 0810979, US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-NA0002372 and Army Research Office Grant No. W911NF1.

  2. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  3. Controlled electron injection using nanoparticles in laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung Hoon; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Kim, Hyung Taek; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Nam, Chang Hee; CenterRelativistic Laser Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration is one of compact electron acceleration schemes due to its high accelerating gradient. Despite of the great progress of several GeV electron beams with high power lasers, the electron injection to the wakefield is still a critical issue for a very low density plasma 1017 electrons/cc. In this talk a novel method to control the injection using nanoparticles is proposed. We investigate the electron injection by analyzing the interaction of electrons with the two potentials - one created by a nanoparticle and the other by the wakefield. The nanoparticle creates a localized electric potential and this nanoparticle potential just slips the present wake potential. To confirm the Hamiltonian description of the interaction, a test particle calculation is performed by controlling the bubble and the nanoparticle potentials. A multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are also presented as a proof-of-principle. Comparing theoretical estimates and PIC simulation, we suggest nanoparticle parameters of size and electron density depending on the background plasma density. Our scheme can be applicable for low plasma density to break though the limitation of self-injection toward extremely high energy electron energy.

  4. Laser wakefield acceleration of polarized electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, D. V.; Andreev, N. E.; Cros, B.

    2016-11-01

    The acceleration of highly polarized electron beams are widely used in state-of-the-art high-energy physics experiments. In this work, a model for investigation of polarization dynamics of electron beams in the laser-plasma accelerator depending on the initial energy of electrons was developed and tested. To obtain the evolution of the trajectory and momentum of the electron for modeling its acceleration the wakefield structure was determined. The spin precession of the beam electron was described by Thomas-Bargman-Michel-Telegdi equations. The evolution of the electron beam polarization was investigated for zero-emittance beams with zero-energy spread.

  5. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  6. Magnetically Controlled Plasma Waveguide For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Davis, P; Palastro, J; Michel, P; Leurent, V; Glenzer, S H; Pollock, B; Tynan, G

    2008-05-14

    An external magnetic field applied to a laser plasma is shown produce a plasma channel at densities relevant to creating GeV monoenergetic electrons through laser wakefield acceleration. Furthermore, the magnetic field also provides a pressure to help shape the channel to match the guiding conditions of an incident laser beam. Measured density channels suitable for guiding relativistic short-pulse laser beams are presented with a minimum density of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} which corresponds to a linear dephasing length of several centimeters suitable for multi-GeV electron acceleration. The experimental setup at the Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where a 1-ns, 150 J 1054 nm laser will produce a magnetically controlled channel to guide a < 75 fs, 10 J short-pulse laser beam through 5-cm of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} plasma is presented. Calculations presented show that electrons can be accelerated to 3 GeV with this system. Three-dimensional resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations are used to design the laser and plasma parameters and quasi-static kinetic simulations indicate that the channel will guide a 200 TW laser beam over 5-cm.

  7. Laser pulse propagation in inhomogeneous magnetoplasma channels and wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, B. S. Jain, Archana; Jaiman, N. K.; Gupta, D. N.; Jang, D. G.; Suk, H.; Kulagin, V. V.

    2014-02-15

    Wakefield excitation in a preformed inhomogeneous parabolic plasma channel by an intense relativistic (≃10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) circularly polarized Gaussian laser pulse is investigated analytically and numerically in the presence of an external longitudinal magnetic field. A three dimensional envelope equation for the evolution of the laser pulse is derived, which includes the effect of the nonparaxial and applied external magnetic field. A relation for the channel radius with the laser spot size is derived and examines numerically to see the external magnetic field effect. It is observed that the channel radius depends on the applied external magnetic field. An analytical expression for the wakefield is derived and validated with the help of a two dimensional particle in cell (2D PIC) simulation code. It is shown that the electromagnetic nature of the wakes in an inhomogeneous plasma channel makes their excitation nonlocal, which results in change of fields with time and external magnetic field due to phase mixing of the plasma oscillations with spatially varying frequencies. The magnetic field effect on perturbation of the plasma density and decreasing length is also analyzed numerically. In addition, it has been shown that the electron energy gain in the inhomogeneous parabolic magnetoplasma channel can be increased significantly compared with the homogeneous plasma channel.

  8. Generation of electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration in pure neon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M. Mirzaie, Mohammad; Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Ge, Xulei; Liu, Feng; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie; Tao, Mengze; Chen, Liming

    2014-08-15

    We report on the generation of quasimonoenergetic electron beams by the laser wakefield acceleration of 17–50 TW, 30 fs laser pulses in pure neon gas jet. The generated beams have energies in the range 40–120 MeV and up to ∼430 pC of charge. At a relatively high density, we observed multiple electron beamlets which has been interpreted by simulations to be the result of breakup of the laser pulse into multiple filaments in the plasma. Each filament drives its own wakefield and generates its own electron beamlet.

  9. All-optical steering of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron beams.

    PubMed

    Popp, A; Vieira, J; Osterhoff, J; Major, Zs; Hörlein, R; Fuchs, M; Weingartner, R; Rowlands-Rees, T P; Marti, M; Fonseca, R A; Martins, S F; Silva, L O; Hooker, S M; Krausz, F; Grüner, F; Karsch, S

    2010-11-19

    We investigate the influence of a tilted laser-pulse-intensity front on laser-wakefield acceleration. Such asymmetric light pulses may be exploited to obtain control over the electron-bunch-pointing direction and in our case allowed for reproducible electron-beam steering in an all-optical way within an 8 mrad opening window with respect to the initial laser axis. We also discovered evidence of collective electron-betatron oscillations due to off-axis electron injection into the wakefield induced by a pulse-front tilt. These findings are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations.

  10. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Thomas, A. G.; Mangles, S. P.D.; Banerjee, S.; Corde, S.; Flacco, A.; Litos, M.; Neely, D.; Viera, J.; Najmudin, Z.; Bingham, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  11. Plasma Density Tapering for Laser Wakefield Acceleration of Electrons and Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, A.; Gordon, D.; Helle, M.; Kaganovich, D.; Sprangle, P.; Hafizi, B.

    2010-11-01

    Extended acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator can be achieved by tailoring the phase velocity of the accelerating plasma wave, either through profiling of the density of the plasma or direct manipulation of the phase velocity. Laser wakefield acceleration has also reached a maturity that proton acceleration by wakefield could be entertained provided we begin with protons that are substantially relativistic, ˜1 GeV. Several plasma density tapering schemes are discussed. The first scheme is called "bucket jumping" where the plasma density is abruptly returned to the original density after a conventional tapering to move the accelerating particles to a neighboring wakefield period (bucket). The second scheme is designed to specifically accelerate low energy protons by generating a nonlinear wakefield in a plasma region with close to critical density. The third scheme creates a periodic variation in the phase velocity by beating two intense laser beams with laser frequency difference equal to the plasma frequency. Discussions and case examples with simulations are presented where substantial acceleration of electrons or protons could be obtained.

  12. Emission of strong Terahertz pulses from laser wakefields in weakly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Divya; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper discusses the laser plasma interaction for the wakefield excitation and the role of external magnetic field for the emission of Terahertz radiation in a collisional plasma. Flat top lasers are shown to be more appropriate than the conventional Gaussian lasers for the effective excitation of wakefields and hence, the generation of strong Terahertz radiation through the transverse component of wakefield.

  13. Bunch self-focusing regime of laser wakefield acceleration with reduced emittance growth.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, A J W; Goloviznin, V V; Kamp, L P J; Schep, T J

    2002-01-07

    A new regime of laser wakefield acceleration of an injected electron bunch is described. In this regime, the bunch charge is so high that the bunch wakefields play an important role in the bunch dynamics. In particular, the transverse bunch wakefield induces a strong self-focusing that suppresses the transverse emittance growth arising from misalignment errors. The decelerating longitudinal bunch wakefield, however, is not so strong that it completely cancels the accelerating laser wakefield. In fact, the induced energy spread can be compensated by exploiting phase slippage effects. These features make the new regime interesting for high beam quality laser wakefield acceleration.

  14. Design of 10 GeV laser wakefield accelerator stages with shaped laser modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Leemans, W.P.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cowan, B.; Paul, K.

    2009-09-25

    We present particle-in-cell simulations, using the VORPAL framework, of 10 GeV laser plasma wakefield accelerator stages. Scaling of the physical parameters with the plasma density allows us to perform these simulations at reasonable cost and to design high performance stages. In particular we show that, by choosing to operate in the quasi-linear regime, we can use higher order laser modes to tailor the focusing forces. This makes it possible to increase the matched electron beam radius and hence the total charge in the bunch while preserving the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  15. High quality electron beam acceleration by ionization injection in laser wakefields with mid-infrared dual-color lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Luo, Ji; Chen, Min; Mori, Warren B.; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    For the laser wakefield acceleration, suppression of beam energy spread while keeping sufficient charge is one of the key challenges. In order to achieve this, we propose bichromatic laser ionization injection with combined laser wavelengths of 2.4 μ m and 0.8 μ m for wakefield excitation and triggering electron injection via field ionization, respectively. A laser pulse at 2.4 μ m wavelength enables one to drive an intense acceleration structure with a relatively low laser power. To further reduce the requirement of laser power, we also propose to use carbon dioxide as the working gas medium, where carbon acts as the injection element. Our three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that electron beams at the GeV energy level with both low energy spreads (around 1%) and high charges (several tens of picocoulomb) can be obtained by the use of this scheme with laser peak power totaling sub-100 TW.

  16. Particle-in-cell simulation of x-ray wakefield acceleration and betatron radiation in nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Tajima, Toshiki; Farinella, Deano; Shin, Youngmin; Mourou, Gerard; Wheeler, Jonathan; Taborek, Peter; Chen, Pisin; Dollar, Franklin; Shen, Baifei

    2016-10-18

    Though wakefield acceleration in crystal channels has been previously proposed, x-ray wakefield acceleration has only recently become a realistic possibility since the invention of the single-cycled optical laser compression technique. We investigate the acceleration due to a wakefield induced by a coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulse guided by a nanoscale channel inside a solid material. By two-dimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations, we show that an acceleration gradient of TeV/cm is attainable. This is about 3 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the conventional plasma-based wakefield accelerations, which implies the possibility of an extremely compact scheme to attain ultrahigh energies. In addition to particle acceleration, this scheme can also induce the emission of high energy photons at ~O(10–100) MeV. Here, our simulations confirm such high energy photon emissions, which is in contrast with that induced by the optical laser driven wakefield scheme. In addition to this, the significantly improved emittance of the energetic electrons has been discussed.

  17. Particle-in-cell simulation of x-ray wakefield acceleration and betatron radiation in nanotubes

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Tajima, Toshiki; Farinella, Deano; ...

    2016-10-18

    Though wakefield acceleration in crystal channels has been previously proposed, x-ray wakefield acceleration has only recently become a realistic possibility since the invention of the single-cycled optical laser compression technique. We investigate the acceleration due to a wakefield induced by a coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulse guided by a nanoscale channel inside a solid material. By two-dimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations, we show that an acceleration gradient of TeV/cm is attainable. This is about 3 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the conventional plasma-based wakefield accelerations, which implies the possibility of an extremely compact scheme to attain ultrahigh energies. In additionmore » to particle acceleration, this scheme can also induce the emission of high energy photons at ~O(10–100) MeV. Here, our simulations confirm such high energy photon emissions, which is in contrast with that induced by the optical laser driven wakefield scheme. In addition to this, the significantly improved emittance of the energetic electrons has been discussed.« less

  18. Particle-in-cell simulation of x-ray wakefield acceleration and betatron radiation in nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Tajima, Toshiki; Farinella, Deano; Shin, Youngmin; Mourou, Gerard; Wheeler, Jonathan; Taborek, Peter; Chen, Pisin; Dollar, Franklin; Shen, Baifei

    2016-10-01

    Though wakefield acceleration in crystal channels has been previously proposed, x-ray wakefield acceleration has only recently become a realistic possibility since the invention of the single-cycled optical laser compression technique. We investigate the acceleration due to a wakefield induced by a coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulse guided by a nanoscale channel inside a solid material. By two-dimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations, we show that an acceleration gradient of TeV /cm is attainable. This is about 3 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the conventional plasma-based wakefield accelerations, which implies the possibility of an extremely compact scheme to attain ultrahigh energies. In addition to particle acceleration, this scheme can also induce the emission of high energy photons at ˜O (10 - 100 ) MeV . Our simulations confirm such high energy photon emissions, which is in contrast with that induced by the optical laser driven wakefield scheme. In addition to this, the significantly improved emittance of the energetic electrons has been discussed.

  19. Electron Rephasing in a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, E; Döpp, A; Thaury, C; Ta Phuoc, K; Lifschitz, A; Grittani, G; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Chou, S W; Veisz, L; Malka, V

    2015-10-09

    An important limit for energy gain in laser-plasma wakefield accelerators is the dephasing length, after which the electron beam reaches the decelerating region of the wakefield and starts to decelerate. Here, we propose to manipulate the phase of the electron beam in the wakefield, in order to bring the beam back into the accelerating region, hence increasing the final beam energy. This rephasing is operated by placing an upward density step in the beam path. In a first experiment, we demonstrate the principle of this technique using a large energy spread electron beam. Then, we show that it can be used to increase the energy of monoenergetic electron beams by more than 50%.

  20. Enhancement of electron energy to the multi-GeV regime by a dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator pumped by petawatt laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Pae, Ki Hong; Cha, Hyuk Jin; Kim, I Jong; Yu, Tae Jun; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-10-18

    Laser-wakefield acceleration offers the promise of a compact electron accelerator for generating a multi-GeV electron beam using the huge field gradient induced by an intense laser pulse, compared to conventional rf accelerators. However, the energy and quality of the electron beam from the laser-wakefield accelerator have been limited by the power of the driving laser pulses and interaction properties in the target medium. Recent progress in laser technology has resulted in the realization of a petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser, which offers new capabilities for research on laser-wakefield acceleration. Here, we present a significant increase in laser-driven electron energy to the multi-GeV level by utilizing a 30-fs, 1-PW laser system. In particular, a dual-stage laser-wakefield acceleration scheme (injector and accelerator scheme) was applied to boost electron energies to over 3 GeV with a single PW laser pulse. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the multi-GeV electron generation from the dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator driven by PW laser pulses.

  1. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  2. Backward Raman Amplifier for Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Joshua; Masson-Laborde, Paul-Edouard; Huller, Stefan; Rozmus, Wojciech; Wilks, Scott C.

    2016-10-01

    Particle in cell simulations via SCPIC and theoretical work on Raman amplification and laser wake field acceleration will be presented. Laser energy depletion has been shown to be a limiting factor during wake field acceleration. This work focuses on optimizing parameters for Raman amplification to work in conjunction with wake field acceleration in order in order to sustain an accelerating laser pulse as it generates plasma waves. It has been shown that laser pulses undergo red shifting during wake generation. Our work demonstrates that this red shifting results in a detuning between pump and seed in the backward Raman Amplifier. This detuning limits the amount of energy that can be transferred from the pump to the seed, and places new limits on backward Raman amplification. To overcome this limiting factor, this study makes use of a chirped pump allowing for extended coupling to the accelerating pulse. Three wave coupling model of Raman amplifier with a frequency shift term due to wake field will also be discussed and compared with PIC simulations.

  3. Laser wakefield acceleration experiments at the University of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Horovitz, Y.; Dollar, F.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Reed, S.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Huntington, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Levin, M.; Zigler, A.

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a supersonic gas-jet using a self-guided laser pulse was studied by changing the laser power and electron density. The recently upgraded HERCULES laser facility equipped with wavefront correction enables a peak intensity of 8x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} at laser power of 100 TW to be delivered to the gas-jet using f/10 focusing optics. We found that electron beam charge was increased significantly with an increase of the laser power from 30 TW to 80 TW and showed density threshold behavior at a fixed laser power. Betatron motion of electrons was also observed depending on laser power and electron density.

  4. Laser wakefield signatures: from gas plasma to nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinella, Deano; Zhang, Xiaomei; Shin, Youngmin; Tajima, Toshiki

    2016-10-01

    The signatures of laser wakefields have become increasingly important in recent years due to the invention of a novel laser compression technique that may enable the creation of single cycle x-ray pulses. This x-ray driver may be able to utilize solid density targets to create acceleration gradients of up to TeV/cm. On the other hand, Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) has been identified as a potential mechanism for the generation of Extreme High Energy Cosmic Rays (EHECR) in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Though these disparate density regimes may include different physics, by investigating scalings of the ratio ncr/ne we are able to survey a wide range of parameters to gain insight into particle acceleration and photon emission properties. The scaling of electron acceleration and photon radiation from wakefields as a function of the parameter ncr/ne has been studied. Further, acceleration gradient as well as other scalings were investigated in solid density channels and compared to gas plasma. Funded in part by the Norman Rostoker Fund.

  5. Laser Triggered Electron Injection into a Channel Guided Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Filip, C.

    2005-10-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated the generation of narrow energy spread (˜ few %) electron beams with considerable amount of charge (>100 pC). Stability of laser-plasma accelerators, as in the conventional accelerators, requires highly synchronized injection of electrons into the structured accelerating field. The Colliding Pulse Method[1] with pre-formed plasma channel guiding [2] can result in jitter-free injection in a dark-current-free accelerating structure. We report on experimental progress of laser triggered injection of electrons into a laser wakefield, where an intense laser pulse is guided by a pre-formed plasma channel. The experiments use the multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:Al2O3 laser at LOASIS facility of LBNL. The ignitor-heater method is used to first produce a pre-formed plasma channel in a hydrogen gas jet. Two counter propagating beams (wakefield driver:100-500mJ-50fs, injector:50-300mJ-50fs) then are focused onto the entrance of the channel. Preliminary results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. Details of the experiment will be presented. [1]G.Fubiani, et al, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004). [2]C.G.R. Geddes et al, Nature 431, 538 (2004). This work is supported by DoE under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  6. Laser-Driven Coherent Betatron Oscillation in a Laser-Wakefield Cavity: Formation of Sinusoid Beam Shapes and Coherent Trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Li Yuelin; Shang Hairong; Harkay, Katherine C.; Shen Baifei; Crowell, Robert; Cary, John R.

    2009-01-22

    High amplitude coherent electron-trajectories have been seen in 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the colliding pulse injection scheme of laser-wakefield accelerators in the bubble regime, and explained as a consequence of laser-driven coherent betatron oscillation in our recent paper [K. Nemeth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 095002 (2008)]. In the present paper we provide more details on the shape of the trajectories, their relationship to the phase velocity of the laser and indicate the dependence of the phenomenon on the accuracy of the numerical representation and choice of laser/plasma parameters.

  7. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2010-09-15

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [1] is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accomodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing theframe of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  8. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Felicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. Here, we first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  9. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Félicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. We first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  10. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    DOE PAGES

    Albert, Felicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons inmore » the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. Here, we first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.« less

  11. Preformed transient gas channels for laser wakefield particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.M.

    1994-11-01

    Acceleration of electrons by laser-driven plasma wake fields is limited by the range over which a laser pulse can maintain its intensity. This distance is typically given by the Rayleigh range for the focused laser beam, usually on the order of 0.1 mm to 1 mm. For practical particle acceleration, interaction distances on the order of centimeters are required. Therefore, some means of guiding high intensity laser pulses is necessary. Light intensities on the order of a few times 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} are required for laser wakefield acceleration schemes using near IR radiation. Gas densities on the order of or greater than 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} are also needed. Laser-atom interaction studies in this density and intensity regime are generally limited by the concomitant problems in beam propagation introduced by the creation of a plasma. In addition to the interaction distance limit imposed by the Rayleigh range, defocusing of the high intensity laser pulse further limits the peak intensity which can be achieved. To solve the problem of beam propagation limitations in laser-plasma wakefield experiments, two potential methods for creating transient propagation channels in gaseous targets are investigated. The first involves creation of a charge-neutral channel in a gas by an initial laser pulse, which then is ionized by a second, ultrashort, high-intensity pulse to create a waveguide. The second method involves the ionization of a gas column by an ultrashort pulse; a transient waveguide is formed by the subsequent expansion of the heated plasma into the neutral gas.

  12. Enhanced x-rays from resonant betatron oscillations in laser wakefield with external wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. M.; Zhang, B.; Hong, W.; Yu, M. Y.; Deng, Z. G.; Teng, J.; He, S. K.; Gu, Y. Q.

    2016-11-01

    Generation of ultra-short betatron x-rays by laser-accelerated electron beams is of great research interest as it has many applications. In this paper, we propose a scheme for obtaining bright betatron x-rays by applying external wiggler magnetic field in the laser wakefield to resonantly drive the betatron oscillations of the accelerated electrons therein. This results in a significant enhancement of the betatron oscillation amplitude and generation of bright x-rays with high photon energy. The scheme is demonstrated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and discussed using a simple analytical model.

  13. Positron acceleration in plasma bubble wakefield driven by an ultraintense laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Ya-Juan; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-01-15

    The dynamics of positrons accelerating in electron-positron-ion plasma bubble fields driven by an ultraintense laser is investigated. The bubble wakefield is obtained theoretically when laser pulses are propagating in the electron-positron-ion plasma. To restrict the positrons transversely, an electron beam is injected. Acceleration regions and non-acceleration ones of positrons are obtained by the numerical simulation. It is found that the ponderomotive force causes the fluctuation of the positrons momenta, which results in the trapping of them at a lower ion density. The energy gaining of the accelerated positrons is demonstrated, which is helpful for practical applications.

  14. Optimization of positrons generation based on laser wakefield electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuchi; Han, Dan; Zhang, Tiankui; Dong, Kegong; Zhu, Bin; Yan, Yonghong; Gu, Yuqiu

    2016-08-01

    Laser based positron represents a new particle source with short pulse duration and high charge density. Positron production based on laser wakefield electron acceleration (LWFA) has been investigated theoretically in this paper. Analytical expressions for positron spectra and yield have been obtained through a combination of LWFA and cascade shower theories. The maximum positron yield and corresponding converter thickness have been optimized as a function of driven laser power. Under the optimal condition, high energy (>100 MeV ) positron yield up to 5 ×1011 can be produced by high power femtosecond lasers at ELI-NP. The percentage of positrons shows that a quasineutral electron-positron jet can be generated by setting the converter thickness greater than 5 radiation lengths.

  15. Hybrid Laser Wakefield and Direct Laser Plasma Accelerator in the Plasma Bubble Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir; Pukhov, Alexander; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-11-01

    The concept of hybrid laser wakefield and direct laser plasma accelerator in plasma bubble regime was recently proposed. The advantage of this approach is two-fold: (a) electrons' energy gains from the laser and from the wake add up, and (b) dephasing is slowed down. Using 2D VLPL simulations, we will demonstrate that two conditions must be met by the electrons injected into the hybrid accelerator: (1) strong spatial overlap with the laser field, and (2) large initial transverse energy. The firstcondition is met by employing two laser pulses: one to produce a plasma bubble, and the second time-delayed pulse to interact with the injected electrons. We will show that there are two approaches to meeting the second condition: self-injection using an engineered density bump and ionization-injection. The criteria for direct laser acceleration of ionization-injected electrons will be discussed. Combinations of laser pulses with different wavelengths will also be considered. This work is supported by the US DOE grant DE-SC0007889 and the AFOSR grant FA9550-14-1-0045.

  16. Increasing energy coupling into plasma waves by tailoring the laser radial focal spot distribution in a laser wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Genoud, G.; Burza, M.; Persson, A.; Svensson, K.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Vieira, J.; Silva, L. O.

    2013-06-15

    By controlling the focal spot quality with a deformable mirror, we are able to show that increasing the fraction of pulse energy contained within the central part of the focal spot, while keeping the total energy and central spot size constant, significantly increases the amount of energy transferred to the wakefield: Our measurements show that the laser loses significantly more laser energy and undergoes greater redshifting and that more charge is produced in the accelerated beam. Three dimensional particle in cell simulations performed with accurate representations of the measured focal spot intensity distribution confirm that energy in the wings of the focal spot is effectively wasted. Even though self-focusing occurs, energy in the wings of the focal spot distribution is not coupled into the wakefield, emphasising the vital importance of high quality focal spot profiles in experiments.

  17. Femtosecond x-rays from Thomson scattering using laser wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Catravas, P.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2001-03-01

    The possibility of producing femtosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering high power laser beams off laser wakefield generated relativistic electron beams is discussed. The electron beams are produced with either a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SM-LWFA) or through a standard laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with optical injection. For a SM-LWFA (LWFA) produced electron beam, a broad (narrow) energy distribution is assumed, resulting in X-ray spectra that are broadband (monochromatic). Designs are presented for 3-100 fs x-ray pulses and the expected flux and brightness of these sources are compared.

  18. Wakefield evolution and electron acceleration in interaction of frequency-chirped laser pulse with inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Pandari, M.; Niknam, A. R.; Massudi, R.; Jahangiri, F.; Hassaninejad, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of an ultra-short intense frequency-chirped laser pulse with an underdense plasma is studied. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity and laser parameters such as chirp, pulse duration, and intensity on plasma density and wakefield evolutions, and electron acceleration are examined. It is found that a properly chirped laser pulse could induce a stronger laser wakefield in an inhomogeneous plasma and result in higher electron acceleration energy. It is also shown that the wakefield amplitude is enhanced by increasing the slope of density in the inhomogeneous plasma.

  19. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Brunetti, E; Gil, D Reboredo; Welsh, G H; Li, F Y; Cipiccia, S; Ersfeld, B; Grant, D W; Grant, P A; Islam, M R; Tooley, M P; Vieux, G; Wiggins, S M; Sheng, Z M; Jaroszynski, D A

    2017-03-10

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5-10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°-60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators.

  20. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Brunetti, E.; Gil, D. Reboredo; Welsh, G. H.; Li, F. Y.; Cipiccia, S.; Ersfeld, B.; Grant, D. W.; Grant, P. A.; Islam, M. R.; Tooley, M. P.; Vieux, G.; Wiggins, S. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators. PMID:28281679

  1. Experimental validation of a radio frequency photogun as external electron injector for a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stragier, X. F. D.; Luiten, O. J.; van der Geer, S. B.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Brussaard, G. J. H.

    2011-07-01

    A purpose-built RF-photogun as external electron injector for a laser wakefield accelerator has been thoroughly tested. Different properties of the RF-photogun have been measured such as energy, energy spread and transverse emittance. The focus of this study is the investigation of the smallest possible focus spot and focus stability at the entrance of the plasma channel. For an electron bunch with 10 pC charge and 3.7 MeV kinetic energy, the energy spread was 0.5% with a shot-to-shot stability of 0.05%. After focusing the bunch by a pulsed solenoid lens at 140 mm from the middle of the lens, the focal spot was 40 μm with a shot-to-shot stability of 5 μm. Higher charge leads to higher energy spread and to a larger spot size, due to space charge effects. All properties were found to be close to design values. Given the limited energy of 3.7 MeV, the properties are sufficient for this gun to serve as injector for one particular version of laser wakefield acceleration, i.e., injection ahead of the laser pulse. These measured electron bunch properties were then used as input parameters for simulations of electron bunch injection in a laser wakefield accelerator. The arrival time jitter was deduced from measurements of the energy fluctuation, in combination with earlier measurements using THz coherent transition radiation, and is around 150 fs in the present setup. The bunch length in the focus, simulated using particle tracking, depends on the accelerated charge and goes from 100 fs at 0.1 pC to 1 ps at 50 pC. When simulating the injection of the 3.7 MeV electron bunch of 10 pC in front of a 25 TW laser pulse with a waist of 30 μm in a plasma with a density of 0.7 × 1024 m-3, the maximum accelerated charge was found to be 1.2 pC with a kinetic energy of ˜900 MeV and an energy spread of ˜5%. The experiments combined with the simulations show the feasibility of external injection and give a prediction of the output parameters that can be expected from a laser

  2. Laser Wakefield in Low Density Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Eiji; Honda, Hiroshi; Miura, Eisuke; Yugami, Noboru; Nishida, Yasushi; Kondo, Kiminori

    2000-10-01

    The laser wakefiled (LWF) and the relativistic and charge-displacementself-channeling in the comparatively low density plasma were studied.The dynamics of the electron plasma wave (EPW) in LWF wasexperimentally observed at the electron density of ˜1016 cm-3.The two dimensional instantaneous image of EPW was also obtained.The asymmetric 2D image was explained by the modified liner theory.These experimental results suggest that the intensity of ˜1018 W/cm2 was achieved in the low density static gas target.This means the possibility of not only the coherent control of EPW, but also the long relativistic and charge-displacement self-channeling withthe low density static gas.For the self-channeling, the simple model tells us that the long channelwithout defocusing could be possible with a tens of TW, ps glass laser system.

  3. X-ray beam source from a Self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Nuno; Albert, Felicie; Marsh, K. A.; Shaw, J. L.; King, P.; Patankar, S.; Ralph, J.; Pollock, B. B.; Martins, J. L.; Amorim, L. D.; Tsung, F. S.; Goyon, C.; Pak, A.; Moody, J. D.; Schumaker, W.; Fiuza, F.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hegelichand, B. M.; Saunders, A.; Flacone, R. W.; Joshi, C.

    2016-10-01

    To diagnose material properties under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure the development of a directional, small-divergence, small source size and short pulse duration x-ray source has become essential. In this work we explore through experiments and PIC simulations the betatron radiation generated in self-modulated laser-wakefield accelerators. The experiment was preformed at the Jupiter Laser Facility, LLNL where electrons with energies up to 200 MeV and Betatron x-rays with critical energies >10 keV were observed. OSIRIS 2D PIC simulations indicate that the x-ray critical energy directly scales with the a0 of the laser and can easily be increased to critical energies exceeding 50 keV using a laser with a0 of 3.

  4. Generation of 20 kA electron beam from a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Huang, K.; Tao, M. Z.; Li, M. H.; Zhao, J. R.; Ma, Y.; Guo, X.; Wang, J. G.; Chen, M.; Hafz, N.; Zhang, J.; Chen, L. M.

    2017-02-01

    We present the experimentally generated electron bunch from laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) with a charge of 620 pC and a maximum energy up to 0.6 GeV by irradiating 80 TW laser pulses at a 3 mm Helium gas jet. The charge of injected electrons is much larger than the normal scaling laws of LWFA in bubble regime. We also got a quasi-monoenergetic electron beam with energy peaked at 249 MeV and a charge of 68 pC with the similar laser conditions but lower plasma density. As confirmed by 2D particle-in-cell simulations, the boosted bunch charge is due to the continuous injection caused by the self-steepening and self-compression of a laser pulse. During the nonlinear evolution of the laser pulse, the bubble structure broadens and stretches, leading to a longer dephasing length and larger beam charge.

  5. Electron Injection into Laser Wakefields by the Two-Beam Colliding Pulse Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Michel, P.; Toth, C. S.; Geddes, C. G. R.; van Tilborg, J.; Fubiani, G.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Cary, J. R.; Giacone, R.; Bruhwiler, D.

    2004-11-01

    Laser driven acceleration in plasmas has succeeded in producing electron beams containing considerable amount of charge (> 100 pC) at energies in excess of 100 MeV. Control of the trapping process is needed to generate monoenergetic electron beams in a reproducible manner. We report on experimental progress of laser triggered injection of electrons into laser wakefields with a two-pulse colliding laser scheme[1]. The experiments use the multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:Al_2O3 laser at the l'OASIS facility of LBNL. In the experiments, two counter propagating beams 30^rc angle are focused onto a high density ( ˜10^19/cm^3) gas jet. Preliminary results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. Details of the experiments will be shown as well as comparisons with simulations. [1] G. Fubiani, et., al, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004).

  6. Influence of a strong longitudinal magnetic field on laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rassou, S.; Bourdier, A.; Drouin, M.

    2015-07-15

    Optimization of the beam quality and electronic trapped charge in the cavity are key issues of laser wake field acceleration. The effect of an initially applied uniform magnetic field, parallel to the direction of propagation of the pump pulse, on the laser wakefield is explored. First, an analytic model for the laser wakefield is built up in the case when such an external magnetic field is applied. Then, simulations are performed with a 3D quasi-cylindrical particle in cell code in the blowout (or bubble) regime. Transverse currents are generated at the rear of the bubble which amplify the longitudinal magnetic field. For several plasma and laser parameters, the wake shape is altered and trapping can be reduced or cancelled by the magnetic field. When considering optical injection, and when two counterpropagating waves interact with a rather high plasma density, trapping is not affected by the magnetic field. In this range of plasma and laser parameters, it is shown that the longitudinal magnetic field can reduce or even prevent self-injection and enhance beam quality.

  7. Optimization of THz Radiation Generation from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Tilborg, J. van; Albert, O.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Ultrashort terahertz pulses with energies in the {mu}J range can be generated with laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA), which are novel, compact accelerators that produce ultrashort electron bunches with energies up to 1 GeV and energy spreads of a few-percent. Laser pulses interacting with a plasma create accelerated electrons which upon exiting the plasma emit terahertz pulses via transition radiation. Because these electron bunches are ultrashort (<50 fs), they can radiate coherently (coherent transition radiation--CTR) in a wide bandwidth ({approx}1-10 THz) yielding high intensity terahertz pulses. In addition to providing a non-invasive bunch-length diagnostic and thus feedback for the LWFA, these high peak power THz pulses are suitable for high field (MV/cm) pump-probe experiments. Here we present energy-based measurements using a Golay cell and an electro-optic technique which were used to characterize these THz pulses.

  8. Summary of Working Group 1: Laser Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Krushelnick, Karl; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Gonsalves, Anthony

    2009-01-22

    There have been many significant experimental and theoretical advances recently with regard to the production of relativistic electron beams using laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) driven by high power short pulse lasers. In particular, there has been an explosion of interest in this field following the discovery of methods to generate such beams with low energy spread. In recent work by many groups around the world the energy and quality of these beams has been improved and a more complete understanding of the 'bubble' regime of electron acceleration has been obtained, enabling a significant improvement in the output electron beam stability. The 2008 Advanced Accelerator Concepts workshop in Santa Cruz CA brought together the leading groups engaged in this research from around the world. This paper will summarize the major results presented at the conference. Further details on the work described here can be found in the other related papers in these proceedings.

  9. Summary of Working Group 1: Laser Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnick, Karl; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Gonsalves, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    There have been many significant experimental and theoretical advances recently with regard to the production of relativistic electron beams using laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) driven by high power short pulse lasers. In particular, there has been an explosion of interest in this field following the discovery of methods to generate such beams with low energy spread. In recent work by many groups around the world the energy and quality of these beams has been improved and a more complete understanding of the "bubble" regime of electron acceleration has been obtained, enabling a significant improvement in the output electron beam stability. The 2008 Advanced Accelerator Concepts workshop in Santa Cruz CA brought together the leading groups engaged in this research from around the world. This paper will summarize the major results presented at the conference. Further details on the work described here can be found in the other related papers in these proceedings.

  10. Direct Observation of the Injection Dynamics of a Laser Wakefield Accelerator Using Few-Femtosecond Shadowgraphy.

    PubMed

    Sävert, A; Mangles, S P D; Schnell, M; Siminos, E; Cole, J M; Leier, M; Reuter, M; Schwab, M B; Möller, M; Poder, K; Jäckel, O; Paulus, G G; Spielmann, C; Skupin, S; Najmudin, Z; Kaluza, M C

    2015-07-31

    We present few-femtosecond shadowgraphic snapshots taken during the nonlinear evolution of the plasma wave in a laser wakefield accelerator with transverse synchronized few-cycle probe pulses. These snapshots can be directly associated with the electron density distribution within the plasma wave and give quantitative information about its size and shape. Our results show that self-injection of electrons into the first plasma-wave period is induced by a lengthening of the first plasma period. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations support our observations.

  11. Laser-wakefield acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams in the first plasma-wave period.

    PubMed

    Mangles, S P D; Thomas, A G R; Kaluza, M C; Lundh, O; Lindau, F; Persson, A; Tsung, F S; Najmudin, Z; Mori, W B; Wahlström, C-G; Krushelnick, K

    2006-06-02

    Beam profile measurements of laser-wakefield accelerated electron bunches reveal that in the monoenergetic regime the electrons are injected and accelerated at the back of the first period of the plasma wave. With pulse durations ctau >or= lambda(p), we observe an elliptical beam profile with the axis of the ellipse parallel to the axis of the laser polarization. This increase in divergence in the laser polarization direction indicates that the electrons are accelerated within the laser pulse. Reducing the plasma density (decreasing ctau/lambda(p)) leads to a beam profile with less ellipticity, implying that the self-injection occurs at the rear of the first period of the plasma wave. This also demonstrates that the electron bunches are less than a plasma wavelength long, i.e., have a duration <25 fs. This interpretation is supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations.

  12. Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: A path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2014-05-15

    The wakefield generated in a plasma by incoherently combining a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e., without constraining the pulse phases) is studied analytically and by means of fully self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The structure of the wakefield has been characterized and its amplitude compared with the amplitude of the wake generated by a single (coherent) laser pulse. We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of the wakefield within the volume occupied by the laser pulses, behind this region, the structure of the wakefield can be regular with an amplitude comparable or equal to that obtained from a single pulse with the same energy. Wake generation requires that the incoherent structures in the laser energy density produced by the combined pulses exist on a time scale short compared to the plasma period. Incoherent combination of multiple laser pulses may enable a technologically simpler path to high-repetition rate, high-average power laser-plasma accelerators, and associated applications.

  13. Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-05-01

    he wakefield generated in a plasma by incoherently combining a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e.,without constraining the pulse phases) is studied analytically and by means of fully-self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The structure of the wakefield has been characterized and its amplitude compared with the amplitude of the wake generated by a single (coherent) laser pulse. We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of the wakefield within the volume occupied by the laser pulses, behind this region the structure of the wakefield can be regular with an amplitude comparable or equal to that obtained from a single pulse with the same energy. Wake generation requires that the incoherent structure in the laser energy density produced by the combined pulses exists on a time scale short compared to the plasma period. Incoherent combination of multiple laser pulses may enable a technologically simpler path to high-repetition rate, high-average power laser-plasma accelerators and associated applications.

  14. GEANT4 simulations for beam emittance in a linear collider based on plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Mete, O. Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Labiche, M.

    2015-08-15

    Alternative acceleration technologies are currently under development for cost-effective, robust, compact, and efficient solutions. One such technology is plasma wakefield acceleration, driven by either a charged particle or laser beam. However, the potential issues must be studied in detail. In this paper, the emittance evolution of a witness beam through elastic scattering from gaseous media and under transverse focusing wakefields is studied.

  15. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Driven by a CO2 Laser (STELLA-LW) - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Wayne D

    2008-06-27

    The original goals of the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration – Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) program were to investigate two new methods for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). In pseudo-resonant LWFA (PR-LWFA), a laser pulse experiences nonlinear pulse steepening while traveling through the plasma. This steepening allows the laser pulse to generate wakefields even though the laser pulse length is too long for resonant LWFA to occur. For the conditions of this program, PR-LWFA requires a minimum laser peak power of 3 TW and a low plasma density (10^16 cm^-3). Seeded self-modulated LWFA (seeded SM-LWFA) combines LWFA with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). An ultrashort (~100 fs) electron beam bunch acts as a seed in a plasma to form a wakefield via PWFA. This wakefield is subsequently amplified by the laser pulse through a self-modulated LWFA process. At least 1 TW laser power and, for a ~100-fs bunch, a plasma density ~10^17 cm^-3 are required. STELLA-LW was located on Beamline #1 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF TW CO2 laser served as the driving laser beam for both methods. For PR-LWFA, a single bunch was to probe the wakefield produced by the laser beam. For seeded SM-LWFA, the ATF linac would produce two bunches, where the first would be the seed and the second would be the witness. A chicane would compress the first bunch to enable it to generate wakefields via PWFA. The plasma source was a short-length, gas-filled capillary discharge with the laser beam tightly focused in the center of the capillary, i.e., no laser guiding was used, in order to obtain the needed laser intensity. During the course of the program, several major changes had to be made. First, the ATF could not complete the upgrade of the CO2 laser to the 3 TW peak power needed for the PR-LWFA experiment. Therefore, the PR-LWFA experiment had to be abandoned leaving only the seeded SM-LWFA experiment. Second, the ATF discovered that the

  16. Undulator radiation driven by laser-wakefield accelerator electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, S. M.; Anania, M. P.; Welsh, G. H.; Brunetti, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Grant, P. A.; Reboredo, D.; Manahan, G.; Grant, D. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Laser-Plasma High-Energy Accelerators towards X-rays (ALPHA-X) programme is developing laserplasma accelerators for the production of ultra-short electron bunches with subsequent generation of coherent, bright, short-wavelength radiation pulses. The new Scottish Centre for the Application of Plasma-based Accelerators (SCAPA) will develop a wide range of applications utilising such light sources. Electron bunches can be propagated through a magnetic undulator with the aim of generating fully coherent free-electron laser (FEL) radiation in the ultra-violet and Xrays spectral ranges. Demonstration experiments producing spontaneous undulator radiation have been conducted at visible and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths but it is an on-going challenge to generate and maintain electron bunches of sufficient quality in order to stimulate FEL behaviour. In the ALPHA-X beam line experiments, a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser system with peak power 20 TW has been used to generate electron bunches of energy 80-150 MeV in a 2 mm gas jet laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and these bunches have been transported through a 100 period planar undulator. High peak brilliance, narrow band spontaneous radiation pulses in the vacuum ultra-violet wavelength range have been generated. Analysis is provided with respect to the magnetic quadrupole beam transport system and subsequent effect on beam emittance and duration. Requirements for coherent spontaneous emission and FEL operation are presented.

  17. Self-truncated ionization injection and consequent monoenergetic electron bunches in laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Ming; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Mori, Warren B.

    2014-03-15

    The ionization-induced injection in laser wakefield acceleration has been recently demonstrated to be a promising injection scheme. However, the energy spread controlling in this mechanism remains a challenge because continuous injection in a mixed gas target is usually inevitable. Here, we propose that by use of certain initially unmatched laser pulses, the electron injection can be constrained to the very front region of the mixed gas target, typically in a length of a few hundreds micrometers determined by the laser self-focusing and the wake deformation. As a result, the produced electron beam has narrow energy spread and meanwhile contains tens of pC in charge. Both multidimensional simulations and theoretical analysis illustrate the effectiveness of this scheme.

  18. Laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Austin Yi, S.; Shvets, Gennady; Pukhov, Alexander

    2013-10-15

    A new method for initiating the modulation instability (MI) of a proton beam in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator using a short laser pulse preceding the beam is presented. A diffracting laser pulse is used to produce a plasma wave that provides a seeding modulation of the proton bunch with the period equal to that of the plasma wave. Using the envelope description of the proton beam, this method of seeding the MI is analytically compared with the earlier suggested seeding technique that involves an abrupt truncation of the proton bunch. The full kinetic simulation of a realistic proton bunch is used to validate the analytic results. It is further used to demonstrate that a plasma density ramp placed in the early stages of the laser-seeded MI leads to its stabilization, resulting in sustained accelerating electric fields (of order several hundred MV/m) over long propagation distances (∼100–1000 m)

  19. Multichromatic Narrow-Energy-Spread Electron Bunches from Laser-Wakefield Acceleration with Dual-Color Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, M.; Chen, M.; Yu, L. L.; Mori, W. B.; Sheng, Z. M.; Hidding, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-02-01

    A method based on laser wakefield acceleration with controlled ionization injection triggered by another frequency-tripled laser is proposed, which can produce electron bunches with low energy spread. As two color pulses copropagate in the background plasma, the peak amplitude of the combined laser field is modulated in time and space during the laser propagation due to the plasma dispersion. Ionization injection occurs when the peak amplitude exceeds a certain threshold. The threshold is exceeded for limited duration periodically at different propagation distances, leading to multiple ionization injections and separated electron bunches. The method is demonstrated through multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Such electron bunches may be used to generate multichromatic x-ray sources for a variety of applications.

  20. Wakefield effects and solitary waves of an intense short laser pulse propagation in a plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Xueren; Xie Baisong; Zhao Xueyan; Zhang Shan; Wu Haicheng

    2011-10-15

    In the presence of relativistic and channel-coupling nonlinearity and wakefield effects, the propagation characteristics and solitary waves of an intense short laser pulse in a preformed plasma channel are investigated. The evolution equation of the laser spot size is derived by using variational technique, the initial laser and plasma parameters for propagation with constant spot size, periodic defocusing and focusing oscillations, and solitary waves are identified. For illustration, some numerical results are also presented. It is found that the laser focusing is enhanced by the wakefield effects that result in a significant reduced focusing power.

