Science.gov

Sample records for laser-based projection lithography

  1. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Distortion free projection lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Gaines, D.P.

    1991-07-09

    Soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) may be used to fabricate high resolution structures for future devices, but will require an all-reflecting optical system with {approximately} 100 nm resolution and < 10 nm image distortion over large fields-of-view. In present designs, the lithographic tool for SXPL is envisioned as a ring-field'' scanning system with multiple (3--5), possibly aspheric, imaging optics fabricated to {approximately} < 1 nm figure precision. In its present form, several technologies must be developed before this tool can become practical. A simple, non-scanning optical system with less expensive optics, reduced mirror reflection losses and lower source power requirements would be very attractive. We have developed a technique, called Encoded Mask Lithography (EML), which allows for distortion free, high resolution reticle replication over a large field-of-view while using an imaging system with substantial inherent distortion. When applied to SXPL, EML allows us to use a simple, two spherical mirror imaging system. The simplified optical system used in EML eases optic fabrication requirements, obviates the need for mask-to-wafer scanning, and decreases multilayer mirror reflection losses and source power requirements. Although developed for SXPL, this concept is applicable to all forms of projection lithography where distortion over large fields may be a problem. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Plasma formed ion beam projection lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette; Ngo, Vinh; Zahir, Nastaran

    2002-01-01

    A plasma-formed ion-beam projection lithography (IPL) system eliminates the acceleration stage between the ion source and stencil mask of a conventional IPL system. Instead a much thicker mask is used as a beam forming or extraction electrode, positioned next to the plasma in the ion source. Thus the entire beam forming electrode or mask is illuminated uniformly with the source plasma. The extracted beam passes through an acceleration and reduction stage onto the resist coated wafer. Low energy ions, about 30 eV, pass through the mask, minimizing heating, scattering, and sputtering.

  4. Image-projection ion-beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Image-projection ion-beam lithography is an attractive alternative for submicron patterning because it may provide high throughput; it uses demagnification to gain advantages in reticle fabrication, inspection, and lifetime; and it enjoys the precise deposition characteristics of ions which cause essentially no collateral damage. This lithographic option involves extracting low-mass ions (e.g., He{sup +} ) from a plasma source, transmitting the ions at low voltage through a stencil reticle, and then accelerating and focusing the ions electrostatically onto a resist-coated wafer. While the advantages of this technology have been demonstrated experimentally by the work of IMS (Austria), many difficulties still impede extension of the technology to the high-volume production of microelectronic devices. We report a computational study of a lithography system designed to address problem areas in field size, telecentricity, and chromatic and geometric aberration. We present a novel ion-column-design approach and conceptual ion-source and column designs which address these issues. We find that image-projection ion-beam technology should in principle meet high-volume-production requirements. The technical success of our present relatively compact-column design requires that a glow-discharge-based ion source (or equivalent cold source) be developed and that moderate further improvement in geometric aberration levels be obtained. Our system requires that image predistortion be employed during reticle fabrication to overcome distortion due to residual image nonlinearity and space-charge forces. This constitutes a software data preparation step, as do correcting for distortions in electron lithography columns and performing proximity-effect corrections. Areas needing further fundamental work are identified.

  5. Novel electrostatic column for ion projection lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Chalupka, A.; Stengl, G.; Buschbeck, H.; Lammer, G.; Vonach, H.; Fischer, R.; Hammel, E.; Loeschner, H.; Nowak, R.; Wolf, P. ); Finkelstein, W.; Hill, R.W. ); Berry, I.L. ); Harriott, L.R. ); Melngailis, J. ); Randall, J.N. ); Wolfe, J.C. ); Stroh, H.; Wollnik, H. ); Mondelli, A.A.; Petillo, J.J. ); Leung, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of Californi

    1994-11-01

    Ion projection lithography (IPL) is being considered for high volume sub-0.25-[mu]m lithography. A novel ion-optical column has been designed for exposing 20[times]20 mm[sup 2] fields at 3[times] reduction from stencil mask to wafer substrates. A diverging lens is realized by using the stencil mask as the first electrode of the ion-optical column. The second and third electrode form an accelerating field lens. The aberrations of the first two lenses (diverging lens and field lens) are compensated by an asymmetric Einzel lens projecting an ion image of the stencil mask openings onto the wafer substrate with better than 2 mrad telecentricity. Less than 30 nm intrafield distortion was calculated within 20[times]20 mm[sup 2] exposure fields. The calculation uncertainty is estimated to be about 10 nm. The calculation holds for helium ions with [approx]10 keV ion energy at the stencil mask and 150 keV ion energy at the wafer plane. A virtual ion source size of 10 [mu]m has been assumed. The calculated chromatic aberrations are less than 60 nm, assuming 6 eV energy spread of the ions extracted from a duoplasmatron source. Recently a multicusp ion source has been developed for which preliminary results indicate an energy spread of less than 2 eV. Thus, with a multicusp source chromatic aberrations of less than 20 nm are to be expected. The ion energy at the crossover between the field lens and the asymmetric Einzel lens is 200 keV. Therefore, stochastic space charge induced degradations in resolution can be kept sufficiently low. The divergence of the ion image projected to the wafer plane is less than 2 mrad. Thus, the usable'' depth of focus for the novel ion optics is in the order of 10 [mu]m.

  6. Considerations for a free-electron laser-based extreme-ultraviolet lithography program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Wood, Obert R.; Barletta, William A.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Preil, Moshe E.

    2015-03-01

    Recent years have seen great strides in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser-produced plasma sources. Field deployed EUV exposure tools are now capable of facilitating advanced technology node development. Nevertheless, as the required manufacturing exposure dose scales, EUV sources must follow suit and provide 500- 1000 W to maintain production throughputs. A free-electron laser (FEL) offers a cost effective, single-source alternative for powering an entire EUV lithography program. FEL integration into semiconductor fab architecture will require both unique facility considerations as well as a paradigm shift in lithography operations. Critical accelerator configurations relating to energy recovery, multi-turn acceleration, and operational mode are discussed from engineering/scientific, cost-minimization, and safety perspectives. Furthermore, the individual components of a FEL (electron injector, RF systems, undulator, etc.) are examined with respect to both design and cost, considering existing technology as well as prospective innovations. Finally, FEL development and deployment roadmaps are presented, focusing on manufacturer deployment for the 5 nm or 3 nm technology nodes.[1-3

  7. Image-projection ion-beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Image-projection ion-beam lithography promises high-throughput patterning with wide process latitude, excellent resolution, and minimal damage to underlying circuit layers. The process involves extracting helium ions from a plasma source, transmitting the ions at low voltage through a stencil reticle, and then accelerating and focusing the ions electrostatically onto the wafer. A key feature is the use of image demagnification which simplifies reticle fabrication and inspection, and leads to low power loading on the reticle and long reticle life. In this paper we report computational studies aimed at improving field size, linearity, and telecentricity over that demonstrated experimentally in the pioneering work by Ion Microfabrication Systems, GmbH (Vienna) during the past decade. We study a mechanically simple arrangement of equal-radii coaxial tubular lenses. We employ ion column optimization by simulated annealing and uncover a new optimization strategy which may be applicable in other optimization work. The resulting column design is much improved over our initial attempts based on an iterative optimization procedure. However, we still are unable to eliminate image distortion, and we would need either to rely on reticle predistortion or on use of a more complex electrode system for a production application. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  8. High numerical aperture projection system for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    2000-01-01

    An optical system is described that is compatible with extreme ultraviolet radiation and comprises five reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The five optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as concave, convex, concave, convex, and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for ring field, step and scan lithography methods. The invention uses aspheric mirrors to minimize static distortion and balance the static distortion across the ring field width which effectively minimizes dynamic distortion. The present invention allows for higher device density because the optical system has improved resolution that results from the high numerical aperture, which is at least 0.14.

  9. Fabrication and testing of optics for EUV projection lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J. S., LLNL

    1998-03-18

    EUV Lithography (EUVL) is a leading candidate as a stepper technology for fabricating the ``0.1 {micro}m generation`` of microelectronic circuits. EUVL is an optical printing technique qualitatively similar to DUV Lithography (DUVL), except that 11-13nm wavelength light is used instead of 193-248nm. The feasibility of creating 0.1{micro}m features has been well-established using small-field EUVL printing tools and development efforts are currently underway to demonstrate that cost-effective production equipment can be engineered to perform full-width ring-field imaging consistent with high wafer throughput rates Ensuring that an industrial supplier base will be available for key components and subsystems is crucial to the success of EUVL. In particular, the projection optics are the heart of the EUVL imaging system, yet they have figure and finish specifications that are beyond the state-of-the-art in optics manufacturing. Thus it is important to demonstrate that industry will be able to fabricate and certify these optics commensurate with EUVL requirements. Indeed, the goal of this paper is to demonstrate that procuring EUVL projection optical substrates is feasible. This conclusion is based on measurements of both commercially-available and developmental substrates. The paper discusses EUVL figure and finish specifications, followed by examples of ultrasmooth and accurate surfaces, and concludes with a discussion of how substrates are measured and evaluated.

  10. Optical design of a 1-to-1 lithography projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiun-Woei

    2016-08-01

    A 1:1 lithography projection has been designed and is fabricated for a 3D integrated circuit fabrication platform. Using a dual triplet as an initial type to form a one-to-one lens and applying a tele-centric structure, the optical common components of an optical system have been designed. The tolerance of the mechanical mounts is simulated by tilting the mounts to single and two aspheric surfaces of lens to show the degradation in the modulation transfer function; thus, the single aspheric-tilted mount in a system is suggested to reach the precision. Furthermore, Koehler illumination is used. By applying partial coherence analysis, the optimized relative numerical aperture was found. As the system is built, optimized performance should be expected.

  11. Holographic illuminator for synchrotron-based projection lithography systems

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2005-08-09

    The effective coherence of a synchrotron beam line can be tailored to projection lithography requirements by employing a moving holographic diffuser and a stationary low-cost spherical mirror. The invention is particularly suited for use in an illuminator device for an optical image processing system requiring partially coherent illumination. The illuminator includes: (1) a synchrotron source of coherent or partially coherent radiation which has an intrinsic coherence that is higher than the desired coherence, (2) a holographic diffuser having a surface that receives incident radiation from said source, (3) means for translating the surface of the holographic diffuser in two dimensions along a plane that is parallel to the surface of the holographic diffuser wherein the rate of the motion is fast relative to integration time of said image processing system; and (4) a condenser optic that re-images the surface of the holographic diffuser to the entrance plane of said image processing system.

  12. Optical design of a 1-to-1 lithography projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiun-Woei

    2016-10-01

    A 1:1 lithography projection has been designed and is fabricated for a 3D integrated circuit fabrication platform. Using a dual triplet as an initial type to form a one-to-one lens and applying a tele-centric structure, the optical common components of an optical system have been designed. The tolerance of the mechanical mounts is simulated by tilting the mounts to single and two aspheric surfaces of lens to show the degradation in the modulation transfer function; thus, the single aspheric-tilted mount in a system is suggested to reach the precision. Furthermore, Koehler illumination is used. By applying partial coherence analysis, the optimized relative numerical aperture was found. As the system is built, optimized performance should be expected.

  13. Fabrication of planar photonic crystals in chalcogenide glass film by maskless projection lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peiqing; Zhang, Qian; Zeng, Jianghui; Han, Jintao; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Jiao, Qing; Wu, Yuehao; Dai, Shixun

    2016-09-01

    Ge20Sb15Se65 chalcogenide glass films were deposited and patterned using maskless projection lithography to create photonic crystal structures. This lithography technology, which is based on a digital micro-mirror device, is demonstrated as a powerful and low-cost tool to produce arbitrary intensity distributions to fabricate photonic devices. Direct photolithography in resist-free chalcogenide films was first studied, and results indicate that the quality of the products is insufficient. High-quality photonic crystals with sub-micrometer size were finally obtained in chalcogenide films with photoresist by maskless projection lithography and inductively coupled plasma technology.

  14. Lithography trends based on projections of the ITRS (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arden, Wolfgang

    2005-06-01

    The microelectronic industry has gone through an enormous technical evolution in the last four decades. Both the tech-nological and economic challenges of microelectronics were increasing consistently in the past few years. This paper discusses the future trends in micro- and nano-technologies with special emphasis on lithography. The trends of minia-turization will be sketched with reference to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). After a description of general trends in technology node timing, an overview will be given on the future lithography require-ments and the technical solutions including options for post-optical lithography as, for example, Extreme UV.

  15. New data postprocessing for e-beam projection lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazuya; Kamijo, Koichi; Kojima, Shinichi; Minami, Hideyuki; Okino, Teruaki

    2001-08-01

    In electron beam projection lithography (EPL), one of the most crucial tasks is to develop a data post-processing system, namely, a specific tool to expose a faithful pattern for every subfield on the wafer based on the pattern layout data. This system includes two basic flows. The 1st flow is common for reticle fabrication, and the 2nd flow is unique for EPL. During the 2nd flow, based on the LSI pattern data, electron optics space-charge effect correction will be automatically and rapidly executed and output to the EPL system in order to adjust parameters such as focus, magnification, rotation and astigmatism. In addition, this system should perform such tasks as segmentations of subfields (including complementary division), arrangement of stripes and reticlets, and alignment mark insertion. For proximity effect correction, we will first use a pattern shape modulation first. Shape modification at stitching boundaries is also investigated. In summary, to achieve conformable EPL delivery to customers, a new data post- processing system is developed in collaboration with some suppliers.

  16. Four-mirror extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography projection system

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Simon J; Jeong, Hwan J; Shafer, David R

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a four-mirror catoptric projection system for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography to transfer a pattern from a reflective reticle to a wafer substrate. In order along the light path followed by light from the reticle to the wafer substrate, the system includes a dominantly hyperbolic convex mirror, a dominantly elliptical concave mirror, spherical convex mirror, and spherical concave mirror. The reticle and wafer substrate are positioned along the system's optical axis on opposite sides of the mirrors. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are positioned on the same side of the system's optical axis as the reticle, and are relatively large in diameter as they are positioned on the high magnification side of the system. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are relatively far off the optical axis and hence they have significant aspherical components in their curvatures. The convex spherical mirror is positioned on the optical axis, and has a substantially or perfectly spherical shape. The spherical concave mirror is positioned substantially on the opposite side of the optical axis from the hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors. Because it is positioned off-axis to a degree, the spherical concave mirror has some asphericity to counter aberrations. The spherical concave mirror forms a relatively large, uniform field on the wafer substrate. The mirrors can be tilted or decentered slightly to achieve further increase in the field size.

  17. Compact multi-bounce projection system for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    2002-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four optical elements providing five reflective surfaces for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The five optical surfaces are characterized in order from object to image as concave, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The second and fourth reflective surfaces are part of the same optical element. The optical system is particularly suited for ring field step and scan lithography methods. The invention uses aspheric mirrors to minimize static distortion and balance the static distortion across the ring field width, which effectively minimizes dynamic distortion.

  18. Multi-Repeated Projection Lithography for High-Precision Linear Scale Based on Average Homogenization Effect.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dongxu; Zhao, Huiying; Zhang, Chupeng; Yuan, Daocheng; Xi, Jianpu; Zhu, Xueliang; Ban, Xinxing; Dong, Longchao; Gu, Yawen; Jiang, Chunye

    2016-04-14

    A multi-repeated photolithography method for manufacturing an incremental linear scale using projection lithography is presented. The method is based on the average homogenization effect that periodically superposes the light intensity of different locations of pitches in the mask to make a consistent energy distribution at a specific wavelength, from which the accuracy of a linear scale can be improved precisely using the average pitch with different step distances. The method's theoretical error is within 0.01 µm for a periodic mask with a 2-µm sine-wave error. The intensity error models in the focal plane include the rectangular grating error on the mask, static positioning error, and lithography lens focal plane alignment error, which affect pitch uniformity less than in the common linear scale projection lithography splicing process. It was analyzed and confirmed that increasing the repeat exposure number of a single stripe could improve accuracy, as could adjusting the exposure spacing to achieve a set proportion of black and white stripes. According to the experimental results, the effectiveness of the multi-repeated photolithography method is confirmed to easily realize a pitch accuracy of 43 nm in any 10 locations of 1 m, and the whole length accuracy of the linear scale is less than 1 µm/m.

  19. Multi-Repeated Projection Lithography for High-Precision Linear Scale Based on Average Homogenization Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Dongxu; Zhao, Huiying; Zhang, Chupeng; Yuan, Daocheng; Xi, Jianpu; Zhu, Xueliang; Ban, Xinxing; Dong, Longchao; Gu, Yawen; Jiang, Chunye

    2016-01-01

    A multi-repeated photolithography method for manufacturing an incremental linear scale using projection lithography is presented. The method is based on the average homogenization effect that periodically superposes the light intensity of different locations of pitches in the mask to make a consistent energy distribution at a specific wavelength, from which the accuracy of a linear scale can be improved precisely using the average pitch with different step distances. The method’s theoretical error is within 0.01 µm for a periodic mask with a 2-µm sine-wave error. The intensity error models in the focal plane include the rectangular grating error on the mask, static positioning error, and lithography lens focal plane alignment error, which affect pitch uniformity less than in the common linear scale projection lithography splicing process. It was analyzed and confirmed that increasing the repeat exposure number of a single stripe could improve accuracy, as could adjusting the exposure spacing to achieve a set proportion of black and white stripes. According to the experimental results, the effectiveness of the multi-repeated photolithography method is confirmed to easily realize a pitch accuracy of 43 nm in any 10 locations of 1 m, and the whole length accuracy of the linear scale is less than 1 µm/m. PMID:27089348

  20. Characterization and possible repair of defects in Soft X-ray Projection Lithography masks

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.

    1993-07-01

    Soft X-ray Projection Lithography (SXPL) is one promising technique for the mass production of integrated circuits with minimum features sizes below 100 nm. Mask fabrication, inspection and repair processes are critically important to all forms of lithography, including SXPL which requires a reflection mask (a substrate coated with a x-ray multilayer coating and patterned with thin metallization layer). Processes for the repair of defects in the metallization patterns have been developed, but at present, there exist no processes for the repair of defects in the multilayer coatings deposited in LLNL`s magnetron sputter deposition facility, which produces state of the art x-ray multilayer mirrors. We also propose one possible process for the repair of defects in these multilayer coatings.

  1. High-throughput realization of an infrared selective absorber/emitter by DUV microsphere projection lithography.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohsen; Dexheimer, Eric; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we present a low-cost and high-throughput nanofabrication method to realize metasurfaces that have selective absorption/emission in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We have developed DUV projection lithography to produce arbitrary patterns with sub-80 nm feature sizes. As examples of practical applications, we experimentally demonstrate structures with single and double spectral absorption/emission features, and in close agreement with numerical simulation. The fundamental mechanism of perfect absorption is discussed as well. Selective infrared absorbers/emitters are critical elements in realizing efficient thermophotovoltaic cells and high-performance biosensors. PMID:26650855

  2. A novel condenser for EUV lithography ring-field projection optics

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H; Nugent, K A

    1999-07-15

    A condenser for a ring-field extreme ultra-violet (EUV) projection lithography camera is presented. The condenser consists of a gently undulating mirror, that we refer to as a ripple plate, and which is illuminated by a collimated beam at grazing incidence. The light is incident along the ripples rather than across them, so that the incident beam is reflected onto a cone and subsequently focused on to the arc of the ring field. A quasistationary illumination is achieved, since any one field point receives light from points on the ripples, which are distributed throughout the condenser pupil. The design concept can easily be applied to illuminate projection cameras with various ring-field and numerical aperture specifications. Ray-tracing results are presented of a condenser for a 0.25 NA EUV projection camera.

  3. LENS (lithography enhancement toward nano scale): a European project to support double exposure and double patterning technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, Pietro; Baldi, Livio; Piacentini, Paolo; Sytsma, Joost; Le Gratiet, Bertrand; Gaugiran, Stéphanie; Wong, Patrick; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Atzei, Luisa R.; Buch, Xavier; Verkleij, Dick; Toublan, Olivier; Perez-Murano, Francesco; Mecerreyes, David

    2010-04-01

    In 2009 a new European initiative on Double Patterning and Double Exposure lithography process development was started in the framework of the ENIAC Joint Undertaking. The project, named LENS (Lithography Enhancement Towards Nano Scale), involves twelve companies from five different European Countries (Italy, Netherlands, France, Belgium Spain; includes: IC makers (Numonyx and STMicroelectronics), a group of equipment and materials companies (ASML, Lam Research srl, JSR, FEI), a mask maker (Dai Nippon Photomask Europe), an EDA company (Mentor Graphics) and four research and development institutes (CEA-Leti, IMEC, Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, CIDETEC). The LENS project aims to develop and integrate the overall infrastructure required to reach patterning resolutions required by 32nm and 22nm technology nodes through the double patterning and pitch doubling technologies on existing conventional immersion exposure tools, with the purpose to allow the timely development of 32nm and 22nm technology nodes for memories and logic devices, providing a safe alternative to EUV, Higher Refraction Index Fluids Immersion Lithography and maskless lithography, which appear to be still far from maturity. The project will cover the whole lithography supply chain including design, masks, materials, exposure tools, process integration, metrology and its final objective is the demonstration of 22nm node patterning on available 1.35 NA immersion tools on high complexity mask set.

  4. Large-area soft x-ray projection lithography using multilayer mirrors structured by RIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Steffen; Kloidt, Andreas; Kleineberg, Ulf; Schmiedeskamp, Bernt; Kadel, Klaus; Schomburg, Werner K.; Hormes, F. J.; Heinzmann, Ulrich

    1993-01-01

    SXPL (soft X-ray projection lithography) is one of the most promising applications of X-ray reflecting optics using multilayer mirrors. Within our collaboration, such multilayer mirrors were fabricated, characterized, laterally structured and then used as reflection masks in a projecting lithography procedure. Mo/Si-multilayer mirrors were produced by electron beam evaporation in UHV under thermal treatment with an in-situ X-ray controlled thickness in the region of 2d equals 14 nm. The reflectivities measured at normal incidence reached up to 54%. Various surface analysis techniques have been applied in order to characterize and optimize the X-ray mirrors. The multilayers were patterned by reactive ion etching (RIE) with CF(subscript 4), using a photoresist as the etch mask, thus producing X-ray reflection masks. The masks were tested in the synchrotron radiation laboratory of the electron accelerator ELSA at the Physikalisches Institut of Bonn University. A double crystal X-ray monochromator was modified so as to allow about 0.5 cm(superscript 2) of the reflection mask to be illuminated by white synchrotron radiation. The reflected patterns were projected (with an energy of 100 eV) onto the resist (Hoechst AZ PF 514), which was mounted at an average distance of about 7 mm. In the first test-experiments, structure sizes down to 8 micrometers were nicely reproduced over the whole of the exposed area. Smaller structures were distorted by Fresnel-diffraction. The theoretically calculated diffraction images agree very well with the observed images.

  5. Multilayer coatings of 10x projection for extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, J A; Montcalm, C; Spiller, E; Wedowski, M

    1999-03-09

    Two new sets of projections optics for the prototype 10X reduction EUV lithography system were coated with Mo/Si multilayers. The coating thickness was graded across the optics by using shadow masks to ensure maximum throughput at all incidence angles in the camera. The overall deviation of the (normalized) wavelength response across the clear aperture of each mirror is below 0.01% RMS. However, the wavelength mismatch between two optics coated in different runs is up to 0.07 nm. Nevertheless, this is still within the allowed tolerances, and the predicted optical throughput loss in the camera due to such wavelength mismatch is about 4%. EUV reflectances of 63-65% were measured around 13.40 nm for the secondary optics, which is in good agreement with the expected reflectance based on the substrate finish as measured with AFM.

  6. VUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Oster, Y.; Mundinger, D.C.

    1990-12-25

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1,700--1,300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850--650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask. 6 figs.

  7. VUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    George, Edward V.; Oster, Yale; Mundinger, David C.

    1990-01-01

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1700-1300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850-650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask.

  8. Multiscale fabrication of multiple proteins and topographical structures by combining capillary force lithography and microscope projection photolithography.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Keon Woo; Choi, Jong-Cheol; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Doh, Junsang

    2011-04-01

    We present new methods that enable the fabrication of multiscale, multicomponent protein-patterned surfaces and multiscale topologically structured surfaces by exploiting the merits of two well-established techniques: capillary force lithography (CFL) and microscope projection photolithography (MPP) based on a protein-friendly photoresist. We further demonstrate that, when hierarchically organized micro- and nanostructures were used as a cell culture platform, human colon cancer cells (cell line SW480) preferentially adhere and migrate onto the area with nanoscale topography over the one with microscale topography. These methods will provide many exciting opportunities for the study of cellular responses to multiscale physicochemical cues.

  9. Physical Limitations in Lithography for Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes techniques being used in the production of microelectronics kits which have replaced traditional optical lithography, including contact and optical projection printing, and X-ray and electron beam lithography. Also includes limitations of each technique described. (SK)

  10. Multi-stencil character projection e-beam lithography: a fast and flexible way for high quality optical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, Uwe; Falkner, Matthias; Zeitner, Uwe D.; Banasch, Michael; Dietrich, Kay; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard

    2014-10-01

    In this work we report on the strong improvement of pattern quality and significant write-time reduction using Character Projection with a multi-stencil character stage with more than 2000 apertures for the fabrication of nanomaterials and, in particular, on an optical metamaterial, which is called "Metamaterial Perfect Absorber". The Character Projection ebeam lithography allows the transition from the time-consuming serial to a fast quasi-parallel writing method and opens the way for the fabrication of device areas which are impossible to realize with often in the R&D used SEM based Gaussian electron beam-writers. More than 150.000 times faster than the comparable Gaussian E-beam exposure, 100 times faster and with a factor of 10 improved pattern size homogeneity than the corresponding Variable Shaped E-beam exposure - these are our main results for the fabrication of optical metamaterials using a Variable Shaped E-beam with Character Projection.

  11. The DARPA compact superconducting x-ray lithography source features. [Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Heese, R. ); Kalsi, S. ); Leung, E. . Space Systems Div.)

    1991-01-01

    Under DARPA sponsorship, a compact Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source (SXLS) is being designed and built by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with industry participation from Grumman Corporation and General Dynamics. This source is optimized for lithography work for sub-micron high density computer chips, and is about the size of a billiard table (1.5 m {times} 4.0 m). The machine has a racetrack configuration with two 180{degree} bending magnets being designed and built by General Dynamics under a subcontract with Grumman Corporation. The machine will have 18 photon ports which would deliver light peaked at a wave length of 10 Angstroms. Grumman is commercializing the SXLS device and plans to book orders for delivery of industrialized SXLS (ISXLS) versions in 1995. This paper will describe the major features of this device. The commercial machine will be equipped with a fully automated user-friendly control systems, major features of which are already working on a compact warm dipole ring at BNL. This ring has normal dipole magnets with dimensions identical to the SXLS device, and has been successfully commissioned. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Electron-beam lithography with character projection exposure for throughput enhancement with line-edge quality optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeno, Rimon; Maruyama, Satoshi; Mita, Yoshio; Ikeda, Makoto; Asada, Kunihiro

    2016-03-01

    Among various electron-beam lithography (EBL) techniques, variable-shaped beam (VSB) and character projection (CP) methods have attracted many EBL users for their high-throughput feature, but they are considered to be more suited to small-featured VLSI fabrication with regularly-arranged layouts like standard-cell logics and memory arrays. On the other hand, non-VLSI applications like photonics, MEMS, MOEMS, and so on, have not been fully utilized the benefit of CP method due to their wide variety of layout patterns. In addition, the stepwise edge shapes by VSB method often causes intolerable edge roughness to degrade device characteristics from its intended performance with smooth edges. We proposed an overall EBL methodology applicable to wade-variety of EBL applications utilizing VSB and CP methods. Its key idea is in our layout data conversion algorithm that decomposes curved or oblique edges of arbitrary layout patterns into CP shots. We expect significant reduction in EB shot count with a CP-bordered exposure data compared to the corresponding VSB-alone conversion result. Several CP conversion parameters are used to optimize EB exposure throughput, edge quality, and resultant device characteristics. We demonstrated out methodology using the leading-edge VSB/CP EBL tool, ADVANTEST F7000S-VD02, with high resolution Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) resist. Through our experiments of curved and oblique edge lithography under various data conversion conditions, we learned correspondence of the conversion parameters to the resultant edge roughness and other conditions. They will be utilized as the fundamental data for further enhancement of our EBL strategy for optimized EB exposure.

  13. Multilayer and grazing incidence X-ray/EUV optics for astronomy and projection lithography; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 19-22, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Editor); Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The present volume on multilayer and grazing incidence X-ray/EUV optics for astronomy and projection lithography discusses AXAF grazing incidence mirrors, the theory and high throughput optics of grazing incidence optics, multilayer mirror fabrication and characterization, and multilayer optics for X-ray projection lithography. Attention is given to the VETA-I X-ray detection system, a motion detection system for AXAF X-ray ground testing, image analysis of the AXAF VETA-I X-ray mirror, and optical constants from mirror reflectivities measured at synchrotrons. Topics discussed include the application of aberration theory to calculate encircled energy of Wolter I-II telescopes, W/C multilayers deposited on plastic films, nonspecular X-ray scattering from Si/Mo multilayers, and multilayer thin-film design as FUV polarizers. Also discussed are thin-film filter lifetesting results in the EUV, chromospheric and coronal observations with multilayer optics, present and future requirements of soft X-ray projection lithography, and the imaging Schwarzschild multilayer X-ray microscope.

  14. Enhanced defect detection capability using learning system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask inspection tool with projection electron microscope optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Terao, Kenji; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask defect detection is a major issue that must be addressed to realize EUVL-based device fabrication. We have designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics for integration into a mask inspection system, and the resulting PEM system performs well in half-pitch (hp) 16-nm-node EUVL patterned mask inspection applications. A learning system has been used in this PEM patterned mask inspection tool. The PEM identifies defects using the "defectivity" parameter that is derived from the acquired image characteristics. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and the costs associated with adjustment of the PEM's detection capabilities to cope with newly defined mask defects. The concepts behind this learning system and the parameter optimization flow are presented here. The learning system for the PEM is based on a library of registered defects. The learning system then optimizes the detection capability by reconciling previously registered defects with newly registered defects. Functional verification of the learning system is also described, and the system's detection capability is demonstrated by applying it to the inspection of hp 11-nm EUV masks. We can thus provide a user-friendly mask inspection system with reduced cost of ownership.

  15. Initial development of efficient, low-debris laser targets for the Sandia soft x-ray projection lithography effort

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, P.D.; Hunter, J.A.; Kubiak, G.D.

    1997-03-01

    During the fiscal years 92-94 a joint group from Sandia/New Mexico and Sandia/California studied the development of new laser-plasma targets for projection x-ray or EUV (extreme ultraviolet) lithography. Our experimental and theoretical analyses incorporated target design as an integral part of the lithographic optical system. Targets studied included thick solid targets, thin-foil metal-coated targets, and cryogenic targets. Our complete measurement suite consisted of x-ray conversion efficiency measurements, source size imaging, source x-ray angular distribution measurements, debris collection, and source EUV spectrum. Target evaluation also included the variation of laser characteristics, such as, laser intensity, spot size, wavelength, pulselength, and pulseshape. Over the course of these experiments we examined targets using KrF (248nm), XeCl (308nm), and CO{sub 2} (10.6 {mu}m) lasers. While debris issues now dominate research in this area, final details were concluded on our understanding of material spectra and radiation transport of 13 run light in laser-plasmas. Additionally, conclusive results were obtained with 308 rim light, showing the pulselength threshold below which plumes no longer limited the transmission of (and thus the conversion efficiency to) 13 nm radiation.

  16. Coaxial Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, Tuncay

    The optical and electrical properties of heterogeneous nanowires are profoundly related to their composition and nanoscale architecture. However, the intrinsic constraints of conventional synthetic and lithographic techniques have limited the types of multi-compositional nanowires that can be realized and studied in the laboratory. This thesis focuses on bridging templated electrochemical synthesis and lithography for expanding current synthetic capabilities with respect to materials generality and the ability to tailor two-dimensional growth in the formation of core-shell structures for the rational design and preparation of nanowires with very complex architectures that cannot be made by any other techniques. Chapter 1 introduces plasmonics, templated electrochemical synthesis, and on-wire lithography concepts and their significances within chemistry and materials science. Chapter 2 details a powerful technique for the deposition of metals and semiconductors with nanometer resolution in segment and gap lengths using on-wire lithography, which serves as a new platform to explore plasmon-exciton interactions in the form of long-range optical nanoscale rulers. Chapter 3 highlights an approach for the electrochemical synthesis of solution dispersible core-shell polymeric and inorganic semiconductor nanowires with metallic leads. A photodetector based on a single core-shell semiconductor nanowire is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the nanowires produced using this approach. Chapter 4 describes a new materials general technique, termed coaxial lithography (COAL), bridging templated electrochemical synthesis and lithography for generating coaxial nanowires in a parallel fashion with sub-10 nanometer resolution in both axial and radial dimensions. Combinations of coaxial nanowires composed of metals, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides, conjugated polymers, and a core/shell semiconductor nanowire with an embedded plasmonic nanoring are presented to

  17. The project of the high power free electron laser based on the race-track microtron-recuperator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, N. A.; Gavrilov, N. G.; Gorniker, E. I.; Kulipanov, G. N.; Kuptsov, I. V.; Kurkin, G. Ya.; Erg, G. I.; Levashov, Yu. I.; Oreshkov, A. D.; Petrov, S. P.; Petrov, V. M.; Pinayev, I. V.; Popik, V. M.; Sedlyarov, I. K.; Shaftan, T. V.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Sokolov, A. S.; Veshcherevich, V. G.; Vobly, P. D.

    1995-02-01

    To provide a user facility for the Siberian Centre of Photochemical Researches in Novosibirsk a high power free electron laser is under construction. The project status and installation are described.

  18. Soft-x-ray projection lithography experiments using Schwarzschild imaging optics

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Malinowski, M.E.; Stulen, R.H.; Haney, S.J.; Berger, K.W.; Brown, L.A. ); Sweatt, W.C. ); Bjorkholm, J.E.; Freeman, R.R.; Himel, M.D.; MacDowell, A.A.; Tennant, D.M.; Wood II, O.R. ); Bokor, J.; Jewell, T.E.; Mansfield, W.M.; Waskiewicz, W.K.; White, D.L.; Windt, D.L. )

    1993-12-01

    Soft-x-ray projection imaging is demonstrated by the use of 14-nm radiation from a laser plasma source and a single-surface multilayer-coated ellipsoidal condenser. Aberrations in the condenser and the Schwarzschild imaging objective are characterized and correlated with imaging performance. A new Schwarzschild housing, designed for improved alignment stability, is described.

  19. Electron Beam Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harriott, Lloyd R.

    1997-04-01

    Electron beams have played a significant role in semiconductor technology for more than twenty years. Early electron beam machines used a raster scanned beam spot to write patterns in electron-sensitive polymer resist materials. The main application of electron beam lithography has been in mask making. Despite the inherently high spatial resolution and wide process margins of electron beam lithography, the writing rate for semiconductor wafers has been too slow to be economically viable on a large scale. In the late 1970's, variable shape electron beam writing was developed, projecting a rectangular beam whose size can be varied for each "shot" exposure of a particular pattern, allowing some integrated circuits to be made economically where a variety of "customized" patterns are desired. In the cell or block projection electron beam exposure technique, a unit cell of a repetitive pattern is projected repeatedly to increase the level of parallelism. This can work well for highly repetitive patterns such as memory chips but is not well suited to complex varying patterns such as microprocessors. The rapid progress in the performance of integrated circuits has been largely driven by progress in optical lithography, through improvements in lens design and fabrication as well as the use of shorter wavelengths for the exposure radiation. Due to limitations from the opacity of lens and mask materials, it is unlikely that conventional optical printing methods can be used at wavelengths below 193 nm or feature sizes much below 180 nm. One candidate technology for a post-optical era is the Scattering with Angular Limitation Projection Electron-beam Lithography (SCALPEL) approach, which combines the high resolution and wide process latitude inherent in electron beam lithography with the throughput of a parallel projection system. A mask consisting of a low atomic number membrane and a high atomic number pattern layer is uniformly illuminated with high energy (100 ke

  20. Visualization of plasma-induced processes by a projection system with a Cu-laser-based brightness amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A. P.; Buzhinskij, R. O.; Gubskii, K. L.; Savjolov, A. S.; Sarantsev, S. A.; Terekhin, A. N.

    2010-05-15

    A novel method for visualization of the process of interaction of high-power energy fluxes with various surfaces is proposed. The possibility of the dynamic visualization of a surface covered with a {approx}3-cm-thick plasma layer with a linear density of {approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} is demonstrated experimentally. A scheme of intracavity shadowgraphy of phase objects with the use of a laser projection microscope is developed. Shadow images illustrating the development of the plasma torch of an erosion capillary discharge in air are presented.

  1. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David R.

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receive a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  2. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell

    2000-01-01

    An all-refelctive optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six refelecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  3. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  4. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  5. Maskless lithography

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, W.C.; Stulen, R.H.

    1999-02-09

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides. 12 figs.

  6. Maskless lithography

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

  7. Membrane projection lithography

    DOEpatents

    Burckel, David Bruce; Davids, Paul S; Resnick, Paul J; Draper, Bruce L

    2015-03-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a three dimensional manufacturing technique for application with semiconductor technologies. A membrane layer can be formed over a cavity. An opening can be formed in the membrane such that the membrane can act as a mask layer to the underlying wall surfaces and bottom surface of the cavity. A beam to facilitate an operation comprising any of implantation, etching or deposition can be directed through the opening onto the underlying surface, with the opening acting as a mask to control the area of the underlying surfaces on which any of implantation occurs, material is removed, and/or material is deposited. The membrane can be removed, a new membrane placed over the cavity and a new opening formed to facilitate another implantation, etching, or deposition operation. By changing the direction of the beam different wall/bottom surfaces can be utilized to form a plurality of structures.

  8. Recent results from extreme ultraviolet lithography patterned mask inspection for 11 nm half-pitch generation using projection electron microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is a promising technique for 1X nm half-pitch (hp) generation lithography. The inspection of patterned EUVL masks is one of the main issues that must be addressed during mask fabrication for manufacture of devices with 11 nm hp feature sizes. We have already designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics that have been integrated into a new inspection system called Model EBEYE-V30 (where "Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) and this system seems quite promising for 16 nm hp generation EUVL patterned mask inspection. The defect inspection sensitivity of this system was evaluated via capture of an electron image that was generated at the mask by focusing the image through the projection optics onto a time-delay integration (TDI) image sensor. For increased throughput and higher defect detection sensitivity, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and a simultaneous deflector for the image capture area that follows the mask scanning motion have been developed. Using a combination of synchronous deflection and mask scanning, the image can be integrated into both the fixed area image sensor and the TDI image sensor. We describe our experimental results for EUV patterned mask inspection using the above system. Elements have been developed for inspection tool integration and the designed specification has been verified. The system performance demonstrates the defect detectability required for 11 nm hp generation EUVL masks.

  9. Why bother with x-ray lithography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Henry I.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    1992-07-01

    The manufacture of state-of-the-art integrated circuits uses UV optical projection lithography. Conventional wisdom (i.e., the trade journals) holds that this technology will take the industry to quarter-micrometer minimum features sizes and below. So, why bother with X-ray lithography? The reason is that lithography is a 'system problem', and proximity X-ray lithography is better matched to that system problem than any other technology, once the initial investment is surmounted. X-ray lithography offers the most cost-effective path to the future of ultra-large-scale integrated circuits with feature sizes of tenth micrometer and below (i.e., gigascale electronics and quantum-effect electronics).

  10. Low-energy electron beam proximity projection lithography (LEEPL): the world's first e-beam production tool, LEEPL 3000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Uwe F. W.

    2004-06-01

    In June 2000 ago the company Accretech and LEEPL corporation decided to develop an E-beam lithography tool for high throughput wafer exposure, called LEEPL. In an amazing short time the alpha tool was built. In 2002 the beta tool was installed at Accretech. Today the first production tool the LEEPL 3000 is ready to be shipped. The 2keV E-beam tool will be used in the first lithography strategy to expose (in mix and match mode with optical exposure tools) critical levels like gate structures, contact holes (CH), and via pattern of the 90 nm and 65 nm node. At the SEMATECH EPL workshop on September 22nd in Cambridge, England it was mentioned that the amount of these levels will increase very rapidly (8 in 2007; 13 in 2010 and 17 in 2013). The schedule of the production tool for 45 nm node is mid 2005 and for the 32 nm node 2008. The Figure 1 shows from left to right α-tool, the β-tool and the production tool LEEPL 3000. Figure 1 also shows the timetable of the 4 LEEPL forum all held in Japan.

  11. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Markle, David A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies.

  12. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Markle, D.A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies. 7 figs.

  13. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Haney, S.J.; Sweeney, D.W.

    2000-02-29

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system is disclosed for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10--14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  14. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Haney, Steven J.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  15. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  16. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  17. Synchronous scan-projection lithography on overall circumference of fine pipes with a diameter of 2 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Toshiyuki; Furuhata, Takahiro; Muro, Hideyuki

    2016-06-01

    The scan-projection exposure of small-diameter pipe surfaces was investigated using a newly developed prototype exposure system. It is necessary to secure a very large depth of focus for printing thick resist patterns on round pipe surfaces with a roughness larger than that of semiconductor wafers. For this reason, a camera lens with a low numerical aperture of 0.089 was used as a projection lens, and the momentary exposure area was limited by a narrow slit with a width of 800 µm. Thus, patterns on a flat reticle were replicated on a pipe surface by linearly moving the reticle and rotating the pipe synchronously. By using a reticle with inclined line-and-space patterns, helical patterns with a width of 30 µm were successfully replicated on stainless-steel pipes with an outer diameter of 2 mm and coated with a 10-µm-thick negative resist. The patterns replicated at the start and stop edges were smoothly stitched seamlessly.

  18. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features

  19. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  20. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  1. Optimization of X-ray sources from a high-average-power ND:Glass laser-produced plasma for proximity lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B.

    1996-06-01

    The concept of a laser-based proximity lithography system for electronic microcircuit production has advanced to the point where a detailed design of a prototype system capable of exposing wafers at 40 wafer levels per hr is technically feasible with high-average-power laser technology. In proximity x-ray lithography, a photoresist composed of polymethyl- methacrylate (PMMA) or similar material is exposed to x rays transmitted through a mask placed near the photoresist, a procedure which is similar to making a photographic contact print. The mask contains a pattern of opaque metal features, with line widths as small as 0.12 {mu}m, placed on a thin (1-{mu}m thick) Si membrane. During the exposure, the shadow of the mask projected onto the resist produces in the physical and chemical properties of the resist a pattern of variation with the same size and shape as the features contained in the metal mask. This pattern can be further processed to produce microscopic structures in the Si substrate. The main application envisioned for this technology is the production of electronic microcircuits with spatial features significantly smaller than currently achievable with conventional optical lithographic techniques (0.12 {micro}m vs 0.25 {micro}m). This article describes work on optimizing a laser-produced plasma x-ray source intended for microcircuit production by proximity lithography.

  2. Thirty years of lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.

    2005-05-01

    Thirty years ago Rick Dill and his team at IBM published the first account of lithography simulation - the accurate description of semiconductor optical lithography by mathematical equations. Since then, lithography simulation has grown dramatically in importance in four important areas: as a research tool, as a development tool, as a manufacturing tool, and as a learning tool. In this paper, the history of lithography simulations is traced from its roots to today"s indispensable tools for lithographic technology development. Along the way, an attempt will be made to define the true value of lithography simulation to the semiconductor industry.

  3. Beam pen lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fengwei; Zheng, Gengfeng; Liao, Xing; Giam, Louise R.; Chai, Jinan; Chen, Xiaodong; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2010-09-01

    Lithography techniques are currently being developed to fabricate nanoscale components for integrated circuits, medical diagnostics and optoelectronics. In conventional far-field optical lithography, lateral feature resolution is diffraction-limited. Approaches that overcome the diffraction limit have been developed, but these are difficult to implement or they preclude arbitrary pattern formation. Techniques based on near-field scanning optical microscopy can overcome the diffraction limit, but they suffer from inherently low throughput and restricted scan areas. Highly parallel two-dimensional, silicon-based, near-field scanning optical microscopy aperture arrays have been fabricated, but aligning a non-deformable aperture array to a large-area substrate with near-field proximity remains challenging. However, recent advances in lithographies based on scanning probe microscopy have made use of transparent two-dimensional arrays of pyramid-shaped elastomeric tips (or `pens') for large-area, high-throughput patterning of ink molecules. Here, we report a massively parallel scanning probe microscopy-based approach that can generate arbitrary patterns by passing 400-nm light through nanoscopic apertures at each tip in the array. The technique, termed beam pen lithography, can toggle between near- and far-field distances, allowing both sub-diffraction limit (100 nm) and larger features to be generated.

  4. An ice lithography instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  5. Workshop on compact storage ring technology: applications to lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-30

    Project planning in the area of x-ray lithography is discussed. Three technologies that are emphasized are the light source, the lithographic technology, and masking technology. The needs of the semiconductor industry in the lithography area during the next decade are discussed, particularly as regards large scale production of high density dynamic random access memory devices. Storage ring parameters and an overall exposure tool for x-ray lithography are addressed. Competition in this area of technology from Germany and Japan is discussed briefly. The design of a storage ring is considered, including lattice design, magnets, and beam injection systems. (LEW)

  6. Terahertz laser based on dipolaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristinsson, K.; Kyriienko, O.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2014-02-01

    We develop the microscopic theory of a terahertz (THz) laser based on the effects of resonant tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure embedded in both optical and THz cavities. In the strong-coupling regime the system hosts dipolaritons, hybrid quasiparticles formed by the direct exciton, indirect exciton, and optical photon, which possess large dipole moments in the growth direction. Their radiative coupling to the mode of a THz cavity combined with strong nonlinearities provided by exciton-exciton interactions allows for stable emission of THz radiation in the regime of the continuous optical excitation. The optimal parameters for maximizing the THz signal output power are analyzed.

  7. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  8. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  9. Immersion lithography bevel solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, Len; Tamada, Osamu; Sanada, Masakazu; Yasuda, Shuichi; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    The introduction of Immersion lithography, combined with the desire to maximize the number of potential yielding devices per wafer, has brought wafer edge engineering to the forefront for advanced semiconductor manufactures. Bevel cleanliness, the position accuracy of the lithography films, and quality of the EBR cut has become more critical. In this paper, the effectiveness of wafer track based solutions to enable state-of-art bevel schemes is explored. This includes an integrated bevel cleaner and new bevel rinse nozzles. The bevel rinse nozzles are used in the coating process to ensure a precise, clean film edge on or near the bevel. The bevel cleaner is used immediately before the wafer is loaded into the scanner after the coating process. The bevel cleaner shows promise in driving down defectivity levels, specifically printing particles, while not damaging films on the bevel.

  10. Metal-Mesh Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhao; Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Metal-mesh lithography (MML) is a practical hybrid of microcontact printing and capillary force lithography that can be applied over millimeter-sized areas with a high level of uniformity. MML can be achieved by blotting various inks onto substrates through thin copper grids, relying on preferential wetting and capillary interactions between template and substrate for pattern replication. The resulting mesh patterns, which are inverted relative to those produced by stenciling or serigraphy, can be reproduced with low micrometer resolution. MML can be combined with other surface chemistry and lift-off methods to create functional microarrays for diverse applications, such as periodic islands of gold nanorods and patterned corrals for fibroblast cell cultures. PMID:22103322

  11. Metal-mesh lithography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhao; Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Metal-mesh lithography (MML) is a practical hybrid of microcontact printing and capillary force lithography that can be applied over millimeter-sized areas with a high level of uniformity. MML can be achieved by blotting various inks onto substrates through thin copper grids, relying on preferential wetting and capillary interactions between template and substrate for pattern replication. The resulting mesh patterns, which are inverted relative to those produced by stenciling or serigraphy, can be reproduced with low micrometer resolution. MML can be combined with other surface chemistry and lift-off methods to create functional microarrays for diverse applications, such as periodic islands of gold nanorods and patterned corrals for fibroblast cell cultures.

  12. Extreme ultraviolet Talbot interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Marconi, Mario C

    2015-10-01

    Periodic nanopatterns can be generated using lithography based on the Talbot effect or optical interference. However, these techniques have restrictions that limit their performance. High resolution Talbot lithography is limited by the very small depth of focus and the demanding requirements in the fabrication of the master mask. Interference lithography, with large DOF and high resolution, is limited to simple periodic patterns. This paper describes a hybrid extreme ultraviolet lithography approach that combines Talbot lithography and interference lithography to render an interference pattern with a lattice determined by a Talbot image. As a result, the method enables filling the arbitrary shaped cells produced by the Talbot image with interference patterns. Detailed modeling, system design and experimental results using a tabletop EUV laser are presented. PMID:26480070

  13. EUV lithography cost of ownership analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1995-01-19

    The cost of fabricating state-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) has been increasing and it will likely be economic rather than technical factors that ultimately limit the progress of ICs toward smaller devices. It is estimated that lithography currently accounts for approximately one-third the total cost of fabricating modem ICs({sup 1}). It is expected that this factor will be fairly stable for the forseeable future, and as a result, any lithographic process must be cost-effective before it can be considered for production. Additionally, the capital equipment cost for a new fabrication facility is growing at an exponential rate (2); it will soon require a multibillion dollar investment in capital equipment alone to build a manufacturing facility. In this regard, it is vital that any advanced lithography candidate justify itself on the basis of cost effectiveness. EUV lithography is no exception and close attention to issues of wafer fabrication costs have been a hallmark of its early history. To date, two prior cost analyses have been conducted for EUV lithography (formerly called {open_quotes}Soft X-ray Projection Lithography{close_quotes}). The analysis by Ceglio, et. al., provided a preliminary system design, set performance specifications and identified critical technical issues for cost control. A follow-on analysis by Early, et.al., studied the impact of issues such as step time, stepper overhead, tool utilization, escalating photoresist costs and limited reticle usage on wafer exposure costs. This current study provides updated system designs and specifications and their impact on wafer exposure costs. In addition, it takes a first cut at a preliminary schematic of an EUVL fabrication facility along with an estimate of the capital equipment costs for such a facility.

  14. Microfluidic Applications of Soft Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Krulevitch, P; Hamilton, J

    2001-04-10

    The soft lithography fabrication technique was applied to three microfluidic devices. The method was used to create an original micropump design and retrofit to existing designs for a DNA manipulation device and a counter biological warfare sample preparation device. Each device presented unique and original challenges to the soft lithography application. AI1 design constraints of the retrofit devices were satisfied using PDMS devices created through variation of soft lithography methods. The micropump utilized the versatility of PDMS, creating design options not available with other materials. In all cases, the rapid processing of soft lithography reduced the fabrication time, creating faster turnaround for design modifications.

  15. Bubble-Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Wei; Yogeesh, Maruthi N; Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore; Perillo, Evan P; Dunn, Andrew K; Akinwande, Deji; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-01-13

    Current lithography techniques, which employ photon, electron, or ion beams to induce chemical or physical reactions for micro/nano-fabrication, have remained challenging in patterning chemically synthesized colloidal particles, which are emerging as building blocks for functional devices. Herein, we develop a new technique - bubble-pen lithography (BPL) - to pattern colloidal particles on substrates using optically controlled microbubbles. Briefly, a single laser beam generates a microbubble at the interface of colloidal suspension and a plasmonic substrate via plasmon-enhanced photothermal effects. The microbubble captures and immobilizes the colloidal particles on the substrate through coordinated actions of Marangoni convection, surface tension, gas pressure, and substrate adhesion. Through directing the laser beam to move the microbubble, we create arbitrary single-particle patterns and particle assemblies with different resolutions and architectures. Furthermore, we have applied BPL to pattern CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on plasmonic substrates and polystyrene (PS) microparticles on two-dimensional (2D) atomic-layer materials. With the low-power operation, arbitrary patterning and applicability to general colloidal particles, BPL will find a wide range of applications in microelectronics, nanophotonics, and nanomedicine.