  1. Control and optimization of a staged laser-wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Yan, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, B.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-09-01

    We report results of an experimental study of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons, using a staged device based on a double-jet gas target that enables independent injection and acceleration stages. This novel scheme is shown to produce stable, quasi-monoenergetic, and tunable electron beams. We show that optimal accelerator performance is achieved by systematic variation of five critical parameters. For the injection stage, we show that the amount of trapped charge is controlled by the gas density, composition, and laser power. For the acceleration stage, the gas density and the length of the jet are found to determine the final electron energy. This independent control over both the injection and acceleration processes enabled independent control over the charge and energy of the accelerated electron beam while preserving the quasi-monoenergetic character of the beam. We show that the charge and energy can be varied in the ranges of 2-45 pC, and 50-450 MeV, respectively. This robust and versatile electron accelerator will find application in the generation of high-brightness and controllable x-rays, and as the injector stage for more conventional devices.

  2. Laser wakefield acceleration at reduced density in the self-guided regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, J. E.; Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Shaw, J. L.; Till, A.; Palastro, J. P.; Glenzer, S. H.; Froula, D. H.; Clayton, C. E.; Pak, A. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Lu, W.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Martins, S. F.; Silva, L. O.

    2010-05-15

    Experiments conducted using a 200 TW 60 fs laser have demonstrated up to 720 MeV electrons in the self-guided laser wakefield regime using pure helium gas jet targets. The self-trapped charge in a helium plasma was shown to fall off with decreasing electron density with a threshold at 2.5x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, below which no charge is measured above 100 MeV. Self-guiding, however, is shown to continue below this density limitation over distances of 14 mm with an exit spot size of 25 {mu}m. Simulations show that injection of electrons at these densities can be assisted through ionization induced trapping in a mix of helium with 3% oxygen.

  3. Laser Wakefield Acceleration at Reduced Density in the Self-Guided Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, J E; Albert, F; Glenzer, S H; Palastro, J P; Pollock, B B; Shaw, J L; Till, A; Froula, D H; Clayton, C E; Lu, W; Mori, W B; Pak, A E; Joshi, C; Martin, S; Silva, L O

    2009-11-18

    Experiments conducted using a 200TW 60 fs laser have demonstrated up to 720 MeV electrons in the self-guided laser wakefield regime using pure Helium gas jet targets. Charge and energy of the accelerated electrons was measured using an electron spectrometer with a 0.5T magnet and charge callibrated image plates. The self-trapped charge in a helium plasma was shown to fall off with decreasing electron density with a threshold at 2.5 x 10{sup 18} (cm{sup -3}) below which no charge is trapped. Self-guiding however is shown to continue below this density limitation over distances of 14 mm with an exit spot size of 25{micro}m. Simulations show that injection of electrons at these densities can be assisted through ionization induced trapping in a mix of Helium with 3% Oxygen.

  4. Development of 873 nm Raman Seed Pulse for Raman-seeded Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigsby, F.; Peng, D.; Downer, M. C.

    2004-12-01

    By using a Raman-shifted seed pulse coincident with a main driving pulse, laser wakefields can be generated with sub-relativistic intensity, coherent control and high repetition rate in the self-modulated regime. Experimentally, the generation of a chirped Stokes laser pulse by inserting a solid state Raman shifter, Ba(NO3)2, into a CPA system before the compressor (to suppress self-phase modulation) will be described. We will also report on design, modeling and experimental demonstration of a novel compressor for the Stokes pulse that uses a mismatched grating pair to achieve a near transform-limited seed pulse. Finally, we will describe the design, simulation and current status of Raman-seeded LWFA experiments that use this novel source.

  5. Dynamics of electron injection and acceleration driven by laser wakefield in tailored density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, P.; Maynard, G.; Audet, T. L.; Cros, B.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of electron acceleration driven by laser wakefield is studied in detail using the particle-in-cell code WARP with the objective to generate high-quality electron bunches with narrow energy spread and small emittance, relevant for the electron injector of a multistage accelerator. Simulation results, using experimentally achievable parameters, show that electron bunches with an energy spread of ˜11 % can be obtained by using an ionization-induced injection mechanism in a mm-scale length plasma. By controlling the focusing of a moderate laser power and tailoring the longitudinal plasma density profile, the electron injection beginning and end positions can be adjusted, while the electron energy can be finely tuned in the last acceleration section.

  6. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    PubMed

    He, Z-H; Beaurepaire, B; Nees, J A; Gallé, G; Scott, S A; Pérez, J R Sánchez; Lagally, M G; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R; Faure, J

    2016-11-08

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-diffraction schemes.

  7. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.-H.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Gallé, G.; Scott, S. A.; Pérez, J. R. Sánchez; Lagally, M. G.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Faure, J.

    2016-11-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-diffraction schemes.

  8. Bubble shape and electromagnetic field in the nonlinear regime for laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Kong, Q.; Gu, Y. J.; Kawata, S.

    2015-08-15

    The electromagnetic field in the electron “bubble” regime for ultra-intense laser wakefield acceleration was solved using the d'Alembert equations. Ignoring the residual electrons, we assume an ellipsoidal bubble forms under ideal conditions, with bubble velocity equal to the speed of light in vacuum. The general solution for bubble shape and electromagnetic field were obtained. The results were confirmed in 2.5D PIC (particle-in-cell) simulations. Moreover, slopes for the longitudinal electric field of larger than 0.5 were found in these simulations. With spherical bubbles, this slope is always smaller than or equal to 0.5. This behavior validates the ellipsoid assumption.

  9. High-efficiency acceleration in the laser wakefield by a linearly increasing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Kegong; Wu, Yuchi; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Zhimeng; Zhao, Zongqing; Zhou, Weimin; Hong, Wei; Cao, Leifeng; Gu, Yuqiu

    2014-12-15

    The acceleration length and the peak energy of the electron beam are limited by the dephasing effect in the laser wakefield acceleration with uniform plasma density. Based on 2D-3V particle in cell simulations, the effects of a linearly increasing plasma density on the electron acceleration are investigated broadly. Comparing with the uniform plasma density, because of the prolongation of the acceleration length and the gradually increasing accelerating field due to the increasing plasma density, the electron beam energy is twice higher in moderate nonlinear wakefield regime. Because of the lower plasma density, the linearly increasing plasma density can also avoid the dark current caused by additional injection. At the optimal acceleration length, the electron energy can be increased from 350 MeV (uniform) to 760 MeV (linearly increasing) with the energy spread of 1.8%, the beam duration is 5 fs and the beam waist is 1.25 μm. This linearly increasing plasma density distribution can be achieved by a capillary with special gas-filled structure, and is much more suitable for experiment.

  10. Energy spread minimization in a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator via velocity bunching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Yu, Changhai; Tian, Ye; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Deng, Aihua; Qi, Rong; Wang, Cheng; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Liu, Jiaqi; Xia, Changquan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-05-01

    We propose a scheme to minimize the energy spread of an electron beam (e-beam) in a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to the one-thousandth-level by inserting a stage to compress its longitudinal spatial distribution. In this scheme, three-segment plasma stages are designed for electron injection, e-beam length compression, and e-beam acceleration, respectively. The trapped e-beam in the injection stage is transferred to the zero-phase region at the center of one wakefield period in the compression stage where the length of the e-beam can be greatly shortened owing to the velocity bunching. After being seeded into the third stage for acceleration, the e-beam can be accelerated to a much higher energy before its energy chirp is compensated owing to the shortened e-beam length. A one-dimensional theory and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have demonstrated this scheme and an e-beam with 0.2% rms energy spread and low transverse emittance could be generated without loss of charge.

  11. Applications of laser wakefield accelerators for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2014-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators driven by high-intensity short-pulse lasers are a proven compact source of high-energy electron beams, with energy gains of ~GeV energy in centimetres of plasma demonstrated. One of the main proposed applications for these accelerators is to drive synchrotron light sources, in particular for x-ray applications. It has also been shown that the same plasma accelerator can also act as a wigglers, capable of the production of high brightness and spatially coherent hard x-ray beams. In this latest work, we demonstrate the application of these unique light-sources for biological and medical applications. The experiments were performed with the Astra Gemini laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. Gemini produces laser pulses with energy exceeding 10 J in pulse lengths down to 40 fs. A long focal length parabola (f / 20) is used to focus the laser down to a spot of size approximately 25 μ m (fwhm) into a gas-cell of variable length. Electrons are accelerated to energies up to 1 GeV and a bright beam of x-rays is observed simultaneously with the accelerated beam. The length of the gas cell was optimised to produce high contrast x-ray images of radiographed test objects. This source was then used for imaging a number of interesting medical and biological samples. Full tomographic imaging of a human trabecular bone sample was made with resolution easily exceeding the ~100 μm level required for CT applications. Phase-contrast imaging of human prostrate and mouse neonates at the micron level was also demonstrated. These studies indicate the usefulness of these sources in research and clinical applications. They also show that full 3D imaging can be made possible with this source in a fraction of the time that it would take with a corresponding x-ray tube. The JAI is funded by STFC Grant ST/J002062/1.

  12. Temporal Evolution of Self-Modulated Laser Wakefields Measured by Coherent Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Moore, C.I.; Burris, H.R.; Esarey, E.; Krall, J.; Sprangle, P. |

    1996-12-01

    Coherent Thomson scattering of a picosecond probe laser was used to measure the time evolution of plasma wakefields produced by a high intensity laser pulse (7{times}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) in an underdense plasma ({ital n}{sub {ital e}}{approx_equal}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3}) in the self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator configuration. Large amplitude plasma wakefields which lasted less than 5ps were observed to decay into ion acoustic waves. The time scales associated with these measurements were consistent with the effects of the modulational instability and the enhancement of scattered signal from plasma channel formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. A table-top x-ray FEL based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K.; Kawakubo, T.; Nakanishi, H.

    1995-12-31

    Ultrahigh-gradient electron acceleration has been confirmed owing to the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The laser wakefield acceleration makes it possible to build a compact electron linac capable of producing an ultra-short bunched electron beam. While the accelerator is attributed to longitudinal wakefields, transverse wakefields simultaneously generated by a short laser pulse can serve as a plasma undulator with a very short wavelength equal to a half of the plasma wavelength. We propose a new FEL concept for X-rays based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system driven by intense short laser pulses delivered from table-top terawatt lasers. The system is composed of the accelerator stage and the undulator stage in a table-top size. A low energy electron beam is accelerated an bunched into microbunches due to laser wakefields in the accelerator stage. A micro-bunched beam travelling to the opposite direction of driving laser pulses produces coherent X-ray radiation in the undulator stage. A practical configuration and its analyses are presented.

  14. Generation of laser pulse trains for tests of multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalloo, R. J.; Corner, L.; Arran, C.; Cowley, J.; Cheung, G.; Thornton, C.; Walczak, R.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    In multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration (MP-LWFA) a plasma wave is driven by a train of low-energy laser pulses separated by the plasma period, an approach which offers a route to driving plasma accelerators with high efficiency and at high pulse repetition rates using emerging technologies such as fibre and thin-disk lasers. Whilst these laser technologies are in development, proof-of-principle tests of MP-LWFA require a pulse train to be generated from a single, high-energy ultrafast pulse. Here we demonstrate the generation of trains of up to 7 pulses with pulse separations in the range 150-170 fs from single 40 fs pulses produced by a Ti:sapphire laser.

  15. Two-Color Laser High-Harmonic Generation in Cavitated Plasma Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2016-10-03

    A method is proposed for producing coherent x-rays via high-harmonic generation using a laser interacting with highly-stripped ions in cavitated plasma wakefields. Two laser pulses of different colors are employed: a long-wavelength pulse for cavitation and a short-wavelength pulse for harmonic generation. This method enables efficient laser harmonic generation in the sub-nm wavelength regime.

  16. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Chen, Y. -H.; Alessi, D.; Pak, A.; Clayton, C. E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  17. Probing lattice dynamics in silicon with laser-wakefield accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nees, John; He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, Karl; Scott, S.; Legally, M.; Beaurepaire, B.; Gallé, G.; Faure, J.

    2016-10-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration is the key technology in a new breed of electron and photon beam sources that operate in the ultrafast domain. We show that the spatial and temporal properties of wakefield-generated electron beams can be manipulated to enable them interrogate ultrafast lattice dynamics in freestanding single-crystal silicon membranes, while maintaining spatial resolution on the atomic scale. In particular, picosecond resolution of Si lattice dynamics is obtained by recording streaked electron diffraction peaks using static magnetic fields. We will also discuss the role of wave front control in establishing optimal beam characteristics and the significance of single-shot measurements. Michigan support from NSF PHY-1535628.

  18. Methods of Generating High-Quality Beams in Laser Wakefield Accelerators through Self-Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Asher Warren

    In the pursuit of discovering the fundamental laws and particles of nature, physicists have been colliding particles at ever increasing energy for almost a century. Lepton (electrons and positrons) colliders rely on linear accelerators (LINACS) because leptons radiate copious amounts of energy when accelerated in a circular machine. The size and cost of a linear collider is mainly determined by the acceleration gradient. Modern linear accelerators have gradients limited to 20-100 MeV/m because of the breakdown of the walls of the accelerator. Plasma based acceleration is receiving much attention because a plasma wave with a phase velocity near the speed of light can support acceleration gradients at least three orders of magnitude larger than those in modern accelerators. There is no breakdown limit in a plasma since it is already ionized. Such a plasma wave can be excited by the radiation pressure of an intense short pulse laser. This is called laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). Much progress has been made in LWFA research in the past 30 years. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have played a major part in this progress. The physics inherent in LWFA is nonlinear and three-dimensional in nature. Three-dimensional PIC simulations are computationally intensive. In this dissertation, we present and describe in detail a new algorithm that was introduced into the Particle-In-Cell Simulation Framework. We subsequently use this new quasi three-dimensional algorithm to efficiently explore the parameter regimes of LWFA that are accessible for existing and near term lasers. This regimes cannot be explored using full three-dimensional simulations even on leadership class computing facilities. The simulations presented in this dissertation show that the nonlinear, self-guided regime of LWFA described through phenomenological scaling laws by Lu et al., in 2007 is still useful for accelerating electrons to energies greater than 10 GeV. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  19. A bremsstrahlung gamma-ray source based on stable ionization injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Lifschitz, A.; Sylla, F.; Goddet, J.-P.; Tafzi, A.; Iaquanello, G.; Lefrou, T.; Rousseau, P.; Conejero, E.; Ruiz, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V.

    2016-09-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration permits the generation of ultra-short, high-brightness relativistic electron beams on a millimeter scale. While those features are of interest for many applications, the source remains constraint by the poor stability of the electron injection process. Here we present results on injection and acceleration of electrons in pure nitrogen and argon. We observe stable, continuous ionization-induced injection of electrons into the wakefield for laser powers exceeding a threshold of 7 TW. The beam charge scales approximately with the laser energy and is limited by beam loading. For 40 TW laser pulses we measure a maximum charge of almost 1 nC per shot, originating mostly from electrons of less than 10 MeV energy. The relatively low energy, the high charge and its stability make this source well-suited for applications such as non-destructive testing. Hence, we demonstrate the production of energetic radiation via bremsstrahlung conversion at 1 Hz repetition rate. In accordance with GEANT4 Monte-Carlo simulations, we measure a γ-ray source size of less than 100 μm for a 0.5 mm tantalum converter placed at 2 mm from the accelerator exit. Furthermore we present radiographs of image quality indicators.

  20. Wakefield-acceleration of relativistic electrons with few-cycle laser pulses at kHz-repetition-rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenot, Diego; Gustas, Dominykas; Vernier, Aline; Boehle, Frederik; Beaurepaire, Benoit; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Faure, Jerome; Appli Team

    2016-10-01

    The generation of relativistic electron beams using laser wakefield acceleration has become a standard technique, providing low emittance electron bunches with femtosecond durations. However, this technique usually requires multi-ten-terawatt lasers and is thus limited to low repetition-rate (typically 10 Hz or less). We have recently demonstrated the generation of few MeV electrons using 2.5-mJ, 4-fs, 1-kHz repetition-rate laser pulses, focused to relativistic intensity onto a gas jet with electron density 1020 cm-3. We have investigated the influence of the pulse duration, the gas density. We demonstrated that an electron beam with a charge in the range of 10-fC/shot, with a divergence of 20-mrad and a peaked spectrum with energies between 2 and 4 MeV can be generated at kHz repetition-rate. These results confirm the possibility of using few-cycle laser pulses with very low energy for exciting wakefields in the bubble regime and for trapping electrons, as predicted by PIC simulations. This kHz electron source is ideally suited for performing electron diffraction experiments with very high temporal resolution. Our results also open the way to other applications, such as the generation of a kHz ultrafast X-ray source. ERC femtoelec.

  1. Summary report of working group 1: Laser-plasma wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Pollock, Bradley; Lu, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The work presented in the laser-plasma acceleration working group at the 2016 Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop is summarized. Some of the highlights include: direct visualization of the electric and magnetic fields using a LPA (laser plasma accelerator) electron probe, offering transverse snapshots of the wakefield even for very low density; first demonstration of multi-pulse LPA and wakefield cancellation with a trailing pulse (first step to energy recovery); and control over the shock front angle to optimize density transition injection, which provides stable and low-energy-spread beams that are critical for increasing the efficiency of the recently presented staged LPA. Interesting ongoing and future work discussed included LPAs driven by CO2 lasers and scaling to 10 GeV with and without optical guiding. Further details on each of these topics can be found in the respective papers in these Proceedings.

  2. Exploiting multi-scale parallelism for large scale numerical modelling of laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. A.; Vieira, J.; Fiuza, F.; Davidson, A.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Silva, L. O.

    2013-12-01

    A new generation of laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA), supported by the extreme accelerating fields generated in the interaction of PW-Class lasers and underdense targets, promises the production of high quality electron beams in short distances for multiple applications. Achieving this goal will rely heavily on numerical modelling to further understand the underlying physics and identify optimal regimes, but large scale modelling of these scenarios is computationally heavy and requires the efficient use of state-of-the-art petascale supercomputing systems. We discuss the main difficulties involved in running these simulations and the new developments implemented in the OSIRIS framework to address these issues, ranging from multi-dimensional dynamic load balancing and hybrid distributed/shared memory parallelism to the vectorization of the PIC algorithm. We present the results of the OASCR Joule Metric program on the issue of large scale modelling of LWFA, demonstrating speedups of over 1 order of magnitude on the same hardware. Finally, scalability to over ˜106 cores and sustained performance over ˜2 P Flops is demonstrated, opening the way for large scale modelling of LWFA scenarios.

  3. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ho Nakajima, Kazuhisa Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Yoo, Byung Ju; Shin, Kang Woo; Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Choi, Il Woo; Rhee, Yong Joo; Shin, Jung Hun; Jo, Sung Ha; Hojbota, Calin; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-15

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime.

  4. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Hojbota, Calin; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime.

  5. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    PubMed Central

    He, Z.-H.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Gallé, G.; Scott, S. A.; Pérez, J. R. Sánchez; Lagally, M. G.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Faure, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-diffraction schemes. PMID:27824086

  6. Measurements and simulations of wakefields at the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snuverink, J.; Ainsworth, R.; Boogert, S. T.; Cullinan, F. J.; Lyapin, A.; Kim, Y. I.; Kubo, K.; Kuroda, S.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; White, G. R.

    2016-09-01

    Wakefields are an important factor in accelerator design, and are a real concern when preserving the low beam emittance in modern machines. Charge dependent beam size growth has been observed at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF2), a test accelerator for future linear collider beam delivery systems. Part of the explanation of this beam size growth is wakefields. In this paper we present numerical calculations of the wakefields produced by several types of geometrical discontinuities in the beam line as well as tracking simulations to estimate the induced effects. We also discuss precision beam kick measurements performed with the ATF2 cavity beam position monitor system for a test wakefield source in a movable section of the vacuum chamber. Using an improved model independent method we measured a wakefield kick for this movable section of about 0.49 V /pC /mm , which, compared to the calculated value from electromagnetic simulations of 0.41 V /pC /mm , is within the systematic error.

  7. Self-modulated laser wakefield accelerators as x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, N.; Martins, J. L.; Tsung, F. S.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Joshi, C.

    2016-02-17

    The development of a directional, small-divergence, and short-duration picosecond x-ray probe beam with an energy greater than 50 keV is desirable for high energy density science experiments. We therefore explore through particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations the possibility of using x-rays radiated by betatron-like motion of electrons from a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator as a possible candidate to meet this need. Two OSIRIS 2D PIC simulations with mobile ions are presented, one with a normalized vector potential a 0 = 1.5 and the other with an a 0 = 3. We find that in both cases direct laser acceleration (DLA) is an important additional acceleration mechanism in addition to the longitudinal electric field of the plasma wave. Together these mechanisms produce electrons with a continuous energy spectrum with a maximum energy of 300 MeV for a 0 = 3 case and 180 MeV in the a 0 = 1.5 case. Forward-directed x-ray radiation with a photon energy up to 100 keV was calculated for the a 0 = 3 case and up to 12 keV for the a 0 = 1.5 case. The x-ray spectrum can be fitted with a sum of two synchrotron spectra with critical photon energies of 13 and 45 keV for the a 0 of 3 and critical photon energies of 0.3 and 1.4 keV for a 0 of 1.5 in the plane of polarization of the laser. As a result, the full width at half maximum divergence angle of the x-rays was 62 × 1.9 mrad for a 0 = 3 and 77 × 3.8 mrad for a 0 = 1.5.

  8. Self-modulated laser wakefield accelerators as x-ray sources

    DOE PAGES

    Lemos, N.; Martins, J. L.; Tsung, F. S.; ...

    2016-02-17

    The development of a directional, small-divergence, and short-duration picosecond x-ray probe beam with an energy greater than 50 keV is desirable for high energy density science experiments. We therefore explore through particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations the possibility of using x-rays radiated by betatron-like motion of electrons from a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator as a possible candidate to meet this need. Two OSIRIS 2D PIC simulations with mobile ions are presented, one with a normalized vector potential a 0 = 1.5 and the other with an a 0 = 3. We find that in both cases direct laser acceleration (DLA) ismore » an important additional acceleration mechanism in addition to the longitudinal electric field of the plasma wave. Together these mechanisms produce electrons with a continuous energy spectrum with a maximum energy of 300 MeV for a 0 = 3 case and 180 MeV in the a 0 = 1.5 case. Forward-directed x-ray radiation with a photon energy up to 100 keV was calculated for the a 0 = 3 case and up to 12 keV for the a 0 = 1.5 case. The x-ray spectrum can be fitted with a sum of two synchrotron spectra with critical photon energies of 13 and 45 keV for the a 0 of 3 and critical photon energies of 0.3 and 1.4 keV for a 0 of 1.5 in the plane of polarization of the laser. As a result, the full width at half maximum divergence angle of the x-rays was 62 × 1.9 mrad for a 0 = 3 and 77 × 3.8 mrad for a 0 = 1.5.« less

  9. Single-shot betatron source size measurement from a laser-wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, A.; Couperus, J. P.; Zarini, O.; Jochmann, A.; Irman, A.; Schramm, U.

    2016-09-01

    Betatron radiation emitted by accelerated electrons in laser-wakefield accelerators can be used as a diagnostic tool to investigate electron dynamics during the acceleration process. We analyze the spectral characteristics of the emitted Betatron pattern utilizing a 2D x-ray imaging spectroscopy technique. Together with simultaneously recorded electron spectra and x-ray images, the betatron source size, thus the electron beam radius, can be deduced at every shot.

  10. Laser-driven plasma wakefield electron acceleration and coherent femtosecond pulse generation in X-ray and gamma ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunov, V. I.; Lotov, K. V.; Gubin, K. V.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Bagayev, S. N.; Logachev, P. V.

    2017-01-01

    The laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of electrons in capillaries and gas jets followed by inverse Compton scattering of high intensity femtosecond laser pulses is discussed. The drive and scattered pulses will be produced by the two-channel multi-terawatt laser system developed in ILP SB RAS.

  11. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, M.; Aurand, B.; Ekerfelt, H.; Persson, A.; Lundh, O.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second pulse in relation to the main pulse. Furthermore, the peak energy of the electrons in the beams is controlled by moving the collision point along the optical axis of the main pulse, and thereby changing the acceleration length in the plasma.

  12. Simulations of a High-Transformer-Ratio Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Using Multiple Electron Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Kallos, Efthymios; Muggli, Patric; Katsouleas, Thomas; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Park, Jangho

    2009-01-22

    Particle-in-cell simulations of a plasma wakefield accelerator in the linear regime are presented, consisting of four electron bunches that are fed into a high-density plasma. It is found that a high transformer ratio can be maintained over 43 cm of plasma if the charge in each bunch is increased linearly, the bunches are placed 1.5 plasma wavelengths apart and the bunch emmitances are adjusted to compensate for the nonlinear focusing forces. The generated wakefield is sampled by a test witness bunch whose energy gain after the plasma is six times the energy loss of the drive bunches.

  13. An Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakeman, Michael S.

    Currently particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider use RF cavities with a maximum field gradient of 50-100 MV/m to accelerate particles over long distances. A new type of plasma based accelerator called a Laser Plasma Accelerator (LPA) is being investigated at the LOASIS group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory which can sustain field gradients of 10-100 GV/m. This new type of accelerator offers the potential to create compact high energy accelerators and light sources. In order to investigate the feasibility of producing a compact light source an undulator-based electron beam diagnostic for use on the LOASIS LPA has been built and calibrated. This diagnostic relies on the principal that the spectral analysis of synchrotron radiation from an undulator can reveal properties of the electron beam such as emittance, energy and energy spread. The effects of electron beam energy spread upon the harmonics of undulator produced synchrotron radiation were derived from the equations of motion of the beam and numerically simulated. The diagnostic consists of quadrupole focusing magnets to collimate the electron beam, a 1.5 m long undulator to produce the synchrotron radiation, and a high resolution high gain XUV spectrometer to analyze the radiation. The undulator was aligned and tuned in order to maximize the flux of synchrotron radiation produced. The spectrometer was calibrated at the Advanced Light Source, with the results showing the ability to measure electron beam energy spreads at resolutions as low as 0.1% rms, a major improvement over conventional magnetic spectrometers. Numerical simulations show the ability to measure energy spreads on realistic LPA produced electron beams as well as the improvements in measurements made with the quadrupole magnets. Experimentally the quadrupoles were shown to stabilize and focus the electron beams at specific energies for their insertion into the undulator, with the eventual hope of producing an all optical

  14. Unphysical kinetic effects in particle-in-cell modeling of laser wakefield accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Shadwick, B A; Geddes, C G R; Esarey, E; Schroeder, C B; Leemans, W P

    2008-07-01

    Unphysical heating and macroparticle trapping that arise in the numerical modeling of laser wakefield accelerators using particle-in-cell codes are investigated. A dark current free laser wakefield accelerator stage, in which no trapping of background plasma electrons into the plasma wave should occur, and a highly nonlinear cavitated wake with self-trapping, are modeled. Numerical errors can lead to errors in the macroparticle orbits in both phase and momentum. These errors grow as a function of distance behind the drive laser and can be large enough to result in unphysical trapping in the plasma wake. The resulting numerical heating in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions grows much faster and to a higher level than the known numerical grid heating of an initially warm plasma in an undriven system. The amount of heating, at least in the region immediately behind the laser pulse, can, in general, be decreased by decreasing the grid size, increasing the number of particles per cell, or using smoother interpolation methods. The effect of numerical heating on macroparticle trapping is less severe in a highly nonlinear cavitated wake, since trapping occurs in the first plasma wave period immediately behind the laser pulse.

  15. Laser wakefield acceleration research by using a tapered capillary waveguide at GIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minseok; Jang, Donggyu; Nam, Inhyuk; Lee, Taehee; Suk, Hyyong

    2012-10-01

    The tapered plasma density in a gas-filled capillary waveguide can suppress the dephasing problem in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). As a result, the acceleration distance and the gained electron energy are expected to be increased significantly. For this purpose, we recently developed a tapered capillary waveguide, which can produce a plasma density of 10^18 cm-3. This capillary plasma waveguide will be used for high-energy electron generation experiment together with a 20 TW/35 fs Ti:sapphire laser system that will be completed by this summer. In this presentation, the ongoing experiments will be reported.

  16. Laser-induced wakefield acceleration by using density-tapered gas-cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minseok; Nam, Inhyuk; Lee, Seungwoo; Suk, Hyyong

    2015-11-01

    The plasma sources with upward density gradient can be used to increase a dephasing length and an accelerating field in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism. As a result, the electron energy accelerated is expected to be increased and we developed a density-tapered gas-cell on this account. Using a 20 TW Ti:Sapphire laser constructed at GIST, we performed the acceleration experiments with the gas-cell and gas-jet with density-gradient. In this presentation, the results of acceleration experiments will be presented in detail.

  17. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Experiments in the Self Modulated Regime at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Paul; Albert, Felicie; Lemos, Nuno; Patankar, Siddarth; Ralph, Joseph; Shaw, Jessica; Hegelich, Manuel; Moody, John; Joshi, Chan

    2016-10-01

    Picosecond laser plasma interaction has been studied as a novel source of producing betatron x-rays. In this regime, electrons are accelerated through the interplay of two mechanisms: self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration and direct laser acceleration. The experiment, conducted on the Titan laser system (1 ps and 150 Joules) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab, using electron densities of 0.5 - 1.5 ×1019cm-3 , found electrons accelerated to energies of up to 250 MeV with divergence half angles on order of 10s of milliradians. Corresponding to the electron densities above, frequency shifts of laser light on order ωp 1.5 - 2 ×1014 rad/sec were measured using Raman forward scattering diagnostics.

  18. Wakefield Simulation of CLIC PETS Structure Using Parallel 3D Finite Element Time-Domain Solver T3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic time-domain code T3P. Higher-order Finite Element methods on conformal unstructured meshes and massively parallel processing allow unprecedented simulation accuracy for wakefield computations and simulations of transient effects in realistic accelerator structures. Applications include simulation of wakefield damping in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) power extraction and transfer structure (PETS).

  19. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL < 1 / (2 πωpe)) laser pulses drive highly nonlinear plasma waves which can trap ~ nC of electrons and accelerate them to ~GeV energies over ~cm lengths. These electron beams can then be converted by a high-Z target via bremsstrahlung into low-divergence (< 20 mrad) beams of high-energy (<600 MeV) photons and subsequently into positrons via the Bethe-Heitler process. By increasing the material thickness and Z, the resulting Ne+ /Ne- ratio can approach unity, resulting in a near neutral density plasma jet. These quasi-neutral beams are presumed to retain the short-pulse (τL < 40 fs) characteristic of the electron beam, resulting in a high peak density of ne- /e+ ~ 1016 cm-3 , making the source an excellent candidate for laboratory study of astrophysical leptonic jets. Alternatively, the electron beam can be interacted with a counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  20. Self-modulated laser wakefield accelerators as x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, N.; Martins, J. L.; Tsung, F. S.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Joshi, C.

    2016-03-01

    The development of a directional, small-divergence, and short-duration picosecond x-ray probe beam with an energy greater than 50 keV is desirable for high energy density science experiments. We therefore explore through particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations the possibility of using x-rays radiated by betatron-like motion of electrons from a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator as a possible candidate to meet this need. Two OSIRIS 2D PIC simulations with mobile ions are presented, one with a normalized vector potential a 0  =  1.5 and the other with an a 0  =  3. We find that in both cases direct laser acceleration (DLA) is an important additional acceleration mechanism in addition to the longitudinal electric field of the plasma wave. Together these mechanisms produce electrons with a continuous energy spectrum with a maximum energy of 300 MeV for a 0  =  3 case and 180 MeV in the a 0  =  1.5 case. Forward-directed x-ray radiation with a photon energy up to 100 keV was calculated for the a 0  =  3 case and up to 12 keV for the a 0  =  1.5 case. The x-ray spectrum can be fitted with a sum of two synchrotron spectra with critical photon energies of 13 and 45 keV for the a 0 of 3 and critical photon energies of 0.3 and 1.4 keV for a 0 of 1.5 in the plane of polarization of the laser. The full width at half maximum divergence angle of the x-rays was 62  ×  1.9 mrad for a 0  =  3 and 77  ×  3.8 mrad for a 0  =  1.5.

  1. Spectrum bandwidth narrowing of Thomson scattering X-rays with energy chirped electron beams from laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tong; Chen, Min Li, Fei-Yu; Yu, Lu-Le; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-06

    We study incoherent Thomson scattering between an ultrashort laser pulse and an electron beam accelerated from a laser wakefield. The energy chirp effects of the accelerated electron beam on the final radiation spectrum bandwidth are investigated. It is found that the scattered X-ray radiation has the minimum spectrum width and highest intensity as electrons are accelerated up to around the dephasing point. Furthermore, it is proposed that the electron acceleration process inside the wakefield can be studied by use of 90° Thomson scattering. The dephasing position and beam energy chirp can be deduced from the intensity and bandwidth of the scattered radiation.

  2. Density characterization of tapered super-sonic gas jet targets for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Gregory; Grace, Emily; Banerjee, Sudeep; Petersen, Chad; Brown, Kevin; Mills, Jared; Chen, Shouyuan; Liu, Cheng; Umstadter, Donald

    2012-10-01

    Phase slippage between plasma wave and electron bunch limits maximum energy gain in laser-wakefield acceleration. Plasma-density spatial tailoring has been proposed as a way to overcome this dephasing problem [1]. In practice, such tailoring can be achieved in super-sonic gas jets by use of a nozzle with a tapered orifice. We have developed a 3-D temporally-resolved interferometric tomography technique to characterize dynamical density distribution of such gas jets. The SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstructive Technique) algorithm [2] was implemented. We also present preliminarily results on laser wakefield acceleration in the tailored gradient density profiles resulting from use of the characterized jets as targets. [4pt] [1] W. Rittershofer, C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, F. J. Gr"uner, and W. P. Leemans, ``Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators,'' Physics of Plasmas 17, 063104, (2010). [0pt] [2] P. Gilbert, ``Iterative methods for the three-dimensional reconstruction of an object from projections,'' Journal of Theoretical Biology 36, 105 (1972).

  3. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A. M. Li, Song; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jie; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya

    2015-10-15

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  4. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A M; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  5. Study of x-ray radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leurent, V.; Pollock, B. B.; Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Doeppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Palastro, J. P.; Froula, D. H.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Marsh, K. A.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Wang, T. L.; Tynan, G.

    2009-01-22

    A Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) is under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to produce electron bunches with GeV class energy and energy spreads of a few-percent. The interaction of a high power (200 TW), short pulse (50 fs) laser with neutral He gas can generate quasi-monoenergetic electron beams at energies up to 1 GeV [1]. The laser pulse can be self-guided over 1 cm overcoming the limitation of vacuum diffraction. X-ray betatron radiation is emitted while the accelerated electrons undergo oscillations in the wakefield electrostatic field. Here we present electron spectra measurements with a two screen spectrometer allowing to measure both the electron energy and the transverse deflection at the plasma exit. We have measured monoenergetic electron beams above 300 MeV. Furthermore a forward directed x-ray beam is observed. Preliminary measurements of the spectrum are in reasonable agreement with the calculated betatron spectrum in the synchrotron asymptotic limit using the measured electron beam parameters.

  6. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  7. Control of laser-wakefield acceleration by the plasma-density profile.

    PubMed

    Pukhov, A; Kostyukov, I

    2008-02-01

    We show that both the maximum energy gain and the accelerated beam quality can be efficiently controlled by the plasma-density profile. Choosing a proper density gradient one can uplift the dephasing limitation and keep the phase synchronism between the bunch of relativistic particles and the plasma wave over extended distances. Putting electrons into the n th wake period behind the driving laser pulse, the maximum energy gain is increased by the factor, which is proportional to n, over that in the case of uniform plasma. Layered plasma is suggested to keep the resonant condition for laser-wakefield excitation. The acceleration is limited then by laser depletion rather than by dephasing. Further, we show that the natural energy spread of the particle bunch acquired at the acceleration stage can be effectively removed by a matched deceleration stage, where a larger plasma density is used.

  8. Enhancement of x-rays generated by a guided laser wakefield accelerator inside capillary tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, J.; Doepp, A.; Cassou, K.; Neveu, O.; Cros, B.; Svensson, K.; Genoud, G.; Wojda, F.; Burza, M.; Persson, A.; Lundh, O.; Wahlstroem, C.-G.; Ferrari, H. E.

    2012-05-07

    Electrons accelerated in the nonlinear regime in a laser wakefield accelerator experience transverse oscillations inside the plasma cavity, giving rise to ultra-short pulsed x-rays, also called the betatron radiation. We show that the fluence of x-ray can be enhanced by more than one order of magnitude when the laser is guided by a 10 mm long capillary tube instead of interacting with a 2 mm gas jet. X-rays with a synchrotron-like spectrum and associated critical energy {approx}5 keV, with a peak brightness of {approx}1x10{sup 21} ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW, were achieved by employing 16 TW laser pulses.

  9. A high resolution, broad energy acceptance spectrometer for laser wakefield acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Christopher M. S.; Cuevas, Sofia Benavides; Veisz, Laszlo; Schramm, Ulrich; Schmid, Karl; Buck, Alexander; Habs, Dieter; Krausz, Ferenc

    2010-07-15

    Laser wakefield experiments present a unique challenge in measuring the resulting electron energy properties due to the large energy range of interest, typically several 100 MeV, and the large electron beam divergence and pointing jitter >1 mrad. In many experiments the energy resolution and accuracy are limited by the convolved transverse spot size and pointing jitter of the beam. In this paper we present an electron energy spectrometer consisting of two magnets designed specifically for laser wakefield experiments. In the primary magnet the field is produced by permanent magnets. A second optional electromagnet can be used to obtain better resolution for electron energies above 75 MeV. The spectrometer has an acceptance of 2.5-400 MeV (E{sub max}/E{sub min}>100) with a resolution of better than 1% rms for electron energies above 25 MeV. This high resolution is achieved by refocusing electrons in the energy plane and without any postprocessing image deconvolution. Finally, the spectrometer employs two complimentary detection mechanisms: (1) absolutely calibrated scintillation screens imaged by cameras outside the vacuum chamber and (2) an array of scintillating fibers coupled to a low-noise charge-coupled device.

  10. Start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of double triangular current profile generation in Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, G.; Power, J.; Kim, S. H.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.

    2012-12-21

    Double triangular current profile (DT) gives a high transformer ratio which is the determining factor of the performance of collinear wakefield accelerator. This current profile can be generated using the emittance exchange (EEX) beam line. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility plans to generate DT using the EEX beam line. We conducted start-to-end simulation for the AWA beam line using PARMELA code. Also, we discuss requirements of beam parameters for the generation of DT.

  11. A Stable High-Energy Electron Source from Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Baozhen; Liu, Cheng; Yan, Wenchao; Golovin, Grigory; Banerjee, Sudeep; Chen, Shouyuan; Haden, Daniel; Fruhling, Colton; Umstadter, Donald

    2016-10-01

    The stability of the electron source from laser wake-field acceleration (LWFA) is essential for applications, such as novel x-ray sources and fundamental experiments in high field physics. To obtain such a stable source, we used an optimal laser pulse and a novel gas nozzle. The high-power laser pulse on target was focused to a diffraction-limited spot by the use of adaptive wavefront correction and the pulse duration was transform limited by the use of spectral feedback control. An innovative design for the nozzle led to a stable, flat-top profile with diameters of 4 mm and 8 mm with a high Mach-number ( 6). In experiments to generate high-energy electron beams by LWFA, we were able to obtain reproducible results with beam energy of 800 MeV and charge >10 pC. Higher charge but broader energy spectrum resulted when the plasma density was increased. These developments have resulted in a laser-driven wakefield accelerator that is stable and robust. With this device, we show that narrowband high-energy x-rays beams can be generated by the inverse-Compton scattering process. This accelerator has also been used in recent experiments to study nonlinear effects in the interaction of high-energy electron beams with ultraintense laser pulses. This material is based upon work supported by NSF No. PHY-153700; US DOE, Office of Science, BES, # DE-FG02-05ER15663; AFOSR # FA9550-11-1-0157; and DHS DNDO # HSHQDC-13-C-B0036.

  12. Kilohertz laser wakefield accelerator using near critical density plasmas and millijoule-level drive pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goers, Andy

    2016-10-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators operating in the so-called bubble or blowout regime are typically driven by Joule-class femtosecond laser systems driving plasma waves in highly underdense plasmas (1017 -1019cm-3). While these accelerators are very promising for accelerating GeV scale, low emittance electron beams, the large energy requirements of the laser systems have so far limited them to repetition rates below 10 Hz. However, there are a variety of applications, such as ultrafast electron diffraction or high repetition rate gamma ray sources for materials characterization or medical radiography, which would benefit from lower energy (1-10 MeV) but higher repetition rate ( 1 kHz) sources of relativistic electrons. This talk will describe relativistic wakefield acceleration of electron bunches in the range 1-10 MeV, driven by a 1 kHz, 30 fs, 1-12 mJ laser system. Our results are made possible by the use of very high density cryogenic H2 and He gas jet targets yielding electron densities >1021cm-3 in thin 100 μm gas flows. At these high densities the critical power for relativistic self-focusing and the plasma wave phase velocity are greatly reduced, leading to pulse collapse and self-injection even with 1 mJ drive laser pulses. Applications of this source to ultrafast electron diffraction and gamma ray radiography will be discussed. This research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  13. Simulations of Jitter Coupling due to Wakefields in the FACET Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, Stephen

    2009-10-30

    Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams (FACET) is a proposed facility at SLAC that would use the initial two-thirds of the linac to transport e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams to an experimental region. A principal use of this facility is to identify the optimum method for accelerating positrons in a beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator. To study this, a positron bunch, followed an RF-cycle later by an electron bunch, will be accelerated to an asymmetric chicane designed to move the positrons behind the electrons, and then on to the plasma wakefield test stand. A major focus of study was the coupling of jitter of the positron bunch to the electron bunch via linac wakes. Lucretia is a Matlab toolbox for the simulation of electron beam transport systems, capable of multi-bunch tracking and wakefield calculations. With the exception of the lack of support for tracking of electrons and positrons within a single bunch train, it was well suited to the jitter coupling studies. This paper describes the jitter studies, including modifications made to Lucretia to correctly simulate tracking of mixed-species bunch trains through a lattice of magnetic elements and EM wakes.

  14. External injection and acceleration of electron bunch in front of the plasma wakefield produced by a periodic chirped laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Esmaeil; Afhami, Saeedeh

    2017-01-01

    Herein, we present the analytical results on the behavior of the electron bunch injected in front of the plasma wakefield produced by a chirped laser pulse. In particular, a periodic chirped pulse may produce an ultra-relativistic electron bunch with a relatively small energy spread. The electrons are trapped near the region of the first accelerating maximum of the wakefield and are compressed in both the longitudinal and transverse directions (betatron oscillation). Our results are in good agreement with the one-dimensional results recently published.

  15. Measurements of high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, W. Vargas, M.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Maksimchuk, A.; Nees, J.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Sarri, G.; Dromey, B.; Zepf, M.

    2014-05-15

    Using high-energy (∼0.5 GeV) electron beams generated by laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), bremsstrahlung radiation was created by interacting these beams with various solid targets. Secondary processes generate high-energy electrons, positrons, and neutrons, which can be measured shot-to-shot using magnetic spectrometers, short half-life activation, and Compton scattering. Presented here are proof-of-principle results from a high-resolution, high-energy gamma-ray spectrometer capable of single-shot operation, and high repetition rate activation diagnostics. We describe the techniques used in these measurements and their potential applications in diagnosing LWFA electron beams and measuring high-energy radiation from laser-plasma interactions.

  16. High-Field, {mu}J-Class THz Pulses from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H.; Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Schroeder, C. B.; Plateau, G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    We present observation and characterization of microjoule-MV/cm-level THz pulses from a laser wakefield accelerator. THz emitted as coherent transition radiation from the plasma-vacuum boundary is collected and refocused by off-axis parabolas to a test stand where a suite of diagnostics is performed, including energy measurement by a Golay cell and electro-optic sampling of the spatio-temporal electric field using a probe pulse split from the main laser. Frequency Domain Holography is also implemented for the first time to capture spatio-temporal field distributions in a single shot. The four techniques strongly corroborate detection of THz pulses of {approx}0.4 ps duration, with peak fields of several hundred kV/cm and energies of 5-10 {mu}J. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed.