  16. Single spherical mirror optic for extreme ultraviolet lithography enabled by inverse lithography technology.

    PubMed

    Scranton, Gregg; Bhargava, Samarth; Ganapati, Vidya; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2014-10-20

    Traditionally, aberration correction in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection optics requires the use of multiple lossy mirrors, which results in prohibitively high source power requirements. We analyze a single spherical mirror projection optical system where aberration correction is built into the mask itself, through Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT). By having fewer mirrors, this would reduce the power requirements for EUV lithography. We model a single spherical mirror system with orders of magnitude more spherical aberration than would ever be tolerated in a traditional multiple mirror system. By using ILT, (implemented by an adjoint-based gradient descent optimization algorithm), we design photomasks that successfully print test patterns, in spite of these enormous aberrations. This mathematical method was tested with a 6 plane wave illumination source. Nonetheless, it would have poor power throughput from a totally incoherent source. PMID:25401536

  17. Programmable imprint lithography template

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.; Talin, Albert A.

    2006-10-31

    A template for imprint lithography (IL) that reduces significantly template production costs by allowing the same template to be re-used for several technology generations. The template is composed of an array of spaced-apart moveable and individually addressable rods or plungers. Thus, the template can be configured to provide a desired pattern by programming the array of plungers such that certain of the plungers are in an "up" or actuated configuration. This arrangement of "up" and "down" plungers forms a pattern composed of protruding and recessed features which can then be impressed onto a polymer film coated substrate by applying a pressure to the template impressing the programmed configuration into the polymer film. The pattern impressed into the polymer film will be reproduced on the substrate by subsequent processing.

  18. Method for maskless lithography

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

  19. Extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Shafer, David; McGuire, James

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography where the condenser includes a series of segments of a parent aspheric mirror having one foci at a quasi-point source of radiation and the other foci at the radius of a ringfield have all but one or all of their beams translated and rotated by sets of mirrors such that all of the beams pass through the real entrance pupil of a ringfield camera about one of the beams and fall onto the ringfield radius as a coincident image as an arc of the ringfield. The condenser has a set of correcting mirrors with one of the correcting mirrors of each set, or a mirror that is common to said sets of mirrors, from which the radiation emanates, is a concave mirror that is positioned to shape a beam segment having a chord angle of about 25 to 85 degrees into a second beam segment having a chord angle of about 0 to 60 degrees.

  20. Nanoimprint lithography for nanodevice fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelo, Steven; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-09-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a compelling technique for low cost nanoscale device fabrication. The precise and repeatable replication of nanoscale patterns from a single high resolution patterning step makes the NIL technique much more versatile than other expensive techniques such as e-beam or even helium ion beam lithography. Furthermore, the use of mechanical deformation during the NIL process enables grayscale lithography with only a single patterning step, not achievable with any other conventional lithography techniques. These strengths enable the fabrication of unique nanoscale devices by NIL for a variety of applications including optics, plasmonics and even biotechnology. Recent advances in throughput and yield in NIL processes demonstrate the potential of being adopted for mainstream semiconductor device fabrication as well.

  1. Condenser for extreme-UV lithography with discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system, for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography, employs quasi grazing-incidence collector mirrors that are coated with a suitable reflective metal such as ruthenium to collect radiation from a discharge source to minimize the effect of contaminant accumulation on the collecting mirrors.

  2. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhurl, Avijit K.

    2000-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  3. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit

    2001-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  4. EUV lithography optics for sub-9nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, Bernhard; Migura, Sascha; Kaiser, Winfried; Neumann, Jens Timo; van Schoot, Jan

    2015-03-01

    EUV lithography for resolution below 9 nm requires the numerical aperture of the projection optics to be significantly larger than 0.45. A configuration of 4x magnification, full field size and 6'' reticle is not feasible anymore. The increased chief ray angle and higher NA at reticle lead to non-acceptable shadowing effects, which can only be controlled by increasing the magnification, hence reducing the system productivity. We demonstrate that the best compromise in imaging, productivity and field split is a so-called anamorphic magnification and a half field of 26 x 16.5 mm². We discuss the optical solutions for anamorphic high-NA lithography.

  5. X-ray lithography: a system integration effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Robert A.; Heaton, John; Vladimirsky, Yuli; Simon, Klaus

    1999-06-01

    Despite growing expectations of significant progress in projection lithography using shorter wavelengths, x-ray lithography is still the most developed and production ready technology compared with the other NGL approaches. For the timely introduction of this technology into the manufacturing environment the development of fully integrated x-ray lithography systems becomes very important. Reflecting manufacturing and R and D demands, the x-ray technology integration has been pursued for goth synchrotron radiation and x-ray point source based approaches. While the synchrotron-based approach provides the high volume platform, the point source will provide the platform for low volume production and R and D efforts. SAL recognizes the needs for both, a synchrotron based stepper as well as a point source stepper and is focused on meeting those needs. This paper will present the status of integration efforts at SAL utilizing a point source system.

  6. Photoinhibition superresolution lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Darren Lawrence

    While the prospect of nanoscale manufacturing has generated tremendous excitement, arbitrary patterning at nanometer length scales cannot be brought about with current photolithography---the technology that for decades has driven electronics miniaturization and enabled mass production of digital logic, memory, MEMS and flat-panel displays. This is due to the relatively long wavelength of light and diffraction, which imposes a physical not technological limit on the resolution of a far-field optical pattern. Photoinhibited superresolution (PInSR) lithography is a new scheme designed to beat the diffraction limit through two-color confinement of photopolymerization and, via efficient single-photon absorption kinetics, also be high-throughput capable. This thesis describes development of an integrated optical and materials system for investigating spatiotemporal dynamics of photoinhibited superresolution lithography, with a demonstrated 3x superresolution beyond the diffraction limit. The two-color response, arising from orthogonal photogeneration of species that participate in competing reactions, is shown to be highly complex. This is both a direct and indirect consequence of mobility. Interesting trade-offs arise: thin-film resins (necessitated by single-photon absorption kinetics) require high viscosity for film stability, but the photoinhibition effect is suppressed in viscous resins. Despite this apparent suppression, which can be overcome with high excitation of the photoinhibition system, the low mobility afforded by viscous materials is beneficial for confinement of active species. Diffusion-induced blurring of patterned photoinhibition is problematic in a resin with viscosity = 1,000 cP, and overcome in a resin with viscosity eta = 500,000 cP. Superresolution of factor 3x beyond the diffraction limit is demonstrated at 0.2 NA, with additional results indicating superresolution ability at 1.2 NA. Investigating the effect of diminished photoinhibition efficacy

  7. Polymer nanofibers by soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisignano, Dario; Maruccio, Giuseppe; Mele, Elisa; Persano, Luana; Di Benedetto, Francesca; Cingolani, Roberto

    2005-09-01

    The fabrication of polymeric fibers by soft lithography is demonstrated. Polyurethane, patterned by capillarity-induced molding with high-resolution elastomeric templates, forms mm-long fibers with a diameter below 0.3μm. The Young's modulus of the fabricated structures, evaluated by force-distance scanning probe spectroscopy, has a value of 0.8MPa. This is an excellent example of nanostructures feasible by the combination of soft nanopatterning and high-resolution fabrication approaches for master templates, and particularly electron-beam lithography.

  8. Porphyrin-Based Photocatalytic Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J; Stone, G; Christian, A; Dugan, L; Hiddessen, A; Wu, K J; Wu, L; Hamilton, J; Stockton, C; Hubbell, J

    2007-10-15

    Photocatalytic lithography is an emerging technique that couples light with coated mask materials in order to pattern surface chemistry. We excite porphyrins to create radical species that photocatalytically oxidize, and thereby pattern, chemistries in the local vicinity. The technique advantageously does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, it is fast and robust and the wavelength of light does not limit the resolution of patterned features. We have patterned proteins and cells in order to demonstrate the utility of photocatalytic lithography in life science applications.

  9. Microfabrication using soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Mei

    Soft Lithography is a group of non-photolithographic techniques currently being explored in our group. Four such techniques-microcontact printing (μCP), replica molding (REM), micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC), and microtransfer molding (μTM)-have been demonstrated for fabricating micro- and nanostructures of a variety of materials with dimension >=30 nm. Part I (Chapters 1-5) reviews several aspects of the three molding techniques REM, MIMIC, and μTM. Chapters 1-3 describe μTM and MIMIC, and the use of these techniques in the fabrication of functional devices. μTM is capable of generating μm-scale structures over large areas, on both planar and contoured surfaces, and is able to make 3-dimensional structures layer by layer. The capability of μTM and MIMIC has been demonstrated in the fabrication of single-mode waveguides, waveguide couplers and interferometers. The coupling between waveguides can be tailored by waveguide spacing or the differential in curing time between the waveguides and the cladding. Chapters 4-5 demonstrate the combination of REM and shrinkable polystyrene (PS) films to reduce the feature size of microstructures and to generate microstructures with high aspect ratios on both planar and curved surfaces. A shrinkable PS film is patterned with relief structures, and then heated and shrinks. Thermal shrinkage results in a 100-fold increase in the aspect ratio of the patterned microstructures in the PS film. The microstructures in the shrunken PS films can be transferred to many other materials by REM. Part II (Chapters 6-7) focuses on two issues in the microfabrication using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as ultrathin resists. Chapter 6 describes a selective etching solution for transferring patterns of SAMs of alkanethiolates into the underlying layers (e.g., gold, silver, and copper). This etching solution uses thiosulfate as the ligand that coordinates to the metal ions, and ferricyanide as the oxidant. It has been demonstrated to be

  10. Graphic Arts/Offset Lithography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoisington, James; Metcalf, Joseph

    This revised curriculum for graphic arts is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary students with entry-level skills and an understanding of current printing technology. It contains lesson plans based on entry-level competencies for offset lithography as identified by educators and industry representatives. The guide is divided into 15…

  11. Biomolecular Patterning via Photocatalytic Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J P; Hiddessen, A L; Wu, K J; Christian, A T; Dugan, L C; Stone, G; Camarero, J; Hinz, A K; Hubbell, J A

    2005-02-18

    We have developed a novel method for patterning surface chemistry: Photocatalytic Lithography. This technique relies on inexpensive stamp materials and light; it does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, and the wavelength of light should not limit feature resolution. We have demonstrated the utility of this technique through the patterning of proteins, single cells and bacteria.

  12. Mask and lithography techniques for FPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Wahlsten, M.; Sundelin, E.; Hansson, G.; Svensson, A.

    2015-09-01

    Large-field projection lithography for FPDs has developed gradually since the 90s. The LCD screen technology has remained largely unchanged and incremental development has given us better image quality, larger screen sizes, and above all lower cost per area. Recently new types of mobile devices with very high pixel density and/or OLED displays have given rise to dramatically higher requirem ents on photomask technology. Devices with 600 ppi or m ore need lithography with higher optical resolution and better linewidth control. OLED di splays pose new challenges with high sensitivity to transistor parameters and to capacitive cross-talk. New mask requirements leads to new maskwriter requirements and Mycronic has developed a new generation of large -area mask writers with significantly improved properties. This paper discusses and shows data for the improved writers. Mask production to high er quality stan dards also need metrology to verify the quality and Mycronic has introduced a 2D metrology tool with accuracy adequate for current and future masks. New printing or additive methods of producing disp lays on plastic or metal foil will make low-cost disp lays available. This inexpensive type of disp lays will exist side by side with the photographic quality displays of TVs and mobile devices, which will continue to be a challenge in terms of mask and production quality.

  13. Multi-bounce laser-based sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Robert A.; Landis, Geoffrey

    2001-02-01

    A laser-based lightsail craft is proposed in which the laser beam is operated in a multi-bounce mode, such that after first striking the lightsail, the beam is reflected back to a source reflector where it is again directed to the lightsail. Recent developments in nearly ideal reflectors permit more than 1000 bounces, which reduce the laser power requirements by a factor of 1000 as compared to conventional laser-based lightsail proposals. Using the multi-bounce lightsail approach coupled with lasers operating in the power range of 100 MW to 1 GW, the details of a mission to Mars requiring only a sub-100 day transit, and an orbital transfer vehicle designed to transport cargo between Phobos and Deimos are examined. .

  14. Gain-coupled distributed feedback laser based on periodic surface anode canals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Jia, Peng; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Li; Chen, Hong; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Xing; Shan, Xiaonan; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2015-10-20

    A single-longitude-mode, broad-stripe, gain-coupled, distributed-feedback laser based on periodic surface anode canals (PSACs) is demonstrated. The PSACs, produced by i-line lithography, enhance the contrast of periodic current density in the active layer without introducing effective photon coupling; calculated grating κL is only 0.026. Power of 144.6 mW at 968.8 nm, with spectrum linewidth less than 0.04 nm on every uncoated cleavage facet, is obtained at a current of 1.2 A with a side-mode suppression ratio >29  dB. PMID:26560371

  15. Photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods. A photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet radiation of boron carbide polymers, hydrochlorocarbons and mixtures thereof.

  16. Anamorphic high-NA EUV lithography optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migura, Sascha; Kneer, Bernhard; Neumann, Jens Timo; Kaiser, Winfried; van Schoot, Jan

    2015-09-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) for a limit resolution below 8 nm requires the numerical aperture (NA) of the projection optics to be larger than 0.50. For such a high-NA optics a configuration of 4x magnification, full field size of 26 x 33 mm² and 6'' mask is not feasible anymore. The increased chief ray angle and higher NA at reticle lead to non-acceptable mask shadowing effects. These shadowing effects can only be controlled by increasing the magnification, hence reducing the system productivity or demanding larger mask sizes. We demonstrate that the best compromise in imaging, productivity and field split is a so-called anamorphic magnification and a half field of 26 x 16.5 mm² but utilizing existing 6'' mask infrastructure. We discuss the optical solutions for such anamorphic high-NA EUVL.

  17. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  18. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  19. EUV Lithography: New Metrology Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Obert

    2007-09-26

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography is one of the most promising printing techniques for high volume semiconductor manufacturing at the 22 nm half-pitch device node and beyond. Because its imaging wavelength is approximately twenty times shorter than those currently in use (13.5 nm versus 193-248 nm) and because EUV optics and masks must be provided with highly-precise reflective multilayer coatings, EUV lithography presents a number of new and difficult metrology challenges. In this paper, the current status of the metrology tools being used to characterize the figure and finish of EUV mirror surfaces, the defectivity and flatness of EUV mask blanks and the outgassing rates of EUV resist materials are discussed.

  20. Maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Patterson, David O.; Gough, Richard A.

    2005-05-03

    A maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system is a system for projecting patterns onto a resist layer on a wafer with feature size down to below 100 nm. The MMRL system operates without a stencil mask. The patterns are generated by switching beamlets on and off from a two electrode blanking system or pattern generator. The pattern generator controllably extracts the beamlet pattern from an ion source and is followed by a beam reduction and acceleration column.

  1. Protein assay structured on paper by using lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, E.; Nargang, T. M.; Al Bitar, W.; Waterkotte, B.; Rapp, B. E.

    2015-03-01

    There are two main challenges in producing a robust, paper-based analytical device. The first one is to create a hydrophobic barrier which unlike the commonly used wax barriers does not break if the paper is bent. The second one is the creation of the (bio-)specific sensing layer. For this proteins have to be immobilized without diminishing their activity. We solve both problems using light-based fabrication methods that enable fast, efficient manufacturing of paper-based analytical devices. The first technique relies on silanization by which we create a flexible hydrophobic barrier made of dimethoxydimethylsilane. The second technique demonstrated within this paper uses photobleaching to immobilize proteins by means of maskless projection lithography. Both techniques have been tested on a classical lithography setup using printed toner masks and on a lithography system for maskless lithography. Using these setups we could demonstrate that the proposed manufacturing techniques can be carried out at low costs. The resolution of the paper-based analytical devices obtained with static masks was lower due to the lower mask resolution. Better results were obtained using advanced lithography equipment. By doing so we demonstrated, that our technique enables fabrication of effective hydrophobic boundary layers with a thickness of only 342 μm. Furthermore we showed that flourescine-5-biotin can be immobilized on the non-structured paper and be employed for the detection of streptavidinalkaline phosphatase. By carrying out this assay on a paper-based analytical device which had been structured using the silanization technique we proofed biological compatibility of the suggested patterning technique.

  2. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  3. Charting CEBL's role in mainstream semiconductor lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, David K.

    2013-09-01

    historically kept it out of mainstream fabs. Thanks to continuing EBDW advances combined with the industry's move to unidirectional (1D) gridded layout style, EBDW promises to cost-efficiently complement 193nm ArF immersion (193i) optical lithography in high volume manufacturing (HVM). Patterning conventional 2D design layouts with 193i is a major roadblock in device scaling: the resolution limitations of optical lithography equipment have led to higher mask cost and increased lithography complexity. To overcome the challenge, IC designers have used 1D layouts with "lines and cuts" in critical layers.1 Leading logic and memory chipmakers have been producing advanced designs with lines-and-cuts in HVM for several technology nodes in recent years. However, cut masks in multiple optical patterning are getting extremely costly. Borodovsky proposes Complementary Lithography in which another lithography technology is used to pattern line-cuts in critical layers to complement optical lithography.2 Complementary E-Beam Lithography (CEBL) is a candidate to pattern the Cuts of optically printed Lines. The concept of CEBL is gaining acceptance. However, challenges in throughput, scaling, and data preparation rate are threatening to deny CEBL's role in solving industry's lithography problem. This paper will examine the following issues: The challenges of massively parallel pixel writing The solutions of multiple mini-column design/architecture in: Boosting CEBL throughput Resolving issues of CD control, CDU, LER, data rate, higher resolution, and 450mm wafers The role of CEBL in next-generation solution of semiconductor lithography

  4. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ``document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.`` This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2`s commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2`s organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2`s strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed.

  5. Laser-based detection of chemical contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmer, Robert G.; Kelly, James F.; Martin, Steven W.; Mong, Gary M.; Sharpe, Steven W.

    1997-02-01

    The goal of our work is tow fold; 1) develop a portable and rapid laser based air sampler for detection of specific chemical contraband and 2) compile a spectral data base in both the near- and mid-IR of sufficiently high quality to be useful for gas phase spectroscopic identification of chemical contraband. During the synthesis or 'cooking' of many illicit chemical substances, relatively high concentrations of volatile solvents, chemical precursors and byproducts are unavoidably released to the atmosphere. In some instances, the final product may have sufficient vapor pressure to be detectable in the surrounding air. The detection of a single high-value effluent or the simultaneous detection of two or more low-value effluents can be used as reliable indicators of a nearby clandestine cooking operation. The designation of high- versus low-value effluent reflects both the commercial availability and legitimate usage of a specific chemical. This paper will describe PNNL's progress and efforts towards the development of a portable laser based air sampling system for the detection of clandestine manufacturing of methamphetamine. Although our current efforts ar focused on methamphetamine, we see no fundamental limitations on detection of other forms of chemical contraband manufacturing. This also includes the synthesis of certain classes of chemical weapons that have recently been deployed by terrorist groups.

  6. Direct write electron beam lithography: a historical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Hans C.

    2010-09-01

    Maskless pattern generation capability in combination with practically limitless resolution made probe-forming electron beam systems attractive tools in the semiconductor fabrication process. However, serial exposure of pattern elements with a scanning beam is a slow process and throughput presented a key challenge in electron beam lithography from the beginning. To meet this challenge imaging concepts with increasing exposure efficiency have been developed projecting ever larger number of pixels in parallel. This evolution started in the 1960s with the SEM-type Gaussian beam systems writing one pixel at a time directly on wafers. During the 1970s IBM pioneered the concept of shaped beams containing multiple pixels which led to higher throughput and an early success of e-beam direct write (EBDW) in large scale manufacturing of semiconductor chips. EBDW in a mix-and match approach with optical lithography provided unique flexibility in part number management and cycle time reduction and proved extremely cost effective in IBM's Quick-Turn-Around-Time (QTAT) facilities. But shaped beams did not keep pace with Moore's law because of limitations imposed by the physics of charged particles: Coulomb interactions between beam electrons cause image blur and consequently limit beam current and throughput. A new technology approach was needed. Physically separating beam electrons into multiple beamlets to reduce Coulomb interaction led to the development of massively parallel projection of pixels. Electron projection lithography (EPL) - a mask based imaging technique emulating optical steppers - was pursued during the 1990s by Bell Labs with SCALPEL and by IBM with PREVAIL in partnership with Nikon. In 2003 Nikon shipped the first NCR-EB1A e-beam stepper based on the PREVAIL technology to Selete. It exposed pattern segments containing 10 million pixels in single shot and represented the first successful demonstration of massively parallel pixel projection. However the window

  7. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  8. Optical Lithography on non-flat surfaces; A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Clayton; Newton, Conrad; Geerts, Wilhelmus; Palmer, Daniel; Tamir, Dan

    2008-10-01

    Only a few studies of optical lithography on non-flat substrates have been reported. Most of these systems only work on polished very well defined substrates. For example, Ball Semiconductor developed a system for projection lithography on polished spherical balls of 1 mm diameter. We propose a system that works on an arbitrary surface and enables lithography on a wide variety of substrates including the wings of insects or a single crystalline grain of a ceramic sample. The system consists of a computer controlled laser beam that is focused through an optical microscope on an XY-table. The size of the beam can be changed by varying the size of the aperture or the change of the objective. The focus of the microscope can be automatically adjusted enabling to follow the 3D profile of the sample's surface. The laser intensity is automatically adjusted to keep the dose constant as the samples profile and the speed of the xy-table very. A cross-compiler, which utilizes principles of computer graphics to figure the required exposure parameters based on the surface of the object was developed. It accepts a text file, a vector based graphic file, or a raster image and generates a file with instructions for the laser beam writer.

  9. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  10. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  11. Mask topography effect in chromeless phase lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipsen, Vicky; Bekaert, Joost; Vandenberghe, Geert; Jonckheere, Rik; Van Den Broeke, Douglas; Socha, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Different types of phase-shift masks (PSM) in combination with the proper illumination condition are widely used to allow 193nm lithography to print ever-decreasing pitches with a sufficient process window. A viable option for the 65nm node is Chromeless Phase Lithography (CPL), which combines a chromeless phase shift mask and 193nm off-axis illumination. It has been demonstrated that CPL has a high flexibility for through pitch imaging. Also concerning mask making CPL masks showed advantages over alternating and attenuated PSM [1]. This paper discusses how the mask quality and its topography influence the imaging performance of CPL. It is shown that mask topography is an important factor for CPL, as the imaging relies also on the quartz depth differences in the mask. The wafer image is sensitive to phase variations induced by the quartz etch depth and the sidewall profile. Their impact is separately studied using rigorous 3D mask electro-magnetic field simulations (Sigma-C Solid-CM). Correlation of experimental results to simulation explains that the observed pitch-dependent tilt in the Bossung curves is mainly related to the 3D character of the mask. In search for a global compensation valid through pitch, the simulation study also evaluates the effect of other contributors such as lens aberrations in the optical system, assist features and half-toning Cr zebra lines in the design. However, as the tilt is inherent to the CPL mask fabrication, a compensation of the Bossung tilt effect can only be obtained for specific combinations of all sources, as will be shown. We concentrate on the imaging of 70nm lines and 100nm contact holes in pitches ranging from dense up to isolated. The wafers are exposed on an ASML PAS5500/1100 ArF scanner working with a 0.75NA projection lens and various types of off-axis illumination. The wafers are evaluated on a top-down CD SEM (KLA-Tencor 8250XR).

  12. Gradient-based inverse extreme ultraviolet lithography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Wang, Jie; Chen, Xuanbo; Li, Yanqiu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-08-20

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the most promising successor of current deep ultraviolet (DUV) lithography. The very short wavelength, reflective optics, and nontelecentric structure of EUV lithography systems bring in different imaging phenomena into the lithographic image synthesis problem. This paper develops a gradient-based inverse algorithm for EUV lithography systems to effectively improve the image fidelity by comprehensively compensating the optical proximity effect, flare, photoresist, and mask shadowing effects. A block-based method is applied to iteratively optimize the main features and subresolution assist features (SRAFs) of mask patterns, while simultaneously preserving the mask manufacturability. The mask shadowing effect may be compensated by a retargeting method based on a calibrated shadowing model. Illustrative simulations at 22 and 16 nm technology nodes are presented to validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:26368764

  13. Nanometer x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Khan Malek, Chantal G.

    1999-10-01

    New developments for x-ray nanomachining include pattern transfer onto non-planar surfaces coated with electrodeposited resists using synchrotron radiation x-rays through extremely high-resolution mask made by chemically assisted focused ion beam lithography. Standard UV photolithographic processes cannot maintain sub-micron definitions over large variation in feature topography. The ability of x-ray printing to pattern thin or thick layers of photoresist with high resolution on non-planar surfaces of large and complex topographies with limited diffraction and scattering effects and no substrate reflection is known and can be exploited for patterning microsystems with non-planar 3D geometries as well as multisided and multilayered substrates. Thin conformal coatings of electro-deposited positive and negative tone photoresist have been shown to be x-ray sensitive and accommodate sub-micro pattern transfer over surface of extreme topographical variations. Chemically assisted focused ion beam selective anisotropic erosion was used to fabricate x-ray masks directly. Masks with feature sizes less than 20 nm through 7 microns of gold were made on bulk silicon substrates and x-ray mask membranes. The technique is also applicable to other high density materials. Such masks enable the primary and secondary patterning and/or 3D machining of Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems over large depths or complex relief and the patterning of large surface areas with sub-optically dimensioned features.

  14. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y

    1998-09-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed.

  15. Semiconductor foundry, lithography, and partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Burn J.

    2002-07-01

    The semiconductor foundry took off in 1990 with an annual capacity of less than 0.1M 8-inch-equivalent wafers at the 2-mm node. In 2000, the annual capacity rose to more than 10M. Initially, the technology practiced at foundries was 1 to 2 generations behind that at integrated device manufacturers (IDMs). Presently, the progress in 0.13-mm manufacturing goes hand-in-hand with any of the IDMs. There is a two-order of magnitude rise in output and the progress of technology development outpaces IDMs. What are the reasons of the success? Is it possible to sustain the pace? This paper shows the quick rise of foundries in capacity, sales, and market share. It discusses the their uniqueness which gives rise to advantages in conjunction with challenges. It also shows the role foundries take with their customer partners and supplier partners, their mutual dependencies, as well as expectations. What role then does lithography play in the foundries? What are the lithographic challenges to sustain the pace of technology? The experience of technology development and transfer, at one of the major foundries, is used to illustrate the difficulties and progresses made. Looking into the future, as semiconductor manufacturing will become even more expensive and capital investment more prohibitive, we will make an attempt to suggest possible solutions.

  16. Multi-focal multiphoton lithography.

    PubMed

    Ritschdorff, Eric T; Nielson, Rex; Shear, Jason B

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton lithography (MPL) provides unparalleled capabilities for creating high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) materials from a broad spectrum of building blocks and with few limitations on geometry, qualities that have been key to the design of chemically, mechanically, and biologically functional microforms. Unfortunately, the reliance of MPL on laser scanning limits the speed at which fabrication can be performed, making it impractical in many instances to produce large-scale, high-resolution objects such as complex micromachines, 3D microfluidics, etc. Previously, others have demonstrated the possibility of using multiple laser foci to simultaneously perform MPL at numerous sites in parallel, but use of a stage-scanning system to specify fabrication coordinates resulted in the production of identical features at each focal position. As a more general solution to the bottleneck problem, we demonstrate here the feasibility for performing multi-focal MPL using a dynamic mask to differentially modulate foci, an approach that enables each fabrication site to create independent (uncorrelated) features within a larger, integrated microform. In this proof-of-concept study, two simultaneously scanned foci produced the expected two-fold decrease in fabrication time, and this approach could be readily extended to many scanning foci by using a more powerful laser. Finally, we show that use of multiple foci in MPL can be exploited to assign heterogeneous properties (such as differential swelling) to micromaterials at distinct positions within a fabrication zone.

  17. Multi-focal multiphoton lithography.

    PubMed

    Ritschdorff, Eric T; Nielson, Rex; Shear, Jason B

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton lithography (MPL) provides unparalleled capabilities for creating high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) materials from a broad spectrum of building blocks and with few limitations on geometry, qualities that have been key to the design of chemically, mechanically, and biologically functional microforms. Unfortunately, the reliance of MPL on laser scanning limits the speed at which fabrication can be performed, making it impractical in many instances to produce large-scale, high-resolution objects such as complex micromachines, 3D microfluidics, etc. Previously, others have demonstrated the possibility of using multiple laser foci to simultaneously perform MPL at numerous sites in parallel, but use of a stage-scanning system to specify fabrication coordinates resulted in the production of identical features at each focal position. As a more general solution to the bottleneck problem, we demonstrate here the feasibility for performing multi-focal MPL using a dynamic mask to differentially modulate foci, an approach that enables each fabrication site to create independent (uncorrelated) features within a larger, integrated microform. In this proof-of-concept study, two simultaneously scanned foci produced the expected two-fold decrease in fabrication time, and this approach could be readily extended to many scanning foci by using a more powerful laser. Finally, we show that use of multiple foci in MPL can be exploited to assign heterogeneous properties (such as differential swelling) to micromaterials at distinct positions within a fabrication zone. PMID:22282105

  18. Secondary Electrons in EUV Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Torok, Justin; Re, Ryan Del; Herbol, Henry; Das, Sanjana; Bocharova, Irina; Paolucci, Angela; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Ventrice Jr., Carl; Lifshin, Eric; Denbeaux, Greg; Brainard, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary electrons play critical roles in several imaging technologies, including extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. At longer wavelengths of light (e.g. 193 and 248 nm), the photons are directly involved in the photochemistry occurring during photolysis. EUV light (13.5 nm, 92 eV), however, first creates a photoelectron, and this electron, or its subsequent daughter electrons create most of the chemical changes that occur during exposure. Despite the importance of these electrons, the details surrounding the chemical events leading to acid production remain poorly understood. Previously reported experimental results using high PAG-loaded resists have demonstrated that up to five or six photoacids can be generated per incident photon. Until recently, only electron recombination events were thought to play a role in acid generation, requiring that at least as many secondary electrons are produced to yield a given number of acid molecules. However, the initial results we have obtained using a Monte Carlo-based modeling program, LESiS, demonstrate that only two to three secondary electrons are made per absorbed EUV photon. A more comprehensive understanding of EUV-induced acid generation is therefore needed for the development of higher performance resists

  19. Speckle disturbance limit in laser-based cinema projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschaffelt, Guy; Roelandt, Stijn; Meuret, Youri; van den Broeck, Wendy; Kilpi, Katriina; Lievens, Bram; Jacobs, An; Janssens, Peter; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-09-01

    In a multi-disciplinary effort, we investigate the level of speckle that can be tolerated in a laser cinema projector based on a quality of experience experiment with movie clips shown to a test audience in a real-life movie theatre setting. We identify a speckle disturbance threshold by statistically analyzing the observers’ responses for different values of the amount of speckle, which was monitored using a well-defined speckle measurement method. The analysis shows that the speckle perception of a human observer is not only dependent on the objectively measured amount of speckle, but it is also strongly influenced by the image content. The speckle disturbance limit for movies turns out to be substantially larger than that for still images, and hence is easier to attain.

  20. Speckle disturbance limit in laser-based cinema projection systems.

    PubMed

    Verschaffelt, Guy; Roelandt, Stijn; Meuret, Youri; Van den Broeck, Wendy; Kilpi, Katriina; Lievens, Bram; Jacobs, An; Janssens, Peter; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    In a multi-disciplinary effort, we investigate the level of speckle that can be tolerated in a laser cinema projector based on a quality of experience experiment with movie clips shown to a test audience in a real-life movie theatre setting. We identify a speckle disturbance threshold by statistically analyzing the observers' responses for different values of the amount of speckle, which was monitored using a well-defined speckle measurement method. The analysis shows that the speckle perception of a human observer is not only dependent on the objectively measured amount of speckle, but it is also strongly influenced by the image content. The speckle disturbance limit for movies turns out to be substantially larger than that for still images, and hence is easier to attain. PMID:26370531

  1. Speckle disturbance limit in laser-based cinema projection systems.

    PubMed

    Verschaffelt, Guy; Roelandt, Stijn; Meuret, Youri; Van den Broeck, Wendy; Kilpi, Katriina; Lievens, Bram; Jacobs, An; Janssens, Peter; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    In a multi-disciplinary effort, we investigate the level of speckle that can be tolerated in a laser cinema projector based on a quality of experience experiment with movie clips shown to a test audience in a real-life movie theatre setting. We identify a speckle disturbance threshold by statistically analyzing the observers' responses for different values of the amount of speckle, which was monitored using a well-defined speckle measurement method. The analysis shows that the speckle perception of a human observer is not only dependent on the objectively measured amount of speckle, but it is also strongly influenced by the image content. The speckle disturbance limit for movies turns out to be substantially larger than that for still images, and hence is easier to attain.

  2. Speckle disturbance limit in laser-based cinema projection systems

    PubMed Central

    Verschaffelt, Guy; Roelandt, Stijn; Meuret, Youri; Van den Broeck, Wendy; Kilpi, Katriina; Lievens, Bram; Jacobs, An; Janssens, Peter; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    In a multi-disciplinary effort, we investigate the level of speckle that can be tolerated in a laser cinema projector based on a quality of experience experiment with movie clips shown to a test audience in a real-life movie theatre setting. We identify a speckle disturbance threshold by statistically analyzing the observers’ responses for different values of the amount of speckle, which was monitored using a well-defined speckle measurement method. The analysis shows that the speckle perception of a human observer is not only dependent on the objectively measured amount of speckle, but it is also strongly influenced by the image content. The speckle disturbance limit for movies turns out to be substantially larger than that for still images, and hence is easier to attain. PMID:26370531

  3. Vacuum-free self-powered parallel electron lithography with sub-35-nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuerui; Lal, Amit

    2010-06-01

    The critical dimension, throughput, and cost of nanolithography are central to developing commercially viable high-performance nanodevices. Available top-down lithography approaches to fabricate large-area nanostructures at low cost, such as controllable nanowire (NW) array fabrication for solar cells applications, are challenging due to the requirement of both high lithography resolution and high throughput. Here, a minimum 35 nm resolution is experimentally demonstrated by using a new mask fabrication technique in our demonstrated vacuum-free high-throughput self-powered parallel electron lithography (SPEL) system, which uses large-area planar radioactive beta-electron thin film emitters to parallel expose e-beam resist through a stencil mask. SPEL is the first-time demonstrated vacuum-free electron lithography, which overcomes the membrane mask distortion challenge that was shown to be the Achilles heel of previous attempts at electron projection lithography in vacuum. Monte Carlo simulations show that by using beryllium tritide thin film source in SPEL system, the exposure time can be reduced down to 2 min for each large-area (10000 cm(2) or more) parallel exposure, with resolution not larger than 20 nm. Moreover, experimental demonstration of large-area diameter-and-density controllable vertical NW arrays fabricated by SPEL shows its promising utility for an application requiring large-area nanostructure definition. PMID:20481509

  4. Cost-effective x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roltsch, Tom J.

    1991-08-01

    The push towards faster, denser VLSI device structures and eventually to ULSI devices means ever-decreasing design rules for IC manufacturers. In order to define patterns on silicon and gallium arsenide substrates with feature sizes of 0.25 microns, lithography, metallization, and electronic materials processing techniques will be pushed beyond current limitations. Of these technologies, lithography in the sub-0.5 micron region appears to be the main obstacle yet to be overcome. As deep-UV optical systems become more expensive and the useful field sized decrease in the attempt to achieve finer resolutions, the question of whether to switch to an alternate lithographic method becomes imminent. X-ray lithography is the leading candidate. In this paper, the question of whether x-ray lithography is economically superior to optical lithography and the cost-effectiveness of x-ray lithography are addressed. Also, the question of how x-ray lithography can be performed in a production environment is considered. First shown is that more elaborate optical systems are simply not going to match x-ray proximity system in terms of resolution because of the need to use exotic lens materials or complicated and ever finer reflection systems, none of which can correct for diffraction effects, yet must be corrected for every other aberration. The economic superiority of a synchrotron-based x- ray lithography beamline is demonstrated in a production facility using a processing-cost model based on Shinji Okazaki's cost-per-bit model. Considered, as well, is the strong possibility that exists for the use of an optically based production line which would use an anode or plasma x-ray stepper to define only the smallest geometries, such as the gate level on a DRAM chip. It is shown that it is unlikely, even pushing the limits of materials and optics, that deep-UV systems will be able to define patterns below 0.35 microns in a production environment. X-ray lithography systems could define 0

  5. High-n immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Harry; Mulkens, Jan; Graeupner, Paul; McCafferty, Diane; Markoya, Louis; Donders, Sjoerd; Cortie, Rogier; Meijers, Ralph; Evangelista, Fabrizio; Samarakone, Nandarisi

    2008-03-01

    A two-year study on the feasibility of High-n Immersion Lithography shows very promising results. This paper reports the findings of the study. The evaluation shows the tremendous progress made in the development of second-generation immersion fluid technology. Candidate fluids from several suppliers have been evaluated. All the commercial fluids evaluated are viable, so there are a number of options. Life tests have been conducted on bench top fluid-handling systems and the results referenced to full-scale systems. Parameters such as Dose per Laser Pulse, Pulse Rate, Fluid Flow Rate, and Fluid Absorbency at 193nm, and Oxygen/Air Contamination Levels were explored. A detailed evaluation of phenomena such as Last Lens Element (LLE) contamination has been conducted. Lens cleaning has been evaluated. A comparison of High-n fluid-based technology and water-based immersion technology shows interesting advantages of High-n fluid in the areas of Defect and Resist Interaction. Droplet Drying tests, Resist Staining evaluations, and Resist Contrast impact studies have all been run. Defect-generating mechanisms have been identified and are being eliminated. The lower evaporation rate of the High-n fluids compared with water shows the advantages of High-n Immersion. The core issue for the technology, the availability of High-n optical material for use as the final lens element, is updated. Samples of LuAG material have been received from development partners and have been evaluated. The latest status of optical materials and the technology timelines are reported. The potential impact of the availability of the technology is discussed. Synergy with technologies such as Double Patterning is discussed. The prospects for <22nm (hp) are evaluated.

  6. Soft Lithography Using Nectar Droplets.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saheli; Chakrabarti, Aditi; Chateauminois, Antoine; Wandersman, Elie; Prevost, Alexis M; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2015-12-01

    In spite of significant advances in replication technologies, methods to produce well-defined three-dimensional structures are still at its infancy. Such a limitation would be evident if we were to produce a large array of simple and, especially, compound convex lenses, also guaranteeing that their surfaces would be molecularly smooth. Here, we report a novel method to produce such structures by cloning the 3D shape of nectar drops, found widely in nature, using conventional soft lithography.The elementary process involves transfer of a thin patch of the sugar solution coated on a glass slide onto a hydrophobic substrate on which this patch evolves into a microdroplet. Upon the absorption of water vapor, such a microdroplet grows linearly with time, and its final size can be controlled by varying its exposure time to water vapor. At any stage of the evolution of the size of the drop, its shape can be cloned onto a soft elastomer by following the well-known methods of molding and cross-linking the same. A unique new science that emerges in our attempt to understand the transfer of the sugar patch and its evolution to a spherical drop is the elucidation of the mechanics underlying the contact of a deformable sphere against a solid support intervening a thin liquid film. A unique aspect of this work is to demonstrate that higher level structures can also be generated by transferring even smaller nucleation sites on the surface of the primary lenses and then allowing them to grow by absorption of water vapor. What results at the end is either a well-controlled distribution of smooth hemispherical lenses or compound structures that could have potential applications in the fundamental studies of contact mechanics, wettability, and even in optics. PMID:26563988

  7. Laser-Based Measurement Of Torsional Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, P. G.; Halliwell, N. A.

    1986-07-01

    Investigations of the torsional vibration characteristics of shaft systems which transmit pulsating torques are an important part of a machinery designer's responsibility. Satisfactory operation of such systems depends to a large extent on successful treatment of this vibration problem, since incorrectly or insufficiently controlled torsional oscillations can lead to fatigue failure, rapid bearing wear, gear hammer etc. The problem is particularly severe in engine crankshaft design where numerous failures have been traced to abnormal vibration at "critical" speeds. Traditionally, the monitoring of torsional oscillation has been performed using strain gauges, slip rings and a variety of mechanical and electrical "torsiographs". More recently systems employing slotted discs or toothed wheels together with proximity transducers have been preferred, but a disadvantage arises from all these methods in that they require contact with the rotating component which necessitates "downtime" for transducer attachment. Moreover, physical access to the rotating surface is often restricted thus making the use of such methods impractical. The "cross-beam" laser velocimeter provides a means of measuring torsional vibration by a non-contact method, thus effectively overcoming the disadvantages of previous measurement systems. This well established laser-based instrument provides a time-resolved voltage analogue of shaft tangential surface velocity and laboratory and field tests have shown it to be both accurate and reliable. The versatility of this instrument, however, is restricted by the need for accurate positioning, since the velocimeter must be arranged so that the rotating surface always traverses the beam intersection region, which is typically only a fraction of a millimetre in length. As a consequence use is restricted to components of circular cross section. This paper compares and contrasts the "cross-beam" system with a new laser instrument, the laser torsional vibrometer

  8. Lithography and design in partnership: a new roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahng, Andrew B.

    2008-10-01

    We discuss the notion of a 'shared technology roadmap' between lithography and design from several perspectives. First, we examine cultural gaps and other intrinsic barriers to a shared roadmap. Second, we discuss how lithography technology can change the design technology roadmap. Third, we discuss how design technology can change the lithography technology roadmap. We conclude with an example of the 'flavor' of technology roadmapping activity that can truly bridge lithography and design.

  9. SYSTEM CONSIDERATIONS FOR MASKLESS LITHOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Joy, David; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Clonts, Lloyd G

    2004-01-01

    Lithographic processes for printing device structures on integrated circuits (ICs) are the fundamental technology behind Moore's law. Next-generation techniques like maskless lithography or ML2 have the advantage that the long, tedious and expensive process of fabricating a unique mask for the manufactured chip is not necessary. However, there are some rather daunting problems with establishing ML2 as a viable commercial technology. The data rate necessary for ML2 to be competitive in manufacturing is not feasible with technology in the near future. There is also doubt that the competing technologies for the writing mechanisms and corresponding photoresist (or analogous medium) will be able to accurately produce the desired patterns necessary to produce multi-layer semiconductor devices. In this work, we model the maskless printing system from a signal processing point of view, utilizing image processing algorithms and concepts to study the effects of various real-world constraints and their implications for a ML2 system. The ML2 elements are discrete devices, and it is doubtful that their motion can be controlled to the level where a one-for-one element to exposed pixel relationship is allowable. Some level of sub-element resolution can be achieved with gray scale levels, but with the highly integrated manufacturing practices required to achieve massive parallelism, the most effective elements will be simple on-off switches that fire a fixed level of energy at the target medium. Consequently gray-scale level devices are likely not an option. Another problem with highly integrated manufacturing methods is device uniformity. Consequently, we analyze the redundant scanning array concept (RSA) conceived by Berglund et al. which can defeat many of these problems. We determine some basic equations governing its application and we focus on applying the technique to an array of low-energy electron emitters. Using the results of Monte Carlo simulations on electron beam

  10. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Seppala, L.G.

    1991-03-26

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm[sup 2]. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics. 9 figures.

  11. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1991-01-01

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

  12. Polymer-based optical interconnects using nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, Arjen; Wiegersma, Sjoukje; Offrein, Bert J.; Duis, Jeroen; Delis, Jos; Ortsiefer, Markus; van Steenberge, Geert; Karpinen, Mikko; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Corbett, Brian

    2013-02-01

    The increasing request for higher data speeds in the information and communication technology leads to continuously increasing performance of microprocessors. This has led to the introduction of optical data transmission as a replacement of electronic data transmission in most transmission applications longer than 10 meters. However, a need remains for optical data transmission for shorter distances inside the computer. This paper gives an overview of the Joint European project FIREFLY, in which new polymer based single mode waveguides are developed for integration with VCSELs, splitters and fibers that will be manufactured using multi-layer nanoimprint lithography (NIL). Innovative polymers, new applications of nano-technology, new methods for optical coupling between components, and the integration of all these new components are the technical ingredients of this ambitious project.

  13. Development of MOEMS technology in maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Klenk, Dieter

    2009-02-01

    Micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems (MOEMS) have proven to be a facilitating technology in the lithography industry. Recently, there have been significant advancements in digital micromirror device (DMD) based maskless lithography. These advancements have been in the areas of throughput, resolution, accuracy, and cost reduction. This progression in digital micromirror evolution provides considerable opportunities to displace existing lithographic techniques. Precise control of the individual mircormirrors, including scrolling, and full utilization of the FPGA, have allowed DMD-based lithography systems to reach new levels of throughput and repeatability, while reducing production and warranty costs. Throughput levels have far surpassed scanning laser techniques. Chip level cooling technologies allow for higher incident power to be reliably distributed over larger areas of the substrate. Resolution roadmaps are in place to migrate from the current 2400dpi (11μm) to 4800dpi (5.3μm). Without the constraints of mask requirements, mask alignment, storage, and defect analysis are not required, thus increasing accuracy and reducing cost. This contribution will examine the advancements in and benefits of DMD based maskless lithography.

  14. Femtosecond Fiber Lasers Based on Dissipative Processes for Nonlinear Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of femtosecond-pulse fiber lasers with parameters appropriate for nonlinear microscopy is reviewed. Pulse-shaping in lasers with only normal-dispersion components is briefly described, and the performance of the resulting lasers is summarized. Fiber lasers based on the formation of dissipative solitons now offer performance competitive with that of solid-state lasers, but with the benefits of the fiber medium. Lasers based on self-similar pulse evolution in the gain section of a laser also offer a combination of short pulse duration and high pulse energy that will be attractive for applications in nonlinear bioimaging. PMID:23869163

  15. Femtosecond Fiber Lasers Based on Dissipative Processes for Nonlinear Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank W

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of femtosecond-pulse fiber lasers with parameters appropriate for nonlinear microscopy is reviewed. Pulse-shaping in lasers with only normal-dispersion components is briefly described, and the performance of the resulting lasers is summarized. Fiber lasers based on the formation of dissipative solitons now offer performance competitive with that of solid-state lasers, but with the benefits of the fiber medium. Lasers based on self-similar pulse evolution in the gain section of a laser also offer a combination of short pulse duration and high pulse energy that will be attractive for applications in nonlinear bioimaging.

  16. Line-edge roughness and the impact of stochastic processes on lithography scaling for Moore's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.

    2014-09-01

    Moore's Law, the idea that every two years or so chips double in complexity and the cost of a transistor is always in decline, has been the foundation of the semiconductor industry for nearly 50 years. The main technical force behind Moore's Law has been lithography scaling: shrinking of lithographic features at a rate faster than the increase in finished wafer costs. With smaller feature size comes the need for better control of those sizes during manufacturing. Critical dimension and overlay control must scale in proportion to feature size, and has done so for the last 50 years. But in the sub-50-nm feature size regime, a new problem has arisen: line-edge roughness due to the stochastic nature of the lithography process. Despite significant effort, this line-edge roughness has not scaled in proportion to feature size and is thus consuming an ever larger fraction of the feature size control budget. Projection of current trends predicts a collision course between lithography scaling needs and line-edge roughness reality. In the end, stochastic uncertainty in lithography and its manifestation as line-edge roughness will prove the ultimate limiter of resolution in semiconductor manufacturing.

  17. Laser based micro forming and assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    MacCallum, Danny O'Neill; Wong, Chung-Nin Channy; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Steyskal, Michele D.; Lehecka, Tom; Scherzinger, William Mark; Palmer, Jeremy Andrew

    2006-11-01

    It has been shown that thermal energy imparted to a metallic substrate by laser heating induces a transient temperature gradient through the thickness of the sample. In favorable conditions of laser fluence and absorptivity, the resulting inhomogeneous thermal strain leads to a measurable permanent deflection. This project established parameters for laser micro forming of thin materials that are relevant to MESA generation weapon system components and confirmed methods for producing micrometer displacements with repeatable bend direction and magnitude. Precise micro forming vectors were realized through computational finite element analysis (FEA) of laser-induced transient heating that indicated the optimal combination of laser heat input relative to the material being heated and its thermal mass. Precise laser micro forming was demonstrated in two practical manufacturing operations of importance to the DOE complex: micrometer gap adjustments of precious metal alloy contacts and forming of meso scale cones.

  18. PREVAIL: IBM's e-beam technology for next generation lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Hans C.

    2000-07-01

    PREVAIL - Projection Reduction Exposure with Variable Axis Immersion Lenses represents the high throughput e-beam projection approach to NGL which IBM is pursuing in cooperation with Nikon Corporation as alliance partner. This paper discusses the challenges and accomplishments of the PREVAIL project. The supreme challenge facing all e-beam lithography approaches has been and still is throughput. Since the throughput of e-beam projection systems is severely limited by the available optical field size, the key to success is the ability to overcome this limitation. The PREVAIL technique overcomes field-limiting off-axis aberrations through the use of variable axis lenses, which electronically shift the optical axis simultaneously with the deflected beam so that the beam effectively remains on axis. The resist images obtained with the Proof-of-Concept (POC) system demonstrate that PREVAIL effectively eliminates off- axis aberrations affecting both resolution and placement accuracy of pixels. As part of the POC system a high emittance gun has been developed to provide uniform illumination of the patterned subfield and to fill the large numerical aperture projection optics designed to significantly reduce beam blur caused by Coulomb interaction.

  19. Extreme Ultraviolet Multilayer Defect Compensation in Computational Lithography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Kon

    2016-05-01

    For the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, multilayer (ML) defects such as bump and pit defects can disrupt the phase of reflected field and degrade aerial images on wafer. In this paper, a defect printability and repair simulator (DPRS) is introduced to predict and repair the effect of ML defects in EUV aerial images. DPRS is composed of multilayer growth by using Gaussian function and Stearns's method, mask simulation by using a scattering matrix (S-matrix) analysis method, and projection simulation by using Köhler's illumination. For bump and pit ML defects, the combining the modified absorber and the layer-by-layer ML peeling is better than other methods. This study can be helpful in understanding EUV defect and also give insight into the EUV defect compensation for the device volume production. PMID:27483941

  20. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.J.; Seppala, L.G.

    1998-04-07

    A critical illumination condenser system is disclosed, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 {micro}m source and requires a magnification of 26. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth. 6 figs.

  1. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Simon J.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1998-01-01

    A critical illumination condenser system, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 .mu.m source and requires a magnification of 26.times.. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth.

  2. 1x stencil masks fabrication and their use in Low-Energy Electron-beam Proximity Lithography (LEEPL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Uwe F. W.

    2004-12-01

    Thirty years ago it was the common believe of most of the lithographer that the limit end for the optical lithography will be at about 1 μm ground rule. So NGL tools were developed to go in the 500nm and 250nm regions. 15 years later the different optical lithography techniques were still alive exposing feature sizes down to 200nm and the NGL tool developer had to move to 100nm and below. Today 100nm features made by optical lithography is world wide a common technique in most of the modern chip manufacturing plants, and feature sizes beyond the used wavelength are state of art. So do we really need NGL or will the optical lithography lives forever? Well, there are already optical system available or will be soon delivered to the manufacturing lines which are able to expose feature sizes down to 70nm and even to 50nm if they use 193nm immersion lithography. But for what price? The optical lithography became extremely expensive. Reticles for the 70nm technology full with OPC structures may cost up to 500 K and an optical reticle set up to 2 Million. So in my understanding the introduction of any NGL technique will only happen if such a technique can demonstrate at least the same performance as the optical lithography but at a lower cost level. The best understood NGLs are the electron beam lithography techniques used in e-beam direct writing tools for the exposure of masks and reticles or e-beam techniques which expose the wafers using masks like E-beam Projection Lithography (EPL) or Low Energy E-beam Proximity Lithography (LEEPL) respectively. Both EPL and LEEPL require a similar mask technique so called stencil masks. The first 1x stencil masks (a silicon wafer with a thin membrane area containing the pattern as physical holes) were developed by IBM Germany more than 25 years ago and perfected in the Advanced Mask Facility (AMF) at IBM Vermont. Today, these 1x stencil masks used for LEEPL are mainly produced by Hoya, DNP, Toppan and NTT-AT in Japan. This paper

  3. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T; Huang, Yong; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location (±5 μm) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing. PMID:20814088

  4. Tunable lithography masks using chiral nematic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeon Su; Srinivasarao, Mohan; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-03-01

    We present a facile route for pattern formation using chiral nematic fluids as tunable masks in lithography process. The chiral nematic phase prepared by adding a chiral dopant (CB15) to 5CB acted as a set of parallel cylindrical lenses and as a polarization selective photomask for the preparation of periodic line patterns. The pitch of the helical twist was easily controlled by the concentration of chiral agent and the feature size of the resulting pattern was easily tuned. Because of the high mobility of the small liquid crystalline compound, the preparation of chiral nematic fluids based lithography masks requires only a few seconds. This approach has significant advantages including facility, range of surface ordering, and rate of forming periodic arrays. Current affiliation: SK Innovation, Daejeon, Korea

  5. Implementation of assist features in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fan; Burkhardt, Martin; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Torres, Andres; Gupta, Rachit; Word, James

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of EUV lithography will happen at a critical feature pitch which corresponds to a k1 factor of roughly 0.45. While this number seems not very aggressive compared to recent ArF lithography nodes, the number is sufficiently low that the introduction of assist features has to be considered. While the small NA makes the k1 factor larger, the depth of focus still needs to be scaled down with wavelength. However the exposure tool's focus control is not greatly improved over the ArF tools, so other solutions to improve the depth of focus, e.g. SRAFs, are needed. On the other hand, sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) require very small mask dimensions, which make masks more costly to write and inspect. Another disadvantage of SRAFs is the fact that they may cause pattern-dependent best focus shift due to thick mask effects. Those effects can be predicted, but the shift of best focus and the associated tilt of Bossung curves make the process more difficult to control. We investigate the impact of SRAFs on printing in EUV lithography and evaluate advantages and disadvantages. By using image quality parameters such as best focus (BF), and depth of focus (DOF), respectively with and without SRAFs, we will answer the question if we can gain a net benefit for 1D and 2D patterns by adding SRAFs. SRAFs will only be introduced if any net improvement in process variation (PV) outweighs the additional expense of assist patterning on the mask. In this paper, we investigate the difference in printing behavior of symmetric and asymmetric SRAF placement and whether through slit effect needs to be considered in SRAF placement for EUV lithography.

  6. Formation of Magnetic Anisotropy by Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si Nyeon; Nam, Yoon Jae; Kim, Yang Doo; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Heon; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Artificial interface anisotropy is demonstrated in alternating Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns, providing a means of forming magnetic anisotropy using lithography. In-plane hysteresis loops measured along two principal directions are explained in depth by two competing shape and interface anisotropies, thus confirming the formation of interface anisotropy at the Co/Pt and Co/Pd interfaces of the stripe patterns. The measured interface anisotropy energies, which are in the range of 0.2–0.3 erg/cm2 for both stripes, are smaller than those observed in conventional multilayers, indicating a decrease in smoothness of the interfaces when formed by lithography. The demonstration of interface anisotropy in the Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns is of significant practical importance, because this setup makes it possible to form anisotropy using lithography and to modulate its strength by controlling the pattern width. Furthermore, this makes it possible to form more complex interface anisotropy by fabricating two-dimensional patterns. These artificial anisotropies are expected to open up new device applications such as multilevel bits using in-plane magnetoresistive thin-film structures. PMID:27216420

  7. Formation of Magnetic Anisotropy by Lithography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si Nyeon; Nam, Yoon Jae; Kim, Yang Doo; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Heon; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Artificial interface anisotropy is demonstrated in alternating Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns, providing a means of forming magnetic anisotropy using lithography. In-plane hysteresis loops measured along two principal directions are explained in depth by two competing shape and interface anisotropies, thus confirming the formation of interface anisotropy at the Co/Pt and Co/Pd interfaces of the stripe patterns. The measured interface anisotropy energies, which are in the range of 0.2-0.3 erg/cm(2) for both stripes, are smaller than those observed in conventional multilayers, indicating a decrease in smoothness of the interfaces when formed by lithography. The demonstration of interface anisotropy in the Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns is of significant practical importance, because this setup makes it possible to form anisotropy using lithography and to modulate its strength by controlling the pattern width. Furthermore, this makes it possible to form more complex interface anisotropy by fabricating two-dimensional patterns. These artificial anisotropies are expected to open up new device applications such as multilevel bits using in-plane magnetoresistive thin-film structures. PMID:27216420

  8. Self-segregating materials for immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Daniel P.; Sundberg, Linda K.; Brock, Phillip J.; Ito, Hiroshi; Truong, Hoa D.; Allen, Robert D.; McIntyre, Gregory R.; Goldfarb, Dario L.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we employ the self-segregating materials approach used in topcoat-free resists for water immersion lithography to extend the performance of topcoat materials for water immersion and to increase the contact angles of organic fluids on topcoat-free resists for high index immersion lithography. By tailoring polymers that segregate to the air and resist interfaces of the topcoat, high contact angle topcoats with relatively low fluorine content are achieved. While graded topcoats may extend the performance and/or reduce the cost of topcoat materials, the large amount of unprotected acidic groups necessary for TMAH development prevent them from achieving the high contact angles and low hysteresis exhibited by topcoat-free resists. Another application of this self-segregating approach is tailoring resist surfaces for high index immersion. Due to the low surface tension and higher viscosities of organic fluids relative to water and their lower contact angles on most surfaces, film pulling cannot be prevented without dramatically reducing wafer scan rates; however, tuning the surface energy of the resist may be important to control stain morphology and facilitate fluid removal from the wafer. By tailoring fluoropolymer additives for high contact angles with second generation organic high index immersion fluids, we show herein that topcoat-free resists can be developed specifically for high index immersion lithography with good contact angles and lithographic imaging performance.

  9. Metallic resist for phase-change lithography

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Bi Jian; Huang, Jun Zhu; Ni, Ri Wen; Yu, Nian Nian; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang Zhi; Li, Zhen; Miao, Xiang Shui

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the most widely used photoresists in optical lithography are organic-based resists. The major limitations of such resists include the photon accumulation severely affects the quality of photolithography patterns and the size of the pattern is constrained by the diffraction limit. Phase-change lithography, which uses semiconductor-based resists such as chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 films, was developed to overcome these limitations. Here, instead of chalcogenide, we propose a metallic resist composed of Mg58Cu29Y13 alloy films, which exhibits a considerable difference in etching rate between amorphous and crystalline states. Furthermore, the heat distribution in Mg58Cu29Y13 thin film is better and can be more easily controlled than that in Ge2Sb2Te5 during exposure. We succeeded in fabricating both continuous and discrete patterns on Mg58Cu29Y13 thin films via laser irradiation and wet etching. Our results demonstrate that a metallic resist of Mg58Cu29Y13 is suitable for phase change lithography, and this type of resist has potential due to its outstanding characteristics. PMID:24931505

  10. Immersion and 32nm lithography: now and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Masaomi; McCallum, Martin

    2007-12-01

    The amazing growth of the semiconductor industry over the past decades has been supported, and in many cases driven, by miniaturization of devices. Behind this has been one strong backbone - lithography. In the 1970's, devices had geometries of several micrometers, but now we are about to enter 45nm device pre-production and shortly after move it into volume-production. Immersion lithography, although having a short development time, is already in production and will become the primary technology driver. What we need to do now is identify the solutions for 32nm lithography. There are several candidates for 32nm lithography, such as EUVL, High Index Immersion and Double Patterning / Double Exposure. Other more esoteric technologies such as nanoimprint and maskless lithography have also been mentioned. In this paper, the present status of Immersion lithography will be reviewed and each of the 32nm candidates are reviewed.

  11. A compact X-ray lithography lattice using superferric magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. A.; Huson, F. R.; Mackay, W. W.; Chen, L. K.; Ohnuma, S.

    A conceptual lattice design for a very compact superconducting synchrotron dedicated to X-ray lithography is presented. The synchrotron radiation produced in the high field superconducting magnets has a critical wavelength of 10 angstrom at a beam energy of about 787 MeV. The size and angular divergence of the beam in this lattice can satisfy future requirements for X-ray lithography. An optimization of the lithography parameters is presented.

  12. Expected innovations of optical lithography in the next 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owa, Soichi; Hirayanagi, Noriyuki

    2016-03-01

    In the past 10 years, immersion lithography has been the most effective high volume manufacturing method for the critical layers of semiconductor devices. Thinking of the next 10 years, we can expect continuous improvement on existing 300 mm wafer scanners with better accuracy and throughput to enhance the total output value per input cost. This value productivity, however, can be upgraded also by larger innovations which might happen in optical lithography. In this paper, we will discuss the possibilities and the impossibilities of potential innovation ideas of optical lithography, which are 450 mm wafer, optical maskless, multicolor lithography, and metamaterial.

  13. 75 FR 44015 - Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing... importation of certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques and products containing... certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques or products containing same...

  14. Mode-locked fiber lasers based on doped fiber arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Song, Yanrong

    2014-05-10

    We designed a new kind of mode-locked fiber laser based on fiber arrays, where the central core is doped. A theoretical model is given for an all-fiber self-starting mode-locked laser based on this kind of doped fiber array. Two different kinds of fiber lasers with negative dispersion and positive dispersion are simulated and discussed. The stable mode-locked pulses are generated from initial noise conditions by the realistic parameters. The process of self-starting mode-locking multipulse transition and the relationship between the energy of the central core and the propagation distance of the pulses are discussed. Finally, we analyze the difference between the averaged mode-locked laser and the discrete mode-locked laser.

  15. Fabrication of metallic nanowires and nanoribbons using laser interference lithography and shadow lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joong- Mok; Nalwa, Kanwar Singh; Leung, Wai; Constant, Kristen; Chaudhary, Sumit; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2010-04-30

    Ordered and free-standing metallic nanowires were fabricated by e-beam deposition on patterned polymer templates made by interference lithography. The dimensions of the nanowires can be controlled through adjustment of deposition conditions and polymer templates. Grain size, polarized optical transmission and electrical resistivity were measured with ordered and free-standing nanowires.

  16. Overview of Lithography: Challenges and Metrologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    2003-09-01

    Semiconductor microlithography is rapidly reaching a point where it becomes exceedingly difficult to shrink features at historical rates. We will no longer be able to increase process windows by going to shorter wavelengths with optical lithography, because we are running out of useable wavelengths. This necessitates either the implementation of processes with very small process windows or a transition to radically new types of lithographic technologies. Either situation presents numerous challenges to lithographers and metrologists. Particularly daunting are the requirements for gate linewidth control for microprocessors. Reducing variation requires improvement in the components of variation, each of which must be smaller than the total result. In order to improve a particular parameter, such as CD variation, metrology must be adequate for identifying improvements in the components of that parameter, not just the total. This places very tight requirements on metrology capability. Departing from optical lithography into the Brave New World of Next Generation Lithography will necessitate new metrology capabilities in several areas, not just the measurement of features on wafers. Creating the capabilities that will be needed in the future requires that funding be available for the requisite development. The need for huge amounts of funding to develop new lithographic technologies will likely necessitate a slowing down in the pace at which we shrink features. It is absolutely essential that a balance is re-established between the prices that purchasers of chips are willing to pay and chip development and manufacturing costs. This will be very challenging with 300 mm wafer fabs coming on-line, since low chip prices have historically been associated with overcapacity in the semiconductor industry, and it is anticipated that new lithographic technologies will be very expensive.

  17. EUV lithography imaging using novel pellicle membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollentier, Ivan; Vanpaemel, Johannes; Lee, Jae Uk; Adelmann, Christoph; Zahedmanesh, Houman; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Gallagher, Emily E.

    2016-03-01

    EUV mask protection against defects during use remains a challenge for EUV lithography. A stand-off protective membrane - a pellicle - is targeted to prevent yield losses in high volume manufacturing during handling and exposure, just as it is for 193nm lithography. The pellicle is thin enough to transmit EUV exposure light, yet strong enough to remain intact and hold any particles out of focus during exposure. The development of pellicles for EUV is much more challenging than for 193nm lithography for multiple reasons including: high absorption of most materials at EUV wavelength, pump-down sequences in the EUV vacuum system, and exposure to high intensity EUV light. To solve the problems of transmission and film durability, various options have been explored. In most cases a thin core film is considered, since the deposition process for this is well established and because it is the simplest option. The transmission specification typically dictates that membranes are very thin (~50nm or less), which makes both fabrication and film mechanical integrity difficult. As an alternative, low density films (e.g. including porosity) will allow thicker membranes for a given transmission specification, which is likely to improve film durability. The risk is that the porosity could influence the imaging. At imec, two cases of pellicle concepts based on reducing density have been assessed : (1) 3D-patterned SiN by directed self-assembly (DSA), and (2) carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanosheets (CNS). The first case is based on SiN membranes that are 3D-patterned by Directed Self Assembly (DSA). The materials are tested relative to the primary specifications: EUV transmission and film durability. A risk assessment of printing performance is provided based on simulations of scattered energy. General conclusions on the efficacy of various approaches will provided.

  18. Film stacking architecture for immersion lithography process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Sanada, Masakazu; Miyagi, Tadashi; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Kanaoka, Masashi; Yasuda, Shuichi; Tamada, Osamu; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary due to film peeling. However, the architecture will restrict lithographic area within a wafer due to top side EBR accuracy In this paper, we report an effective film stacking architecture that also allows maximum lithographic area. This study used a new bevel rinse system on RF3 for all materials to make suitable film stacking on the top side bevel. This evaluation showed that the new bevel rinse system allows the maximum lithographic area and a clean wafer edge. Patterning defects were improved with suitable film stacking.

  19. The next generation of maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    The essential goal for fast prototyping of microstructures is to reduce the cycle time. Conventional methods up to now consist of creating designs with a CAD software, then fabricating or purchasing a Photomask and finally using a mask aligner to transfer the pattern to the photoresist. The new Maskless Aligner (MLA) enables to expose the pattern directly without fabricating a mask, which results in a significantly shorter prototyping cycle. To achieve this short prototyping cycle, the MLA has been improved in many aspects compared to other direct write lithography solutions: exposure speed, user interface, ease of operation and flexibility.

  20. Nanoimprint lithography: an enabling technology for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuhan; Liu, He; Wang, Yifei; Li, Yuanrui; Song, Boxiang; Bratkovsk, Alexandre; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wu, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is an indispensable tool to realize a fast and accurate nanoscale patterning in nanophotonics due to high resolution and high yield. The number of publication on NIL has increased from less than a hundred per year to over three thousand per year. In this paper, the most recent developments on NIL patterning transfer processes and its applications on nanophotonics are discussed and reviewed. NIL has been opening up new opportunities for nanophotonics, especially in fabricating optical meta-materials. With more researches on this low-cost high-throughput fabrication technology, we should anticipate a brighter future for nanophotonics and NIL.

  1. Wave and Particle in Molecular Interference Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Juffmann, Thomas; Truppe, Stefan; Geyer, Philipp; Major, Andras G.; Arndt, Markus; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2009-12-31

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  2. Economic consequences of high throughput maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, John G.; Govindaraju, Lakshmi

    2005-11-01

    Many people in the semiconductor industry bemoan the high costs of masks and view mask cost as one of the significant barriers to bringing new chip designs to market. All that is needed is a viable maskless technology and the problem will go away. Numerous sites around the world are working on maskless lithography but inevitably, the question asked is "Wouldn't a one wafer per hour maskless tool make a really good mask writer?" Of course, the answer is yes, the hesitation you hear in the answer isn't based on technology concerns, it's financial. The industry needs maskless lithography because mask costs are too high. Mask costs are too high because mask pattern generators (PG's) are slow and expensive. If mask PG's become much faster, mask costs go down, the maskless market goes away and the PG supplier is faced with an even smaller tool demand from the mask shops. Technical success becomes financial suicide - or does it? In this paper we will present the results of a model that examines some of the consequences of introducing high throughput maskless pattern generation. Specific features in the model include tool throughput for masks and wafers, market segmentation by node for masks and wafers and mask cost as an entry barrier to new chip designs. How does the availability of low cost masks and maskless tools affect the industries tool makeup and what is the ultimate potential market for high throughput maskless pattern generators?

  3. Mask cost of ownership for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzio, Edward G.; Seidel, Philip K.

    2000-07-01

    As technology advances, becoming more difficult and more expensive, the cost of ownership (CoO) metric becomes increasingly important in evaluating technical strategies. The International SEMATECH CoC analysis has steadily gained visibility over the past year, as it attempts to level the playing field between technology choices, and create a fair relative comparison. In order to predict mask cots for advanced lithography, mask process flows are modeled using bets-known processing strategies, equipment cost, and yields. Using a newly revised yield mode, and updated mask manufacture flows, representative mask flows can be built. These flows are then used to calculate mask costs for advanced lithography down to the 50 nm node. It is never the goal of this type of work to provide absolute cost estimates for business planning purposes. However, the combination of a quantifiable yield model with a clearly defined set of mask processing flows and a cost model based upon them serves as an excellent starting point for cost driver analysis and process flow discussion.

  4. Inverse lithography source optimization via compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiyang; Ma, Xu; Gao, Jie; Wang, Jie; Li, Yanqiu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2014-06-16

    Source optimization (SO) has emerged as a key technique for improving lithographic imaging over a range of process variations. Current SO approaches are pixel-based, where the source pattern is designed by solving a quadratic optimization problem using gradient-based algorithms or solving a linear programming problem. Most of these methods, however, are either computational intensive or result in a process window (PW) that may be further extended. This paper applies the rich theory of compressive sensing (CS) to develop an efficient and robust SO method. In order to accelerate the SO design, the source optimization is formulated as an underdetermined linear problem, where the number of equations can be much less than the source variables. Assuming the source pattern is a sparse pattern on a certain basis, the SO problem is transformed into a l1-norm image reconstruction problem based on CS theory. The linearized Bregman algorithm is applied to synthesize the sparse optimal source pattern on a representation basis, which effectively improves the source manufacturability. It is shown that the proposed linear SO formulation is more effective for improving the contrast of the aerial image than the traditional quadratic formulation. The proposed SO method shows that sparse-regularization in inverse lithography can indeed extend the PW of lithography systems. A set of simulations and analysis demonstrate the superiority of the proposed SO method over the traditional approaches.

  5. Inverse lithography technique for advanced CMOS nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaret, Alexandre; Tritchkov, Alexander; Entradas, Jorge; Yesilada, Emek

    2013-04-01

    Resolution Enhancement Techniques have continuously improved over the last decade, driven by the ever growing constraints of lithography process. Despite the large number of RET applied, some hotspot configurations remain challenging for advanced nodes due to aggressive design rules. Inverse Lithography Technique (ILT) is evaluated here as a substitute to the dense OPC baseline. Indeed ILT has been known for several years for its near-to-ideal mask quality, while also being potentially more time consuming in terms of OPC run and mask processing. We chose to evaluate Mentor Graphics' ILT engine "pxOPCTM" on both lines and via hotspot configurations. These hotspots were extracted from real 28nm test cases where the dense OPC solution is not satisfactory. For both layer types, the reference OPC consists of a dense OPC engine coupled to rule-based and/or model-based assist generation method. The same CM1 model is used for the reference and the ILT OPC. ILT quality improvement is presented through Optical Rule Check (ORC) results with various adequate detectors. Several mask manufacturing rule constraints (MRC) are considered for the ILT solution and their impact on process ability is checked after mask processing. A hybrid OPC approach allowing localized ILT usage is presented in order to optimize both quality and runtime. A real mask is prepared and fabricated with this method. Finally, results analyzed on silicon are presented to compare localized ILT to reference dense OPC.

  6. Semiconductor defect metrology using laser-based quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie; Edwards, Chris; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford

    2015-03-01

    A highly sensitive laser-based quantitative phase imaging tool, using an epi-illumination diffraction phase microscope, has been developed for silicon wafer defect inspection. The first system used a 532 nm solid-state laser and detected 20 nm by 100 nm by 110 nm defects in a 22 nm node patterned silicon wafer. The second system, using a 405 nm diode laser, is more sensitive and has enabled detection of 15 nm by 90 nm by 35 nm defects in a 9 nm node densely patterned silicon wafer. In addition to imaging, wafer scanning and image-post processing are also crucial for defect detection.

  7. Laser-Based Diagnostic Measurements of Low Emissions Combustor Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides a summary of primarily laser-based measurement techniques we use at NASA Glenn Research Center to characterize fuel injection, fuel/air mixing, and combustion. The report highlights using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence, Particle Image Velocimetry, and Phase Doppler Interferometry to obtain fuel injector patternation, fuel and air velocities, and fuel drop sizes and turbulence intensities during combustion. We also present a brief comparison between combustors burning standard JP-8 Jet fuel and an alternative fuels. For this comparison, we used flame chemiluminescence and high speed imaging.

  8. Improved near field lithography by surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Beibei; Zhao, Yanhui; Fang, Liang; Wang, Changtao; Luo, Xiangang

    2009-05-01

    Conventionally, the finest pattern obtained in optical lithography is determined by wavelength and numerical aperture of optical system, due to diffraction effect. This principle delivers theoretical obstacles for nano lithography using conventional light source, like Hg lamp. According to theory, this obstacle can be circumvented with near field lithography (NFL) technique, just by confining the mask and photo resist into sub-wavelength dimensions. Sub-wavelength patterns with features down to 100nm can be realized in the NFL, as demonstrated numerically and experimentally in many papers. One obvious problem associated with NFL is that low efficiency in the lithography process, since it is difficult to transmit through sub-wavelength scaled apertures in the mask. This usually results in the deleterious effect to the patterns on photo resist. In this paper, we demonstrate that the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) effect helps to solve this problem. It is found that noble metal, instead of chromium, usually gives much greater transmission when employed as mask material. The enhancement is contributed to resonant excitation of surface plasmon mode. Further, the transmission can be enhanced by appropriately design of patterns. The polarization of illumination light affects lithography efficiency as well. As illustrative examples, mask patterns like lines group, grating structure and holes array are designed and simulated with greatly improved lithography efficiency. This method is believed to have potential applications in nano lithography.

  9. Scanner performance predictor and optimizer in further low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Hajime; Nakashima, Toshiharu; Ogata, Taro; Kudo, Shintaro; Kita, Naonori; Ikeda, Junji; Matsui, Ryota; Yamamoto, Hajime; Sukegawa, Ayako; Makino, Katsushi; Murayama, Masayuki; Masaki, Kazuo; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2014-03-01

    Due to the importance of errors in lithography scanners, masks, and computational lithography in low-k1 lithography, application software is used to simultaneously reduce them. We have developed "Masters" application software, which is all-inclusive term of critical dimension uniformity (CDU), optical proximity effect (OPE), overlay (OVL), lens control (LNS), tool maintenance (MNT) and source optimization for wide process window (SO), for compensation of the issues on imaging and overlay. In this paper, we describe the more accurate and comprehensive solution of OPE-Master, LNS-Master and SO-Master with functions of analysis, prediction and optimization. Since OPE-Master employed a rigorous simulation, a root cause of error in OPE matching was found out. From the analysis, we had developed an additional knob and evaluated a proof-of- concept for the improvement. Influence of thermal issues on projection optics is evaluated with a heating prediction, and an optimization with scanner knobs on an optimized source taken into account mask 3D effect for obtaining usable process window. Furthermore, we discuss a possibility of correction for reticle expansion by heating comparing calculation and measurement.

  10. Extension of optical lithography by mask-litho integration with computational lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigawa, T.; Gronlund, K.; Wiley, J.

    2010-05-01

    Wafer lithography process windows can be enlarged by using source mask co-optimization (SMO). Recently, SMO including freeform wafer scanner illumination sources has been developed. Freeform sources are generated by a programmable illumination system using a micro-mirror array or by custom Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). The combination of freeform sources and complex masks generated by SMO show increased wafer lithography process window and reduced MEEF. Full-chip mask optimization using source optimized by SMO can generate complex masks with small variable feature size sub-resolution assist features (SRAF). These complex masks create challenges for accurate mask pattern writing and low false-defect inspection. The accuracy of the small variable-sized mask SRAF patterns is degraded by short range mask process proximity effects. To address the accuracy needed for these complex masks, we developed a highly accurate mask process correction (MPC) capability. It is also difficult to achieve low false-defect inspections of complex masks with conventional mask defect inspection systems. A printability check system, Mask Lithography Manufacturability Check (M-LMC), is developed and integrated with 199-nm high NA inspection system, NPI. M-LMC successfully identifies printable defects from all of the masses of raw defect images collected during the inspection of a complex mask. Long range mask CD uniformity errors are compensated by scanner dose control. A mask CD uniformity error map obtained by mask metrology system is used as input data to the scanner. Using this method, wafer CD uniformity is improved. As reviewed above, mask-litho integration technology with computational lithography is becoming increasingly important.

  11. A laser-based ice shape profilometer for use in icing wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.; Vargas, Mario

    1995-01-01

    A laser-based profilometer was developed to measure the thickness and shape of ice accretions on the leading edge of airfoils and other models in icing wind tunnels. The instrument is a hand held device that is connected to a desk top computer with a 10 meter cable. It projects a laser line onto an ice shape and used solid state cameras to detect the light scattered by the ice. The instrument corrects the image for camera angle distortions, displays an outline of the ice shape on the computer screen, saves the data on a disk, and can print a full scale drawing of the ice shape. The profilometer has undergone extensive testing in the laboratory and in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Results of the tests show very good agreement between profilometer measurements and known simulated ice shapes and fair agreement between profilometer measurements and hand tracing techniques.

  12. Final Report - ADVANCED LASER-BASED SENSORS FOR INDUSTRIAL PROCESS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this work is to capture the potential of real-time monitoring and overcome the challenges of harsh industrial environments, Los Gatos Research (LGR) is fabricating, deploying, and commercializing advanced laser-based gas sensors for process control monitoring in industrial furnaces (e.g. electric arc furnaces). These sensors can achieve improvements in process control, leading to enhanced productivity, improved product quality, and reduced energy consumption and emissions. The first sensor will utilize both mid-infrared and near-infrared lasers to make rapid in-situ measurements of industrial gases and associated temperatures in the furnace off-gas. The second sensor will make extractive measurements of process gases. During the course of this DOE project, Los Gatos Research (LGR) fabricated, tested, and deployed both in-situ tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS) analyzers and extractive Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) analyzers.

  13. Hybrid hotspot detection using regression model and lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Taiki; Matsunawa, Tetsuaki; Nojima, Shigeki; Pan, David Z.

    2016-03-01

    As minimum feature sizes shrink, unexpected hotspots appear on wafers. Therefore, it is important to detect and fix these hotspots at design stage to reduce development time and manufacturing cost. Currently, as the most accurate approach, lithography simulation is widely used to detect such hotspots. However, it is known to be time-consuming. This paper proposes a novel aerial image synthesizing method using regression and minimum lithography simulation for only hotspot detection. Experimental results show hotspot detection on the proposed method is equivalent compared with the results on the conventional hotspot detection method which uses only lithography simulation with much less computational cost.

  14. Lithography aspects of dual-damascene interconnect technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhoudt, Mireille; Van Goidsenhoven, Diziana; Pollentier, Ivan K.; Ronse, Kurt G.; Lepage, Muriel; Struyf, Herbert; Van Hove, Marleen

    2001-04-01

    The introduction of Cu and low-k dielectrics in back-end-of- line processes has serious implications for lithography. Different low-k material shave different reflective properties and also the potential use of hard masks has consequences for lithography. Furthermore, depending on the integration scheme that is chosen, various issues for lithography and etch are showing up. While the first photo step is on a planar substrate, the second photo has to cover a topography. This can have large implications on CD uniformity and the amount of material left for the subsequent etch.

  15. Vapor deposited release layers for nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tong; Kobrin, Boris; Wanebo, Mike; Nowak, Romek; Yi, Richard; Chinn, Jeff; Bender, Markus; Fuchs, Andreas; Otto, Martin

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the advantages of using a vapor deposited self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as a mold release layer for nano-imprint lithography. The release SAM was formed from a perfluorinated organo-silane precursor at room temperature in the gaseous state by a technique called Molecular Vapor Deposition (MVD TM). In contrast to a conventional coating from a liquid immersion sequence, the vapor deposition process forms a particulate free film resulting in a substantial reduction of surface defects. Another advantage of the vapor process is its excellent conformity onto the nanoscale topography of the mold. The self-assembling and self-limiting characteristics of the MVD process enables excellent CD control of the mold pattern. Pattern replication as small as 38nm features was achieved. Various other quantitative metrics of the MVD release layer are presented in this paper.

  16. Inverse lithography using sparse mask representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Radu C.; Hurley, Paul; Apostol, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel optimisation algorithm for inverse lithography, based on optimization of the mask derivative, a domain inherently sparse, and for rectilinear polygons, invertible. The method is first developed assuming a point light source, and then extended to general incoherent sources. What results is a fast algorithm, producing manufacturable masks (the search space is constrained to rectilinear polygons), and flexible (specific constraints such as minimal line widths can be imposed). One inherent trick is to treat polygons as continuous entities, thus making aerial image calculation extremely fast and accurate. Requirements for mask manufacturability can be integrated in the optimization without too much added complexity. We also explain how to extend the scheme for phase-changing mask optimization.

  17. Resist materials for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Ishikawa, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Seiro; Naito, Takuya; Yamazaki, Tamio; Watanabe, Manabu; Itani, Toshiro

    2001-08-01

    Fluoropolymers are key materials for single layer resists of 157nm lithography. We have been studying fluoropolymers to identify their potential for base resins of 157nm photoresist. Many fluoropolymers showed high optical transparencies, with absorption coefficients of 0.01micrometers -1 to 2micrometers -1 at 157nm, and dry- etching resistance comparable to an ArF resist, and non- swelling solubility in the standard developer. Positive- tone resists were formulated using fluoropolymers that fulfill practical resist requirements. They showed good sensitivities, from 1 mJ/cm(superscript 2 to 10 mJ/cm2, and contrast in the sensitivity curves. They were able to be patterned using a F2 laser microstepper.

  18. Femtolitre chemistry assisted by microfluidic pen lithography

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Carlos; Stylianou, Kyriakos C.; Hernando, Jordi; Evangelio, Emi; Barnett, Sarah A.; Nettikadan, Saju; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions at ultrasmall volumes are becoming increasingly necessary to study biological processes, to synthesize homogenous nanostructures and to perform high-throughput assays and combinatorial screening. Here we show that a femtolitre reaction can be realized on a surface by handling and mixing femtolitre volumes of reagents using a microfluidic stylus. This method, named microfluidic pen lithography, allows mixing reagents in isolated femtolitre droplets that can be used as reactors to conduct independent reactions and crystallization processes. This strategy overcomes the high-throughput limitations of vesicles and micelles and obviates the usually costly step of fabricating microdevices and wells. We anticipate that this process enables performing distinct reactions (acid-base, enzymatic recognition and metal-organic framework synthesis), creating multiplexed nanoscale metal-organic framework arrays, and screening combinatorial reactions to evaluate the crystallization of novel peptide-based materials. PMID:23863998

  19. Lithography process window analysis with calibrated model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhan; Yu, Jin; Lo, James; Liu, Johnson

    2004-05-01

    As critical-dimension shrink below 0.13 μm, the SPC (Statistical Process Control) based on CD (Critical Dimension) control in lithography process becomes more difficult. Increasing requirements of a shrinking process window have called on the need for more accurate decision of process window center. However in practical fabrication, we found that systematic error introduced by metrology and/or resist process can significantly impact the process window analysis result. Especially, when the simple polynomial functions are used to fit the lithographic data from focus exposure matrix (FEM), the model will fit these systematic errors rather than filter them out. This will definitely impact the process window analysis and determination of the best process condition. In this paper, we proposed to use a calibrated first principle model to do process window analysis. With this method, the systematic metrology error can be filtered out efficiently and give a more reasonable window analysis result.

  20. Nanoimprint lithography using disposable biomass template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanabata, Makoto; Takei, Satoshi; Sugahara, Kigen; Nakajima, Shinya; Sugino, Naoto; Kameda, Takao; Fukushima, Jiro; Matsumoto, Yoko; Sekiguchi, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    A novel nanoimprint lithography process using disposable biomass template having gas permeability was investigated. It was found that a disposable biomass template derived from cellulose materials shows an excellent gas permeability and decreases transcriptional defects in conventional templates such as quartz, PMDS, DLC that have no gas permeability. We believe that outgasses from imprinted materials are easily removed through the template. The approach to use a cellulose for template material is suitable as the next generation of clean separation technology. It is expected to be one of the defect-less thermal nanoimprint lithographic technologies. It is also expected that volatile materials and solvent including materials become available that often create defects and peelings in conventional temples that have no gas permeability.

  1. Integrating nanosphere lithography in device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurvick, Tod V.; Coutu, Ronald A.; Lake, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the integration of nanosphere lithography (NSL) with other fabrication techniques, allowing for nano-scaled features to be realized within larger microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based devices. Nanosphere self-patterning methods have been researched for over three decades, but typically not for use as a lithography process. Only recently has progress been made towards integrating many of the best practices from these publications and determining a process that yields large areas of coverage, with repeatability and enabled a process for precise placement of nanospheres relative to other features. Discussed are two of the more common self-patterning methods used in NSL (i.e. spin-coating and dip coating) as well as a more recently conceived variation of dip coating. Recent work has suggested the repeatability of any method depends on a number of variables, so to better understand how these variables affect the process a series of test vessels were developed and fabricated. Commercially available 3-D printing technology was used to incrementally alter the test vessels allowing for each variable to be investigated individually. With these deposition vessels, NSL can now be used in conjunction with other fabrication steps to integrate features otherwise unattainable through current methods, within the overall fabrication process of larger MEMS devices. Patterned regions in 1800 series photoresist with a thickness of ~700nm are used to capture regions of self-assembled nanospheres. These regions are roughly 2-5 microns in width, and are able to control the placement of 500nm polystyrene spheres by controlling where monolayer self-assembly occurs. The resulting combination of photoresist and nanospheres can then be used with traditional deposition or etch methods to utilize these fine scale features in the overall design.

  2. Benchtop micromolding of polystyrene by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuli; Balowski, Joseph; Phillips, Colleen; Phillips, Ryan; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-09-21

    Polystyrene (PS), a standard material for cell culture consumable labware, was molded into microstructures with high fidelity of replication by an elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. The process was a simple, benchtop method based on soft lithography using readily available materials. The key to successful replica molding by this simple procedure relies on the use of a solvent, for example, gamma-butyrolactone, which dissolves PS without swelling the PDMS mold. PS solution was added to the PDMS mold, and evaporation of the solvent was accomplished by baking the mold on a hotplate. Microstructures with feature sizes as small as 3 μm and aspect ratios as large as 7 were readily molded. Prototypes of microfluidic chips made from PS were prepared by thermal bonding of a microchannel molded in PS with a flat PS substrate. The PS microfluidic chip displayed much lower adsorption and absorption of hydrophobic molecules (e.g. rhodamine B) compared to a comparable chip created from PDMS. The molded PS surface exhibited stable surface properties after plasma oxidation as assessed by contact angle measurement. The molded, oxidized PS surface remained an excellent surface for cell culture based on cell adhesion and proliferation. To demonstrate the application of this process for cell biology research, PS was micromolded into two different microarray formats, microwells and microposts, for segregation and tracking of non-adherent and adherent cells, respectively. The micromolded PS possessed properties that were ideal for biological and bioanalytical needs, thus making it an alternative material to PDMS and suitable for building lab-on-a-chip devices by soft lithography methods.

  3. Medical diagnostics by laser-based analysis of exhaled breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco

    2002-08-01

    IMany trace gases can be found in the exhaled breath, some of them giving the possibility of a non invasive diagnosis of related diseases or allowing the monitoring of the disease in the course of its therapy. In the present lecture the principle of medical diagnosis based on the breath analysis will be introduced and the detection of trace gases in exhaled breath by high- resolution molecular spectroscopy in the IR spectral region will be discussed. A number of substrates and the optical systems for their laser detection will be reported. The following laser based experimental systems has been realised in the Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory in ENEA in Frascati for the analysis of specific substances in the exhaled breath. A tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) appartus for the measurement of 13C/12C isotopic ratio in carbon dioxide, a TDLAS apparatus for the detection of CH4 and a CO2 laser based photoacoustic system to detect trace ethylene at atmospheric pressure. The experimental set-up for each one of the a.m. optical systems will be shown and the related medical applications will be illustrated. The concluding remarks will be focuses on chemical species that are of major interest for medical people today and their diagnostic ability.

  4. Laser -Based Joining of Metallic and Non-metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabham, G.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    Laser as a high intensity heat source can be effectively used for joining of materials by fusion welding and brazing in autogenous or in hybrid modes. In autogenous mode, welding is done in conduction , deep penetration , and keyhole mode. However, due to inherently high energy density available from a laser source, autogenous keyhole welding is the most popular laser welding mode. But, it has certain limitations like need for extremely good joint fit-up, formation of very hard welds in steel , keyhole instability, loss of alloying elements, etc. To overcome these limitations, innovative variants such as laser-arc hybrid welding , induction-assisted welding , dual beam welding , etc., have been developed. Using laser heat, brazing can be performed by melting a filler to fill the joints, without melting the base materials. Accomplishing laser-based joining as mentioned above requires appropriate choice of laser source, beam delivery system, processing head with appropriate optics and accessories. Basic principles of various laser-based joining processes, laser system technology, process parameters, metallurgical effects on different base materials, joint performance, and applications are explained in this chapter.

  5. Laser based diagnostics - from cultural heritage to human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, S.

    2008-09-01

    An overview of applied laser-based diagnostics as pursued at the Division of Atomic Physics, Lund University, is given. The fields of application range from environmental monitoring including cultural heritage assessment, to biomedical applications. General aspects of laser-based methods are non-intrusiveness, high spectral- and spatial resolution, and data production in real-time. Different applications are frequently generically very similar irrespective of the particular context, which, however, decides the spatial and temporal scales as well as the size of the optics employed. Thus, volcanic plume mapping by lidar, and optical mammography are two manifestations of the same principle, as is fluorescence imaging of a human bronchus by an endoscope, and the scanning of a cathedral using a fluorescence lidar system. Recent applications include remote laser-induced break-down spectroscopy (LIBS) and gas monitoring in scattering media (GASMAS). In particular, a powerful method for diagnostics of human sinus cavities was developed, where free oxygen and water molecules are monitored simultaneously.

  6. Non-Contact Laser Based Ultrasound Evaluation of Canned Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, David

    2005-03-01

    Laser-Based Ultrasound detection was used to measure the velocity of compression waves transmitted through canned foods. Condensed broth, canned pasta, and non-condensed soup were evaluated in these experiments. Homodyne adaptive optics resulted in measurements that were more accurate than the traditional heterodyne method, as well as yielding a 10 dB gain in signal to noise. A-Scans measured the velocity of ultrasound sent through the center of the can and were able to distinguish the quantity of food stuff in its path, as well as distinguish between meat and potato. B-Scans investigated the heterogeneity of the sample’s contents. The evaluation of canned foods was completely non-contact and would be suitable for continuous monitoring in production. These results were verified by conducting the same experiments with a contact piezo transducer. Although the contact method yields a higher signal to noise ratio than the non-contact method, Laser-Based Ultrasound was able to detect surface waves the contact transducer could not.

  7. Fundamentals of embossing nanoimprint lithography in polymer substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; King, William P.

    2011-02-01

    The convergence of micro-/nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) and biomedical industries is creating a need for innovation and discovery around materials, particularly in miniaturized systems that use polymers as the primary substrate. Polymers are ubiquitous in the microelectronics industry and are used as sensing materials, lithography tools, replication molds, microfluidics, nanofluidics, and biomedical devices. This diverse set of operational requirements dictates that the materials employed must possess different properties in order to reduce the cost of production, decrease the scale of devices to the appropriate degree, and generate engineered devices with new functional properties at cost-competitive levels of production. Nanoscale control of polymer deformation at a massive scale would enable breakthroughs in all of the aforementioned applications, but is currently beyond the current capabilities of mass manufacturing. This project was focused on developing a fundamental understanding of how polymers behave under different loads and environments at the nanoscale in terms of performance and fidelity in order to fill the most critical gaps in our current knowledgebase on this topic.

  8. Impacts of cost functions on inverse lithography patterning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jue-Chin; Yu, Peichen

    2010-10-25

    For advanced CMOS processes, inverse lithography promises better patterning fidelity than conventional mask correction techniques due to a more complete exploration of the solution space. However, the success of inverse lithography relies highly on customized cost functions whose design and know-how have rarely been discussed. In this paper, we investigate the impacts of various objective functions and their superposition for inverse lithography patterning using a generic gradient descent approach. We investigate the most commonly used objective functions, which are the resist and aerial images, and also present a derivation for the aerial image contrast. We then discuss the resulting pattern fidelity and final mask characteristics for simple layouts with a single isolated contact and two nested contacts. We show that a cost function composed of a dominant resist-image component and a minor aerial-image or image-contrast component can achieve a good mask correction and contour targets when using inverse lithography patterning.

  9. Lithography imaging control by enhanced monitoring of light source performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagna, Paolo; Zurita, Omar; Lalovic, Ivan; Seong, Nakgeuon; Rechsteiner, Gregory; Thornes, Joshua; D'havé, Koen; Van Look, Lieve; Bekaert, Joost

    2013-04-01

    Reducing lithography pattern variability has become a critical enabler of ArF immersion scaling and is required to ensure consistent lithography process yield for sub-30nm device technologies. As DUV multi-patterning requirements continue to shrink, it is imperative that all sources of lithography variability are controlled throughout the product life-cycle, from technology development to high volume manufacturing. Recent developments of new ArF light-source metrology and monitoring capabilities have been introduced in order to improve lithography patterning control.[1] These technologies enable performance monitoring of new light-source properties, relating to illumination stability, and enable new reporting and analysis of in-line performance.

  10. Direct-write scanning probe lithography: towards a desktop fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giam, Louise R.; Senesi, Andrew J.; Liao, Xing; Wong, Lu Shin; Chai, Jinan; Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Shim, Wooyoung; Rasin, Boris; He, Shu; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2011-06-01

    Massively parallel scanning-probe based methods have been used to address the challenges of nanometer to millimeter scale printing for a variety of materials and mark a step towards the realization of a "desktop fab." Such tools enable simple, flexible, high-throughput, and low-cost nano- and microscale patterning, which allow researchers to rapidly synthesize and study systems ranging from nanoparticle synthesis to biological processes. We have developed a novel scanning probe-based cantilever-free printing method termed polymer pen lithography (PPL), which uses an array of elastomeric tips to transfer materials (e.g. alkanethiols, proteins, polymers) in a direct-write manner onto a variety of surfaces. This technique takes the best attributes of dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) and eliminates many of the disadvantages of contact printing. Various related techniques such as beam pen lithography (BPL), scanning probe block copolymer lithography (SPBCL), and hard-tip, soft spring lithography (HSL) are also discussed.

  11. Evolution in the concentration of activities in lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    2016-03-01

    From a perusal of the proceedings of the SPIE Advanced Lithography Symposium, the progression of new concepts in lithographic technology can be seen. A new idea first appears in a few papers, and over time, there is an increase in the number of papers on the same topic. Eventually the method becomes commonplace, and the number of papers on the topic declines, as the idea becomes part of our industry's working knowledge. For example, one or two papers on resolution enhancement techniques (RETs) appeared in the proceedings of the Optical Microlithography Conference in 1989 and 1990. By 1994, the total number of papers had increased to 35. Early lithographers focused on practical issues, such as adhesion promotion and resist edge bead. The introduction of simulation software brought on the next era of lithography. This was followed by a period of time in which RETs were developed and brought to maturity. The introduction of optical proximity corrections (OPC) initiated the next major era of lithography. The traditional path for scaling by using shorter wavelengths, decreasing k1 and increasing numerical aperture has given way to the current era of optical multiple patterning and lithography-design co-optimization. There has been sufficient activity in EUV lithography R and D to justify a separate EUV Lithography Conference as part of the annual Advanced Lithography Symposium. Each era builds on the cumulative knowledge gained previously. Over time, there have been parallel developments in optics, exposure tools, resist, metrology and mask technology, many of which were associated with changes in the wavelength of light used for leading-edge lithography.

  12. Diffraction spectral filter for use in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Bernardez, Luis J.

    2002-01-01

    A condenser system for generating a beam of radiation includes a source of radiation light that generates a continuous spectrum of radiation light; a condenser comprising one or more first optical elements for collecting radiation from the source of radiation light and for generating a beam of radiation; and a diffractive spectral filter for separating first radiation light having a particular wavelength from the continuous spectrum of radiation light. Cooling devices can be employed to remove heat generated. The condenser system can be used with a ringfield camera in projection lithography.

  13. Successful demonstration of a comprehensive lithography defect monitoring strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ingrid B.; Breaux, Louis H.; Cross, Andrew; von den Hoff, Michael

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the validation of the methodology, the model and the impact of an optimized Lithography Defect Monitoring Strategy at two different semiconductor manufacturing factories. The lithography defect inspection optimization was implemented for the Gate Module at both factories running 0.13-0.15μm technologies on 200mm wafers, one running microprocessor and the other memory devices. As minimum dimensions and process windows decrease in the lithography area, new technologies and technological advances with resists and resist systems are being implemented to meet the demands. Along with these new technological advances in the lithography area comes potentially unforeseen defect issues. The latest lithography processes involve new resists in extremely thin, uniform films, exposing the films under conditions of highly optimized focus and illumination, and finally removing the resist completely and cleanly. The lithography cell is defined as the cluster of process equipment that accomplishes the coating process (surface prep, resist spin, edge-bead removal and soft bake), the alignment and exposure, and the developing process (post-exposure bake, develop, rinse) of the resist. Often the resist spinning process involves multiple materials such as BARC (bottom ARC) and / or TARC (top ARC) materials in addition to the resist itself. The introduction of these new materials with the multiple materials interfaces and the tightness of the process windows leads to an increased variety of defect mechanisms in the lithography area. Defect management in the lithography area has become critical to successful product introduction and yield ramp. The semiconductor process itself contributes the largest number and variety of defects, and a significant portion of the total defects originate within the lithography cell. From a defect management perspective, the lithography cell has some unique characteristics. First, defects in the lithography process module have the

  14. Pulsed diode laser-based monitor for singlet molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonkyung; Zhu, Leyun; Minhaj, Ahmed M.; Hinds, Michael F.; Vu, Danthu H.; Rosen, David I.; Davis, Steven J.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising cancer treatment. PDT uses the affinity of photosensitizers to be selectively retained in malignant tumors. When tumors, pretreated with the photosensitizer, are irradiated with visible light, a photochemical reaction occurs and tumor cells are destroyed. Oxygen molecules in the metastable singlet delta state O2(1Δ) are believed to be the species that destroys cancerous cells during PDT. Monitoring singlet oxygen produced by PDT may lead to more precise and effective PDT treatments. Our approach uses a pulsed diode laser-based monitor with optical fibers and a fast data acquisition system to monitor singlet oxygen during PDT. We present results of in vitro singlet oxygen detection in solutions and in a rat prostate cancer cell line as well as PDT mechanism modeling. PMID:18601555

  15. Pulsed diode laser-based monitor for singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonkyung; Zhu, Leyun; Minhaj, Ahmed M; Hinds, Michael F; Vu, Danthu H; Rosen, David I; Davis, Steven J; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2008-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising cancer treatment. PDT uses the affinity of photosensitizers to be selectively retained in malignant tumors. When tumors, pretreated with the photosensitizer, are irradiated with visible light, a photochemical reaction occurs and tumor cells are destroyed. Oxygen molecules in the metastable singlet delta state O2(1Delta) are believed to be the species that destroys cancerous cells during PDT. Monitoring singlet oxygen produced by PDT may lead to more precise and effective PDT treatments. Our approach uses a pulsed diode laser-based monitor with optical fibers and a fast data acquisition system to monitor singlet oxygen during PDT. We present results of in vitro singlet oxygen detection in solutions and in a rat prostate cancer cell line as well as PDT mechanism modeling.

  16. A Laser-Based Vision System for Weld Quality Inspection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2011-01-01

    Welding is a very complex process in which the final weld quality can be affected by many process parameters. In order to inspect the weld quality and detect the presence of various weld defects, different methods and systems are studied and developed. In this paper, a laser-based vision system is developed for non-destructive weld quality inspection. The vision sensor is designed based on the principle of laser triangulation. By processing the images acquired from the vision sensor, the geometrical features of the weld can be obtained. Through the visual analysis of the acquired 3D profiles of the weld, the presences as well as the positions and sizes of the weld defects can be accurately identified and therefore, the non-destructive weld quality inspection can be achieved. PMID:22344308

  17. Switchable multi-wavelength fiber laser based on modal interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Jiang, Sun; Qi, Yan-Hui; Kang, Ze-Xin; Jian, Shui-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    A comb fiber filter based on modal interference is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. Here two cascaded up-tapers are used to excite the cladding mode, and a core-offset jointing point is used to act as an interference component. Experimental results show that this kind of structure possesses a comb filter property in a range of the C-band. The measured extinction ratio is better than 12 dB with an insertion loss of about 11 dB. A switchable multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on this novel comb filter is demonstrated. By adjusting the polarization controller, the output laser can be switched among single-, dual-, and three-wavelengths with a side mode suppression ratio of better than 45 dB.

  18. LASER-BASED PROFILE MONITOR FOR ELECTRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Marc C

    2003-05-27

    High performance TeV energy electron / positron colliders (LC) are the first machines to require online, non-invasive beam size monitors for micron and sub-micron for beam phase space optimization. Typical beam densities in the LC are well beyond the threshold density for single pulse melting and vaporization of any material, making conventional wire scanners ineffective. Using a finely focused, diffraction limited high power laser, it is possible to devise a sampling profile monitor that, in operation, resembles a wire scanner. Very high resolution laser-based profile monitors have been developed and tested, first at FFTB (SLAC) and later at SLC and ATF. The monitor has broad applicability and we review here the technology, application and status of ongoing research programs.

  19. Diode laser based water vapor DIAL using modulated pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong Le Hoai; Abo, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring lower-tropospheric water vapor profile using the modulated pulse technique. The transmitter is based on single-mode diode laser and tapered semiconductor optical amplifier with a peak power of 10W around 800nm absorption band, and the receiver telescope diameter is 35cm. The selected wavelengths are compared to referenced wavelengths in terms of random error and systematic errors. The key component of modulated pulse technique, a macropulse, is generated with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, and the modulation within the macropulse is coded according to a pseudorandom sequence with 100ns chip width. As a result, we evaluate both single pulse modulation and pseudorandom coded pulse modulation technique. The water vapor profiles conducted from these modulation techniques are compared to the real observation data in summer in Japan.

  20. Laser-Based Hot-Melt Bonding of Thermosetting GFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, P.; Pillach, B.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M.

    In the future the use of tailored multi-material components will increase because of lightweight constructions. However for an optimal integration of different materials suitable joining techniques are necessary. This paper presents results of joining thermosetting composites to thermoplastics by means of laser-based hot-melt bonding. First the joining process of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) to thermoplastics is analyzed with regard to appropriate material selection of the thermoplastic joining partner. Then experiments are performed to join two thermosetting GFRP composites using a thermoplastic interlayer. All joined specimens are characterized by tensile shear tests whereby the influences of the used peel ply and the thermoplastic joining partner on the tensile shear strength are analyzed. Finally climate tests are performed to investigate the long-term durability of the joint connections.