  17. OPTIMIZATION AND SINGLE-SHOT CHARACTERIZATION OF ULTRASHORT THz PULSES FROM A LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-05-04

    We present spatiotemporal characterization of J-class ultrashort THz pulses generated from a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Accelerated electrons, resulting from the interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with a plasma, emit high-intensity THz pulses as coherent transition radiation. Such high peak-power THz pulses, suitable for high-field (MV/cm) pump-probe experiments, also provide a non-invasive bunch-length diagnostic and thus feedback for the accelerator. The characterization of the THz pulses includes energy measurement using a Golay cell, 2D sign-resolved electro-optic measurement and single-shot spatiotemporal electric-field distribution retrieval using a new technique, coined temporal electric-field cross-Correlation (TEX). All three techniques corroborate THz pulses of 5 muJ, with peak fields of 100's of kV/cm and ~;;0:4 ps rms duration.

  18. Focusing Betatron Radiation Produced by Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electrons with a Spherically Curved Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2011-10-01

    Laser Wakefield Acceleration in the bubble regime can be used to accelerate electrons to GeV energies while simultaneously wiggling them to produce a synchotron like x-ray radiation. Using HERCULES, a 100TW TiSapphire laser, 30fs pulses are focused onto a 5mm He gas jet to accelerate electrons in the bubble regime. The betatron x-rays produced by the transverse motion of the accelerated electrons are focused onto a detector by a spherically curved quartz, and other crystals. This result shows the feasibility of dynamic studies of crystal diffraction, with femtosecond level accuracy, using pump probe techniques. This work was supported by NSF FOCUS Grant No. PHY-0114336, and NRC Grant No. 38-09-953.

  19. Challenges in plasma and laser wakefield accelerated beams diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Marchetti, B.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2013-08-01

    The new frontier in the particle beam accelerator is the so called plasma acceleration. Using the strong electric field inside a plasma it is possible to achieve accelerating gradients in the order of magnitude larger with respect to the actual technologies. Different schemes have been proposed and several already tested, producing beams of energy of several GeV. Mainly two approaches are followed: either the beam is directly produced by the interaction of a TW/PW class laser with a gas jet or a preexisting particle beam is accelerated in a plasma channel. In both cases a precise determination of the emerging beam parameters is mandatory for the fine tuning of the devices. The measurement of these parameters, in particular the emittance, is not trivial, mainly due to the large energy spread and to the tight focusing of these beams or to the background noise produced in the plasma channel. We show the problems related to the diagnostic of this kind of beams and the proposed or already realized solutions.

  20. Near-GeV-energy laser-wakefield acceleration of self-injected electrons in a centimeter-scale plasma channel.

    PubMed

    Tsung, F S; Narang, Ritesh; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2004-10-29

    The first three-dimensional, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of laser-wakefield acceleration of self-injected electrons in a 0.84 cm long plasma channel are reported. The frequency evolution of the initially 50 fs (FWHM) long laser pulse by photon interaction with the wake followed by plasma dispersion enhances the wake which eventually leads to self-injection of electrons from the channel wall. This first bunch of electrons remains spatially highly localized. Its phase space rotation due to slippage with respect to the wake leads to a monoenergetic bunch of electrons with a central energy of 0.26 GeV after 0.55 cm propagation. At later times, spatial bunching of the laser enhances the acceleration of a second bunch of electrons to energies up to 0.84 GeV before the laser pulse intensity is significantly reduced.

  1. Tomography of human trabecular bone with a laser-wakefield driven x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. M.; Wood, J. C.; Lopes, N. C.; Poder, K.; Abel, R. L.; Alatabi, S.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Jin, A.; Kneip, S.; Mecseki, K.; Parker, S.; Symes, D. R.; Sandholzer, M. A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2016-01-01

    A laser-wakefield driven x-ray source is used for the radiography of human bone. The betatron motion of accelerated electrons generates x-rays which are hard (critical energy {{E}\\text{crit}}>30 keV), have small source size (<3 μm) and high average brightness. The x-rays are generated from a helium gas cell which is near-instantly replenishable, and thus the average photon flux is limited by the repetition rate of the driving laser rather than the breakdown of the x-ray source. A tomograph of a human bone sample was recorded with a resolution down to 50 μm. The photon flux was sufficiently high that a radiograph could be taken with each laser shot, and the fact that x-ray beams were produced on 97% of shots minimised failed shots and facilitated full micro-computed tomography in a reasonable time scale of several hours, limited only by the laser repetition rate. The x-ray imaging beamline length (not including the laser) is shorter than that of a synchrotron source due to the high accelerating fields and small source size. Hence this interesting laboratory-based source may one day bridge the gap between small microfocus x-ray tubes and large synchrotron facilities.

  2. Characterization of electrons and x-rays produced using chirped laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T. Z.; Behm, K.; He, Z.-H.; Maksimchuk, A.; Nees, J. A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2016-11-01

    The electron injection process into a plasma-based laser wakefield accelerator can be influenced by modifying the parameters of the driver pulse. We present an experimental study on the combined effect of the laser pulse duration, pulse shape, and frequency chirp on the electron injection and acceleration process and the associated radiation emission for two different gas types—a 97.5% He and 2.5% N2 mixture and pure He. In general, the shortest pulse duration with minimal frequency chirp produced the highest energy electrons and the most charge. Pulses on the positive chirp side sustained electron injection and produced higher charge, but lower peak energy electrons, compared with negatively chirped pulses. A similar trend was observed for the radiant energy. The relationship between the radiant energy and the electron charge remained linear over a threefold change in the electron density and was independent of the drive pulse characteristics. X-ray spectra showed that ionization injection of electrons into the wakefield generally produced more photons than self-injection for all pulse durations/frequency chirp and had less of a spread in the number of photons around the peak x-ray energy.

  3. Using Betatron Emissions from Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electrons to Probe Ultra-fast Warm Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotick, Jordan; Schumaker, Will; Condamine, Florian; Albert, Felicie; Barbrel, Benjamin; Galtier, Eric; Granados, Eduardo; Ravasio, Alessandra; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been shown to produce short X-ray pulses from betatron oscillations of electrons within the plasma wake. These betatron X-rays pulses have a broad, synchrotron-like energy spectrum and a duration on the order of the driving laser pulse, thereby enabling probing of ultrafast interactions. Using the 1 J, 40fs short-pulse laser at the Matter in Extreme Conditions experimental station at LCLS, we have implemented LWFA to generate and subsequently characterized betatron X-rays. Notch filtering and single photon counting techniques were used to measure the betatron X-ray spectrum while the spatial profile was measured using X-ray CCDs and image plates. We used an ellipsoidal mirror to focus the soft betatron X-rays for pump-probe studies on various targets in conjunction with LCLS X-ray and optical laser pulses. This experimental platform provides the conditions necessary to do a detailed study of warm-dense matter dynamics on the ultrafast time-scale.

  4. Controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons via colliding pulse injection in non-collinear geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Csaba; Nakamura, Kei; Geddes, Cameron; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2007-11-01

    Colliding laser pulses [1] have been proposed as a method for controlling injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) and hence producing high quality electron beams with energy spread below 1% and normalized emittances < 1 micron. The. One pulse excites a plasma wake, and a collinear pulse following behind it collides with a counterpropagating pulse forming a beat pattern that boosts background electrons into accelerating phase. A variation of the original method uses only two laser pulses [2] which may be non-collinear. The first pulse drives the wake, and beating of the trailing edge of this pulse with the colliding pulse injects electrons. Non-collinear injection avoids optical elements on the electron beam path (avoiding emittance growth). We report on progress of non-collinear experiments at LBNL, using the Ti:Sapphire laser at the LOASIS facility of LBNL. New results indicate that the electron beam properties are affected by the presence of the second beam. [1] E. Esarey, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 79, 2682 (1997) [2] G. Fubiani, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004)

  5. Synergistic Direct/Wakefield Acceleration of Plasma Electrons In the Plasma Bubble Regime Using Tailored Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    The integration of direct laser acceleration (DLA) and laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) is a new approach to plasma-based acceleration that confers several benefits over both schemes taken separately. Such integration requires a significant portion of the laser energy (e.g., a separate laser pulse) to trail the main bubble-producing laser pulse, and resonantly interact with the trapped accelerated electrons undergoing betatron motion inside the plasma bubble. I will demonstrate how electron dephasing from the accelerating wakefield, which is one of the key limitations of LWFA, is reduced by their growing undulating motion. Moreover, the distinct energy gains from wake and the laser pulse are compounding, thereby increasing the total energy gain. Even more significant increases of the overall acceleration can be obtained by moving away from single-frequency laser format toward combining mid-infrared laser pulses for plasma bubble generation with short-wavelength trailing pulses for DLA. Various injection mechanisms, such as ionization injection, external injection, self-injection, and their advantages will also be discussed. Translating these new concepts into specific experiments will take advantage of recent technological advances in synchronizing laser and electron beams, and using multiple beamlines for producing sophisticated laser pulse formats.

  6. Effect of experimental laser imperfections on laser wakefield acceleration and betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, J.; Davoine, X.; Fourmaux, S.; Kieffer, J. C.; Corde, S.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Lifschitz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser pulses in current ultra-short TW systems are far from being ideal Gaussian beams. The influence of the presence of non-Gaussian features of the laser pulse is investigated here from experiments and 3D Particle-in-Cell simulations. Both the experimental intensity distribution and wavefront are used as input in the simulations. It is shown that a quantitative agreement between experimental data and simulations requires to use realistic pulse features. Moreover, some trends found in the experiments, such as the growing of the X-ray signal with the plasma length, can only be retrieved in simulations with realistic pulses. The performances on the electron acceleration and the synchrotron X-ray emission are strongly degraded by these non-Gaussian features, even keeping constant the total laser energy. A drop on the X-ray photon number by one order of magnitude was found. This clearly put forward the limitation of using a Gaussian beam in the simulations. PMID:27324915

  7. Medical imaging using a laser-wakefield driven x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Jason; Wood, Jonathan; Lopes, Nelson; Poder, Kristjan; Kamperidis, Christos; Alatabi, Saleh; Bryant, Jonathan; Kneip, Stefan; Mecseki, Katalin; Norris, Dominic; Teboul, Lydia; Westerburg, Henrik; Abel, Richard; Jin, Andi; Symes, Dan; Mangles, Stuart; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators driven by high-intensity laser pulses are a proven centimetre-scale source of GeV electron beams. One of the proposed uses for these accelerators is the driving of compact hard x-ray synchrotron light sources. Such sources have been shown to be bright, have small source size and high photon energy, and are therefore interesting for imaging applications. By doubling the focal length at the Astra-Gemini laser facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, we have significantly improved the average betatron x-ray flux compared to previous experiments. This fact, coupled to the stability of the radiation source, facilitated the acquisition of full 3D tomograms of hard bone tissue and soft mouse neonates, the latter requiring the recording of over 500 successive radiographs. Such multimodal performance is unprecedented in the betatron field and indicates the usefulness of these sources in clinical imaging applications, scalable to very high photon flux without compromising source size or photon energy.

  8. High-resolution and ultrafast imaging using betatron x-rays from laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2015-11-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators now routinely produce ~GeV energy gain in ~cm plasmas. and are simultaneously capable of producing high brightness and spatially coherent hard x-ray beams. This unique light-source has been used for medical applications, and also for ultrafast imaging in high energy density science. The experiments were performed with the Astra Gemini laser producing 10 J pulses with duration ~ 40 fs focussed to produce a spot of 25 μ m (fwhm) in a gas-cell of variable length to produce a low divergence beam of x-rays. The length of the gas cell was optimised to produce high contrast x-ray images of radiographed test objects. This source was used for full tomographic imaging of a human trabecular bone sample, with resolution exceeding the ~ 100 μ m level required for CT applications. Phase-contrast imaging of human prostate and mouse neonates at the micron level was also demonstrated. These studies indicate the usefulness of these sources in research and clinical applications. The ultrafast nature of the source was also demonstrated by performing time resolved imaging of a laser driven shock. The ultrashort duration of the x-ray source essentially freeze the motion of these fast moving transient phenomena.

  9. Demonstration of passive plasma lensing of a laser wakefield accelerated electron bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Kuschel, S.; Hollatz, D.; Heinemann, T.; Karger, O.; Schwab, M. B.; Ullmann, D.; Knetsch, A.; Seidel, A.; Rodel, C.; Yeung, M.; Leier, M.; Blinne, A.; Ding, H.; Kurz, T.; Corvan, D. J.; Savert, A.; Karsch, S.; Kaluza, M. C.; Hidding, B.; Zepf, M.

    2016-07-20

    We report on the first demonstration of passive all-optical plasma lensing using a two-stage setup. An intense femtosecond laser accelerates electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) to 100 MeV over millimeter length scales. By adding a second gas target behind the initial LWFA stage we introduce a robust and independently tunable plasma lens. We observe a density dependent reduction of the LWFA electron beam divergence from an initial value of 2.3 mrad, down to 1.4 mrad (rms), when the plasma lens is in operation. Such a plasma lens provides a simple and compact approach for divergence reduction well matched to the mm-scale length of the LWFA accelerator. The focusing forces are provided solely by the plasma and driven by the bunch itself only, making this a highly useful and conceptually new approach to electron beam focusing. Possible applications of this lens are not limited to laser plasma accelerators. Since no active driver is needed the passive plasma lens is also suited for high repetition rate focusing of electron bunches. As a result, its understanding is also required for modeling the evolution of the driving particle bunch in particle driven wake field acceleration.

  10. Demonstration of passive plasma lensing of a laser wakefield accelerated electron bunch

    DOE PAGES

    Kuschel, S.; Hollatz, D.; Heinemann, T.; ...

    2016-07-20

    We report on the first demonstration of passive all-optical plasma lensing using a two-stage setup. An intense femtosecond laser accelerates electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) to 100 MeV over millimeter length scales. By adding a second gas target behind the initial LWFA stage we introduce a robust and independently tunable plasma lens. We observe a density dependent reduction of the LWFA electron beam divergence from an initial value of 2.3 mrad, down to 1.4 mrad (rms), when the plasma lens is in operation. Such a plasma lens provides a simple and compact approach for divergence reduction well matchedmore » to the mm-scale length of the LWFA accelerator. The focusing forces are provided solely by the plasma and driven by the bunch itself only, making this a highly useful and conceptually new approach to electron beam focusing. Possible applications of this lens are not limited to laser plasma accelerators. Since no active driver is needed the passive plasma lens is also suited for high repetition rate focusing of electron bunches. As a result, its understanding is also required for modeling the evolution of the driving particle bunch in particle driven wake field acceleration.« less

  11. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone.

    PubMed

    Cole, J M; Wood, J C; Lopes, N C; Poder, K; Abel, R L; Alatabi, S; Bryant, J S J; Jin, A; Kneip, S; Mecseki, K; Symes, D R; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z

    2015-08-18

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications.

  12. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays.

  13. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone

    PubMed Central

    Cole, J. M.; Wood, J. C.; Lopes, N. C.; Poder, K.; Abel, R. L.; Alatabi, S.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Jin, A.; Kneip, S.; Mecseki, K.; Symes, D. R.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2015-01-01

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications. PMID:26283308

  14. Simulation of Laser Wake Field Acceleration using a 2.5D PIC Code

    SciTech Connect

    An, W. M.; Hua, J. F.; Huang, W. H.; Tang, Ch. X.; Lin, Y. Z.

    2006-11-27

    A 2.5D PIC simulation code is developed to study the LWFA( Laser WakeField Acceleration ). The electron self-injection and the generation of mono-energetic electron beam in LWFA is briefly discussed through the simulation. And the experiment of this year at SILEX-I laser facility is also introduced.

  15. Proton driven plasma wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golian, Y.; Dorranian, D.

    2016-11-01

    An analytical model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. In the suggested model, the plasma density profile has a minimum value on the propagation axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. While previous works investigated on the simulation results and on the perturbation techniques in case of laser wakefield accelerations for a parabolic channel, we have carried out an analytical model and solved the accelerating field equation for proton beam in a parabolic plasma channel. The solution is expressed by Whittaker (hypergeometric) functions. Effects of plasma channel radius, proton bunch parameters and plasma parameters on the accelerating processes of proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration are studied. Results show that the higher accelerating fields could be generated in the PWFA scheme with modest reductions in the bunch size. Also, the modest increment in plasma channel radius is needed to obtain maximum accelerating gradient. In addition, the simulations of longitudinal and total radial wakefield in parabolic plasma channel are presented using LCODE. It is observed that the longitudinal wakefield generated by the bunch decreases with the distance behind the bunch while total radial wakefield increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  16. 3-D Simulations of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Non-Idealized Plasmas and Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.; Mori, W.B.; Hemker, R.; Ren, C.; Huang, C.; Dodd, E.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Wang, S.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; O'Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    3-D Particle-in-cell OSIRIS simulations of the current E-162 Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Experiment are presented in which a number of non-ideal conditions are modeled simultaneously. These include tilts on the beam in both planes, asymmetric beam emittance, beam energy spread and plasma inhomogeneities both longitudinally and transverse to the beam axis. The relative importance of the non-ideal conditions is discussed and a worst case estimate of the effect of these on energy gain is obtained. The simulation output is then propagated through the downstream optics, drift spaces and apertures leading to the experimental diagnostics to provide insight into the differences between actual beam conditions and what is measured. The work represents a milestone in the level of detail of simulation comparisons to plasma experiments.

  17. Tomographic characterisation of gas-jet targets for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couperus, J. P.; Köhler, A.; Wolterink, T. A. W.; Jochmann, A.; Zarini, O.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K. J.; Irman, A.; Schramm, U.

    2016-09-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has emerged as a promising concept for the next generation of high energy electron accelerators. The acceleration medium is provided by a target that creates a local well-defined gas-density profile inside a vacuum vessel. Target development and analysis of the resulting gas-density profiles is an important aspect in the further development of LWFA. Gas-jet targets are widely used in regimes where relatively high electron densities over short interaction lengths are required (up to several millimetres interaction length, plasma densities down to 1018cm-3). In this paper we report a precise characterisation of such gas-jet targets by a laser interferometry technique. We show that phase shifts down to 4 mrad can be resolved. Tomographic phase reconstruction enables detection of non-axisymmetrical gas-density profiles which indicates defects in cylindrical nozzles, analysis of slit-nozzles and nozzles with an induced shock-wave density step. In a direct comparison between argon and helium jets we show that it cannot automatically be assumed, as is often done, that a nozzle measured with argon will provide the same gas density with helium.

  18. A Fast, Electromagnetically Driven Supersonic Gas Jet Target For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Wright, Jason; Ma, Timothy

    2009-01-22

    Laser-Wakefield acceleration (LWFA) promises electron accelerators with unprecedented electric field gradients. Gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for LWFA. Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4x10{sup 19} /cm{sup 3}, sufficient for self-trapping and acceleration to energies up to {approx}150 MeV. While 3 cm capillary structures have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV, gas jets require a well-collimated beam that is {>=}10 mm in length and <500 {mu}m in width, with a tunable gas density profile to optimize the LWFA process. This paper describes the design of an electromagnetically driven, fast supersonic gas valve that opens in <100 {mu}s, closes in <500 {mu}s and can operate at pressures beyond 1000 psia. The motion of the valve seat (flyer plate) is measured using a laser probe and compared with predictions of a model. The valve design is based on an optimization of many parameters: flyer plate mass and durability, driver bank speed and stored energy for high rep-rate (>10 Hz) operation, return spring non-linearity and materials selection for various components. Optimization of the valve dynamics and preliminary designs of the supersonic flow patterns are described.

  19. Developments in laser wakefield accelerators: From single-stage to two-stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Tao; Wang, Wen-Tao; Liu, Jian-Sheng; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Qi, Rong; Yu, Chang-Hai; Li, Ru-Xin; Xu, Zhi-Zhan

    2015-01-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are compact accelerators which can produce femtosecond high-energy electron beams on a much smaller scale than the conventional radiofrequency accelerators. It is attributed to their high acceleration gradient which is about 3 orders of magnitude larger than the traditional ones. The past decade has witnessed the major breakthroughs and progress in developing the laser wakfield accelerators. To achieve the LWFAs suitable for applications, more and more attention has been paid to optimize the LWFAs for high-quality electron beams. A single-staged LWFA does not favor generating controllable electron beams beyond 1 GeV since electron injection and acceleration are coupled and cannot be independently controlled. Staged LWFAs provide a promising route to overcome this disadvantage by decoupling injection from acceleration and thus the electron-beam quality as well as the stability can be greatly improved. This paper provides an overview of the physical conceptions of the LWFA, as well as the major breakthroughs and progress in developing LWFAs from single-stage to two-stage LWFAs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11127901, 11425418, and 61221064), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808100), and the Science and Technology Talent Project of Shanghai City, China (Grant Nos. 12XD1405200 and 12ZR1451700).

  20. Simulation of ionization effects for high-density positron drivers in future plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, D.L.; Dimitrov, D.A.; Cary, J.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-05-12

    The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) concept has been proposed as a potential energy doubler for present or future electron-positron colliders. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the self-fields of the required electron beam driver can tunnel ionize neutral Li, leading to plasma wake dynamics differing significantly from that of a preionized plasma. It has also been shown, for the case of a preionized plasma, that the plasma wake of a positron driver differs strongly from that of an electron driver. We will present new PIC simulations, using the OOPIC code, showing the effects of tunneling ionization on the plasma wake generated by high-density positron drivers. The results will be compared to previous work on electron drivers with tunneling ionization and positron drivers without ionization. Parameters relevant to the energy doubler and the upcoming E-164x experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will be considered.

  1. A multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:sapphire laser system for laser wake-field acceleration studies

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Tilborg, J. van; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-12-07

    The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (L'OASIS) Lab of LBNL operates a highly automated and remotely controlled Ti:sapphire chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system that provides synchronized beams of 2x1.0 TW, 12 TW, and 100 TW peak-power, in a unique, radiation shielded facility. The system has been specially designed for studying high field laser-plasma interactions and particularly aimed for the investigations of laser wake-field particle acceleration. It generates and recombines multiple beams having different pulse durations, wavelengths, and pulse energies for various stages of plasma preparation, excitation, and diagnostics. The amplifier system is characterized and continuously monitored via local area network (LAN) from a radiation shielded control room by an array of diagnostics, including beam profile monitoring cameras, remote controlled alignment options, self-correcting beam-pointing stabilization loops, pulse measurement tools, such as single-shot autocorrelator for pulse duration and third-order correlator for contrast measurements, FROG for pulse shape studies.

  2. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  3. Characterization of femtosecond electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator using THz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, Jeroen

    2005-10-01

    We report on the temporal characterization of laser-plasma-produced electron bunches, indicating ultra-short sub-50 fs charge structure. In the LOASIS laboratory at LBNL, the electron bunches are produced through the interaction of an intense (>10^19 Wcm-2) laser pulse with an underdense (˜10^19 cm-3) Helium plasma. The femtosecond multi-nanoCoulomb bunches have relativistic energies, with a 100% energy spread. As the bunch exits the plasma-vacuum interface, coherent transition radiation is emitted. Since the electron bunch is still dense and compact at the emission interface, the coherent spectrum of the intense radiation pulse covers the THz regime. Spectral and temporal measurements on the THz pulse are performed and correlated to the temporal properties of the electron bunch. Detection techniques such as Michelson interferometry, semiconductor switching, and electro-optic sampling are applied. The latter technique, where the THz electric field versus time is mapped out, provides detailed temporal structure of the radiation pulse, and by inference the electron bunch. The measurements indicate that THz radiation is emitted by a skewed bunch with a sub-50 fs rise time and a ˜600 fs tail (half-width-at-half-maximum), which is consistent with ballistic debunching of 100%-energy-spread beams during propagation. The electro-optic time resolution of the method was limited by the crystal properties. The Michelson interferometry and semiconductor switching experiments confirmed the femtosecond nature of the electron bunches. The electro-optic measurement also demonstrates shot-to-shot stability of the laser-wakefield accelerator (LWFA) as well as femtosecond synchronization between the electron bunch and the probe beam. This highlights the applicability of the LWFA in pump-probe experiments, where synchronized emission of x-rays, gamma rays, THz waves, NIR beams, and electron bunches is available. This work is supported by DoE under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  4. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometry for controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Csaba; Nakamura, K.; Geddes, C.; Michel, P.; Schroeder, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.

    2006-10-01

    A method for controlled injection of electrons into a plasma wakefield relying on colliding laser pulses [1] has been proposed a decade ago to produce high quality relativistic electron beams with energy spread below 1% and normalized emittances < 1 micron from a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). The original idea uses three pulses in which one pulse excites the plasma wake and a trailing laser pulse collides with a counterpropagating one to form a beat pattern that boosts background electrons to catch the plasma wave. Another, two-beam off-axis injection method [2] with crossing angles varying from 180 to 90 degrees avoids having optical elements on the path of the electron beam and has been studied at the LOASIS facility of LBNL as a viable method for laser triggered injection. It allows low dark current operation with controllable final beam energy and low energy spread. Here, we report on progress of electron optical injection via the two-beam non-collinear colliding pulse scheme using multi-terawatt Ti:Sapphire laser beams (45 fs, 100s of mJ) focused onto a Hydrogen gas plume. Experimental results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. *This work is supported by DoE under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. [1] E. Esarey, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 79, 2682 (1997) [2] G. Fubiani, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004)

  5. A 1 GeV Laser Wakefield Accelerator: Experimental Progress at the l'OASIS Facility of LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, W. P.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, C. S.; van Tilborg, J.; Nagler, B.; Michel, P.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A.; Spence, D. J.; Hooker, S. M.; Filip, C.; Cowan, T.

    2004-11-01

    Experimental progress towards a 1 GeV laser-driven plasma-based accelerator will be discussed. The design of the 1 GeV accelerator module consists of two components: (1) an all-optical electron injector and (2) a plasma channel for laser guiding and electron acceleration to high energy via the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism. Experimental results on the injector development include the demonstration of laser guiding at relativistic intensities in preformed plasmas and production of quasi-monochromatic electron beams with energy around 100 MeV. Progress on guiding 100 TW laser pulses in capillary-discharge-based plasma channels will be discussed and integration of these channels with the all-optical injector will be reported.

  6. Fluid simulation of relativistic electron beam driven wakefield in a cold plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Ratan Kumar; Sengupta, Sudip; Das, Amita

    2015-07-15

    Excitation of wakefield in a cold homogeneous plasma, driven by an ultra-relativistic electron beam is studied in one dimension using fluid simulation techniques. For a homogeneous rigid beam having density (n{sub b}) less than or equal to half the plasma density (n{sub 0}), simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the analytical work of Rosenzweig [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 555 (1987)]. Here, Rosenzweig's work has been analytically extended to regimes where the ratio of beam density to plasma density is greater than half and results have been verified using simulation. Further in contrast to Rosenzweig's work, if the beam is allowed to evolve in a self-consistent manner, several interesting features are observed in simulation viz. splitting of the beam into beam-lets (for l{sub b} > λ{sub p}) and compression of the beam (for l{sub b} < λ{sub p}), l{sub b} and λ{sub p}, respectively, being the initial beam length and plasma wavelength.

  7. Direct laser acceleration of electrons in plasma bubbles or ion channels with and without a longitudinal wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudik, Vladimir; Zhang, Xi; Arefiev, Alexey; Shvets, Gennady

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the motion of electrons in a plasma bubble (or an ion channel) under combined action of an oscillating laser field, quasistatic transverse wakefield, and longitudinal electric field. The longitudinal field E∥ significantly influences the broadband resonance between betatron oscillations of electrons and oscillations of the laser wave, which results in the profoundly different electron dynamics at different signs and magnitudes of the longitudinal force -eE∥. Specifically, we make a contrast between three representative cases: when this force is absent (-eE∥ = 0), when it accelerates electrons (-eE∥ > 0), and when it decelerates them (-eE∥ < 0). We estimate the electron energy gain at given laser-plasma parameters.

  8. Analysis of radial and longitudinal force of plasma wakefield generated by a chirped pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, Leila; Afhami, Saeedeh; Eslami, Esmaeil

    2015-08-15

    In present paper, the chirp effect of an electromagnetic pulse via an analytical model of wakefield generation is studied. Different types of chirps are employed in this study. Our results show that by the use of nonlinear chirped pulse the longitudinal wakefield and focusing force is stronger than that of linear chirped pulse. It is indicated that quadratic nonlinear chirped pulses are globally much efficient than periodic nonlinear chirped pulses. Our calculations also predict that in nonlinear chirped pulse case, the overlap of focusing and accelerating regions is broader than that achieved in linear chirped pulse.

  9. Dose properties of x-ray beams produced by laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Kainz, K K; Hogstrom, K R; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D

    2005-01-07

    Given that laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been demonstrated experimentally to accelerate electron beams to energies beyond 25 MeV, it is reasonable to assess the ability of existing LWFA technology to compete with conventional radiofrequency linear accelerators in producing electron and x-ray beams for external-beam radiotherapy. We present calculations of the dose distributions (off-axis dose profiles and central-axis depth dose) and dose rates of x-ray beams that can be produced from electron beams that are generated using state-of-the-art LWFA. Subsets of an LWFA electron energy distribution were propagated through the treatment head elements (presuming an existing design for an x-ray production target and flattening filter) implemented within the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Three x-ray energy configurations (6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV) were studied, and the energy width deltaE of the electron-beam subsets varied from 0.5 MeV to 12.5 MeV. As deltaE increased from 0.5 MeV to 4.5 MeV, we found that the off-axis and central-axis dose profiles for x-rays were minimally affected (to within about 3%), a result slightly different from prior calculations of electron beams broadened by scattering foils. For deltaE of the order of 12 MeV, the effect on the off-axis profile was of the order of 10%, but the central-axis depth dose was affected by less than 2% for depths in excess of about 5 cm beyond d(max). Although increasing deltaE beyond 6.5 MeV increased the dose rate at d(max) by more than 10 times, the absolute dose rates were about 3 orders of magnitude below those observed for LWFA-based electron beams at comparable energies. For a practical LWFA-based x-ray device, the beam current must be increased by about 4-5 orders of magnitude.

  10. Probing the K-edge of a laser heated aluminum plasma using X-rays from betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator with femtosecond resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Keegan; Hussein, Amina; Zhao, Tony; Hill, Edward; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Nees, John; Yanovsky, Victor; Mangles, Stuart; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team; Plasmas Group Team

    2016-10-01

    Presented here are data from a two-beam pump-probe experiment. We used synchrotron-like X-rays created by betatron oscillations to probe a thin metal foil that is pumped by the secondary laser beam. The Hercules Ti:Sapphire laser facility was operated with a pulse duration of 34 fs and a power of 80 TW split. A 75-25 beam splitter was used to drive a laser wakefield accelerator and heat the secondary target. We observed opacity changes around the K-edge of thin aluminum foil as it was heated by an ultrafast pump laser. To understand how the opacity is changing with heating and expansion of the plasma, the delay between the two laser paths was adjusted on a femtosecond time scale from 50 to 400 fs. Experimental data for aluminum shows variation in opacity around the K-edge with changes in the probe delay. The transmitted synchrotron-like spectrum was measured using single photon counting on an X-ray CCD camera and was available on a shot-by-shot basis. The success of this work demonstrates a practical application for X-rays produced from betatron oscillations in a wakefield accelerator. U.S. Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  11. A New Type of Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Driven By Magnetowaves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin; Chang, Feng-Yin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert J.; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2011-09-12

    We present a new concept for a plasma wakefield accelerator driven by magnetowaves (MPWA). This concept was originally proposed as a viable mechanism for the 'cosmic accelerator' that would accelerate cosmic particles to ultra-high energies in the astrophysical setting. Unlike the more familiar plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) and the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) where the drivers, the charged-particle beam and the laser, are independently existing entities, MPWA invokes the high-frequency and high-speed whistler mode as the driver, which is a medium wave that cannot exist outside of the plasma. Aside from the difference in drivers, the underlying mechanism that excites the plasma wakefield via the ponderomotive potential is common. Our computer simulations show that under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over many plasma wavelengths. We suggest that in addition to its celestial application, the MPWA concept can also be of terrestrial utility. A proof-of-principle experiment on MPWA would benefit both terrestrial and celestial accelerator concepts.

  12. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-28

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  13. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-01

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  14. Mitigating Particle Integration Error in Relativistic Laser-Plasma Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuera, Adam; Weichmann, Kathleen; Cowan, Benjamin; Cary, John

    2016-10-01

    In particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield accelerators with a0 greater than unity, errors in particle trajectories produce incorrect beam charges and energies, predicting performance not realized in experiments such as the Texas Petawatt Laser. In order to avoid these errors, the simulation time step must resolve a time scale smaller than the laser period by a factor of a0. If the Yee scheme advances the fields with this time step, the laser wavelength must be over-resolved by a factor of a0 to avoid dispersion errors. Here is presented and demonstrated with Vorpal simulations, a new electromagnetic algorithm, building on previous work, correcting Yee dispersion for arbitrary sub-CFL time steps, reducing simulation times by a0.

  15. High-Brightness High-Energy Electron Beams from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator via Energy Chirp Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. T.; Li, W. T.; Liu, J. S.; Zhang, Z. J.; Qi, R.; Yu, C. H.; Liu, J. Q.; Fang, M.; Qin, Z. Y.; Wang, C.; Xu, Y.; Wu, F. X.; Leng, Y. X.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2016-09-01

    By designing a structured gas density profile between the dual-stage gas jets to manipulate electron seeding and energy chirp reversal for compressing the energy spread, we have experimentally produced high-brightness high-energy electron beams from a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator with peak energies in the range of 200-600 MeV, 0.4%-1.2% rms energy spread, 10-80 pC charge, and ˜0.2 mrad rms divergence. The maximum six-dimensional brightness B6 D ,n is estimated as ˜6.5 ×1 015 A /m2/0.1 % , which is very close to the typical brightness of e beams from state-of-the-art linac drivers. These high-brightness high-energy e beams may lead to the realization of compact monoenergetic gamma-ray and intense coherent x-ray radiation sources.

  16. Quadrupole lens-free multiple-profile diagnostics for emittance measurement of laser wakefield accelerated electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krůs, M.; Laštovička, T.; Levato, T.

    2016-02-01

    A quadrupole lens-free diagnostic is a simple single shot method which can be used to measure the electron beam transverse emittance. LANEX screens are used as profile monitors due to the high yield of visible photons which can be easily detected by standard camera sensors. This type of minimally destructive diagnostics is particularly suitable for electron beams accelerated by the laser wakefield mechanism where the basic parameters of such beams fluctuate shot-to-shot mainly during the beam optimizing process. It allows to simultaneously measure the beam divergence, position, profile, pointing, and charge. The numerical study of the diagnostics performance and applicability range is presented and its limits are discussed. The influence of the LANEX screen multiple Coulomb scattering is studied by means of GEANT4; the unfolding procedure for multiple scattering contribution is presented.

  17. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  18. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung

    1992-12-31

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  19. Linear to non linear analysis for positron acceleration in plasma hollow channel wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Ligia Diana; An, Weiming; Mori, Warren B.; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators are promising candidates for future generation compact accelerators. The standard regime of operation, non-linear or blowout regime, is reached when a particle bunch space charge or laser pulse ponderomotive force radially expels plasma electrons forming a bucket of ions that defocus positron bunches, thus preventing their acceleration. To avoid defocusing, hollow plasma channels have been considered. The corresponding wakefields have been examined in the linear and non-linear excitation regimes for electrons. It is therefore important to extend the theory for positron acceleration, particularly in the nonlinear regime where the wakefields strongly differ. In this work we explore the wakefield structure, examine the differences between the electron and positron beam cases, and explore positron acceleration in nonlinear regimes. We support our findings with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations performed with OSIRIS and quasi-3D and QuickPIC.

  20. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, Michael C.

    2014-04-30

    -15 seconds) in duration and 150 Joules in energy (equivalent to the muzzle energy of a small pistol bullet). This duration was well matched to the natural electron density oscillation period of plasma of 1/100 atmospheric density, enabling efficient excitation of a plasma wake, while this energy was sufficient to drive a high-amplitude wake of the right shape to produce an energetic, collimated electron beam. Continuing research is aimed at increasing electron energy even further, increasing the number of electrons captured and accelerated, and developing applications of the compact, multi-GeV accelerator as a coherent, hard x-ray source for materials science, biomedical imaging and homeland security applications. The second major advance under this project was to develop new methods of visualizing the laser-driven plasma wake structures that underlie laser-plasma accelerators. Visualizing these structures is essential to understanding, optimizing and scaling laser-plasma accelerators. Yet prior to work under this project, computer simulations based on estimated initial conditions were the sole source of detailed knowledge of the complex, evolving internal structure of laser-driven plasma wakes. In this project we developed and demonstrated a suite of optical visualization methods based on well-known methods such as holography, streak cameras, and coherence tomography, but adapted to the ultrafast, light-speed, microscopic world of laser-driven plasma wakes. Our methods output images of laser-driven plasma structures in a single laser shot. We first reported snapshots of low-amplitude laser wakes in Nature Physics in 2006. We subsequently reported images of high-amplitude laser-driven plasma “bubbles”, which are important for producing electron beams with low energy spread, in Physical Review Letters in 2010. More recently, we have figured out how to image laser-driven structures that change shape while propagating in a single laser shot. The latter techniques, which use

  1. High field terahertz emission from relativistic laser-driven plasma wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2015-10-15

    We propose a method to generate high field terahertz (THz) radiation with peak strength of GV/cm level in the THz frequency gap range of 1–10 THz using a relativistic laser interaction with a gaseous plasma target. Due to the effect of local pump depletion, an initially Gaussian laser pulse undergoes leading edge erosion and eventually evolves to a state with leading edge being step function. Interacting with such a pulse, electrons gain transverse residual momentum and excite net transverse currents modulated by the relativistic plasma frequency. These currents give rise to the low frequency THz emission. We demonstrate this process with one and two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  2. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Sylla, F.; Lambert, G.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 1019 cm-3 range well suited for LWFA.

  3. The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) laser system and its associated optics

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.

    1992-07-01

    Generating a 100 nC, 15 ps pulse length electron beam at the AWA requires a stable laser system capable of producing 1--3 ps, 5 mJ at 248 nm with the ability to shape the wave front. We have installed a combined Coherent ultra fast 702 dye laser and Lambda Physik excimer pulsed amplification system which meets these requirements. A device has been built to produce shaped laser pulses. Detailed characterizations of the laser system, its associated optics development, and timing/amplitude stabilization are presented.

  4. Laser Ranging Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazolla, Sabino; Hemmati, Hamid; Tratt, David

    2003-01-01

    Laser Ranging Simulation Program (LRSP) is a computer program that predicts selected aspects of the performances of a laser altimeter or other laser ranging or remote-sensing systems and is especially applicable to a laser-based system used to map terrain from a distance of several kilometers. Designed to run in a more recent version (5 or higher) of the MATLAB programming language, LRSP exploits the numerical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB. LRSP generates a graphical user interface that includes a pop-up menu that prompts the user for the input of data that determine the performance of a laser ranging system. Examples of input data include duration and energy of the laser pulse, the laser wavelength, the width of the laser beam, and several parameters that characterize the transmitting and receiving optics, the receiving electronic circuitry, and the optical properties of the atmosphere and the terrain. When the input data have been entered, LRSP computes the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of range, signal and noise currents, and ranging and pointing errors.

  5. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  6. MeV-energy x rays from inverse compton scattering with laser-wakefield accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Powers, N D; Ghebregziabher, I; Maharjan, C M; Liu, C; Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Zhang, J; Cunningham, N; Moorti, A; Clarke, S; Pozzi, S; Umstadter, D P

    2013-04-12

    We report the generation of MeV x rays using an undulator and accelerator that are both driven by the same 100-terawatt laser system. The laser pulse driving the accelerator and the scattering laser pulse are independently optimized to generate a high energy electron beam (>200  MeV) and maximize the output x-ray brightness. The total x-ray photon number was measured to be ∼1×10(7), the source size was 5  μm, and the beam divergence angle was ∼10  mrad. The x-ray photon energy, peaked at 1 MeV (reaching up to 4 MeV), exceeds the thresholds of fundamental nuclear processes (e.g., pair production and photodisintegration).

  7. Demonstration of a narrow energy spread, ∼0.5  GeV electron beam from a two-stage laser wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Pollock, B B; Clayton, C E; Ralph, J E; Albert, F; Davidson, A; Divol, L; Filip, C; Glenzer, S H; Herpoldt, K; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Meinecke, J; Mori, W B; Pak, A; Rensink, T C; Ross, J S; Shaw, J; Tynan, G R; Joshi, C; Froula, D H

    2011-07-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultracompact stages of GeV scale, high-quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high-energy colliders. Ultrahigh intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves (the wake) over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1  GeV energy in centimeter-scale low density plasmas using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake even at low densities. By restricting electron injection to a distinct short region, the injector stage, energetic electron beams (of the order of 100 MeV) with a relatively large energy spread are generated. Some of these electrons are then further accelerated by a second, longer accelerator stage, which increases their energy to ∼0.5  GeV while reducing the relative energy spread to <5% FWHM.

  8. Absorber for wakefield interference management at the entrance of the wiggler of a free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Marchlik, Matthew; Biallas, George Herman

    2017-03-07

    A method for managing the broad band microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation in a free electron laser (FEL) having a wiggler producing power in the electromagnetic spectrum. The method includes placement of broadband microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation absorbers on the upstream end of the wiggler. The absorbers dampen the bounced back, broad band microwave and THz radiation returning from the surfaces outside the nose of the cookie-cutter and thus preventing broadening of the electron beam pulse's narrow longitudinal energy distribution. Broadening diminishes the ultimate laser power from the wiggler. The broadband microwave and THz radiation absorbers are placed on either side of the slot in the cookie-cutter that shapes the wake field wave of the electron pulse to the slot shape of the wiggler chamber aperture. The broad band microwave and THz radiation absorber is preferably a non-porous pyrolytic grade of graphite with small grain size.

  9. High Flux Spatially Coherent X-ray Generation from Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, Chris

    2011-10-01

    Nonlinear plasma waves driven by existing ultra-intense short-pulse lasers can trap large numbers of electrons from the plasma (as many as 5 ×109) and accelerate them to ~ GeV energy over ~ 1 cm . The details of the trapping process and plasma wave structure dictate that the trapped electrons undergo transverse oscillatory motion on the microscopic scale of the plasma structure, resulting in short wavelength betatron radiation. These x-ray beams are presumed to retain the short-pulse characteristic of the laser, resulting in high peak flux, making the source a candidate for ultrafast temporally resolved imaging applications. Presented here are experimental studies of the scalings of fluence upon laser power, gas jet length, and electron beam parameters. The spectrum was directly measured by single hit spectroscopy to be broad and smooth with peak photon energy exceeding 10 keV . Additional measurements indicate that the beam source size can be as small as 1 μm and that the radiation exhibits spatial coherence. These two key characteristics allow advanced imaging capabilities including phase contrast imaging and tomography, as demonstrated by radiography studies of biological specimens. Collaborators: S. Kneip (Imperial College London), T. Matsuoka (Present affiliation: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science), W. Schumaker, V. Chvykov, F. Dollar, M. Vargas, G. Kalintchenko, V. Yanovsky, A. Maksimchuk, A. G. R. Thomas, and K. Krushelnick (University of Michigan). This work was supported by the NSF (award PHY-0114336), the NSF/DNDO (award F021166), and the NRC (award 38-09-953).

  10. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O’Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. In this study, we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I; Clayton, Chris E; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A; Mori, Warren B; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m(-1) is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  12. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m−1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:27250570

  13. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; ...

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. In this study, we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel ismore » created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.« less

  14. Terahertz radiation as a bunch diagnostic for laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches

    SciTech Connect

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Schroeder, Carl; Filip, Catalin; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Fubiani, Gwenael; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-17

    Experimental results are reported from two measurement techniques (semiconductor switching and electro-optic sampling) that allow temporal characterization of electron bunches produced by a laser-driven plasma-based accelerator. As femtosecond electron bunches exit the plasma-vacuum interface, coherent transition radiation (at THz frequencies) is emitted. Measuring the properties of this radiation allows characterization of the electron bunches. Theoretical work on the emission mechanism is presented, including a model that calculates the THz wave form from a given bunch profile. It is found that the spectrum of the THz pulse is coherent up to the 200 {micro}m thick crystal (ZnTe) detection limit of 4 THz, which corresponds to the production of sub-50 fs (rms) electron bunch structure. The measurements demonstrate both the shot-to-shot stability of bunch parameters that are critical to THz emission (such as total charge and bunch length), as well as femtosecond synchronization among bunch, THz pulse, and laser beam.