  1. Ultrafast laser-based micro-CT system for small-animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Nees, John; Chen, Liming; Toth, R.; Hou, Bixue; Kincaid, Russell E., Jr.; Coman, Ioana L.; Lipson, Edward D.; Mourou, Gerard

    2004-05-01

    We investigated ultrafast laser-based x-ray (ULX) source as an attractive alternative to a microfocal x-ray tube used in micro-CT systems. The laser pulse duration was in the 30 fs-200 fs range, the repetition rate in the 10 Hz - 1 kHz range. A number of solid targets including Ge, Mo, Rh, Ag, Sn, Ba, La, Nd with matching filters was used. We optimized conditions for x-rays generation and measured: x-ray spectra, conversion efficiency (from laser light to x-rays), x-ray fluence, effective x-ray focal spot size and spatial resolution, contrast resolution and radiation dose. Good quality projection images of small animals in single-and dual-energy mode were obtained. ULX generates narrow x-ray spectra that consist mainly of characteristic lines that can be easily tailored (by changing laser beam target) to the imaging task, (e.g. to maximize contrast while minimizing radiation dose). X-ray fluence can exceed fluence produced by conventional microfocal tube with 10 μm focal-spot hence allowing for faster scans with very high spatial resolution. Changing the laser target, and thus matching the characteristic emission lines with the investigated animal's thickness and composition, can be done quickly and easily. Using narrow emission lines for imaging, instead of broad bremsstrahlung, offers superior dose utilization and limits beam-hardening effects. Employing two narrow emission lines-above and below the absorption edge of a contrast agent-in quick succession allows dual-energy-subtraction micro-CT for imaging with a contrast medium. Dual-energy-subtraction is not practical with a microfocal tube. Compact, robust, ultrafast lasers are commercially available, and their characteristics are rapidly improving. We plan to construct a prototype in vivo ultrafast laser-based micro-CT system.

  2. Laser-based sensors for oil spill remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Carl E.; Fingas, Mervin F.; Mullin, Joseph V.

    1997-07-01

    Remote sensing is becoming an increasingly important tool for the effective direction of oil spill countermeasures. Cleanup personnel have recognized that remote sensing can increase spill cleanup efficiency. It has long been recognized that there is no one sensor which is capable of detecting oil and related petroleum products in all environments and spill scenarios. There are sensors which possess a wide field-of- view and can therefore be used to map the overall extent of the spill. These sensors, however lack the capability to positively identify oil and related products, especially along complicated beach and shoreline environments where several substrates are present. The laser-based sensors under development by the Emergencies Science Division of Environment Canada are designed to fill specific roles in oil spill response. The scanning laser environmental airborne fluorosensor (SLEAF) is being developed to detect and map oil and related petroleum products in complex marine and shoreline environments where other non-specific sensors experience difficulty. The role of the SLEAF would be to confirm or reject suspected oil contamination sites that have been targeted by the non-specific sensors. This confirmation will release response crews from the time-consuming task of physically inspecting each site, and direct crews to sites that require remediation. The laser ultrasonic remote sensing of oil thickness (LURSOT) sensor will provide an absolute measurement of oil thickness from an airborne platform. There are presently no sensors available, either airborne or in the laboratory which can provide an absolute measurement of oil thickness. This information is necessary for the effective direction of spill countermeasures such as dispersant application and in-situ burning. This paper describes the development of laser-based airborne oil spill remote sensing instrumentation at Environment Canada and identifies the anticipated benefits of the use of this technology

  3. Projection lithography with distortion compensation using reticle chuck contouring

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.

    2001-01-01

    A chuck for holding a reflective reticle where the chuck has an insulator block with a non-planer surface contoured to cause distortion correction of EUV radiation is provided. Upon being placed on the chuck, a thin, pliable reflective reticle will conform to the contour of the chuck's non-planer surface. When employed in a scanning photolithography system, distortion in the scanned direction is corrected.

  4. Nanoparticle fabrication by geometrically confined nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denomme, Ryan C.; Iyer, Krishna; Kreder, Michael; Smith, Brendan; Nieva, Patricia M.

    2013-07-01

    Arrays of metal nanoparticles, typically gold or silver, exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance, a phenomenon that has many applications, such as chemical and biological sensing. However, fabrication of metal nanoparticle arrays with high uniformity and repeatability, at a reasonable cost, is difficult. Nanosphere lithography (NSL) has been used before to produce inexpensive nanoparticle arrays through the use of monolayers of self-assembled microspheres as a deposition mask. However, control over the size and location of the arrays, as well as uniformity over large areas is poor, thus limiting its use to research purposes. In this paper, a new NSL method, called here geometrically confined NSL (GCNSL), is presented. In GCNSL, microsphere assembly is confined to geometric patterns defined in photoresist, allowing high-precision and large-scale nanoparticle patterning while still remaining low cost. Using this new method, it is demonstrated that 400 nm polystyrene microspheres can be assembled inside of large arrays of photoresist patterns. Results show that optimal microsphere assembly is achieved with long and narrow rectangular photoresist patterns. The combination of microsphere monolayers and photoresist patterns is then used as a deposition mask to produce silver nanoparticles at precise locations on the substrate with high uniformity, repeatability, and quality.

  5. Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh Bao

    1994-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 {mu}m wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

  6. Characterization of 'metal resist' for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Sato, Yuta; Kumai, Reiji; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Itani, Toshiro

    2016-03-01

    We characterized EIDEC metal resist for EUV lithography by various measurement methods. The low-voltage aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy showed the morphology of metal resists in nanometer regions and enabled studying the distribution of resist component in the resist film. The zirconium oxide metal resist kept the core-shell structure in the resist films and the titanium oxide metal resist showed the aggregation in the film. X-ray diffractometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulation showed the amorphous structure with short-range order of the zirconium oxide metal resist. X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy of the zirconium oxide-methacrylic acid metal resist showed the decomposition of the shell molecules and the increase of electron density at zirconium atoms after the EUV exposure. Infrared (IR) spectra indicated that the shell molecules made the various bindings to the metal core and the specific vibrational mode of shell molecules showed the divergent responsivity to the irradiation wavenumber of the IR Free electron laser.

  7. Smartphone sensors for stone lithography authentication.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Giuseppe Schirripa; Cozzella, Lorenzo; Papalillo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays mobile phones include quality photo and video cameras, access to wireless networks and the internet, GPS assistance and other innovative systems. These facilities open them to innovative uses, other than the classical telephonic communication one. Smartphones are a more sophisticated version of classic mobile phones, which have advanced computing power, memory and connectivity. Because fake lithographs are flooding the art market, in this work, we propose a smartphone as simple, robust and efficient sensor for lithograph authentication. When we buy an artwork object, the seller issues a certificate of authenticity, which contains specific details about the artwork itself. Unscrupulous sellers can duplicate the classic certificates of authenticity, and then use them to "authenticate" non-genuine works of art. In this way, the buyer will have a copy of an original certificate to attest that the "not original artwork" is an original one. A solution for this problem would be to insert a system that links together the certificate and the related specific artwork. To do this it is necessary, for a single artwork, to find unique, unrepeatable, and unchangeable characteristics. In this article we propose an innovative method for the authentication of stone lithographs. We use the color spots distribution captured by means of a smartphone camera as a non-cloneable texture of the specific artworks and an information management system for verifying it in mobility stone lithography. PMID:24811077

  8. Resist profile simulation with fast lithography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Ying; Chou, Chih-Shiang; Tang, Yu-Po; Huang, Wen-Chun; Liu, Ru-Gun; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    A traditional approach to construct a fast lithographic model is to match wafer top-down SEM images, contours and/or gauge CDs with a TCC model plus some simple resist representation. This modeling method has been proven and is extensively used for OPC modeling. As the technology moves forward, this traditional approach has become insufficient in regard to lithography weak point detection, etching bias prediction, etc. The drawback of this approach is from metrology and simulation. First, top-down SEM is only good for acquiring planar CD information. Some 3D metrology such as cross-section SEM or AFM is necessary to obtain the true resist profile. Second, the TCC modeling approach is only suitable for planar image simulation. In order to model the resist profile, full 3D image simulation is needed. Even though there are many rigorous simulators capable of catching the resist profile very well, none of them is feasible for full-chip application due to the tremendous consumption of computational resource. The authors have proposed a quasi-3D image simulation method in the previous study [1], which is suitable for full-chip simulation with the consideration of sidewall angles, to improve the model accuracy of planar models. In this paper, the quasi-3D image simulation is extended to directly model the resist profile with AFM and/or cross-section SEM data. Resist weak points detected by the model generated with this 3D approach are verified on the wafer.

  9. Metal hierarchical patterning by direct nanoimprint lithography

    PubMed Central

    Radha, Boya; Lim, Su Hui; Saifullah, Mohammad S. M.; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional hierarchical patterning of metals is of paramount importance in diverse fields involving photonics, controlling surface wettability and wearable electronics. Conventionally, this type of structuring is tedious and usually involves layer-by-layer lithographic patterning. Here, we describe a simple process of direct nanoimprint lithography using palladium benzylthiolate, a versatile metal-organic ink, which not only leads to the formation of hierarchical patterns but also is amenable to layer-by-layer stacking of the metal over large areas. The key to achieving such multi-faceted patterning is hysteretic melting of ink, enabling its shaping. It undergoes transformation to metallic palladium under gentle thermal conditions without affecting the integrity of the hierarchical patterns on micro- as well as nanoscale. A metallic rice leaf structure showing anisotropic wetting behavior and woodpile-like structures were thus fabricated. Furthermore, this method is extendable for transferring imprinted structures to a flexible substrate to make them robust enough to sustain numerous bending cycles. PMID:23446801

  10. Lithography optics: its present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Mori, Takashi

    1998-09-01

    Firstly, various technical aspects of ArF optics are surveyed. At present, the ArF excimer laser is regarded as one of the most promising candidates as a next-generation light source for optical lithography. Discussions are ranging over some critical issues of ArF optics. The lifetime of ArF optics supposedly limited by the radiation compaction of silica glass is estimated in comparison with KrF optics. Availability of calcium fluoride (CaF2) is also discussed. As a designing issue, a comparative study is made about the optical configuration, dioptric or catadioptric. In the end, our resist-based performance is shown. Secondly, estimated are the future trend regarding minimum geometry and the optical parameters, such as numerical aperture and wavelength. For the estimation, simulations based on aerial images are performed, where in the resolution limit is defined as a minimum feature size which retains practical depth of focus. Pattern geometry is classified into two categories, which are dense lines and isolated lines. Available wavelengths are assumed to be KrF excimer laser ((λ =248 nm), ArF excimer laser (λ =193 nm) and F2 excimer laser (λ =157 nm). Based upon the simulation results, the resolution limit is estimated for each geometry and each wavelength.

  11. Smartphone Sensors for Stone Lithography Authentication

    PubMed Central

    Schirripa Spagnolo, Giuseppe; Cozzella, Lorenzo; Papalillo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays mobile phones include quality photo and video cameras, access to wireless networks and the internet, GPS assistance and other innovative systems. These facilities open them to innovative uses, other than the classical telephonic communication one. Smartphones are a more sophisticated version of classic mobile phones, which have advanced computing power, memory and connectivity. Because fake lithographs are flooding the art market, in this work, we propose a smartphone as simple, robust and efficient sensor for lithograph authentication. When we buy an artwork object, the seller issues a certificate of authenticity, which contains specific details about the artwork itself. Unscrupulous sellers can duplicate the classic certificates of authenticity, and then use them to “authenticate” non-genuine works of art. In this way, the buyer will have a copy of an original certificate to attest that the “not original artwork” is an original one. A solution for this problem would be to insert a system that links together the certificate and the related specific artwork. To do this it is necessary, for a single artwork, to find unique, unrepeatable, and unchangeable characteristics. In this article we propose an innovative method for the authentication of stone lithographs. We use the color spots distribution captured by means of a smartphone camera as a non-cloneable texture of the specific artworks and an information management system for verifying it in mobility stone lithography. PMID:24811077

  12. Intelligent control system based on ARM for lithography tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changlong; Tang, Xiaoping; Hu, Song; Wang, Nan

    2014-08-01

    The control system of traditional lithography tool is based on PC and MCU. The PC handles the complex algorithm, human-computer interaction, and communicates with MCU via serial port; The MCU controls motors and electromagnetic valves, etc. This mode has shortcomings like big volume, high power consumption, and wasting of PC resource. In this paper, an embedded intelligent control system of lithography tool, based on ARM, is provided. The control system used S5PV210 as processor, completing the functions of PC in traditional lithography tool, and provided a good human-computer interaction by using LCD and capacitive touch screen. Using Android4.0.3 as operating system, the equipment provided a cool and easy UI which made the control more user-friendly, and implemented remote control and debug, pushing video information of product by network programming. As a result, it's convenient for equipment vendor to provide technical support for users. Finally, compared with traditional lithography tool, this design reduced the PC part, making the hardware resources efficiently used and reducing the cost and volume. Introducing embedded OS and the concepts in "The Internet of things" into the design of lithography tool can be a development trend.

  13. Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography - Reflective Mask Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C.C.; Kearney, P.A.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Bowers, J.M.; Cerjan, C.; Warrick, A.L.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Fought, E.; Moore, C.; Larson, C.; Baker, S.; Burkhart, S.C.; Hector, S.D.

    2000-05-09

    EUVL mask blanks consist of a distributed Bragg reflector made of 6.7nm-pitch bi-layers of MO and Si deposited upon a precision Si or glass substrate. The layer deposition process has been optimized for low defects, by application of a vendor-supplied but highly modified ion-beam sputter deposition system. This system is fully automated using SMIF technology to obtain the lowest possible environmental- and handling-added defect levels. Originally designed to coat 150mm substrates, it was upgraded in July, 1999 to 200 mm and has coated runs of over 50 substrates at a time with median added defects >100nm below 0.05/cm{sup 2}. These improvements have resulted from a number of ion-beam sputter deposition system modifications, upgrades, and operational changes, which will be discussed. Success in defect reduction is highly dependent upon defect detection, characterization, and cross-platform positional registration. We have made significant progress in adapting and extending commercial tools to this purpose, and have identified the surface scanner detection limits for different defect classes, and the signatures of false counts and non-printable scattering anomalies on the mask blank. We will present key results and how they have helped reduce added defects. The physics of defect reduction and mitigation is being investigated by a program on multilayer growth over deliberately placed perturbations (defects) of varying size. This program includes modeling of multilayer growth and modeling of defect printability. We developed a technique for depositing uniformly sized gold spheres on EUVL substrates, and have studied the suppression of the perturbations during multilayer growth under varying conditions. This work is key to determining the lower limit of critical defect size for EUV Lithography. We present key aspects of this work. We will summarize progress in all aspects of EUVL mask blank development, and present detailed results on defect reduction and mask blank

  14. Antireflective surface patterned by rolling mask lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Oliver; Geddes, Joseph B.; Aryal, Mukti; Perez, Joseph; Wassei, Jonathan; McMackin, Ian; Kobrin, Boris

    2014-03-01

    A growing number of commercial products such as displays, solar panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs), automotive and architectural glass are driving demand for glass with high performance surfaces that offer anti-reflective, self-cleaning, and other advanced functions. State-of-the-art coatings do not meet the desired performance characteristics or cannot be applied over large areas in a cost-effective manner. "Rolling Mask Lithography" (RML™) enables highresolution lithographic nano-patterning over large-areas at low-cost and high-throughput. RML is a photolithographic process performed using ultraviolet (UV) illumination transmitted through a soft cylindrical mask as it rolls across a substrate. Subsequent transfer of photoresist patterns into the substrate is achieved using an etching process, which creates a nanostructured surface. The current generation exposure tool is capable of patterning one-meter long substrates with a width of 300 mm. High-throughput and low-cost are achieved using continuous exposure of the resist by the cylindrical photomask. Here, we report on significant improvements in the application of RML™ to fabricate anti-reflective surfaces. Briefly, an optical surface can be made antireflective by "texturing" it with a nano-scale pattern to reduce the discontinuity in the index of refraction between the air and the bulk optical material. An array of cones, similar to the structure of a moth's eye, performs this way. Substrates are patterned using RML™ and etched to produce an array of cones with an aspect ratio of 3:1, which decreases the reflectivity below 0.1%.

  15. 11nm logic lithography with OPC-lite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Axelrad, Valery; Nakayama, Ryo; Oyama, Kenichi; Hara, Arisa

    2014-03-01

    CMOS logic at the 22nm node and below is being done with a highly regular layout style using Gridded Design Rules (GDR). Smaller nodes have been demonstrated using a "lines and cuts" approach with good pattern fidelity and process margin, with extendibility to ~7nm.[1] In previous studies, Design-Source-Mask Optimization (DSMO) has been demonstrated to be effective down to the 12nm node.[2,3,4,5,6] The transition from single- to double- and in some cases triple- patterning was evaluated for different layout styles, with highly regular layouts delaying the need for multiple-patterning compared to complex layouts. To address mask complexity and cost, OPC for the "cut" patterns was studied and relatively simple OPC was found to provide good quality metrics such as MEEF and DOF.[3,7,8] This is significant since mask data volumes of >500GB per layer are projected for pixelated masks created by complex OPC or inverse lithography; writing times for such masks are nearly prohibitive. In our present work, we extend the scaling using SMO with "OPC Lite" beyond 12nm. The focus is on the contact pattern since a "hole" pattern is similar to a "cut" pattern so a similar technique should be useful. The test block is a reasonably complex logic function with ~100k gates of combinatorial logic and flip-flops, scaled from previous studies. The contact pattern is a relatively dense layer since it connects two underlying layers - active and gate - to one overlying layer - metal-1. Several design iterations were required to get suitable layouts while maintaining circuit functionality. Experimental demonstration of the contact pattern using OPC-Lite will be presented. Wafer results have been obtained at a metal-1 half-pitch of 18nm, corresponding to the 11nm CMOS node. Additional results for other layers - FINs, local interconnect, and metal-1 - will also be discussed.

  16. Low-defect reflective mask blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, S C; Cerjarn, C; Kearney, P; Mirkarimi, P; Walton, C; Ray-Chaudhuri, A

    1999-03-11

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithgraphy (EUVL) is an emerging technology for fabrication of sub-100 nm feature sizes on silicon, following the SIA roadmap well into the 21st century. The specific EUVL system described is a scanned, projection lithography system with a 4:1 reduction, using a laser plasma EUV source. The mask and all of the system optics are reflective, multilayer mirrors which function in the extreme ultraviolet at 13.4 nm wavelength. Since the masks are imaged to the wafer exposure plane, mask defects greater than 80% of the exposure plane CD (for 4:1 reduction) will in many cases render the mask useless, whereas intervening optics can have defects which are not a printing problem. For the 100 nm node, we must reduce defects to less than 0.01/cm² @ 80nm or larger to obtain acceptable mask production yields. We have succeeded in reducing the defects to less than 0.1/cm² for defects larger than 130 nm detected by visible light inspection tools, however our program goal is to achieve 0.01/cm² in the near future. More importantly though, we plan to have a detailed understanding of defect origination and the effect on multilayer growth in order to mitigate defects below the 10-2/cm² level on the next generation of mask blank deposition systems. In this paper we will discuss issues and results from the ion-beam multilayer deposition tool, details of the defect detection and characterization facility, and progress on defect printability modeling.

  17. Diode-Laser-Based Spectrometer for Sensing Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.

    2005-01-01

    A diode-laser-based spectrometer has been developed for measuring concentrations of gases and is intended particularly for use in analyzing and monitoring combustion processes under microgravitational conditions in a drop tower or a spacecraft. This instrument is also well suited for use on Earth in combustion experiments and for such related purposes as fire-safety monitoring and monitoring toxic and flammable gases in industrial settings. Of the gas-sensing spectrometers available prior to the development of this instrument, those that were sensitive enough for measuring the combustion gases of interest were too large, required critical optical alignments, used far too much electrical power, and were insufficiently rugged for use under the severe conditions of spacecraft launch and space flight. In contrast, the present instrument is compact, consumes relatively little power, and is rugged enough to withstand launch vibrations and space flight. In addition, this instrument is characterized by long-term stability, accuracy, and reliability. The diode laser in this spectrometer is operated in a wavelength-modulation mode. Different gases to be measured can be selected by changing modular laser units. The operation of the laser is controlled by customized, low-power electronic circuitry built around a digital signal-processor board. This customized circuitry also performs acquisition and analysis of data, controls communications, and manages errors.

  18. Virtual environment assessment for laser-based vision surface profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElSoussi, Adnane; Al Alami, Abed ElRahman; Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.

    2015-03-01

    Oil and gas businesses have been raising the demand from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to implement a reliable metrology method in assessing surface profiles of welds before and after grinding. This certainly mandates the deviation from the commonly used surface measurement gauges, which are not only operator dependent, but also limited to discrete measurements along the weld. Due to its potential accuracy and speed, the use of laser-based vision surface profiling systems have been progressively rising as part of manufacturing quality control. This effort presents a virtual environment that lends itself for developing and evaluating existing laser vision sensor (LVS) calibration and measurement techniques. A combination of two known calibration techniques is implemented to deliver a calibrated LVS system. System calibration is implemented virtually and experimentally to scan simulated and 3D printed features of known profiles, respectively. Scanned data is inverted and compared with the input profiles to validate the virtual environment capability for LVS surface profiling and preliminary assess the measurement technique for weld profiling applications. Moreover, this effort brings 3D scanning capability a step closer towards robust quality control applications in a manufacturing environment.

  19. Advances in laser-based isotope ratio measurements: selected applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstel, E.; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-09-01

    Small molecules exhibit characteristic ro-vibrational transitions in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions, which are strongly influenced by isotopic substitution. This gift of nature has made it possible to use laser spectroscopy for the accurate analysis of the isotopic composition of gaseous samples. Nowadays, laser spectroscopy is clearly recognized as a valid alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Laser-based instruments are leaving the research laboratory stage and are being used by a growing number of isotope researchers for significant advances in their own field of research. In this review article, we discuss the current status and new frontiers of research on high-sensitivity and high-precision laser spectroscopy for isotope ratio analyses. Although many of our comments will be generally applicable to laser isotope ratio analyses in molecules of environmental importance, this paper concerns itself primarily with water and carbon dioxide, two molecules that were studied extensively in our respective laboratories. A complete coverage of the field is practically not feasible in the space constraints of this issue, and in any case doomed to fail, considering the large body of work that has appeared ever since the review by Kerstel in 2004 ( Handbook of Stable Isotope Analytical Techniques, Chapt. 34, pp. 759-787).

  20. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hsin, Tse-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  1. Stochastic resonance-enhanced laser-based particle detector.

    PubMed

    Dutta, A; Werner, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a Laser-based particle detector whose response was enhanced by modulating the Laser diode with a white-noise generator. A Laser sheet was generated to cast a shadow of the object on a 200 dots per inch, 512 x 1 pixels linear sensor array. The Laser diode was modulated with a white-noise generator to achieve stochastic resonance. The white-noise generator essentially amplified the wide-bandwidth (several hundred MHz) noise produced by a reverse-biased zener diode operating in junction-breakdown mode. The gain in the amplifier in the white-noise generator was set such that the Receiver Operating Characteristics plot provided the best discriminability. A monofiber 40 AWG (approximately 80 microm) wire was detected with approximately 88% True Positive rate and approximately 19% False Positive rate in presence of white-noise modulation and with approximately 71% True Positive rate and approximately 15% False Positive rate in absence of white-noise modulation.

  2. Possible new lasers based on plasmas similar to thermionic converters

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, E.J.; Lawless, J.L.; McVey, J.B.

    1986-08-15

    This paper describes novel plasma recombination lasers that can be produced with conditions similar to the plasma in a thermionic convertor. Calculations have shown that a population inversion can be obtained by either time variation of the current in a thermionic converter discharge or by gas dynamic expansion of plasma flow driven by heat pipe action. Sudden modulation of the current can cool the plasma in a thermionic convertor with electrons coming from the thermionically emitting electrode to produce an inversion of the 7p-7s line in cesium. Alternatively, if the inter-electrode plasma is made to flow through a supersonic expansion nozzle, a population inversion in the downstream plume may also be produced. Either of theses approaches or a combination of them can be used to convert heat directly into laser output. Two laser lines in the cesium vapor at 2.93 and 3.10 microns are predicted. Two other novel laser concepts are also mentioned: a solar pumped atmospheric laser and a laser based on the space plasma around an orbiting vehicle.

  3. Laser-based patterning for fluidic devices in nitrocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Katis, Ioannis N.; Eason, Robert W.; Sones, Collin L.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we demonstrate a simple and low cost method that can be reproducibly used for fabrication of microfluidic devices in nitrocellulose. The fluidic patterns are created via a laser-based direct-write technique that induces polymerisation of a photo-polymer previously impregnated in the nitrocellulose. The resulting structures form hydrophobic barriers that extend through the thickness of the nitrocellulose and define an interconnected hydrophilic fluidic-flow pattern. Our experimental results show that using this method it is possible to achieve microfluidic channels with lateral dimensions of ∼100 μm using hydrophobic barriers that form the channel walls with dimensions of ∼60 μm; both of these values are considerably smaller than those that can be achieved with other current techniques used in the fabrication of nitrocellulose-based fluidic devices. A simple grid patterned nitrocellulose device was then used for the detection of C-reactive protein via a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, which served as a useful proof-of-principle experiment. PMID:26015836

  4. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  5. Residual stress determination from a laser-based curvature measurement

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Swank; R. A. Gavalya; J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2000-05-08

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  6. Residual Stress Determination from a Laser-Based Curvature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, William David; Gavalya, Rick Allen; Wright, Julie Knibloe; Wright, Richard Neil

    2000-05-01

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  7. Dental hard tissue characterization using laser-based ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.; Massey, Ward L.

    2003-07-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. One critical need is the detection of tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated to help re-mineralize the tooth. Currently employed x-ray imaging is limited in its ability to visualize interfaces and incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration. To this end, non-destructive and non-contact in vitro measurements on extracted human molars using laser-based ultrasonics are presented. Broadband ultrasonic waves are excited in the extracted sections by using a pulsed carbon-dioxide (CO2) laser operating in a region of high optical absorption in the dental hard tissues. Optical interferometric detection of the ultrasonic wave surface displacements in accomplished with a path-stabilized Michelson-type interferometer. Results for bulk and surface in-vitro characterization of caries are presented on extracted molars with pre-existing caries.

  8. Receding contact lines: From sliding drops to immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkels, K. G.; Peters, I. R.; Evangelista, F.; Riepen, M.; Daerr, A.; Limat, L.; Snoeijer, J. H.

    2011-02-01

    Instabilities of receding contact lines often occur through the formation of a corner with a very sharp tip. These dewetting structures also appear in the technology of Immersion Lithography, where water is put between the lens and the silicon wafer to increase the optical resolution. In this paper we aim to compare corners appearing in Immersion Lithography to those at the tail of gravity driven-drops sliding down an incline. We use high speed recordings to measure the dynamic contact angle and the sharpness of the corner, for varying contact line velocity. It is found that these quantities behave very similarly for Immersion Lithography and drops on an incline. In addition, the results agree well with predictions by a lubrication model for cornered contact lines, hinting at a generic structure of dewetting corners.

  9. Shadowing effect modeling and compensation for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hua; Zavyalova, Lena; Su, Irene; Shiely, James; Schmoeller, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is one of the leading technologies for 16nm and smaller node device patterning. One patterning issue intrinsic to EUV lithography is the shadowing effect due to oblique illumination at the mask and mask absorber thickness. This effect can cause CD errors up to a few nanometers, consequently needs to be accounted for in OPC modeling and compensated accordingly in mask synthesis. Because of the dependence on the reticle field coordinates, shadowing effect is very different from the traditional optical and resist effects. It poses challenges to modeling, compensation, and verification that were not encountered in tradition optical lithography mask synthesis. In this paper, we present a systematic approach for shadowing effect modeling and model-based shadowing compensation. Edge based shadowing effect calculation with reticle and scan information is presented. Model calibration and mask synthesis flows are described. Numerical experiments are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  10. Deconstructing contact hole CD printing variability in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civay, D.; Wallow, T.; Doganaksoy, N.; Verduijn, E.; Schmid, G.; Mangat, P.

    2014-04-01

    Lithographic CD printing variability can be easily captured with a CDU measurement, however delineating the most significant sources causing the variability is challenging. In EUV lithography, the resist, reticle, metrology methodology, and stochastics are examples of factors that influence printing variability. Determining the most significant sources of variability in contact hole and via patterning is particularly interesting because the variability can be measured as a function of two tethered dimensions. Contact hole (CH) variability has a direct impact on device performance while via variability affects metal area scaling and design. By studying sources of variability opportunities for improving device performance and scaling can be identified. In this paper, we will examine sources of contact patterning variability in EUV lithography comprehensively using various EUV exposure tools as well as simulation methods. We will present a benchmark of current state of the art materials and patterning methods with the goal of assessing contact hole printability at the limit of 0.33 NA EUV lithography.

  11. Recent progress in nanoparticle photoresists development for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Kazuki; Kosma, Vasiliki; Odent, Jeremy; Xu, Hong; Yu, Mufei; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is a promising candidate for next generation lithography. For high volume manufacturing of semiconductor devices, significant improvement of resolution and sensitivity is required for successful implementation of EUV resists. Performance requirements for such resists demand the development of entirely new resist platforms. Cornell University has intensely studied metal oxide nanoparticle photoresists with high sensitivity for EUV lithography applications. Zirconium oxide nanoparticles with PAG enabling sub 30nm line negative tone patterns at an EUV dose below 5 mJ/cm2 show one of the best EUV sensitivity results ever reported. In this paper, recent progress in metal oxide nanoparticle photoresist research will be discussed. Several studies regarding composition investigation and new metal element study are reported.

  12. Thickness optimization for lithography process on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaojing; Su, Yajuan; Liu, Yansong; Chen, Fong; Liu, Zhimin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Bifeng; Gao, Tao; Wei, Yayi

    2015-03-01

    With the development of the lithography, the demand for critical dimension (CD) and CD uniformity (CDU) has reached a new level, which is harder and harder to achieve. There exists reflection at the interface between photo-resist and substrate during lithography exposure. This reflection has negative impact on CD and CDU control. It is possible to optimize the litho stack and film stack thickness on different lithography conditions. With the optimized stack, the total reflectivity for all incident angles at the interface can be controlled less than 0.5%, ideally 0.1%, which enhances process window (PW) most of the time. The theoretical results are verified by the experiment results from foundry, which helps the foundry achieve the mass production finally.

  13. Graphene nanoribbon superlattices fabricated via He ion lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Archanjo, Braulio S.; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Winston, Donald; Miao, Feng; Alberto Achete, Carlos; Medeiros-Ribeiro, Gilberto

    2014-05-12

    Single-step nano-lithography was performed on graphene sheets using a helium ion microscope. Parallel “defect” lines of ∼1 μm length and ≈5 nm width were written to form nanoribbon gratings down to 20 nm pitch. Polarized Raman spectroscopy shows that crystallographic orientation of the nanoribbons was partially maintained at their lateral edges, indicating a high-fidelity lithography process. Furthermore, Raman analysis of large exposure areas with different ion doses reveals that He ions produce point defects with radii ∼ 2× smaller than do Ga ions, demonstrating that scanning-He{sup +}-beam lithography can texture graphene with less damage.

  14. Immersion defectivity study with volume production immersion lithography tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Katsushi; Kato, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Tomoharu; Shiraishi, K.; Iriuchijima, Yasuhiro; Owa, Soichi; Malik, Irfan; Woodman, Steve; Terala, Prasad; Pelissier, Christine; Zhang, Haiping

    2007-03-01

    ArF immersion lithography has become accepted as the critical layer patterning solution for lithography going forward. Volume production of 55 nm devices using immersion lithography has begun. One of the key issues for the success of volume production immersion lithography is the control of immersion defectivity. Because the defectivity is influenced by the exposure tool, track, materials, and the wafer environment, a broad range of analysis and optimization is needed to minimize defect levels. Defect tests were performed using a dedicated immersion cluster consisting of a volume production immersion exposure tool, Nikon NSR-S609B, having NA of 1.07, and a resist coater-developer, TEL LITHIUS i+. Miniaturization of feature size by immersion lithography requires higher sensitivity defect inspection. In this paper, first we demonstrate the high sensitivity defect measurement using a next generation wafer inspection system, KLA-Tencor 2800 and Surfscan SP2, on both patterned and non-patterned wafers. Long-term defect stability is very important from the viewpoint of device mass production. Secondly, we present long-term defectivity data using a topcoat-less process. For tool and process qualification, a simple monitor method is required. Simple, non-pattern immersion scanned wafer measurement has been proposed elsewhere, but the correlation between such a non-pattern defect and pattern defect must be confirmed. In this paper, using a topcoat process, the correlation between topcoat defects and pattern defects is analyzed using the defect source analysis (DSA) method. In case of accidental tool contamination, a cleaning process should be established. Liquid cleaning is suitable because it can be easily introduced through the immersion nozzle. An in-situ tool cleaning method is introduced. A broad range of optimization of tools, materials, and processes provide convincing evidence that immersion lithography is ready for volume production chip manufacturing.

  15. ILT for double exposure lithography with conventional and novel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonawala, Amyn; Borodovsky, Yan; Milanfar, Peyman

    2007-03-01

    Multiple paths exists to provide lithography solutions pursuant to Moore's Law for next 3-5 generations of technology, yet each of those paths inevitably leads to solutions eventually requiring patterning at k I < 0.30 and below. In this article, we explore double exposure single development lithography for k I >= 0.25 (using conventional resist) and k1 < 0.25 (using new out-of-sight out-of-mind materials). For the case of k I >= 0.25, we propose a novel double exposure inverse lithography technique (ILT) to split the pattern. Our algorithm is based on our earlier proposed single exposure ILT framework, and works by decomposing the aerial image (instead of the target pattern) into two parts. It also resolves the phase conflicts automatically as part of the decomposition, and the combined aerial image obtained using the estimated masks has a superior contrast. For the case of k I < 0.25, we focus on analyzing the use of various dual patterning techniques enabled by the use of hypothetic materials with properties that allow for the violation of the linear superposition of intensities from the two exposures. We investigate the possible use of two materials: contrast enhancement layer (CEL) and two-photon absorption resists. We propose a mathematical model for CEL, define its characteristic properties, and derive fundamental bounds on the improvement in image log-slope. Simulation results demonstrate that double exposure single development lithography using CEL enables printing 80nm gratings using dry lithography. We also combine ILT, CEL, and DEL to synthesize 2-D patterns with k I = 0.185. Finally, we discuss the viability of two-photon absorption resists for double exposure lithography.

  16. Mix-and-match lithography for half-micron technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Warren W.; Dameron, David H.

    1991-08-01

    Half-micron lithography for a production environment is not considered realistic with currently available lithography tools. While optical steppers have high wafer throughputs, they do not have sufficient process latitude at half-micron geometries. In contrast, advanced technologies with sufficient capabilities for half-micron processing such as direct-write e-beam and x-ray lithography are extremely expensive and have low effective throughputs. A mix-and- match lithography approach can take advantage of the best features of both types of systems by sing an optical stepper for noncritical levels and an advanced lithography system for critical levels. In order to facilitate processing of a triple level metal half-micron CMOS technology, a mix-and-match scheme has been developed between a Hitachi HL-700 D e-beam direct write system and an Ultratech 1500 wide-field 1x stepper. The Hitachi is used to pattern an accurate zero or registration level. All critical levels are exposed on the Hitachi and aligned back to this zero level. The Ultratech is used to align all other process levels which do not have critical targets that are placed on subsequent process levels. The mix-and-match approach is discussed, and optical to e-beam as well as e-beam to optical alignment results from seven production lots are presented. The linear alignment error components X translation, Y translation, rotation and magnification are extracted and analyzed to determine their source. It was found that a simple adjustment improved the registration capabilities of these two lithography tools by reducing the X translation, Y translation and rotation standard deviations by a factor of two or more, while greatly reducing the magnification errors between the two tools.

  17. Directed self-assembly graphoepitaxy template generation with immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuansheng; Lei, Junjiang; Andres Torres, J.; Hong, Le; Word, James; Fenger, Germain; Tritchkov, Alexander; Lippincott, George; Gupta, Rachit; Lafferty, Neal; He, Yuan; Bekaert, Joost; Vanderberghe, Geert

    2015-07-01

    We present an optimization methodology for the template designs of subresolution contacts using directed self-assembly (DSA) with graphoepitaxy and immersion lithography. We demonstrate the flow using a 60-nm-pitch contact design in doublet with Monte Carlo simulations for DSA. We introduce the notion of template error enhancement factor (TEEF) to gauge the sensitivity of DSA printing infidelity to template printing infidelity and evaluate optimized template designs with TEEF metrics. Our data show that source mask optimization and inverse lithography technology are critical to achieve sub-80 nm non-L0 pitches for DSA patterns using 193i.

  18. Nanometer-scale placement in electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, Juan

    2000-12-01

    Electron-beam lithography is capable of high-resolution lithographic pattern generation (down to 10 nm or below). However, for conventional e-beam lithography, pattern- placement accuracy is inferior to resolution. Despite significant efforts to improve pattern placement, a limit is being approached. The placement capability of conventional e-beam tools is insufficient to fabricate narrow-band optical filters and lasers, which require sub-micrometer-pitch gratings with a high degree of spatial coherence. Moreover, it is widely recognized that placement accuracy will not be sufficient for future semiconductor device generations, with minimum feature sizes below 100 nm. In electron-beam lithography, an electromagnetic deflection system is used in conjunction with a laser-interferometer-controlled stage to generate high-resolution patterns over large areas. Placement errors arise because the laser interferometer monitors the stage position, but the e-beam can independently drift relative to the stage. Moreover, the laser interferometer can itself drift during exposure. To overcome this fundamental limitation, the method of spatial phase-locked electron-beam lithography has been proposed. The beam position is referenced to a high- fidelity grid, exposed by interference lithography, on the substrate surface. In this method, pattern-placement performance depends upon the accuracy of the reference grid and the precision with which patterns can be locked to the grid. The grid must be well characterized to serve as a reliable fiducial. This document describes work done to characterize grids generated by interference lithography. A theoretical model was developed to describe the spatial-phase progression of interferometric gratings and grids. The accuracy of the interference lithography apparatus was found to be limited by substrate mounting errors and uncertainty in setting the geometrical parameters that determine the angle of interference. Experimental measurements were

  19. Nanoimprint lithography for functional polymer patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Dehu

    2011-07-01

    Organic semiconductors have generated huge interested in recent years for low-cost and flexible electronics. Current and future device applications for semiconducting polymers include light-emitting diodes, thin-film transistors, photovoltaic cells, photodetectors, lasers, and memories. The performance of conjugated polymer devices depends on two major factors: the chain conformation in polymer film and the device architecture. Highly ordered chain structure usually leads to much improved performance by enhancing interchain interaction to facilitate carrier transport. The goal of this research is to improve the performance of organic devices with the nanoimprint lithography. The work begins with the controlling of polymer chain orientation in patterned nanostructures through nanoimprint mold design and process parameter manipulation, and studying the effect of chain ordering on material properties. Then, step-and-repeat thermal nanoimprint technique for large-scale continuous manufacturing of conjugated polymer nanostructures is developed. After that, Systematic investigation of polymer chain configuration by Raman spectroscopy is carried out to understand how nanoimprint process parameters, such as mold pattern size, temperature, and polymer molecular weight, affects polymer chain configuration. The results indicate that chain orientation in nanoimprinted polymer micro- and nanostructures is highly related to the nanoimprint temperature and the dimensions of the mold structures. The ability to create nanoscale polymer micro- and nanostructures and manipulate their internal chain conformation establishes an original experimental platform that enables studying the properties of functional polymers at the micro- and nanoscale and understanding their fundamental structure-property relationships. In addition to the impact on basic research, the techniques developed in this work are important in applied research and development. Large-area conjugated polymer micro- and

  20. Capillary force lithography for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Macadangdang, Jesse; Lee, Hyun Jung; Carson, Daniel; Jiao, Alex; Fugate, James; Pabon, Lil; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-06-10

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide(1). Cardiac tissue engineering holds much promise to deliver groundbreaking medical discoveries with the aims of developing functional tissues for cardiac regeneration as well as in vitro screening assays. However, the ability to create high-fidelity models of heart tissue has proven difficult. The heart's extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure consisting of both biochemical and biomechanical signals ranging from the micro- to the nanometer scale(2). Local mechanical loading conditions and cell-ECM interactions have recently been recognized as vital components in cardiac tissue engineering(3-5). A large portion of the cardiac ECM is composed of aligned collagen fibers with nano-scale diameters that significantly influences tissue architecture and electromechanical coupling(2). Unfortunately, few methods have been able to mimic the organization of ECM fibers down to the nanometer scale. Recent advancements in nanofabrication techniques, however, have enabled the design and fabrication of scalable scaffolds that mimic the in vivo structural and substrate stiffness cues of the ECM in the heart(6-9). Here we present the development of two reproducible, cost-effective, and scalable nanopatterning processes for the functional alignment of cardiac cells using the biocompatible polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)(8) and a polyurethane (PU) based polymer. These anisotropically nanofabricated substrata (ANFS) mimic the underlying ECM of well-organized, aligned tissues and can be used to investigate the role of nanotopography on cell morphology and function(10-14). Using a nanopatterned (NP) silicon master as a template, a polyurethane acrylate (PUA) mold is fabricated. This PUA mold is then used to pattern the PU or PLGA hydrogel via UV-assisted or solvent-mediated capillary force lithography (CFL), respectively(15,16). Briefly, PU or PLGA pre-polymer is drop dispensed onto a glass coverslip

  1. Capillary Force Lithography for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Macadangdang, Jesse; Lee, Hyun Jung; Carson, Daniel; Jiao, Alex; Fugate, James; Pabon, Lil; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide1. Cardiac tissue engineering holds much promise to deliver groundbreaking medical discoveries with the aims of developing functional tissues for cardiac regeneration as well as in vitro screening assays. However, the ability to create high-fidelity models of heart tissue has proven difficult. The heart’s extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure consisting of both biochemical and biomechanical signals ranging from the micro- to the nanometer scale2. Local mechanical loading conditions and cell-ECM interactions have recently been recognized as vital components in cardiac tissue engineering3-5. A large portion of the cardiac ECM is composed of aligned collagen fibers with nano-scale diameters that significantly influences tissue architecture and electromechanical coupling2. Unfortunately, few methods have been able to mimic the organization of ECM fibers down to the nanometer scale. Recent advancements in nanofabrication techniques, however, have enabled the design and fabrication of scalable scaffolds that mimic the in vivo structural and substrate stiffness cues of the ECM in the heart6-9. Here we present the development of two reproducible, cost-effective, and scalable nanopatterning processes for the functional alignment of cardiac cells using the biocompatible polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)8 and a polyurethane (PU) based polymer. These anisotropically nanofabricated substrata (ANFS) mimic the underlying ECM of well-organized, aligned tissues and can be used to investigate the role of nanotopography on cell morphology and function10-14. Using a nanopatterned (NP) silicon master as a template, a polyurethane acrylate (PUA) mold is fabricated. This PUA mold is then used to pattern the PU or PLGA hydrogel via UV-assisted or solvent-mediated capillary force lithography (CFL), respectively15,16. Briefly, PU or PLGA pre-polymer is drop dispensed onto a glass coverslip and the PUA

  2. Comparison study for sub-0.13-μm lithography between ArF and KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seok-Kyun; Kim, YoungSik; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Ham, Young-Mog; Baik, Ki-Ho

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we investigated the feasibility of printing sub-0.13 micrometers device patterns with ArF and KrF lithography by using experiment and simulation. To do this we evaluated various cell structures with different sizes from 0.26 micrometers to 0.20 micrometers pitch. In experiment 0.60NA ArF and 0.70NA KrF exposure tools, commercial and in house resists and bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) materials are used. To predict and compare with experimental data we also used our developed simulation tool HOST base don diffused aerial iamge model. We found that ArF lithography performance is a little bit better than KrF and therefore 0.70NA KrF lithography can be used up to 0.12 micrometers design rule device and 0.60NA ArF lithography can be used up to 0.11 micrometers . But to get more than 10 percent expose latitude, 0.13 micrometers with KrF and 0.12 micrometers with ArF are the minimum design rule size. However to obtain process margin we had to use extreme off-axis illumination (OAI) which results in large isolated- dense bias and poor linearity including isolated pattern. Using higher NA can reduce ID bias and mask error factor. For contact hole it is more effective to use KrF lithography because resist thermal flow process can be used to shrink C/H size. Our developed ArF resist and BARC shows good performance and we can reduce k1 value up to 0.34. Through this study we verified again that ArF lithography can be applied for sub-0.13 micrometers device through sub-0.10 micrometers with high contrast resist and 0.75NA exposure tool.

  3. Laser-based techniques for living cell pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Béla; Smausz, Tomi; Papdi, Bence; Bor, Zsolt; Szabó, András; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Fotakis, Costas; Nógrádi, Antal

    2008-10-01

    In the production of biosensors or artificial tissues a basic step is the immobilization of living cells along the required pattern. In this paper the ability of some promising laser-based methods to influence the interaction between cells and various surfaces is presented. In the first set of experiments laser-induced patterned photochemical modification of polymer foils was used to achieve guided adherence and growth of cells to the modified areas: (a) Polytetrafluoroethylene was irradiated with ArF excimer laser ( λ=193 nm, FWHM=20 ns, F=9 mJ/cm2) in presence of triethylene tetramine liquid photoreagent; (b) a thin carbon layer was produced by KrF excimer laser ( λ=248 nm, FWHM=30 ns, F=35 mJ/cm2) irradiation on polyimide surface to influence the cell adherence. It was found that the incorporation of amine groups in the PTFE polymer chain instead of the fluorine atoms can both promote and prevent the adherence of living cells (depending on the applied cell types) on the treated surfaces, while the laser generated carbon layer on polyimide surface did not effectively improve adherence. Our attempts to influence the cell adherence by morphological modifications created by ArF laser irradiation onto polyethylene terephtalate surface showed a surface roughness dependence. This method was effective only when the Ra roughness parameter of the developed structure did not exceed the 0.1 micrometer value. Pulsed laser deposition with femtosecond KrF excimer lasers ( F=2.2 J/cm2) was effectively used to deposit structured thin films from biomaterials (endothelial cell growth supplement and collagen embedded in starch matrix) to promote the adherence and growth of cells. These results present evidence that some surface can be successfully altered to induce guided cell growth.

  4. Laser-based gluing of diamond-tipped saw blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigs, Christian; Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Hustedt, Michael; Brand, Helmut; Wloka, Richard; Zobel, Frank; Dültgen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    To process natural stone such as marble or granite, saw blades equipped with wear-resistant diamond grinding segments are used, typically joined to the blade by brazing. In case of damage or wear, they must be exchanged. Due to the large energy input during thermal loosening and subsequent brazing, the repair causes extended heat-affected zones with serious microstructure changes, resulting in shape distortions and disadvantageous stress distributions. Consequently, axial run-out deviations and cutting losses increase. In this work, a new near-infrared laser-based process chain is presented to overcome the deficits of conventional brazing-based repair of diamond-tipped steel saw blades. Thus, additional tensioning and straightening steps can be avoided. The process chain starts with thermal debonding of the worn grinding segments, using a continuous-wave laser to heat the segments gently and to exceed the adhesive's decomposition temperature. Afterwards, short-pulsed laser radiation removes remaining adhesive from the blade in order to achieve clean joining surfaces. The third step is roughening and activation of the joining surfaces, again using short-pulsed laser radiation. Finally, the grinding segments are glued onto the blade with a defined adhesive layer, using continuous-wave laser radiation. Here, the adhesive is heated to its curing temperature by irradiating the respective grinding segment, ensuring minimal thermal influence on the blade. For demonstration, a prototype unit was constructed to perform the different steps of the process chain on-site at the saw-blade user's facilities. This unit was used to re-equip a saw blade with a complete set of grinding segments. This saw blade was used successfully to cut different materials, amongst others granite.

  5. Waveguide effect in high-NA EUV lithography: The key to extending EUV lithography to the 4-nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Michael; Barouch, Eytan; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2015-06-01

    One of the main concerns about EUV lithography is whether or not it can be extended to very high numerical aperture. In this paper, rigorous electromagnetic simulation is first used to show that there is an interesting waveguide effect occurring in the 4-nm feature size regime. An exact mathematical analysis is then presented to explain the effect observed in the simulation. This waveguide effect is applied to simulate the printing of 4-nm lines and spaces with excellent aerial-image contrast and peak intensity. The feasibility of EUV lithography for printing logic circuits containing general two-dimensional patterns with 4-nm feature size is also demonstrated.

  6. Biologically inspired omniphobic surfaces by reverse imprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Hensel, René; Finn, Andreas; Helbig, Ralf; Braun, Hans-Georg; Neinhuis, Christoph; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim; Werner, Carsten

    2014-04-01

    Springtail skin morphology is translated into robust omniphobic polymer membranes by reverse imprint lithography. The combination of overhanging cross-sections and their arrangement in a self-supporting comblike pattern are crucial for mechanically stable coatings that can be even applied to curved surfaces. PMID:24375518

  7. Defectivity reduction studies for ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Kentaro; Kondoh, Takehiro; Kato, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Yuuji; Hayasaki, Kei; Ito, Shinichi; Yoshida, Akira; Shimura, Satoru; Kawasaki, Tetsu; Kyoda, Hideharu

    2007-03-01

    Immersion lithography is widely expected to meet the manufacturing requirements of future device nodes. A critical development in immersion lithography has been the construction of a defect-free process. Two years ago, the authors evaluated the impact of water droplets made experimentally on exposed resist films and /or topcoat. (1) The results showed that the marks of drying water droplet called watermarks became pattern defects with T-top profile. In the case that water droplets were removed by drying them, formation of the defects was prevented. Post-exposure rinse process to remove water droplets also prevented formation of the defects. In the present work, the authors evaluated the effect of pre- and post-exposure rinse processes on hp 55nm line and space pattern with Spin Rinse Process Station (SRS) and Post Immersion Rinse Process Station (PIR) modules on an inline lithography cluster with the Tokyo Electron Ltd. CLEAN TRACK TM LITHIUS TM i+ and ASML TWINSCAN XT:1700Fi , 193nm immersion scanner. It was found that total defectivity is decreased by pre- and post-exposure rinse. In particular, bridge defects and large bridge defects were decreased by pre- and post-exposure rinse. Pre- and post-exposure rinse processes are very effective to reduce the bridge and large bridge defects of immersion lithography.

  8. Correcting lithography hot spots during physical-design implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk-Pat, Gerard T.; Miloslavsky, Alexander; Ikeuchi, Atsuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Kyoh, Suigen; Izuha, Kyoko; Tseng, Frank; Wen, Linni

    2006-10-01

    As the technology node shrinks, printed-wafer shapes show progressively less similarity to the design-layout shapes, even with optical proximity correction (OPC). Design tools have a restricted ability to address this shape infidelity. Their understanding of lithography effects is limited, taking the form of design rules that try to prevent "Hot Spots" - locations that demonstrate wafer-printing problems. These design rules are becoming increasingly complex and therefore less useful in addressing the lithography challenges. Therefore, design tools that have a better understanding of lithography are becoming a necessity for technology nodes of 65 nm and below. The general goal of this work is to correct lithography Hot Spots during physical-design implementation. The specific goal is to automatically fix a majority of the Hot Spots in the Metal 2 layers and above, with a run time on the order of a few hours per layer. Three steps were taken to achieve this goal. First, Hot Spot detection was made faster by using rule-based detection. Second, Hot Spot correction was automated by using rule-based correction. Third, convergence of corrections was avoided by performing correction locally, which means that correcting one Hot Spot was very unlikely to create new Hot Spots.