  15. Generation of 500 MeV-1 GeV energy electrons from laser wakefield acceleration via ionization induced injection using CO{sub 2} mixed in He

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, M. Z.; Ali, A.; Fedosejevs, R.; Fourmaux, S.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of 500 MeV to 1 GeV electron bunches has been demonstrated using ionization injection in mixtures of 4% to 10% of CO{sub 2} in He. 80 TW laser pulses were propagated through 5 mm gas jet targets at electron densities of 0.4-1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}cm{sup -3}. Ionization injection led to lower density thresholds, a higher total electron charge, and an increased probability of producing electrons above 500 MeV in energy compared to self-injection in He gas alone. Electrons with GeV energies were also observed on a few shots and indicative of an additional energy enhancement mechanism.

  16. Spectroscopy of betatron radiation emitted from laser-produced wakefield accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Thorn, D B; Geddes, C G R; Matlis, N H; Plateau, G R; Esarey, E H; Battaglia, M; Schroeder, C B; Shiraishi, S; Stöhlker, Th; Tóth, C; Leemans, W P

    2010-10-01

    X-ray betatron radiation is produced by oscillations of electrons in the intense focusing field of a laser-plasma accelerator. These hard x-rays show promise for use in femtosecond-scale time-resolved radiography of ultrafast processes. However, the spectral characteristics of betatron radiation have only been inferred from filter pack measurements. In order to achieve higher resolution spectral information about the betatron emission, we used an x-ray charge-coupled device to record the spectrum of betatron radiation, with a full width at half maximum resolution of 225 eV. In addition, we have recorded simultaneous electron and x-ray spectra along with x-ray images that allow for a determination of the betatron emission source size, as well as differences in the x-ray spectra as a function of the energy spectrum of accelerated electrons.

  17. Analog Simulation of a Laser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Gary

    1982-01-01

    Presents an analog simulation of laser properties (finding time evolution of the intensity of a ruby laser pulse) which serves as the basis of a three-four hour laboratory experiment. Includes programs for solution to rate equations of a three-level laser and production of a giant pulse in a ruby laser. (Author/SK)

  18. Role of stochastic heating in wakefield acceleration when optical injection is used

    SciTech Connect

    Rassou, S.; Bourdier, A.; Drouin, M.

    2014-08-15

    The dynamics of an electron in two counterpropagating waves is investigated. Conditions for stochastic acceleration are derived. The possibility of stochastic heating is confirmed when two waves interact with low density plasma by performing PIC (Particle In Cell) code simulations. It is shown that stochastic heating can play an important role in laser wakefield acceleration. When considering low density plasma interacting with a high intensity wave perturbed by a low intensity counterpropagating wave, stochastic heating can provide electrons with the right momentum for trapping in the wakefield. The influence of stochastic acceleration on the trapping of electrons is compared to the one of the beatwave force which is responsible for cold injection. To do so, several polarizations for the colliding pulses are considered. For some value of the plasma density and pulse duration, a transition from an injection due to stochastic acceleration to a cold injection dominated regime—regarding the trapped charge—has been observed from 2D and 3D PIC code simulations. This transition is ruled by the ratio of the interaction length of the pulses to the longitudinal size of the bubble. When the interaction length of the laser pulses reaches the radius of the accelerating cavity stochastic heating becomes dominant, and might be necessary to get electrons trapped into the wakefield, when wakefield inhibition grows with plasma density.

  19. Strong Radiation-Damping Effects in a Gamma-Ray Source Generated by the Interaction of a High-Intensity Laser with a Wakefield-Accelerated Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A. G. R.; Ridgers, C. P.; Bulanov, S. S.; Griffin, B. J.; Mangles, S. P. D.

    2012-10-01

    A number of theoretical calculations have studied the effect of radiation-reaction forces on radiation distributions in strong-field counterpropagating electron-beam-laser interactions, but could these effects—including quantum corrections—be observed in interactions with realistic bunches and focusing fields, as is hoped in a number of soon-to-be-proposed experiments? We present numerical calculations of the angularly resolved radiation spectrum from an electron bunch with parameters similar to those produced in laser-wakefield-acceleration experiments, interacting with an intense, ultrashort laser pulse. For our parameters, the effect of radiation damping on the angular distribution and energy distribution of photons is not easily discernible for a realistic moderate-emittance electron beam. However, experiments using such a counterpropagating beam-laser geometry should be able to measure these effects using current laser systems through measurement of the electron-beam properties. In addition, the brilliance of this source is very high, with peak spectral brilliance exceeding 1029photonss-1mm-2mrad-2(0.1%bandwidth)-1 with an approximately 2% conversion efficiency and with a peak energy of 10 MeV.

  20. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kneip, S.; McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V.; Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J.

    2011-08-29

    We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

  1. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Kim, K. J.; Sun, Y. E.; Piot, P.; Rihaoui, M.; High Energy Physics; Northern Illinois Univ.; FNAL

    2009-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  2. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Power, J. G.; Piot, P.; Sun, Y.-E.

    2009-01-22

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  3. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.J.; Piot, Philippe; Power, John Gorham; Sun, Y.E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  4. 2.5D Numerical Simulation of Excitation of Coherent Chain of Electron Wake-Field Bubbles by Optimal Non-Resonant Chain of Dense Relativistic Electron Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, V. I.; Lotov, K. V.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Svistun, O. M.

    2010-06-16

    It is shown that optimal difference of frequencies of following of electron bunches and following of wake-field bubbles exists, so N-1 drive-bunches strengthen chain of wakefield bubbles and N-th bunch gets in maximal accelerating wakefield.

  5. Generating high-brightness electron beams via ionization injection by transverse colliding lasers in a plasma-wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Li, F; Hua, J F; Xu, X L; Zhang, C J; Yan, L X; Du, Y C; Huang, W H; Chen, H B; Tang, C X; Lu, W; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Gu, Y Q

    2013-07-05

    The production of ultrabright electron bunches using ionization injection triggered by two transversely colliding laser pulses inside a beam-driven plasma wake is examined via three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The relatively low intensity lasers are polarized along the wake axis and overlap with the wake for a very short time. The result is that the residual momentum of the ionized electrons in the transverse plane of the wake is reduced, and the injection is localized along the propagation axis of the wake. This minimizes both the initial thermal emittance and the emittance growth due to transverse phase mixing. Simulations show that ultrashort (~8 fs) high-current (0.4 kA) electron bunches with a normalized emittance of 8.5 and 6 nm in the two planes, respectively, and a brightness of 1.7×10(19) A rad(-2) m(-2) can be obtained for realistic parameters.

  6. Strong radiation damping effects in a gamma-ray source generated by the interaction of a high intensity laser with a wakefield accelerated electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alexander; Ridgers, Christopher; Bulanov, Stepan; Griffin, Blake; Mangles, Stuart

    2012-10-01

    We present numerical calculations of the angularly resolved radiation spectrum from a relativistic electron beam interacting with an ultrashort laser pulse. These calculations include the effect of semi-classical radiation reaction forces including a Gaunt factor for synchrotron radiation. For a laser of 5x10^21 Wcm-2 intensity interacting with a 200 MeV electron beam with an emittance similar to that in laser wakefield acceleration experiments, radiation reaction does not produce a significant change in the angular and energy distribution of photons. However the effects of radiation reaction are clear when observing the electron beam properties. The result is that near-term experiments using such a counter-propagating beam-laser geometry should be able to measure the effects of quantum effects in radiation reaction. The calculations also show that the brilliance of this source is very high, with a peak spectral brilliance exceeding 10^29 photons,s-1mm-2mrad-2(0.1% bandwidth)-1 with approximately 2% efficiency and with a peak energy of 10 MeV.

  7. Space simulators for laser optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Different approaches that are being utilized to test laser optical systems are described. One of the most crucial areas in the testing phase is the stability of the laser optics mounted inside the space simulator. The thermal vacuum system, the refrigeration system, and the space simulator are discussed.

  8. Laser Altimeter for Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Height of flight-simulator probe above model of terrain measured by automatic laser triangulation system. Airplane simulated by probe that moves over model of terrain. Altitude of airplane scaled from height of probe above model. Height measured by triangulation of laser beam aimed at intersection of model surface with plumb line of probe.

  9. Investigation of ionization-induced electron injection in a wakefield driven by laser inside a gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, T. L.; Hansson, M.; Lee, P.; Desforges, F. G.; Maynard, G.; Dobosz Dufrénoy, S.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Aurand, B.; Persson, A.; Gallardo González, I.; Maitrallain, A.; Monot, P.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.; Cros, B.

    2016-02-01

    Ionization-induced electron injection was investigated experimentally by focusing a driving laser pulse with a maximum normalized potential of 1.2 at different positions along the plasma density profile inside a gas cell, filled with a gas mixture composed of 99 %H2+1 %N2 . Changing the laser focus position relative to the gas cell entrance controls the accelerated electron bunch properties, such as the spectrum width, maximum energy, and accelerated charge. Simulations performed using the 3D particle-in-cell code WARP with a realistic density profile give results that are in good agreement with the experimental ones. The interest of this regime for optimizing the bunch charge in a selected energy window is discussed.

  10. Studies of a hybrid Trojan Horse wakefield accelerator with high transformer ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Bruhwiler, David; Hidding, Bernhard; Vay, Jean-Luc; Webb, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration uses relativistic high-charge electron bunches to generate a plasma blowout supporting intense electric fields for trapping and acceleration. Dramatic improvements in emittance, peak current and brightness are achievable through laser-controlled ionization in the plasma blowout, which is the premise of the Trojan Horse approach. The hybrid Trojan Horse concept extends this approach to use the output beam from a laser plasma accelerator to drive a Trojan Horse, resulting in a compact system that can produce higher brightness bunches with order-of-magnitude lower energy spread. We are exploring the use of multiple, shaped laser pulses to resonantly inject a shaped electron drive bunch. The resulting output bunch could generate wakes in PWFA or beam-driven dielectric structures with transformer ratios of 5 to 10 or larger. Hence, a hybrid Trojan Horse accelerator with bunch shaping may provide a compact source of nC bunches that can drive a variety of systems for studying high-gradient wakefields and lepton acceleration. Initial work will use previously simulated electron bunches from a laser plasma accelerator to drive the plasma wakefield stage. We present preliminary results from simulations using the parallel, particle-in-cell framework Warp. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of High Energy Physics, under Award Number DE-SC0013855.

  11. Suppressing Parasitic Effects in a Long Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna; Jing, Chunguang; Li, Chen; Zholents, Alexander A.; Power, John G.

    2014-08-27

    Dielectric wakefield acceleration is a promising concept for increasing the accelerating gradient above the limits of conventional accelerators. Although superior gradients are reported in short dielectric wakefield accelerator tubes, problems arise when it comes to efficiency and multi-meter long interaction lengths. Here we discuss possible issues and provide some solutions backed by simulations.

  12. Terahertz radiation driven by two-color laser pulses at near-relativistic intensities: Competition between photoionization and wakefield effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González de Alaiza Martínez, P.; Davoine, X.; Debayle, A.; Gremillet, L.; Bergé, L.

    2016-06-01

    We numerically investigate terahertz (THz) pulse generation by linearly-polarized, two-color femtosecond laser pulses in highly-ionized argon. Major processes consist of tunneling photoionization and ponderomotive forces associated with transverse and longitudinal field excitations. By means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we reveal the importance of photocurrent mechanisms besides transverse and longitudinal plasma waves for laser intensities >1015 W/cm2. We demonstrate the following. (i) With two-color pulses, photoionization prevails in the generation of GV/m THz fields up to 1017 W/cm2 laser intensities and suddenly loses efficiency near the relativistic threshold, as the outermost electron shell of ionized Ar atoms has been fully depleted. (ii) PIC results can be explained by a one-dimensional Maxwell-fluid model and its semi-analytical solutions, offering the first unified description of the main THz sources created in plasmas. (iii) The THz power emitted outside the plasma channel mostly originates from the transverse currents.

  13. Terahertz radiation driven by two-color laser pulses at near-relativistic intensities: Competition between photoionization and wakefield effects

    PubMed Central

    González de Alaiza Martínez, P.; Davoine, X.; Debayle, A.; Gremillet, L.; Bergé, L.

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate terahertz (THz) pulse generation by linearly-polarized, two-color femtosecond laser pulses in highly-ionized argon. Major processes consist of tunneling photoionization and ponderomotive forces associated with transverse and longitudinal field excitations. By means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we reveal the importance of photocurrent mechanisms besides transverse and longitudinal plasma waves for laser intensities >1015 W/cm2. We demonstrate the following. (i) With two-color pulses, photoionization prevails in the generation of GV/m THz fields up to 1017 W/cm2 laser intensities and suddenly loses efficiency near the relativistic threshold, as the outermost electron shell of ionized Ar atoms has been fully depleted. (ii) PIC results can be explained by a one-dimensional Maxwell-fluid model and its semi-analytical solutions, offering the first unified description of the main THz sources created in plasmas. (iii) The THz power emitted outside the plasma channel mostly originates from the transverse currents. PMID:27255689

  14. Phase-contrast imaging using radiation sources based on laser-plasma wakefield accelerators: state of the art and future development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboredo., D.; Cipiccia, S.; Grant, P. A.; Welsh, G. H.; Grant, D. W.; McKendrick, G.; Subiel, A.; Maneuski, D.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Both the laser-plasma wakefield accelerator (LWFA) and X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi) are promising technologies that are attracting the attention of the scientific community. Conventional X-ray absorption imaging cannot be used as a means of imaging biological material because of low contrast. XPCi overcomes this limitation by exploiting the variation of the refraction index of materials. The contrast obtained is higher than for conventional absorption imaging and requires a lower dose. The LWFA is a new concept of acceleration where electrons are accelerated to very high energy (~150 MeV) in very short distances (mm scale) by surfing plasma waves excited by the passage of an ultra-intense laser pulse (~1018 Wcm-2) through plasma. Electrons in the LWFA can undergo transverse oscillation and emit synchrotron-like (betatron) radiation in a narrow cone around the propagation axis. The properties of the betatron radiation produced by LWFA, such as source size and spectrum, make it an excellent candidate for XPCi. In this work we present the characterization of betatron radiation produced by the LWFA in the ALPHA-X laboratory (University of Strathclyde). We show how phase contrast images can be obtained using the betatron radiation in a free-space propagation configuration and we discuss the potential and limitation of the LWFA driven XPCi.

  15. Computational studies and optimization of wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tsung, Frank S.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Esarey, Eric H.; Mori, Warren B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Martins, Samuel F.; Katsouleas, Tom; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Fawley, William M.; Huang, Chengkun; Wang, Xiadong; Cowan, Ben; Decyk, Victor K.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nakamura, Kei; Paul, Kevin; Plateau, Guillaume R.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Silva, Luis O.; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, C.G.R.; Tzoufras, Michael; Antonsen, Tom; Vieira, Jorge; Leemans, Wim P.

    2008-06-16

    Laser- and particle beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators produce accelerating fields thousands of times higher than radio-frequency accelerators, offering compactness and ultrafast bunches to extend the frontiers of high energy physics and to enable laboratory-scale radiation sources. Large-scale kinetic simulations provide essential understanding of accelerator physics to advance beam performance and stability and show and predict the physics behind recent demonstration of narrow energy spread bunches. Benchmarking between codes is establishing validity of the models used and, by testing new reduced models, is extending the reach of simulations to cover upcoming meter-scale multi-GeV experiments. This includes new models that exploit Lorentz boosted simulation frames to speed calculations. Simulations of experiments showed that recently demonstrated plasma gradient injection of electrons can be used as an injector to increase beam quality by orders of magnitude. Simulations are now also modeling accelerator stages of tens of GeV, staging of modules, and new positron sources to design next-generation experiments and to use in applications in high energy physics and light sources.

  16. Consistency analysis on laser signal in laser guided weapon simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ruiguang; Zhang, Wenpan; Guo, Hao; Gan, Lin

    2015-10-01

    The hardware-in-the-loop simulation is widely used in laser semi-active guidance weapon experiments, the authenticity of the laser guidance signal is the key problem of reliability. In order to evaluate the consistency of the laser guidance signal, this paper analyzes the angle of sight, laser energy density, laser spot size, atmospheric back scattering, sun radiation and SNR by comparing the different working state between actual condition and hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Based on measured data, mathematical simulation and optical simulation result, laser guidance signal effects on laser seeker are determined. By using Monte Carlo method, the laser guided weapon trajectory and impact point distribution are obtained, the influence of the systematic error are analyzed. In conclusion it is pointed out that the difference between simulation system and actual system has little influence in normal guidance, has great effect on laser jamming. The research is helpful to design and evaluation of laser guided weapon simulation.

  17. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Update `92

    SciTech Connect

    Rosing, M.; Balka, L.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1992-09-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is an experiment designed to test various ideas related to wakefield technology. Construction is now underway for a 100 nC electron beam in December of 1992. This report updates this progress.

  18. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Update '92

    SciTech Connect

    Rosing, M.; Balka, L.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is an experiment designed to test various ideas related to wakefield technology. Construction is now underway for a 100 nC electron beam in December of 1992. This report updates this progress.

  19. Group velocity dispersion and relativistic effects on the wakefield induced by chirped laser pulse in parabolic plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Sohbatzadeh, F.; Akou, H.

    2013-04-15

    The excitation of wake field plasma waves by a short laser pulse propagating through a parabolic plasma channel is studied. The laser pulse is assumed to be initially chirped. In this regard, the effects of initial and induced chirp on the plasma wake field as well as the laser pulse parameters are investigated. The group velocity dispersion and nonlinear relativistic effects were taken into account to evaluate the excited wake field in two dimension using source dependent expansion method. Positive, negative, and un-chirped laser pulses were employed in numerical code to evaluate the effectiveness of the initial chirp on 2-D wake field excitation. Numerical results showed that for laser irradiances exceeding 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}, an intense laser pulse with initial positive chirp generates larger wake field compared to negatively and un-chirped pulses.

  20. Generation of annular, high-charge electron beams at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, E. E.; Li, C.; Gai, W.; Power, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present and discuss the results from the experimental generation of high-charge annular(ring-shaped)electron beams at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). These beams were produced by using laser masks to project annular laser profiles of various inner and outer diameters onto the photocathode of an RF gun. The ring beam is accelerated to 15 MeV, then it is imaged by means of solenoid lenses. Transverse profiles are compared for different solenoid settings. Discussion includes a comparison with Parmela simulations, some applications of high-charge ring beams,and an outline of a planned extension of this study.

  1. Generation of annular, high-charge electron beams at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, E. E.; Li, C.; Gai, W.; Power, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss the results from the experimental generation of high-charge annular(ring-shaped)electron beams at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). These beams were produced by using laser masks to project annular laser profiles of various inner and outer diameters onto the photocathode of an RF gun. The ring beam is accelerated to 15 MeV, then it is imaged by means of solenoid lenses. Transverse profiles are compared for different solenoid settings. Discussion includes a comparison with Parmela simulations, some applications of high-charge ring beams,and an outline of a planned extension of this study.

  2. DOE-HEP Final Report for 2013-2016: Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Katsouleas, Thomas C.; Sahai, Aakash A.

    2016-08-08

    There were two goals for this funded project: 1. Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and 2. Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration. For goal 1, an analytical model was developed to determine the ion-motion resulting from the interaction of non-linear “blow-out” wakefields excited by beam-plasma and laser-plasma interactions. This is key to understanding the state of the plasma at timescales of 1 picosecond to a few 10s of picoseconds behind the driver-energy pulse. More information can be found in the document. For goal 2, we analytically and computationally analyzed the longitudinal instabilities of the laser-plasma interactions at the critical layer. Specifically, the process of “Doppler-shifted Ponderomotive bunching” is significant to eliminate the very high-energy spread and understand the importance of chirping the laser pulse frequency. We intend to publish the results of the mixing process in 2-D. We intend to publish Chirp-induced transparency. More information can be found in the document.

  3. Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    A simulation of laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame. Both the laser and the wakefield buckets must be resolved over the entire domain of the plasma, requiring many cells and many time steps. While researchers often use a simulation window that moves with the pulse, this reduces only the multitude of cells, not the multitude of time steps. For an artistic impression of how to solve the simulation by using the boosted-frame method, watch the video "Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the wakefield frame."

  4. Optimization of the LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Strong Undulator Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Reiche, S.; Bane, K.L.F.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Nuhn, H.D.; Stupakov, G.V.; Fawley, W.M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-03-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Free-Electron Laser will operate in the wavelength range of 1.5 to 15 Angstroms. Energy loss due to wakefields within the long undulator can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g. Cu) and its radius. To study the expected performance in the presence of these wakefields, we make a series of start-to-end simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT and time-dependent FEL simulation codes Genesis 1.3 and Ginger. We discuss the impact of the wakefield on output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation obtained with a slight z dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare these results to those obtained by decreasing the bunch charge or increasing the vacuum chamber radius. We also compare our results to those predicted in concurrent analytical work.

  5. The Ion Wakefield Inside a Glass Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mudi; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2016-10-01

    The formation of an ion wakefield downstream of dust particles in a complex plasma sheath has long been understood to have strong implications on their structure, stability and dynamics . The presence of the ion wake introduces interesting phenomena such as charge reduction on downstream particles and asymmetric interaction forces between upstream and downstream particles. Many of the self-ordered dust particle structures observed in complex plasma experiments are the result of the combination of the ion-wakefield and the external confinement; unfortunately, few experimental measurements isolating the effect of the wakefield have been conducted. In this experiment, 1-D dust particle structures (i.e., vertically aligned particle chains) are formed in a GEC RF reference cell within a glass box sitting on the powered lower electrode. A diode pumped, solid-state laser is used to perturb individual particles within the particle chain, allowing a map of the ion wakefield inside the glass box to be generated. The implications of these results will be discussed. NSF / DOE funding is gratefully acknowledged - PHY1414523 & PHY1262031.

  6. Simulations of laser thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1999-03-01

    The authors have shown that bubble expansion and collapse near the interface between two materials with modest property differences produces jet-like interpenetration of the two materials. The bubble dynamics at a water-viscous fluid interface is compared with that at the interface of water with a weak elastic-plastic material. The authors find that, despite rather similar behavior during bubble growth and the initial portion of bubble collapse, the terminal jetting behavior is quite different, even in direction. The elastic-plastic properties chosen realistically represent real and surrogate thrombus. Simulations using the elastic-plastic model quantitatively agree with laboratory thrombolysis mass removal experiments. In the earlier simulations of laboratory experiments, walls have been remote so as to not effect the dynamics. Here the authors present two-dimensional simulations of thrombolysis with water over elastic-plastic surrogate thrombus in a geometry representative of the clinical situation. The calculations include thin cylindrical elastic walls with properties and dimensions appropriate for arteries. The presence of these artery walls does not substantially change the interface jetting predicted in unconfined simulations.

  7. Studies on high-quality electron beams and tunable x-ray sources produced by laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Luo, Ji; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zheng-Ming

    2016-11-01

    The applications of laser wake field accelerators (LWFA) rely heavily on the quality of produced high energy electron beams and X-ray sources. We present our recent progress on this issue. Firstly we propose a bichromatic laser ionization injection scheme for obtaining high quality electron beams. With the laser pulse combinations of 800 nm and 267 nm, or 2400 nm and 800 nm in wavelengths, electron beams with energy spread of 1% or lower can be produced. Secondly we propose polarization tunable X-ray sources based on LWFA. By shooting a laser pulse into a preformed plasma channel with a skew angle referring to the channel axis, the plasma channel can act as a helical undulator for elliptically polarized X-rays.

  8. Radial equilibrium of relativistic particle bunches in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotov, K. V.

    2017-02-01

    Drive particle beams in linear or weakly nonlinear regimes of the plasma wakefield accelerator quickly reach a radial equilibrium with the wakefield, which is described in detail for the first time. The equilibrium beam state and self-consistent wakefields are obtained by combining analytical relationships, numerical integration, and first-principles simulations. In the equilibrium state, the beam density is strongly peaked near the axis, the beam radius is constant along most of the beam, and longitudinal variation of the focusing strength is balanced by varying beam emittance. The transverse momentum distribution of beam particles depends on the observation radius and is neither separable nor Gaussian.

  9. High resolution simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Pogorelov, I. V.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report on large-scale high resolution simulations of beam dynamics in electron linacs for the next-generation x-ray free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wakefields, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and treatment of radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. We present a study of the microbunching instability causing severe electron beam fragmentation in the longitudinal phase space which is a critical issue for future FELs. Using parameters for a proposed FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is generally needed to control the numerical macroparticle shot noise and avoid overestimating the microbunching instability. We explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We also study the effect of initial uncorrelated energy spread on the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam for the FEL linac.

  10. Synergy Between Experiments and Simulations in Laser and Beam-Driven Plasma Acceleration and Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Warren B.

    2015-11-01

    Computer simulations have been an integral part of plasma physics research since the early 1960s. Initially, they provided the ability to confirm and test linear and nonlinear theories in one-dimension. As simulation capabilities and computational power improved, then simulations were also used to test new ideas and applications of plasmas in multi-dimensions. As progress continued, simulations were also used to model experiments. Today computer simulations of plasmas are ubiquitously used to test new theories, understand complicated nonlinear phenomenon, model the full temporal and spatial scale of experiments, simulate parameters beyond the reach of current experiments, and test the performance of new devices before large capital expenditures are made to build them. In this talk I review the progress in simulations in a particular area of plasma physics: plasma based acceleration (PBA). In PBA a short laser pulse or particle beam propagates through long regions of plasma creating plasma wave wakefields on which electrons or positrons surf to high energies. In some cases the wakefields are highly nonlinear, involve three-dimensional effects, and the trajectories of plasma particles cross making it essential that fully kinetic and three-dimensional models are used. I will show how particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations were initially used to propose the basic idea of PBA in one dimension. I will review some of the dramatic progress in the experimental demonstration of PBA and show how this progress was dramatically helped by a synergy between experiments and full-scale multi-dimensional PIC simulations. This will include a review of how the capability of PIC simulation tools has improved. I will also touch on some recent progress on improvements to PIC simulations of PBA and discuss how these improvements may push the synergy further towards real time steering of experiments and start to end modeling of key components of a future linear collider or XFEL based on PBA

  11. Numerical simulations of LWFA for the next generation of laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, S. F.; Vieira, J.; Fiuza, F.; Silva, L. O.; Trines, R.; Norreys, P.

    2009-01-22

    The development of new laser systems based on OPCPA will push Laser Wakefield Accelerators (LWFA) to a qualitatively new energy range. As in the past, numerical simulations will play a critical role in testing, probing and optimizing the physical parameters and setup of these upscale experiments. Based on the prospective design parameters for the future Vulcan 10 PW OPCPA laser system, we have determined the optimal parameters for a single LWFA stage from theoretical scalings for such system, which predict accelerations to the energy frontier, with self-injected electrons in excess of 10 GeV for a self-guided configuration, and above 50 GeV bunches with externally-injected electrons in a laser-guided configuration. These parameters were then used as a baseline for 3D full scale simulations with OSIRIS and QuickPIC. A 12 GeV self-injected beam was obtained with both codes, in agreement with theoretical predictions for the maximum energy gain and the injected charge. Preliminary results on the laser-guided configuration already confirm the accelerating gradients and the stability of the laser guided propagation for long distances required to reach the higher energies predicted by the theoretical scalings for this scenario.

  12. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  13. Laser-capillary interaction for the EXIN project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisesto, F. G.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A. L.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Marocchino, A.; Mostacci, A.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    The EXIN project is under development within the SPARC_LAB facility of the National Laboratory of Frascati (LNF-INFN). This project aims to accelerate pre-existing electron bunches with high brightness by exploiting the wakefield plasma acceleration technique, while preserving the initial brightness. The wakefield is excited inside a dielectric capillary by high intensity laser pulses produced by the FLAME laser interacting with a gas. In this work, we present numerical simulations in order to optimize energy coupling between our laser with super-Gaussian transverse profile and a dielectric capillary. Moreover, an overview of the experimental layout will be given.

  14. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  16. Simulation based analysis of laser beam brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, Michael; Wiethop, Philipp; Schmid, Daniel; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Laser beam brazing is a well-established joining technology in car body manufacturing with main applications in the joining of divided tailgates and the joining of roof and side panels. A key advantage of laser brazed joints is the seam's visual quality which satisfies highest requirements. However, the laser beam brazing process is very complex and process dynamics are only partially understood. In order to gain deeper knowledge of the laser beam brazing process, to determine optimal process parameters and to test process variants, a transient three-dimensional simulation model of laser beam brazing is developed. This model takes into account energy input, heat transfer as well as fluid and wetting dynamics that lead to the formation of the brazing seam. A validation of the simulation model is performed by metallographic analysis and thermocouple measurements for different parameter sets of the brazing process. These results show that the multi-physical simulation model not only can be used to gain insight into the laser brazing process but also offers the possibility of process optimization in industrial applications. The model's capabilities in determining optimal process parameters are exemplarily shown for the laser power. Small deviations in the energy input can affect the brazing results significantly. Therefore, the simulation model is used to analyze the effect of the lateral laser beam position on the energy input and the resulting brazing seam.

  17. Theory, Modeling, and Simulation of Semiconductor Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Saini, Subbash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Semiconductor lasers play very important roles in many areas of information technology. In this talk, I will first give an overview of semiconductor laser theory. This will be followed by a description of different models and their shortcomings in modeling and simulation. Our recent efforts in constructing a fully space and time resolved simulation model will then be described. Simulation results based on our model will be presented. Finally the effort towards a self-consistent and comprehensive simulation capability for the opto-electronics integrated circuits (OEICs) will be briefly reviewed.

  18. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C J; Hua, J F; Xu, X L; Li, F; Pai, C-H; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Gu, Y Q; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Lu, W

    2016-07-11

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. The capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method.

  19. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C. J.; Hua, J. F.; Xu, X. L.; Li, F.; Pai, C. -H.; Wan, Y.; Wu, Y. P.; Gu, Y. Q.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.

    2016-07-11

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. As a result, the capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method.

  20. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, C. J.; Hua, J. F.; Xu, X. L.; ...

    2016-07-11

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of themore » wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. As a result, the capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method.« less

  1. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, C. J.; Hua, J. F.; Xu, X. L.; Li, F.; Pai, C.-H.; Wan, Y.; Wu, Y. P.; Gu, Y. Q.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.

    2016-01-01

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. The capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method. PMID:27403561

  2. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M.E.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.G.; Schoessow, P.; Sun, X.

    2001-07-11

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator has been successfully used for conducting wakefield experiments in dielectric loaded structures and plasmas. Although the initial wakefield experiments were successful, higher drive beam quality would substantially improve the wakefield accelerating gradients. For this reason they have built a new 1-1/2 cell L-band photocathode RF gun. This gun is expected to produce 10-100 nC bunches with 2-5 ps rms pulse length and normalized emittance less than 100 mm mrad. The gun will initially have a copper photocathode, which will soon be replaced by a high quantum efficiency cesium telluride one, allowing the generation of a train of high charge bunches. the beam energy at the exit of the gun cavity will be in the range 7.5-10 MeV. A standing-wave linac structure operating at the same frequency (1.3 GHz) will increase the beam energy to about 15 MeV. This beam will be used in high-gradient wakefield acceleration experiments and other high intensity electron beam applications. Traveling-wave dielectric loaded structures, operating at 7.8 and 15.6 GHz, will be excited by the propagation of single bunches or by trains of up to 32 electron bunches, reaching gradients in excess of 100 MV/m over distances of the order of 1 meter.

  3. Maritime Laser Communications Trial 98152-19703

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    held at Port Wakefield Proof & Experimental Establishment in September 2011. A novel analogue FM ship-to-shore communications system was used to...Laser Communications Trial 98152-19703 held at Port Wakefield Proof & Experimental Establishment in September 2011. The primary objective of the...27 APPENDIX A : PORT WAKEFIELD TIDE LEVELS

  4. The Simulation of Off-Axis Laser Propagation Using Heleeos

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    56 Laser Pointer Test...55 6. Laser pointer simulation ....................................................................................... 57 7... lasers have many different uses and can be found in much of today’s new technology. They are used in DVD players, CD players, builder’s leveling

  5. Development of our laser fusion integration simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinghong; Zhai, Chuanlei; Li, Shuanggui; Li, Xin; Zheng, Wudi; Yong, Heng; Zeng, Qinghong; Hang, Xudeng; Qi, Jin; Yang, Rong; Cheng, Juan; Song, Peng; Gu, Peijun; Zhang, Aiqing; An, Hengbin; Xu, Xiaowen; Guo, Hong; Cao, Xiaolin; Mo, Zeyao; Pei, Wenbing; Jiang, Song; Zhu, Shao-ping

    2013-11-01

    In the target design of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, it is common practice to apply radiation hydrodynamics code to study the key physical processes happening in ICF process, such as hohlraum physics, radiation drive symmetry, capsule implosion physics in the radiation-drive approach of ICF. Recently, many efforts have been done to develop our 2D integrated simulation capability of laser fusion with a variety of optional physical models and numerical methods. In order to effectively integrate the existing codes and to facilitate the development of new codes, we are developing an object-oriented structured-mesh parallel code-supporting infrastructure, called JASMIN. Based on two-dimensional three-temperature hohlraum physics code LARED-H and two-dimensional multi-group radiative transfer code LARED-R, we develop a new generation two-dimensional laser fusion code under the JASMIN infrastructure, which enable us to simulate the whole process of laser fusion from the laser beams' entrance into the hohlraum to the end of implosion. In this paper, we will give a brief description of our new-generation two-dimensional laser fusion code, named LARED-Integration, especially in its physical models, and present some simulation results of holhraum.

  6. Optical eye simulator for laser dazzle events.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João M P; Freitas, José; Williamson, Craig A

    2016-03-20

    An optical simulator of the human eye and its application to laser dazzle events are presented. The simulator combines optical design software (ZEMAX) with a scientific programming language (MATLAB) and allows the user to implement and analyze a dazzle scenario using practical, real-world parameters. Contrary to conventional analytical glare analysis, this work uses ray tracing and the scattering model and parameters for each optical element of the eye. The theoretical background of each such element is presented in relation to the model. The overall simulator's calibration, validation, and performance analysis are achieved by comparison with a simpler model based uponCIE disability glare data. Results demonstrate that this kind of advanced optical eye simulation can be used to represent laser dazzle and has the potential to extend the range of applicability of analytical models.

  7. Frequency Domain Tomography Of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Peng; Reed, Stephen; Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady; Downer, Mike

    2009-01-22

    Frequency Domain Holography (FDH), a technique for visualizing quasistatic objects propagating near the speed of light, has produced 'snapshots' of laser wakefields, but they are averaged over structural variations that occur during propagation through the plasma medium. Here we explore via simulations a generalization of FDH--that we call Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT)--that can potentially record a time sequence of quasistatic snapshots, like the frames of a movie, of the wake structure as it propagates through the plasma. FDT utilizes a several probe-reference pulse pairs that propagate obliquely to the drive pulse and wakefield, along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans.

  8. Wakefield: Community and Library Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumpeter, Margo C.; Donahue, Mary Ellen

    This community analysis was conducted in order to characterize and identify the information needs of the Wakefield community, and library services and use were evaluated to determine how well the library meets these needs. The study included an examination of the history of the town and its physical characteristics, economic development, and…

  9. High Transformer ratios in collinear wakefield accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanreykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC

    2008-01-01

    Based on our previous experiment that successfully demonstrated wakefield transformer ratio enhancement in a 13.625 GHz dielectric-loaded collinear wakefield accelerator using the ramped bunch train technique, we present here a redesigned experimental scheme for even higher enhancement of the efficiency of this accelerator. Design of a collinear wakefield device with a transformer ratio R2, is presented. Using a ramped bunch train (RBT) rather than a single drive bunch, the enhanced transformer ratio (ETR) technique is able to increase the transformer ratio R above the ordinary limit of 2. To match the wavelength of the fundamental mode of the wakefield with the bunch length (sigmaz=2 mm) of the new Argonne wakefield accelerator (AWA) drive gun (where the experiment will be performed), a 26.625 GHz dielectric based accelerating structure is required. This transformer ratio enhancement technique based on our dielectric-loaded waveguide design will result in a compact, high efficiency accelerating structures for future wakefield accelerators.

  10. Two-color beam generation based on wakefield excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, S.; Prat, E.; Reiche, S.

    2016-05-01

    Several beam manipulation methods have been studied and experimentally tested to generate two-color photon beams in free electron laser facilities to accommodate the user requests. We propose to use the interaction of the beam with an oscillating longitudinal wakefield source to obtain a suitable electron beam structure. The bunch generates two subpulses with different energies and delayed in time passing through a magnetic chicane after its longitudinal phase space has been modulated by the wakefield source. According to this approach the power of the emitted radiation is not degraded compared to the monochromatic beam, and the setup in the machine is quite simple because the bunch is manipulated only in the high energy section, where it is more rigid. We present the design applied to SwissFEL. We identified the parameters and the corresponding range of tunability of the time and energy separation among the two subbunches.

  11. Recent Experiment on Wakefield Transformer Ratio Enhancement at AWA

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Liu, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.

    2010-11-04

    One technique to enhance the transformer ratio beyond the ordinary limit of 2 in a collinear wakefield acceleration scheme is to use a ramped bunched train (RBT). The first experimental demonstration has been reported in [1]. However, due to the mismatch between the beam bunch length and frequency of the accelerating structure, the observed transformer ratio was only marginally above 2 in the earlier experiment. We recently revisited this experiment with an optimized bunch length using the laser stacking technique at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. A transformer ratio of 3.4 has been measured using two drive bunches. Attempting to use four drive bunches met with major challenges. In this article, measurement results and data analysis from these experiments are presented in detail.

  12. Modeling of 10 GeV-1 TeV laser-plasma accelerators using Lorentz boosted simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J. -L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D. P.

    2011-12-13

    We study modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [J.-L. Vay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 130405 (2007)] that allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted and beam loaded laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV (parameters not computationally accessible otherwise). This verifies the scaling of plasmaaccelerators to very high energies and accurately models the laser evolution and the accelerated electron beam transverse dynamics and energy spread. Over 4, 5, and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV, and 1 TeV class stages, respectively. Agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference for a 0.1 GeV class stage. In addition, obtaining these speedups and levels of accuracy was permitted by solutions for handling data input (in particular, particle and laser beams injection) and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference, as well as mitigation of a high-frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness.

  13. Volumetric modeling in laser BPH therapy simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Zhou, Xiangmin; Shen, Yunhe; Sweet, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel application of volume modeling techniques on laser Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) therapy simulation. The core technique in our system is an algorithm for simulating the tissue vaporization process by laser heating. Different from classical volume CSG operations, our technique takes experimental data as the guidance to determine the vaporization amount so that only a specified amount of tissue is vaporized in each time. Our algorithm uses a predictor-corrector strategy. First, we apply the classical CSG algorithm on a tetrahedral grid based distance field to estimate the vaporized tissue amount. Then, a volume-correction phase is applied on the distance field. To improve the performance, we further propose optimization approaches for efficient implementation.

  14. Argonne's new Wakefield Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-07-20

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne's AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

  15. Simulation of reflected and scattered laser radiation for designing laser shields.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Piotr; Wolska, Agnieszka; Swiderski, Jacek; Zajac, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a computer simulation of reflected and scattered laser radiation for calculating the angle of laser shields performed with the Laser Shield Solver computer program. The authors describe a method of calculating the shield angle for laser shields which protect workers against reflected and scattered laser radiation and which are made from different materials. The main assumptions of the program, which calculates and simulates reflected laser radiation from any material and which can be used for designing shield angles, are presented. Calculations are compared with measurements of reflected laser radiation. The results for one type of laser and different materials which interacted with a laser beam showed that the Laser Shield Solver was an appropriate tool for designing laser shields and its simulations of reflected laser radiation distribution have practical use.

  16. Radiation in 1.5 GeV and 12 GeV Laser Wakefield Acceleration Stages from PIC Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, J. L.; Martins, S. F.; Silva, L. O.

    2010-11-04

    A massivelly parallel post-processing radiation diagnostic for PIC codes is presented, which is then used to study the main features of the radiation from single LWFA stages (1.5 GeV and 12 GeV). This diagnostic also allows to examine radiation signatures associated with the physics of self-injection.

  17. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. )

    2011-04-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  18. A preliminary design of the collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholents, A.; Gai, W.; Doran, S.; Lindberg, R.; Power, J. G.; Strelnikov, N.; Sun, Y.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Vasserman, I.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Li, Y.; Gao, Q.; Shchegolkov, D. Y.; Simakov, E. I.

    2016-09-01

    A preliminary design of the multi-meter long collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator that achieves a highly efficient transfer of the drive bunch energy to the wakefields and to the witness bunch is considered. It is made from 0.5 m long accelerator modules containing a vacuum chamber with dielectric-lined walls, a quadrupole wiggler, an rf coupler, and BPM assembly. The single bunch breakup instability is a major limiting factor for accelerator efficiency, and the BNS damping is applied to obtain the stable multi-meter long propagation of a drive bunch. Numerical simulations using a 6D particle tracking computer code are performed and tolerances to various errors are defined.

  19. Laser simulation at the Air Force Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosek, Jacob; Naderi, Shadi; Oliker, Benjamin; Lane, Ryan; Dajani, Iyad; Madden, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The physics of high brightness, high-power lasers present a variety of challenges with respect to simulation. The Air Force Research Laboratory is developing high-fidelity models for Yb-doped, Tm-doped, and Raman fiber amplifiers, hollow-core optical fiber gas lasers, and diode pumped alkali lasers. The approach to simulation and the physics specific to each laser technology are described, along with highlights of results, and relevant modeling considerations and limitations.

  20. Observation of Wakefields and Resonances in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, B. E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, T. E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, W. A.; Warnock, R.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report on high resolution measurements of resonances in the spectrum of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The resonances permeate the spectrum at wave number intervals of 0.074 cm-1 , and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup (energy, bucket filling pattern, CSR in bursting or continuous mode). Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory as eigenmodes of a smooth toroidal vacuum chamber driven by a bunched beam moving on a circular orbit. A corollary of peaks in the spectrum is the presence of pulses in the wakefield of the bunch at well-defined spatial intervals. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber, which has a fluted form much different from a smooth torus. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes, and indirectly by an interferometer in the THz range. The wake pulse sequence found by diodes is less regular than in the toroidal model, and depends on the point of observation, but is accounted for in a simulation of fields in the fluted chamber. Attention is paid to polarization of the observed fields, and possible coherence of fields produced in adjacent bending magnets. Low frequency wakefield production appears to be mainly local in a single bend, but multibend effects cannot be excluded entirely, and could play a role in high frequency resonances. New simulation techniques have been developed, which should be invaluable in further work.

  1. Dynamics of electron bunches at the laser-plasma interaction in the bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. I.; Svystun, O. M.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Tkachenko, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The multi-bunches self-injection, observed in laser-plasma accelerators in the bubble regime, affects the energy gain of electrons accelerated by laser wakefield. However, understanding of dynamics of the electron bunches formed at laser-plasma interaction may be challenging. We present here the results of fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of laser wakefield acceleration driven by a short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The trapping and acceleration of three witness electron bunches by the bubble-like structures were observed. It has been shown that with time the first two witness bunches turn into drivers and contribute to acceleration of the last witness bunch.

  2. Simulation and calculation of particle trapping using a quasistatic 2D simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Sepehr; Antonsen, Thomas; Huang, Chengkun; Mori, Warren

    2008-11-01

    In LWFA schemes the laser pulse must propagate several centimeters and maintain its coherence over this distance, which corresponds to many Rayleigh lengths. These Wakefields and their effect on the laser can be simulated in quasistatic approximation [1, 2]. In this approximation the assumption is that the driver (laser) does not change shape during the time it takes for it to pass by a plasma particle. As a result the particles that are trapped and moving with near-luminal velocity can not be treated with this approximation. Here we have modified the 2D code WAKE with an alternate algorithm so that when a plasma particle gains sufficient energy from wakefields it is promoted to beam particle status which later on may become trapped in the wakefields of laser. Similar implementations have been made in the 3D code QUICKPIC [2]. We also have done comparison between WAKE and results from 200 TW laser simulations using OSIRIS [3]. These changes in WAKE will give users a tool that can be used on a desk top machine to simulate GeV acceleration.[0pt] [1] P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen Jr., Phys Plasma 4, 217 (1997)[0pt] [2] C. Huang et al. Comp Phys. 217 (2006)[0pt] [3] W. Lu et al. PRST, Accelerators and Beams 10, 061301 (2007)

  3. Accordion effect in a laser wakefield accelerator: Generating comb-like electron beams for a tunable pulsed source of polychromatic gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Serge; Davoine, Xavier; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Shadwick, Bradley

    2016-10-01

    Trains of synchronized, fs-length GeV-scale electron bunches with a sub-micron normalized transverse emittance, brightness up to 1017 A/m2, and controlled energy spacing may be purposely produced in both plasma channels and uniform plasmas. A cavity of electron density, driven by an optimally designed multi-color stack of 10-TW-scale laser pulses, experiences expansions and contractions, periodically injecting electrons from the ambient dense plasma, accelerating them without compromising the beam quality. This periodic injection is naturally achieved in a plasma channel. The channel, however, is not a prerequisite to this effect. The number of comb components, as well as their charge and energy spacing, can be controlled in a uniform plasma by independently varying focal spots of the laser stack components. Inverse Thomson scattering from these comb-like beams produces synchronized sequences of quasi-monochromatic, fs-length gamma-ray flashes, which may become an asset to pump-probe experiments in dense plasmas. NSF Grant PHY-1535678.

  4. EXPERIMENTS ON LASER AND E-BEAM TRANSPORT AND INTERACTION IN A PLASMA CHANNEL.

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.; PAVLISHIN,I.V.; BEN-ZVI,I.; ET AL.

    2004-09-15

    An ablative capillary discharge is installed into a linac beamline and serves as a plasma source for generating and characterizing wakefields. Simultaneously, the electron beam is used as a tool for plasma diagnostics. A high-energy picosecond CO{sub 2} laser channeled within the same capillary strongly affects a counterpropagating electron beam. These observations, supported with simulations, suggest the possibility of manipulating relativistic electron beams by steep plasma channels ponderomotively produced by a laser.

  5. Simulations for Plasma and Laser Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Lehe, Rémi

    Computer simulations have had a profound impact on the design and understanding of past and present plasma acceleration experiments, and will be a key component for turning plasma accelerators from a promising technology into a mainstream scientific tool. In this article, we present an overview of the numerical techniques used with the most popular approaches to model plasma-based accelerators: electromagnetic particle-in-cell, quasistatic and ponderomotive guiding center. The material that is presented is intended to serve as an introduction to the basics of those approaches, and to advances (some of them very recent) that have pushed the state of the art, such as the optimal Lorentz-boosted frame, advanced laser envelope solvers and the elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability. The particle-in-cell method, which has broader interest and is more standardized, is presented in more depth. Additional topics that are cross-cutting, such as azimuthal Fourier decomposition or filtering, are also discussed, as well as potential challenges and remedies in the initialization of simulations and output of data. Examples of simulations using the techniques that are presented have been left out of this article for conciseness, and because simulation results are best understood when presented together, and contrasted with theoretical and/or experimental results, as in other articles of this volume.

  6. Wakefields in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, Tim E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, Ward A.; Warnock, Robert L.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.; Michaelian, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    When the electron bunches in a storage ring are sufficiently short the electrons act coherently producing radiation several orders of magnitude more intense than normal synchrotron radiation. This is referred to as Coherent Syncrotron Radiation (CSR). Due to the potential of CSR to provide a good source of Terahertz radiation for our users, the Canadian Light Source (CLS) has been researching the production and application of CSR. CSR has been produced at the CLS for many years, and has been used for a number of applications. However, resonances that permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of 0.074 cm-1, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup, have hampered some experiments. Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes. These results are consistent with observations made by the interferometer in the THz range. Also discussed will be some practical examples of the application of CSR for the study of condensed phase samples using both transmission and Photoacoustic techniques.

  7. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  8. Laser altimetry simulator. Version 3.0: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Mcgarry, Jan F.; Pacini, Linda K.; Blair, J. Bryan; Elman, Gregory C.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical simulator of a pulsed, direct detection laser altimeter has been developed to investigate the performance of space-based laser altimeters operating over surfaces with various height profiles. The simulator calculates the laser's optical intensity waveform as it propagates to and is reflected from the terrain surface and is collected by the receiver telescope. It also calculates the signal and noise waveforms output from the receiver's optical detector and waveform digitizer. Both avalanche photodiode and photomultiplier detectors may be selected. Parameters of the detected signal, including energy, the 50 percent rise-time point, the mean timing point, and the centroid, can be collected into histograms and statistics calculated after a number of laser firings. The laser altimeter can be selected to be fixed over the terrain at any altitude. Alternatively, it can move between laser shots to simulate the terrain profile measured with the laser altimeter.

  9. Exciton-polariton wakefields in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terças, H.; Mendonça, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    We consider the excitation of polariton wakefields due to a propagating light pulse in a semiconductor microcavity. We show that two kinds of wakes are possible, depending on the constituents fraction (either exciton or photon) of the polariton wavefunction. The nature of the wakefields (pure excitonic or polaritonic) can be controlled by changing the speed of propagation of the external pump. This process could be used as a diagnostic for the internal parameters of the microcavity.

  10. Wakefield Computations for the Injector (Part I)

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.

    2010-12-13

    In this document, we report on basic wakefield computations used to establish the impedance budget for the LCLS injector. Systematic comparisons between analytic formulae and results from ABCI are done. Finally, a comparison between 2D and 3D wakefield calculations are given for a cross. The three parts of the document are presented as follows: (1) ABCI computations for a few structures (Flange, Bellows...); (2) Comparison analytic with ABCI runs; and (3) Comparison Cross and Cavity using MAFIA.

  11. Clutter discrimination algorithm simulation in pulse laser radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Su, Xuan; Zhu, Fule

    2015-10-01

    Pulse laser radar imaging performance is greatly influenced by different kinds of clutter. Various algorithms are developed to mitigate clutter. However, estimating performance of a new algorithm is difficult. Here, a simulation model for estimating clutter discrimination algorithms is presented. This model consists of laser pulse emission, clutter jamming, laser pulse reception and target image producing. Additionally, a hardware platform is set up gathering clutter data reflected by ground and trees. The data logging is as clutter jamming input in the simulation model. The hardware platform includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The laser diode transmits short laser pulses (40ns FWHM) at 12.5 kilohertz pulse rate and at 905nm wavelength. An analog-to-digital converter chip integrated in the sample circuit works at 250 mega samples per second. The simulation model and the hardware platform contribute to a clutter discrimination algorithm simulation system. Using this system, after analyzing clutter data logging, a new compound pulse detection algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines matched filter algorithm and constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. Firstly, laser echo pulse signal is processed by matched filter algorithm. After the first step, CFD algorithm comes next. Finally, clutter jamming from ground and trees is discriminated and target image is produced. Laser radar images are simulated using CFD algorithm, matched filter algorithm and the new algorithm respectively. Simulation result demonstrates that the new algorithm achieves the best target imaging effect of mitigating clutter reflected by ground and trees.

  12. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong; Tang Zhiping

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  13. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huifeng; Yuan, Hong; Tang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  15. Simulations of laser locking to a LISA arm

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvestre, Julien

    2004-11-15

    We present detailed numerical simulations of a laser phase stabilization scheme for Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), where both lasers emitting along one arm are locked to each other. Including the standard secondary noises and spacecraft motions that approximately mimic LISA's orbit (excluding the rotation of the constellation), we verify that very stable laser phases can be obtained and that time delay interferometry can be used to remove the laser phase noise from measurements of gravitational wave strains. Most importantly, we show that this locking scheme can provide significant simplifications over LISA's baseline design in the implementation of time delay interferometry.

  16. Quasi-stable injection channels in a wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltshire-Turkay, Mara; Farmer, John P.; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    The influence of initial position on the acceleration of externally injected electrons in a plasma wakefield is investigated. Test-particle simulations show previously unobserved complex structure in the parameter space, with quasi-stable injection channels forming for particles injected in narrow regions away from the wake centre. Particles injected into these channels remain in the wake for a considerable time after dephasing and as a result achieve significantly higher energy than their neighbours. The result is relevant to both the planning and optimisation of experiments making use of external injection.

  17. Transformer ratio saturation in a beam-driven wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J. P.; Martorelli, R.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-12-15

    We show that for beam-driven wakefield acceleration, the linearly ramped, equally spaced train of bunches typically considered to optimise the transformer ratio only works for flat-top bunches. Through theory and simulation, we explain that this behaviour is due to the unique properties of the plasma response to a flat-top density profile. Calculations of the optimal scaling for a train of Gaussian bunches show diminishing returns with increasing bunch number, tending towards saturation. For a periodic bunch train, a transformer ratio of 23 was achieved for 50 bunches, rising to 40 for a fully optimised beam.

  18. Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

    2005-06-06

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) at LBNL have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  19. Terahertz Free Electron Laser: Design, Simulation and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    general principal is that a “pump” light pulse (usually a high peak power laser ) is incident upon a sample and causes an excitation . A certain time...light in free electron lasers , x-ray sources, and THz sources, and neutron production. Niowave also builds radio frequency ( RF ) guns, superconducting...FREE ELECTRON LASER : DESIGN, SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS by Conor M. Pogue December 2014 Dissertation Supervisor William B. Colson THIS PAGE

  20. High power CW iodine laser pumped by solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Lee, Min H.; Weaver, Willard R.

    1987-01-01

    An iodine photodissociation laser was pumped by a long Ar arc as the solar simulator to produce a 10-W CW output. Continuous lasing for 1 h was achieved with a flow of the laser material n-C3F7I. The 10-W CW output is the highest produced to date and establishes the feasibility of developing a solar-pumped laser for space power transmission.

  1. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for

  2. Increasing the transformer ratio at the Argonne wakefield accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J.G.; Conde, M.; Liu, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.

    2011-01-01

    The transformer ratio is defined as the ratio of the maximum energy gain of the witness bunch to the maximum energy loss experienced by the drive bunch (or a bunch within a multidrive bunch train). This plays an important role in the collinear wakefield acceleration scheme. A high transformer ratio is desirable since it leads to a higher overall efficiency under similar conditions (e.g. the same beam loading, the same structure, etc.). One technique to enhance the transformer ratio beyond the ordinary limit of 2 is to use a ramped bunch train. The first experimental demonstration observed a transformer ratio only marginally above 2 due to the mismatch between the drive microbunch length and the frequency of the accelerating structure [C. Jing, A. Kanareykin, J. Power, M. Conde, Z. Yusof, P. Schoessow, and W. Gai, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 144801 (2007)]. Recently, we revisited this experiment with an optimized microbunch length using a UV laser stacking technique at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility and measured a transformer ratio of 3.4. Measurements and data analysis from these experiments are presented in detail.

  3. LISP: a laser imaging simulation package for developing and testing laser vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kung C.

    1993-01-01

    The difficulties commonly encountered in developing laser imaging technologies are: (1) high cost of the laser system, and (2) time and cost involved in modeling and maneuvering a physical environment for the desired scenes. In contrast to the real imaging systems, computer generated laser images provide researchers with fast, accurate, cost-effective data for testing and developing algorithms. The laser imaging simulation package (LISP) described in this paper provides an interactive solid modeler that allows users to construct the artificial environment by various solid modelling techniques. Two fast ray tracing algorithms were developed and discussed in this paper for generating the near realistic laser data of any desired scene. These computer generated laser data facilitates the researchers in developing laser imaging algorithms. Thus, LISP not only provides an ideal testbed for developing and testing algorithms, but also an opportunity to explore the limitation of laser imaging applications.

  4. Laser propagation in simulations of low fill density hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, Nathan; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Izumi, N.; Divol, L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ralph, J. E.; Moody, J. D.; Callahan, D. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present analysis of laser propagation in simulations of low fill density hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Simulations using the radiation hydrodynamic code hydra are compared in 2D and 3D. The absorption of laser rays in different materials and spatial locations is extracted from the simulations to identify where and when the inner cone laser beams undergo significant absorption. Inner cone laser beams can be absorbed in the outer cone ``gold bubble'' or in the region where the ablator and hohlraum material interact. The simulations provide guidance on which hohlraum mitigation methods will be most effective at improving inner beam propagation. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Dechirper wakefields for short bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady

    2016-06-01

    In previous work (Bane and Stupakov, 2015 [1]) general expressions, valid for arbitrary bunch lengths, were derived for the wakefields of corrugated structures with flat geometry, such as is used in the RadiaBeam/LCLS dechirper. However, the bunch at the end of linac-based X-ray FELs-like the LCLS-is extremely short, and for short bunches the wakes can be considerably simplified. In this work, we first derive analytical approximations to the short-range wakes. These are generalized wakes, in the sense that their validity is not limited to a small neighborhood of the symmetry axis, but rather extends to arbitrary transverse offsets of driving and test particles. The validity of these short-bunch wakes holds not only for the corrugated structure, but rather for any flat structure whose beam-cavity interaction can be described by a surface impedance. We use these wakes to obtain, for a short bunch passing through a dechirper: estimates of the energy loss as function of gap, the transverse kick as a function of beam offset, the slice energy spread increase, and the emittance growth. In the Appendix, a more accurate derivation-than that is found in Bane and Stupakov (2015) [1]-of the arbitrary bunch length wakes is performed; we find full agreement with the earlier results, provided the bunches are short compared to the dechirper gap, which is normally the regime of interest.

  6. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-15

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  7. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  8. Dielectric-Based Wakefield Power Extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Antipov, S.; Gao, F.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Conde, M.; Liu, W.; Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Yusof, Z.

    2010-11-04

    In the Two Beam Accelerator (TBA), wakefield power extractors which extract high power RF from a high current beam are used to power high gradient accelerating structures. A dielectric-based Wakefield Power Extractor (DWPE) is one option in addition to the metallic structures considered previously, like the CLIC PETS (Power Extraction and Transfer Structure). 7.8 GHz and 26 GHz DWPE prototypes have been successfully built and tested at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. We are currently designing an X-band version for a potential application with the CLIC beam. In this article, we report on test results of the 26 GHz DWPE and the preliminary design of the X-band structure. Future plan and possible difficulties in the development of DWPEs are also discussed.

  9. Laser-driven hypersonic air-breathing propulsion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash B.; Lo, Edmond Y.; Pugh, Evan R.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented of simulating airbreathing propulsion on small scale hypersonic models using laser energy. The laser heat addition scheme allows simultaneous inlet and exhaust flows during wind tunnel testing of models with scramjet models. The proposed propulsion simulation concept has extended the Kantrowitz (1974) idea to propulsive wind tunnel models of hypersonic aircraft. Critical issues in aeropropulsive testing of models based on a ramjet power plant are addressed which include transfer of the correct amount of energy to the flowing gas, efficient absorption of laser energy into the gas, and test performance under tunnel reservoir conditions and at reasonable Reynolds numbers.

  10. Potential of solar-simulator-pumped alexandrite lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, Russell J.

    1990-01-01

    An attempt was made to pump an alexandrite laser rod using a Tamarak solar simulator and also a tungsten-halogen lamp. A very low optical laser cavity was used to achieve the threshold minimum pumping-power requirement. Lasing was not achieved. The laser threshold optical-power requirement was calculated to be approximately 626 W/sq cm for a gain length of 7.6 cm, whereas the Tamarak simulator produces 1150 W/sq cm over a gain length of 3.3 cm, which is less than the 1442 W/sq cm required to reach laser threshold. The rod was optically pulsed with 200 msec pulses, which allowed the alexandrite rod to operate at near room temperature. The optical intensity-gain-length product to achieve laser threshold should be approximately 35,244 solar constants-cm. In the present setup, this product was 28,111 solar constants-cm.

  11. Simulation of Laser Interaction with Ablative Plasma and ydrodynamic of Laser Supported Plasma(LSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huifeng, Tong; Zhiping, Tang

    2011-06-01

    A general Godunov finite difference schemes-WENO(Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) Schemes which have fifth-order accuracy was used to make a numerical calculation for 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field under laser ablated solid target. The models of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma and the simplified eos(equation of state) of plasma were considered in the simulation. The plasma field parameters during and after laser duration variation with time are also obtained. The simulation results show that the laser beam power was strong absorbed by plasma of target surface, and the velocity of LSD(Laser Supported Detonation) wave is half of ideal LSD value which derived from C-J detonation theory.

  12. PIC Simulations of direct laser accelerated electron from underdense plasmas using the OMEGA EP Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Amina; Batson, Thomas; Krushelnick, Karl; Willingale, Louise; Arefiev, Alex; Wang, Tao; Nilson, Phil; Froula, Dustin; Haberberger, Dan; Davies, Andrew; Theobald, Wolfgang; Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The OMEGA EP laser system is used to study channeling phenomena and direct laser acceleration (DLA) through an underdense plasma. The interaction of a ps laser pulse with a subcritical density CH plasma plume results in the expulsion of electron along the laser axis, forming a positively charged channel. Electrons confined within this channel are subject to the action of the laser field as well as the transverse electric field of the channel, resulting the DLA of these electrons and the formation of a high energy electron beam. We have performed 2D simulations of ultra-intense laser radiation with underdense plasma using the PIC code EPOCH to investigate electron densities and self-consistently generated electric fields, as well as electron trajectories. This work was supported by the National Laser Users' Facility (NLUF), DOE.

  13. Optical Frequency Domain Visualization of Electron Beam Driven Plasma Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, M. C.; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Babzien, Marcus; Kusche, Karl; Fedurin, Mikhail

    2010-11-01

    Beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA), such as the ``plasma afterburner,'' are a promising approach for significantly increasing the particle energies of conventional accelerators. The study and optimization of PWFA would benefit from an experimental correlation between the parameters of the drive bunch, the accelerated bunch and the corresponding, accelerating plasma wave structure. However, the plasma wave structure has not yet been observed directly in PWFA. We will report our current work on noninvasive optical Frequency Domain Interferometric (FDI) and Holographic (FDH) visualization of beam-driven plasma waves. Both techniques employ two laser pulses (probe and reference) co-propagating with the particle drive-beam and its plasma wake. The reference pulse precedes the drive bunch, while the probe overlaps the plasma wave and maps its longitudinal and transverse structure. The experiment is being developed at the BNL/ATF Linac to visualize wakes generated by two and multi-bunch drive beams.

  14. Examining laser triangulation system performance using a software simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Jeffery S.; Nurre, Joseph H.

    1999-03-01

    The invention of the laser diode, the microcomputer and the CCD camera have made possible the new technology of triangulation measurement systems. Current applications range from scanning the insides of old pipes, to a vision tool for the blind. As such, it is important that techniques be developed to minimize the error in laser triangulation measurement systems. Due to the nonlinear nature of the problem and the fact that error is dependent on an ever changing and vast number of subjects, a computer simulation was written to examine the trade-off between occlusion and data quality. A computer simulation allows for a large amount of flexibility. The software gives the user the ability to calculate the error for a given triangulation configuration without having to build and test the actual hardware. This paper describes and demonstrates the use of the simulator. Limitless laser triangulation systems can be modeled and most subjects represented in CAD files can be used in the computer simulation.

  15. Energy Measurement in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ischebeck, R

    2007-07-06

    In the E-167 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment, electrons with an initial energy of 42GeV are accelerated in a meter-scale lithium plasma. Particles are leaving plasma with a large energy spread. To determine the spectrum of the accelerated particles, a two-plane spectrometer has been set up.

  16. Electron cloud wakefields in bunch trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, F. B.; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    Electron cloud is a concern for many modern and future accelerator facilities. There are a number of undesired effects attributed to the presence of electron clouds. Among them are coherent instabilities, emittance growth, cryogenic heat load, synchronous phase shift and pressure rise. In long bunch trains one can observe the emittance growth getting faster along the bunch train. The interaction between the beam and the electron cloud is a two-stream interaction. The prameters of the electron cloud wakefields depend on the beam intensity, beam centroid perturbations, and on the electron density and perturbations. If the electron cloud forgets the bunch centroid perturbation very fast, the buildup itself, via growing density, becomes a way of coupling between the bunches. In the present paper we address how the bunch perturbation shape affects the multi-bunch wakefields under the conditions similar to the CERN LHC and SPS. We study the interplay between the single-bunch and multi-bunch electron cloud wakefields. The effect of the dipole magnetic field on the multi-bunch wakefields is studied.

  17. Target model and simulation for laser imaging fuze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiheng; Song, Chengtian

    2013-09-01

    Image detection is an important direction of fuze development nowadays, and laser imaging fuze is one of the main technologies. This paper carries out the research in simulation technology of the process with detection, scan and imaging, which is used in laser imaging fuze for tank target, and get the simulation images information of different intersection conditions, including tank spot information,distance information and power information. The target coordinate system is established with the movement characteristics,physical characteristics and existing coordinate system of tank target. And through transferring missile coordinates to the target coordinate system as well as the relative movement between the different time intervals, the model of missile-target in time and space is build up. The model is build up according to the tank target and diffusion properties of different background, including desert, soil, vegetation, and buildings. The relations of scattering power and bidirectional reflectance distribution function deduced the laser echo power calculation formula, which can calculate the echoes incidence to each surface of the laser.The design of laser imaging fuze simulation system is complicated ,which contains the technology of the process with detection, scan and imaging used in laser imaging fuze for tank target. The simulation system products the tank spot picture, the distance gradation picture, and the power gradation picture. The latter two contains two-dimensional information, the scanning distance as well as the value of echo power to meet the expected design effects.

  18. Novel concepts for laser-plasma-based acceleration of electrons using ultrahigh power laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon-Koo

    Analytical and numerical studies of plasma physics in ultra-intense plasma wave generation, electron injection, and wavebreaking are performed, which are relevant to the subject of plasma wake-field accelerators. A method for generating large-amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, which utilizes an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses, is analyzed in one dimension both theoretically and numerically (using both Maxwell-fluid and particle-in-cell codes). Optimal pulse widths and interpulse spacings are computed for pulses with either square or finite-rise-time sine shapes. A resonant region of the plasma-wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. Resonant excitation is found to be superior for electron acceleration to either beatwave or single- pulse excitation because comparable plasma wave amplitudes may be generated at lower plasma densities, reducing electron-phase detuning, or at lower laser intensities, reducing laser-plasma instabilities. The idea of all-optical acceleration of electrons in the wakefield is also discussed. It is shown that the injection of background plasma electrons can be accomplished using the large ponderomotive force of an injection laser pulse in either collinear or transverse geometry with respect to the direction of pump propagation, thus removing the necessity of an expensive first-stage linac system for injection of electrons. Detailed nonlinear analysis of the trapping and acceleration of electrons inside the separatrix of the wakefield is formulated and compared with PIC (Particle- In-Cell) and fluid simulations. The three-dimensional wave-breaking of relativistic plasma waves driven by a ultrashort high-power lasers, is described within a framework of cold 2-D fluid theory. It is shown that the transverse nonlinearity of the plasma wave results in temporally increasing transverse plasma oscillation in the wake of the laser pulse, inevitably inducing wave

  19. Appearance of Density Cavitations in the Laser Wake in Simulations of High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.-L.

    2009-01-22

    Nonlinear interactions of high intensity, ultrashort laser pulses with underdense plasmas produce many interesting features that may appear in computer simulations. One of these features commonly observed in Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations is the spontaneous appearance of long-lived density cavitations in the plasma wake region behind the laser pulse. To study these cavitations, several small 2D PIC simulations are run in which plasma density, density ramps, total simulation time, laser pulsewidth, laser intensity, and laser polarization parameters have been varied. Based on the simulation results, some possible aspects of an experiment designed to directly detect these structures are discussed.

  20. Single event effects and laser simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Schwartz, H.; Mccarty, K.; Coss, J.; Barnes, C.

    1993-01-01

    The single event upset (SEU) linear energy transfer threshold (LETTH) of radiation hardened 64K Static Random Access Memories (SRAM's) was measured with a picosecond pulsed dye laser system. These results were compared with standard heavy ion accelerator (Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)) measurements of the same SRAM's. With heavy ions, the LETTH of the Honeywell HC6364 was 27 MeV-sq cm/mg at 125 C compared with a value of 24 MeV-sq cm/mg obtained with the laser. In the case of the second type of 64K SRAM, the IBM640lCRH no upsets were observed at 125 C with the highest LET ions used at BNL. In contrast, the pulsed dye laser tests indicated a value of 90 MeV-sq cm/mg at room temperature for the SEU-hardened IBM SRAM. No latchups or multiple SEU's were observed on any of the SRAM's even under worst case conditions. The results of this study suggest that the laser can be used as an inexpensive laboratory SEU prescreen tool in certain cases.

  1. Simulation of High Power Lasers (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    product of laser power. 5. References 1 Wilcox, D. C, Turbulence Modeling for CFD, DCW Industries, Inc. pp. 185-193, July 1998. 2 Menter, F. L...Modeling for CFD, DCW Industries, Inc. pp. 294-296, July 1998. 4 Perram, G. P, .Int. J. Chem. Kinet. 27, 817-28 (1995). 5 Madden, T. J. and Solomon

  2. Simulation of femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, R. V.; Antonov, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper a mathematical model for femtosecond laser ablation of metals is proposed, based on standard two-temperature model connected with 1D hydrodynamic equations. Wide-range equation of state has been developed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data for aluminium and copper. A good agreement for both metals with numerical results and experiment shows that this model can be employed for choosing laser parameters to better accuracy in nanoparticles production by ablation of metals.

  3. Efficient method for transport simulations in quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maczka, Mariusz; Pawlowski, Stanislaw

    2016-12-01

    An efficient method for simulating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers is presented. The calculations are performed within a simple approximation inspired by Büttiker probes and based on a finite model for semiconductor superlattices. The formalism of non-equilibrium Green's functions is applied to determine the selected transport parameters in a typical structure of a terahertz laser. Results were compared with those obtained for a infinite model as well as other methods described in literature.

  4. Bio-heat transfer simulation of retinal laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Arunn; Jha, Kaushal Kumar

    2012-05-01

    Retinopathy is a surgical process in which maladies of the human eye are treated by laser irradiation. A two-dimensional numerical model of the human eye geometry has been developed to investigate transient thermal effects due to laser radiation. In particular, the influence of choroidal pigmentation and that of choroidal blood convection-parameterized as a function of choroidal blood perfusion-are investigated in detail. The Pennes bio-heat transfer equation is invoked as the governing equation, and finite volume formulation is employed in the numerical method. For a 500-μm diameter spot size, laser power of 0.2 W, and 100% absorption of laser radiation in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) region, the peak RPE temperature is observed to be 103 °C at 100 ms of the transient simulation of the laser surgical period. Because of the participation of pigmented layer of choroid in laser absorption, peak temperature is reduced to 94 °C after 100 ms of the laser surgery period. The effect of choroidal blood perfusion on retinal cooling is found to be negligible during transient simulation of retinopathy. A truncated three-dimensional model incorporating multiple laser irradiation of spots is also developed to observe the spatial effect of choroidal blood perfusion and choroidal pigmentation. For a circular array of seven uniformly distributed spots of identical diameter and laser power of 0.2 W, transient temperature evolution using simultaneous and sequential mode of laser surgical process is presented with analysis.

  5. Computer simulations of laser-induced melting of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Bai, Mingze; Dou, Yusheng; Ran, Qi; Lo, Glenn V.

    2013-04-01

    Laser-induced solid-to-liquid phase transitions in 100 nm aluminum film were simulated using a hybrid model that combines molecular dynamics (MD) with a continuum description of the laser excitation and a two-temperature method (TTM) to model the relaxation of conduction band electrons. When the laser fluence provides more energy than needed for a complete melting of the film, the phase transition is characterized by an ultrafast collapse of the crystal structure within 2-3 ps. Otherwise, the transition involves a homogeneous nucleation and growth of liquid zones inside the crystal and a heterogeneous propagation of transition fronts from the external surfaces or nucleated liquid zones.

  6. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the Clic Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2011-08-19

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC's parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  7. Numerical simulation of damage detection using laser-generated ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peipei; Nazirah, Ab Wahab; Sohn, Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Laser ultrasonic techniques have been widely investigated due to its high spatial resolution and capacity for remote and noncontact measurement. In this study, the laser induced ultrasonic wave on an aluminum plate is simulated, and a nonlinear feature is used to detect a micro crack introduced in the plate model. A multi-physics simulation is conducted and optimized considering the effect of thermal diffusion. A nonlinear feature, called Bhattacharyya Distance (BD), is calculated to show the crack-induced geometric difference among the state space attractors obtained from closely spaced measurement points near the crack. First, a 3D model is built, and its simulation result is compared with an experiment performed using a noncontact laser ultrasonic measurement system. Then, by creating a micro crack in the model, BD is extracted and the crack is successfully detected and visualized. Finally, the effects of BD parameters, such as embedding dimension and frequency band, on damage visualization are investigated.

  8. Simulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadband radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bajlekov, Svetoslav; Fawley, William; Schroeder, Carl; Bartolini, Riccardo; Hooker, Simon

    2011-03-10

    The longitudinal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL) radiation can be enhanced by seeding the FEL with high harmonics of an optical laser pulse. The radiation produced by high-harmonic generation (HHG), however, has a fast-varying temporal profile that can violate the slowly varying envelope approximation and limited frequency window that is employed in conventional free-electron laser simulation codes. Here we investigate the implications of violating this approximation on the accuracy of simulations. On the basis of both analytical considerations and 1D numerical studies, it is concluded that, for most realistic scenarios, conventional FEL codes are capable of accurately simulating the FEL process even when the seed radiation violates the slowly varying envelope approximation. We additionally discuss the significance of filtering the harmonic content of broadband HHG seeds.

  9. Laser Doppler velocimeter system simulation for sensing aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, J. A. L.; Meng, J. C. S.

    1974-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model of aircraft vortex wakes in an irregular wind shear field near the ground is developed and used as a basis for modeling the characteristics of a laser Doppler detection and vortex location system. The trailing vortex sheet and the wind shear are represented by discrete free vortices distributed over a two-dimensional grid. The time dependent hydrodynamic equations are solved by direct numerical integration in the Boussinesq approximation. The ground boundary is simulated by images, and fast Fourier Transform techniques are used to evaluate the vorticity stream function. The atmospheric turbulence was simulated by constructing specific realizations at time equal to zero, assuming that Kolmogoroff's law applies, and that the dissipation rate is constant throughout the flow field. The response of a simulated laser Doppler velocimeter is analyzed by simulating the signal return from the flow field as sensed by a simulation of the optical/electronic system.

  10. Investigations of the concept of a multibunch dielectric wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishchenko, I. N.; Kiselev, V. A.; Linnik, A. F.; Pristupa, V. I.; Sotnikov, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the physical principles of multibunch dielectric wakefield accelerator concept based on the wakefield excitation in the dielectric structure by a sequence of relativistic electron bunches are presented. The purpose of the concept is to enhance the wakefield intensity by means of the multibunch coherent excitation and wakefield accumulation in a resonator. The acceleration of bunches is achieved at detuning of bunch repetition frequency relative to the frequency of the excited wakefield. In such a way the sequence of bunches is divided into exciting and accelerated parts due to displacing bunches into accelerating phases of wakefield excited by a previous part of bunches of the same sequence. Besides the change of the permittivity and loss tangent of dielectrics under the irradiation by 100 MeV electron beam is studied.

  11. Simulations of laser-initiated stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Maitland, D.J.; Celliers, P.; Amendt, P.; Da Silva, L.; London, R.A.; Matthews, D.; Strauss, M.; Visuri, S.R.

    1997-03-07

    We present a study of the short-time scale (< 250 ns) fluid dynamic response of water to a fiber-delivered laser pulse of variable energy and spatial profile. The laser pulse was deposited on a stress confinement time scale. The spatial profile was determined by the fiber core radius r (110 and 500 microns) and the water absorption coefficient {mu}{sub 2} (200 and 50 l/cm). Considering 2D cylindrical symmetry, the combination of fiber radius and absorption coefficient parameters can be characterized as near planar (1{mu}{sub 2} greater than r), symmetric (1/{mu}{sub 2}=r), and side-directed (1/{mu}{sub 2} less than r). The spatial profile study shows how the stress wave various as a function of geometry. For example, relatively small absorption coefficients can result in side-propagating shear and tensile fields.

  12. Ultrafast electron radiography of magnetic fields in high-intensity laser-solid interactions.

    PubMed

    Schumaker, W; Nakanii, N; McGuffey, C; Zulick, C; Chyvkov, V; Dollar, F; Habara, H; Kalintchenko, G; Maksimchuk, A; Tanaka, K A; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V; Krushelnick, K

    2013-01-04

    Using electron bunches generated by laser wakefield acceleration as a probe, the temporal evolution of magnetic fields generated by a 4 × 10(19) W/cm(2) ultrashort (30 fs) laser pulse focused on solid density targets is studied experimentally. Magnetic field strengths of order B(0) ~ 10(4) T are observed expanding at close to the speed of light from the interaction point of a high-contrast laser pulse with a 10-μm-thick aluminum foil to a maximum diameter of ~1 mm. The field dynamics are shown to agree with particle-in-cell simulations.

  13. Relativistically strong CO{sub 2} laser driver for plasma-channeled particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-12-31

    Long-wavelength, short-duration laser pulses are desirable for plasma wakefield particle acceleration and plasma waveguiding. The first picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser is under development to test laser-driven electron acceleration schemes.

  14. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This special issue on laser and plasma accelerators illustrates the rapid advancement and diverse applications of laser and plasma accelerators. Plasma is an attractive medium for particle acceleration because of the high electric field it can sustain, with studies of acceleration processes remaining one of the most important areas of research in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The rapid advance in laser and accelerator technology has led to the development of terawatt and petawatt laser systems with ultra-high intensities and short sub-picosecond pulses, which are used to generate wakefields in plasma. Recent successes include the demonstration by several groups in 2004 of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams by wakefields in the bubble regime with the GeV energy barrier being reached in 2006, and the energy doubling of the SLAC high-energy electron beam from 42 to 85 GeV. The electron beams generated by the laser plasma driven wakefields have good spatial quality with energies ranging from MeV to GeV. A unique feature is that they are ultra-short bunches with simulations showing that they can be as short as a few femtoseconds with low-energy spread, making these beams ideal for a variety of applications ranging from novel high-brightness radiation sources for medicine, material science and ultrafast time-resolved radiobiology or chemistry. Laser driven ion acceleration experiments have also made significant advances over the last few years with applications in laser fusion, nuclear physics and medicine. Attention is focused on the possibility of producing quasi-mono-energetic ions with energies ranging from hundreds of MeV to GeV per nucleon. New acceleration mechanisms are being studied, including ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils and direct laser acceleration. The application of wakefields or beat waves in other areas of science such as astrophysics and particle physics is beginning to take off, such as the study of cosmic accelerators considered

  15. Baseline monitoring using aircraft laser ranging. [spaceborne laser simulation and aircraft laser tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Hoge, F. E.; Martin, C. F.

    1982-01-01

    The use of aircraft laser ranging for the determination of baselines between ground based retroreflectors was investigated via simulations and with tests at Wallops Flight Center using the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) on the Wallops C-54 aircraft ranging to a reflector array deployed around one of the Wallops runways. The aircraft altitude and reflector spacing were chosen on the basis of scaled down modeling of spacecraft tracking from 1000 km of reflectors separated by some 52 km, or of high altitude (10 km) aircraft tracking of reflectors separated by some 500 m. Aircraft altitudes flown for different passes across the runway reflector array varied from 800 m to 1350 m, with 32 reflectors deployed over an approximtely 300 m x 500 m ground pattern. The AOL transmitted 400 pulses/sec with a scan rate of 5/sec in a near circular pattern, so that the majority of the pulses were reflected by the runway surface or its environs rather than by retroreflectors. The return pulse characteristics clearly showed the high reflectivity of portions of the runway, with several returns indistinguishable in amplitude from reflector returns. For each pass across the reflector field, typically six to ten reflector hits were identified, consistent with that predicted by simulations and the observed transmitted elliptical pulse size.

  16. Modeling and Simulation of Semiconductor Quantum Well Structures and Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Saini, Subbash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this talk I will cover two aspects of modeling and simulation efforts at NASA Ames Research Center. In the quantum well structure simulation, we typically start from the quantum mechanical calculation of the quantum well structures for the confined/and unconfined eigen states and functions. A bandstructure calculation of the k*p type is then performed for the confined valence states. This information is then used to computer the optical gain and refractive index of the quantum well structures by solving the linearized multiband semiconductor Bloch equations with the many-body interactions included. In our laser simulation, we typically solve the envelope equations for the laser field in space-time domain, coupled with a reduced set of material equations using the microscopic calculation of the first step. Finally I will show some examples of both aspects of simulation and modeling.

  17. A numerical simulation of photothermal response in laser medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Fan, Shifu; Zhao, Youquan; Xiao, Songshan

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we reported a numerical solution of laser induced thermal effect in the bio-tissue. The model of photothermal effect and classical Pennes bio-heat transfer equation were introduced. Finite element method (FEM), which was realized by Matlab software, was used to calculate the temperature distribution. He-Ne laser (633 nm) was used to simulate the physical therapy in in vivo skin tissue. Under the cylinder coordinates, the three-dimension (3-D) geometry of tissue was reduced to two-dimension (2-D) computation. The results contained the radial, axial and temperature 3-D color plot. Combining the time animation display was possible. By changing the laser and tissue parameters we can get different results. This will be the initial and indispensable work of the non-destructive evaluation of the laser induced injury.

  18. Free-electron laser simulations on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonlaven, Scott A.; Liebrock, Lorie M.

    1987-01-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are of interest because they provide high power, high efficiency, and broad tunability. FEL simulations can make efficient use of computers of the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) class because most of the processing consists of applying a simple equation to a set of identical particles. A test version of the KMS Fusion FEL simulation, which resides mainly in the MPPs host computer and only partially in the MPP, has run successfully.

  19. Argonne`s new Wakefield Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-07-20

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne`s AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

  20. Axionic suppression of plasma wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, D. A.; Noble, A.; Walton, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    Contemporary attempts to explain the existence of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using plasma-based wakefield acceleration deliberately avoid non-standard model particle physics. However, such proposals exploit some of the most extreme environments in the Universe and it is conceivable that hypothetical particles outside the standard model have significant implications for the effectiveness of the acceleration process. Axions solve the strong CP problem and provide one of the most important candidates for cold dark matter, and their potential significance in the present context should not be overlooked. Our analysis of the field equations describing a plasma augmented with axions uncovers a dramatic axion-induced suppression of the energy gained by a test particle in the wakefield driven by a particle bunch, or an intense pulse of electromagnetic radiation, propagating at ultra-relativistic speeds within the strongest magnetic fields in the Universe.

  1. Numerical simulations of a diode laser BPH treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, V; London, R A; Papademetriou, S

    1999-02-23

    Numerical simulations are presented of the laser-tissue interaction of a diode laser system for treating benign prostate hyperplasia. The numerical model includes laser light transport, heat transport, cooling due to blood perfusion, thermal tissue damage, and enthalpy of tissue damage. Comparisons of the simulation results to clinical data are given. We report that a reasonable variation from a standard set of input data produces heating times which match those measured in the clinical trials. A general trend of decreasing damage volume with increasing heating time is described. We suggest that the patient-to- patient variability seen in the data can be explained by differences in fundamental biophysical properties such as the optical coefficients. Further work is identified, including the measurement and input to the model of several specific data parameters such as optical coefficients, blood perfusion cooling rate, and coagulation rates.

  2. Earth Model with Laser Beam Simulating Seismic Ray Paths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John Arthur; Handzus, Thomas Jay, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Described is a simple device, that uses a laser beam to simulate P waves. It allows students to follow ray paths, reflections and refractions within the earth. Included is a set of exercises that lead students through the steps by which the presence of the outer and inner cores can be recognized. (Author/CW)

  3. Study the encountering simulation system for laser fuze based on intensity attenuation and fiber delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huimin; Li, Ping; Guo, Weirong

    2010-10-01

    Laser fuze is a kind of proximity fuze developed with laser technology. A encountering simulation system for laser fuze based on environment simulator and fiber retarder is introduced in this paper. The system can simulate the process for the laser fuze to approach the target quickly, with consideration of changing light path and intensity caused by factors like environment and distance. It can be a reference for the future design of laser fuze.

  4. Wake-field generation by the ponderomotive memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, U.; Schamel, H.

    1997-10-01

    An analytical and numerical investigation of the plasma response to an imposed high frequency wave packet with a slow explicit time-dependent envelope is presented. An underlying picture of ponderomotive effects is developed, which shows that the explicit time dependence forces us to treat the problem kinetically, and furthermore, that a wake field is generated by the ponderomotive memory effect. The latter supplements the well-known ponderomotive force and fake heating effect. Several perturbation schemes are compared showing that the influence of resonant particles, treated by the method of characteristics, has to be taken into account for Langmuir wave packets with kλd>=0.2, where k is the wave number and λd the Debye length. A self-consistent Vlasov simulation shows the disappearance of the density depression in the case of immobile ions, whereas the wake-field pattern survives self-consistency.

  5. High power microwave source for a plasma wakefield experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafir, G.; Shlapakovski, A.; Siman-Tov, M.; Bliokh, Yu.; Leopold, J. G.; Gleizer, S.; Gad, R.; Rostov, V. V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the generation of a high-power microwave (˜550 MW, 0.5 ns, ˜9.6 GHz) beam and feasibility of wakefield-excitation with this beam in under-dense plasma are presented. The microwave beam is generated by a backward wave oscillator (BWO) operating in the superradiance regime. The BWO is driven by a high-current electron beam (˜250 keV, ˜1.5 kA, ˜5 ns) propagating through a slow-wave structure in a guiding magnetic field of 2.5 T. The microwave beam is focused at the desired location by a dielectric lens. Experimentally obtained parameters of the microwave beam at its waist are used for numerical simulations, the results of which demonstrate the formation of a bubble in the plasma that has almost 100% electron density modulation and longitudinal and transverse electric fields of several kV/cm.

  6. Challenges of PIC Simulations at High Laser Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luedtke, Scott V.; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Toncian, Toma; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel

    2015-11-01

    New lasers with very high intensity pulses (I >1022 W/cm2) are being commissioned to explore new regimes of laser-matter interactions. These lasers require accurate particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which may require new computational approaches to efficiently produce physically accurate results. We examine the constraints on PIC simulations at high field intensity imposed by both the particle pusher and field solver. As proposed by Arefiev, et al. (Physics of Plasmas 22, 013103 (2015)), we implement adaptive sub-cycling in the Boris pusher of the EPOCH code and demonstrate its effectiveness in efficiently reducing errors from the pusher. It is well know that the use of a finite-difference scheme also modifies the electromagnetic wave dispersion relation. We examine the effect of the resulting discrepancy in the phase velocity on electron acceleration, and demonstrate that relatively small errors in the phase velocity lead to substantial changes in the electron energy gain from the laser pulse. We discuss the corresponding conditions for the field solver. These results are relevant to direct laser acceleration and underdense ionization experiments. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's PULSE program (12-63-PULSE-FP014) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-14-1-0045).

  7. Results from Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Clarke, C.I.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.; Litos, M.D.; Walz, D.R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Adli, E.; /U. Oslo

    2011-12-13

    We report initial results of the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) Experiments performed at FACET - Facility for Advanced aCcelertor Experimental Tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. At FACET a 23 GeV electron beam with 1.8 x 10{sup 10} electrons is compressed to 20 {mu}m longitudinally and focused down to 10 {mu}m x 10 {mu}m transverse spot size for user driven experiments. Construction of the FACET facility completed in May 2011 with a first run of user assisted commissioning throughout the summer. The first PWFA experiments will use single electron bunches combined with a high density lithium plasma to produce accelerating gradients > 10 GeV/m benchmarking the FACET beam and the newly installed experimental hardware. Future plans for further study of plasma wakefield acceleration will be reviewed. The experimental hardware and operation of the plasma heat-pipe oven have been successfully commissioned. Plasma wakefield acceleration was not observed because the electron bunch density was insufficient to ionize the lithium vapor. The remaining commissioning time in summer 2011 will be dedicated to delivering the FACET design parameters for the experimental programs which will begin in early 2012. PWFA experiments require the shorter bunches and smaller transverse sizes to create the plasma and drive large amplitude wakefields. Low emittance and high energy will minimize head erosion which was found to be a limiting factor in acceleration distance and energy gain. We will run the PWFA experiments with the design single bunch conditions in early 2012. Future PWFA experiments at FACET are discussed in [5][6] and include drive and witness bunch production for high energy beam manipulation, ramped bunch to optimize tranformer ratio, field-ionized cesium plasma, preionized plasmas, positron acceleration, etc.. We will install a notch collimator for two-bunch operation as well as new beam diagnostics such as the X-band TCAV [7] to resolve the two bunches

  8. Transverse Effect due to Short-range Resistive Wall Wakefield

    SciTech Connect

    Juhao Wu; Alex Chao; Jean Delayen

    2007-06-18

    For accelerator designs with ultra short electron beams, beam dynamics study has to invoke the short-range wakefields. In this paper, we first obtain the short-range dipole mode resistive wall wakefield. Analytical approach is then developed to study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics due to this short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS undulator.