  9. Matrix-assisted polymer pen lithography induced Staudinger Ligation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Shudan; Schesing, Kevin B; Braunschweig, Adam B

    2012-05-21

    The Staudinger Ligation has been combined with Polymer Pen Lithography to create patterns of fluorescent and redox-active inks with 1-micrometer scale feature diameters over centimeter-scale areas. This report presents a straightforward strategy to expand the scope of organic reactions employed in surface science. PMID:22509494

  10. Beyond EUV lithography: a comparative study of efficient photoresists' performance

    PubMed Central

    Mojarad, Nassir; Gobrecht, Jens; Ekinci, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at 13.5 nm is the main candidate for patterning integrated circuits and reaching sub-10-nm resolution within the next decade. Should photon-based lithography still be used for patterning smaller feature sizes, beyond EUV (BEUV) lithography at 6.x nm wavelength is an option that could potentially meet the rigid demands of the semiconductor industry. We demonstrate simultaneous characterization of the resolution, line-edge roughness, and sensitivity of distinct photoresists at BEUV and compare their properties when exposed to EUV under the same conditions. By using interference lithography at these wavelengths, we show the possibility for patterning beyond 22 nm resolution and characterize the impact of using higher energy photons on the line-edge roughness and exposure latitude. We observe high sensitivity of the photoresist performance on its chemical content and compare their overall performance using the Z-parameter criterion. Interestingly, inorganic photoresists have much better performance at BEUV, while organic chemically-amplified photoresists would need serious adaptations for being used at such wavelength. Our results have immediate implications for deeper understanding of the radiation chemistry of novel photoresists at the EUV and soft X-ray spectra. PMID:25783209

  11. Beyond EUV lithography: a comparative study of efficient photoresists' performance.

    PubMed

    Mojarad, Nassir; Gobrecht, Jens; Ekinci, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at 13.5 nm is the main candidate for patterning integrated circuits and reaching sub-10-nm resolution within the next decade. Should photon-based lithography still be used for patterning smaller feature sizes, beyond EUV (BEUV) lithography at 6.x nm wavelength is an option that could potentially meet the rigid demands of the semiconductor industry. We demonstrate simultaneous characterization of the resolution, line-edge roughness, and sensitivity of distinct photoresists at BEUV and compare their properties when exposed to EUV under the same conditions. By using interference lithography at these wavelengths, we show the possibility for patterning beyond 22 nm resolution and characterize the impact of using higher energy photons on the line-edge roughness and exposure latitude. We observe high sensitivity of the photoresist performance on its chemical content and compare their overall performance using the Z-parameter criterion. Interestingly, inorganic photoresists have much better performance at BEUV, while organic chemically-amplified photoresists would need serious adaptations for being used at such wavelength. Our results have immediate implications for deeper understanding of the radiation chemistry of novel photoresists at the EUV and soft X-ray spectra. PMID:25783209

  12. Patterning strategy for low-K1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, David H.; Cheng, Wen-Hao

    2004-08-01

    Moore's law has been guiding the semiconductor industry for four decades. Lithography is the key enabler to keep the industry on the technology treadmill. Lithographers have been facing unprecedented challenges during last five years to keep the technology on the technology treadmill by developing various kinds of resolution enhancement techniques (RETs). In low K1 regime, co-optimization of design, layout mask, OPC, lithography and etching is the primary strategy to deliver a production-worthy patterning solution. Optical shrink is not a trivial task anymore. Intel always pursues parallel patterning techniques based on the dual exposure wavelength patterning strategy. While EUVL is the preferred patterning solution for 32nm node, 193nm immersion lithography with super high NA illumination is one of the parallel patterning strategies. The effects of polarization at super high NA illumination on mask technology, such as lens reduction ratio, blank absorber thickness and image imbalance correction, and restriction on design layout are addressed in this paper. Contact patterning is extremely challenging at low K1. Contact shape factor (circularity) which impacts the design rule will be discussed in this paper. Explosion of data file size and mask write time, stringent mask CD control and mask defect disposition are direct consequences of low-K1/high-MEEF (Mask Error Enhancement Factor) lithography. Mask makers alone cannot resolve the challenges in a cost effective manner. A seamless integration solution is a must.

  13. Effective decomposition algorithm for self-aligned double patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Du, Yuelin; Wong, Martin D. F.; Topaloglu, Rasit; Conley, Will

    2011-04-01

    Self-aligned double patterning (SADP) lithography is a novel lithography technology that has the intrinsic capability to reduce the overlay in the double patterning lithography (DPL). Although SADP is the critical technology to solve the lithography difficulties in sub-32nm 2D design, the questions - how to decompose a layout with reasonable overlay and how to perform a decomposability check - are still two open problems with no published work. In this paper, by formulating the problem into a SAT formation, we can answer the above two questions optimally. This is the first published paper with detailed algorithm to perform the SADP decomposition. In a layout, we can efficiently check whether a layout is decomposable. For a decomposable layout, our algorithm guarantees to find a decomposition solution with reasonable overlay reduction requirement. With little changes on the clauses in the SAT formula, we can address the decomposition problem for both the positive tone process and the negative tone process. Experimental results validate our method, and decomposition results for Nangate Open Cell Library and larger test cases are also provided with competitive run times.

  14. Technology of alignment mark in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Min; Xu, Tang; Chen, Baoqin; Niu, Jiebin

    2014-08-01

    Electron beam direct wring lithography has been an indispensable approach by which all sorts of novel nano-scale devices include many kinds optical devices can be fabricated. Alignment accuracy is a key factor especially to those devices which need multi-level lithography. In addition to electron beam lithography system itself the quality of alignment mark directly influences alignment accuracy. This paper introduces fundamental of alignment mark detection and discusses some techniques of alignment mark fabrication along with considerations for obtaining highly accurate alignment taking JBX5000LS and JBX6300FS e-beam lithography systems for example. The fundamental of alignment mark detection is expounded first. Many kinds of factors which can impact on the quality of alignment mark are analyzed including mark materials, depth of mark groove and influence of multi-channel process. It has been proved from experiments that material used as metal mark with higher average atomic number is better beneficial for getting high alignment accuracy. Depth of mark groove is required to 1.5~5 μm on our experience. The more process steps alignment mark must pass through, the more probability of being damaged there will be. So the compatibility of alignment mark fabrication with the whole device process and the protection of alignment mark are both need to be considered in advance.

  15. Solid state laser driver for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Honig, J.; Reichert, P.; Hackel, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    We describe the design and initial performance of a Nd:YAG laser master oscillator/phase conjugated power amplifier as a driver for extreme ultraviolet lithography. The design provides 0.5 to 1 joule per pulse with about 5 ns pulse width and excellent beam quality up through 1.5 kHz repetition frequency.

  16. Study on photochemical analysis system (VLES) for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, A.; Kono, Y.; Kadoi, M.; Minami, Y.; Kozawa, T.; Tagawa, S.; Gustafson, D.; Blackborow, P.

    2007-03-01

    A system for photo-chemical analysis of EUV lithography processes has been developed. This system has consists of 3 units: (1) an exposure that uses the Z-Pinch (Energetiq Tech.) EUV Light source (DPP) to carry out a flood exposure, (2) a measurement system RDA (Litho Tech Japan) for the development rate of photo-resists, and (3) a simulation unit that utilizes PROLITH (KLA-Tencor) to calculate the resist profiles and process latitude using the measured development rate data. With this system, preliminary evaluation of the performance of EUV lithography can be performed without any lithography tool (Stepper and Scanner system) that is capable of imaging and alignment. Profiles for 32 nm line and space pattern are simulated for the EUV resist (Posi-2 resist by TOK) by using VLES that hat has sensitivity at the 13.5nm wavelength. The simulation successfully predicts the resist behavior. Thus it is confirmed that the system enables efficient evaluation of the performance of EUV lithography processes.

  17. Fabrication of superconducting NbN meander nanowires by nano-imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yang; Li-Hua, Liu; Lu-Hui, Ning; Yi-Rong, Jin; Hui, Deng; Jie, Li; Yang, Li; Dong-Ning, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD), as a new type of superconducting single photon detector (SPD), has a broad application prospect in quantum communication and other fields. In order to prepare SNSPD with high performance, it is necessary to fabricate a large area of uniform meander nanowires, which is the core of the SNSPD. In this paper, we demonstrate a process of patterning ultra-thin NbN films into meander-type nanowires by using the nano-imprint technology. In this process, a combination of hot embossing nano-imprint lithography (HE-NIL) and ultraviolet nano-imprint lithography (UV-NIL) is used to transfer the meander nanowire structure from the NIL Si hard mold to the NbN film. We have successfully obtained a NbN nanowire device with uniform line width. The critical temperature (Tc) of the superconducting NbN meander nanowires is about 5 K and the critical current (Ic) is about 3.5 μA at 2.5 K. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CBA00106 and 2009CB929102) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11104333 and 10974243).

  18. Application of nanoimprint lithography to nano-optics: wire grid polarizer and photonic crystal LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Dong; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Park, Joo-Do; Kim, Ja-Yeon; Park, Seong-Ju

    2007-02-01

    Two optical devices with nano-scale subwavelength structures have been fabricated by using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). (1) Wire grid polarizer (WGP) is one of key optical components for projection displays with liquid crystal micro-display. Although WGP with 140 nm pitch is commercially available now, it still poses a problem with low extinction ratio (ER) for blue color. Since the ER can be increased by reducing the pitch, fabrication of a WGP with 100 nm pitch was attempted by NIL. We successfully developed thermal nanoimprint and aluminum dry etching processes. Fabricated WGPs showed twice higher ER than 140 nm pitch one. (2) Photonic crystal (PC) structures on LED have been known to enhance the light extraction significantly. Although e-beam lithography has been used for the proof of principle, it is far from real production method. We applied thermal NIL to fabricate PC structures in p-GaN layer of green LED. To identify the PC effect, two structures were fabricated and compared. One structure makes the green light of 525 nm wavelength fall within the photonic band gap (PBG) while the other puts it outside of PBG. The former structure showed 9-fold increment of photoluminescence compared to LED without PC structures, while the latter showed only 6-fold increment

  19. Switching behavior of Nb/Exchange spring magnet/Nb Josephson Junctions fabricated by Nanosphere Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jiyeong; Arias, Gilbert; Hedges, Samuel

    Superconductor(S)/ferromagnet(F)/superconductor Josephson junction was fabricated by nanosphere lithography method. Samarium-Cobalt (SmCo)/Permalloy(Py) exchange spring magnet system was used to generate an inhomogeneous magnetic structure in Niobium(Nb)-based Josephson junctions. We introduced nanosphere lithography in our device fabrication in order to decrease the lateral size of junctions and improve the quality of our devices. A bigger size junctions (tens of microns) were fabricated by optical photolithography using a mask.* Materials were deposited through DC magnetron sputtering. Base structure of devices was patterned through photolithography. Modulations of the critical current and IV-curve characteristics of the junction were used to search for direct evidence of the odd-triplet component. In addition, to investigate the switching behavior of S/F/S junction for memory application junction critical current was measured as a function of magnetic field and the angle between an easy axis of ferromagnetic layer and the external magnetic field by rotating the sample under magnetic field. Magnetic switching behavior of the ferromagnetic layers in our junction was also characterized based on this observation. * Junction fabrication in this research by an optical photolithography using a mask was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (CNMS User Project CNMS2014-257).

  20. Substrate conformal imprint lithography for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuuren, M. A.

    2010-03-01

    The field of nano-photonics studies the interaction and control of light with dielectric, semiconductor and metal structures which are comparable in size or smaller than the vacuum wavelength of light. In this thesis we present Substrate Conformal Imprint Lithography (SCIL) as a novel wafer-scale nanoimprint method with nano-scale resolution which combines the resolution and accuracy of rigid stamps with the flexibility of soft stamp methods. Chapter two describes the SCIL soft nanoimprint process and introduces a novel silica sol-gel imprint resist. A new soft rubber stamp material is described which enables sub-10 nm resolution. We demonstrate that SCIL imprinted patterns have on average less than 0.1 nm distortion and demonstrate sub-50 nm overlay alignment. Chapter 3 demonstrates 30 nm dense structures and features with aspect ratios from 1/640 up to 5. Imprinted sol-gel patterns can be transferred into underlying materials while maintaining sub-10 nm resolution. Two methods are demonstrated to pattern noble metals in particle arrays and sub-wavelength hole arrays. SCIL is applied to produce photonic crystal power InGaN LEDs which exhibit strong modification of the emission pattern. Chapter 4 demonstrates a relatively simple route towards 3D woodpile type photonic crystals. We show a four layer woodpile type structure with 70 nm features on a 240 nm pitch, which is temperature stable up to 1000 C. Chapter 5 demonstrates a novel fabrication route to large area nano hole arrays, which are interesting as angle independent color filters and for sensor applications. A solid state index matched hole array exhibits SPP mediated super resonant transmission. Chapter 6 treats single mode polarization stabilized Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). The lasers produced by SCIL exhibit equal performance as devices produced by e-beam. VCSELs with SCIL imprinted sub-wavelength gratings increase the laser efficiency by 29 % compared to conventional gratings

  1. Controlling linewidth roughness in step and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Gerard M.; Khusnatdinov, Niyaz; Brooks, Cynthia B.; LaBrake, Dwayne; Thompson, Ecron; Resnick, Douglas J.; Owens, Jordan; Ford, Arnie; Sasaki, Shiho; Toyama, Nobuhito; Kurihara, Masaaki; Hayashi, Naoya; Kobayashi, Hideo; Sato, Takashi; Nagarekawa, Osamu; Hart, Mark W.; Gopalakrishnan, Kailash; Shenoy, Rohit; Jih, Ron; Zhang, Ying; Sikorski, Edmund; Rothwell, Mary Beth; Yoshitake, Shusuke; Sunaoshi, Hitoshi; Yasui, Kenichi

    2008-04-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in extending optical lithography to deep sub-wavelength imaging, the limit for the technology seems imminent. At 22nm half pitch design rules, neither very high NA tools (NA 1.6), nor techniques such as double patterning are likely to be sufficient. One of the key challenges in patterning features with these dimensions is the ability to minimize feature roughness while maintaining reasonable process throughput. This limitation is particularly challenging for electron and photon based NGL technologies, where fast chemically amplified resists are used to define the patterned images. Control of linewidth roughness (LWR) is critical, since it adversely affects device speed and timing in CMOS circuits. Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32 and 22 nm nodes. This technology has been shown to be an effective method for replication of nanometer-scale structures from a template (imprint mask). As a high fidelity replication process, the resolution of imprint lithography is determined by the ability to create a master template having the required dimensions. Although the imprint process itself adds no additional linewidth roughness to the patterning process, the burden of minimizing LWR falls to the template fabrication process. Non chemically amplified resists, such as ZEP520A, are not nearly as sensitive but have excellent resolution and can produce features with very low LWR. The purpose of this paper is to characterize LWR for the entire imprint lithography process, from template fabrication to the final patterned substrate. Three experiments were performed documenting LWR in the template, imprint, and after pattern transfer. On average, LWR was extremely low (less than 3nm, 3σ), and independent of the processing step and feature size.

  2. Linewidth roughness characterization in step and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Gerard M.; Khusnatdinov, Niyaz; Brooks, Cynthia B.; LaBrake, Dwayne; Thompson, Ecron; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2008-05-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in extending optical lithography to deep sub-wavelength imaging, the limit for the technology seems imminent. At 22nm half pitch design rules, neither very high NA tools (NA 1.6), nor techniques such as double patterning are likely to be sufficient. One of the key challenges in patterning features with these dimensions is the ability to minimize feature roughness while maintaining reasonable process throughput. This limitation is particularly challenging for electron and photon based NGL technologies, where fast chemically amplified resists are used to define the patterned images. Control of linewidth roughness (LWR) is critical, since it adversely affects device speed and timing in CMOS circuits. Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32 and 22 nm nodes. This technology has been shown to be an effective method for replication of nanometer-scale structures from a template (imprint mask). As a high fidelity replication process, the resolution of imprint lithography is determined by the ability to create a master template having the required dimensions. Although the imprint process itself adds no additional linewidth roughness to the patterning process, the burden of minimizing LWR falls to the template fabrication process. Non chemically amplified resists, such as ZEP520A, are not nearly as sensitive but have excellent resolution and can produce features with very low LWR. The purpose of this paper is to characterize LWR for the entire imprint lithography process, from template fabrication to the final patterned substrate. Three experiments were performed documenting LWR in the template, imprint, and after pattern transfer. On average, LWR was extremely low (less than 3nm, 3σ), and independent of the processing step and feature size.

  3. Development and testing of a laser-based decontamination system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthofer, A.; Lippmann, W.; Hurtado, A.

    2013-06-01

    Decontamination of radioactive concrete surfaces may be necessary during operation or decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Usually only the upper layers of the concrete structure are contaminated and are removed using labor-intensive mechanical milling processes. Production of a large amount of dust, which can lead to secondary contamination, is inherent to these processes. Improvements in high-energy laser technology have now made it possible for laser radiation to be used in decontamination technologies for the removal of concrete layers. A decontamination unit comprising a diode laser with a beam power of 10 kW in continuous wave (CW) mode in combination with an autonomous manipulator was developed for use in nuclear plants. The laser beam melts the concrete surface to a depth of approximately 5 mm. Compressed air jets then detach the molten layer from the concrete surface and convey it to a suction system, with which it is transported to a collection container. Most of the radionuclides are trapped in the solidifying melt particles, which form an extremely stable effluent well suited to long-term storage. A relatively small amount of dust is generated in the process. Because there is no backlash during energy transfer, the laser device carrier can be designed to be lightweight and flexible. A specially developed manipulator that can move freely along walls and ceilings by means of suction plates is used for the carrier unit. This results in short setup times for preparing for use of the device and minimal personnel exposure to the radiation. Experiments were conducted on a concrete wall to demonstrate the functionality of the overall system in realistic conditions. An optimal ablation rate of 2.16 m²/h at an ablation depth of 1-5 mm was achieved. Today's commercially available diode lasers with powers higher than 50 kW enable ablation rates of >10 m²/h to be achieved and hence make these laser-based systems competitive alternatives to mechanical systems.

  4. Extending photo-patternable low-κ concept to 193nm lithography and e-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qinghuang; Nelson, A.; Bozano, L.; Brock, P.; Cohen, S.; Davis, B.; Kwong, R.; Liniger, E.; Neumayer, D.; Rathore, J. S.; Shobha, H.; Sooriyakumaran, R.; Purushothaman, S.; Miller, R.; Allen, R.; Spooner, T.; Wisnieff, R.

    2011-04-01

    Increasing complexity and manufacturing costs, along with the fundamental limits of planar CMOS devices, threaten to slow down the historical pace of progress in the semiconductor industry. We have proposed and demonstrated proof-of-concept of a simple and low-cost way to fabricate dual-damascene copper (Cu) on-chip interconnect or Back-End-Of-the- Line (BEOL) structures using a novel multifunctional on-chip electrical insulator called a photo-patternable low dielectric constant (low-κ) dielectric (PPLK) material [Q. Lin, et al, Proc. SPIE, 2010]. This demonstration was accomplished with a silsesquioxane-based (SiCOH), κ=2.7 material which is compatible with 248 nm optical lithography. In this paper, we report on the extension of the photo-patternable low-κ concept to the ultra-low-κ (κ<2.5) regime and resolution down well below 100 nm with 193 nm lithography as well as e-beam lithography. We have accomplished this demonstration using the same silsesquioxane-based (SiCOH) material platform as that of the 248 nm photo-patternable low-κ materials. The 193 nm photo-patternable low-κ materials possess dielectric constants below 2.5 and are able to resolve 100 nm half-pith line/space features with dry 193 nm single exposure lithography. The resolution of photopatternable low-κ materials can be pushed down to 40 nm half-pith line and space features with a line-edge-roughness less than 3.0 nm with e-beam lithography.

  5. Fabricating Blazed Diffraction Gratings by X-Ray Lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Hartley, Frank; Wilson, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Gray-scale x-ray lithography is undergoing development as a technique for fabricating blazed diffraction gratings. As such, gray-scale x-ray lithography now complements such other grating-fabrication techniques as mechanical ruling, holography, ion etching, laser ablation, laser writing, and electron-beam lithography. Each of these techniques offers advantages and disadvantages for implementing specific grating designs; no single one of these techniques can satisfy the design requirements for all applications. Gray-scale x-ray lithography is expected to be advantageous for making gratings on steeper substrates than those that can be made by electron-beam lithography. This technique is not limited to sawtooth groove profiles and flat substrates: various groove profiles can be generated on arbitrarily shaped (including highly curved) substrates with the same ease as sawtooth profiles can be generated on flat substrates. Moreover, the gratings fabricated by this technique can be made free of ghosts (spurious diffraction components attributable to small spurious periodicities in the locations of grooves). The first step in gray-scale x-ray lithography is to conformally coat a substrate with a suitable photoresist. An x-ray mask (see Figure 1) is generated, placed between the substrate and a source of collimated x-rays, and scanned over the substrate so as to create a spatial modulation in the exposure of the photoresist. Development of the exposed photoresist results in a surface corrugation that corresponds to the spatial modulation and that defines the grating surface. The grating pattern is generated by scanning an appropriately shaped x-ray area mask along the substrate. The mask example of Figure 1 would generate a blazed grating profile when scanned in the perpendicular direction at constant speed, assuming the photoresist responds linearly to incident radiation. If the resist response is nonlinear, then the mask shape can be modified to account for the

  6. Reflective electron-beam lithography performance for the 10nm logic node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Regina; Gubiotti, Thomas; Sun, Jeff; Cheung, Anthony; Yang, Jason; McCord, Mark; Petric, Paul; Carroll, Allen; Ummethala, Upendra; Hale, Layton; Hench, John; Kojima, Shinichi; Mieher, Walter; Bevis, Chris F.

    2012-11-01

    Maskless electron beam lithography has the potential to extend semiconductor manufacturing to the sub-10 nm technology node. KLA-Tencor is currently developing Reflective Electron Beam Lithography (REBL) for high-volume 10 nm logic (16 nm HP). This paper reviews progress in the development of the REBL system towards its goal of 100 wph throughput for High Volume Lithography (HVL) at the 2X and 1X nm nodes. In this paper we introduce the Digital Pattern Generator (DPG) with integrated CMOS and MEMs lenslets that was manufactured at TSMC and IMEC. For REBL, the DPG is integrated to KLA-Tencor pattern generating software that can be programmed to produce complex, gray-scaled lithography patterns. Additionally, we show printing results for a range of interesting lithography patterns using Time Domain Imaging (TDI). Previously, KLA-Tencor reported on the development of a Reflective Electron Beam Lithography (REBL) tool for maskless lithography at and below the 22 nm technology node1. Since that time, the REBL team and its partners (TSMC, IMEC) have made good progress towards developing the REBL system and Digital Pattern Generator (DPG) for direct write lithography. Traditionally, e-beam direct write lithography has been too slow for most lithography applications. Ebeam direct write lithography has been used for mask writing rather than wafer processing since the maximum blur requirements limit column beam current - which drives e-beam throughput. To print small features and a fine pitch with an e-beam tool requires a sacrifice in processing time unless one significantly increases the total number of beams on a single writing tool. Because of the continued uncertainty with regards to the optical lithography roadmap beyond the 22 nm technology node, the semiconductor equipment industry is in the process of designing and testing e-beam lithography tools with the potential for HVL.

  7. Design and testing of planar magnetic micromotors fabricated by deep x-ray lithography and electroplating

    SciTech Connect

    Guckel, H.; Christenson, T.R.; Skrobis, K.J.; Klein, J.; Karnowsky, M.

    1993-05-01

    The successful design and testing of a three-phase planar integrated magnetic micromotor is presented. Fabrication is based on a modified deep X-ray lithography and electroplating or LIGA process. Maximum rotational speeds of 33,000 rpm are obtained in air with a rotor diameter of 285 {mu}m and do not change when operated in vacuum. Real time rotor response is obtained with an integrated shaft encoder. Long lifetime is evidenced by testing to over 5(10){sup 7} ration cycles without changes in performance. Projected speeds of the present motor configuration are in the vicinity of 100 krpm and are limited by torque ripple. Higher speeds, which are attractive for sensor applications. require constant torque characteristic excitation as is evidenced by ultracentrifuge and gyroscope design. Further understanding of electroplated magnetic material properties will drive these performance improvements.

  8. Nanostructure patterning on flexible substrates using electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, K. S.; Sangeeth, K.; Hegde, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Patterning nanostructures on flexible substrates plays a key role in the emerging flexible electronics technology. The flexible electronic devices are inexpensive and can be conformed to any shape. The potential applications for such devices are sensors, displays, solar cells, RFID, high-density biochips, optoelectronics etc. E-beam lithography is established as a powerful tool for nanoscale fabrication, but its applicability on insulating flexible substrates is often limited because of surface charging effects. This paper presents the fabrication of nanostructures on insulating flexible substrates using low energy E-beam lithography along with metallic layers for charge dissipation. Nano Structures are patterned on different substrates of materials such as acetate and PET foils. The fabrication process parameters such as the proximity gap of exposure, the exposure dosage and developing conditions have been optimized for each substrate.

  9. A temperature control algorithm of immersion liquid for immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Junwei; Li, Xiaoping; Lei, Min; Chen, Bing; Wang, Jinchun

    2014-03-01

    Immersion lithography is one of the main technologies used to manufacture integrated circuits with the shortest feature size. In immersion lithography, temperature of immersion liquid is strictly constrained and its allowable range is less than +/-0.01°C at 22°C. To meet this requirement, a temperature control algorithm adopted by the test rig which controls the temperature of the immersion liquid with process cooling water (PCW) via heat exchangers is proposed. By adjusting the flow rate of PCW through the heat exchangers, the control system varies the amount of heat exchanged, and the temperature of the immersion liquid can be properly controlled. The temperature control rig is a multi-disturbed, timevariant, non-linear and time-delayed system and its transfer function varies with the inlet temperature and flow rates of the streams through the heat exchangers. Considering the characteristics of the system, a cascade-connected fuzzy PID feedback algorithm is designed.

  10. Metallic nanodot arrays by stencil lithography for plasmonic biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Mena, Oscar; Sannomiya, Takumi; Villanueva, Luis G; Voros, Janos; Brugger, Juergen

    2011-02-22

    The fabrication of gold nanodots by stencil lithography and its application for optical biosensing based on localized surface plasmon resonance are presented. Arrays of 50-200 nm wide nanodots with different spacing of 50-300 nm are fabricated without any resist, etching, or lift-off process. The dimensions and morphology of the nanodots were characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. The fabricated nanodots showed localized surface plasmon resonance in their extinction spectra in the visible range. The resonance wavelength depends on the periodicity and dimensions of the nanodots. Bulk refractive index measurements and model biosensing of streptavidin were successfully performed based on the plasmon resonance shift induced by local refractive index change when biomolecules are adsorbed on the nanodots. These results demonstrate the potential of stencil lithography for the realization of plasmon-based biosensing devices. PMID:21192666

  11. 4-Nitrobenzene Grafted in Porous Silicon: Application to Optical Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiddia, Mariavitalia; Mula, Guido; Sechi, Elisa; Vacca, Annalisa; Cara, Eleonora; De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Boarino, Luca

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we report a method to process porous silicon to improve its chemical resistance to alkaline solution attacks based on the functionalization of the pore surface by the electrochemical reduction of 4-nitrobenzendiazonium salt. This method provides porous silicon with strong resistance to the etching solutions used in optical lithography and allows the fabrication of tailored metallic contacts on its surface. The samples were studied by chemical, electrochemical, and morphological methods. We demonstrate that the grafted samples show a resistance to harsh alkaline solution more than three orders of magnitude larger than that of pristine porous silicon, being mostly unmodified after about 40 min. The samples maintained open pores after the grafting, making them suitable for further treatments like filling by polymers. Optical lithography was performed on the functionalized samples, and electrochemical characterization results are shown.

  12. Controlled Fabrication of Si Nanowires with Nanodots Using Nanosphere Lithography.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Shaolei; He, Sufeng; Hu, Mingyue; Ge, Pengpeng; Wang, Jing; Guo, YanYan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce an easy method for fabricating Si nanowires with nanodots using nanosphere lithography. First, a self-assembly ordered single layer of polystyrene nanospheres with a diameter of 220 nm was prepared on Si substrate. Secondly, the polystyrene spheres monolayer was etched by 02 with different time from 10 s to 35 s. After this etching process, the polystyrene nanowires between polystyrene spheres were fabrication. If the etching time was longer than 35 s, there were no polystyrene nanowires. Thereafter, the following etching process with carbon fluoride was performanced. The polystyrene nanowires and nanosphers were worked as masks. Finally, the Si nanowires with nanodots were formed. The size and morphology can be controlled by etching process. This technique for forming nanostructure arrays using nanosphere lithography can be applied in many areas of science and technology.

  13. Rapid soft lithography by bottom-up enhanced capillarity.

    PubMed

    Pisignano, Dario; Di Benedetto, Francesca; Persano, Luana; Gigli, Giuseppe; Cingolani, Roberto

    2004-06-01

    The growing demand for new solutions to pursue the trend of micro- and nanoelectronics predicted by Moore's law is stimulating the development of new high-resolution, low-cost lithographies. Here we demonstrate that several bottom-up approaches can be used to increase the throughput of soft lithography by exploiting the enhanced hydrophilicity, the low viscosity, and the fragility of the employed materials. In particular, the customized functionalization of the involved surfaces to improve the wettability to polymer fluids and the dramatic decrease of the viscosity of polymer compounds as the temperature is increased, together with the good thermal stability of the functionalized surfaces, allow a faster filling of elastomeric channels, up to almost an order of magnitude with respect to conventional microfluidics.

  14. Super-resolved optical lithography with phase controlled source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Peilong; Zhang, Guoquan

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that second-order subwavelength interference could be realized in an optical lithography scheme with an effective entangled source [P. Hong and G. Zhang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 043838 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.043838]. In this paper, by considering the correlation function in both the source plane and observation plane, we show how the coherence property of such a source is controlled via introduction of random-phase correlation, which finally affects the two-photon interference effect observed in the far-field plane. Furthermore, by introducing different but similar random-phase correlations, we generalize the phase controlled source with particular high-order coherence properties to obtain higher-order subwavelength interference, i.e., high-order super-resolved optical lithography. These results show the importance of phase control in generating a light field with particular high-order coherence properties.

  15. 4-Nitrobenzene Grafted in Porous Silicon: Application to Optical Lithography.

    PubMed

    Tiddia, Mariavitalia; Mula, Guido; Sechi, Elisa; Vacca, Annalisa; Cara, Eleonora; De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Boarino, Luca

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we report a method to process porous silicon to improve its chemical resistance to alkaline solution attacks based on the functionalization of the pore surface by the electrochemical reduction of 4-nitrobenzendiazonium salt. This method provides porous silicon with strong resistance to the etching solutions used in optical lithography and allows the fabrication of tailored metallic contacts on its surface. The samples were studied by chemical, electrochemical, and morphological methods. We demonstrate that the grafted samples show a resistance to harsh alkaline solution more than three orders of magnitude larger than that of pristine porous silicon, being mostly unmodified after about 40 min. The samples maintained open pores after the grafting, making them suitable for further treatments like filling by polymers. Optical lithography was performed on the functionalized samples, and electrochemical characterization results are shown. PMID:27686091

  16. 32 nm logic patterning options with immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, K.; Burns, S.; Halle, S.; Zhuang, L.; Colburn, M.; Allen, S.; Babcock, C.; Baum, Z.; Burkhardt, M.; Dai, V.; Dunn, D.; Geiss, E.; Haffner, H.; Han, G.; Lawson, P.; Mansfield, S.; Meiring, J.; Morgenfeld, B.; Tabery, C.; Zou, Y.; Sarma, C.; Tsou, L.; Yan, W.; Zhuang, H.; Gil, D.; Medeiros, D.

    2008-03-01

    The semiconductor industry faces a lithographic scaling limit as the industry completes the transition to 1.35 NA immersion lithography. Both high-index immersion lithography and EUV lithography are facing technical challenges and commercial timing issues. Consequently, the industry has focused on enabling double patterning technology (DPT) as a means to circumvent the limitations of Rayleigh scaling. Here, the IBM development alliance demonstrate a series of double patterning solutions that enable scaling of logic constructs by decoupling the pattern spatially through mask design or temporally through innovative processes. These techniques have been successfully employed for early 32nm node development using 45nm generation tooling. Four different double patterning techniques were implemented. The first process illustrates local RET optimization through the use of a split reticle design. In this approach, a layout is decomposed into a series of regions with similar imaging properties and the illumination conditions for each are independently optimized. These regions are then printed separately into the same resist film in a multiple exposure process. The result is a singly developed pattern that could not be printed with a single illumination-mask combination. The second approach addresses 2D imaging with particular focus on both line-end dimension and linewidth control [1]. A double exposure-double etch (DE2) approach is used in conjunction with a pitch-filling sacrificial feature strategy. The third double exposure process, optimized for via patterns also utilizes DE2. In this method, a design is split between two separate masks such that the minimum pitch between any two vias is larger than the minimum metal pitch. This allows for final structures with vias at pitches beyond the capability of a single exposure. In the fourth method,, dark field double dipole lithography (DDL) has been successfully applied to BEOL metal structures and has been shown to be

  17. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  18. Design and fabrication of diverse metamaterial structures by holographic lithography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Qiuze; Wang, Guo Ping

    2008-07-21

    We demonstrate a holographic lithography for the fabrication of diverse metamaterial structures by using an optical prism. Cylindrical nanoshells, U-shaped resonator arrays, and double-split ring arrays are obtained experimentally by real time modulating the phase relation of the interference beams. This easy-to-use method may provide a roadway for the design and fabrication of future metamaterials requiring diverse structures for effectively manipulating electromagnetic properties at optical frequencies. PMID:18648445

  19. 3D nanostructures fabricated by advanced stencil lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilkoy, F.; Flauraud, V.; Rüegg, M.; Kim, B. J.; Brugger, J.

    2016-02-01

    This letter reports on a novel fabrication method for 3D metal nanostructures using high-throughput nanostencil lithography. Aperture clogging, which occurs on the stencil membranes during physical vapor deposition, is leveraged to create complex topographies on the nanoscale. The precision of the 3D nanofabrication method is studied in terms of geometric parameters and material types. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by various symmetric and chiral patterns made of Al and Au.

  20. 3D nanostructures fabricated by advanced stencil lithography.

    PubMed

    Yesilkoy, F; Flauraud, V; Rüegg, M; Kim, B J; Brugger, J

    2016-03-01

    This letter reports on a novel fabrication method for 3D metal nanostructures using high-throughput nanostencil lithography. Aperture clogging, which occurs on the stencil membranes during physical vapor deposition, is leveraged to create complex topographies on the nanoscale. The precision of the 3D nanofabrication method is studied in terms of geometric parameters and material types. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by various symmetric and chiral patterns made of Al and Au. PMID:26884085

  1. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  2. Fabrication of Micro Lens Array by UV-LED Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Yoshinori

    High curvature micro lens array of 240-570 μm diameters and 110-270 μm heights has been fabricated by using UV-LED lithography and imprinting technique. Curved SU-8 structures were fabricated by backside exposure through thin glass substrate because UV-LED array light source has wide directivity characteristics of UV dose. The structure was transferred to Polydimethylsiloxsane (PDMS) mold. Micro lens array of photosensitive acrylic resin was fabricated by using the mold.

  3. Analysis of feature stability for laser-based determination of tissue thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Floris; Schweikard, Achim; Stüber, Patrick; Bruder, Ralf; Wagner, Benjamin; Wissel, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Localisation of the cranium is necessary for accurate stereotactic radiotherapy of malign lesions in the brain. This is achieved by immobilizing the patient's head (typically by using thermoplastic masks, bite blocks or combinations thereof) and x-ray imaging to determine the actual position of the patient with respect to the treatment device. In previous work we have developed a novel method for marker-less and non-invasive tracking of the skull using a combination of laser-based surface triangulation and the analysis of backscattered feature patterns of a tightly collimated NIR laser beam scanned over the patient's forehead. An HDR camera is coupled into the beam path of the laser scanning system to acquire one image per projected laser point. We have demonstrated that this setup is capable of accurately determining the tissue thickness for each triangulation point and consequently allows detecting the surface of the cranial bone with sub-millimetre accuracy. Typical clinical settings (treatment times of 15-90 min) require feature stability over time, since the determination of tissue thickness is achieved by machine learning methods trained on initial feature scans. We have collected initial scans of the forehead as well as long-term backscatter data (20 images per seconds over 30 min) from five subjects and extracted the relevant tissue features from the image streams. Based on the knowledge of the relationship between the tissue feature values and the tissue thickness, the analysis of the long-term data showed that the noise level is low enough to allow robust discrimination of tissue thicknesses of 0.5 mm.

  4. Nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films via block copolymer lithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, M.; Darling, S. B.; Sumant, A. V.; Auciello, O.

    2010-07-01

    Nanopatterning of diamond surfaces is critical for the development of diamond-based microelectromechanical system/nanoelectromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS), such as resonators or switches. Micro-/nanopatterning of diamond materials is typically done using photolithography or electron beam lithography combined with reactive ion etching (RIE). In this work, we demonstrate a simple process, block copolymer (BCP) lithography, for nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films to produce nanostructures suitable for the fabrication of NEMS based on UNCD. In BCP lithography, nanoscale self-assembled polymeric domains serve as an etch mask for pattern transfer. The authors used thin films of a cylinder-forming organic-inorganic BCP, poly(styrene-block-ferrocenyldimethylsilane), PS-b-PFS, as an etch mask on the surface of UNCD films. Orientational control of the etch masking cylindrical PFS blocks is achieved by manipulating the polymer film thickness in concert with the annealing treatment. We have observed that the surface roughness of UNCD layers plays an important role in transferring the pattern. Oxygen RIE was used to etch the exposed areas of the UNCD film underneath the BCP. Arrays of both UNCD posts and wirelike structures have been created using the same starting polymeric materials as the etch mask.

  5. Large-Area Zone Plate Fabrication with Optical Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.

    2011-09-09

    Zone plates as condenser optics for x-ray microscopes offer simple optical designs for both illumination and spectral resolution when used as a linear monochromator. However, due to the long write times for electron beam lithography, both the availability and the size of zone plates for condensers have been limited. Since the resolution provided by the linear monochromator scales almost linearly with the diameter of the zone plate, the full potential for zone plate monochromators as illumination systems for x-ray microscopes has not been achieved. For example, the 10-mm-diameter zone plate has demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/{Delta}E = 700[1], but with a 26-mm-diameter zone plate, the calculated spectral resolution is higher than E/{Delta}E = 3000. These large-area zone plates are possible to fabricate with the leading edge semiconductor lithography tools such as those available at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany. One of the lithography tools available is the ASML TWINSCAN XT: 1950i with 37-nm resolution [2]. A single 300-mm wafer can contain more than 60 fields, each with a large area condenser, and the throughput of the tool can be more than one wafer every minute.

  6. Considerations for cost of ownership in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Anthony; Bailey, Christopher; Donders, Jos; Condon, Neil

    2011-04-01

    The cost of ownership of semiconductor manufacturing equipment is typically addressed in terms of raw utility consumption. Focusing on energy, the average consumption of a typical semiconductor fabrication plant has doubled over a recent 10 year period, with approximately 30% of this energy currently attributed to vacuum equipment. Compared to conventional optical lithography, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) requires the adoption of a vacuum subsystem to enable the technology, bringing an additional vacuum requirement to semiconductor fabs. With this trend it is increasingly important to focus on more efficient ways of operating semiconductor manufacturing tools and their supporting equipment. Clever operation through employment of 'GREEN' modes can provide significant utility savings. However, in semiconductor lithography, tool uptime is a critical parameter to be considered in any cost of ownership model, and the facility vacuum equipment plays an intimate role here, so including redundancy in pumping equipment can be a key enabler to maintaining tool uptime. Consequently optimizing the design of the vacuum subsystem will help to reduce the overall footprint, utility consumption and energy costs associated with this process.

  7. Advanced metrology for the 14 nm node double patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carau, D.; Bouyssou, R.; Dezauzier, C.; Besacier, M.; Gourgon, C.

    2014-05-01

    In microelectronics the two crucial parameters for the lithography step are the critical dimension, which is the width of the smallest printable pattern, and the misalignment error of the reticle, called overlay. For the 14 nm node, the limit of scanner resolution can be overcome by the double patterning technique, which requires a maximum overlay error between the two reticles of 3 nm [1]. The current approach in the measurements of critical dimension and overlay is to treat them separately, but it has become much more complex in the double patterning context, since they are no longer independent. In this paper, a strategy of a common measurement is developed. The aim of the strategy is to measure simultaneously overlay and critical dimension in the metal level double patterning grating before the second etch process. The scatterometry technique is well known for critical dimension measurement. This study demonstrates that the overlay between the two gratings can also be deduced. Thanks to this original scatterometry-based method, it becomes possible to provide information on the lithography step quality before the second etch process; therefore the lithography can be reworked if it is necessary.

  8. Large-Area Zone Plate Fabrication with Optical Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denbeaux, G.

    2011-09-01

    Zone plates as condenser optics for x-ray microscopes offer simple optical designs for both illumination and spectral resolution when used as a linear monochromator. However, due to the long write times for electron beam lithography, both the availability and the size of zone plates for condensers have been limited. Since the resolution provided by the linear monochromator scales almost linearly with the diameter of the zone plate, the full potential for zone plate monochromators as illumination systems for x-ray microscopes has not been achieved. For example, the 10-mm-diameter zone plate has demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 700 [1], but with a 26-mm-diameter zone plate, the calculated spectral resolution is higher than E/ΔE = 3000. These large-area zone plates are possible to fabricate with the leading edge semiconductor lithography tools such as those available at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany. One of the lithography tools available is the ASML TWINSCAN XT: 1950i with 37-nm resolution [2]. A single 300-mm wafer can contain more than 60 fields, each with a large area condenser, and the throughput of the tool can be more than one wafer every minute.

  9. Fabrication of 70nm split ring resonators by nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Graham J.; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the fabrication of 70 nm wide, high resolution rectangular U-shaped split ring resonators (SRRs) using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The fabrication method for the nanoimprint stamp does not require dry etching. The stamp is used to pattern SRRs in a thin PMMA layer followed by metal deposition and lift-off. Nanoimprinting in this way allows high resolution patterns with a minimum feature size of 20 nm. This fabrication technique yields a much higher throughput than conventional e-beam lithography and each stamp can be used numerous times to imprint patterns. Reflectance measurements of fabricated aluminium SRRs on silicon substrates show a so-called an LC resonance peak in the visible spectrum under transverse electric polarisation. Fabricating the SRRs by NIL rather than electron beam lithography allows them to be scaled to smaller dimensions without any significant loss in resolution, partly because pattern expansion caused by backscattered electrons and the proximity effect are not present with NIL. This in turn helps to shift the magnetic response to short wavelengths while still retaining a distinct LC peak.

  10. Feasibility study of optical/e-beam complementary lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohle, Christoph; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Freitag, Martin; Gutsch, Manuela; Jaschinsky, Philipp; Kahlenberg, Frank; Klein, Christof; Klikovits, Jan; Paul, Jan; Rudolph, Matthias; Thrun, Xaver

    2012-03-01

    Using electron beam direct write (EBDW) as a complementary approach together with standard optical lithography at 193nm or EUV wavelength has been proposed only lately and might be a reasonable solution for low volume CMOS manufacturing and special applications as well as design rule restrictions. Here, the high throughput of the optical litho can be combined with the high resolution and the high flexibility of the e-beam by using a mix & match approach (Litho- Etch-Litho-Etch, LELE). Complementary Lithography is mainly driven by special design requirements for unidirectional (1-D gridded) Manhattan type design layouts that enable scaling of advanced logic chips. This requires significant data prep efforts such as layout splitting. In this paper we will show recent results of Complementary Lithography using 193nm immersion generated 50nm lines/space pattern addressing the 32nm logic technology node that were cut with electron beam direct write. Regular lines and space arrays were patterned at GLOBALFOUNDRIES Dresden and have been cut in predefined areas using a VISTEC SB3050DW e-beam direct writer (50KV Variable Shaped Beam) at Fraunhofer Center Nanoelectronic Technologies (CNT), Dresden, as well as on the PML2 tool at IMS Nanofabrication, Vienna. Two types of e-beam resists were used for the cut exposure. Integration issues as well as overlay requirements and performance improvements necessary for this mix & match approach will be discussed.

  11. Inverse Tomo-Lithography for Making Microscopic 3D Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Victor; Wiberg, Dean

    2003-01-01

    According to a proposal, basic x-ray lithography would be extended to incorporate a technique, called inverse tomography, that would enable the fabrication of microscopic three-dimensional (3D) objects. The proposed inverse tomo-lithographic process would make it possible to produce complex shaped, submillimeter-sized parts that would be difficult or impossible to make in any other way. Examples of such shapes or parts include tapered helices, paraboloids with axes of different lengths, and even Archimedean screws that could serve as rotors in microturbines. The proposed inverse tomo-lithographic process would be based partly on a prior microfabrication process known by the German acronym LIGA (lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung, which means lithography, electroforming, molding). In LIGA, one generates a precise, high-aspect ratio pattern by exposing a thick, x-ray-sensitive resist material to an x-ray beam through a mask that contains the pattern. One can electrodeposit metal into the developed resist pattern to form a precise metal part, then dissolve the resist to free the metal. Aspect ratios of 100:1 and patterns into resist thicknesses of several millimeters are possible.

  12. The use of EUV lithography to produce demonstration devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFontaine, Bruno; Deng, Yunfei; Kim, Ryoung-Han; Levinson, Harry J.; McGowan, Sarah; Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Seltmann, Rolf; Tabery, Cyrus; Tchikoulaeva, Anna; Wallow, Tom; Wood, Obert; Arnold, John; Canaperi, Don; Colburn, Matthew; Kimmel, Kurt; Koay, Chiew-Seng; Mclellan, Erin; Medeiros, Dave; Rao, Satyavolu Papa; Petrillo, Karen; Yin, Yunpeng; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Bouten, Sander; Crouse, Michael; van Dijk, Andre; van Dommelen, Youri; Galloway, Judy; Han, Sang-In; Kessels, Bart; Lee, Brian; Lok, Sjoerd; Niekrewicz, Brian; Pierson, Bill; Routh, Robert; Schmit-Weaver, Emil; Cummings, Kevin; Word, James

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the integration of EUV lithography into a standard semiconductor manufacturing flow to produce demonstration devices. 45 nm logic test chips with functional transistors were fabricated using EUV lithography to pattern the first interconnect level (metal 1). This device fabrication exercise required the development of rule-based 'OPC' to correct for flare and mask shadowing effects. These corrections were applied to the fabrication of a full-field mask. The resulting mask and the 0.25-NA fullfield EUV scanner were found to provide more than adequate performance for this 45 nm logic node demonstration. The CD uniformity across the field and through a lot of wafers was 6.6% (3σ) and the measured overlay on the test-chip (product) wafers was well below 20 nm (mean + 3σ). A resist process was developed and performed well at a sensitivity of 3.8 mJ/cm2, providing ample process latitude and etch selectivity for pattern transfer. The etch recipes provided good CD control, profiles and end-point discrimination, allowing for good electrical connection to the underlying levels, as evidenced by electrical test results. Many transistors connected with Cu-metal lines defined using EUV lithography were tested electrically and found to have characteristics very similar to 45 nm node transistors fabricated using more traditional methods.

  13. Update on the SEMATECH 0.5 NA Extreme-Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) Microfield Exposure Tool (MET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Kevin; Ashworth, Dominic; Bremer, Mark; Chin, Rodney; Fan, Yu-Jen; Girard, Luc; Glatzel, Holger; Goldstein, Michael; Gullikson, Eric; Kennon, Jim; Kestner, Bob; Marchetti, Lou; Naulleau, Patrick; Soufli, Regina; Bauer, Johannes; Mengel, Markus; Welker, Joachim; Grupp, Michael; Sohmen, Erik; Wurm, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    In support of the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) roadmap, a SEMATECH/CNSE joint program is underway to produce multiple EUVL (wavelength of 13.5 nm) R&D photolithography tools. The 0.5 NA projection optic magnification (5X), track length and mechanical interfaces match the currently installed 0.3 NA micro-field exposure tools (MET) projection optic [1] [2] [3]. Therefore, significant changes to the current tool platforms and other adjacent modules are not necessary. However, many of the existing systems do need upgrades to achieve the anticipated smaller exposure feature sizes [4]. To date we have made considerable progress in the production of the first of the two-mirror 0.5 NA projection optics for EUVL [5]. With a measured transmitted wave front error of less than 1 nm root mean square (RMS) over its 30 μm × 200 μm image field, lithography modeling shows that a predicted resolution of <=12 nm and an ultimate resolution of 8 nm (with extreme dipole illumination) will be possible. This paper will present an update from the 0.5 NA EUVL program. We will detail the more significant activities that are being undertaken to upgrade the MET and discuss expected performance.

  14. IR LASER BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR THE COOPERATIVE MONITORING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A Whitaker

    2005-08-08

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the device properties of the quantum cascade laser (QCL), a type of laser invented at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies in the device physics research lab of Dr. Federico Capasso and more specifically to determine the remote sensing capability of this device. The PI and Stevens Institute of Technology collaborated with Dr. Capasso and Bell Laboratories to carry out this research project. The QCL is a unique laser source capable of generating laser radiation in the middle-infrared spectral region that overlaps the most important molecular absorption bands. With appropriate modulation techniques it is possible to use the laser to measure the concentration of many molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. In addition, the mid-IR emission wavelength is well suited to atmospheric transmission as mid-IR experiences much less scattering due to dust and fog. At the onset of this project little was known about several key device performance parameters of this family of lasers and the NNSA supported research enabled them to determine values of several of these characteristics.

  15. Double exposure technology for KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, S.; Bauer, J.; Haak, U.; Stolarek, D.; Schulz, K.; Wolf, H.; Meier, W.; Trojahn, M.; Matthus, E.; Beyer, H.; Old, G.; Marschmeyer, St.; Kuck, B.

    2008-04-01

    The application of Double Exposure Lithography (DEL) would enlarge the capability of 248 nm exposure technique to smaller pitch. We will use the DEL for the integration of critical layers for dedicated applications requiring resolution enhancement into 0.13 μm BiCMOS technology. In this paper we present the overlay precision and the focus difference of 1st and 2nd exposure as critical parameters of the DEL for k I <= 0.3 lithography (100 nm half pitch) with binary masks (BIM). The realization of excellent overlay (OVL) accuracy is a main key of double exposure and double patterning techniques. We show the DEL requires primarily a good mask registration, when the wafer stays in the scanner for both exposures without alignment between 1st and 2nd exposure. The exposure tool overlay error is more a practical limit for double patterning lithography (DPL). Hence we prefer the DEL for the resolution enhancement, especially if we use the KrF high NA lithography tool for 130 nm generation. Experimental and simulated results show that the critical dimension uniformity (CDU) depends strongly on the overlay precision. The DEL results show CDU is not only affected by the OVL but also by an optical proximity effect of 1st and 2nd exposure and the mask registration. The CD uniformity of DEL demands a low focus difference between 1st and 2nd exposure and therefore requires a good focus repeatability of the exposure tool. The Depth of Focus (DOF) of 490 nm at stable CD of lines was achieved for DEL. If we change the focus of one of the exposures the CD-focus performance of spaces was reduced with simultaneous line position changing. CDU vs. focus difference between 1st and 2nd exposure demands a focus repeatability <100 nm for the exposure tool. Summary, the results show DEL has the potential to be a practical lithography enhancement method for device fabrication using high NA KrF tool generation.

  16. Lithography alternatives meet design style reality: How do they "line" up?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Optical lithography resolution scaling has stalled, giving innovative alternatives a window of opportunity. One important factor that impacts these lithographic approaches is the transition in design style from 2D to 1D for advanced CMOS logic. Just as the transition from 3D circuits to 2D fabrication 50 years ago created an opportunity for a new breed of electronics companies, the transition today presents exciting and challenging time for lithographers. Today, we are looking at a range of non-optical lithography processes. Those considered here can be broadly categorized: self-aligned lithography, self-assembled lithography, deposition lithography, nano-imprint lithography, pixelated e-beam lithography, shot-based e-beam lithography .Do any of these alternatives benefit from or take advantage of 1D layout? Yes, for example SAPD + CL (Self Aligned Pitch Division combined with Complementary Lithography). This is a widely adopted process for CMOS nodes at 22nm and below. Can there be additional design / process co-optimization? In spite of the simple-looking nature of 1D layout, the placement of "cut" in the lines and "holes" for interlayer connections can be tuned for a given process capability. Examples of such optimization have been presented at this conference, typically showing a reduction of at least one in the number of cut or hole patterns needed.[1,2] Can any of the alternatives complement each other or optical lithography? Yes.[3] For example, DSA (Directed Self Assembly) combines optical lithography with self-assembly. CEBL (Complementary e-Beam Lithography) combines optical lithography with SAPD for lines with shot-based e-beam lithography for cuts and holes. Does one (shrinking) size fit all? No, that's why we have many alternatives. For example NIL (Nano-imprint Lithography) has been introduced for NAND Flash patterning where the (trending lower) defectivity is acceptable for the product. Deposition lithography has been introduced in 3D NAND Flash to

  17. Study of defect verification based on lithography simulation with a SEM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shingo; Fujii, Nobuaki; Kanno, Koichi; Imai, Hidemichi; Hayano, Katsuya; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Shida, Soichi; Murakawa, Tsutomu; Kuribara, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Jun; Nakamura, Takayuki; Matsushita, Shohei; Hara, Daisuke; Pang, Linyong

    2015-07-01

    In a Photomask manufacturing process, mask defect inspection is an increasingly important topic for 193nm optical lithography. Further extension of 193nm optical lithography to the next technology nodes, staying at a maximum numerical aperture (NA) of 1.35, pushes lithography to its utmost limits. This extension from technologies like ILT and SMO requires more complex mask patterns. In mask defect inspection, defect verification becomes more difficult because many nuisance defects are detected in aggressive mask features. One of the solutions is lithography simulation like AIMS. An issue with AIMS, however, is the low throughput of measurement, analysis etc.