  9. Transverse Effect Due to Short Range Resistive Wall Wakefield

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Chao, Alexander Wu; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2008-01-08

    For accelerator designs with ultra short electron beams, beam dynamics study has to invoke the short-range wakefields. In this paper, we first obtain the short-range dipole mode resistive wall wakefield. Analytical approach is then developed to study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics due to this short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS undulator.

  10. Wave optics simulation of diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Nagaoka, Ryuji; Nagaoka, Hiroki; Nagai, Toru; Wani, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    A numerical simulation code for a diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) was developed. The code employs the Fresnel- Kirchhoff diffraction integral for both laser mode and pump light propagations. A three-dimensional rate equation set was developed to determine the local gain. The spectral divergence of the pump beam was represented by a series of monochromatic beams with different wavelengths. The calculated results showed an excellent agreements with relevant experimental results. It was found that the main channel of the pump power drain is the spontaneous emission from the upper level of the lasing transition.

  11. Hydrodynamic simulations of metal ablation by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Colombier, J.P.; Combis, P.; Bonneau, F.

    2005-04-15

    Ablation of Cu and Al targets has been performed with 170 fs laser pulses in the intensity range of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. We compare the measured removal depth with 1D hydrodynamic simulations. The electron-ion temperature decoupling is taken into account using the standard two-temperature model. The influence of the early heat transfer by electronic thermal conduction on hydrodynamic material expansion and mechanical behavior is investigated. A good agreement between experimental and numerical matter ablation rates shows the importance of including solid-to-vapor evolution of the metal in the current modeling of the laser matter interaction.

  12. Component Technology for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W J; Smith, S G; Dahlgren, T; Epperley, T; Kohn, S; Kumfert, G

    2002-06-17

    This paper will discuss the application of high performance component software technology developed for a complex physics simulation development effort. The primary tool used to build software components is called Babel and is used to create language-independent libraries for high performance computers. Components were constructed from legacy code and wrapped with a thin Python layer to enable run-time scripting. Low-level components in Fortran, C++, and Python were composed directly as Babel components and invoked interactively from a parallel Python script.

  13. Optical Frequency Domain Visualization of Electron Beam Driven Plasma Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, Michael C.; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl; Fedurin, Michhail; Babzien, Marcus

    2010-11-04

    Bunch driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA), such as the 'plasma afterburner', are a promising emerging method for significantly increasing the energy output of conventional particle accelerators. The study and optimization of this method would benefit from an experimental correlation of the drive bunch parameters and the accelerated particle parameters with the corresponding plasma wave structure. However, the plasma wave structure has not been observed directly so far. We will report ongoing development of a noninvasive optical Frequency Domain Interferometric (FDI) and Holographic (FDH) diagnostics of bunch driven plasma wakes. Both FDI and FDH have been previously demonstrated in the case of laser driven wakes. These techniques employ two laser pulses co-propagating with the drive particle bunch and the trailing plasma wave. One pulse propagates ahead of the drive bunch and serves as a reference, while the second is overlapped with the plasma wave and probes its structure. The multi-shot FDI and single-shot FDH diagnostics permit direct noninvasive observation of longitudinal and transverse structure of the plasma wakes. The experiment is being developed at the 70 MeV Linac in the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to visualize wakes generated by two and multi-bunch drive beams.

  14. Optical Frequency Domain Visualization of Electron Beam Driven Plasma Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, Michael C.; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl; Fedurin, Michhail; Babzien, Marcus

    2010-11-01

    Bunch driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA), such as the "plasma afterburner," are a promising emerging method for significantly increasing the energy output of conventional particle accelerators [1]. The study and optimization of this method would benefit from an experimental correlation of the drive bunch parameters and the accelerated particle parameters with the corresponding plasma wave structure. However, the plasma wave structure has not been observed directly so far. We will report ongoing development of a noninvasive optical Frequency Domain Interferometric (FDI) [2] and Holographic (FDH) [3] diagnostics of bunch driven plasma wakes. Both FDI and FDH have been previously demonstrated in the case of laser driven wakes. These techniques employ two laser pulses co-propagating with the drive particle bunch and the trailing plasma wave. One pulse propagates ahead of the drive bunch and serves as a reference, while the second is overlapped with the plasma wave and probes its structure. The multi-shot FDI and single-shot FDH diagnostics permit direct noninvasive observation of longitudinal and transverse structure of the plasma wakes. The experiment is being developed at the 70 MeV Linac in the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to visualize wakes generated by two [4] and multi-bunch [5] drive beams.

  15. Physical layer simulator for undersea free-space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgleish, Fraser R.; Shirron, Joseph J.; Rashkin, David; Giddings, Thomas E.; Vuorenkoski Dalgleish, Anni K.; Cardei, Ionut; Ouyang, Bing; Caimi, Frank M.; Cardei, Mihaela

    2014-05-01

    High bandwidth (10 to 100 Mbps), real-time data networking in the subsea environment using free-space lasers has a potentially high impact as an enabling technology for a variety of future subsea operations in the areas of distributed sensing, real-time wireless data transfer, control of unmanned undersea vehicles, and other submerged assets. However, the development and testing of laser networking equipment in the undersea environment are expensive and time consuming, and there is a clear need for a network simulation framework that will allow researchers to evaluate the performance of alternate optical and electronic configurations under realistic operational and environmental constraints. The overall objective of the work reported in this paper was to develop and validate such a simulation framework, which consists of (1) a time-dependent radiative transfer model to accurately predict the channel impulse characteristics for alternate system designs over a range of geometries and optical properties and (2) digital modulation and demodulation blocks which accurately simulate both laser source and receiver noise characteristics in order to generate time domain bit stream samples that can be digitally demodulated to predict the resulting bit error rate of the simulated link.

  16. Numerical simulation of a battlefield Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, Markus; Sjoqvist, Lars; Uhrwing, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    A numeric model has been developed to identify the critical components and parameters in improving the output beam quality of a flashlamp pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a folded Porro-prism resonator and polarization output coupling. The heating of the laser material and accompanying thermo-optical effects are calculated using the finite element partial differential equations package FEMLAB allowing arbitrary geometries and time distributions. The laser gain and the cavity are modeled with the physical optics simulation code GLAD including effects such as gain profile, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence, the Pockels cell rise-time and component aberrations. The model is intended to optimize the pumping process of an OPO providing radiation to be used for ranging, imaging or optical countermeasures.

  17. Numerical simulations of a diode laser BPH treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, Richard A.; Esch, Victor C.; Papademetriou, Stephanos

    1999-06-01

    Numerical simulations are presented of the laser-tissue interaction of a diode laser system for treating benign prostate hyperplasia. The numerical model includes laser light transport, heat transport, cooling due to blood perfusion, thermal tissue damage, and enthalpy of tissue damage. Comparisons of the stimulation results to clinical data are given. We report that a reasonable variation from a standard set of input data produces heating times which match those measured in the clinical trials. A general trend of decreasing damage volume with increasing heating time is described. We suggest that the patient-to-patient variability seen in the data can be explained by differences in fundamental biophysical properties such as the optical coefficients. Further work is identified, including the measurement and input to the model of several specific data parameters such as optical coefficients, blood perfusion cooling rate, and coagulation rates.

  18. Three-dimensional thermal response numerical simulation of laser irradiating simulative warhead target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minsun; Jiang, Houman

    2015-05-01

    The thermal response of a cylindrical simulative warhead consisting of the steel casing and the TNT explosive irradiated by laser is simulated, basing on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method. Preliminary computational simulation results show that, when the power density of 500W/cm2 continuous laser irradiation on a sealed explosive device consisting of the type 304 steel casing with thickness of 5mm and TNT explosive, compared with no airflow, the speed of 200m/s tangential airflow can reduce the thermal initiation time of 0.6s. In the case of incident laser power density is high, the convection cooling effect of tangential airflow can be neglected. The oxidation of airflow can significantly shorten the thermal initiation time of internal explosive.

  19. Numerical simulation of laser ablation for photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, P.; García, O.; Morales, M.; Huber, H. P.; Molpeceres, C.

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this work is to help understanding the impacts of short laser pulses on materials of interest for photovoltaic applications, namely aluminum and silver. One of the traditional advantages of using shorter laser pulses has been the attempt to reduce the characteristic heat affected zone generated in the interaction process, however the complex physical problem involved limitates the integration of simplified physical models in standard tools for numerical simulation. Here the interaction between short laser pulses and matter is modeled in the commercial finite-element software Abaqus. To describe ps and fs laser pulses properly, the two-temperature model (TTM) is applied considering electrons and lattice as different thermal transport subsystems. The Material has been modeled as two equally sized and meshed but geometrically independent parts, representing each the electron and the lattice domain. That means, both domains match in number and position of the respective elements as well as in their shape and their size. The laser pulse only affects the electron domain so that the lattice domain remains at ambient temperature. The thermal connection is only given by the electron-phonon coupling, depending on the temperature difference between both domains. It will be shown, that melting and heat affected zones getting smaller with decreasing pulse durations.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of laser beam scattering by water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Biao; Tong, Guang-de; Lin, Jia-xuan

    2013-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of laser beam scattering in discrete water droplets is present and the temporal profile of LIDAR signal scattered from random distributed water droplets such as raindrop and fog is acquired. A photon source model is developed in the simulation for laser beam of arbitrary intensity distribution. Mie theory and geometrical optics approximation is used to calculate optical parameters, such as scattering coefficient, Aledo and average asymmetry factor, for water droplets of variable size with gamma distribution. The scattering angle is calculated using the probability distribution given by Henyey-Greenstein phase function. The model solving semi-infinite homogeneous media problem is capable of handling a variety of geometries and arbitrary spatio-temporal pulse profiles.

  1. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of HighlyTime-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn; Stupakov,Gennady; Fawley, William M.; Reiche, Sven

    2005-08-25

    Energy loss due to wakefields within a long undulator, if not compensated by an appropriate tapering of the magnetic field strength, can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive-wall component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g., Cu) and its radius. Of recent interest[1] is the so-called ''AC'' component of the resistive-wall wake which can lead to strong variations on very short timescales (e.g., {approx} 20 0fs). To study the expected performance of the LCLS in the presence of these wakefields, we have made an extensive series of start-to-end SASE simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT, and time-dependent FEL simulation codes GENESIS1.3 and GINGER. We discuss the impact of the wakefield losses upon output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation of the time-dependent wake losses obtained with a slight z-dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare the taper results to those predicted analytically[2].

  2. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highly Time-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Bane, K.L.F.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Stupakov, G.; Reiche, S.; /UCLA

    2005-09-30

    Energy loss due to wakefields within a long undulator, if not compensated by an appropriate tapering of the magnetic field strength, can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive-wall component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g., Cu) and its radius. Of recent interest[1] is the so-called ''AC'' component of the resistive-wall wake which can lead to strong variations on very short timescales (e.g., {approx} 20 fs). To study the expected performance of the LCLS in the presence of these wakefields, we have made an extensive series of start-to-end SASE simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT, and time-dependent FEL simulation codes GENESIS1.3 and GINGER. We discuss the impact of the wakefield losses upon output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation of the time-dependent wake losses obtained with a slight z-dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare the taper results to those predicted analytically[2].

  3. SIMPLEX: simulator and postprocessor for free-electron laser experiments.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    SIMPLEX is a computer program developed for simulating the amplification process of free-electron lasers (FELs). It numerically solves the so-called FEL equations describing the evolution of the radiation field and growth of microbunching while the electron beam travels along the undulator. In order to reduce the numerical cost, the FEL equations have been reduced to more convenient forms for numerical implementation by applying reasonable approximations. SIMPLEX is equipped with a postprocessor to facilitate the retrieval of desired information from the simulation results, which is crucial for practical applications such as designing the beamline and analyzing the experimental results.

  4. SIMPLEX: simulator and postprocessor for free-electron laser experiments

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    SIMPLEX is a computer program developed for simulating the amplification process of free-electron lasers (FELs). It numerically solves the so-called FEL equations describing the evolution of the radiation field and growth of microbunching while the electron beam travels along the undulator. In order to reduce the numerical cost, the FEL equations have been reduced to more convenient forms for numerical implementation by applying reasonable approximations. SIMPLEX is equipped with a postprocessor to facilitate the retrieval of desired information from the simulation results, which is crucial for practical applications such as designing the beamline and analyzing the experimental results. PMID:26289287

  5. A simulator for airborne laser swath mapping via photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatton, K. C.; Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R.

    2005-06-01

    Commercially marketed airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) instruments currently use laser rangers with sufficient energy per pulse to work with return signals of thousands of photons per shot. The resulting high signal to noise level virtually eliminates spurious range values caused by noise, such as background solar radiation and sensor thermal noise. However, the high signal level approach requires laser repetition rates of hundreds of thousands of pulses per second to obtain contiguous coverage of the terrain at sub-meter spatial resolution, and with currently available technology, affords little scalability for significantly downsizing the hardware, or reducing the costs. A photon-counting ALSM sensor has been designed by the University of Florida and Sigma Space, Inc. for improved topographic mapping with lower power requirements and weight than traditional ALSM sensors. Major elements of the sensor design are presented along with preliminary simulation results. The simulator is being developed so that data phenomenology and target detection potential can be investigated before the system is completed. Early simulations suggest that precise estimates of terrain elevation and target detection will be possible with the sensor design.

  6. Simulation of laser cooling by the bichromatic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Xiang; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2016-06-01

    The bichromatic force allows laser cooling using stimulated processes only. We provide details of our simulations of the bichromatic force when the effects of spontaneous emission are suppressed by restricting the atom-light interaction time to be short enough that there cannot be a significant number of spontaneous emission events. This short interaction time requires that the simulation include dynamics of the atomic motion through the light field that is coupled to the internal state dynamics that determine the force on the atom. The simulation is first tested with several standard optical field configurations to confirm its accuracy. Then the results, using conditions that match our experiment, are presented and compared with our measurements. The simulation shows that the resolution of the experiment greatly obscures the degree of cooling. Our simulation predicts an observed velocity distribution reduced by up to a factor of 4 in width over a time comparable to the excited state lifetime. This technique can allow the direct laser cooling of atoms and molecules without closed cycling transitions.

  7. Temporal profile measurements of relativistic electron bunch based on wakefield generation

    DOE PAGES

    Bettoni, S.; Craievich, P.; Lutman, A. A.; ...

    2016-02-25

    A complete characterization of the time-resolved longitudinal beam phase space is important to optimize the final performances of an accelerator, and in particular this is crucial for Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. In this study we propose a novel method to characterize the profile of a relativistic electron bunch by passively streaking the beam using its self-interaction with the transverse wakefield excited by the bunch itself passing off-axis through a dielectric-lined or a corrugated waveguide. Results of a proof-of-principle experiment at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility are discussed.

  8. Temporal profile measurements of relativistic electron bunch based on wakefield generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, S.; Craievich, P.; Lutman, A. A.; Pedrozzi, M.

    2016-02-01

    A complete characterization of the time-resolved longitudinal beam phase space is important to optimize the final performances of an accelerator, and in particular this is crucial for Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. In this paper we propose a novel method to characterize the profile of a relativistic electron bunch by passively streaking the beam using its self-interaction with the transverse wakefield excited by the bunch itself passing off-axis through a dielectric-lined or a corrugated waveguide. Results of a proof-of-principle experiment at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility are discussed.

  9. A possible experiment at LEUTL to characterize surface roughness Wakefield effects

    SciTech Connect

    Biedron, S.G.; Dattoli, G.; Fawley, W.M.; Freund, H.P.; Huang, Zhirong; Lewellen, J.W.; Milton, S.V.; Nuhn, H.D.

    2001-01-10

    Wakefield effects due to internal vacuum chamber roughness may increase the electron beam energy spread and so have become an immediate concern for future x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project developments such as the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the DESY TESLA x-ray FEL. We describe a possible experiment to characterize the effects of surface roughness on an FEL driven by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) operation. Although the specific system described is not completely identical to the above-proposed projects, much useful scaling information could be obtained and applied to shorter wavelength systems.

  10. Simulations Of Laser Cooling In An Ultracold Neutral Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langin, Thomas; Strickler, Trevor; Pohl, Thomas; Vrinceanu, Daniel; Killian, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) generated by photoionization of laser-cooled, magneto-optically trapped neutral gases, are useful systems for studying strongly coupled plasmas. Coupling is parameterized by Γi, the ratio of the average nearest neighbor Coulomb interaction energy to the ion kinetic energy. For typical UNPs, Γi is currently limited to ~ 3 . For alkaline earth ions, higher Γi can be achieved by laser-cooling. Using Molecular Dynamics and a quantum trajectories approach, we have simulated laser-cooling of Sr+ ions interacting through a Yukawa potential. The simulations include re-pumping from two long-lived D-states, and are conducted at experimentally achievable parameters (density n = 2 e+14 m-3, size σ0 = 4 mm, Te = 19 K). Laser-cooling is shown to both reduce the temperature by a factor of 2 over relevant timescales (tens of μ s) and slow the electron thermal-pressure driven radial expansion of the UNP. We also discuss the unique aspects of laser-cooling in a highly collisional system; in particular, the effect of collisions on dark state formation due to the coupling of the P3/2 state to both the S1/2 (via the cooling transition) and the D5/2 (via a re-pump transition) states. Supported by NSF and DoE, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the NDSEG Program, and NIH NCRR S10RR02950, an IBM SUR Award in partnership with CISCO, Qlogic and Adaptive Computing.

  11. Simplification of the laser absorption process in the particle simulation for the laser-induced shockwave processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Kohei

    2016-09-01

    To reduce the computational cost in the particle method for the numerical simulation of the laser plasma, we examined the simplification of the laser absorption process. Because the laser frequency is sufficiently larger than the collision frequency between the electron and heavy particles, we assumed that the electron obtained the constant value from the laser irradiation. First of all, the simplification of the laser absorption process was verified by the comparison of the EEDF and the laser-absorptivity with PIC-FDTD method. Secondary, the laser plasma induced by TEA CO2 laser in Argon atmosphere was modeled using the 1D3V DSMC method with the simplification of the laser-absorption. As a result, the LSDW was observed with the typical electron and neutral density distribution.

  12. Wakefields in THz cylindrical dielectric lined waveguides driven by femtosecond electron bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yuancun

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the wakefield effects driven by a high-intensity relativistic electron bunch in a dielectric lined waveguide (DLW). A state-of-the-art electron bunch is employed to serve as the drive bunch, which has an rms length of 10 μm, i.e. 33 fs, and a charge of 200 pC. Such bunch parameters are comparable to those of DESY's FLASH and SLAC's LCLS and FACET facilities. It is demonstrated that coherent Cherenkov radiation (CCR) at the fundamental mode with frequency above 1 THz and accelerating gradient as high as 2 GV/m can be obtained in a single layer cylindrical diamond-DLW structure, as long as the geometrical parameters of the DLW are properly selected to match the drive bunch. Wakefield-induced energy modulations on the drive bunch itself are studied as well, which can be used to reduce its energy spread or to produce microbunches with much shorter length from it. The simulated results agree well with the theoretical predictions. Such wakefields can be used to accelerate or modulate electron bunches with ultra-high gradients, and produce high power THz radiations directly. These properties have potential applications in the fields of compact colliders and advanced radiation sources.

  13. Ionization-injected electron acceleration with sub-terawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, Linus; Goers, Andy; Hine, George; Miao, Bo; Salehi, Fatholah; Woodbury, Daniel; Milchberg, Howard

    2016-10-01

    The vast majority of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiments use drive lasers with peak powers >10 TW and repetition rates from 10 Hz to less than once an hour. However, it was recently demonstrated that by using a thin, high density gas target, LWFA can be driven by laser pulses well below a TW and with high repetition rates. We present experiments and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the effect of doping the high density gas jet with higher Z molecules (here nitrogen). Our earlier experiments with low-Z gas relied on self-injection of electrons into the accelerating wake through wave-breaking. In ionization injection, the relativistically self-focused laser pulse ionizes the inner shell of the dopant inside the plasma wake. High energy electrons are then trapped by the wakefield in the earliest potential buckets, which overlap with the laser pulse. PIC simulations show acceleration of these electrons by LWFA and directly by the laser pulse, with the direct contribution significantly increasing the electron energy beyond the LWFA contribution alone. Additionally, ionization injection can be controlled to prevent dephasing of the electron beam, resulting in a narrower energy spectrum and lower spatial divergence. This research is supported by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  14. Simulation and characterization of laser induced deformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yajun

    2006-04-01

    Laser induced deformation processes include laser forming (LF) and laser shock processing. LF is a recently developed and highly flexible thermal forming technique, and laser shock processing is an innovative mechanical process in which shock waves up to 10GPa are generated by a confined laser ablation process. The generated high pressure imparts beneficial residual stress into the surface layer of metal parts as well as shapes thin metal parts. In laser forming, it has been known that microstructural evolution has an important effect on the deformation process, and that the typical thermal cycles in laser forming are much steeper than those in other thermal mechanical processes like welding and hot rolling. In this study, microstructural evolution in laser forming has been investigated, and a thermal-microstructural-mechanical model is developed to predict microstructural changes (phase transformations and recrystallization) and their effects on flow behavior and deformation. Grain structure and phase transformation in heat affected zone (HAZ) is experimentally characterized, and measurement of bending curvature also helps to validate the proposed model. Based on the similar methodology, two different materials have been studied: AISI 1010 low carbon steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. In the case of Ti-6A1-4V alloy, the initial phase ratio of Ti-alpha and Ti-beta need to be measured by X-ray diffraction. In laser shock processing, under shock loading solid material behavior is fluidlike and shock-solid interactions play a key role in determining the induced residual stress distributions and the final deformed shape. In this work shock-solid interactions under high pressure and thus high strain rate in laser shock processing are studied and simulated based on conservation's law, equation of state and elastoplasticity of material. A series of carefully controlled experiments, including spatially resolved residual stress measurement by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and

  15. Laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  16. Simulation of Full-Waveform Laser Altimeter Echowaveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y.; Tong, X. H.; Liu, S. J.; Xie, H.; Luan, K. F.; Liu, J.

    2016-06-01

    Change of globe surface height is an important factor to study human living environment. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on ICESat is the first laser-ranging instrument for continuous global observations of the Earth. In order to have a comprehensive understanding of full-waveform laser altimeter, this study simulated the operating mode of ICESat and modeled different terrains' (platform terrain, slope terrain, and artificial terrain) echo waveforms based on the radar equation. By changing the characteristics of the system and the targets, numerical echo waveforms can be achieved. Hereafter, we mainly discussed the factors affecting the amplitude and size (width) of the echoes. The experimental results implied that the slope of the terrain, backscattering coefficient and reflectivity, target height, target position in the footprint and area reacted with the pulse all can affect the energy distribution of the echo waveform and the receiving time. Finally, Gaussian decomposition is utilized to decompose the echo waveform. From the experiment, it can be noted that the factors which can affect the echo waveform and by this way we can know more about large footprint full-waveform satellite laser altimeter.

  17. Laser Brazing with Beam Scanning: Experimental and Simulative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmanek, M.; Dobler, M.; Graudenz, M.; Perret, W.; Göbel, G.; Schmidt, M.; Beyer, E.

    Laser beam brazing with copper based filler wire is a widely established technology for joining zinc-coated steel plates in the body-shop. Successful applications are the divided tailgate or the zero-gap joint, which represents the joint between the side panel and the roof-top of the body-in-white. These joints are in direct view to the customer, and therefore have to fulfil highest optical quality requirements. For this reason a stable and efficient laser brazing process is essential. In this paper the current results on quality improvement due to one dimensional laser beam deflections in feed direction are presented. Additionally to the experimental results a transient three-dimensional simulation model for the laser beam brazing process is taken into account. With this model the influence of scanning parameters on filler wire temperature and melt pool characteristics is analyzed. The theoretical predictions are in good accordance with the experimental results. They show that the beam scanning approach is a very promising method to increase process stability and seam quality.

  18. Time-dependent numerical simulation of vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Csanak, G.; So, L.L.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Campbell, M.

    1994-12-31

    To simulate vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), the authors are developing a three-dimensional, time-dependent field-gain model with absorption in bulk dielectric regions and gain in quantum well regions. Since the laser linewidth is narrow, the bulk absorption coefficient is assumed to be independent of frequency with a value determined by the material and the lattice temperature. In contrast, the frequency-dependent gain regions must be solved consistently in the time domain. Treatment of frequency-dependent media in a finite-difference time-domain code is computationally intensive. However, because the volume of the quantum well regions is small relative to the volume of the multilayer dielectric (MLD) mirror regions, the computational overhead is reasonable. A key issue is the calculation of the fields in the MLD mirror regions. Although computationally intensive, good agreement has been obtained between simulation results and matrix equation solutions for the reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, and bandwidth of MLD mirrors. The authors discuss the development and testing of the two-dimensional field-gain model. This field-gain model will be integrated with a carrier transport model to form the self-consistent laser code, VCSEL.

  19. Simulation study on transverse mode of laser resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, H.; Zhou, L. F.; Yang, Z.

    2015-08-01

    Simulation study of the stability lateral field distribution for a variety of shapes parallel-plane cavity with the Fox-Li numerical iterative method is conducted in this paper, which gives the optical field amplitude distribution and phase distribution after iterating any number of times. After calculation and simulation, we find that the strip cavity needs 245 times iterations to produce a stable field conditions, while rectangular and circular cavity need 103 and 114 times under the same condition. Finally, the user interface for simulating the field distribution of a common parallel-plane cavity is designed, which is conducive to the understanding and extensive application of the theory of laser transverse mode.

  20. Proposed Dark Current Studies at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.P.; Conde, Manoel Eduardo; Gai, Wei; Power, John Gorham; Yusof, Z.M.; Spentzouris, L.K.; Dolgashev, V.A.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18

    A study of dark currents has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility (AWA). Emission of dark current is closely related to a breakdown. Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. An imaging system is being put together to identify single emitters on the cathode surface. This will allow us to study dark current properties in the gun. We also plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV). Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after can shed some light on a modification of metal surface after the breakdown.

  1. Simulation of Weibel Instability for LWFA and PWFA Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Muggli, P.; Feng, B.; Katsouleas, T.; Huang, C.; Yakimenko, V.; Maksimchuk, A.

    2009-01-22

    Weibel instability is of central importance for relativistic beams both in laboratory, ex. fast-igniter concept for inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysical, ex. cosmic jets, plasmas. Simulations, using QuickPIC, of an intense and monoenergetic beam propagating through a plasma were conducted for experimental setups with Laser Wakefield and RF accelerators and show the appearance of Weibel instability (or current instability). The appearance of the instability is investigated as a function of beam parameters (density, spot size and bunch length) and plasma parameters (plasma density and length of plasma). We present preliminary simulation results that show that the instability should be observable for the RF accelerator experiment.

  2. Multidimensional simulations of the ELFA superradiant free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W. M.; Sharp, W. M.

    1991-07-01

    ELFA (electron laser facility for acceleration) is a high-gain, microwave ( ν = 100 GHz) free electron laser (FEL) facility driven by an rf linac. ELFA will test the existence of the theoretically predicted regimes of strong and weak superradiance. Both regimes can be studied with the same FEL by changing the height of the interaction waveguide, which controls the radiation group velocity, and thus the relative slippage between electrons and photons. The operation of ELFA has been modeled using a modified version of the two-dimensional, time-dependent sideband code GINGER. The simulations take into account the time and space variations of the radiation field, as well as the space charge and transverse emittance of the electron beam. The sensitivity of the superradiant signal to variations of the beam emittance, energy and energy spread is examined.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of laser attenuation characteristics in fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Sun, Chao; Zhu, You-zhang; Sun, Hong-hui; Li, Pan-shi

    2011-06-01

    Based on the Mie scattering theory and the gamma size distribution model, the scattering extinction parameter of spherical fog-drop is calculated. For the transmission attenuation of the laser in the fog, a Monte Carlo simulation model is established, and the impact of attenuation ratio on visibility and field angle is computed and analysed using the program developed by MATLAB language. The results of the Monte Carlo method in this paper are compared with the results of single scattering method. The results show that the influence of multiple scattering need to be considered when the visibility is low, and single scattering calculations have larger errors. The phenomenon of multiple scattering can be interpreted more better when the Monte Carlo is used to calculate the attenuation ratio of the laser transmitting in the fog.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of laser backscatter from sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerber, B. W.; Phillips, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation study of laser backscatter from sea water has been carried out to provide data required to assess the feasibility of measuring inherent optical propagation properties of sea water from an aircraft. The possibility was examined of deriving such information from the backscatter component of the return signals measured by the WRELADS laser airborne depth sounder system. Computations were made for various water turbidity conditions and for different fields of view of the WRELADS receiver. Using a simple model fitted to the computed backscatter data, it was shown that values of the scattering data absorption coefficients can be derived from the initial amplitude and the decay rate of the backscatter envelope.

  5. Soft X-ray stimulated bremsstrahlung in traveling longitudinal electric wake-fields of two-beam pill-box cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Chen, K. W.; Wilhelm, H. E.

    The amplification of laser light in a free electron laser (FEL) due to stimulated bremsstrahlung in a traveling longitudinal undulating electric field is derived. It is shown that this FEL provides sufficient gain to be used as a coherent radiation source down to the soft X-ray regime. It is suggested that, among other possibilities, the wake-field produced in a two-beam elliptical or annular pill-box cavity is suitable for the required traveling longitudinal undulating electric field.

  6. Material model validation for laser shock peening process simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarchinta, H. K.; Grandhi, R. V.; Langer, K.; Stargel, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced mechanical surface enhancement techniques have been used successfully to increase the fatigue life of metallic components. These techniques impart deep compressive residual stresses into the component to counter potentially damage-inducing tensile stresses generated under service loading. Laser shock peening (LSP) is an advanced mechanical surface enhancement technique used predominantly in the aircraft industry. To reduce costs and make the technique available on a large-scale basis for industrial applications, simulation of the LSP process is required. Accurate simulation of the LSP process is a challenging task, because the process has many parameters such as laser spot size, pressure profile and material model that must be precisely determined. This work focuses on investigating the appropriate material model that could be used in simulation and design. In the LSP process material is subjected to strain rates of 106 s-1, which is very high compared with conventional strain rates. The importance of an accurate material model increases because the material behaves significantly different at such high strain rates. This work investigates the effect of multiple nonlinear material models for representing the elastic-plastic behavior of materials. Elastic perfectly plastic, Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong models are used, and the performance of each model is compared with available experimental results.

  7. Simulation and calculation of particle trapping using a quasistatic simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Sepehr; Palastro, John; Antonsen, Thomas; Huang, Chengkun; Mori, Warren

    2007-11-01

    In LWFA schemes the laser pulse must propagate several centimeters and maintain its coherence over this distance, which corresponds to many Rayleigh lengths. These Wakefields and their effect on the laser can be simulated in quasistatic approximation [1, 2]. In this approximation the assumption is that the driver (laser) does not change shape during the time it takes for it to pass by a plasma particle. As a result the particles that are trapped and moving with near-luminal velocity can not be treated with this approximation. Here we have modified the 2D code WAKE with an alternate algorithm so that when a plasma particle gains sufficient energy from wakefields it becomes trapped to satisfy the trapping conditions. Similar implementations have been made in the 3D cod QUICKPIC [2]. We also have done simulation and comparison of results for centimeter scale GeV electron accelerator experiments from LBL [3] with WAKE. These changes in WAKE will give users a tool that can be used on a desk top machine to simulate GeV acceleration. [1] P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen Jr., Phys Plasma 4, 217 (1997) [2] C. Huang et al. Comp Phys. 217 (2006) [3] W. P. Leemans et al. Nature Phys 2, 696 (2006) Letters

  8. Status of Coherent Cherenkov Wakefield Experiment at UCLA

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A. M.; Knyazik, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Tikhoplav, R.; Travish, G.; Williams, O. B.

    2009-01-22

    Coherent Cherenkov radiation (CCR) wakefields are produced when a compressed electron beam travels along the axis of a hollow cylindrical dielectric tube. In a dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) these wakefields accelerate either a trailing electron bunch or the tail of the driving bunch, depending on the modal structure of the radiation. For an appropriate choice of dielectric structure geometry and beam parameters the device operates in a single-mode regime, producing sinusoidal wakefields with wavelengths in the THz range. We report on preliminary results of an experiment at UCLA studying the potential of a DWA structure to produce high-power, narrow-band THz radiation. First measurements include observation of 1 MW peak-power pulses of coherent broadband radiation from a compact dipole beam dump magnet.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations studies of laser ablation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Johannes; Sonntag, Steffen; Karlin, Johannes; Paredes, Carolina Trichet; Sartison, Marc; Krauss, Armin; Trebin, Hans-Rainer

    2012-07-30

    An overview of several aspects of our recent molecular dynamics simulations of femtosecond laser ablation is presented. This includes the study of phase diagrams for suitable interactions, analysis of ablated material and bubble formation below threshold, study of two-pulse ablation and the classification of materials with respect to electron properties and electron-phonon coupling in the two-temperature model. A treatment of boundary conditions and of an extended twotemperature model is also included. Most of the results apply to aluminum, others also to copper and iron, and to metals in general.

  10. Coherent seeding of self-modulated plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Grüner, F. J.

    2013-05-15

    The growth of the beam self-modulation and hosing instabilities initiated by a seed wakefield is examined. Although the growth rates for the self-modulation and hosing instabilities are comparable, it is shown that an externally excited wakefield can be effective in selectively seeding the beam radial self-modulation, enabling the beam to fully modulate before strong beam hosing develops. Methods for coherent seeding are discussed.

  11. Physics of beam self-modulation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-10-15

    The self-modulation instability is a key effect that makes possible the usage of nowadays proton beams as drivers for plasma wakefield acceleration. Development of the instability in uniform plasmas and in plasmas with a small density up-step is numerically studied with the focus at nonlinear stages of beam evolution. The step parameters providing the strongest established wakefield are found, and the mechanism of stable bunch train formation is identified.

  12. Coherent seeding of self-modulated plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; Gruener, Florian; Leemans, Wim

    2013-04-30

    The growth of the beam self-modulation and hosing instabilities initiated by a seed wakefield is examined. Although the growth rates for the self-modulation and hosing instabilities are comparable, it is shown that an externally excited wakefield can be effective in selectively seeding the beam radial self-modulation, enabling the beam to fully modulate before strong beam hosing develops. Methods for coherent seeding are discussed.

  13. Integrated simulation approach for laser-driven fast ignition.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-M; Gibbon, P; Sheng, Z-M; Li, Y-T

    2015-01-01

    An integrated simulation approach fully based on the particle-in-cell (PIC) model is proposed, which involves both fast-particle generation via laser solid-density plasma interaction and transport and energy deposition of the particles in extremely high-density plasma. It is realized by introducing two independent systems in a simulation, where the fast-particle generation is simulated by a full PIC system and the transport and energy deposition computed by a second PIC system with a reduced field solver. Data of the fast particles generated in the full PIC system are copied to the reduced PIC system in real time as the fast-particle source. Unlike a two-region approach, which takes a single PIC system and two field solvers in two plasma density regions, respectively, the present one need not match the field solvers since the reduced field solver and the full solver adopted respectively in the two systems are independent. A simulation case is presented, which demonstrates that this approach can be applied to integrated simulation of fast ignition with real target densities, e.g., 300 g/cm(3).

  14. Threshold kinetics of a solar-simulator-pumped iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Lee, Y.; Weaver, W. R.; Humes, D. H.; Lee, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the chemical kinetics of the n-C3F7I solar-simulator-pumped iodine laser is utilized to study the major kinetic processes associated with the threshold behavior of this experimental system. Excited-state diffusion to the cell wall is the dominant limiting factor below 5 torr. Excited-state diffusion to the cell wall is the dominant limiting factor below 5 torr. Excited-state recombination with the alkyl radical and quenching by the parent gas control threshold at higher pressures. Treatment of the hyperfine splitting and uncertainty in the pressure broadening are important factors in fixing the threshold level. In spite of scatter in the experimental data caused by instabilities in the simulator high-pressure high-pressure arc, reasonable agreement is achieved between the model and experiment. Model parameters arrived at are within the uncertainty range of values found in the literature.

  15. Numerical simulation of optical feedback on a quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Khursan, Amin H.; Ghalib, Basim Abdullattif; Al-Obaidi, Sabri J.

    2012-02-15

    We use multi-population rate equations model to study feedback oscillations in the quantum dot laser. This model takes into account all peculiar characteristics in the quantum dots such as inhomogeneous broadening of the gain spectrum, the presence of the excited states on the quantum dot and the non-confined states due to the presence of wetting layer and the barrier. The contribution of quantum dot groups, which cannot follow by other models, is simulated. The results obtained from this model show the feedback oscillations, the periodic oscillations which evolves to chaos at higher injection current of higher feedback levels. The frequency fluctuation is attributed mainly to wetting layer with a considerable contribution from excited states. The simulation shows that is must be not using simple rate equation models to express quantum dots working at excited state transition.

  16. Introduction to wakefields and wake potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1989-01-01

    What are wakefields and wake potentials, and why are these concepts useful in the physics of linear accelerators and storage rings We approach this question by first reviewing the basic physical concepts which underlie the mathematical formalism. We then present a summary of the various techniques that have been developed to make detailed calculations of wake potentials. Finally, we give some applications to current problems of interest in accelerator physics. No attempt at completeness can be made in an introductory article of modest length. Rather, we try to give a broad overview and to list key references for more detailed study. It will also be apparent that the last chapter on this subject, with all the loose ends neatly tied up, has yet to be written. There are subtle points, there are controversial questions, and active calculations to resolve these questions are continuing at the time of this writing. 61 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  18. Numerical simulation of melt ejection during the laser drilling process on aluminum alloy by millisecond pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhang; Jin, Guangyong; Wang, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, established a physical model to simulate the melt ejection induced by millisecond pulsed laser on aluminum alloy and use the finite element method to simulate the whole process. A semi-infinite axisymmetric model was established according to the experiment and the analytical solution of temperature in a solid phase was derived based on the thermal conduction equation. Mean while, by assuming that material was removed from the hole once it was melted, the function describing the hole's shape was obtained with the energy balance theory. This simulation is based on the interaction between single pulsed laser with different pulse-width and different peak energy and aluminum alloy material, the result of numerical simulation is that the hole's depth increases with the increase of laser energy and the hole's depth increases with the increase of laser pulse width, the keyhole depth is linearly increased with the increase of laser energy, respectively; the growth of the keyhole radius is in the trend to be gentle. By comparing the theoretical simulation data and the actual test data, we discover that: we discover that: the relative error between the theoretical values and the actual values is about 8.8%, the theoretical simulation curve is well consistent with the actual experimental curve. This research may provide the theoretical references to the understanding of the interaction between millisecond pulsed laser and many kinds of materials, as well as be beneficial to the application of the laser materials processing and military field.

  19. LDRD Final Report: Adaptive Methods for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M R; Garaizar, F X; Hittinger, J A

    2003-01-29

    The goal of this project was to investigate the utility of parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in the simulation of laser plasma interaction (LPI). The scope of work included the development of new numerical methods and parallel implementation strategies. The primary deliverables were (1) parallel adaptive algorithms to solve a system of equations combining plasma fluid and light propagation models, (2) a research code implementing these algorithms, and (3) an analysis of the performance of parallel AMR on LPI problems. The project accomplished these objectives. New algorithms were developed for the solution of a system of equations describing LPI. These algorithms were implemented in a new research code named ALPS (Adaptive Laser Plasma Simulator) that was used to test the effectiveness of the AMR algorithms on the Laboratory's large-scale computer platforms. The details of the algorithm and the results of the numerical tests were documented in an article published in the Journal of Computational Physics [2]. A principal conclusion of this investigation is that AMR is most effective for LPI systems that are ''hydrodynamically large'', i.e., problems requiring the simulation of a large plasma volume relative to the volume occupied by the laser light. Since the plasma-only regions require less resolution than the laser light, AMR enables the use of efficient meshes for such problems. In contrast, AMR is less effective for, say, a single highly filamented beam propagating through a phase plate, since the resulting speckle pattern may be too dense to adequately separate scales with a locally refined mesh. Ultimately, the gain to be expected from the use of AMR is highly problem-dependent. One class of problems investigated in this project involved a pair of laser beams crossing in a plasma flow. Under certain conditions, energy can be transferred from one beam to the other via a resonant interaction with an ion acoustic wave in the crossing region. AMR provides an

  20. Phenomenological model of laser-tissue interaction with application to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangmin; Zhang, Nan; Shen, Yunhe; Burke, Dan; Konchada, Vamsi; Sweet, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Laser-tissue interaction is a multi-physics phenomenon not yet mathematically describable and computationally predictable. It is a challenge to model the laser-tissue interaction for real time laser Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) simulation which requires the laser-tissue interaction model to be computationally efficient and accurate. Under the consideration and enforcement of the thermodynamic first law and treating the laser-tissue interaction as a gray-box, utilizing the sensitivity analysis of some key parameters that will affect the laser intensity on the tissue surface with respect to the tissue vaporization rate, a phenomenological model of laser-tissue interaction is developed. The developed laser-tissue interaction model has been implemented for a laser BPH simulator and achieves real time performance (more than 30 frames per second). The model agrees well with the available experimental data.

  1. Simulations of Electron Transport in Laser Hot Spots

    SciTech Connect

    S. Brunner; E. Valeo

    2001-08-30

    Simulations of electron transport are carried out by solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the diffusive approximation. The system of a single laser hot spot, with open boundary conditions, is systematically studied by performing a scan over a wide range of the two relevant parameters: (1) Ratio of the stopping length over the width of the hot spot. (2) Relative importance of the heating through inverse Bremsstrahlung compared to the thermalization through self-collisions. As for uniform illumination [J.P. Matte et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30 (1988) 1665], the bulk of the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) present a super-Gaussian dependence. However, as a result of spatial transport, the tails are observed to be well represented by a Maxwellian. A similar dependence of the distributions is also found for multiple hot spot systems. For its relevance with respect to stimulated Raman scattering, the linear Landau damping of the electron plasma wave is estimated for such VD Fs. Finally, the nonlinear Fokker-Planck simulations of the single laser hot spot system are also compared to the results obtained with the linear non-local hydrodynamic approach [A.V. Brantov et al., Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 2742], thus providing a quantitative limit to the latter method: The hydrodynamic approach presents more than 10% inaccuracy in the presence of temperature variations of the order delta T/T greater than or equal to 1%, and similar levels of deformation of the Gaussian shape of the Maxwellian background.

  2. Ion Acceleration by Ultra-intense Laser Pulse Interacting with Double-layer Near-critical Density Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Nagashima, T.; Takano, M.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Wang, P. X.

    2016-03-01

    A collimated ion beam is generated through the interaction between ultra-intense laser pulse and a double layer plasma. The maximum energy is above 1GeV and the total charge of high energy protons is about several tens of nC/μm. The double layer plasma is combined with an underdense plasma and a thin overdense one. The wakefield traps and accelerates a bunch of electrons to high energy in the first underdense slab. When the well collimated electron beam accelerated by the wakefield penetrates through the second overdense slab, it enhances target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) and breakout after-burner (BOA) regimes. The mechanism is simulated and analyzed by 2.5 dimensional Particle-in-cell code. Compared with single target TNSA or BOA, both the acceleration gradient and energy transfer efficiency are higher in the double layer regime.

  3. Efficient modeling of plasma wakefield acceleration in quasi-non-linear-regimes with the hybrid code Architect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F.; Rossi, A. R.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a hybrid approach aiming to assess feasible plasma wakefield acceleration working points with reduced computation resources. The growing interest for plasma wakefield acceleration and especially the need to control with increasing precision the quality of the accelerated bunch demands for more accurate and faster simulations. Particle in cell codes are the state of the art technique to simulate the underlying physics, however the run-time represents the major drawback. Architect is a hybrid code that treats the bunch kinetically and the background electron plasma as a fluid, initialising bunches in vacuum so to take into account for the transition from vacuum to plasma. Architect solves directly the Maxwell's equations on a Yee lattice. Such an approach allows us to drastically reduce run time without loss of generality or accuracy up to the weakly non linear regime.

  4. Simulation of Laser Cooling and Trapping in Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan; Lunblad, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    An advanced computer code is undergoing development for numerically simulating laser cooling and trapping of large numbers of atoms. The code is expected to be useful in practical engineering applications and to contribute to understanding of the roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and numbers of particles play in experiments using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms. The code is based on semiclassical theories of the forces exerted on atoms by magnetic and optical fields. Whereas computer codes developed previously for the same purpose account for only a few physical mechanisms, this code incorporates many more physical mechanisms (including atomic collisions, sub-Doppler cooling mechanisms, Stark and Zeeman energy shifts, gravitation, and evanescent-wave phenomena) that affect laser-matter interactions and the cooling of atoms to submillikelvin temperatures. Moreover, whereas the prior codes can simulate the interactions of at most a few atoms with a resonant light field, the number of atoms that can be included in a simulation by the present code is limited only by computer memory. Hence, the present code represents more nearly completely the complex physics involved when using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms in engineering applications. Another advantage that the code incorporates is the possibility to analyze the interaction between cold atoms of different atomic number. Some properties that cold atoms of different atomic species have, like cross sections and the particular excited states they can occupy when interacting with each other and light fields, play important roles not yet completely understood in the new experiments that are under way in laboratories worldwide to form ultracold molecules. Other research efforts use cold atoms as holders of quantum information, and more recent developments in cavity quantum electrodynamics also use ultracold atoms to explore and expand new information-technology ideas. These experiments give a hint

  5. Simulation of planetary entry radiative heating with a CO2 gasdynamic laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.; Dickey, R. R.; Howe, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    Heating encountered during entry into the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus is described, followed by a discussion of the use of a CO2 gasdynamic laser to simulate the radiative component of the heating. Operation and performance of the laser is briefly described. Finally, results of laser tests of some candidate heat-shield materials are presented.

  6. Phase Velocity and Particle Injection in a Self-Modulated Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pukhov, A.; Kumar, N.; Tueckmantel, T.; Upadhyay, A.; Lotov, K.; Muggli, P.; Khudik, V.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2011-09-30

    It is demonstrated that the performance of the self-modulated proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator is strongly affected by the reduced phase velocity of the plasma wave. Using analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations, we show that the reduction is largest during the linear stage of self-modulation. As the instability nonlinearly saturates, the phase velocity approaches that of the driver. The deleterious effects of the wake's dynamics on the maximum energy gain of accelerated electrons can be avoided using side-injections of electrons, or by controlling the wake's phase velocity by smooth plasma density gradients.

  7. Phase velocity and particle injection in a self-modulated proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Pukhov, A; Kumar, N; Tückmantel, T; Upadhyay, A; Lotov, K; Muggli, P; Khudik, V; Siemon, C; Shvets, G

    2011-09-30

    It is demonstrated that the performance of the self-modulated proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator is strongly affected by the reduced phase velocity of the plasma wave. Using analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations, we show that the reduction is largest during the linear stage of self-modulation. As the instability nonlinearly saturates, the phase velocity approaches that of the driver. The deleterious effects of the wake's dynamics on the maximum energy gain of accelerated electrons can be avoided using side-injections of electrons, or by controlling the wake's phase velocity by smooth plasma density gradients.

  8. Propagation of an ultra-short, intense laser in a relativistic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, A.B.; Decker, C.D.

    1997-12-31

    A Maxwell-relativistic fluid model is developed to describe the propagation of an ultrashort, intense laser pulse through an underdense plasma. The model makes use of numerically stabilizing fast Fourier transform (FFT) computational methods for both the Maxwell and fluid equations, and it is benchmarked against particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Strong fields generated in the wake of the laser are calculated, and the authors observe coherent wake-field radiation generated at harmonics of the plasma frequency due to nonlinearities in the laser-plasma interaction. For a plasma whose density is 10% of critical, the highest members of the plasma harmonic series begin to overlap with the first laser harmonic, suggesting that widely used multiple-scales-theory, by which the laser and plasma frequencies are assumed to be separable, ceases to be a useful approximation.

  9. Dosimetry for lasers and light in dermatology: Monte Carlo simulations of 577 nm-pulsed laser penetration into cutaneous vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.; Keijzer, Marleen

    1991-06-01

    The role of skin optics in planning proper dosimetry for radiant energy delivered by lasers and conventional light sources is presented. The optical properties of the epidermis, dermis, and cutaneous blood are summarized. The ability of laser pulses at 577-nm wavelength to penetrate into and around a large blood vessel is studied using Monte Carlo simulations. The variation in laser penetration for variable beam diameters and variable vessel depths in presented. The distinction between TOTAL PULSE ENERGY versus PULSE ENERGY DENSITY is illustrated. The topic of this paper is especially pertinent to laser therapy for portwine stain lesions.

  10. Nonlinear structure of the wakefield generated by relativistic intense ion bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, A. A.; Andreev, N. E.

    2016-11-01

    The resonant excitation of the nonlinear wakefield by a single proton bunch is investigated with the parameters characteristic of the AWAKE experiment. It is shown that obtained structure of the wakefield at a distance more than twenty periods behind the driver proton bunch can be suitable for the side injection and further acceleration of the witness electron bunch in the wakefield.

  11. Simulation of coarsening during laser engineered Net-Shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Tikare, V.; Griffith, M.; Schlienger, E.; Smugeresky, J.

    1997-09-01

    Laser Engineered Net-Shaping, otherwise known as LENS{trademark}, is an advanced manufacturing technique used to fabricate complex near net shaped components directly from engineered solid models without the use of dies or machining. The ultimate objective of this project is to develop predictive simulation capability which will allow the LENS{trademark} processors to determine fabrication conditions given the material, shape, and application of the final part. In this paper, the authors will present an incremental achievement to meeting the ultimate goal, a model capable of simulating the coarsening of microstructural features under the unique thermal history to which a LENS{trademark} part is subjected during processing. The simulation results show how grains of very different shapes and sizes form within the same deposition line. They also show that relatively minor changes in the dynamic temperature profile results in microstructures with vastly different characteristics. The implications of this work for LENS{trademark} fabrication is that controlling the temperature profile is essential to tailoring the microstructure of a component to its application.

  12. Simulation and modeling of high-energy laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Donald J.; St. John, Richard

    2004-09-01

    Since the beginning of High Energy Laser systems, simulations have been used to predict performance, do parameter trades, and assist in troubleshooting. Today, simulations benefit from higher speed computers with more memory, but they are also being asked to do more. New types of HEL devices are being proposed, more hardware details are being incorporated, beam control systems are becoming more complex, innovative new systems are being designed to work under conditions of strong turbulence, and more types of targets are being considered. There are three types of physics level codes: resonator, beam control, and lethality. All three are slow running and require a high level of expertise to use. Scaling law codes are much easier to use and much faster running. These codes are based on analytical predictions and anchored to the wave optics simulations and to experiments. Scaling law codes can quickly predict performance, weight, and volume for various scenarios and conditions. Now that HEL systems are closer to reality, there is more interest in incorporating the scaling law codes into engagement codes, which predict overall system effectiveness in battle situations.

  13. LCODE: A parallel quasistatic code for computationally heavy problems of plasma wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosedkin, A. P.; Lotov, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    LCODE is a freely distributed quasistatic 2D3V code for simulating plasma wakefield acceleration, mainly specialized at resource-efficient studies of long-term propagation of ultrarelativistic particle beams in plasmas. The beam is modeled with fully relativistic macro-particles in a simulation window copropagating with the light velocity; the plasma can be simulated with either kinetic or fluid model. Several techniques are used to obtain exceptional numerical stability and precision while maintaining high resource efficiency, enabling LCODE to simulate the evolution of long particle beams over long propagation distances even on a laptop. A recent upgrade enabled LCODE to perform the calculations in parallel. A pipeline of several LCODE processes communicating via MPI (Message-Passing Interface) is capable of executing multiple consecutive time steps of the simulation in a single pass. This approach can speed up the calculations by hundreds of times.

  14. Simulation of Laser Additive Manufacturing and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yousub

    Laser and metal powder based additive manufacturing (AM), a key category of advanced Direct Digital Manufacturing (DDM), produces metallic components directly from a digital representation of the part such as a CAD file. It is well suited for the production of high-value, customizable components with complex geometry and the repair of damaged components. Currently, the main challenges for laser and metal powder based AM include the formation of defects (e.g., porosity), low surface finish quality, and spatially non-uniform properties of material. Such challenges stem largely from the limited knowledge of complex physical processes in AM especially the molten pool physics such as melting, molten metal flow, heat conduction, vaporization of alloying elements, and solidification. Direct experimental measurement of melt pool phenomena is highly difficult since the process is localized (on the order of 0.1 mm to 1 mm melt pool size) and transient (on the order of 1 m/s scanning speed). Furthermore, current optical and infrared cameras are limited to observe the melt pool surface. As a result, fluid flows in the melt pool, melt pool shape and formation of sub-surface defects are difficult to be visualized by experiment. On the other hand, numerical simulation, based on rigorous solution of mass, momentum and energy transport equations, can provide important quantitative knowledge of complex transport phenomena taking place in AM. The overarching goal of this dissertation research is to develop an analytical foundation for fundamental understanding of heat transfer, molten metal flow and free surface evolution. Two key types of laser AM processes are studied: a) powder injection, commonly used for repairing of turbine blades, and b) powder bed, commonly used for manufacturing of new parts with complex geometry. In the powder injection simulation, fluid convection, temperature gradient (G), solidification rate (R) and melt pool shape are calculated using a heat transfer

  15. Simulation study on thermal effect of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yao; Jin, Guangyong; Yuan, Boshi

    2016-10-01

    Laser machining is one of most widely used technologies nowadays and becoming a hot industry as well. At the same time, many kinds of carbon fiber material have been used in different area, such as sports products, transportation, microelectronic industry and so on. Moreover, there is lack of the combination research on the laser interaction with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material with simulation method. In this paper, the temperature status of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP will be simulated and discussed. Firstly, a laser thermal damage model has been built considering the heat conduction theory and thermal-elasto-plastic theory. Then using COMSOL Multiphysics software to build the geometric model and to simulate the mathematic results. Secondly, the functions of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP has been introduced. Material surface temperature increased by time during the laser irradiating time and the increasing speed is faster when the laser fluence is higher. Furthermore, the peak temperature of the center of material surface is increasing by enhanced the laser fluence when the pulse length is a constant value. In this condition, both the ablation depth and the Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) is larger when increased laser fluence. When keep the laser fluence as a constant value, the laser with shorter pulse length is more easier to make the CFRP to the vaporization material. Meanwhile, the HAZ is becoming larger when the pulse length is longer, and the thermal effect depth is as the same trend as the HAZ. As a result, when long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material, the thermal effect is the significant value to analysis the process, which is mostly effect by laser fluence and pulse length. For laser machining in different industries, the laser parameter choose should be different. The shorter pulse length laser is suitable for the laser machining which requires high accuracy, and the longer one is better for the deeper or larger

  16. Dielectric wakefield accelerator to drive to the future FEL light sourcei.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J.G.; Zholents, A.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A. )

    2011-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and the accelerator holds the largest portion of the cost of the entire facility. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may facilitate reduction of the facility size and significant cost saving. We show that a collinear dielectric wake-field accelerator can, in principle, accelerate low charge and high peak current electron bunches to a few GeV energy with up to 100 kHz bunch repetition rate. Several such accelerators can share the same tunnel and same CW superconducting linac (operating with a few MHz bunch repetition rate) whose sole purpose is feeding the DWAs with wake producing low energy, high charge electron bunches with a desirable periodicity. Then, ten or more x-ray FELs can operate independently, each using its own linac. In this paper, we present an initial case study of a single stage 850 GHz DWA based on a quartz tube with a {approx}100MV/m loaded gradient sufficient to accelerate a 50 pC main electron beam to 2.4 GeV at a 100 kHz bunch repetition rate in just under 30 meters.

  17. Time-Dependent, Three-Dimensional Simulation of Free-Electron-Laser Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Slot, P. J. M. van der; Boller, K.-J.; Freund, H. P.; Miner, W. H. Jr.; Benson, S. V.; Shinn, M.

    2009-06-19

    We describe a procedure for the simulation of free-electron-laser (FEL) oscillators. The simulation uses a combination of the MEDUSA simulation code for the FEL interaction and the OPC code to model the resonator. The simulations are compared with recent observations of the oscillator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and are in substantial agreement with the experiment.

  18. Wakefields in the LCLS Undulator Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Zagorodnov, Igor A.; /DESY

    2005-08-15

    We have studied longitudinal wakefields of very short bunches in non-cylindrically symmetric (3D) vacuum chamber transitions using analytical models and the computer program ECHO. The wake (for pairs of well-separated, non-smooth transitions) invariably is resistive, with its shape proportional to the bunch distribution. For the example of an elliptical collimator in a round beam pipe we have demonstrated that--as in the cylindrically symmetric (2D) case--the wake can be obtained from the static primary field of the beam alone. We have obtained the wakes of the LCLS rectangular-to-round transitions using indirect (numerical) field integration combined with a primary beam field calculation. For the LCLS 1 nC bunch charge configuration we find that the total variation in wake-induced energy change is small (0.03% in the core of the beam, 0.15% in the horns of the distribution) compared to that due to the resistive wall wakes of the undulator beam pipe (0.6%).

  19. Simulation of laser beam reflection at the sea surface modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Frédéric; Repasi, Endre

    2013-06-01

    A 3D simulation of the reflection of a Gaussian shaped laser beam on the dynamic sea surface is presented. The simulation is suitable for the pre-calculation of images for cameras operating in different spectral wavebands (visible, short wave infrared) for a bistatic configuration of laser source and receiver for different atmospheric conditions. In the visible waveband the calculated detected total power of reflected laser light from a 660nm laser source is compared with data collected in a field trial. Our computer simulation comprises the 3D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) and the simulation of laser beam reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. To predict the view of a camera the sea surface radiance must be calculated for the specific waveband. Additionally, the radiances of laser light specularly reflected at the wind-roughened sea surface are modeled considering an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function). Validation of simulation results is prerequisite before applying the computer simulation to maritime laser applications. For validation purposes data (images and meteorological data) were selected from field measurements, using a 660nm cw-laser diode to produce laser beam reflection at the water surface and recording images by a TV camera. The validation is done by numerical comparison of measured total laser power extracted from recorded images with the corresponding simulation results. The results of the comparison are presented for different incident (zenith/azimuth) angles of the laser beam.

  20. Simulation Studies of Satellite Laser CO2 Mission Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, Stephan Randy; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Collatz, G. J.; Sun X.; Weaver, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Results of mission simulation studies are presented for a laser-based atmospheric CO2 sounder. The simulations are based on real-time carbon cycle process modeling and data analysis. The mission concept corresponds to ASCENDS as recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey. Compared to passive sensors, active (lidar) sensing of CO2 from space has several potentially significant advantages that hold promise to advance CO2 measurement capability in the next decade. Although the precision and accuracy requirements remain at unprecedented levels of stringency, analysis of possible instrument technology indicates that such sensors are more than feasible. Radiative transfer model calculations, an instrument model with representative errors, and a simple retrieval approach complete the cycle from "nature" run to "pseudodata" CO2. Several mission and instrument configuration options are examined, and the sensitivity to key design variables is shown. Examples are also shown of how the resulting pseudo-measurements might be used to address key carbon cycle science questions.

  1. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Benjamin M.; Paul, Kevin; Mullowney, Paul J.; Messmer, Peter; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Esarey, Eric; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Leemans, Wim; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-22

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating >10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of {approx}2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  2. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Mullowney, P.J.; Messmer, P.; Esarey, E.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2008-09-10

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating>10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ~;;2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  3. [Spectroscopic study of laser induced breakdown plasma spectroscopy in air and semi-empirical simulation].

    PubMed

    Sun, Dui-xiong; Su, Mao-gen; Dong, Chen-zhong; Ma, Yun-yun; Yang, Feng; Cao, Shi-quan

    2014-12-01

    A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy experiment was carried out using Nd:YAG laser in air, and time-resolved spectra were measured. Based on local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption, a method used to simulate LIBS spectra is proposed. A LIBS spectrum of air in the wavelength range of 700~900 nm was simulated using this method. A good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained, and moreover, the relative concentrations of the N, O and Ar in air were obtained.

  4. Generation of high quality electron beams via ionization injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Joshi, Chan; E217 SLAC Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Ionization injection in a beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator has been used to generate electron beams with over 30 GeV of energy in a 130 cm of lithium plasma. The experiments were performed using the 3 nC, 20.35 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory as the driver of the wakefield. The ionization of helium atoms in the up ramp of a lithium plasma were injected into the wake and over the length of acceleration maintained an emittance on the order of 30 mm-mrad, which was an order of magnitude smaller than the drive beam, albeit with an energy spread of 10-20%. The process of ionization injection occurs due to an increase in the electric field of the drive beam as it pinches through its betatron oscillations. Thus, this energy spread is attributed to the injection region encompassing multiple betatron oscillations. In this poster, we will present evidence through OSIRIS simulations of producing an injected beam with percent level energy spread and low emittance by designing the plasma parameters appropriately, such that the ionization injection occurs over a very limited distance of one betatron cycle. Work at UCLA was supported by the NSF Grant Number PHY-1415386 and DOE Grant Number DE-SC0010064. Work at SLAC was supported by DOE contract number DE-AC02-76SF00515. Simulations used the Hoffman cluster at UCLA.

  5. Mary Wakefield: Health Resources and Services Administrator. Interview.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Mary

    2014-06-01

    Dr. Mary Wakefield is the administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration. She came from the University of North Dakota, where she directed the Center for Rural Health. She has served as director of the Center for Health Policy, Research and Ethics at George Mason University and has worked with the World Health Organization's Global Programme on AIDS in Geneva, Switzerland. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. A native of North Dakota, Wakefield holds a doctoral degree in nursing from the University of Texas.

  6. Mentalism, mechanisms, and medical analogues: reply to Wakefield (1998).

    PubMed

    Houts, A C; Follette, W C

    1998-10-01

    J. C. Wakefield's (1998) critique of W. C. Follette and A. C. Houts's (1996) article is addressed by raising questions about (a) mentalism as a framework for studying psychopathology, (b) the nature of inferred mechanisms and the process of making such inferences, and (c) the accuracy of claiming that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM; American Psychiatric Association) expansion is analogous to the success of physical medicine. The authors argue that Wakefield's analysis of mental disorders leads to the conclusion that the modern DSMs are not reflective of the progress of physical medicine.

  7. Effect of halo on high power laser pulse wake in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Naveen; Zhidkov, Alexei; Masuda, Shinichi; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2016-11-01

    Strong disturbance in the wake of the laser pulses propagating in underdense plasma and consequent unstable electron acceleration by the wakefield can be provoked by pulse's halo, which always exists as a result of an imperfect optical focusing. When the power in the halo part exceeds a critical level for the self-focusing, it evolves in the plasma as an independent mode, which later gets coupled with the propagation of the central Gaussian spot of the pulse resulting in a novel instability. Here, this instability is investigated numerically via fully relativistic 3D particle-in-cell simulations and is shown to be partially suppressed by using plasma channels for pulse guiding.

  8. Resonant laser plasma channel undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bifeng; Wang, Jingwei; Kharin, Vasily; Rykovanov, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    Laser-plasma based undulators/wigglers attract a lot of attention because of their potential for the next generation of compact ( cm scales) radiation sources. The undulator wavelength of plasma-based devices can theoretically reach 1 mm or less while keeping the undulator strength on the order of unity - values so far unachievable by conventional magnetic undulators. Recently, a novel type of the plasma channel undulator/wiggler (PIGGLER) based on the wakefields generated in a parabolic plasma channel by a laser pulse undergoing centroid oscillations was proposed. It was demonstrated analytically and with the help of numerical simulations that narrow-bandwidth, flexible polarization and bright UV-soft X-ray source can be obtained for the case when the laser pulse centroid oscillation frequency, proportional to the Rayleigh length of the laser pulse, is tuned to be much larger than the betatron frequency. In the current contribution, the case of the resonance, when the laser pulse centroid oscillation frequency is equal to the betatron frequency is discussed. It is shown that significant photon yield enhancement can be. Both linear and nonlinear regimes are studied. Helmholtz Institute Jena, Germany.

  9. The effect of laser wavelength in the simulation of laser generated surface waves in human skin model.

    PubMed

    L'Etang, Adéle; Huang, Zhihong

    2006-01-01

    A finite element (FE) simulation of the thermoelastic laser generated surface waves in a 3-layered model of human skin is presented. Commercial finite element code ANSYS is used to study the effects of changing laser wavelength and hence the optical absorption has on the generated surface waves. The FE model consists of a thermal analysis with a volumetric heat generation boundary condition to simulate the thermal effect of the laser source penetrating into the skin. The results from the thermal analysis are then subsequently applied as a load in a mechanical analysis where the out-of plane displacement histories and temperature fields are analysed using two different laser sources to generate the ultrasonic waves.

  10. X-Ray Diffraction Simulation Using Laser Pointers and Printers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a laser pointer to demonstrate the analogy between optical and X-ray diffraction and a laser printer with 600 or 1200 dot resolution to create and modify arrays, print them on transparencies, and illuminate them with laser pointers. Includes 14 references. (Author/YDS)

  11. Photon acceleration in the amplified plasma density wake of two copropagating laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, G.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-07-15

    Photon acceleration of a laser pulse occurs in a medium with a space and time-varying permittivity. Using Hamiltonian formulation, a theoretical study of the frequency upshift of a probe laser pulse, which is considered as a 'quasiphoton' or 'test particle,' propagating through an amplified plasma density wake of two copropagating laser pulses, is presented. The linear superposition of wakefields studied using an analytical model shows that the presence of a controlling pulse amplifies the wake of a driver pulse. The amplified wake amplitude can be controlled by varying the delay between the two pulses. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate wake superposition due to the two copropagating laser pulses. A phase space analysis shows that the probe photon can experience a significant frequency upshift in the amplified density wake. Furthermore, the range of photon frequencies trapped and accelerated is determined by the amplitude of the density wake.

  12. The application of tapered multi-mode fiber in laser signal simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ruiguang; Guo, Hao; Liang, Weiwei; Zhang, Wenpan; Li, Hui

    2016-09-01

    According to laser signal simulation, the advantage of application of tapered multi-mode fiber on laser pulse signal transmission was analyzed. By optical system simulation, the effect on the coupling efficiency of 1.06μm laser pulse signal of different angle was analyzed. By optical experiment, the coupling efficiency and transmission mode of different incident angle and force condition were confirmed. Combining the application of simulation system, with convex lens, frosted glass and optical integrator on the outlet of fiber, the far-field energy distribution was measured. According the receiving optical system entrance pupil, the effect on the beam quality to the simulation result was analyzed. The results showed that the application of tapered multi-mode fiber on laser pulse signal simulation is feasible, and the equipment has been used in the engineering projects.

  13. Method to simulate and analyse induced stresses for laser crystal packaging technologies.

    PubMed

    Ribes-Pleguezuelo, Pol; Zhang, Site; Beckert, Erik; Eberhardt, Ramona; Wyrowski, Frank; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2017-03-20

    A method to simulate induced stresses for a laser crystal packaging technique and the consequent study of birefringent effects inside the laser cavities has been developed. The method has been implemented by thermo-mechanical simulations implemented with ANSYS 17.0. ANSYS results were later imported in VirtualLab Fusion software where input/output beams in terms of wavelengths and polarization were analysed. The study has been built in the context of a low-stress soldering technique implemented for glass or crystal optics packaging's called the solderjet bumping technique. The outcome of the analysis showed almost no difference between the input and output laser beams for the laser cavity constructed with an yttrium aluminum garnet active laser crystal, a second harmonic generator beta-barium borate, and the output laser mirror made of fused silica assembled by the low-stress solderjet bumping technique.

  14. Application of melt ejection criterion in simulation of micromachining with laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semak, Vladimir V.; Schriempf, J. T.; Knorovsky, G. A.; MacCallum, D. O.

    2003-07-01

    The theoretical criterion defining the threshold pulse energy and beam intensity required for melt ejection is proposed. The results of numerical simulation present dependencies of the threshold pulse energy and beam intensity as functions of laser pulse duration and beam radius. The experimental verification of proposed criterion is described and the comparison of theoretical predictions and measurements is presented. The criterion is applied for simulation of laser drilling metal foil with thickness in the range 25 μm - 125 μm using laser beam with 12 μm beam radius and pulse durations 10 ns and 100 ns. The computational results are used to interpret the results of experimental study of laser drilling of 125 μm aluminum foil using a single mode beam of a XeCl laser performed at the Nederlands Centrum voor Laser Research (NCLR) and the University of Twente. Additional results on Nd:YAG spot welds in pure Ni are also presented.

  15. TEA CO 2 Laser Simulator: A software tool to predict the output pulse characteristics of TEA CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Ghani, B.

    2005-09-01

    "TEA CO 2 Laser Simulator" has been designed to simulate the dynamic emission processes of the TEA CO 2 laser based on the six-temperature model. The program predicts the behavior of the laser output pulse (power, energy, pulse duration, delay time, FWHM, etc.) depending on the physical and geometrical input parameters (pressure ratio of gas mixture, reflecting area of the output mirror, media length, losses, filling and decay factors, etc.). Program summaryTitle of program: TEA_CO2 Catalogue identifier: ADVW Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVW Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: P.IV DELL PC Setup: Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Scientific Services Department, Mathematics and Informatics Division Operating system: MS-Windows 9x, 2000, XP Programming language: Delphi 6.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 47 315 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:7 681 109 Distribution format:tar.gz Classification: 15 Laser Physics Nature of the physical problem: "TEA CO 2 Laser Simulator" is a program that predicts the behavior of the laser output pulse by studying the effect of the physical and geometrical input parameters on the characteristics of the output laser pulse. The laser active medium consists of a CO 2-N 2-He gas mixture. Method of solution: Six-temperature model, for the dynamics emission of TEA CO 2 laser, has been adapted in order to predict the parameters of laser output pulses. A simulation of the laser electrical pumping was carried out using two approaches; empirical function equation (8) and differential equation (9). Typical running time: The program's running time mainly depends on both integration interval and step; for a 4 μs period of time and 0.001 μs integration step (defaults values used in the program), the running time will be about 4 seconds. Restrictions on the complexity: Using a very small integration

  16. Laser Simulation of Single-Event Effects: A State of the Art Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    accurately simulate the effects of cosmic rays. Two alternate techniques that have been proposed for SEE testing are a pulsed laser and californium ...shielded cables. 49 8. Perspectives A combination of ion beams, pulsed lasers and Californium is perhaps the ideal way of doing SEE testing. The main...disadvantage of Californium is that the ions emitted have a small range and, therefore, are limited with respect to SEL testing. Lasers and

  17. Simulation of a polarized laser beam reflected at the sea surface: modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    A 3-D simulation of the polarization-dependent reflection of a Gaussian shaped laser beam on the dynamic sea surface is presented. The simulation considers polarized or unpolarized laser sources and calculates the polarization states upon reflection at the sea surface. It is suitable for the radiance calculation of the scene in different spectral wavebands (e.g. near-infrared, SWIR, etc.) not including the camera degradations. The simulation also considers a bistatic configuration of laser source and receiver as well as different atmospheric conditions. In the SWIR, the detected total power of reflected laser light is compared with data collected in a field trial. Our computer simulation combines the 3-D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) with the simulation of polarized or unpolarized laser light reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. To predict the input of a camera equipped with a linear polarizer, the polarized sea surface radiance must be calculated for the specific waveband. The s- and p-polarization states are calculated for the emitted sea surface radiance and the specularly reflected sky radiance to determine the total polarized sea surface radiance of each component. The states of polarization and the radiance of laser light specularly reflected at the wind-roughened sea surface are calculated by considering the s- and p- components of the electric field of laser light with respect to the specular plane of incidence. This is done by using the formalism of their coherence matrices according to E. Wolf [1]. Additionally, an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) is considered for the reflection of laser light radiances. Validation of the simulation results is required to ensure model credibility and applicability to maritime laser applications. For validation purposes, field measurement data (images and

  18. Simulation of medical Q-switch flash-pumped Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    -Yan-lin, Wang; Huang-Chuyun; Yao-Yucheng; Xiaolin, Zou

    2011-01-01

    Er: YAG laser, the wavelength is 2940nm, can be absorbed strongly by water. The absorption coefficient is as high as 13000 cm-1. As the water strong absorption, Erbium laser can bring shallow penetration depth and smaller surrounding tissue injury in most soft tissue and hard tissue. At the same time, the interaction between 2940nm radiation and biological tissue saturated with water is equivalent to instantaneous heating within limited volume, thus resulting in the phenomenon of micro-explosion to removal organization. Different parameters can be set up to cut enamel, dentin, caries and soft tissue. For the development and optimization of laser system, it is a practical choice to use laser modeling to predict the influence of various parameters for laser performance. Aim at the status of low Erbium laser output power, flash-pumped Er: YAG laser performance was simulated to obtain optical output in theory. the rate equation model was obtained and used to predict the change of population densities in various manifolds and use the technology of Q-switch the simulate laser output for different design parameters and results showed that Er: YAG laser output energy can achieve the maximum average output power of 9.8W under the given parameters. The model can be used to find the potential laser systems that meet application requirements.

  19. Effect of the laser wavefront in a laser-plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernier, Aline; Beaurepaire, B.; Bocoum, M.; Böhle, F.; Jullien, A.; Rousseau, J.-P.; Lefrou, T.; Iaquaniello, G.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Lifschitz, A.; Faure, J.

    2015-11-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators are a promising alternative as they can currently provide short (down to a few fs), relativistic (from a few MeV up to a few GeV) electron beams over millimeter distances. In such devices, an intense laser pulse drives a plasma wave in which self-injected electrons can be accelerated. The quality, in terms of emittance, of such electron beams is known to strongly depend on the laser focal spot, but very little attention is generally given to the laser transverse distribution on either side of the focal plane. Our recent experimental results and PIC simulations quantify the role of the wavefront at the focus on the acceleration of eletrons: distortions of the laser wavefront cause spatial inhomogeneity of the out-of-focus laser intensity distribution and consequently, the laser pulse drives a transversely inhomogenous wakefield whose focusing/defocusing properties affect the electron distribution. We acknowledge support from the ERC (Contract No. 306708), and the ANR (ANR-11-EQPX-005-ATTOLAB).

  20. Wakefield Computations for the CLIC PETS using the Parallel Finite Element Time-Domain Code T3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the high-performance parallel 3D electromagnetic time-domain code, T3P, for simulations of wakefields and transients in complex accelerator structures. T3P is based on advanced higher-order Finite Element methods on unstructured grids with quadratic surface approximation. Optimized for large-scale parallel processing on leadership supercomputing facilities, T3P allows simulations of realistic 3D structures with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Applications to the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) are presented.

  1. Mono-Energetic Beams from Laser Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth,Cs.; van Tilborg, J.; Cary, John R.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Nieter, Chet

    2005-05-09

    A laser driven wakefield accelerator has been tuned to produce high energy electron bunches with low emittance and energy spread by extending the interaction length using a plasma channel. Wakefield accelerators support gradients thousands of times those achievable in RF accelerators, but short acceleration distance, limited by diffraction, has resulted in low energy beams with 100 percent electron energy spread. In the present experiments on the L'OASIS laser, the relativistically intense drive pulse was guided over 10 diffraction ranges by a plasma channel. At a drive pulse power of 9 TW, electrons were trapped from the plasma and beams of percent energy spread containing > 200 pC charge above 80 MeV and with normalized emittance estimated at< 2pi-mm-mrad were produced. Data and simulations (VORPAL code) show the high quality bunch was formed when beam loading turned off injection after initial trapping, and when the particles were extracted as they dephased from the wake. Up to 4TW was guided without trapping, potentially providing a platform for controlled injection. The plasma channel technique forms the basis of a new class of accelerators, with high gradients and high beam quality.

  2. Investigation of a Gas Jet-Produced Hollow Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, N; Blumenfeld, I.; Hogan, M.J.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; Davidson, A.W.; Huang, C.; /UCLA

    2009-05-21

    The effect of ion motion and the need for practical positron propagation in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) have incited interest in hollow plasma channels. These channels are typically assumed to be cylindrically symmetric; however, a different geometry might be easier to achieve. The introduction of an obstruction into the outlet of a high Mach number gas jet can produce two parallel slabs of gas separated by a density depression. Here, there is a detailed simulation study of the density depression created in such a system. This investigation reveals that the density depression is insufficient at the desired plasma density. However, insights from the simulations suggest another avenue for the creation of the hollow slab geometry.

  3. Theoretical simulation of melt ejection during the laser drilling process on aluminum alloy by single pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingxin; Jin, Guangyong; Guo, Ming; Wang, Di; Gu, Xiuying

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we establish a physical model to simulate the melt ejection induced by millisecond pulsed laser on aluminum alloy and use the finite element method to simulate the melting and vaporization process of aluminum alloy. Compared with the conventional model, this model explicitly adds the source terms of gas dynamics in the thermal-hydrodynamic equations, completes the trace of the gas-liquid interface and improves the traditional level-set method. All possible effects which can impact the dynamic behavior of the keyhole are taken into account in this two-dimensional model, containing gravity, recoil pressure of the metallic vapor, surface tension and Marangoni effect. This simulation is based on the same experiment condition where single pulsed laser with 3ms pulse width, 57J energy and 1mm spot radius is used. By comparing the theoretical simulation data and the actual test data, we discover that: the relative error between the theoretical values and the actual values is about 9.8%, the melt ejection model is well consistent with the actual experiment; from the theoretical model we can see the surrounding air of the aluminum alloy surface exist the metallic vapor; an increment of the interaction time between millisecond pulsed laser and aluminum alloy material, the temperature at the center of aluminum alloy surface increases and evaporation happens after the surface temperature reaches boiling point and later the aluminum alloy material sustains in the status of equilibrium vaporization; the keyhole depth is linearly increased with the increase of laser energy, respectively; the growth of the keyhole radius is in the trend to be gentle. This research may provide the theoretical references to the understanding of the interaction between millisecond pulsed laser and many kinds of materials, as well as be beneficial to the application of the laser materials processing and military field.

  4. Simulation experiments to generate broadband chaos using dual-wavelength optically injected Fabry-Perot laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Hafiz Muhammad; Khawar Islam, Muhammad; Obaid Ullah, Muhammad

    2016-08-01

    Broadband chaos can be generated by beating two wavelengths in a hybrid arrangement of Fabry-Perot (FP) Laser and Fiber ring cavity by injecting dual wavelengths. The bandwidth of generated chaos can be controlled by detuning different modes of FP Laser for beating. The bandwidth of generated chaos increased to many folds depending upon the injected strength and wavelength spacing matched to FP laser modes. The bandwidth enhancement in different simulation experiments conducted is optimized by varying different parameters of FP laser and cavity. The waveforms are analyzed and Lyapunov exponents are calculated in order to validate the existence of high bandwidth non-pulsating chaos.

  5. Numerical generation of laser-resonance phase noise for optical communication simulators.

    PubMed

    Ó Dúill, Seán P; Anthur, Aravind P; Huynh, Tam N; Naimi, Sepideh T; Nguyen, Lim; Venkitesh, Deepa; Barry, Liam P

    2015-04-10

    We generate random numerical waveforms that mimic laser phase noise incorporating laser-resonance enhanced phase noise. The phase noise waveforms are employed in system simulators to estimate the resulting bit error rate penalties for differential quadrature phase shift keying signals. The results show that baudrate dependence of the bit error rate performance arises from laser-resonance phase noise. In addition, we show with supporting experimental results that the laser-resonance phase noise on the pumps in four-wave-mixing-based wavelength converters is responsible for large bit error rate floors.

  6. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Arsenyev, Sergey A; Buechler, Cynthia E; Edwards, Randall L; Romero, William P; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G; Wisniewski, Eric E; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-12

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  7. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-01

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  8. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; ...

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. Wemore » conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.« less

  9. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  10. Simulation of tunable Cr:YSO Q-switched Cr:LiSAF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsiu-Fen; Hsieh, Shang-Wei; Kuo, Yen-Kuang

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we numerically investigate the passive Q-switching performance of the tunable Cr:YSO Q-switched Cr:LiSAF laser over its entire tuning range. Specifically, the optical performance of the Cr:YSO Q-switched Cr:LiSAF laser as functions of the initial population in the ground state of the Cr:YSO saturable absorber, the pumping rate, the reflectivity of the output coupler, and the dissipative loss inside the laser cavity are studied. Simulation results show that the Cr:YSO is an effective saturable absorber Q switch for the Cr:LiSAF laser over its entire tuning range. Unlike the Cr:YSO Q-switched alexandrite laser and the Cr:YSO Q-switched Cr:LiCAF laser, the Cr:YSO Q-switched Cr:LiSAF laser has similar passive Q-switching performance when the laser polarization is along each of the three principal axes of the Cr:YSO. The results obtained numerically in this work are in good agreement with those obtained experimentally by other researchers. Our simulation results indicate that, a Q-switched laser pulse with an output energy of 10 mJ and a pulse width of 17 ns may be obtained at 850 nm, the peak of its tuning spectrum.

  11. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  12. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow in laser drilling of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingzhong; Ni, Chenyin; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Hongchao; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu; Lu, Jian

    2015-05-01

    Laser processing as laser drilling, laser welding and laser cutting, etc. is rather important in modern manufacture, and the interaction of laser and matter is a complex phenomenon which should be detailed studied in order to increase the manufacture efficiency and quality. In this paper, a two-dimensional transient numerical model was developed to study the temperature field and molten pool size during pulsed laser keyhole drilling. The volume-of-fluid method was employed to track free surfaces, and melting and evaporation enthalpy, recoil pressure, surface tension, and energy loss due to evaporating materials were considered in this model. Besides, the enthalpy-porosity technique was also applied to account for the latent heat during melting and solidification. Temperature fields and melt pool size were numerically simulated via finite element method. Moreover, the effectiveness of the developed computational procedure had been confirmed by experiments.

  13. Simulation of Temperature Field Distribution for Cutting the Temperated Glass by Ultraviolet Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B. J.; He, Y. C.; Dai, F.; Lin, X. C.

    2017-03-01

    The finite element software ANSYS was adopted to simulate the temperature field distribution for laser cutting tempered glass, and the influence of different process parameters, including laser power, glass thickness and cutting speed, on temperature field distribution was studied in detail. The results show that the laser power has a greater influence on temperature field distribution than other paremeters, and when the laser power gets to 60W, the highest temperature reaches 749°C, which is higher than the glass softening temperature. It reflects the material near the laser spot is melted and the molten slag is removed by the high-energy water beam quickly. Finally, through the water guided laser cutting tempered glass experiment the FEM theoretical analysis was verified.

  14. Properties of Trapped Electron Bunches in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Neil; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Plasma-based accelerators use the propagation of a drive bunch through plasma to create large electric fields. Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments, carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), successfully doubled the energy for some of the 42 GeV drive bunch electrons in less than a meter; this feat would have required 3 km in the SLAC linac. This dissertation covers one phenomenon associated with the PWFA, electron trapping. Recently it was shown that PWFAs, operated in the nonlinear bubble regime, can trap electrons that are released by ionization inside the plasma wake and accelerate them to high energies. These trapped electrons occupy and can degrade the accelerating portion of the plasma wake, so it is important to understand their origins and how to remove them. Here, the onset of electron trapping is connected to the drive bunch properties. Additionally, the trapped electron bunches are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that the emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the non-linear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents. These properties make the trapped electrons a possible particle source for next generation light sources. This dissertation is organized as follows. The first chapter is an overview of the PWFA, which includes a review of the accelerating and focusing fields and a survey of the remaining issues for a plasma-based particle collider. Then, the second chapter examines the physics of electron trapping in the PWFA. The third chapter uses theory and simulations to analyze the properties of the trapped electron

  15. Experimental Plans to Explore Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration in the THZ Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Piot, P.; Behrens, C.; Elsen, E.; Flottmann, K.; Gerth, C.; Kube, G.; Schmidt, B.; Osterhoff, J.; Stoltz, P.

    2011-09-07

    Dielectric wakefield accelerators have shown great promise toward high-gradient acceleration. We investigate the performances of a possible experiment under consideration at the FLASH facility in DESY to explore wakefield acceleration with an enhanced transformer ratio. The experiment capitalizes on a unique pulse shaping capability recently demonstrated at this facility. In addition, the facility incorporates a superconducting linear accelerator that could generate bunch trains with closely spaced bunches thereby opening the exploration of potential dynamical effects in dielectric wakefield accelerators.

  16. Digital Computer Simulation Programs for Electrostrictive Laser Beam Trapping,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    output is a printed computer movie showing the beam propagation trajectory at selected intervals during the laser pulse, and a graph of peak achieved intensity along the beam axis. The movie may also be plotted. (Author)

  17. Effects of dimensionality on computer simulations of laser-ion acceleration: When are three-dimensional simulations needed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Stark, D. J.; Albright, B. J.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-ion acceleration via relativistic induced transparency provides an effective means to accelerate ions to tens of MeV/nucleon over distances of 10s of μm. These ion sources may enable a host of applications, from fast ignition and x-rays sources to medical treatments. Understanding whether two-dimensional (2D) PIC simulations can capture the relevant 3D physics is important to the development of a predictive capability for short-pulse laser-ion acceleration and for economical design studies for applications of these accelerators. In this work, PIC simulations are performed in 3D and in 2D where the direction of the laser polarization is in the simulation plane (2D-P) and out-of-plane (2D-S). Our studies indicate modeling sensitivity to dimensionality and laser polarization. Differences arise in energy partition, electron heating, ion peak energy, and ion spectral shape. 2D-P simulations are found to over-predict electron heating and ion peak energy. The origin of these differences and the extent to which 2D simulations may capture the key acceleration dynamics will be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  18. Computer simulated rate processes in copper vapor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    A computer model for metal vapor lasers has been developed which places emphasis on the change of excited state populations of the lasant through inelastic collisions and radiative interaction. Also included are an energy equation for the pumping electrons and rate equations for laser photon densities. Presented are results of calculations for copper vapor with a neon buffer over a range of conditions. General agreement with experiments was obtained.

  19. Study of laser heated propulsion devices. Part 2: Assessment of laser propulsion modeling and simulation requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoenes, J.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical models for the laser heated thruster are reviewed. The requirements for an improved laser heated thruster theoretical model are discussed. The application of a time dependent finite difference Navier-Stokes equation solution to the laser heated thruster problem is described, along with a simple closed form solution which was developed in order to gain insight into the difficulties encountered in the pursuit of the numerical solution.

  20. Laser Noise Stabilization, Processing, And Extraction Simulations For The Lisa Mission At The University Of Florida.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinan; Mitryk, S.; Sweeney, D.; Spector, A.; Eichholz, J.; Donelan, D.; Preston, A.; Munoz, J. S.; Azer, S.; Tanner, D.; Mueller, G.

    2011-05-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Mission will strive to measure gravitational radiation in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 0.1 mHz from black hole mergers and other compact objects. Three spacecraft (SC) in a nearly equilateral triangular formation with an arm-length of 5.0 ± 0.025 Gm form the space-based interferometer. Differential length changes between free-floating proof-masses will be measured to an accuracy of 40 pm/√Hz using one-way laser phase measurements between lasers on adjacent SC. Accurately reconstructing the differential arm-length and extracting the gravitational wave signals from the photo-detector beatnotes depends on the performance of the laser pre-stabilization system, the ability of time-delay interferometry (TDI) to cancel the additional laser phase noise, the accuracy of the distance-ranging measurement between the SC, the sensitivity of the laser beatnote phase measurement, and the quality of the inter-SC clock transfers. The University of Florida Laser Interferometry Simulator (UFLIS) emulates the LISA interferometry using LISA-like laser noise sources, electronic replications of inter-SC laser phase delays, and µcycle/√Hz phase measurements of MHz-frequency laser beat-notes to test LISA interferometry. This work is supported by NASA Grant #NNX08AG75G.

  1. Tuning of betatron radiation in laser-plasma accelerators via multimodal laser propagation through capillary waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, A.; Giulietti, D.; Petrarca, M.

    2017-02-01

    The betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons in dielectric capillary waveguides is investigated. The multimode laser propagation is responsible for a modulated plasma wakefield structure, which affects the electron transverse dynamics, therefore influencing the betatron radiation spectra. Such a phenomenon can be exploited to tune the energy spectrum of the betatron radiation by controlling the excitation of the capillary modes.