  18. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  19. Infrared laser-based monitoring of the silane dissociation during deposition of silicon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlome, R.; Feltrin, A.; Ballif, C.

    2009-05-18

    The silane dissociation efficiency, or depletion fraction, is an important plasma parameter by means of which the film growth rate and the amorphous-to-microcrystalline silicon transition regime can be monitored in situ. In this letter we implement a homebuilt quantum cascade laser-based absorption spectrometer to measure the silane dissociation efficiency in an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. This infrared laser-based diagnostic technique is compact, sensitive, and nonintrusive. Its resolution is good enough to resolve Doppler-broadened rotovibrational absorption lines of silane. The latter feature various absorption strengths, thereby enabling depletion measurements over a wide range of process conditions.

  20. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  1. Production integrated laser-based measurement system for railway sleepers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanke, Gerd; Kessler, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    Deutsche Bahn (German Railways) requires its suppliers to deliver concrete sleepers with high precision dimensions for critical sections. To meet these demands suppliers have to continuously monitor the production process. Critical dimensions are the track width and the widths of both rail supporting planes. Also their orientation must not exceed given tolerances. That demands measurements with a precision of 0.2 mm or better. The contactless measurement system developed uses the triangulation approach based on laser plane projection. It consists of two CCD-cameras and four lasers projecting planes under 45° each. A third camera serves for the recognition of the mould numbers. Software detects if a sleeper is in a measuring position, the camera images are frozen and the measurements are done using line approximation and subpixel accuracy. Additionally the measurement of the positions of peg holes is integrated, these data serve for the control of a screw-in robot. The system is added to the running production line in a harsh industrial environment. It works fully automatically. All measured data are transferred to the production monitoring for evaluation and archiving. The system has been working now for two years, more than half a million sleepers have been reliably monitored.

  2. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm S.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1997-01-01

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  3. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  4. Research of infrared laser based pavement imaging and crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hanyu; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Xiuhua; Jing, Genqiang

    2013-08-01

    Road crack detection is seriously affected by many factors in actual applications, such as some shadows, road signs, oil stains, high frequency noise and so on. Due to these factors, the current crack detection methods can not distinguish the cracks in complex scenes. In order to solve this problem, a novel method based on infrared laser pavement imaging is proposed. Firstly, single sensor laser pavement imaging system is adopted to obtain pavement images, high power laser line projector is well used to resist various shadows. Secondly, the crack extraction algorithm which has merged multiple features intelligently is proposed to extract crack information. In this step, the non-negative feature and contrast feature are used to extract the basic crack information, and circular projection based on linearity feature is applied to enhance the crack area and eliminate noise. A series of experiments have been performed to test the proposed method, which shows that the proposed automatic extraction method is effective and advanced.

  5. Quantum cascade laser based standoff photoacoustic chemical detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Cheng, Liwei; Guo, Dingkai; Kostov, Yordan; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2011-10-10

    Standoff chemical detection with a distance of more than 41 feet using photoacoustic effect and quantum cascade laser (QCL) operated at relatively low power, less than 40 mW, is demonstrated for the first time. The option of using QCL provides the advantages of easy tuning and modulation besides the benefit of compact size, light weight and low power consumption. The standoff detection signal can be calibrated as a function of different parameters such as laser pulse energy, gas vapor concentration and detection distance. The results yield good agreements with theoretical model. Techniques to obtain even longer detection distance and achieve outdoor operations are in the process of implementation and their projection is discussed.

  6. Speckle perception and disturbance limit in laser based projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschaffelt, Guy; Roelandt, Stijn; Meuret, Youri; Van den Broeck, Wendy; Kilpi, Katriina; Lievens, Bram; Jacobs, An; Janssens, Peter; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the level of speckle that can be tolerated in a laser cinema projector. For this purpose, we equipped a movie theatre room with a prototype laser projector. A group of 186 participants was gathered to evaluate the speckle perception of several, short movie trailers in a subjective `Quality of Experience' experiment. This study is important as the introduction of lasers in projection systems has been hampered by the presence of speckle in projected images. We identify a speckle disturbance threshold by statistically analyzing the observers' responses for different values of the amount of speckle, which was monitored using a well-defined speckle measurement method. The analysis shows that the speckle perception of a human observer is not only dependent on the objectively measured amount of speckle, but it is also strongly influenced by the image content. As is also discussed in [Verschaffelt et al., Scientific Reports 5, art. nr. 14105, 2015] we find that, for moving images, the speckle becomes disturbing if the speckle contrast becomes larger than 6.9% for the red, 6.0% for the green, and 4.8% for the blue primary colors of the projector, whereas for still images the speckle detection threshold is about 3%. As we could not independently tune the speckle contrast of each of the primary colors, this speckle disturbance limit seems to be determined by the 6.9% speckle contrast of the red color as this primary color contains the largest amount of speckle. The speckle disturbance limit for movies thus turns out to be substantially larger than that for still images, and hence is easier to attain.

  7. Double-Sided Opportunities Using Chemical Lift-Off Lithography.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Anne M; Liao, Wei-Ssu; Weiss, Paul S

    2016-08-16

    We discuss the origins, motivation, invention, development, applications, and future of chemical lift-off lithography, in which a specified pattern of a self-assembled monolayer is removed, i.e., lifted off, using a reactive, patterned stamp that is brought into contact with the monolayer. For Au substrates, this process produces a supported, patterned monolayer of Au on the stamp in addition to the negative pattern in the original molecular monolayer. Both the patterned molecular monolayer on the original substrate and the patterned supported metal monolayer on the stamp are useful as materials and for further applications in sensing and other areas. Chemical lift-off lithography effectively lowers the barriers to and costs of high-resolution, large-area nanopatterning. On the patterned monolayer side, features in the single-nanometer range can be produced across large (square millimeter or larger) areas. Patterns smaller than the original stamp feature sizes can be produced by controlling the degree of contact between the stamp and the lifted-off monolayer. We note that this process is different than conventional lift-off processes in lithography in that chemical lift-off lithography removes material, whereas conventional lift-off is a positive-tone patterning method. Chemical lift-off lithography is in some ways similar to microtransfer printing. Chemical lift-off lithography has critical advantages in the preparation of biocapture surfaces because the molecules left behind are exploited to space and to orient functional(ized) molecules. On the supported metal monolayer side, a new two-dimensional material has been produced. The useful important chemical properties of Au (vis-à-vis functionalization with thiols) are retained, but the electronic and optical properties of bulk Au or even Au nanoparticles are not. These metal monolayers do not quench excitation and may be useful in optical measurements, particularly in combination with selective binding due to

  8. Double-Sided Opportunities Using Chemical Lift-Off Lithography.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Anne M; Liao, Wei-Ssu; Weiss, Paul S

    2016-08-16

    We discuss the origins, motivation, invention, development, applications, and future of chemical lift-off lithography, in which a specified pattern of a self-assembled monolayer is removed, i.e., lifted off, using a reactive, patterned stamp that is brought into contact with the monolayer. For Au substrates, this process produces a supported, patterned monolayer of Au on the stamp in addition to the negative pattern in the original molecular monolayer. Both the patterned molecular monolayer on the original substrate and the patterned supported metal monolayer on the stamp are useful as materials and for further applications in sensing and other areas. Chemical lift-off lithography effectively lowers the barriers to and costs of high-resolution, large-area nanopatterning. On the patterned monolayer side, features in the single-nanometer range can be produced across large (square millimeter or larger) areas. Patterns smaller than the original stamp feature sizes can be produced by controlling the degree of contact between the stamp and the lifted-off monolayer. We note that this process is different than conventional lift-off processes in lithography in that chemical lift-off lithography removes material, whereas conventional lift-off is a positive-tone patterning method. Chemical lift-off lithography is in some ways similar to microtransfer printing. Chemical lift-off lithography has critical advantages in the preparation of biocapture surfaces because the molecules left behind are exploited to space and to orient functional(ized) molecules. On the supported metal monolayer side, a new two-dimensional material has been produced. The useful important chemical properties of Au (vis-à-vis functionalization with thiols) are retained, but the electronic and optical properties of bulk Au or even Au nanoparticles are not. These metal monolayers do not quench excitation and may be useful in optical measurements, particularly in combination with selective binding due to

  9. Application of SMIF isolation to lithography processes for contamination control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sheng-Bai

    2001-08-01

    Contamination control is particularly important in lithography processes because pattern defects are converted to wafers after each exposure. Contamination, by definition, is undesired matter or energy, which causes product defects or process instabilities, and, consequently, reduces yield and reliability. In lithography processes, particles, condensable hydrocarbosn, base molecules, moisture, and static electricity are examples of contaminants. Particles are inert minute objects, which interfere with the proper formation of circuit features. Condensable hydrocarbosn may cause optics hazing which reduces image homogeneity and energy transmission. Some Chemically Amplified Resists (CAR) are susceptible to molecular base contamination, resulting in image degradation such as T-topping. Moisture can affect the characteristics of photoresist, destabilizing photo-exposure and development processes. In combination with water, amine containing photoresist strippers can form hydroxyl ions that can attack aluminum and aluminum-copper alloys. Charged surfaces can tract and hold contaminants of opposite polarity. In case the electrical field exceeds the dielectric strength, ESD event occurs, often accompanied with damage of reticles, masks, or wafer circuits. With SMIF isolation technologies, yield loss due to defects and/or instabilities is minimized. Reticles, masks, and wafers are isolated form contamination sources through hermetic seal, in conjunction with particle/chemical filtration, and static shielding. Pressurization, inert gas purge, chemical absorbents, and electric grounding or air ionization are techniques of removing contaminants from the critical areas. For best performance, adequate selection of construction materials is critical. This paper discusses impacts of contamination on lithography processes and the possibility of solving such problems using SMIF isolation techniques. Theoretical models are developed and experimental data are presented.

  10. Inspection of imprint lithography patterns for semiconductor and patterned media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Douglas J.; Haase, Gaddi; Singh, Lovejeet; Curran, David; Schmid, Gerard M.; Luo, Kang; Brooks, Cindy; Selinidis, Kosta; Fretwell, John; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2010-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Acceptance of imprint lithography for manufacturing will require demonstration that it can attain defect levels commensurate with the requirements of cost-effective device production. This work summarizes the results of defect inspections of semiconductor masks, wafers and hard disks patterned using Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM). Inspections were performed with optical and e-beam based automated inspection tools. For the semiconductor market, a test mask was designed which included dense features (with half pitches ranging between 32 nm and 48 nm) containing an extensive array of programmed defects. For this work, both e-beam inspection and optical inspection were used to detect both random defects and the programmed defects. Analytical SEMs were then used to review the defects detected by the inspection. Defect trends over the course of many wafers were observed with another test mask using a KLA-T 2132 optical inspection tool. The primary source of defects over 2000 imprints were particle related. For the hard drive market, it is important to understand the defectivity of both the template and the imprinted disk. This work presents a methodology for automated pattern inspection and defect classification for imprint-patterned media. Candela CS20 and 6120 tools from KLA-Tencor map the optical properties of the disk surface, producing highresolution grayscale images of surface reflectivity, scattered light, phase shift, etc. Defects that have been identified in this manner are further characterized according to the morphology

  11. Step and flash imprint lithography for sub-100-nm patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colburn, Matthew; Grot, Annette; Amistoso, Marie N.; Choi, Byung J.; Bailey, Todd C.; Ekerdt, John G.; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Hollenhorst, James; Willson, C. Grant

    2000-07-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (SFIL) is an alternative to photolithography that efficiently generates high aspect-ratio, sub-micron patterns in resist materials. Other imprint lithography techniques based on physical deformation of a polymer to generate surface relief structures have produced features in PMMA as small as 10 nm, but it is very difficult to imprint large depressed features or to imprint a thick films of resist with high aspect-ratio features by these techniques. SFIL overcomes these difficulties by exploiting the selectivity and anisotropy of reactive ion etch (RIE). First, a thick organic 'transfer' layer (0.3 micrometer to 1.1 micrometer) is spin coated to planarize the wafer surface. A low viscosity, liquid organosilicon photopolymer precursor is then applied to the substrate and a quartz template applied at 2 psi. Once the master is in contact with the organosilicon solution, a crosslinking photopolymerization is initiated via backside illumination with broadband UV light. When the layer is cured the template is removed. This process relies on being able to imprint the photopolymer while leaving the minimal residual material in the depressed areas. Any excess material is etched away using a CHF3/He/O2 RIE. The exposed transfer layer is then etched with O2 RIE. The silicon incorporated in the photopolymer allows amplification of the low aspect ratio relief structure in the silylated resist into a high aspect ratio feature in the transfer layer. The aspect ratio is limited only by the mechanical stability of the transfer layer material and the O2 RIE selectivity and anisotropy. This method has produced 60 nm features with 6:1 aspect ratios. This lithography process was also used to fabricate alternating arrays of 100 nm Ti lines on a 200 nm pitch that function as efficient micropolarizers. Several types of optical devices including gratings, polarizers, and sub-wavelength structures can be easily patterned by SFIL.

  12. Mask CD measurement approach by diffraction intensity for lithography equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Takaharu; Mesuda, Kei; Sutou, Takanori; Inazuki, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Toyama, Nobuhito; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2008-04-01

    In 45nm node and beyond with hyper NA lithography, mask topography effect is not ignorable and mask CD bias impacts printing performance such as MEEF or exposure latitude. In that situation, 3D simulation is required for precise evaluation of printing performance and the accuracy of 3D mask model on simulation is a key issue. Verification of 3D mask model by diffraction intensity measurement with AIMS TM45-193i was discussed in our previous works. Through the verification, though real mask successfully creates effective or simulated diffractions, CD on 3D mask model on simulation was different to that on AIMS TM result which was measured by CD-SEM. Therefore, purpose of this work is to analyze the cause of CD differences through AIMS TM diffraction intensity evaluation in various conditions (mask material, pattern pitch, mask CD bias and mask CD-SEM system). Furthermore, lithography equivalent CD is proposed as width of "ideal" mask shape. As a result achieved from the experiments, constant CD shift was successfully observed at hp40-70nm L/S pattern with varied bias for both 6% EAPSM and Binary masks. It can be said that mask topography difference related to mask material and pattern dimensions has not been observed. On the other hand, the value of CD shift was smaller on the condition of newer generation CD-SEM measurement. Other result achieved from further discussion and analysis, cause of the CD difference was explained using simple SEM image simulation. The CD difference was mainly changed by electron beam size factor, and it was stable with side wall angle in the range of 80 to 90 degree if the middle CD, which is the width of 3D model defined at the half height of the mask film's thickness, is constant. Since side wall angles on actual masks are nearly 90 degree, lithography equivalent CD could be measured by CD-SEM with constant offset.

  13. Speckle reduction methods in laser-based picture projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, M. Nadeem; Chen, Xuyuan

    2016-02-01

    Laser sources have been promised for many years to be better light sources as compared to traditional lamps or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for projectors, which enable projectors having wide colour gamut for vivid image, super brightness and high contrast for the best picture quality, long lifetime for maintain free operation, mercury free, and low power consumption for green environment. A major technology obstacle in using lasers for projection has been the speckle noise caused by to the coherent nature of the lasers. For speckle reduction, current state of the art solutions apply moving parts with large physical space demand. Solutions beyond the state of the art need to be developed such as integrated optical components, hybrid MOEMS devices, and active phase modulators for compact speckle reduction. In this article, major methods reported in the literature for the speckle reduction in laser projectors are presented and explained. With the advancement in semiconductor lasers with largely reduced cost for the red, green and the blue primary colours, and the developed methods for their speckle reduction, it is hoped that the lasers will be widely utilized in different projector applications in the near future.

  14. Low-cost method for producing extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude; Taylor, John S.; Spiller, Eberhard A.

    2003-11-21

    Spherical and non-spherical optical elements produced by standard optical figuring and polishing techniques are extremely expensive. Such surfaces can be cheaply produced by diamond turning; however, the roughness in the diamond turned surface prevent their use for EUV lithography. These ripples are smoothed with a coating of polyimide before applying a 60 period Mo/Si multilayer to reflect a wavelength of 134 .ANG. and have obtained peak reflectivities close to 63%. The savings in cost are about a factor of 100.

  15. Nanoimprint lithography of Al nanovoids for deep-UV SERS.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Sigle, Daniel O; Herrmann, Lars O; Wolverson, Daniel; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2014-10-22

    Deep-ultraviolet surface-enhanced Raman scattering (UV-SERS) is a promising technique for bioimaging and detection because many biological molecules possess UV absorption lines leading to strongly resonant Raman scattering. Here, Al nanovoid substrates are developed by combining nanoimprint lithography of etched polymer/silica opal films with electron beam evaporation, to give a high-performance sensing platform for UV-SERS. Enhancement by more than 3 orders of magnitude in the UV-SERS performance was obtained from the DNA base adenine, matching well the UV plasmonic optical signatures and simulations, demonstrating its suitability for biodetection. PMID:25291629

  16. Nanoscale control of polymer crystallization by nanoimprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhijun; Baralia, Gabriel; Bayot, Vincent; Gohy, Jean-François; Jonas, Alain M

    2005-09-01

    Polymer crystallization is notoriously difficult to control. Here, we demonstrate that the orientation of polymer crystals can be fully controlled at the nanoscale by using nanoimprint lithography (NIL) with molds bearing nanotrenches to shape thin films of poly(vinylidene fluoride). This unprecedented control is due to the thermomechanical history experienced by the polymer during embossing, to the shift of the nucleation mechanism from heterogeneous to homogeneous in confined regions of the mold, and to the constraining of the fast growth axis along the direction of the trenches. NIL thus appears as an ideal tool to realize smart polymer surfaces where crystal ordering can be tuned locally.

  17. Development of a laboratory extreme-ultraviolet lithography tool

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Malinowski, M.E.; Stulen, R.H.; Haney, S.J.; Berger, K.W.; Nissen, R.P.; Wilkerson, G.A.; Paul, P.H.; Birtola, S.R.; Jin, P.S.; Arling, R.W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A.K.; Sweatt, W.C.; Chow, W.W.; Bjorkholm, J.E.; Freeman, R.R.; Himel, M.D.; MacDowell, A.A.; Tennant, D.M.; Fetter, L.A.; Wood, O.R. II; Waskiewicz, W.K.; White, D.L.; Windt, D.L.; Jewell, T.E.

    1994-04-01

    The development of a laboratory EUV lithography tool based on a laser plasma source, a 10x Schwarzchild camera, and a magnetically levitated wafer stage is presented. Interferometric measurements of the camera aberrations are incorporated into physical-optics simulations to estimate the EUV imaging performance of the camera. Experimental results demonstrate the successful matching of five multilayer reflecting surfaces, coated to specification for a wide range of figure and incidence angle requirements. High-resolution, 10x-reduction images of a reflection mask are shown.

  18. Practical constraints on sources for pulsed beam lithographies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, J.Y.; Picraux, S.T.; Light, R.W.; Hsing, W.W.

    1988-03-01

    Many of the sources currently being considered for advanced microlithography are pulsed, rather than continuous. These sources are characterized not merely by brightness and lifetime, but more generally by shot-to-shot stability, lifetime, single-pulse fluence, and repetition rate. These four characteristics are constrained by practical considerations, and, within limits, can be traded off against each other. We describe these tradeoffs and optimal source operating regimes for lithographies based on broad- and narrow-band excimer laser sources and on pulsed x-ray sources. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Lithography on GaP(1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Perez, Rosangelly; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2008-06-01

    Two types of lithographic methods were used to modify GaP(1 0 0) surfaces with commercially available alkanethiol molecules: microcontact printing (μCP) and "dip-pen" nanolithography (DPN). The patterned surfaces were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). The characterization was done in order to understand the quality of each type of pattern, its chemical composition, and the organization of the molecules on the surface. Differences between the two lithographic methods used to do lithography on the GaP(1 0 0) in this study were dependent on the chosen molecular "ink".

  20. Self-cleaning optic for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2003-12-16

    A multilayer reflective optic or mirror for lithographic applications, and particularly extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, having a surface or "capping" layer which in combination with incident radiation and gaseous molecular species such as O.sub.2, H.sub.2, H.sub.2 O provides for continuous cleaning of carbon deposits from the optic surface. The metal capping layer is required to be oxidation resistant and capable of transmitting at least 90% of incident EUV radiation. Materials for the capping layer include Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt and Au and combinations thereof.

  1. Evaluation Of An Organosilicon Photoresist For Excimer Laser Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Janet C.; Orvek, Kevin J.; Ditmer, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    An organosilicon resist was investigated for use in deep UV laser lithography. The resist was based on 0-trimethylsilyl poly(vinylphenol) resin. It was found to exhibit transparency at 248nm comparable to the transparency of g-line light in conventional novolak resists, making single-layer resist processing possible. The results of single-layer and bi-layer patterning on an excimer laser contact printer are presented. The bi-layer processing uses oxygen reactive ion etching (RIE) for transfer of a top layer pattern into a thick underlying novolak layer.

  2. Masks for high aspect ratio x-ray lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, C.K.; Jackson, K.H.; Bonivert, W.D.; Hruby, J.

    1997-04-01

    Fabrication of very high aspect ratio microstructures, as well as ultra-high precision manufacturing is of increasing interest in a multitude of applications. Fields as diverse as micromechanics, robotics, integrated optics, and sensors benefit from this technology. The scale-length of this spatial regime is between what can be achieved using classical machine tool operations and that which is used in microelectronics. This requires new manufacturing techniques, such as the LIGA process, which combines x-ray lithography, electroforming, and plastic molding.

  3. Patterning of crystalline organic materials by electro-hydrodynamic lithography.

    PubMed

    Goldberg-Oppenheimer, Pola; Kohn, Peter; Langford, Richard M; Steiner, Ullrich

    2012-08-20

    The control of semi-crystalline polymers in thin films and in micrometer-sized patterns is attractive for (opto-)electronic applications. Electro-hydrodynamic lithography (EHL) enables the structure formation of organic crystalline materials on the micrometer length scale while at the same time exerting control over crystal orientation. This gives rise to well-defined micro-patterned arrays of uniaxially aligned polymer crystals. This study explores the interplay of EHL structure formation with crystal alignment and studies the mechanisms that give rise to crystal orientation in EHL-generated structures. PMID:22674540

  4. Surface force measurement of ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Jun; Hasegawa, Masayuki; Amemiya, Hironao; Kobayashi, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) has advantages such as room-temperature operation, high through-put, and high resolution. In the UV-NIL process, the mold needs a release coating material to prevent adhesion of the transfer resin. Usually, fluorinated silane coupling agents are used as release coating materials. To evaluate the release property, surface force analyzer equipment was used. This equipment can measure the surface forces between release-coated or noncoated mold material surfaces and UV-cured resin surfaces in the solid state. Lower surface forces were measured when a release coating was used on the mold material surface.

  5. Nanoimprint Lithography of Al Nanovoids for Deep-UV SERS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Deep-ultraviolet surface-enhanced Raman scattering (UV-SERS) is a promising technique for bioimaging and detection because many biological molecules possess UV absorption lines leading to strongly resonant Raman scattering. Here, Al nanovoid substrates are developed by combining nanoimprint lithography of etched polymer/silica opal films with electron beam evaporation, to give a high-performance sensing platform for UV-SERS. Enhancement by more than 3 orders of magnitude in the UV-SERS performance was obtained from the DNA base adenine, matching well the UV plasmonic optical signatures and simulations, demonstrating its suitability for biodetection. PMID:25291629

  6. 76 FR 81518 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Laser-Based Multi-Function Office Machines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Laser... laser-based multi-function office machines. Based upon the facts presented, CBP has concluded in the... of the laser-based multi-function office machine, and it is at their assembly and programming...

  7. Nanoimprint lithography with a focused laser beam for the fabrication of nanopatterned microchannel molds.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyungjun; Ryu, Jihyeong; Kim, Geehong; Choi, Kee-Bong; Lee, Sunghwi; Lee, Jaejong

    2013-08-21

    We present a process based on nanoimprint lithography for the fabrication of a microchannel mold having nanopatterns formed at the bottoms of its microchannels. A focused laser beam selectively cures the resist in the micrometer scale during nanoimprint lithography. Nanopatterns within the microchannels may be used to control microfluidic behavior.

  8. Laser-based study of geometrical optics at school level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Amit; Dhingra, Vishal; Sharma, Reena; Mittal, Ankit; Tiwadi, Raman; Chakravarty, Pratik

    2011-10-01

    Students at the school level from grade 7 to 12 are taught various concepts of geometrical optics but with little hands-on activities. Light propagation through different media, image formation using lenses and mirrors under different conditions and application of basic principles to characterization of lenses, mirrors and other instruments has been a subject which although fascinates students but due to lack of suitable demonstrating setups, students find difficulty in understanding these concepts and hence unable to appreciate the importance of such concepts in various useful scientific apparatus, day to day life, instruments and devices. Therefore, students tend to cram various concepts related to geometrical optics instead of understanding them. As part of the extension activity in the University Grants Commission major research project "Investigating science hands-on to promote innovation and research at undergraduate level" and University of Delhi at Acharya Narendra Dev College SPIE student chapter, students working under this optics outreach programme have demonstrated various experiments on geometrical optics using a five beam laser ray box and various optical components like different types of mirrors, lenses, prisms, optical fibers etc. The various hands-on activities includes demonstrations on laws of reflection, image formation using plane, concave and convex mirrors, mirror formula, total internal reflection, light propagation in an optical fiber, laws of refraction, image formation using concave and convex lenses and combination of these lenses, lens formula, light propagation through prisms, dispersion in prism, defects in eye- Myopia and hypermetropia. Subjects have been evaluated through pre and post tests in order to measure the improvement in their level of understanding.

  9. The impact of charging on low-energy electron beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Mun, Lau Kien; Drouin, Dominique; Lavallée, Eric; Beauvais, Jacques

    2004-12-01

    A major issue in low voltage lithography is surface charging, which results in beam deflection presented as uneven exposure between adjacent structures. In this study, charge-induced pattern distortions in low-voltage energy beam lithography (LVEBL) were investigated using a silicide direct-write electron beam lithography process. Two methodologies have been proposed to avert charging effects in LVEBL, namely, pattern randomizing and lithography using the crossover voltage. Experimental results demonstrated that these methods are effective in significantly reducing the problems associated with charging. They indicate that charging on a sample is a function of time interval and proximity between line structures. In addition, the optimum time and distance between exposures for no charge-induced pattern distortion were determined. By using the crossover voltage of the material for lithography, charging effect can be significantly minimized. PMID:19780323

  10. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Allen, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array.

  11. Passively Q-switched dual-wavelength Yb:LSO laser based on tungsten disulphide saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing-Hui, Liu; Jin-Rong, Tian; He-Yang, Guoyu; Run-Qin, Xu; Ke-Xuan, Li; Yan-Rong, Song; Xin-Ping, Zhang; Liang-Bi, Su; Jun, Xu

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a passively Q-switched Yb:LSO laser based on tungsten disulphide (WS2) saturable absorber operating at 1034 nm and 1056 nm simultaneously. The saturable absorbers were fabricated by spin coating method. With low speed, the WS2 nanoplatelets embedded in polyvinyl alcohol could be coated on a BK7 glass substrate coated with high-refractive-index thin polymer. The shortest pulse width of 1.6 μs with a repetition rate of 76.9 kHz is obtained. As the pump power increases to 9 W, the maximum output power is measured to be 250 mW, corresponding to a single pulse energy of 3.25 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to obtain dual-wavelength Q-switched solid-state laser using few-layer WS2 nanoplatelets. Project supported by the National Scientific Research Project of China (Grant No. 61177047), Beijing Municipal Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 1102005), and the Basic Research Foundation of Beijing University of Technology, China (Grant No. X3006111201501).

  12. Fundamental study of optical threshold layer approach towards double exposure lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinyu; Berro, Adam J.; Cho, Younjin; Jen, Kane; Lee, Saul; Ngai, Tomoki; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Durand, William J.; Sundaresan, Arunkumar; Lancaster, Jeffrey R.; Jockusch, Steffen; Zimmerman, Paul; Turro, Nicholas J.; Willson, C. G.

    2009-03-01

    193 immersion lithography has reached its maximal achievable resolution. There are mainly two lithographic strategies that will enable continued increase in resolution. Those are being pursued in parallel. The first is extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography and the second is double patterning (exposure) lithography. EUV lithography is counted on to be available in 2013 time frame for 22 nm node. Unfortunately, this technology has suffered several delays due to fundamental problems with source power, mask infrastructure, metrology and overall reliability. The implementation of EUV lithography in the next five years is unlikely due to economic factors. Double patterning lithography (DPL) is a technology that has been implemented by the industry and has already shown the proof of concept for the 22nm node. This technique while expensive is the only current path forward for scaling with no fundamental showstoppers for the 32nm and 22nm nodes. Double exposure lithography (DEL) is being proposed as a cost mitigating approach to advanced lithography. Compared to DPL, DEL offers advantages in overlay and process time, thus reducing the cost-of-ownership (CoO). However, DEL requires new materials that have a non-linear photoresponse. So far, several approaches were proposed for double exposure lithography, from which Optical Threshold Layer (OTL) was found to give the best lithography performance according to the results of the simulation. This paper details the principle of the OTL approach. A photochromic polymer was designed and synthesized. The feasibility of the material for application of DEL was explored by a series of evaluations.

  13. Integrated lithography to prepare periodic arrays of nano-objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipos, Áron; Szalai, Anikó; Csete, Mária

    2013-08-01

    We present an integrated lithography method to prepare versatile nano-objects with variable shape and nano-scaled substructure, in wavelength-scaled periodic arrays with arbitrary symmetry. The idea is to illuminate colloid sphere monolayers by polarized beams possessing periodic lateral intensity modulations. Finite element method was applied to determine the effects of the wavelength, polarization and angle of incidence of the incoming beam, and to predict the characteristics of nano-objects, which can be fabricated on thin metal layer covered substrates due to the near-field enhancement under silica colloid spheres. The inter-object distance is controlled by varying the relative orientation of the periodic intensity modulation with respect to the silica colloid sphere monolayer. It is shown that illuminating silica colloid sphere monolayers by two interfering beams, linear patterns made of elliptical holes appear in case of linear polarization, while circularly polarized beams result in co-existent rounded objects, as more circular nano-holes and nano-crescents. The size of the nano-objects and their sub-structure is determined by the spheres diameter and by the wavelength. We present various complex plasmonic patterns made of versatile nano-objects that can be uniquely fabricated applying the inherent symmetry breaking possibilities in the integrated lithography method.

  14. Integrated lithography to prepare arrays of rounded nano-objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipos, Áron; Szalai, Anikó; Csete, Mária

    2012-03-01

    An integrated lithography method is presented to prepare rounded nano-objects with variable shape, in arrays with arbitrary symmetry and wavelength-scaled periodicity. Finite element method was applied to determine the near-field confinement under monolayers of silver and gold colloid spheres illuminated by circularly polarized beams possessing periodic intensity distribution, and to predict the shape of nano-objects, which can be fabricated on thin noble metal layers on glass substrates. It was shown that illumination by perpendicularly incident homogeneous beam results in hexagonal array of uniform nano-rings, while uniform nano-crescents appear due to single obliquely incident beam. Illumination of colloid sphere monolayers by interfering beams causes development of co-existent nano-rings and nanocrescents. It was demonstrated that the periodicity of complex patterns is determined by the wavelength and angle of incidence; the inter-object distance is controlled by the relative orientation of interference patterns with respect to colloid sphere monolayers; the nano-object size is determined by the wavelength, sphere diameter and material; while the nearfield distribution sensitively depends on the direction of illumination by circularly polarized light. We present complex patterns of various rounded nano-objects that can be uniquely fabricated via Circular Integrated Interference and Colloid sphere Lithography (CIICL), and applied as plasmonic and meta-materials.

  15. Evaluation of Metal Absorber Materials for Beyond Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seongchul; Kim, Jung Sik; Lee, Jae Uk; Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jung Hwan; Ahn, Jinho

    2015-11-01

    In addition to the development of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), studies on beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography (BEUVL), which uses radiation with a wavelength of 6.7 nm, are in progress for their application in high-volume manufacturing. The BEUV wavelength, which is much shorter than the EUV wavelength, improves the resolution of patterned features. However, suitable materials for the mask stack of BEUVL are still under development. In this study, the applicability of metallic materials, such as Ni, Co, Ir, W, and Ta, as the absorber in a binary-intensity BEUVL mask was evaluated. The mask-imaging properties were simulated by adopting a thickness that ensured a reflectivity of <1% for each material. Furthermore, we used a multilayered La/B mirror--which exhibited a high reflectivity at a wavelength of 6.7 nm--because BEUV light is absorbed by most materials, and therefore uses reflective optics as desired. The numerical aperture (NA), angle of incidence, and demagnification factor were 0.5 and 0.6, 6 degrees, and 8x, respectively. We confirmed that a line-and-space pattern with a half-pitch of 11 nm can be patterned with metallic absorbers by using a high NA. PMID:26726569

  16. Evaluation of Metal Absorber Materials for Beyond Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seongchul; Kim, Jung Sik; Lee, Jae Uk; Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jung Hwan; Ahn, Jinho

    2015-11-01

    In addition to the development of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), studies on beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography (BEUVL), which uses radiation with a wavelength of 6.7 nm, are in progress for their application in high-volume manufacturing. The BEUV wavelength, which is much shorter than the EUV wavelength, improves the resolution of patterned features. However, suitable materials for the mask stack of BEUVL are still under development. In this study, the applicability of metallic materials, such as Ni, Co, Ir, W, and Ta, as the absorber in a binary-intensity BEUVL mask was evaluated. The mask-imaging properties were simulated by adopting a thickness that ensured a reflectivity of <1% for each material. Furthermore, we used a multilayered La/B mirror--which exhibited a high reflectivity at a wavelength of 6.7 nm--because BEUV light is absorbed by most materials, and therefore uses reflective optics as desired. The numerical aperture (NA), angle of incidence, and demagnification factor were 0.5 and 0.6, 6 degrees, and 8x, respectively. We confirmed that a line-and-space pattern with a half-pitch of 11 nm can be patterned with metallic absorbers by using a high NA.

  17. Mask replication using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta S.; Jones, Chris; Doyle, Gary F.; Brown, Laura; Imhof, Joseph; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2011-11-01

    The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. It is anticipated that the lifetime of a single template (for patterned media) or mask (for semiconductor) will be on the order of 104 - 105imprints. This suggests that tens of thousands of templates/masks will be required to satisfy the needs of a manufacturing environment. Electron-beam patterning is too slow to feasibly deliver these volumes, but instead can provide a high quality "master" mask which can be replicated many times with an imprint lithography tool. This strategy has the capability to produce the required supply of "working" templates/masks. In this paper, we review the development of the mask form factor, imprint replication tools and the semiconductor mask replication process. A PerfectaTM MR5000 mask replication tool has been developed specifically to pattern replica masks from an ebeam written master. Performance results, including image placement, critical dimension uniformity, and pattern transfer are covered in detail.

  18. Block-based mask optimization for optical lithography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Song, Zhiyang; Li, Yanqiu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2013-05-10

    Pixel-based optical proximity correction (PBOPC) methods have been developed as a leading-edge resolution enhancement technique (RET) for integrated circuit fabrication. PBOPC independently modulates each pixel on the reticle, which tremendously increases the mask's complexity and, at the same time, deteriorates its manufacturability. Most current PBOPC algorithms recur to regularization methods or a mask manufacturing rule check (MRC) to improve the mask manufacturability. Typically, these approaches either fail to satisfy manufacturing constraints on the practical product line, or lead to suboptimal mask patterns that may degrade the lithographic performance. This paper develops a block-based optical proximity correction (BBOPC) algorithm to pursue the optimal masks with manufacturability compliance, where the mask is shaped by a set of overlapped basis blocks rather than pixels. BBOPC optimization is formulated based on a vector imaging model, which is adequate for both dry lithography with lower numerical aperture (NA), and immersion lithography with hyper-NA. The BBOPC algorithm successively optimizes the main features (MF) and subresolution assist features (SRAF) based on a modified conjugate gradient method. It is effective at smoothing any unmanufacturable jogs along edges. A weight matrix is introduced in the cost function to preserve the edge fidelity of the printed images. Simulations show that the BBOPC algorithm can improve lithographic imaging performance while maintaining mask manufacturing constraints. PMID:23669851

  19. Candidate plasma-facing materials for EUV lithography source components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanein, Ahmed; Burtseva, Tatiana; Brooks, Jeff N.; Konkashbaev, Isak K.; Rice, Bryan J.

    2003-06-01

    Material selection and lifetime issues for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography are of critical importance to the success of this technology for commercial applications. This paper reviews current trends in production and use of plasma-facing electrodes, insulators, and wall materials for EUV type sources. Ideal candidate materials should be able to: withstand high thermal shock from the short pulsed plasma; withstand high thermal loads without structural failure; reduce debris generation during discharge; and be machined accurately. We reviewed the literature on current and proposed fusion plasma-facing materials as well as current experience with plasma gun and other simulation devices. Both fusion and EUV source materials involve issues of surface erosion by particle sputtering and heat-induced evaporation/melting. These materials are either bare structural materials or surface coatings. EUV materials can be divided into four categories: wall, electrode, optical, and insulator materials. For electric discharge sources, all four types are required, whereas laser-produced plasma EUV sources do not require electrode and insulator materials. Several types of candidate alloy and other materials and methods of manufacture are recommended for each component of EUV lithography light sources.

  20. Thermal management of masks for deep x-ray lithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.; Chojnowski, D.; Mancini, D.C.; Lai, B.; Dejus, R.

    1997-11-18

    This paper addresses some options and techniques in the thermal management of masks used in deep x-ray lithography. The x-ray masks are thin plates made of low-atomic-number materials on which a patterned thin film of a high-atomic-number metal has been deposited. When they are exposed to an x-ray beam, part of the radiation is transmitted to replicate the pattern on a downstream photoresist, and the remainder is absorbed in the mask in the form of heat. This heat load can cause deformation of the mask and thus image distortion in the lithography process. The mask geometry considered in the present study is 100 mm x 100 mm in area, and about 0.1 to 2 mm thick. The incident radiation is a bending magnet x-ray beam having a footprint of 60 mm x 4 mm at the mask. The mask is scanned vertically about {+-} 30 mm so that a 60 mm x 60 mm area is exposed. the maximum absorbed heat load in the mask is 80 W, which is significantly greater than a few watts encountered in previous systems. In this paper, cooling techniques, substrate material selection, transient and steady state thermal and structural behavior, and other thermo-mechanical aspects of mask design are discussed. It is shown that, while diamond and graphite remain attractive candidates, at present beryllium is a more suitable material for this purpose and, when properly cooled, can provide the necessary dimensional tolerance.

  1. Scalable, high performance, enzymatic cathodes based on nanoimprint lithography

    PubMed Central

    Pankratov, Dmitry; Sundberg, Richard; Sotres, Javier; Suyatin, Dmitry B; Maximov, Ivan; Montelius, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here we detail high performance, enzymatic electrodes for oxygen bio-electroreduction, which can be easily and reproducibly fabricated with industry-scale throughput. Planar and nanostructured electrodes were built on biocompatible, flexible polymer sheets, while nanoimprint lithography was used for electrode nanostructuring. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first reports concerning the usage of nanoimprint lithography for amperometric bioelectronic devices. The enzyme (Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase) was immobilised on planar (control) and artificially nanostructured, gold electrodes by direct physical adsorption. The detailed electrochemical investigation of bioelectrodes was performed and the following parameters were obtained: open circuit voltage of approximately 0.75 V, and maximum bio-electrocatalytic current densities of 18 µA/cm2 and 58 µA/cm2 in air-saturated buffers versus 48 µA/cm2 and 186 µA/cm2 in oxygen-saturated buffers for planar and nanostructured electrodes, respectively. The half-deactivation times of planar and nanostructured biocathodes were measured to be 2 h and 14 h, respectively. The comparison of standard heterogeneous and bio-electrocatalytic rate constants showed that the improved bio-electrocatalytic performance of the nanostructured biocathodes compared to planar biodevices is due to the increased surface area of the nanostructured electrodes, whereas their improved operational stability is attributed to stabilisation of the enzyme inside nanocavities. PMID:26199841

  2. Scalable, high performance, enzymatic cathodes based on nanoimprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Pankratov, Dmitry; Sundberg, Richard; Sotres, Javier; Suyatin, Dmitry B; Maximov, Ivan; Shleev, Sergey; Montelius, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Here we detail high performance, enzymatic electrodes for oxygen bio-electroreduction, which can be easily and reproducibly fabricated with industry-scale throughput. Planar and nanostructured electrodes were built on biocompatible, flexible polymer sheets, while nanoimprint lithography was used for electrode nanostructuring. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first reports concerning the usage of nanoimprint lithography for amperometric bioelectronic devices. The enzyme (Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase) was immobilised on planar (control) and artificially nanostructured, gold electrodes by direct physical adsorption. The detailed electrochemical investigation of bioelectrodes was performed and the following parameters were obtained: open circuit voltage of approximately 0.75 V, and maximum bio-electrocatalytic current densities of 18 µA/cm(2) and 58 µA/cm(2) in air-saturated buffers versus 48 µA/cm(2) and 186 µA/cm(2) in oxygen-saturated buffers for planar and nanostructured electrodes, respectively. The half-deactivation times of planar and nanostructured biocathodes were measured to be 2 h and 14 h, respectively. The comparison of standard heterogeneous and bio-electrocatalytic rate constants showed that the improved bio-electrocatalytic performance of the nanostructured biocathodes compared to planar biodevices is due to the increased surface area of the nanostructured electrodes, whereas their improved operational stability is attributed to stabilisation of the enzyme inside nanocavities.

  3. Probing cell migration in confined environments by plasma lithography.

    PubMed

    Junkin, Michael; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-03-01

    Cellular processes are regulated by various mechanical and physical factors in their local microenvironment such as geometric confinements, cell-substrate interactions, and cell-cell contact. Systematic elucidation of these regulatory mechanisms is crucial for fundamental understanding of cell biology and for rational design of biomedical devices and regenerative medicine. Here, we report a generally applicable plasma lithography technique, which performs selective surface functionalization on large substrate areas, for achieving long-term, stable confinements with length scales from 100 nm to 1 cm toward the investigation of cell-microenvironment interactions. In particular, we applied plasma lithography for cellular confinement of neuroblastomas, myoblasts, endothelial cells, and mammary gland epithelial cells, and examined the motion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts in directionality-confined environments for studying the effect of confinements on migratory behavior. In conjunction with live cell imaging, the distance traveled, velocity, and angular motion of individual cells and collective cell migration behaviors were measured in confined environments with dimensions comparable to a cell. A critical length scale that a cell could conceivably occupy and migrate to was also identified by investigating the behaviors of cells using confined environments with subcellular length scales.

  4. Scatterometry-based process control for nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masafumi; Tsuda, Hirotaka; Komori, Motofumi; Matsuki, Kazuto; Abe, Hideaki; Jung, Woo-Yung

    2016-03-01

    In principal, the critical dimension (CD) of Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) pattern is determined by the CD of the template pattern. Unless one template is changed to another, NIL does not have a knob for direct control of the CD, such as the exposure dose and focus in optical lithography. Alternatively, the CD would be controlled by adjusting the thickness of the residual layer underneath the NIL pattern and controlling the etching process to transfer the pattern to a substrate. Controlling the residual layer thickness (RLT) can change the etching bias, resulting in the control of the CD of etched pattern. RLT is controllable by the resist dispense condition of the inkjet. For CD control, the metrology of RLT and feedback of the results to the dispense condition are extremely important. Scatterometry is the most promising metrology for the task because it is nondestructive 3D metrology with high throughput. In this paper, we discuss how to control CD in the NIL process and propose a process control flow based on scatterometry.

  5. Wafer-scale fabrication of nanoapertures using corner lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burouni, Narges; Berenschot, Erwin; Elwenspoek, Miko; Sarajlic, Edin; Leussink, Pele; Jansen, Henri; Tas, Niels

    2013-07-01

    Several submicron probe technologies require the use of apertures to serve as electrical, optical or fluidic probes; for example, writing precisely using an atomic force microscope or near-field sensing of light reflecting from a biological surface. Controlling the size of such apertures below 100 nm is a challenge in fabrication. One way to accomplish this scale is to use high resolution tools such as deep UV or e-beam. However, these tools are wafer-scale and expensive, or only provide series fabrication. For this reason, in this study a versatile method adapted from conventional micromachining is investigated to fabricate protruding apertures on wafer-scale. This approach is called corner lithography and offers control of the size of the aperture with diameter less than 50 nm using a low-budget lithography tool. For example, by tuning the process parameters, an estimated mean size of 44.5 nm and an estimated standard deviation of 2.3 nm are found. The technique is demonstrated—based on a theoretical foundation including a statistical analysis—with the nanofabrication of apertures at the apexes of micromachined pyramids. Besides apertures, the technique enables the construction of wires, slits and dots into versatile three-dimensional structures.

  6. Dr.LiTHO: a development and research lithography simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fühner, Tim; Schnattinger, Thomas; Ardelean, Gheorghe; Erdmann, Andreas

    2007-03-01

    This paper introduces Dr.LiTHO, a research and development oriented lithography simulation environment developed at Fraunhofer IISB to flexibly integrate our simulation models into one coherent platform. We propose a light-weight approach to a lithography simulation environment: The use of a scripting (batch) language as an integration platform. Out of the great variety of different scripting languages, Python proved superior in many ways: It exhibits a good-natured learning-curve, it is efficient, available on virtually any platform, and provides sophisticated integration mechanisms for existing programs. In this paper, we will describe the steps, required to provide Python bindings for existing programs and to finally generate an integrated simulation environment. In addition, we will give a short introduction into selected software design demands associated with the development of such a framework. We will especially focus on testing and (both technical and user-oriented) documentation issues. Dr.LiTHO Python files contain not only all simulation parameter settings but also the simulation flow, providing maximum flexibility. In addition to relatively simple batch jobs, repetitive tasks can be pooled in libraries. And as Python is a full-blown programming language, users can add virtually any functionality, which is especially useful in the scope of simulation studies or optimization tasks, that often require masses of evaluations. Furthermore, we will give a short overview of the numerous existing Python packages. Several examples demonstrate the feasibility and productiveness of integrating Python packages into custom Dr.LiTHO scripts.

  7. Layout compliance for triple patterning lithography: an iterative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bei; Garreton, Gilda; Pan, David Z.

    2014-10-01

    As the semiconductor process further scales down, the industry encounters many lithography-related issues. In the 14nm logic node and beyond, triple patterning lithography (TPL) is one of the most promising techniques for Metal1 layer and possibly Via0 layer. As one of the most challenging problems in TPL, recently layout decomposition efforts have received more attention from both industry and academia. Ideally the decomposer should point out locations in the layout that are not triple patterning decomposable and therefore manual intervention by designers is required. A traditional decomposition flow would be an iterative process, where each iteration consists of an automatic layout decomposition step and manual layout modification task. However, due to the NP-hardness of triple patterning layout decomposition, automatic full chip level layout decomposition requires long computational time and therefore design closure issues continue to linger around in the traditional flow. Challenged by this issue, we present a novel incremental layout decomposition framework to facilitate accelerated iterative decomposition. In the first iteration, our decomposer not only points out all conflicts, but also provides the suggestions to fix them. After the layout modification, instead of solving the full chip problem from scratch, our decomposer can provide a quick solution for a selected portion of layout. We believe this framework is efficient, in terms of performance and designer friendly.

  8. Functional polymers by two-photon 3D lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infuehr, Robert; Pucher, Niklas; Heller, Christian; Lichtenegger, Helga; Liska, Robert; Schmidt, Volker; Kuna, Ladislav; Haase, Anja; Stampfl, Jürgen

    2007-12-01

    In the presented work, two-photon 3D lithography and selective single-photon photopolymerization in a prefabricated polydimethylsiloxane matrix is presented as an approach with potential applicability of waveguide writing in 3D by two-photon polymerization. Photopolymers based on acrylate chemistry were used in order to evaluate the optical capabilities of the available two-photon system. Several photoinitiators, tailored for two-photon absorption, were tested in a mixture of trimethylolpropane triacrylate and ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate. Best results were obtained with a recently synthesized diynone-based photoinitiator. Feature resolutions in the range of 300 nm were achieved. Due to the cross-conjugated nature of that donor-π-acceptor-π-donor system a high two-photon absorption activity was achieved. Therefore, a resin mixture containing only 0.025 wt% of photoinitiator was practical for structuring by two-photon polymerization. The required initiator content was therefore a factor of 100 lower than in traditional one-photon lithography. The aim of the second part of this work was to fabricate optical waveguides by selectively irradiating a polymer network, which was swollen by a monomer. The monomer was polymerized by conventional single-photon polymerization and the uncured monomer was removed by evaporation at elevated temperatures. This treatment leads to a local change in refractive index. Refractive index changes in the range of Δ n = 0.01 (Δ n/ n = 0.7%) were achieved, which is sufficient for structuring waveguides for optoelectronic applications.

  9. Large area patterning using interference and nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bläsi, B.; Tucher, N.; Höhn, O.; Kübler, V.; Kroyer, T.; Wellens, Ch.; Hauser, H.

    2016-04-01

    Interference lithography (IL) is the best suited technology for the origination of large area master structures with high resolution. In prior works, we seamlessly pattern areas of up to 1.2 x 1.2 m2 with periodic features, i.e. a diffraction grating with a period in the micron range. For this process we use an argon ion laser emitting at 363.8 nm. Thus, feasible periods are in the range of 100 μm to 200 nm. Edge-defined techniques or also called (self-aligned) double patterning processes can be used to double the spatial frequency of such structures. This way, we aim to reduce achievable periods further down to 100 nm. In order to replicate master structures, we make use of nanoimprint lithography (NIL) processes. In this work, we present results using IL as mastering and NIL as replication technology in the fields of photovoltaics as well as display and lighting applications. In photovoltaics different concepts like the micron-scale patterning of the front side as well as the realization of rear side diffraction gratings are presented. The benefit for each is shown on final device level. In the context of display and lighting applications, we realized various structures ranging from designed, symmetric or asymmetric, diffusers, antireflective and/or antiglare structures, polarization optical elements (wire grid polarizers), light guidance and light outcoupling structures.

  10. Fabrication of circular sawtooth gratings using focused UV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Wujun; Karlsson, Staffan; Holmberg, Anders; Danielsson, Mats; Nillius, Peter

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel micro-fabrication method using focused ultraviolet (UV) light to manufacture three-dimensional sawtooth structures in ultra-thick negative photoresist to fabricate a novel multi-prism x-ray lens. The method uses a lens to shape the UV beam instead of the photomask conventionally used in UV lithography. Benefits of this method include the ability to manufacture sawtooth structures in free form, for example in circular shapes as well as arrays of these shapes, and in resist that is up to 76 μm thick. To verify the method, initially a simple simulation based on Fourier optics was done to predict the exposure energy distribution in the photoresist. Furthermore, circular sawtooth gratings were manufactured in a 76 μm SU-8 resist. The UV lens was fabricated using electron beam lithography and then used to expose the SU-8 with UV light. This paper details the complete developed process, including pre-exposure with an e-beam and cold development, which creates stable sawtooth structures. The measured profile was compared to the ideal sawtooth and the simulation. The main discrepancy was in the smallest feature size, the sawtooth tips, which were wider than the desired structures, as would be expected by simulation.