  2. Computer simulation of the relationship between selected properties of laser remelted tool steel surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonek, Mirosław; Śliwa, Agata; Mikuła, Jarosław

    2016-12-01

    Investigations >The language in this paper has been slightly changed. Please check for clarity of thought, and that the meaning is still correct, and amend if necessary.include Finite Element Method simulation model of remelting of PMHSS6-5-3 high-speed steel surface layer using the high power diode laser (HPDL). The Finite Element Method computations were performed using ANSYS software. The scope of FEM simulation was determination of temperature distribution during laser alloying process at various process configurations regarding the laser beam power and method of powder deposition, as pre-coated past or surface with machined grooves. The Finite Element Method simulation was performed on five different 3-dimensional models. The model assumed nonlinear change of thermal conductivity, specific heat and density that were depended on temperature. The heating process was realized as heat flux corresponding to laser beam power of 1.4, 1.7 and 2.1 kW. Latent heat effects are considered during solidification. The molten pool is composed of the same material as the substrate and there is no chemical reaction. The absorptivity of laser energy was dependent on the simulated materials properties and their surface condition. The Finite Element Method simulation allows specifying the heat affected zone and the temperature distribution in the sample as a function of time and thus allows the estimation of the structural changes taking place during laser remelting process. The simulation was applied to determine the shape of molten pool and the penetration depth of remelted surface. Simulated penetration depth and molten pool profile have a good match with the experimental results. The depth values obtained in simulation are very close to experimental data. Regarding the shape of molten pool, the little differences have been noted. The heat flux input considered in simulation is only part of the mechanism for heating; thus, the final shape of solidified molten pool will depend

  3. Predictive modeling, simulation, and optimization of laser processing techniques: UV nanosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of polymers and selective laser melting of powder metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criales Escobar, Luis Ernesto

    One of the most frequently evolving areas of research is the utilization of lasers for micro-manufacturing and additive manufacturing purposes. The use of laser beam as a tool for manufacturing arises from the need for flexible and rapid manufacturing at a low-to-mid cost. Laser micro-machining provides an advantage over mechanical micro-machining due to the faster production times of large batch sizes and the high costs associated with specific tools. Laser based additive manufacturing enables processing of powder metals for direct and rapid fabrication of products. Therefore, laser processing can be viewed as a fast, flexible, and cost-effective approach compared to traditional manufacturing processes. Two types of laser processing techniques are studied: laser ablation of polymers for micro-channel fabrication and selective laser melting of metal powders. Initially, a feasibility study for laser-based micro-channel fabrication of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) via experimentation is presented. In particular, the effectiveness of utilizing a nanosecond-pulsed laser as the energy source for laser ablation is studied. The results are analyzed statistically and a relationship between process parameters and micro-channel dimensions is established. Additionally, a process model is introduced for predicting channel depth. Model outputs are compared and analyzed to experimental results. The second part of this research focuses on a physics-based FEM approach for predicting the temperature profile and melt pool geometry in selective laser melting (SLM) of metal powders. Temperature profiles are calculated for a moving laser heat source to understand the temperature rise due to heating during SLM. Based on the predicted temperature distributions, melt pool geometry, i.e. the locations at which melting of the powder material occurs, is determined. Simulation results are compared against data obtained from experimental Inconel 625 test coupons fabricated at the National

  4. Laser-Accelerated Ions from a Shock-Compressed Gas Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, M. H.; Gordon, D. F.; Kaganovich, D.; Chen, Y.; Palastro, J. P.; Ting, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present results of energetic laser-ion acceleration from a tailored, near solid density gas target. Colliding hydrodynamic shocks compress a pure hydrogen gas jet into a 70 μ m thick target prior to the arrival of the ultraintense laser pulse. A density scan reveals the transition from a regime characterized by a wide angle, low-energy beam (target normal sheath acceleration) to one of a more focused beam with a high-energy halo (magnetic vortex acceleration). In the latter case, three-dimensional simulations show the formation of a Z pinch driven by the axial current resulting from laser wakefield accelerated electrons. Ions at the rear of the target are then accelerated by a combination of space charge fields from accelerated electrons and Coulombic repulsion as the pinch dissipates.

  5. Summary report of working group 3: High gradient and laser-structure based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Cowan, B.M.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2010-01-01

    The charge for the working group on high gradient and laser-structure based acceleration was to assess the current challenges involved in developing an advanced accelerator based on electromagnetic structures, and survey state-of-the-art methods to address those challenges. The topics of more than 50 presentations in the working group covered a very broad range of issues, from ideas, theoretical models and simulations, to design and manufacturing of accelerating structures and, finally, experimental results on obtaining extremely high accelerating gradients in structures from conventional microwave frequency range up to THz and laser frequencies. Workshop discussion topics included advances in the understanding of the physics of breakdown and other phenomena, limiting high gradient performance of accelerating structures. New results presented in this workshop demonstrated significant progress in the fields of conventional vacuum structure-based acceleration, dielectric wakefield acceleration, and laser-structure acceleration.

  6. Computer simulation of effect of conditions on discharge-excited high power gas flow CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Ryo; Iyoda, Mitsuhiro; Taniwaki, Manabu; Sato, Shunichi

    2017-01-01

    The authors have developed the computer simulation codes to analyze the effect of conditions on the performances of discharge excited high power gas flow CO laser. The six be analyzed. The simulation code described and executed by Macintosh computers consists of some modules to calculate the kinetic processes. The detailed conditions, kinetic processes, results and discussions are described in this paper below.

  7. A new Monte Carlo simulation model for laser transmission in smokescreen based on MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heming; Wang, Qianqian; Shan, Bin; Li, Xiaoyang; Gong, Yong; Zhao, Jing; Peng, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    A new Monte Carlo simulation model of laser transmission in smokescreen is promoted in this paper. In the traditional Monte Carlo simulation model, the radius of particles is set at the same value and the initial cosine value of photons direction is fixed also, which can only get the approximate result. The new model is achieved based on MATLAB and can simulate laser transmittance in smokescreen with different sizes of particles, and the output result of the model is close to the real scenarios. In order to alleviate the influence of the laser divergence while traveling in the air, we changed the initial direction cosine of photons on the basis of the traditional Monte Carlo model. The mixed radius particle smoke simulation results agree with the measured transmittance under the same experimental conditions with 5.42% error rate.

  8. Simulations of laser propagation and ionization in l'OASIS experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, D.A.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Leemans, W.; Esarey, E.; Catravas, P.; Toth, C.; Shadwick, B.; Cary, J.R.; Giacone, R.

    2002-06-30

    We have conducted particle-in-cell simulations of laser pulse propagation through neutral He, including the effects of tunneling ionization, within the parameter regime of the l'OASIS experiments [1,2] at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The simulations show the theoretically predicted [3] blue shifting of the laser frequency at the leading edge of the pulse. The observed blue shifting is in good agreement with the experimental data. These results indicate that such computations can be used to accurately simulate a number of important effects related to tunneling ionization for laser-plasma accelerator concepts, such as steepening due to ionization-induced pump depletion, which can seed and enhance instabilities. Our simulations show self-modulation occurring earlier when tunneling ionization is included then for a pre-ionized plasma.

  9. Development of 26GHz dielectric-based wakefield power extractor.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Gao, F.; Kazakov, S.; Kustov, A.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs; KEK; Dynamics Software

    2009-01-01

    High frequency, high power rf sources are needed for many applications in particle accelerators, communications, radar, etc. In this article we present a design of a 26 GHz high power rf source based on the extraction of wakefields from a relativistic electron beam. The extractor is designed to couple out rf power generated from a high charge electron bunch train traversing a dielectric loaded waveguide. Using a 20 nC bunch train (bunch length of 1.5 mm) at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility, we can obtain a steady 26 GHz output power of 148 MW. The extractor has been fabricated and bench tested, with the first high power beam experiments to be performed in the coming year.

  10. Development of 26 GHz Dielectric-Based Wakefield Power Extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Gao, F.; Kazakov, S.; Kustov, A.

    2009-01-22

    High frequency, high power rf sources are needed for many applications in particle accelerators, communications, radar, etc. In this article we present a design of a 26 GHz high power rf source based on the extraction of wakefields from a relativistic electron beam. The extractor is designed to couple out rf power generated from a high charge electron bunch train traversing a dielectric loaded waveguide. Using a 20 nC bunch train (bunch length of 1.5 mm) at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility, we can obtain a steady 26 GHz output power of 148 MW. The extractor has been fabricated and bench tested, with the first high power beam experiments to be performed in the coming year.

  11. Simulation of the fundamental and nonlinear harmonic output from an FEL amplifier with a soft x-ray seed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Biedron, S. G.; Freund, H. P.; Li, Y.; Milton, S. V.

    2000-07-05

    A single-pass, high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) x-ray amplifier was simulated using the 3D, polychromatic simulation code MEDUSA. The seed for the system is a table-top, soft x-ray laser. The simulated fundamental and nonlinear harmonic x-ray output wavelengths are discussed.

  12. Analysis of laser energy characteristics of laser guided weapons based on the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yawen; Cui, Xiaohong; Wang, Qianqian; Tong, Qiujie; Cui, Xutai; Li, Chenyu; Zhang, Le; Peng, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    The hardware-in-the-loop simulation system, which provides a precise, controllable and repeatable test conditions, is an important part of the development of the semi-active laser (SAL) guided weapons. In this paper, laser energy chain characteristics were studied, which provides a theoretical foundation for the SAL guidance technology and the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system. Firstly, a simplified equation was proposed to adjust the radar equation according to the principles of the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system. Secondly, a theoretical model and calculation method were given about the energy chain characteristics based on the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system. We then studied the reflection characteristics of target and the distance between the missile and target with major factors such as the weather factors. Finally, the accuracy of modeling was verified by experiment as the values measured experimentally generally follow the theoretical results from the model. And experimental results revealed that ratio of attenuation of the laser energy exhibited a non-linear change vs. pulse number, which were in accord with the actual condition.

  13. Modulation of continuous electron beams in plasma wake-fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1988-09-08

    In this paper we discuss the interaction of a continuous electron beam with wake-field generated plasma waves. Using a one-dimensional two fluid model, a fully nonlinear analytical description of the interaction is obtained. The phenomena of continuous beam modulation and wave period shortening are discussed. The relationship between these effects and the two-stream instability is also examined. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Energy Measurements of Trapped Electrons from a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Neil; Berry, Melissa; Blumenfeld, Ian; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J.; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Auerbach, David; Clayton, Christopher E.; Huang, Chengkun; Johnson, Devon; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; Zhou, Miaomiao; Katsouleas, Thomas; Muggli, Patric

    2006-11-27

    Recent electron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiments carried out at SLAC indicate trapping of plasma electrons. More charge came out of than went into the plasma. Most of this extra charge had energies at or below the 10 MeV level. In addition, there were trapped electron streaks that extended from a few GeV to tens of GeV, and there were mono-energetic trapped electron bunches with tens of GeV in energy.

  15. Energy Measurements of Trapped Electrons from a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Neal; Auerbach, David; Berry, Melissa; Blumenfeld, Ian; Clayton, Christopher E.; Decer, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J.; Huang, Chengkun; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Johnson, Devon; Joshi, Chadrashekhar; Katsouleas, Thomas; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao; /SLAC /UCLA /Southern California U.

    2007-01-03

    Recent electron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiments carried out at SLAC indicate trapping of plasma electrons. More charge came out of than went into the plasma. Most of this extra charge had energies at or below the 10 MeV level. In addition, there were trapped electron streaks that extended from a few GeV to tens of GeV, and there were mono-energetic trapped electron bunches with tens of GeV in energy.

  16. Measurement of the Decelerating Wake in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R. H.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R. H.; Walz, D. R.; Clayton, C. E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhou, M.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.

    2009-01-22

    Recent experiments at SLAC have shown that high gradient acceleration of electrons is achievable in meter scale plasmas. Results from these experiments show that the wakefield is sensitive to parameters in the electron beam which drives it. In the experiment the bunch lengths were varied systematically at constant charge. The effort to extract a measurement of the decelerating wake from the maximum energy loss of the electron beam is discussed.

  17. Demonstration of the hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gessner, Spencer J.

    2016-09-17

    A plasma wakefield accelerator is a device that converts the energy of a relativistic particle beam into a large-amplitude wave in a plasma. The plasma wave, or wakefield, supports an enormous electricfield that is used to accelerate a trailing particle beam. The plasma wakefield accelerator can therefore be used as a transformer, transferring energy from a high-charge, low-energy particle beam into a high-energy, low-charge particle beam. This technique may lead to a new generation of ultra-compact, high-energy particle accelerators. The past decade has seen enormous progress in the field of plasma wakefield acceleration with experimental demonstrations of the acceleration of electron beams by several gigaelectron-volts. The acceleration of positron beams in plasma is more challenging, but also necessary for the creation of a high-energy electron-positron collider. Part of the challenge is that the plasma responds asymmetrically to electrons and positrons, leading to increased disruption of the positron beam. One solution to this problem, first proposed over twenty years ago, is to use a hollow channel plasma which symmetrizes the response of the plasma to beams of positive and negative charge, making it possible to accelerate positrons in plasma without disruption. In this thesis, we describe the theory relevant to our experiment and derive new results when needed. We discuss the development and implementation of special optical devices used to create long plasma channels. We demonstrate for the first time the generation of meter-scale plasma channels and the acceleration of positron beams therein.

  18. Ultrafast laser melting of Au nanoparticles: atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ningyu; Rokhlin, S. I.; Farson, D. F.

    2011-10-01

    In spite of the technological importance of laser modification and processing of nanoparticles, the interaction of laser energy with nanoparticles is not well understood. In this work, integrated molecular dynamics (MD) and two-temperature (TTM) computational models have been developed to study ultrafast laser interaction with free Au nanoparticles with sizes 2.44-6.14 nm. At low intensity, when surface premelting and solid-liquid phase transition dominate, a nonhomogeneous surface premelting mechanism was identified. The appearance of a contiguous surface liquid layer (complete surface premelting) is size dependent and is not related to surface premelting history. The effects of temporary superheating and stable supercooling of nanoparticles were found and examined.

  19. Ultrafast laser processing of glass-phase materials: mathematical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Tatiana N.; Surmenko, Elena L.; Chebotarevsky, Yury V.; Konyushin, Alexander V.; Popov, Ivan A.; Bessonov, Dmitry A.

    2013-11-01

    Glass-phase materials, such as glass-carbon, ceramics etc., are a wide class of substances applied in electronic industry. These materials often need special technologies for their processing. Unlike traditional methods of micromachining, focused ultrashort laser pulses of sufficiently high fluence makes it possible not only to avoid the majority of side effects, including temperature, but also to create a qualitatively new laser technology for "hard materials". When using ultrafast lasers in micromachining processes it is necessary to account the possible negative effects that occur in the processing of brittle materials. Removing material from the surface in cold ablation process caused by laser light, in such a short period of time with such a high rate, creates the area of high pressure in the interaction zone that could cause a microdamage of brittle materials. To study the stress-strain state arising in brittle materials under the influence of ultrafast lasers, the special physicalmathematical model of the process was formulated. As a measure of the mechanical action of laser radiation on the processed material in cold ablation the reactive force was taken. As a mechanical reaction of the treated glass-carbon substrate a back pressure generated by the reactive force was considered. Brittle materials suffer plastic deformation, as a rule, only in the areas of high-temperature heating. Hence, in case of picosecond treatment in cold ablation process the material, from a mechanical point of view, was seen as a perfectly elastic up to its destruction. From a geometrical point of view, the processed object was presented in the form of a thin rectangular plate, loosely founded on the elastic base.

  20. Transverse Emittance and Current of Multi-GeV Trapped Electrons in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, N.; Blumenfeld, I.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Martins, S.F.; Mori, W.B.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2009-10-17

    Multi-GeV trapped electron bunches in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the nonlinear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents.

  1. Positron Acceleration by Plasma Wakefields Driven by a Hollow Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Neeraj; Antonsen, T. M.; Palastro, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    A scheme for positron plasma wakefield acceleration using hollow or donut-shaped electron driver beams is studied. An annular-shaped, electron-free region forms around the hollow driver beam, creating a favorable region (longitudinal field is accelerating and transverse field is focusing) for positron acceleration. For Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET)-like parameters, the hollow beam driver produces accelerating gradients on the order of 10 GV /m . The accelerating gradient increases linearly with the total charge in the driver beam. Simulations show acceleration of a 23-GeV positron beam to 35.4 GeV with a maximum energy spread of 0.4% and very small emittance over a plasma length of 140 cm is possible.

  2. Efficient numerical modelling of the emittance evolution of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrling, T. J.; Robson, R. E.; Erbe, J.-H.; Osterhoff, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-analytic numerical approach (SANA) for the rapid computation of the transverse emittance of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime. The SANA method is used to model the beam emittance evolution when injected into and extracted from realistic plasma profiles. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, establishing the accuracy and efficiency of the procedure. In addition, it is demonstrated that the tapering of vacuum-to-plasma and plasma-to-vacuum transitions is a viable method for the mitigation of emittance growth of beams during their injection and extraction from and into plasma cells.

  3. Measurements of the Transverse Wakefields Due to Varying Collimator Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, S.; Seletskiy, Sergei; Woods, Mike; Smith, Jonathan David Andrew; Beard, Carl David; Fernandez-Hernando, Juan Luis; Watson, Nigel; Bungau, Adriana; Sopczak, Andre; /Lancaster U.

    2007-07-06

    We report on measurements of the transverse wakefields induced by collimators of differing characteristics. An apparatus allowing the insertion of different collimator jaws into the path of a beam was installed in End Station A (ESA) in SLAC. Eight comparable collimator geometries were designed, including one that would allow easy comparison with previous results, and were installed in this apparatus. Measurements of the beam kick due to the collimator wakefields were made with a beam energy of 28.5 GeV, and beam dimensions of 100 microns vertically and a range of 0.5 to 1.5 mm longitudinally. The trajectory of the beam upstream and downstream of the collimator test apparatus was determined from the outputs of ten BPMs (four upstream and six downstream), thus allowing a measurement of the angular kick imparted to the beam by the collimator under test. The transverse wakefield was inferred from the measured kick. The different aperture designs, data collection and analysis, and initial comparison to theoretical and analytic predictions are presented here.

  4. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; London, R.A.; Strauss, M.

    1997-10-26

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks.

  5. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter A.; London, Richard A.; Strauss, Moshe; Glinsky, Michael E.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Celliers, Peter M.; Visuri, Steven R.; Bailey, David S.; Young, David A.; Ho, Darwin; Lin, Charles P.; Kelly, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks [Lin and Kelly, SPIE 2391, 294 (1995)].

  6. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of boron activation in implanted Si under laser thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisicaro, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Lourdes; Aboy, Maria; Lopez, Pedro; Italia, Markus; Huet, Karim; Cristiano, Filadelfo; Essa, Zahi; Yang, Qui; Bedel-Pereira, Elena; Quillec, Maurice; La Magna, Antonino

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the correlation between dopant activation and damage evolution in boron-implanted silicon under excimer laser irradiation. The dopant activation efficiency in the solid phase was measured under a wide range of irradiation conditions and simulated using coupled phase-field and kinetic Monte Carlo models. With the inclusion of dopant atoms, the presented code extends the capabilities of a previous version, allowing its definitive validation by means of detailed comparisons with experimental data. The stochastic method predicts the post-implant kinetics of the defect-dopant system in the far-from-equilibrium conditions caused by laser irradiation. The simulations explain the dopant activation dynamics and demonstrate that the competitive dopant-defect kinetics during the first laser annealing treatment dominates the activation phenomenon, stabilizing the system against additional laser irradiation steps.

  7. Simulations of laser imprint reduction using underdense foams and its consequences on the hydrodynamic instability growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph; Riazuelo, G.; Grech, M.; Breil, J.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.; Borisenko, N.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms of laser imprint reduction on a surface of a planar foil performed using an underdense foam are presented. The consequences on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth at the ablation front when the foil is accelerated are studied. The analysis is based on numerical simulations using a chain of codes: the electromagnetic paraxial code Parax provides the modifications of the intensity perturbation spectrum while the laser beam is crossing the foam. Two-dimensional axially symmetric simulations with the radiation hydrodynamic code CHIC describe the foam expansion and the foil dynamics. Finally, the perturbed flow calculations and the instability growth are investigated with the two-dimensional CHIC version in the planar geometry by using the initial and smoothed perturbation spectra. The dominant role of temporal laser smoothing during the time of foam crossing by the laser beam is demonstrated. Applications to the direct drive targets for inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  8. Simulation of surface profile formation in oxygen laser cutting of mild steel due to combustion cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaev, G. V.; Kovalev, O. B.

    2009-09-01

    A physicomathematical model of cyclic iron combustion in an oxygen flow during oxygen laser cutting of metal sheets is developed. The combustion front is set into motion by focused laser radiation and a heterogeneous oxidation reaction in oxygen. The burning rate is limited by oxygen supply from the gas phase towards the metal surface, and the interface motion depends on the local temperature. A 3D numerical simulation predicts wavy structures on the metal surface; their linear sizes depend on the scanning speed of the laser beam, the thickness of the produced liquid oxide film and the parameters of the oxygen jet flow. Simulation results help in understanding the mechanism of striation formation during oxygen gas-laser cutting of mild steel and are in qualitative agreement with experimental findings.

  9. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Viet, Man; Roland, Christopher Sagui, Celeste; Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  10. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study.

    PubMed

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  11. Simulation of laser bistatic two-dimensional scattering imaging about lambertian cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Li, Lang; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the simulation of laser bi-static scattering imaging about lambertian cylinders. Two-dimensional imaging of a target can reflect the shape of the target and material property on the surface of the target. Two-dimensional imaging has important significance for target recognition. Simulations results of laser bi-static two-dimensional scattering imaging of some cylinders are given. The laser bi-static scattering imaging of cylinder, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. The scattering direction of laser bi-static scattering imaging is arbitrary direction. The scattering direction of backward two-dimensional scattering imaging is at opposite direction of the incident direction of laser. The backward two-dimensional scattering imaging is special case of bi-static two dimensional scattering imaging. The scattering intensity of a micro-element on the target could be obtained based on the laser radar equation. The intensity is related to local angle of incidence, local angle of scattering and the infinitesimal area on the surface of cylinder. According to the incident direction of incident laser and normal of infinitesimal area, the local incidence angle can be calculated. According to the scattering direction and normal of infinitesimal area, the local angle of scattering can be calculated. Through surface integration and the introduction of the rectangular function, we can get the intensity of imaging unit on the imaging surface, and then get mathematical model of bi-static laser two dimensional scattering imaging about lambert cylinder. From the results given, one can see that the simulation results of laser bi-static scattering about lambert cylinder is correct.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of heat-affected zone of copper metal ablated with femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-03-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation of materials with high thermal conductivity is of paramount importance, because the chemical composition and properties of the area ablated with femtosecond laser are kept unchanged. The material processing by femtosecond laser can well control the heat-affected zone, compared to nanosecond laser ablation. We report on the heat-affected zone of crystalline copper (Cu) by use of femtosecond laser experimentally and theoretically. Laser ablation of Cu is investigated theoretically by two temperature model and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD simulation takes into account of electron temperature and thermal diffusion length calculated by two temperature model. The dependence of lattice temperature on time and depth is calculated by the MD simulation and two temperature model. The heat-affected zone estimated from the temperature is mainly studied and calculated to be 3 nm at 0.02 J/cm2 which is below the threshold fluence of 0.137 J/cm2. In addition, the thickness of heat-affected zone of copper crystal ablated with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser is experimentally studied. As a result of X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the ablated surface, the surface crystallinity is partially changed into disordered structure from crystal form. The residual energy left in the metal, which is not used for ablation, will induce liquid phase, leading to the amorphous phase of the metal during resolidification. The thickness of heat-affected zone depends on laser fluence and is experimentally measured to be less than 1 μm at higher laser fluences than the ablation threshold.

  13. Simulations of a grazing-incidence pumped x-ray laser at 14.7 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, F.; Zhang, J.; Dong, Q. L.; Lu, X.; Li, Y. J.

    2006-02-15

    Numerical simulations of the grazing-incidence pumped Ni-like Pd x-ray laser at 14.7 nm (4d{yields}4p, J=0{yields}1) is performed using a modified one-dimensional hydrodynamic code MEDUSA. The effective absorption of the main laser pulse in the gain region is greatly increased due to the lengthened propagation path. Results predict that a saturated output of the x-ray laser can be achieved with only subjoules driver energy on a 4-mm-long Pd target.

  14. Simulation of high precision pulsed laser fuze based on phase shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huimin; Li, Ping; Peng, Zhoufeng; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yingwen

    2009-07-01

    With the development of semiconductor laser technology, laser proximity fuzes have been widely used in various kinds of guided missiles and routine ammunitions. And its precision of ranging has a direct influence on the overall performance of the system. This work employed Spartan III series FPGA chip from Xilinx company. Through phase shifting the primary reference clock and ranging with four doubled-frequency clocks with each phase shiftings of 90 degree, the ranging precision can be improved obviously. The theoretical ranging error is 0.1875m and the result has been proven by simulation with Modelsim. Valuable conclusions were drawn for improving the ranging precision of laser fuze.

  15. Numerical simulation of temperature field in K9 glass irradiated by ultraviolet pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Fang, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    The optical component of photoelectric system was easy to be damaged by irradiation of high power pulse laser, so the effect of high power pulse laser irradiation on K9 glass was researched. A thermodynamic model of K9 glass irradiated by ultraviolet pulse laser was established using the finite element software ANSYS. The article analyzed some key problems in simulation process of ultraviolet pulse laser damage of K9 glass based on ANSYS from the finite element models foundation, meshing, loading of pulse laser, setting initial conditions and boundary conditions and setting the thermal physical parameters of material. The finite element method (FEM) model was established and a numerical analysis was performed to calculate temperature field in K9 glass irradiated by ultraviolet pulse laser. The simulation results showed that the temperature of irradiation area exceeded the melting point of K9 glass, while the incident laser energy was low. The thermal damage dominated in the damage mechanism of K9 glass, the melting phenomenon should be much more distinct.

  16. Photon dose estimation from ultraintense laser-solid interactions and shielding calculation with Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Rui; Li, JunLi; Lu, Wei; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    When a strong laser beam irradiates a solid target, a hot plasma is produced and high-energy electrons are usually generated (the so-called "hot electrons"). These energetic electrons subsequently generate hard X-rays in the solid target through the Bremsstrahlung process. To date, only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this study, extensive literature reviews on the physics and properties of hot electrons have been conducted. On the basis of these information, the photon dose generated by the interaction between hot electrons and a solid target was simulated with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. With some reasonable assumptions, the calculated dose can be regarded as the upper boundary of the experimental results over the laser intensity ranging from 1019 to 1021 W/cm2. Furthermore, an equation to estimate the photon dose generated from ultraintense laser-solid interactions based on the normalized laser intensity is derived. The shielding effects of common materials including concrete and lead were also studied for the laser-driven X-ray source. The dose transmission curves and tenth-value layers (TVLs) in concrete and lead were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations. These results could be used to perform a preliminary and fast radiation safety assessment for the X-rays generated from ultraintense laser-solid interactions.

  17. Numerical simulation of interactions between pulsed laser and soild targets in an ambient gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterkin, , Jr.

    1998-10-01

    When a GW/cm^2 repetitively pulsed laser strikes a solid target that is immersed in a gas at 1 atm, numerous interesting plasma phenomena are observed. To help us understand these observations, we perform time-dependent numerical simulations of the propagation and partial absorption via inverse bremsstrahlung of a pulsed CO2 laser beam through He and N, and the interaction with a solid copper target aligned at various angles with respect to the incident laser beam. For this numerical study, we use the general-purpose 2 1/2-dimensional finite-volume MHD code uc(mach2.) The early portion of the laser pulses is deposited into the solid target and produces a jet of target material that is almost aligned with the target normal. Most of the subsequent laser energy is deposited into the ambient gas at the critical surface. For a repetitive pulsed laser, we observe a series of laser supported detonation (LSD) waves each of which originates at the instantaneous location of the critical surface. The space- and time-dependent electron number density defines this surface. For the numerical code to reproduce accurately the relevant physics, the overall energy budget must be computed accurately. The solid ejecta interacts with the LSD waves in a complex fashion, allowing the spontaneous generation of a magnetic field via the grad(P) term of a generalized Ohm's law. We illustrate the dynamics with graphical results from uc(mach2) simulations.

  18. Simulation of the temperature increase in porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Kurtz, Ronald M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2012-03-01

    As a model for laser exposure of the iris during femtosecond corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature rise in porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by the femtosecond laser. The temperature increase induced by a 60 kHz iFS Advanced Femtosecond Laser (AMO Inc., Santa Ana, CA) in porcine cadaver iris was simulated using COMSOL (Comsol Inc., Burlington, MA) finite element software. Temperature increases up to 2.45 °C (corresponding to 2 μJ laser pulse energy and 24 second illumination) were observed in the porcine cadaver iris from the simulation with little variation in temperature profiles compared with specimens for the same laser energy illumination in experiment. : The commercial iFS Advanced Femtosecond Laser operating with pulse energies at approximately the lower limit of the range evaluated in this study would be expected to result in a 1.23 °C temperature increase and, therefore, does not present a safety hazard to the iris.

  19. Laser bistatic two-dimensional scattering imaging simulation of lambert cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Zhu, Chongyue; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with the laser bistatic two-dimensional scattering imaging simulation of lambert cone. Two-dimensional imaging is called as planar imaging. It can reflect the shape of the target and material properties. Two-dimensional imaging has important significance for target recognition. The expression of bistatic laser scattering intensity of lambert cone is obtained based on laser radar eauqtion. The scattering intensity of a micro-element on the target could be obtained. The intensity is related to local angle of incidence, local angle of scattering and the infinitesimal area on the cone. According to the incident direction of laser, scattering direction and normal of infinitesimal area, the local incidence angle and scattering angle can be calculated. Through surface integration and the introduction of the rectangular function, we can get the intensity of imaging unit on the imaging surface, and then get Lambert cone bistatic laser two-dimensional scattering imaging simulation model. We analyze the effect of distinguishability, incident direction, observed direction and target size on the imaging. From the results, we can see that the scattering imaging simulation results of the lambert cone bistatic laser is correct.

  20. Limitation on the accelerating gradient of a wakefield excited by an ultrarelativistic electron beam in rubidium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Clayton, C. E.; An, W.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Clarke, C. I.; Litos, M.; Green, S. Z.; Gessner, S.; Frederico, J.; Fisher, A. S.; Wu, Z.; Walz, D.; Hogan, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the viability of using plasmas formed by ionization of high Z, low ionization potential element rubidium (Rb) for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The Rb vapor column confined by argon (Ar) buffer gas was used to reduce the expected limitation on the beam propagation length due to head erosion that was observed previously when a lower Z but higher ionization potential lithium vapor was used. However, injection of electrons into the wakefield due to ionization of Ar buffer gas and nonuniform ionization of Rb1 + to Rb2 + was a possible concern. In this paper we describe experimental results and the supporting simulations which indicate that such ionization of Ar and Rb1 + in the presence of combined fields of the beam and the wakefield inside the wake does indeed occur. Some of this charge accumulates in the accelerating region of the wake leading to the reduction of the electric field—an effect known as beam loading. The beam-loading effect is quantified by determining the average transformer ratio ⟨R ⟩ which is the maximum energy gained divided by the maximum energy lost by the electrons in the bunch used to produce the wake. ⟨R ⟩ is shown to depend on the propagation length and the quantity of the accumulated charge, indicating that the distributed injection of secondary Rb electrons is the main cause of beam loading in this experiment. The average transformer ratio is reduced from 1.5 to less than 1 as the excess charge from secondary ionization increased from 100 to 700 pC. The simulations show that while the decelerating field remains constant, the accelerating field is reduced from its unloaded value of 82 to 46 GeV /m due to this distributed injection of dark current into the wake.

  1. Laser acceleration and its future

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2010-01-01

    Laser acceleration is based on the concept to marshal collective fields that may be induced by laser. In order to exceed the material breakdown field by a large factor, we employ the broken-down matter of plasma. While the generated wakefields resemble with the fields in conventional accelerators in their structure (at least qualitatively), it is their extreme accelerating fields that distinguish the laser wakefield from others, amounting to tiny emittance and compact accelerator. The current research largely falls on how to master the control of acceleration process in spatial and temporal scales several orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional method. The efforts over the last several years have come to a fruition of generating good beam properties with GeV energies on a table top, leading to many applications, such as ultrafast radiolysis, intraoperative radiation therapy, injection to X-ray free electron laser, and a candidate for future high energy accelerators. PMID:20228616

  2. Experimental determination of thermal profiles during laser spike annealing with quantitative comparison to 3-dimensional simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, Krishna; Jung, Byungki; Willemann, Michael; Thompson, Michael O.; Clancy, Paulette

    2012-05-21

    Thin film platinum resistors were used to directly measure temperature profiles during laser spike annealing (LSA) with high spatial and temporal resolution. Observed resistance changes were calibrated to absolute temperatures using the melting points of the substrate silicon and thin gold films. Both the time-dependent temperature experienced by the sample during passage of the focussed laser beam and profiles across the spatially dependent laser intensity were obtained with sub-millisecond time resolution and 50 {mu}m spatial resolution. Full 3-dimensional simulations incorporating both optical and thermal variations of material parameters were compared with these results. Accounting properly for the specific material parameters, good agreement between experiments and simulations was achieved. Future temperature measurements in complex environments will permit critical evaluation of LSA simulations methodologies.

  3. Simulation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave propagation in collisional weakly relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2016-11-01

    The process of interaction of lasers beating in a plasma has been explored by virtue of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in the presence of electron-ion collisions. A plasma beat wave is resonantly excited by ponderomotive force by two relatively long laser pulses of different frequencies. The amplitude of the plasma wave become maximum, when the difference in the frequencies is equal to the plasma frequency. We propose to demonstrate the energy transfer between the laser beat wave and the plasma wave in the presence of electron-ion collision in nearly relativistic regime with 2D-PIC simulations. The relativistic effect and electron-ion collision both affect the energy transfer between the interacting waves. The finding of simulation results shows that there is a considerable decay in the plasma wave and the field energy over time in the presence of electron-ion collisions.

  4. Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Shahine, B; Ding, M; Li, J S; Tajima, T; Ma, C M

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy.

  5. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W.

    2013-08-15

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  6. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W.

    2013-08-01

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  7. Anharmonic resonance absorption of short laser pulses in clusters: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, S. S.; Kundu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Linear resonance (LR) absorption of an intense 800 nm laser light in a nano-cluster requires a long laser pulse >100 fs when Mie-plasma frequency ( ω M ) of electrons in the expanding cluster matches the laser frequency (ω). For a short duration of the pulse, the condition for LR is not satisfied. In this case, it was shown by a model and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 123401 (2006)] that electrons absorb laser energy by anharmonic resonance (AHR) when the position-dependent frequency Ω [ r ( t ) ] of an electron in the self-consistent anharmonic potential of the cluster satisfies Ω [ r ( t ) ] = ω . However, AHR remains to be a debate and still obscure in multi-particle plasma simulations. Here, we identify AHR mechanism in a laser driven cluster using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By analyzing the trajectory of each MD electron and extracting its Ω [ r ( t ) ] in the self-generated anharmonic plasma potential, it is found that electron is outer ionized only when AHR is met. An anharmonic oscillator model, introduced here, brings out most of the features of MD electrons while passing the AHR. Thus, we not only bridge the gap between PIC simulations, analytical models, and MD calculations for the first time but also unequivocally prove that AHR process is a universal dominant collisionless mechanism of absorption in the short pulse regime or in the early time of longer pulses in clusters.

  8. Selective ablation of Xe from silicon surfaces: molecular dynamics simulations and experimental laser patterning.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ori; Lin, Zhibin; Zhigilei, Leonid V; Asscher, Micha

    2011-06-16

    The mechanism of laser-induced removal of Xe overlayers from a Si substrate has been investigated employing MD simulations and evaluated by buffer layer assisted laser patterning experiments. Two distinct regimes of overlayer removal are identified in the simulations of a uniform heating of the Si substrate by a 5 ns laser pulse: The intensive evaporation from the surface of the Xe overlayer and the detachment of the entire Xe overlayer driven by explosive boiling in the vicinity of the hot substrate. Simulations of selective heating of only a fraction of the silicon substrate suggest that the lateral heat transfer and bonding to the unheated, colder regions of the Xe overlayer is very efficient and suppresses the separation of a fraction of the overlayer from the substrate. Interaction with surrounding cold Xe is responsible for significant increase in the substrate temperature required for achieving the spatially selective ablation of the overlayer. The predictions of the MD simulations are found to be in a qualitative agreement with the results of experimental measurements of the threshold laser power required for the removal of Xe overlayers of different thickness and the shapes of metallic stripes generated by buffer-assisted laser patterning.

  9. Problems and Good Practice in Post-Compulsory Educational Provision for Travellers: The Wakefield Kushti Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hately-Broad, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the work of the Wakefield Local Education Authority (LEA) Kushti Project in the UK. This project, focused on the Traveller population in England, is aimed specifically at the post-16 Traveller population in Wakefield, West Yorkshire. Generally, the paper considers the project in three broad areas: recruitment, retention and…

  10. FEM simulation of residual stresses induced by laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyre, P.; Sollier, A.; Chaieb, I.; Berthe, L.; Bartnicki, E.; Braham, C.; Fabbro, R.

    2003-08-01

    Benefits from laser Peening have been demonstrated several times in fields like fatigue, wear or stress corrosion cracking. However, in spite of recent work on the calculation of residual stresses, very few authors have considered a finite element method (FEM) approach to predict laser-induced mechanical effect. This comes mainly from the high strain rates involved during LP (10^6 s^{-1}), that necessitate the precise determination of dynamic properties, and also from the possible combination of thermal and mechanical loadings in the case of LP without protective coatings. In this paper, we aim at presenting a global approach of the problem, starting from the determination of loading conditions and dynamic yield strengths, to finish with FEM calculation of residual stress fields induced on a 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel and a 7075 aluminium alloy.

  11. Cathode spot energy transfer simulated by a focused laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, N.; Hoft, H. )

    1989-10-01

    Minimum conditions for the formation of surface craters by laser irradiation have been studied experimentally and theoretically for various metals. The critical power density for crater formation within 20 ns was about 10{sup 11}W/m{sup 2}. It is therefore concluded that crater formation by ion bombardment will require an ion current density of the order of 10{sup 10}A/m{sup 2}.

  12. Terahertz Free-Electron Laser Optical Design and Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Resistivity Float Zone ICBM Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile K Kelvin KE Kinetic Energy Km Kilometer LASER Light Amplification by Stimulated...silicon’s transmission of THz radiation is greatly reduced as temperatures increase above 25 degrees Celsius , as can be seen in Figure 10. This...a single formula expressing the maximum power, P0, sustainable in a lens of thickness , linear expansion coefficient α, absorption coefficient δ

  13. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of laser interaction with weakly ionized helium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li Huayu; Ki, Hyungson

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents a lattice Boltzmann method for laser interaction with weakly ionized plasmas considering electron impact ionization and three-body recombination. To simulate with physical properties of plasmas, the authors' previous work on the rescaling of variables is employed and the electromagnetic fields are calculated from the Maxwell equations by using the finite-difference time-domain method. To calculate temperature fields, energy equations are derived separately from the Boltzmann equations. In this way, we attempt to solve the full governing equations for plasma dynamics. With the developed model, the continuous-wave CO{sub 2} laser interaction with helium is simulated successfully.

  14. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of laser interaction with weakly ionized helium plasmas.

    PubMed

    Li, Huayu; Ki, Hyungson

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a lattice Boltzmann method for laser interaction with weakly ionized plasmas considering electron impact ionization and three-body recombination. To simulate with physical properties of plasmas, the authors' previous work on the rescaling of variables is employed and the electromagnetic fields are calculated from the Maxwell equations by using the finite-difference time-domain method. To calculate temperature fields, energy equations are derived separately from the Boltzmann equations. In this way, we attempt to solve the full governing equations for plasma dynamics. With the developed model, the continuous-wave CO2 laser interaction with helium is simulated successfully.

  15. An Assessment of Molecular Dynamic Force Fields for Silica for Use in Simulating Laser Damage Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, T F; Gilmer, G H; Matthews, M J; Stolken, J S; Feit, M D

    2010-10-21

    We compare force fields (FF's) that have been used in molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of silica in order to assess their applicability for use in simulating IR-laser damage mitigation. Although pairwise FF?s obtained by fitting quantum mechanical calculations such as the BKS and CHIK potentials have been shown to reproduce many of the properties of silica including the stability of silica polymorphs and the densification of the liquid, we show that melting temperatures and fictive temperatures are much too high. Softer empirical force fields give liquid and glass properties at experimental temperatures but may not predict all properties important to laser mitigation experiments.

  16. Parallel implementation of three-dimensional molecular dynamic simulation for laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.

    2013-11-15

    The objective of this article is to report the parallel implementation of the 3D molecular dynamic simulation code for laser-cluster interactions. The benchmarking of the code has been done by comparing the simulation results with some of the experiments reported in the literature. Scaling laws for the computational time is established by varying the number of processor cores and number of macroparticles used. The capabilities of the code are highlighted by implementing various diagnostic tools. To study the dynamics of the laser-cluster interactions, the executable version of the code is available from the author.

  17. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  18. Optical and thermal simulations of noninvasive laser coagulation of the human vas deferens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Cilip, Christopher M.; Trammell, Susan R.; Cherukuri, Harish; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Successful noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo, has been previously reported. However, there is a significant difference between the optical properties of canine and human skin. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of light transport through tissue and heat transfer simulations are performed to determine the feasibility of noninvasive laser vasectomy in humans. A laser wavelength of 1064 nm was chosen for deep optical penetration in tissue. Monte Carlo simulations determined the spatial distribution of absorbed photons inside the tissue layers (epidermis, dermis, and vas). The results were convolved with a 3-mm-diameter laser beam, and then used as the spatial heat source for the heat transfer model. A laser pulse duration of 500 ms and pulse rate of 1 Hz, and cryogen spray cooling were incident on the tissue for 60 s. Average laser power (5-9 W), cryogen pulse duration (60-100 ms), cryogen cooling rate (0.5-1.0 Hz), and increase in optical transmission due to optical clearing (0-50 %), were studied. After application of an optical clearing agent to increase skin transmission by 50%, an average laser power of 6 W, cryogen pulse duration of 60 ms, and cryogen cooling rate of 1 Hz resulted in vas temperatures of ~ 60°C, sufficient for thermal coagulation, while 1 mm of the skin surface (epidermis and dermis) remained at a safe temperature of ~ 45 °C. Monte Carlo and heat transfer simulations indicate that it is possible to noninvasively thermally coagulate the human vas without adverse effects (e.g. scrotal skin burns), if an optical clearing agent is applied to the skin prior to the procedure.

  19. Diagnostics, Modeling and Simulation: Three Keys Towards Mastering the Cutting Process with Fiber, Disk and Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petring, Dirk; Molitor, Thomas; Schneider, Frank; Wolf, Norbert

    Even established laser processing technologies such as cutting are far away from being completely understood. Nevertheless, the progress in industrially available laser cutting systems and applications is quite respectable. Fiber and disk laser cutting changed from a debatable newcomer to a serious part of the business while the diode laser appears at the horizon as the next player to be reckoned. Understanding of the process and its performance are continually improved. This paper highlights results of research and development from the recent years. Some speculations, simulations, diagnostics and facts about the process, its properties and capabilities are assessed. Earlier and latest diagnostics and CALCut simulation results of laser beam cutting processes are presented.

  20. Simulations of impulsive laser scattering of biological protein assemblies: Application to M13 bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Benson, Daryn; Tsen, K.-T.; Sankey, Otto F.

    2009-10-01

    We develop a theoretical framework, based on a bond-polarizability model, for simulating the impulsive force experienced on a protein or an assembly of proteins from a pulsed light source by coupling the laser electric field to an atomic distortion. The mechanism is impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) where mechanical distortions produce variation in the electronic polarization through atomic displacements similar to vibrational Raman scattering. The magnitude of the impulsive force is determined from the empirical two-body bond-polarizability model and the intensity of the incident light. We apply the method to the M13 bacteriophage protein capsid system by performing several classical molecular-dynamics simulations that include the additional impulsive laser scattering force at various light intensities and pulse widths. The results of the molecular-dynamics simulations are then qualitatively interpreted with a simple harmonic oscillator model driven by ISRS. The intensity of light required to produce damage to the capsid in the simulations was found to be far higher than what was found in recent pulsed laser scattering experiments of M13 phage, suggesting that the observed inactivation of viruses with ultrashort laser pulses involves processes and/or mechanisms not taken into account in the present simulations.