  11. Direct modification of silicon surface by nanosecond laser interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Wang, Zuobin; Zhang, Ziang; Yue, Yong; Li, Dayou; Maple, Carsten

    2013-10-01

    Periodic and quasi-periodic structures on silicon surface have numerous significant applications in photoelectronics and surface engineering. A number of technologies have been developed to fabricate the structures in various research fields. In this work, we take the strategy of direct nanosecond laser interference lithography technology, and focus on the silicon material to create different well-defined surface structures based on theoretical analysis of the formation of laser interference patterns. Two, three and four-beam laser interference systems were set up to fabricate the grating, regular triangle and square structures on silicon surfaces, respectively. From the AFM micrographs, the critical features of structures have a dependence on laser fluences. For a relative low laser fluence, grating and dot structures formed with bumps due to the Marangoni Effect. With the increase of laser fluences, melt and evaporation behaviors can be responsible for the laser modification. By properly selecting the process parameters, well-defined grating and dot structures can been achieved. It can be demonstrated that direct laser interference lithography is a facile and efficient technology with the advantage of a single process procedure over macroscale areas for the fabrication of micro and nano structures.

  12. Method of creating microscale prototypes using SLM based holographic lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Joseph L.; Jenness, Nathan; Wilson, Scott; Clark, Robert L.

    2013-03-01

    A method of generating arbitrary structures using spatial light modulator (SLM) based holograms with multiphoton absorption is presented. Current methodologies for designing 3D prototyping, such as G-code, are not ideally suited for holographic lithography and therefore limit its functionality or requires additional complex processing. The process outlined here allows a microstructure to be fabricated based on designs from commercially available CAD software. CAD software enables the microstructures to be designed and then realized using dynamic holographic lithography methods enabling designers a simple, quick, and robust method of fabricating novel microstructures. Holographic patterning routines such as raster scans of one or multiple focal points, holograms encoded with two or three dimensional spatial information, or a combination of both techniques may be utilized with this methodology. The process described allows for the development of complex structures that would be difficult to otherwise program using traditional methods. No limitations are placed on the form or function of the designed components, enabling undercut and interlocking features to be fabricated. This methodology also enables the location and orientation of the structures to be controlled dynamically simplifying the process of creating multi-scaled structures or complex arrays of arbitrary structures. As a proof of concept demonstration, a simple cantilever beam was modeled and fabricated.

  13. Design of microcantilever sensors using SLM based holographic lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Joseph L.; Jenness, Nathan J.; Clark, Robert

    2013-03-01

    A holographic multiphoton fabrication technique is applied to the development of a microcantilever based analyte sensor. Holograms generated using a spatial light modulator (SLM) initiate the fabrication of sub-micron three-dimensional structures. Chemically functional microstructures are patterned onto the surface of commercially available piezoelectric microcantilevers using this holographic lithography technique. Controlling the form and location of the added structure enables the resonant frequency of the cantilever to be regulated with a higher accuracy than is currently available using bulk lithography techniques and without the inclusion of additional electronic feedback control components. A potential analyte sensor is then developed by patterning on an array of multiple piezoelectric microcantilevers, which are initially identical within manufacturing tolerances. The resonant frequency, was adjusted such that cantilevers, which were initially separated by 2.82 kHz, are tuned to be within 0.13 kHz of each other. Connecting the piezoelectric microcantilevers in series enables the response of each sensor element to be measured simultaneously using a single frequency based data acquisition system and allowing rapid data collection.

  14. Synthesis of triphenylsulfonium triflate bound copolymer for electron beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ojung; Sagar, Ashok D; Kang, Ha Na; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Ki-Bum; Lee, Haiwon

    2014-08-01

    Photoacid generator (PAG) has been widely used as a key component in photoresist for high-resolution patterning with high sensitivity. A novel acrylic monomer, triphenylsulfonium salt methyl methacrylate (TPSMA), was synthesized and includes triphenylsulfonium triflate as a PAG. The poly(MMA-co-TPSMA) (PMT) as a polymer-bound PAG was synthesized with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and TPSMA for electron beam lithography. Characterization of PMT was carried out by NMR and FTIR. The molecular weight was analyzed by GPC. Thermal properties were studied using TGA and DSC. Thecharacterization results were in good agreement with corresponding chemical compositions and thermal stability. PMT was subsequently employed in electron beam lithography and its lithographic performance was confirmed by FE-SEM. This PMT was accomplished to improve the lithographic performance including sensitivity, line width roughness (LWR) and resolution. We found that PMT was capable of 20 nm negative tone patterns with better sensitivity than hydrogensilsesquioxane (HSQ) which is a conventional negative tone resist. PMID:25936102

  15. Demonstration of electronic pattern switching and 10x pattern demagnification in a maskless micro-ion beam reduction lithography system

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, V.V.; Akker, B.; Leung, K.N.; Noh, I.; Scott, K.L.; Wilde, S.

    2002-05-31

    A proof-of-principle ion projection lithography (IPL) system called Maskless Micro-ion beam Reduction Lithography (MMRL) has been developed and tested at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for future integrated circuits (ICs) manufacturing and thin film media patterning [1]. This MMRL system is aimed at completely eliminating the first stage of the conventional IPL system [2] that contains the complicated beam optics design in front of the stencil mask and the mask itself. It consists of a multicusp RF plasma generator, a multi-beamlet pattern generator, and an all-electrostatic ion optical column. Results from ion beam exposures on PMMA and Shipley UVII-HS resists using 75 keV H+ are presented in this paper. Proof-of-principle electronic pattern switching together with 10x reduction ion optics (using a pattern generator made of nine 50-{micro}m switchable apertures) has been performed and is reported in this paper. In addition, the fabrication of a micro-fabricated pattern generator [3] on an SOI membrane is also presented.

  16. Loss of hydrogen atoms in H{sub 2} plasma on the surfaces of materials used in EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Zyryanov, S. M.; Kovalev, A. S.; Lopaev, D. V.; Malykhin, E. M.; Rakhimov, A. T.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Koshelev, K. N.; Krivtsun, V. M.

    2011-10-15

    Low-pressure hydrogen is an important component of the working medium in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography. Under the action of EUV photons and fast secondary electrons on the gas medium, plasma and atomic hydrogen, actively interacting with the surface, are produced. This interaction is very important, because it largely determines the lifetime of the multilayered EUV optics. In this study, the loss of atomic hydrogen under the conditions of a low pressure (<10 Torr) RF plasma discharge on the surfaces of materials used in EUV lithography is investigated. The surface loss probabilities of H atoms on these materials are measured. It is shown that surface recombination of atomic hydrogen goes according to the Eley-Rideal mechanism via direct recombination of H atoms from the gas phase with chemically and physically adsorbed atoms. In this case, the surface recombination probability is mainly determined by the density of chemical adsorption sites. The density of adsorption sites and the desorption energy of H atoms are estimated. The desorption energy of physically adsorbed H atoms on pure metal surfaces (or surfaces exposed to plasma) is about 0.5 eV, and the density of sorption sites is close to the surface density of atoms. This results in a high loss probability of H atoms on metals ({approx}0.1). Therefore, to provide efficient transportation of hydrogen atoms, it is necessary to use materials with the lowest loss probability of H atoms, i.e., dielectrics.

  17. Comparison of laser-based and monochromator-based thermodynamic temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Yoon, H. W.; Gibson, C. E.; Smith, A. W.; Neira, J.; Khromchenko, V. B.

    2013-09-11

    In this work, we describe comparisons between a laser-based and a monochromator-based radiance responsivity calibration of a radiation thermometer. The spectral selection of the radiation thermometer is performed using a spectrally broad photopic-response filter which was selected to minimize effects of convolution differences due to the spectral width of the laser-and the monochromator-based sources. The photopic-response filter is physically thick, which should also reduce possible interference fringes which can be problematic in the laser-based calibrations. We compare the radiance responsivities obtained using the two approaches and also compare the blackbody temperatures determined using the detector/monochromator based and the gold-point based calibration methods.

  18. Femtosecond laser based enucleation of porcine oocytes for somatic cell nuclear transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kütemeyer, K.; Lucas-Hahn, A.; Petersen, B.; Hassel, P.; Lemme, E.; Niemann, H.; Heisterkamp, A.

    2009-07-01

    Cloning of several mammalian species has been achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in recent years. However, this method still results in very low efficiencies around 1% which originate from suboptimal culture conditions and highly invasive techniques for oocyte enucleation and injection of the donor cell using micromanipulators. In this paper, we present a new minimal invasive method for oocyte imaging and enucleation based on the application of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. After imaging of the oocyte with multiphoton microscopy, ultrashort pulses are focused onto the metaphase plate of MII-oocytes in order to ablate the DNA molecules. We show that fs laser based enucleation of porcine oocytes completely inhibits the first mitotic cleavage after parthenogenetic activation while maintaining intact oocyte morphology in most cases. In contrast, control groups without previous irradiation of the metaphase plate are able to develop to the blastocyst stage. Further experiments have to clarify the suitability of fs laser based enucleated oocytes for SCNT.

  19. Investigation of Plant-Pathogen Interaction by Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puiu, A.; Giubileo, G.; Lai, A.

    2014-12-01

    The laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy apparatus, constructed at ENEA Frascati (Italy), was applied to monitor trace amounts of ethylene emitted by plants in a stress condition. More specifically, in the present work, the biotic stress response of tomato mutant plants after inoculation with Phthorimaea operculella larvae ( Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) was investigated. The principle of the method, the photoacoustic setup, the experimental work, and the results are being reported.

  20. A comparison of NH{sub 3} point monitoring and diode laser based path integrated measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.; Richtsmeier, S.C.; Lee, J.; Bien, F.; Fetzer, G.J.; Groff, K.W.

    1994-12-31

    Measurements made using two different types of ammonia monitors during a two-month field study in the summer of 1994 are discussed. The first was a diode-laser based open path monitor designed for automated operation in an industrial environment. The second is a monitoring analyzer based on thermal decomposition of ammonia to NO and subsequent analysis by O{sub 3}-NO chemiluminescence. The two monitors provided consistent measurements of ammonia concentration during weeks of continuous unattended operation.

  1. Pulsed quantum-cascade laser-based sensor for trace-gas detection of carbonyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Gerard; McCurdy, Matt; So, Stephen; Weidmann, Damien; Roller, Chad; Curl, Robert F; Tittel, Frank K

    2004-11-10

    Simultaneous exhaled carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon dioxide concentration measurements in human breath are demonstrated with a compact pulsed quantum-cascade laser-based gas sensor. We achieved a noise-equivalent sensitivity (1sigma) of 1.2 parts per billion by measuring a well-isolated OCS P(11) absorption line in the v3 band at 2057.6 cm(-1) using an astigmatic Herriott cell of 36-m optical path length and 0.4-s acquisition time.

  2. Analysis of an atom laser based on the spatial control of the scattering length

    SciTech Connect

    Carpentier, Alicia V.; Michinel, Humberto; Rodas-Verde, Maria I.; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.

    2006-07-15

    In this paper we analyze atom lasers based on the spatial modulation of the scattering length of a Bose-Einstein condensate. We demonstrate, through numerical simulations and approximate analytical methods, the controllable emission of matter-wave bursts and study the dependence of the process on the spatial shape of the scattering length along the axis of emission. We also study the role of an additional modulation of the scattering length in time.

  3. Tomographic Imaging of Glass/Epoxy Composite with a Laser Based Ultrasonics Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, N.; Raghuram, V.; Munshi, P.; Kishore, N. N.; Arnold, W.

    2008-09-26

    The present work is an attempt to augment the classical laser-based-ultrasonics setup for tomographic imaging purposes. A Glass/epoxy composite with steel insert is the test specimen and time-of-flight data has been used for tomographic reconstruction. Multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique is used for this limited-view experiment. The resulting image is able to bring out the strong metal features.

  4. Status of Real-Time Laser Based Ion Engine Diagnostics at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The development status of laser based erosion diagnostics for ion engines at the NASA Glenn Research Center is discussed. The diagnostics are being developed to enhance component life-prediction capabilities. A direct measurement of the erosion product density using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is described. Erosion diagnostics based upon evaluation of the ion dynamics are also under development, and the basic approach is presented. The planned implementation of the diagnostics is discussed.

  5. Fabrication of III-V compound nanowires via hot embossing nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, An-Chieh; He, Shi-Yuan; Lee, Ming-Kwei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique used to fabricate III-V compound nanowires was investigated. A silicon mold and thermoplastic polymer mr-I 7010R were used for hot embossing nanoimprint lithography. The mold was patterned by e-beam lithography with two masks exposed with different dosages to reduce the proximity effect. The filling capability and residual layer thickness of the thermoplastic polymer were optimized at the embossing temperature of 125 °C. A 73 nm GaAs nanowire was obtained by the mold coated with an antisticking layer.

  6. The New X-Ray Lithography Beamline BL1 At DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Lietz, D.; Paulus, M.; Sternemann, C.; Berges, U.; Hippert, B.; Tolan, M.

    2010-06-23

    Lithography using synchrotron radiation in the x-ray regime provides a powerful method to produce mechanical components of sub-millimeter size with a very good quality for microtechnological applications. In recent years the demand for x-ray lithography beamtime for industrial production of microparts increased rapidly resulting in the development of new experimental endstations at synchrotron radiation sources dedicated for the production of micromechanical devices. We present in this work the layout of the new x-ray lithography beamline BL1 at the synchrotron radiation source DELTA in Dortmund and discuss first results of exposure tests.

  7. Two new types of microneedle array fabricated by x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yigui; Sugiyama, Susumu

    2004-12-01

    The microneedle for blood extraction and painless injection is a rapidly growing area of interest in bio-applications. Two new types of microneedle array are designed and developed for biomedical application. The one is hollow PMMA microneedle array with very shape tip fabricated by two times X-ray lithography (one time is with X-ray mask and one time is without X-ray mask). The other is PMMA microneedle array with tips and fluid channels fabricated by an X-ray lithography technique. The resist stage of the X-ray system driven by actuators is to realize movement lithography.

  8. Design and fabrication of electrostatic microcolumn in multiple electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhidong; Wen, Ye; Traverso, Luis; Datta, Anurup; Chen, Chen; Xu, Xianfan; Pan, Liang

    2016-03-01

    Microcolumns are widely used for parallel electron-beam lithography because of their compactness and the ability to achieve high spatial resolution. A design of an electrostatic microcolumn for our recent nanoscale photoemission sources is presented. We proposed a compact column structure (as short as several microns in length) for the ease of microcolumn fabrication and lithography operation. We numerically studied the influence of several design parameters on the optical performance such as microcolumn diameter, electrode thickness, beam current, working voltages, and working distance. We also examined the effect of fringing field between adjacent microcolumns during parallel lithography operations. The microcolumns were also fabricated to show the possibility.

  9. A physical resist shrinkage model for full-chip lithography simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zheng, Leiwu; Ma, Maggie; Zhao, Qian; Fan, Yongfa; Zhang, Qiang; Feng, Mu; Guo, Xin; Wallow, Tom; Gronlund, Keith; Goossens, Ronald; Zhang, Gary; Lu, Yenwen

    2016-03-01

    Strong resist shrinkage effects have been widely observed in resist profiles after negative tone development (NTD) and therefore must be taken into account in computational lithography applications. However, existing lithography simulation tools, especially those designed for full-chip applications, lack resist shrinkage modeling capabilities because they are not needed until only recently when NTD processes begin to replace the conventional positive tone development (PTD) processes where resist shrinkage effects are negligible. In this work we describe the development of a physical resist shrinkage (PRS) model for full-chip lithography simulations and present its accuracy evaluation against experimental data.

  10. Design of electrostatic microcolumn for nanoscale photoemission source in massively parallel electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ye; Du, Zhidong; Pan, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Microcolumns are widely used for parallel electron-beam lithography because of their compactness and the ability to achieve high spatial resolution. A design of an electrostatic microcolumn for our recent nanoscale photoemission sources is presented. We proposed a compact column structure (as short as several microns in length) for the ease of microcolumn fabrication and lithography operation. We numerically studied the influence of several design parameters on the optical performance such as microcolumn diameter, electrode thickness, beam current, working voltages, and working distance. We also examined the effect of fringing field between adjacent microcolumns during parallel lithography operations.

  11. Method for the protection of extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    DOEpatents

    Grunow, Philip A.; Clift, Wayne M.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-06-22

    A coating for the protection of optical surfaces exposed to a high energy erosive plasma. A gas that can be decomposed by the high energy plasma, such as the xenon plasma used for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), is injected into the EUVL machine. The decomposition products coat the optical surfaces with a protective coating maintained at less than about 100 .ANG. thick by periodic injections of the gas. Gases that can be used include hydrocarbon gases, particularly methane, PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S. The use of PH.sub.3 and H.sub.2S is particularly advantageous since films of the plasma-induced decomposition products S and P cannot grow to greater than 10 .ANG. thick in a vacuum atmosphere such as found in an EUVL machine.

  12. Wavefront sensor sampling plane fabricated by maskless grayscale lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirino, G. A.; Amaral, F. T.; Lopera, S. A.; Montagnolil, A. N.; Arruda, A.; Mansano, R. D.; M.-Brahim, T.; Monteiro, D. W. L.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report the design and characterization of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sampling plane based on a microlens array (MLA) composed of 12 X 12 hexagonal contiguous diffractive lenslet, with 355 μm pitch, 4.5 mm focal length, and 4.3 X 4.3 mm lateral dimensions. The device was fabricated by maskless grayscale lithography based on Digital Light Projector (DLP) technology. Optical characterization was performed in order to measure wavefront aberrations in Zernike polynomials terms. Intraocular lenses were used as test elements because they yield well-known optical aberrations, such as defocus and spherical aberration. For the wavefront reconstruction, the modal approach was used, in which the first derivatives of Zernike polynomials are used as the set of orthogonal basis functions. The corresponding polynomial coefficients up to the first 10 Zernike terms were obtained and the resulting reconstructed wavefront presents an RMS reconstruction error compliant to most optical systems of interest.

  13. Towards High Accuracy Reflectometry for Extreme-Ultraviolet Lithography.

    PubMed

    Tarrio, Charles; Grantham, Steven; Squires, Matthew B; Vest, Robert E; Lucatorto, Thomas B

    2003-01-01

    Currently the most demanding application of extreme ultraviolet optics is connected with the development of extreme ultraviolet lithography. Not only does each of the Mo/Si multilayer extreme-ultraviolet stepper mirrors require the highest attainable reflectivity at 13 nm (nearly 70 %), but the central wavelength of the reflectivity of these mirrors must be measured with a wavelength repeatability of 0.001 nm and the peak reflectivity of the reflective masks with a repeatability of 0.12 %. We report on two upgrades of our NIST/DARPA Reflectometry Facility that have given us the ability to achieve 0.1 % repeatability and 0.3 % absolute uncertainty in our reflectivity measurements. A third upgrade, a monochromator with thermal and mechanical stability for improved wavelength repeatability, is currently in the design phase.

  14. Modular Polymer Biosensors by Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Jayven S.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Grate, Jay W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Gratton, Enrico; Vasdekis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography (SIIL), a rapid benchtop microsystem prototyping technique, including polymer functionalization, imprinting and bonding. Here, we focus on the realization of planar polymer sensors using SIIL through simple solvent immersion without imprinting. We describe SIIL’s impregnation characteristics, including an inherent mechanism that not only achieves practical doping concentrations, but their unexpected 4-fold enhancement compared to the immersion solution. Subsequently, we developed and characterized optical sensors for detecting molecular O2. To this end, a high dynamic range is reported, including its control through the immersion duration, a manifestation of SIIL’s modularity. Overall, SIIL exhibits the potential of improving the operating characteristics of polymer sensors, while significantly accelerating their prototyping, as it requires a few seconds of processing and no need for substrates or dedicated instrumentation. These are critical for O2 sensing as probed by way of example here, as well as any polymer permeable reactant.

  15. Single and multilayer metamaterials fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmair, I.; Dastmalchi, B.; Bergmair, M.; Saeed, A.; Hilber, W.; Hesser, G.; Helgert, C.; Pshenay-Severin, E.; Pertsch, T.; Kley, E. B.; Hübner, U.; Shen, N. H.; Penciu, R.; Kafesaki, M.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Hingerl, K.; Muehlberger, M.; Schoeftner, R.

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate for the first time a fast and easy nanoimprint lithography (NIL) based stacking process of negative index structures like fishnet and Swiss-cross metamaterials. The process takes a few seconds, is cheap and produces three-dimensional (3D) negative index materials (NIMs) on a large area which is suitable for mass production. It can be performed on all common substrates even on flexible plastic foils. This work is therefore an important step toward novel and breakthrough applications of NIMs such as cloaking devices, perfect lenses and magnification of objects using NIM prisms. The optical properties of the fabricated samples were measured by means of transmission and reflection spectroscopy. From the measured data we retrieved the effective refractive index which is shown to be negative for a wavelength around 1.8 µm for the fishnet metamaterial while the Swiss-cross metamaterial samples show a distinct resonance at wavelength around 1.4 µm.

  16. Tuning and Freezing Disorder in Photonic Crystals using Percolation Lithography.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ian B; Abedzadeh, Navid; Kay, Theresa M; Shneidman, Anna V; Cranshaw, Derek J; Lončar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Although common in biological systems, synthetic self-assembly routes to complex 3D photonic structures with tailored degrees of disorder remain elusive. Here we show how liquids can be used to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In these optofluidic crystals, dynamically tunable disorder is superimposed onto the periodic optical structure through partial wetting or evaporation. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking is driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry. These variations direct site-selective infiltration of liquids through capillary interactions. Incorporating cross-linkable resins into our liquids, we developed methods to freeze in place the filling patterns at arbitrary degrees of partial wetting and intermediate stages of drying. These percolation lithography techniques produced permanent photonic structures with adjustable disorder. By coupling strong changes in optical properties to subtle differences in fluid behavior, optofluidic crystals may also prove useful in rapid analysis of liquids. PMID:26790372

  17. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    DOEpatents

    Aigeldinger, Georg; Skala, Dawn M.; Griffiths, Stewart K.; Talin, Albert Alec; Losey, Matthew W.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter

    2009-10-27

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  18. Step and flash imprint lithography for manufacturing patterned media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Cynthia; Schmid, Gerard M.; Miller, Mike; Johnson, Steve; Khusnatdinov, Niyaz; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2009-03-01

    The ever-growing demand for hard drives with greater storage density has motivated a technology shift from continuous magnetic media to patterned media hard disks, which are expected to be implemented in future generations of hard disk drives to provide data storage at densities exceeding 1012 bits per square inch. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL) technology has been employed to pattern the hard disk substrates. This paper discusses the infrastructure required to enable S-FIL in high-volume manufacturing; namely, fabrication of master templates, template replication, high-volume imprinting with precisely controlled residual layers, and dual-sided imprinting. Imprinting of disks is demonstrated with substrate throughput currently as high as 180 disks/hour (dualsided). These processes are applied to patterning hard disk substrates with both discrete tracks and bit-patterned designs.

  19. Extending immersion lithography down to 1x nm production nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boeij, Wim P.; Pieternella, Remi; Bouchoms, Igor; Leenders, Martijn; Hoofman, Marjan; de Graaf, Roelof; Kok, Haico; Broman, Par; Smits, Joost; Kuit, Jan-Jaap; McLaren, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we report on the performance enhancements on the NXT immersion scanner platform to support the immersion lithography roadmap. We particular discuss scanner modules that enable future overlay and focus requirements. Among others we describe the improvements in grid calibrations and grid matching; thermal control of reticle heating with dynamic systems adjustments; aberration tuning and FlexWave-lens heating control as well as aberration- and overlay-metrology on wafer-2-wafer timescales. Finally we address reduction of leveling process dependencies, stage servo dynamics and wafer table flatness to enhance on-product focus and leveling performance. We present and discuss module- and system-data of the above mentioned scanner improvements.

  20. Micro stereo lithography and fabrication of 3D microdevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1999-08-01

    Micro Stereo Lithography (MSL) is a poor man's LIGA for fabricating high aspect ratio MEMS devices in UV curable semiconducting polymers using either two computer-controlled low inertia galvanometric mirrors with the aid of focusing lens or an array of optical fibers. For 3D MEMS devices, the polymers need to have conductive and possibly piezoelectric or ferroelectric properties. Such polymers are being developed at Penn State resulting in microdevices for fluid and drug delivery. Applications may include implanted medical delivery systems, chemical and biological instruments, fluid delivery in engines, pump coolants and refrigerants for local cooling of electronic components. With the invention of organic thin film transistor, now it is possible to fabricate 3D polymeric MEMS devices with built-in-electronics similar to silicon based microelectronics. In this paper, a brief introduction of MSL system is presented followed by a detailed design and development of micro pumps using this approach.

  1. Simulation of exposure and alignment for nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yunfei; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2002-07-01

    Rigorous electromagnetic simulation with TEMPEST is used to examine the exposure and alignment processes for nano-imprint lithography with attenuating thin-film molds. Parameters in the design of topographical features of the nano-imprint system and material choices of the components are analyzed. The small feature size limits light transmission through the feature. While little can be done with auxiliary structures to attract light into small holes, the use of an absorbing material with a low real part of the refractive index such as silver helps mitigates the problem. Results on complementary alignment marks shows that the small transmission through the metal layer and the vertical separation of two alignment marks create the leakage equivalent to 1 nm misalignment but satisfactory alignment can be obtained by measuring alignment signals over a +/- 30 nm range.

  2. High speed hydraulic scanner for deep x-ray lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, J.C.; Johnson, E.D.

    1997-07-01

    From their research and development in hard x-ray lithography, the authors have found that the conventional leadscrew driven scanner stages do not provide adequate scan speed or travel. These considerations have led the authors to develop a scanning system based on a long stroke hydraulic drive with 635 mm of travel and closed loop feedback to position the stage to better than 100 micrometers. The control of the device is through a PC with a custom LabView interface coupled to simple x-ray beam diagnostics. This configuration allows one to set a variety of scan parameters, including target dose, scan range, scan rates, and dose rate. Results from the prototype system at beamline X-27B are described as well as progress on a production version for the X-14B beamline.

  3. On-wire lithography: synthesis, encoding and biological applications

    PubMed Central

    Banholzer, Matthew J; Qin, Lidong; Millstone, Jill E; Osberg, Kyle D; Mirkin, Chad A

    2014-01-01

    The next step in the maturing field of nanotechnology is to develop ways to introduce unusual architectural changes to simple building blocks. For nanowires, on-wire lithography (OWL) has emerged as a powerful way of synthesizing a segmented structure and subsequently introducing architectural changes through post-chemical treatment. In the OWL protocol presented here, multisegmented nanowires are grown and a support layer is deposited on one side of each nanostructure. After selective chemical etching of sacrificial segments, structures with gaps as small as 2 nm and disks as thin as 20 nm can be created. These nanostructures are highly tailorable and can be used in electrical transport, Raman enhancement and energy conversion. Such nanostructures can be functionalized with many types of adsorbates, enabling the use of OWL-generated structures as bioactive probes for diagnostic assays and molecular transport junctions. The process takes 13–36 h depending on the type of adsorbate used to functionalize the nanostructures. PMID:19444241

  4. Novel resist for replica preparation of mold for imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukawa, Daisaku; Wakayama, Hiroyuki; Mitsukura, Kazuyuki; Okamura, Haruyuki; Hirai, Yoshihiko; Shirai, Masamitsu

    2009-03-01

    Two types of dimethacrylate which have hemiacetal ester moiety in a molecule were synthesized from difunctional vinyl ethers and methacrylic acid. UV curing of the monomers and photo-induced degradation of the UV cured resins were investigated. On UV irradiation at 365 nm under N2 atmosphere, these dimethacrylates containing 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone and triphenylsulfonium triflate became insoluble in methanol. The UV cured resins degraded if acids were generated in the system. Present resins were applied to make a plastic replica of mold for imprint lithography and the plastic replica was prepared in good form. The effect of imprint conditions on volume shrinkage of methacrylates was investigated. Dimethacrylate that has adamantyl unit showed a low-shrinkage property.

  5. Swords to plowshares: Shock wave applications to advanced lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.; Grady, D.E.; Kubiak, G.D.; Kipp, M.E.; Olson, R.E.; Farnsworth, A.

    1995-03-01

    Extreme UltraViolet Lithography (EUVL) seeks to apply radiation in a wavelength region centered near 13 nm to produce microcircuits having features sizes 0.1 micron or less. A critical requirement for the commercial application of this technology is the development of an economical, compact source of this radiation which is suitable for lithographic applications. A good candidate is a laser-plasma source, which is generated by the interaction of an intermediate intensity laser pulse (up to 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}) with a metallic target. While such a source has radiative characteristics which satisfy the needs of an EUVL source, the debris generated during the laser-target interaction strikes at the economy of the source. Here, the authors review the use of concepts and computer modeling, originally developed for hypervelocity impact analysis, to study this problem.

  6. Interpreting cost of ownership for mix-and-match lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Alan L.; Bergendahl, Albert S.

    1994-05-01

    Cost of ownership modeling is a critical and emerging tool that provides significant insight into the ways to optimize device manufacturing costs. The development of a model to deal with a particular application, mix-and-match lithography, was performed in order to determine the level of cost savings and the optimum ways to create these savings. The use of sensitivity analysis with cost of ownership allows the user to make accurate trade-offs between technology and cost. The use and interpretation of the model results are described in this paper. Parameters analyzed include several manufacturing considerations -- depreciation, maintenance, engineering and operator labor, floorspace, resist, consumables and reticles. Inherent in this study is the ability to customize this analysis for a particular operating environment. Results demonstrate the clear advantages of a mix-and-match approach for three different operating environments. These case studies also demonstrate various methods to efficiently optimize cost savings strategies.

  7. Extreme ultraviolet mask substrate surface roughness effects on lithography patterning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric; Goldberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Erik

    2010-06-21

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography exposure systems, mask substrate roughness induced scatter contributes to LER at the image plane. In this paper, the impact of mask substrate roughness on image plane speckle is explicitly evaluated. A programmed roughness mask was used to study the correlation between mask roughness metrics and wafer plane aerial image inspection. We find that the roughness measurements by top surface topography profile do not provide complete information on the scatter related speckle that leads to LER at the image plane. We suggest at wavelength characterization by imaging and/or scatter measurements into different frequencies as an alternative for a more comprehensive metrology of the mask substrate/multilayer roughness effects.

  8. Field Emitter Arrays and Displays Produced by Ion Tracking Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Felter, T E; Musket, R G; Bernhardt, A F

    2004-12-28

    When ions of sufficient electronic energy loss traverse a dielectric film or foil, they alter the chemical bonding along their nominally straight path within the material. A suitable etchant can quickly dissolve these so-called latent tracks leaving holes of small diameter ({approx}10nm) but long length - several microns. Continuing the etching process gradually increases the diameter reproducibly and uniformly. The trackable medium can be applied as a uniform film onto large substrates. The small, monodisperse holes produced by this track etching can be used in conjunction with additional thin film processing to create functional structures attached to the substrate. For example, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Candescent Technologies Corporation (CTC) co-developed a process to make arrays of gated field emitters ({approx}100nm diameter electron guns) for CTC's ThinCRT{trademark} displays, which have been fabricated to diagonal dimensions > 13. Additional technological applications of ion tracking lithography will be briefly covered.

  9. Nanoimprint lithography for functional three-dimensional patterns.

    PubMed

    Ofir, Yuval; Moran, Isaac W; Subramani, Chandramouleeswaran; Carter, Kenneth R; Rotello, Vincent M

    2010-08-24

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is viewed as an alternative nanopatterning technique to traditional photolithography, allowing micrometer-scale and sub-hundred-nanometer resolution as well as three-dimensional structure fabrication. In this Research News article we highlight current activities towards the use of NIL in patterning active or functional materials, and the application of NIL in patterning materials that present both chemistry and structure/topography in the patterned structures, which provide scaffolds for subsequent manipulation. We discuss and give examples of the various materials and chemistries that have been used to create functional patterns and their implication in various fields as electronic and magnetic devices, optically relevant structures, biologically important surfaces, and 3D particles. PMID:20552602

  10. Two-color photo-initiation/inhibition lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Robert R.; Kowalski, Benjamin A.; Cole, Michael C.

    2010-02-01

    Traditional photolithography begins with single-photon absorption of patterned light by a photo-initiator to locally expose a resist. In two-color photo-initiation/inhibition (2PII) lithography, these exposed regions are confined by a surrounding pattern of inhibitors generated by one-photon absorption of a second color in a photo-inhibitor. Like a stencil used to confine spray-paint to a thin, sharp line, the inhibitory pattern acts as a remotely programmable, transient near-field mask to control the size and shape of the modified resist region. The inhibiting species rapidly recombine in the dark, allowing for fast sequential exposures and thus enabling fabrication of complex two- or threedimensional structures.

  11. Designing Responsive Buckled Surfaces by Halftone Gel Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungwook; Hanna, James A.; Byun, Myunghwan; Santangelo, Christian D.; Hayward, Ryan C.

    2012-03-01

    Self-actuating materials capable of transforming between three-dimensional shapes have applications in areas as diverse as biomedicine, robotics, and tunable micro-optics. We introduce a method of photopatterning polymer films that yields temperature-responsive gel sheets that can transform between a flat state and a prescribed three-dimensional shape. Our approach is based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymers containing pendent benzophenone units that allow cross-linking to be tuned by irradiation dose. We describe a simple method of halftone gel lithography using only two photomasks, wherein highly cross-linked dots embedded in a lightly cross-linked matrix provide access to nearly continuous, and fully two-dimensional, patterns of swelling. This method is used to fabricate surfaces with constant Gaussian curvature (spherical caps, saddles, and cones) or zero mean curvature (Enneper’s surfaces), as well as more complex and nearly closed shapes.

  12. Tuning and Freezing Disorder in Photonic Crystals using Percolation Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Ian B.; Abedzadeh, Navid; Kay, Theresa M.; Shneidman, Anna V.; Cranshaw, Derek J.; Lončar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Although common in biological systems, synthetic self-assembly routes to complex 3D photonic structures with tailored degrees of disorder remain elusive. Here we show how liquids can be used to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In these optofluidic crystals, dynamically tunable disorder is superimposed onto the periodic optical structure through partial wetting or evaporation. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking is driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry. These variations direct site-selective infiltration of liquids through capillary interactions. Incorporating cross-linkable resins into our liquids, we developed methods to freeze in place the filling patterns at arbitrary degrees of partial wetting and intermediate stages of drying. These percolation lithography techniques produced permanent photonic structures with adjustable disorder. By coupling strong changes in optical properties to subtle differences in fluid behavior, optofluidic crystals may also prove useful in rapid analysis of liquids.

  13. Extending standard mask lithography exposure technique to spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Daniela; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2014-06-01

    Similar to planar lithography, the use of a mask to produce multiple copies of a binary master sample is also possible in the case of spherical surfaces. Evidently, the spherical mask needs to have the opposite radius of curvature of the desired substrate, and additional problems arising from the curved geometry have to be taken into consideration. Inhomogeneities of the illumination impinging on the resist-coated surface negatively influence the exposure result. Ways of overcoming these difficulties to obtain satisfactory results for the implementation of the exposure in a conventional mask aligner are shown. Despite a lowered contrast due to back reflections and a varying distance between mask and substrate, exposure results of sufficient quality are achieved with the help of an adapted aperture and the use of water as an immersion fluid.

  14. Stimulated Emission Depletion Lithography with Mercapto-Functional Polymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Surface reactive nanostructures were fabricated using stimulated emission depletion (STED) lithography. The functionalization of the nanostructures was realized by copolymerization of a bifunctional metal oxo cluster in the presence of a triacrylate monomer. Ligands of the cluster surface cross-link to the monomer during the lithographic process, whereas unreacted mercapto functionalized ligands are transferred to the polymer and remain reactive after polymer formation of the surface of the nanostructure. The depletion efficiency in dependence of the cluster loading was investigated and full depletion of the STED effect was observed with a cluster loading exceeding 4 wt %. A feature size by λ/11 was achieved by using a donut-shaped depletion beam. The reactivity of the mercapto groups on the surface of the nanostructure was tested by incubation with mercapto-reactive fluorophores. PMID:26816204

  15. Solvent immersion nanoimprint lithography of fluorescent conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, G. L.; Zhang, S.; Stevenson, J. R. Y.; Ebenhoch, B.; Samuel, I. D. W.; Turnbull, G. A.

    2015-10-19

    Solvent immersion imprint lithography (SIIL) was used to directly nanostructure conjugated polymer films. The technique was used to create light-emitting diffractive optical elements and organic semiconductor lasers. Gratings with lateral features as small as 70 nm and depths of ∼25 nm were achieved in poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl). The angular emission from the patterned films was studied, comparing measurement to theoretical predictions. Organic distributed feedback lasers fabricated with SIIL exhibited thresholds for lasing of ∼40 kW/cm{sup 2}, similar to those made with established nanoimprint processes. The results show that SIIL is a quick, convenient and practical technique for nanopatterning of polymer photonic devices.

  16. Subtractive Patterning via Chemical Lift-Off Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei-Ssu; Cheunkar, Sarawut; Cao, Huan H.; Bednar, Heidi R.; Weiss, Paul S.; Andrews, Anne M.

    2012-09-01

    Conventional soft-lithography methods involving the transfer of molecular “inks” from polymeric stamps to substrates often encounter micrometer-scale resolution limits due to diffusion of the transferred molecules during printing. We report a “subtractive” stamping process in which silicone rubber stamps, activated by oxygen plasma, selectively remove hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiols from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold surfaces with high pattern fidelity. The covalent interactions formed at the stamp-substrate interface are sufficiently strong to remove not only alkanethiol molecules but also gold atoms from the substrate. A variety of high-resolution patterned features were fabricated, and stamps were cleaned and reused many times without feature deterioration. The remaining SAM acted as a resist for etching exposed gold features. Monolayer backfilling into the lift-off areas enabled patterned protein capture, and 40-nanometer chemical patterns were achieved.

  17. Tuning and Freezing Disorder in Photonic Crystals using Percolation Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ian B.; Abedzadeh, Navid; Kay, Theresa M.; Shneidman, Anna V.; Cranshaw, Derek J.; Lončar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Although common in biological systems, synthetic self-assembly routes to complex 3D photonic structures with tailored degrees of disorder remain elusive. Here we show how liquids can be used to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In these optofluidic crystals, dynamically tunable disorder is superimposed onto the periodic optical structure through partial wetting or evaporation. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking is driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry. These variations direct site-selective infiltration of liquids through capillary interactions. Incorporating cross-linkable resins into our liquids, we developed methods to freeze in place the filling patterns at arbitrary degrees of partial wetting and intermediate stages of drying. These percolation lithography techniques produced permanent photonic structures with adjustable disorder. By coupling strong changes in optical properties to subtle differences in fluid behavior, optofluidic crystals may also prove useful in rapid analysis of liquids. PMID:26790372

  18. EUV mask surface cleaning effects on lithography process performance

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Baclea-an, Lorie Mae; Naulleau, Patrick; Chen, Robert J.; Liang, Ted

    2010-06-18

    The reflective, multilayer based, mask architectures for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography are highly susceptible to surface oxidation and contamination. As a result, EUV masks are expected to undergo cleaning processes in order to maintain the lifetimes necessary for high volume manufacturing. For this study, the impact of repetitive cleaning of EUV masks on imaging performance was evaluated. Two, high quality industry standard, EUV masks are used for this study with one of the masks undergoing repeated cleaning and the other one kept as a reference. Lithographic performance, in terms of process window analysis and line edge roughness, was monitored after every two cleans and compared to the reference mask performance. After 8x clean, minimal degradation is observed. The cleaning cycles will be continued until significant loss imaging fidelity is found.

  19. New spin-on metal hardmask materials for lithography processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huirong; Mullen, Salem; Wolfer, Elizabeth; Rahman, Dalil; Anyadiegwu, Clement; Mckenzie, Douglas; Dioses, Alberto; Cho, Joonyeon; Padmanaban, Munirathna

    2013-03-01

    Since the critical dimensions in integrated circuit (IC) device fabrication continue to shrink below 32 nm, multilayer stacks with alternating etch selectivities are required for successful pattern transfer from the exposed photoresist to the substrate. Inorganic resist underlayer materials are used as hard masks in reactive ion etching (RIE) with oxidative gases. The conventional silicon hardmask has demonstrated good reflectivity control and reasonable etch selectivity. However, some issues such as the rework of trilayer stacks and cleaning of oxide residue by wet chemistry are challenging problems for manufacturability. The present work reveals novel spin-on underlayer materials containing significant amounts of metal oxides in the film after baking at normal processing conditions. Such an inorganic metal hardmask (MHM) has excellent etch selectivity in plasma etch processes of the trilayer stack. The composition has good long term shelf life and pot life stability based on solution LPC analysis and wafer defect studies, respectively. The material absorbs DUV wavelengths and can be used as a spin-on inorganic or hybrid antireflective coating to control substrate reflectivity under DUV exposure of photoresist. Some of these metal-containing materials can be used as an underlayer in EUV lithography to significantly enhance photospeed. Specific metal hard masks are also developed for via or trench filling applications in IRT processes. The materials have shown good coating and lithography performance with a film thicknesses as low as 10 nm under ArF dry or immersion conditions. In addition, the metal oxide films or residues can be partially or completely removed by using various wet-etching solutions at ambient temperature.

  20. Limitation of blend type of resist platform on EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Taku; Kim, Su Min; Na, Hai Sub; Koh, Chawon; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2012-03-01

    Chemically amplified resist (CAR) system is being widely used not only for 248 nm and 193 nm lithography but for Extreme Ultra Violet Lithography (EUVL).[1] And CAR system is based on blend resist platform which is formulated with polymer and photo-acid generator (PAG) independently. In EUVL to aim at 22 nm node and beyond, EUV resists are required to achieve much higher acid generation efficiency and overcome RLS (Resolution, Line edge roughness, Sensitivity) trade-off using some ideas such as increase in PAG concentration and film absorption coefficient, suppression of acid diffusion length and so on.[2-6] Increase in PAG loading ratio is a promising strategy to improve EUV resist performance,[7-10] however there must be upper limitation of PAG loading ratio on blend resist platform due to lowering film Tg induced by a plasticization effect of blended PAG. This plasticization effect of blended PAG would have another impact to increase acid diffusion length, resulting in low resolution and significant thickness loss, especially on ultra thin film condition. On the other hand, utilizing the PAG having bulky cation structure was beneficial in order to maintain dark loss (in other word, top loss) of the patterned features, however, this type of cation would show low quantum yield driven by the substituent on a cation structure, so that total performance such as ultimate resolution deteriorated. From these results, the bound resist platform which has PAG unit on polymer backbone as branch would be promising platform because of its potential advantages such as suppression of dark loss, no plasticization effect and control of acid diffusion.

  1. Sub-Optical Lithography With Nanometer Definition Masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Malek, Chantal Khan; Neogi, Jayant

    2000-01-01

    Nanometer feature size lithography represents a major paradigm shift for the electronics and micro-electro-mechanical industries. In this paper, we discuss the capacity of dynamic focused reactive ion beam (FIB) etching systems to undertake direct and highly anisotropic erosion of thick evaporated gold coatings on boron-doped silicon X-ray mask membranes. FIB offers a new level of flexibility in micro fabrication, allowing for fast fabrication of X-ray masks, where pattern definition and surface alteration are combined in the same step which eliminates the whole lithographic process, in particular resist, resist development, electro-deposition and resist removal. Focused ion beam diameters as small as 7 nm can be obtained enabling fabrication well into the sub-20 nm regime. In preliminary demonstrations of this X-ray mask fabrication technique 22 nm width lines were milled directly through 0.9 microns of gold and a miniature mass spectrometer pattern was milled through over 0.5 microns of gold. Also presented are the results of the shadow printing, using the large depth of field of synchrotron high energy parallel X-ray beam, of these and other sub-optical defined patterns in photoresist conformally coated over surfaces of extreme topographical variation. Assuming that electronic circuits and/or micro devices scale proportionally, the surface area of devices processed with X-ray lithography and 20 nm critical dimension X-ray masks would be 0.5% that of contemporary devices (350 nm CD). The 20 CD mask fabrication represents an initial effort - a further factor of three reduction is anticipated which represents a further order-of-magnitude reduction in die area.

  2. Lithography application of a novel photoresist for patterning of cells.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Halberstadt, Craig R; Gonsalves, Kenneth E

    2004-05-01

    Photolithography is the current workhorse for the microelectronic industry. It has been used extensively for the creation of patterns on two-dimensional surfaces. Various research groups have studied the use of photolithography to pattern surfaces for the alignment of cells. So far, these applications have been limited due to the use of organic solvents in the pattern developing process, which can denature biomacromolecules that would be attached to the material. To address this problem, a novel bioactive photoresist (bioresist) based on the copolymer of methyl methacrylate and 3-(t-butoxycarbonyl)-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (MMA:TBNVP) was prepared and in vitro fibroblast cell growth on this resist was studied. Results demonstrated that the resist is non-adhesive to the fibroblast cells. By deprotecting the t-BOC groups into carboxyl groups (MMA:D-TBNVP), the material became cell adhesive. Furthermore, cells were able to proliferate on the MMA:D-TBNVP surface. By culturing cells on the MMA:D-TBNVP surface in serum versus serum-free medium, we reached the conclusion that the chemistry of the deprotected copolymer indirectly promoted cell attachment through its absorbance of serum proteins on the material. Patterns of 25 microm x 25 microm lines were obtained by chemically manipulating the surface of the photoresist using UV lithography without any solvent development. Fibroblast cells were observed to align on the patterned surface. This resist could be a suitable candidate to improve the application of conventional lithography in direct protein patterning for the guided growth of cells.

  3. 28nm node process optimization: a lithography centric view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltmann, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    Many experts claim that the 28nm technology node will be the most cost effective technology node forever. This results from primarily from the cost of manufacturing due to the fact that 28nm is the last true Single Patterning (SP) node. It is also affected by the dramatic increase of design costs and the limited shrink factor of the next following nodes. Thus, it is assumed that this technology still will be alive still for many years. To be cost competitive, high yields are mandatory. Meanwhile, leading edge foundries have optimized the yield of the 28nm node to such a level that that it is nearly exclusively defined by random defectivity. However, it was a long way to go to come to that level. In my talk I will concentrate on the contribution of lithography to this yield learning curve. I will choose a critical metal patterning application. I will show what was needed to optimize the process window to a level beyond the usual OPC model work that was common on previous nodes. Reducing the process (in particular focus) variability is a complementary need. It will be shown which improvements were needed in tooling, process control and design-mask-wafer interaction to remove all systematic yield detractors. Over the last couple of years new scanner platforms were introduced that were targeted for both better productivity and better parametric performance. But this was not a clear run-path. It needed some extra affords of the tool suppliers together with the Fab to bring the tool variability down to the necessary level. Another important topic to reduce variability is the interaction of wafer none-planarity and lithography optimization. Having an accurate knowledge of within die topography is essential for optimum patterning. By completing both the variability reduction work and the process window enhancement work we were able to transfer the original marginal process budget to a robust positive budget and thus ensuring high yield and low costs.

  4. Lithography-induced limits to scaling of design quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahng, Andrew B.

    2014-03-01

    Quality and value of an IC product are functions of power, performance, area, cost and reliability. The forthcoming 2013 ITRS roadmap observes that while manufacturers continue to enable potential Moore's Law scaling of layout densities, the "realizable" scaling in competitive products has for some years been significantly less. In this paper, we consider aspects of the question, "To what extent should this scaling gap be blamed on lithography?" Non-ideal scaling of layout densities has been attributed to (i) layout restrictions associated with multi-patterning technologies (SADP, LELE, LELELE), as well as (ii) various ground rule and layout style choices that stem from misalignment, reliability, variability, device architecture, and electrical performance vs. power constraints. Certain impacts seem obvious, e.g., loss of 2D flexibility and new line-end placement constraints with SADP, or algorithmically intractable layout stitching and mask coloring formulations with LELELE. However, these impacts may well be outweighed by weaknesses in design methodology and tooling. Arguably, the industry has entered a new era in which many new factors - (i) standard-cell library architecture, and layout guardbanding for automated place-and-route: (ii) performance model guardbanding and signoff analyses: (iii) physical design and manufacturing handoff algorithms spanning detailed placement and routing, stitching and RET; and (iv) reliability guardbanding - all contribute, hand in hand with lithography, to a newly-identified "design capability gap". How specific aspects of process and design enablements limit the scaling of design quality is a fundamental question whose answer must guide future RandD investment at the design-manufacturing interface. terface.

  5. In vivo X-ray elemental imaging of single cell model organisms manipulated by laser-based optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Vergucht, Eva; Brans, Toon; Beunis, Filip; Garrevoet, Jan; De Rijcke, Maarten; Bauters, Stephen; Deruytter, David; Vandegehuchte, Michiel; Van Nieuwenhove, Ine; Janssen, Colin; Burghammer, Manfred; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    We report on a radically new elemental imaging approach for the analysis of biological model organisms and single cells in their natural, in vivo state. The methodology combines optical tweezers (OT) technology for non-contact, laser-based sample manipulation with synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microimaging for the first time. The main objective of this work is to establish a new method for in vivo elemental imaging in a two-dimensional (2D) projection mode in free-standing biological microorganisms or single cells, present in their aqueous environment. Using the model organism Scrippsiella trochoidea, a first proof of principle experiment at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) demonstrates the feasibility of the OT XRF methodology, which is applied to study mixture toxicity of Cu-Ni and Cu-Zn as a result of elevated exposure. We expect that the new OT XRF methodology will significantly contribute to the new trend of investigating microorganisms at the cellular level with added in vivo capability. PMID:25762511

  6. In vivo X-ray elemental imaging of single cell model organisms manipulated by laser-based optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Vergucht, Eva; Brans, Toon; Beunis, Filip; Garrevoet, Jan; De Rijcke, Maarten; Bauters, Stephen; Deruytter, David; Vandegehuchte, Michiel; Van Nieuwenhove, Ine; Janssen, Colin; Burghammer, Manfred; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    We report on a radically new elemental imaging approach for the analysis of biological model organisms and single cells in their natural, in vivo state. The methodology combines optical tweezers (OT) technology for non-contact, laser-based sample manipulation with synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microimaging for the first time. The main objective of this work is to establish a new method for in vivo elemental imaging in a two-dimensional (2D) projection mode in free-standing biological microorganisms or single cells, present in their aqueous environment. Using the model organism Scrippsiella trochoidea, a first proof of principle experiment at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) demonstrates the feasibility of the OT XRF methodology, which is applied to study mixture toxicity of Cu-Ni and Cu-Zn as a result of elevated exposure. We expect that the new OT XRF methodology will significantly contribute to the new trend of investigating microorganisms at the cellular level with added in vivo capability. PMID:25762511

  7. In vivo X-ray elemental imaging of single cell model organisms manipulated by laser-based optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergucht, Eva; Brans, Toon; Beunis, Filip; Garrevoet, Jan; de Rijcke, Maarten; Bauters, Stephen; Deruytter, David; Vandegehuchte, Michiel; van Nieuwenhove, Ine; Janssen, Colin; Burghammer, Manfred; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    We report on a radically new elemental imaging approach for the analysis of biological model organisms and single cells in their natural, in vivo state. The methodology combines optical tweezers (OT) technology for non-contact, laser-based sample manipulation with synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microimaging for the first time. The main objective of this work is to establish a new method for in vivo elemental imaging in a two-dimensional (2D) projection mode in free-standing biological microorganisms or single cells, present in their aqueous environment. Using the model organism Scrippsiella trochoidea, a first proof of principle experiment at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) demonstrates the feasibility of the OT XRF methodology, which is applied to study mixture toxicity of Cu-Ni and Cu-Zn as a result of elevated exposure. We expect that the new OT XRF methodology will significantly contribute to the new trend of investigating microorganisms at the cellular level with added in vivo capability.

  8. The application of variable universe fuzzy PID controller in computer-aided alignment of lithography projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei; Zheng, Meng; Li, Yanqiu

    2013-12-01

    A variable universe fuzzy PID algorithm is designed to control the misalignment of the lithography projection optics to meet the requirement of high image quality. This paper first simulates the alignment of Schwarzschild objective designed by us. Secondly, the variable universe fuzzy PID control is introduced to feed back the misalignment of Schwarzschild objective to the control system to drive the stage which holds the objective. So the position can be adjusted automatically. This feedback scheme can adjust the variables' universe self-adaptively by using fuzzy rules so that the concrete function and parameters of the contraction-expansion factor are not necessary. Finally, the proposed approach is demonstrated by simulations. The results show that, variable universe fuzzy PID method exhibits better performance in both improving response speed and decreasing overshoot compared to conventional PID and fuzzy PID control methods. In addition, the interference signal can be effectively restrained. It is concluded that this method can improve the dynamic and static properties of system and meet the requirement of fast response.

  9. Displacement Talbot lithography: a new method for high-resolution patterning of large areas.

    PubMed

    Solak, Harun H; Dais, Christian; Clube, Francis

    2011-05-23

    Periodic micro and nano-structures can be lithographically produced using the Talbot effect. However, the limited depth-of-field of the self-images has effectively prevented its practical use, especially for high-resolution structures with periods less than 1 micrometer. In this article we show that by integrating the diffraction field transmitted by a grating mask over a distance of one Talbot period, one can obtain an effective image that is independent of the absolute distance from the mask. In this way high resolution periodic patterns can be printed without the depth-of-field limitation of Talbot self-images. For one-dimensional patterns the image obtained is shown to be related to the convolution of the mask transmission function with itself. This technique, which we call Displacement Talbot Lithography (DTL), enables high-resolution photolithography without the need for complex and expensive projection optics for the production of periodic structures like diffraction gratings or photonic crystals. Experimental results showing the printing of linear gratings and an array of holes on a hexagonal lattice are presented.

  10. Large-solid-angle illuminators for extreme ultraviolet lithography with laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, G.D.; Tichenor, D.A.; Sweatt, W.C.; Chow, W.W.

    1995-06-01

    Laser Plasma Sources (LPSS) of extreme ultraviolet radiation are an attractive alternative to synchrotron radiation sources for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) due to their modularity, brightness, and modest size and cost. To fully exploit the extreme ultraviolet power emitted by such sources, it is necessary to capture the largest possible fraction of the source emission half-sphere while simultaneously optimizing the illumination stationarity and uniformity on the object mask. In this LDRD project, laser plasma source illumination systems for EUVL have been designed and then theoretically and experimentally characterized. Ellipsoidal condensers have been found to be simple yet extremely efficient condensers for small-field EUVL imaging systems. The effects of aberrations in such condensers on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging have been studied with physical optics modeling. Lastly, the design of an efficient large-solid-angle condenser has been completed. It collects 50% of the available laser plasma source power at 14 nm and delivers it properly to the object mask in a wide-arc-field camera.

  11. Multi-mirror adaptive optics for control of thermally induced aberrations in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habets, Michel; Scholten, Joni; Weiland, Siep; Coene, Wim

    2016-03-01

    The imaging quality of the projection optics of an extreme ultraviolet lithography scanner degrades under the influence of thermally induced deformations of its mirrors. Wavefronts of different reticle points encounter different parts of the deformed mirrors, resulting in a field dependent wavefront error. This paper presents how ideas from multi-conjugate adaptive optics can be used to reduce these thermally induced aberrations. To this end a generic deformable mirror model is implemented. Linear actuator sensitivities are derived directly, based on nominal ray locations and directions, enabling fast prototyping. An integrated opto-thermo-mechanical mirror heating model is used to determine the evolution of thermally induced abberations over time. This transient simulation is used to analyze four different adaptive optics configurations and two different control algorithms. It is shown that by employing the multi-objective goal-attainment method, it is possible to improve the optical performance significantly when compared to minimizing the l2-norm of the total residual wavefront error vector.

  12. Combined laser interference and photolithography patterning of a hybrid mask mold for nanoimprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sungmo; Choi, Jinnil; Kim, Eunhye; Dong, Ki-Young; Jeon, Heonsu; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Lee, Kyu Back

    2011-07-01

    A lithography technique that combines laser interference lithography (LIL) and photolithography, which can be a valuable technique for the low cost production of microscale and nanoscale hybrid mask molds, is proposed. LIL is a maskless process which allows the production of periodic nanoscale structures quickly, uniformly, and over large areas. A 257 nm wavelength Ar-Ion laser is utilized for the LIL process incorporating a Lloyd's mirror one beam inteferometer. By combining LIL with photolithography, the non-selective patterning limitation of LIL are explored and the design and development of a hybrid mask mold for nanoimprint lithography process, with uniform two-dimensional nanoscale patterns are presented. Polydimethylsiloxane is applied on the mold to fabricate a replica of the stamp. Through nanoimprint lithography using the manufactured replica, successful transfer of the patterns is achieved, and selective nanoscale patterning is confirmed with pattern sizes of around 180 nm and pattern aspect ratio of around 1.44:1.

  13. Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography using cyclodextrin-based porous template for pattern failure reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    An approach to ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprint lithography using a cyclodextrin-based porous template was investigated for the reduction of air trapping and template damage caused by gases such as nitrogen and oxygen generated from UV cross-linked materials. The accuracy of the printed pattern using UV nanoimprint lithography with the porous transparent template was improved because of enhanced material adsorption and increased permeability to gaseous species. The use of volatile solvents in the UV cross-linked materials for nanoimprint lithography has been limited because of high pattern failure rates. However, using the cyclodextrin-based porous template, the UV cross-linked materials with a 5 wt. % volatile solvent exhibited well-defined nanoscale patterns. Based on this study, acceptable chemistries for the UV cross-linked materials have been expanded, which will be beneficial for future device applications using UV nanoimprint lithography.

  14. Improved near field lithography by surface plasmon resonance in groove-patterned masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Beibei; Pan, Li; Liu, Ling; Fang, Liang; Wang, Changtao; Luo, Xiangang

    2009-12-01

    Near field lithography (NFL) provides an effective way for obtaining lithography features' sizes far beyond the diffraction limit. However, optical transmission through isolated subwavelength apertures is very low in the lithography process. It also makes it difficult to obtain a uniform lithography pattern where isolated and arrayed slit structures coexist because of different optical transmission through these two kinds of structures. It is proposed in this paper that using appropriately designed groove structures around subwavelength metallic slits could solve this problem. Numerical calculations performed by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method demonstrate that about ten times transmission enhancement could be obtained. This occurs as a surface plasmon is resonantly excited and light is concentrated into nanometer scale apertures, resulting in not only greatly enhanced NFL efficiency but also uniform distribution of light intensity for isolated and arrayed slit patterns. Also discussed is the enhancement dependence on the structural parameters of NFL masks.

  15. High aspect ratio tungsten grating on ultrathin Si membranes for extreme UV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xinsheng; Ying, Yulong

    2016-09-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography is one of the modern lithography tools for high-volume manufacturing with 22 nm resolution and beyond. But critical challenges exist to the design and fabrication of large-scale and highly efficient diffraction transmission gratings, significantly reducing the feature sizes down to 22 nm and beyond. To achieve such a grating, the surface flatness, the line edge roughness, the transmission efficiency and aspect ratio should be improved significantly. Delachat et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 108262) develop a full process to fabricate a tungsten diffraction grating on an ultrathin silicon membrane with higher aspect ratio up to 8.75 that met all the aforementioned requirements for extreme ultraviolet lithography. This process is fully compatible with standard industrial extreme ultraviolet lithography.

  16. Lithography-assisted alignment control for preparation of mesoporous silica films with uniaxially oriented mesochannels.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yusuke; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Norihiro; Wu, Kevin C W

    2014-03-01

    We report the lithography-assisted alignment control of one-dimensional (1D) mesochannels. The effectiveness on both nonionic and cationic surfactants is discussed, and a continuous film with fully uniaxially oriented mesochannels is also successfully prepared.

  17. High aspect ratio tungsten grating on ultrathin Si membranes for extreme UV lithography.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinsheng; Ying, Yulong

    2016-09-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography is one of the modern lithography tools for high-volume manufacturing with 22 nm resolution and beyond. But critical challenges exist to the design and fabrication of large-scale and highly efficient diffraction transmission gratings, significantly reducing the feature sizes down to 22 nm and beyond. To achieve such a grating, the surface flatness, the line edge roughness, the transmission efficiency and aspect ratio should be improved significantly. Delachat et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 108262) develop a full process to fabricate a tungsten diffraction grating on an ultrathin silicon membrane with higher aspect ratio up to 8.75 that met all the aforementioned requirements for extreme ultraviolet lithography. This process is fully compatible with standard industrial extreme ultraviolet lithography. PMID:27458188

  18. The Dawn of Nuclear Photonics with Laser-based Gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J

    2011-03-17

    A renaissance in nuclear physics is occurring around the world because of a new kind of incredibly bright, gamma-ray light source that can be created with short pulse lasers and energetic electron beams. These highly Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) sources produce narrow, laser-like beams of incoherent, tunable gamma-rays and are enabling access and manipulation of the nucleus of the atom with photons or so called 'Nuclear Photonics'. Just as in the early days of the laser when photon manipulation of the valence electron structure of the atom became possible and enabling to new applications and science, nuclear photonics with laser-based gamma-ray sources promises both to open up wide areas of practical isotope-related, materials applications and to enable new discovery-class nuclear science. In the United States, the development of high brightness and high flux MEGa-ray sources is being actively pursued at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore (LLNL), California near San Francisco. The LLNL work aims to create by 2013 a machine that will advance the state of the art with respect to source the peak brightness by 6 orders of magnitude. This machine will create beams of 1 to 2.3 MeV photons with color purity matching that of common lasers. In Europe a similar but higher photon energy gamma source has been included as part of the core capability that will be established at the Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility in Magurele, Romania outside of Bucharest. This machine is expected to have an end point gamma energy in the range of 13 MeV. The machine will be co-located with two world-class, 10 Petawatt laser systems thus allowing combined intense-laser and gamma-ray interaction experiments. Such capability will be unique in the world. In this talk, Dr. Chris Barty from LLNL will review the state of the art with respect to MEGa-ray source design, construction and experiments and will describe both the ongoing projects

  19. M&A For Lithography Of Sparse Arrays Of Sub-Micrometer Features

    DOEpatents

    Brueck, Steven R.J.; Chen, Xiaolan; Zaidi, Saleem; Devine, Daniel J.

    1998-06-02

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for the exposure of sparse hole and/or mesa arrays with line:space ratios of 1:3 or greater and sub-micrometer hole and/or mesa diameters in a layer of photosensitive material atop a layered material. Methods disclosed include: double exposure interferometric lithography pairs in which only those areas near the overlapping maxima of each single-period exposure pair receive a clearing exposure dose; double interferometric lithography exposure pairs with additional processing steps to transfer the array from a first single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair into an intermediate mask layer and a second single-period interferometric lithography exposure to further select a subset of the first array of holes; a double exposure of a single period interferometric lithography exposure pair to define a dense array of sub-micrometer holes and an optical lithography exposure in which only those holes near maxima of both exposures receive a clearing exposure dose; combination of a single-period interferometric exposure pair, processing to transfer resulting dense array of sub-micrometer holes into an intermediate etch mask, and an optical lithography exposure to select a subset of initial array to form a sparse array; combination of an optical exposure, transfer of exposure pattern into an intermediate mask layer, and a single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair; three-beam interferometric exposure pairs to form sparse arrays of sub-micrometer holes; five- and four-beam interferometric exposures to form a sparse array of sub-micrometer holes in a single exposure. Apparatuses disclosed include arrangements for the three-beam, five-beam and four-beam interferometric exposures.

  20. Heterogeneous Charge-Transfer Nanorods by Strained Melt-Molding Lithography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jueun; Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Seo, Chunhee; Nam, Jihye; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Hetero-nanorods consisting of two charge-transfer (CT) complexes were fabricated by the strained melt-molding lithography. Utilizing the lowered melting temperature by the formation of eutectic mixture, various well-defined CT complex nanorods can be easily fabricated by soft-lithography-assisted melt crystallization below 100 degrees C. Hetero-nanorods were fabricated by selective doping of the secondary CT complex at defects induced by applying the uniaxial strain. PMID:27455696

  1. The capability of lithography simulation based on MVM-SEM® system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shingo; Fujii, Nobuaki; Kanno, Koichi; Imai, Hidemichi; Hayano, Katsuya; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Shida, Soichi; Murakawa, Tsutomu; Kuribara, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Jun; Nakamura, Takayuki; Matsushita, Shohei; Hara, Daisuke; Pang, Linyong

    2015-10-01

    The 1Xnm technology node lithography is using SMO-ILT, NTD or more complex pattern. Therefore in mask defect inspection, defect verification becomes more difficult because many nuisance defects are detected in aggressive mask feature. One key Technology of mask manufacture is defect verification to use aerial image simulator or other printability simulation. AIMS™ Technology is excellent correlation for the wafer and standards tool for defect verification however it is difficult for verification over hundred numbers or more. We reported capability of defect verification based on lithography simulation with a SEM system that architecture and software is excellent correlation for simple line and space.[1] In this paper, we use a SEM system for the next generation combined with a lithography simulation tool for SMO-ILT, NTD and other complex pattern lithography. Furthermore we will use three dimension (3D) lithography simulation based on Multi Vision Metrology SEM system. Finally, we will confirm the performance of the 2D and 3D lithography simulation based on SEM system for a photomask verification.

  2. Large area direct-write focused ion-beam lithography with dual-beam microscope.

    SciTech Connect

    Imre-Joshi, A.; Ocola, L. E.; Rich, L.; Klingfus, J.

    2010-03-01

    The authors have investigated the performance of focused ion-beam (FIB) direct-write lithography for large area (multiple write-field) patterning in an FEI Nova Nanolab 600 dual-beam microscope. Their system is configured with a 100 nm resolution X-Y stage and a RAITH ELPHY LITHOGRAPHY control interface, with its own integrated 16 bit DAC pattern generator and software. Key issues with regard to configuration, process parameters, and procedures have been addressed. Characterization of stitching errors, pattern repeatability, and drift were performed. Offset lithography (multiple exposures with offset write fields) and in-field registration marks were evaluated for correcting stitching errors, and a test microfluidic device covering an area of 1 x 1.4 mm{sup 2} was successfully fabricated. The authors found that by using a combination of offset lithography and in-field registration mark correction methods, the stitching errors can be kept well below 100 nm. They also found that due to higher beam deflection speed provided by the electrostatic scanning in FIB systems versus the wide-spread electron-beam systems with electromagnetic scanning, FIB lithography can be just as fast as electron-beam lithography for typical mill depths down to about 200-500 nm (material dependent). This opens the door for a large suite of applications for materials where pattern transfer is difficult or impossible by reactive methods.

  3. High resolution patterning for flexible electronics via roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, Sami; de Riet, Joris; Yakimets, Iryna; Smits, Edsger

    2014-03-01

    Flexible electronics is a growing field and is currently maturing in applications such as displays, smart packaging, organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. In order to process on flexible substrates at high throughput and large areas, novel patterning techniques will be essential. Conventional optical lithography is limited in throughput as well as resolution, and requires several alignment steps to generate multi-layered patterns, required for applications such as thin-film transistors. It therefore remains a complex and expensive process. Nanoimprint lithography is an emerging alternative to optical lithography, demonstrating patterning capabilities over a wide range of resolutions, from several microns down to a few nanometres. For display applications, nanoimprint lithography can be used to pattern various layers. Micron sized thin-film transistors for backplane can be fabricated where a self-aligned geometry is used to decrease the number of alignment steps, and increase the overlay accuracy. In addition, nano-structures can be used for optical applications such as anti-reflective surfaces and nano patterned transparent electrodes. Imprint lithography is a fully roll-to-roll compatible process and enables large area and high throughput fabrication for flexible electronics. In this paper we discuss the possibilities and the challenges of large area patterning by roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography, reviewing micron and nano sized structures realized on our roll-to-roll equipment. Nano patterned transparent electrodes, moth-eye antireflective coatings, and multilevel structures will be covered.

  4. Nanofabrication at 1nm resolution by quantum optical lithography (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Eugen

    2015-08-01

    A major problem in the optical lithography was the diffraction limit. Here, we report and demonstrate a lithography method, Quantum Optical Lithography [1,2], able to attain 1 nm resolution by optical means using new materials (fluorescent photosensitive glass-ceramics and QMC-5 resist). The performance is several times better than that described for any optical or Electron Beam Lithography (EBL) methods. In Fig. 1 we present TEM images of 1 nm lines recorded at 9.6 m/s. a) b) Fig. 1 TEM images of: a) multiple 1 nm lines written in a fluorescent photosensitive glass-ceramics sample; b) single 1 nm line written in QMC-5 resist. References [1] E. Pavel, S. Jinga, B.S. Vasile, A. Dinescu, V. Marinescu, R. Trusca and N. Tosa, "Quantum Optical Lithography from 1 nm resolution to pattern transfer on silicon wafer", Optics and Laser Technology, 60 (2014) 80-84. [2] E. Pavel, S. Jinga, E. Andronescu, B.S. Vasile, G. Kada, A. Sasahara, N. Tosa, A. Matei, M. Dinescu, A. Dinescu and O.R. Vasile, "2 nm Quantum Optical Lithography", Optics Communications,291 (2013) 259-263

  5. Optimized lithography process for through-silicon vias-fabrication using a double-sided (structured) photomask for mask aligner lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichelt, Tina; Stuerzebecher, Lorenz; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2015-07-01

    Through-silicon vias (TSV) are very important for wafer-level packaging as they provide patterning holes through thick silicon dies to integrate and interconnect devices which are stacked in the z-direction. For economic processing, TSV fabrication primarily needs to be cost effective, especially for a high throughput. Furthermore, a lithography process for TSV has to be stable enough to allow patterning on prestructured substrates with inhomogeneous topography. This can be addressed by an exposure process which offers a large depth of focus. We have developed a mask-aligner lithography process based on the use of a double-sided photomask to realize aerial images that meet these constraints.

  6. Combined overlay, focus and CD metrology for leading edge lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Martin; Cramer, Hugo; Tel, Wim; Kubis, Michael; Megens, Henry

    2011-04-01

    As leading edge lithography moves to 22-nm design rules, low k1 technologies like double patterning are the new resolution enablers, and system control and setup are the new drivers to meet remarkably tight process requirements. The way of thinking and executing setup and control of lithography scanners is changing in four ways. First, unusually tight process tolerances call for very dense sampling [1], which in effect means measurements at high throughput combined with high order modeling and corrections to compensate for wafer spatial fingerprint. Second, complex interactions between scanner and process no longer allow separation of error sources through traditional metrology approaches, which are based on using one set of metrology tools and methods for setup and another for scanner performance control. Moreover, setup and control of overlay is done independently from CD uniformity, which in effect leads to independent and conflicting adjustments for the scanner. Third, traditional CD setup and control is based on the focus and dose calculated from their CD response and not from measurement of their effect on pattern profile, which allows a clean and orthogonal de-convolution of focus and dose variations across the wafer. Fourth, scanner setup and control has to take into consideration the final goal of lithography, which is the accurate printing of a complex pattern describing a real device layout. To this end we introduce a new setup and control metrology step: measuring-to-match scanner 1D and 2D proximity. In this paper we will describe the strategy for setup and control of overlay, focus, CD and proximity based on the YieldStarTM metrology tool and present the resulting performance. YieldStar-200 is a new, high throughput metrology tool based on a high numerical aperture scatterometer concept. The tool can be used stand-alone as well as integrated in a processing track. It is suitable for determining process offsets in X,Y and Z directions through Overlay

  7. High performance Si immersion gratings patterned with electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully-Santiago, Michael A.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Brooks, Cynthia B.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Muller, Richard E.

    2014-07-01

    Infrared spectrographs employing silicon immersion gratings can be significantly more compact than spectro- graphs using front-surface gratings. The Si gratings can also offer continuous wavelength coverage at high spectral resolution. The grooves in Si gratings are made with semiconductor lithography techniques, to date almost entirely using contact mask photolithography. Planned near-infrared astronomical spectrographs require either finer groove pitches or higher positional accuracy than standard UV contact mask photolithography can reach. A collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin Silicon Diffractive Optics Group and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Microdevices Laboratory has experimented with direct writing silicon immersion grating grooves with electron beam lithography. The patterning process involves depositing positive e-beam resist on 1 to 30 mm thick, 100 mm diameter monolithic crystalline silicon substrates. We then use the facility JEOL 9300FS e-beam writer at JPL to produce the linear pattern that defines the gratings. There are three key challenges to produce high-performance e-beam written silicon immersion gratings. (1) E- beam field and subfield stitching boundaries cause periodic cross-hatch structures along the grating grooves. The structures manifest themselves as spectral and spatial dimension ghosts in the diffraction limited point spread function (PSF) of the diffraction grating. In this paper, we show that the effects of e-beam field boundaries must be mitigated. We have significantly reduced ghost power with only minor increases in write time by using four or more field sizes of less than 500 μm. (2) The finite e-beam stage drift and run-out error cause large-scale structure in the wavefront error. We deal with this problem by applying a mark detection loop to check for and correct out minuscule stage drifts. We measure the level and direction of stage drift and show that mark detection reduces peak-to-valley wavefront error

  8. Molecular self-assembly for biological investigations and nanoscale lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheunkar, Sarawut

    Small, diffusible molecules when recognized by their binding partners, such as proteins and antibodies, trigger enzymatic activity, cell communication, and immune response. Progress in analytical methods enabling detection, characterization, and visualization of biological dynamics at the molecular level will advance our exploration of complex biological systems. In this dissertation, analytical platforms were fabricated to capture membrane-associated receptors, which are essential proteins in cell signaling pathways. The neurotransmitter serotonin and its biological precursor were immobilized on gold substrates coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol)alkanethiols and their reactive derivatives. The SAM-coated substrates present the biologically selective affinity of immobilized molecules to target native membrane-associated receptors. These substrates were also tested for biospecificity using antibodies. In addition, small-molecule-functionalized platforms, expressing neurotransmitter pharmacophores, were employed to examine kinetic interactions between G-protein-coupled receptors and their associated neurotransmitters. The binding interactions were monitored using a quartz crystal microbalance equipped with liquid-flow injection. The interaction kinetics of G-protein-coupled serotonin 1A receptor and 5-hydroxytyptophan-functionalized surfaces were studied in a real-time, label-free environment. Key binding parameters, such as equilibrium dissociation constants, binding rate constants, and dissociative half-life, were extracted. These parameters are critical for understanding and comparing biomolecular interactions in modern biomedical research. By integrating self-assembly, surface functionalization, and nanofabrication, small-molecule microarrays were created for high-throughput screening. A hybrid soft-lithography, called microcontact insertion printing, was used to pattern small molecules at the dilute scales necessary for highly

  9. Amine control for DUV lithography: identifying hidden sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishkovich, Oleg P.; Larson, Carl E.

    2000-06-01

    The impact of airborne basic molecular contamination (MB) on the performance of chemically amplified (CA) resist systems has been a long standing problem. Low ppb levels of MB may be sufficient for robust 0.25 micrometer lithography with today's advanced CA resist systems combined with adequate chemical air filtration. However, with minimum CD targets heading below 150 nm, the introduction of new resist chemistries for Next Generation Lithography, and the trend towards thinner resists, the impact of MB at low and sub-ppb levels again becomes a critical manufacturing issue. Maximizing process control at aggressive feature sizes requires that the level of MB be maintained below a certain limit, which depends on such parameters as the sensitivity of the CA resist, the type of production tools, product mix, and process characteristics. Three approaches have been identified to reduce the susceptibility of CA resists to MB: effective chemical air filtration, modifications to resist chemistry/processing and cleanroom protocols involving MB monitoring and removal of MB sources from the fab. The final MB concentration depends on the effectiveness of filtration resources and on the total pollution originating from different sources in and out of the cleanroom. There are many well-documented sources of MB. Among these are: ambient air; polluted exhaust from other manufacturing areas re-entering the cleanroom through make-up air handlers; manufacturing process chemicals containing volatile molecular bases; certain cleanroom construction materials, such as paint and ceiling tiles; and volatile, humidifier system boiler additives (corrosion inhibitors), such as morpholine, cyclohexylamine, and dimethylaminoethanol. However, there is also an indeterminate number of other 'hidden' pollution sources, which are neither obvious nor well-documented. None of these sources are new, but they had little impact on earlier semiconductor manufacturing processes because the contamination

  10. Progress in mask replication using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta S.; Brooks, Cynthia B.; Doyle, Gary F.; Brown, Laura; Jones, Chris; Imhof, Joseph; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2011-04-01

    The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. It is anticipated that the lifetime of a single template (for patterned media) or mask (for semiconductor) will be on the order of 104 - 105imprints. This suggests that tens of thousands of templates/masks will be required to satisfy the needs of a manufacturing environment. Electron-beam patterning is too slow to feasibly deliver these volumes, but instead can provide a high quality "master" mask which can be replicated many times with an imprint lithography tool. This strategy has the capability to produce the required supply of "working" templates/masks. In this paper, we review the development of the mask form factor, imprint replication tools and processes specifically for semiconductor applications. The requirements needed for semiconductors dictate the need for a well defined form factor for both master and replica masks which is also compatible with the existing mask infrastructure established for the 6025 semi standard, 6" x 6" x 0.25" photomasks. Complying with this standard provides the necessary tooling needed for mask fabrication processes, cleaning, metrology, and inspection. The replica form factor has additional features specific to imprinting such as a pre-patterned mesa. A PerfectaTM MR5000 mask replication tool has been developed specifically to pattern replica masks from an e-beam written master. The system specifications include a throughput of four replicas per hour with an added image placement component of 5nm, 3sigma and a critical dimension uniformity error of less than 1nm, 3sigma. A new process has been developed to fabricate replicas with high contrast alignment marks so that designs for imprint can fit within current

  11. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  12. CO-laser-based photoacoustic trace-gas detection: applications in postharvest physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomens, J.; Zuckermann, H.; Persijn, S.; Parker, D. H.; Harren, F. J. M.

    1998-10-01

    A sensitive CO-laser-based photoacoustic trace-gas detector has been applied to study physiological processes in biological samples. A continuous flow-through system at atmospheric pressure leads the released trace gases from the sample to the photoacoustic resonator cells at flow rates where these processes can be studied with high time resolution. We focus here on transient effects that were found during fermentation of red bell peppers and apples, yielding in particular ethanol and acetaldehyde. Results are discussed also in the light of simultaneous O2 measurements using polarographic oxygen sensors.

  13. Algal Biomass Analysis by Laser-Based Analytical Techniques—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pořízka, Pavel; Prochazková, Petra; Prochazka, David; Sládková, Lucia; Novotný, Jan; Petrilak, Michal; Brada, Michal; Samek, Ota; Pilát, Zdeněk; Zemánek, Pavel; Adam, Vojtěch; Kizek, René; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Algal biomass that is represented mainly by commercially grown algal strains has recently found many potential applications in various fields of interest. Its utilization has been found advantageous in the fields of bioremediation, biofuel production and the food industry. This paper reviews recent developments in the analysis of algal biomass with the main focus on the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and partly Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma techniques. The advantages of the selected laser-based analytical techniques are revealed and their fields of use are discussed in detail. PMID:25251409

  14. Quantum cascade laser-based substance detection: approaching the quantum noise limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuffner, Peter C.; Conroy, Kathryn J.; Boyson, Toby K.; Milford, Greg; Mabrok, Mohamed A.; Kallapur, Abhijit G.; Petersen, Ian R.; Calzada, Maria E.; Spence, Thomas G.; Kirkbride, Kennith P.; Harb, Charles C.

    2011-06-01

    A consortium of researchers at University of New South Wales (UNSW@ADFA), and Loyola University New Orleans (LU NO), together with Australian government security agencies (e.g., Australian Federal Police), are working to develop highly sensitive laser-based forensic sensing strategies applicable to characteristic substances that pose chemical, biological and explosives (CBE) threats. We aim to optimise the potential of these strategies as high-throughput screening tools to detect prohibited and potentially hazardous substances such as those associated with explosives, narcotics and bio-agents.

  15. Real-time quantum cascade laser-based infrared microspectroscopy in-vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger-Lui, N.; Haase, K.; Pucci, A.; Schönhals, A.; Petrich, W.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared microscopy can be performed to observe dynamic processes on a microscopic scale. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy-based microscopes are bound to limitations regarding time resolution, which hampers their potential for imaging fast moving systems. In this manuscript we present a quantum cascade laser-based infrared microscope which overcomes these limitations and readily achieves standard video frame rates. The capabilities of our setup are demonstrated by observing dynamical processes at their specific time scales: fermentation, slow moving Amoeba Proteus and fast moving Caenorhabditis elegans. Mid-infrared sampling rates between 30 min and 20 ms are demonstrated.

  16. Cleaning of optical components for high-power laser-based firing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sparrow, B.D.; Hendrix, J.L.

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the progress of AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), in addressing the issues of cleaning of hardware and optical components for laser-based firing sets. These issues are acceptability of cleaning processes and techniques of other government programs to the quality, reliability, performance, stockpile life, materials compatibility issues, and, perhaps most important, environmentally conscious manufacturing requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE). A review of ``previous cleaning art`` is presented using Military Standards (MIL STDs) and Military Interim Specifications (MISs) as well as empirical data compiled by the authors. Observations on processes and techniques used in building prototype hardware and plans for future work are presented.

  17. Development of Field-deployable Diode-laser-based Water Vapor Dial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Le Hoai, Phong; Abo, Makoto; Sakai, Tetsu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for lower-tropospheric water vapor observation in Tokyo, Japan. A photoacoustic cell is used for spectroscopy experiment around absorption peaks of 829.022 nm and 829.054 nm. The water vapor density extracted from the observational data agrees with the referenced radiosonde data. Furthermore, we applied modulated pulse technique for DIAL transmitter. It enables DIAL to measure water vapor profile for both low and high altitude regions.

  18. Terahertz quantum cascade lasers based on two-dimensional photonic crystal resonators.

    PubMed

    Sirigu, Lorenzo; Terazzi, Romain; Amanti, Maria I; Giovannini, Marcella; Faist, Jèrome; Dunbar, L Andrea; Houdré, Romuald

    2008-04-14

    We demonstrate high spectral control from surface emitting THz Quantum Cascade Lasers based on a two-dimensional photonic crystal cavity. The perforated top metallic contact acts as an in plane resonator in a tight double-metal plasmonic waveguide providing a strong optical feedback without needing three-dimensional cavity features. The optical far-field patterns do not exhibit the expected symmetry and the shape of the cavity mode. The difference is attributed to a metal surface plasmon mediated light outcoupling mechanism also responsible for the relatively low extraction efficiency. PMID:18542623

  19. Laser-Based Trespassing Prediction in Restrictive Environments: A Linear Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cheein, Fernando Auat; Scaglia, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Stationary range laser sensors for intruder monitoring, restricted space violation detections and workspace determination are extensively used in risky environments. In this work we present a linear based approach for predicting the presence of moving agents before they trespass a laser-based restricted space. Our approach is based on the Taylor's series expansion of the detected objects' movements. The latter makes our proposal suitable for embedded applications. In the experimental results (carried out in different scenarios) presented herein, our proposal shows 100% of effectiveness in predicting trespassing situations. Several implementation results and statistics analysis showing the performance of our proposal are included in this work.

  20. A laser-based sensor system for tire tread deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yi; Tuononen, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Optical tire sensors are powerful engineering tools that can reveal the mechanisms behind tire-road interactions. This paper presents a laser-based sensor system to measure tire-tread block deformation. The methodology and corresponding procedure for the system are introduced. Practical issues, such as tire sensor localization, are discussed. Validation experiments were conducted on a chassis dynamometer, and an asymmetric tire tread deformation along the contact patch was observed. It is proposed that asymmetric tread deformation is due to rolling resistance. The measurements under different operational conditions, including the rolling direction, wheel load, rolling velocity, and inflation pressure, were analyzed in the context of rolling resistance.

  1. Vacuum space charge effect in laser-based solid-state photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Jeff; Hellmann, Stefan; Jozwiak, Chris; Smallwood, Christopher; Hussain, Zahid; Kaindl, Robert; Kipp, Lutz; Rossnagel, Kai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2009-08-05

    We report a systematic measurement of the space charge effect observed in the few-ps laser pulse regime in laser-based solid-state photoemission spectroscopy experiments. The broadening and the shift of a gold Fermi edge as a function of spot size, laser power, and emission angle are characterized for pulse lengths of 6 ps and 6 eV photon energy. The results are used as a benchmark for an N-body numerical simulation and are compared to different regimes used in photoemission spectroscopy. These results provide an important reference for the design of time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy setups and next-generation light sources.

  2. All-fiber amplifier similariton laser based on a fiber Bragg grating filter.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Michel; Gagnon, Mathieu; Duval, Simon; Bernier, Martin; Piché, Michel

    2015-12-01

    This article presents, for the first time to our knowledge, an all-fiber amplifier similariton laser based on a fiber Bragg grating filter. The laser emits 2.9 nJ pulses at a wavelength of 1554 nm with a repetition rate of 31 MHz. The dechirped pulses have a duration of 89 fs. The characteristic features of the pulse profile and spectrum along with the dynamics of the laser are highlighted in representative simulations. These simulations also address the effect of the filter shape and detuning with respect to the gain spectral peak. PMID:26625073

  3. Laser-Based Methods for Detection of Nitric Oxide in Plants.

    PubMed

    Mandon, Julien; Mur, Luis A J; Harren, Frans J M; Cristescu, Simona M

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in plant signaling and in response to various stress conditions. Therefore, real-time measurements of NO production provide better insights into understanding plant processes and can help developing strategies to improve food production and postharvest quality. Using laser-based spectroscopic methods, sensitive, online, in planta measurements of plant-pathogen interactions are possible. This chapter introduces the basic principle of the optical detectors using different laser sources for accurate monitoring of fast dynamic changes of NO production. Several applications are also presented to demonstrate the suitability of these detectors for detection of NO in plants. PMID:27094415

  4. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  5. Multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on random distributed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyang; Dong, Xinyong; Jiang, Meng; Yu, Xia; Shum, Ping

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on random distributed feedback via a 20-km-long single-mode fiber together with a Sagnac loop mirror. The number of channels can be modulated from 2 to 8 at room temperature when the pump power is changed from 30 to 180 mW, indicating that wavelength competition caused by homogenous gain broadening of erbium-doped fiber is significantly suppressed. Other advantages of the laser include low cost, low-threshold pump power and simple fabrication.

  6. Synchronously pumped picosecond all-fibre Raman laser based on phosphorus-doped silica fibre.

    PubMed

    Kobtsev, Sergey; Kukarin, Sergey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey

    2015-07-13

    Reported for the first time is picosecond-range pulse generation in an all-fibre Raman laser based on P₂O₅-doped silica fibre. Employment of phosphor-silicate fibre made possible single-cascade spectral transformation of pumping pulses at 1084 nm into 270-ps long Raman laser pulses at 1270 nm. The highest observed fraction of the Stokes component radiation at 1270 nm in the total output of the Raman laser amounted to 30%. The identified optimal duration of the input pulses at which the amount of Stokes component radiation in a ~16-m long phosphorus-based Raman fibre converter reaches its maximum was 140-180 ps.

  7. Zone-plate-array lithography (ZPL): a maskless fast-turn-around system for microoptic device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rajesh; Gil, Dario; Carter, David J. D.; Patel, Amil; Smith, Henry I.

    2003-01-01

    Ever-increasing demands of smaller feature sizes and larger throughputs have catapulted the semicondutor lithography juggernaut to develop immensely complex and expensive systems. However, it is not clear if the lithography needs for microoptic and other "botique" device fabrication are being addressed. ZPAL is a new nanolithography technique which leverages advances in micromechanics and diffractive optics technologies. We present ZPAL as the ideal system for such non-conventional lithography needs.

  8. Initial experimentation with in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kincaid, Russell; Servol, Marina; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Nesterets, Yakov; Gureyev, Tim; Stevenson, Andrew; Wilkins, Steve; Ye, Hongwei; Lipson, Edward; Toth, Remy; Pogany, Andrew; Coman, Ioana

    2007-03-01

    We have investigated experimentally and theoretically the imaging performance of our newly constructed in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging system with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source. Projection images of nylon fibers with diameters in the 10-330 μm range were obtained using an ultrafast (100 Hz, 28 fs, 40 mJ) laser-based x-ray source with Mo and Ta targets and Be filter, and Gaussian spatial-intensity distribution (FWHMS = 5 μm). A cooled CCD camera (24 μm pitch) with a Gd IIOS II screen coupled via 1:1 optical taper was used (FWHMD = 50 μm). We have investigated nylon-fiber image quality vs. imaging setup geometry and x-ray spectra. The following parameters were evaluated: contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, and sampling. In addition, we performed theoretical simulation of image formation for the same objects but within a wide range of geometrical parameters. The rigorous wave-optical formalism was used for modeling of the free-space propagation of x-rays from the object plane to the detector, and the "projection approximation" was used. We found reasonable agreement between predictions of our analytical model and the experiments. We conclude that: a) Optimum magnification maximizing contrast and SNR is almost independent of the source-to-detector (R) distance and depends strongly on the diameter of the fiber. b) The corresponding maximum values of the contrast and SNR are almost linear with respect to R; the optimum magnification decreases with fiber diameter. c) The minimum diameter of fiber defines the minimum source-to-object distance R I if R is fixed and the object is moved.

  9. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems.

  10. Concentric dot-ring metal nanostructures prepared by colloidal lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zopf, D.; Schmidl, G.; Fritzsche, W.; Stranik, O.

    2016-10-01

    A large scale production of well-defined metallic nanostructures represents an important step for a real application of plasmonic technology. Here, we report about a development in colloidal lithography for the production of metallic nanostructures of flexible geometry, which can be changed between disks, cones, rings and even concentric dot-ring structures. We show that the simple spherical colloidal mask—applied to produce metallic disks—can be modified by chemical and plasma etching process to produce either ring or dot-ring structure. Furthermore, etching of the colloidal mask leads to cone shaped metallic nanostructures. All these structures are prepared by the same fabrication steps, and different geometries are achieved just by variation of the fabrication parameters. We are able to prepare homogenously dispersed nanostructures (with defined density) with a height between 20 and 50 nm and a lateral dimension between 100 and 200 nm. In the realized nanostructures, the thickness of the ring is 46.2 ± 4.4 nm and the dot structure has an outer diameter of ˜217 nm.

  11. Study on immersion lithography defectivity improvement in memory device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiming; Hu, Huayong; Wu, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    As integrated circuit (IC) industry steps into immersion lithography's era, defectivity in photolithography becomes more complex which requires more efforts in the analysis and solution finding when compared to traditional dry lithographic process. In this paper, we focus on one type of immersion defect from memory or flash memory devices with typical mask layouts. Since the use of self-aligned double patterning (SADP) or other double patterning techniques, the original single pattern layer has to be split into 2 mask layers: logic area vs cell area. One characteristic of such split process is that the total mask transmission rate (TR) is above 70%, with extended open area and a pattern area with a transmission rate close to 50%. This indicates that it may have special defect mechanism and type compared to logic devices. We have found one type of residue defect with center ring-like map. We have studied this defect with different development recipes and analyzed their underlying mechanisms. We have also studied the effect of different immersion photoresists including types with top-coating and without top-coating, as well as the effect of bottom anti-reflection coating (BARC) substrate (organic-BARC/Si-BARC). The results of our study will be presented and discussed.

  12. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems. PMID:27345766

  13. Magnesium diboride nanobridges fabricated by electron-beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Malisa, A.; Charlebois, S.; Lindstroem, T.

    2005-12-15

    MgB{sub 2} nanobridges were fabricated by e-beam lithography and Ar-ion beam milling. Nanobridges of widths ranging from 60 nm to 1 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m in length were realized by Ar-ion beam milling using amorphous carbon as etching mask. The processing did not harm the superconducting properties appreciably. High values of the critical current density, more than 10 MA/cm{sup 2}, were measured for bridges with widths down to 60 nm. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics showed a behavior typical of a bridge going normal, after the critical current is exceeded, and remaining normal as the current is decreased to a lower switch back value due to Joule heating. We could also observe switching behavior in some bridges indicating formation of normal hotspots in the bridges before they returned to their superconducting state. Alternative explanations may include natural grain boundaries in the film or the movement of Abrikosov vortices. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics showing critical current densities up to 5x10{sup 7}A/cm{sup 2} indicates excellent film properties in the nanobridges.

  14. Replica mold for nanoimprint lithography from a novel hybrid resin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bong Kuk; Hong, Lan-Young; Lee, Hea Yeon; Kim, Dong-Pyo; Kawai, Tomoji

    2009-10-01

    The use of durable replica molds with high feature resolution has been proposed as an inexpensive and convenient route for manufacturing nanostructured materials. A simple and fast duplication method, involving the use of a master mold to create durable polymer replicas as imprinting molds, has been demonstrated using both UV- and thermal nanoimprinting lithography (NIL). To obtain a high-durability replicating material, a dual UV/thermal-curable, organic-inorganic hybrid resin was synthesized using a sol-gel-based combinatorial method. The cross-linked hybrid resin exhibited high transparency to UV light and resistance to organic solvents. Molds made of this material showed good mechanical properties (Young's modulus=1.76 GPa) and gas permeability. The low viscosity of the hybrid resin (approximately 29 cP) allowed it to be easily transferred to relief nanostructures on transparent glass substrates using UV-NIL at room temperature and low pressure (0.2 MPa) over a relatively short time (80 s). A low surface energy release agent was successfully coated onto the hybrid mold surface without destroying the imprinted nanostructures, even after O2 plasma treatment. Nanostructures with feature sizes down to 80 nm were successfully reproduced using these molds in both UV- and thermal-NIL processes. After repeating 10 imprinting cycles at relatively high temperature and pressure, no detectable collapse or contamination of the replica surface was observed. These results indicate that the hybrid molds could tolerate repeated UV- and thermal-NIL processes.

  15. Characterization of Multilayer Reflective Coatings for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Wedowski, M.; Gullikson, E.M.; Underwood, J.H.; Spiller, E.A.; Montcalm, C.; Kearney, P.A.; Bajt, S.; Schmidt, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1999-11-01

    The synchrotron-based reflectometer at beamline 6.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley is an important metrology tool within the current Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) program. This program is a joint activity of three National Laboratories and a consortium of leading semiconductor manufacturers. Its goal is the development of a technology for routine production of sub-100 nm feature sizes for microelectronic circuits. Multilayer-coated normal-incidence optical surfaces reflecting in the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spectral range near 13 nm are the basis for this emerging technology. All optical components of EUV lithographic steppers need to be characterized at-wavelength during their development and manufacturing process. Multilayer coating uniformity and gradient, accurate wavelength matching and high peak reflectances are the main parameters to be optimized. The mechanical and optical properties of the reflectometer at ALS beamline 6.3.2 proved to be well suited for the needs of the current EUVL program. In particular the facility is highly precise in its wavelength calibration and the determination of absolute EUV reflectance. The reproducibility of results of measurements at ALS beamline 6.3.2 is 0.2 % for reflectivity and 0.002 nm for wavelength.

  16. Aryl sulfonates as neutral photoacid generators (PAGs) for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Robert; Blackwell, James M.; Younkin, Todd R.; Putna, E. Steve; Esswein, Katherine; DiPasquale, Antonio G.; Callahan, Ryan; Tsubaki, Hideaki; Tsuchihashi, Tooru

    2009-03-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is a leading candidate for printing sub-32 nm hp patterns. In order for EUVL to be commercially viable at these dimensions, a continuous evolution of the photoresist material set is required to simultaneously meet the aggressive specifications for resolution, resist sensitivity, LWR, and outgassing rate. Alternative PAG designs, especially if tailored for EUVL, may aid in the formation of a material set that helps achieve these aggressive targets. We describe the preparation, characterization, and lithographic evaluation of aryl sulfonates as non-ionic or neutral photoacid generators (PAGs) for EUVL. Full lithographic characterization is reported for our first generation resist formulation using compound H, MAP-1H-2.5. It is benchmarked against MAP-1P-5.0, which contains the well-known sulfonium PAG, triphenylsulfonium triflate (compound P). Z-factor analysis indicates nZ32 = 81.4 and 16.8 respectively, indicating that our first generation aryl sulfonate formulations require about 4.8x improvement to match the results achieved with a model onium PAG. Improving the acid generation efficiency and use of the generated byproducts is key to the continued optimization of this class of PAGs. To that end, we believe EI-MS fragmentation patterns and molecular simulations can be used to understand and optimize the nature and efficiency of electron-induced PAG fragmentation.

  17. Evaluation of rinse material and process for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuma; Itani, Toshiro

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is the most promising option for future manufacturing of IC devices at sub-10nm node. However, resist pattern collapse is one concern for high volume manufacturing. To mitigate resist pattern collapse, rinse material is applied for EUVL. However at narrow pitches, it was found that some rinse materials caused pattern bridging and critical dimension (CD) shift. In this study, we suggest a model of resist deformation by surfactant penetration to resist pattern. Moreover, we focused on affinity between resist and surfactant which is main components in rinse material to clarify the pattern bridging and CD-shift issue by inducing surfactant penetration to resist pattern. To define the affinity between each material, Solubility Parameter (SP) value and Difference of Solubility Parameter value (DSP) of each material was calculated. The relation between surfactant penetration and DSP of each material was investigated. To clarify the relation, stress test was applied to enhance pattern deformation. As a result, it can be said that there is good correlation between surfactant penetration and SP value. Using these studies, rinse material design with low affinity surfactant for resist was able to achieve no CD-shift and less pattern bridging defect number.

  18. Interdigitated multicolored bioink micropatterns by multiplexed polymer pen lithography.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Greiner, Alexandra M; Weschenfelder, Markus; Waterkotte, Björn; Bastmeyer, Martin; Fuchs, Harald

    2013-10-11

    Multiplexing, i.e., the application and integration of more than one ink in an interdigitated microscale pattern, is still a challenge for microcontact printing (μCP) and similar techniques. On the other hand there is a strong demand for interdigitated patterns of more than one protein on subcellular to cellular length scales in the lower micrometer range in biological experiments. Here, a new integrative approach is presented for the fabrication of bioactive microarrays and complex multi-ink patterns by polymer pen lithography (PPL). By taking advantage of the strength of microcontact printing (μCP) combined with the spatial control and capability of precise repetition of PPL in an innovative way, a new inking and writing strategy is introduced for PPL that enables true multiplexing within each repetitive subpattern. Furthermore, a specific ink/substrate platform is demonstrated that can be used to immobilize functional proteins and other bioactive compounds over a biotin-streptavidin approach. This patterning strategy aims specifically at application by cell biologists and biochemists addressing a wide range of relevant pattern sizes, easy pattern generation and adjustment, the use of only biofriendly, nontoxic chemicals, and mild processing conditions during the patterning steps. The retained bioactivity of the fabricated cm(2) area filling multiprotein patterns is demonstrated by showing the interaction of fibroblasts and neurons with multiplexed structures of fibronectin and laminin or laminin and ephrin, respectively. PMID:23554307

  19. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems.

  20. Highly hydrophobic materials for ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takebe, Yoko; Shirota, Naoko; Sasaki, Takashi; Murata, Koichi; Yokokoji, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography, the impact of water on resist performance and the possibility of damage to the lens by the components eluted from the resist material are seriously concern. And much work has shown that controlling the water-resist interface is critical to enabling high scan rates. Many topcoat materials have been developed to control the aforementioned interfacial properties. Developable topcoats have been particularly investigated as suitable candidates for its applicability to the resist developing process. Achieving the balance between the low surface energy required for higher receding contact angle and the base solubility for topcoat removal is challenging. We have already reported FUGU polymer which have partially fluorinated monocyclic structure and hexafluoroalcohol(HFA) group and showed that its developer solubility was excellent but hydrophobicity was insufficient for high scan rate. We have also reported that co-polymers of FUGU and highly fluorinated monomers which have perfluorinated cyclic structure had sufficient hydrophobicity but lower developer solubility. We have found that it was difficult to use these copolymers in themselves as topcoat. But by blending of moderate amount of these copolymers into FUGU polymer, we have finally obtained highly hydrophobic developer-soluble topcoat. Hydrophobicity can be controlled by blending ratio. Furthermore we have newly successfully synthesized a series of fluoropolymers, FIT polymer partially fluorinated monocyclic structure and having carboxylic acid group as developer-soluble unit. When FIT polymer as well as FUGU polymer, was blended to highly hydrophobic copolymer, the blended polymer also showed higher hydrophobicity keeping sufficient developer solubility.

  1. Electron beam inspection methods for imprint lithography at 32 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  2. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems. PMID:27345766

  3. Large-Area Semiconducting Graphene Nanomesh Tailored by Interferometric Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Alireza; He, Xiang; Alaie, Seyedhamidreza; Ghasemi, Javad; Dawson, Noel Mayur; Cavallo, Francesca; Habteyes, Terefe G.; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nanostructures are attracting a great deal of interest because of newly emerging properties originating from quantum confinement effects. We report on using interferometric lithography to fabricate uniform, chip-scale, semiconducting graphene nanomesh (GNM) with sub-10 nm neck widths (smallest edge-to-edge distance between two nanoholes). This approach is based on fast, low-cost, and high-yield lithographic technologies and demonstrates the feasibility of cost-effective development of large-scale semiconducting graphene sheets and devices. The GNM is estimated to have a room temperature energy bandgap of ~30 meV. Raman studies showed that the G band of the GNM experiences a blue shift and broadening compared to pristine graphene, a change which was attributed to quantum confinement and localization effects. A single-layer GNM field effect transistor exhibited promising drive current of ~3.9 μA/μm and ON/OFF current ratios of ~35 at room temperature. The ON/OFF current ratio of the GNM-device displayed distinct temperature dependence with about 24-fold enhancement at 77 K. PMID:26126936

  4. Large-scale organic nanowire lithography and electronics.

    PubMed

    Min, Sung-Yong; Kim, Tae-Sik; Kim, Beom Joon; Cho, Himchan; Noh, Yong-Young; Yang, Hoichang; Cho, Jeong Ho; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Controlled alignment and patterning of individual semiconducting nanowires at a desired position in a large area is a key requirement for electronic device applications. High-speed, large-area printing of highly aligned individual nanowires that allows control of the exact numbers of wires, and their orientations and dimensions is a significant challenge for practical electronics applications. Here we use a high-speed electrohydrodynamic organic nanowire printer to print large-area organic semiconducting nanowire arrays directly on device substrates in a precisely, individually controlled manner; this method also enables sophisticated large-area nanowire lithography for nano-electronics. We achieve a maximum field-effect mobility up to 9.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with extremely low contact resistance (<5.53 Ω cm), even in nano-channel transistors based on single-stranded semiconducting nanowires. We also demonstrate complementary inverter circuit arrays comprising well-aligned p-type and n-type organic semiconducting nanowires. Extremely fast nanolithography using printed semiconducting nanowire arrays provide a simple, reliable method of fabricating large-area and flexible nano-electronics.

  5. Optimizing the lithography model calibration algorithms for NTD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, C. M.; Lo, Fred; Yang, Elvis; Yang, T. H.; Chen, K. C.

    2016-03-01

    As patterns shrink to the resolution limits of up-to-date ArF immersion lithography technology, negative tone development (NTD) process has been an increasingly adopted technique to get superior imaging quality through employing bright-field (BF) masks to print the critical dark-field (DF) metal and contact layers. However, from the fundamental materials and process interaction perspectives, several key differences inherently exist between NTD process and the traditional positive tone development (PTD) system, especially the horizontal/vertical resist shrinkage and developer depletion effects, hence the traditional resist parameters developed for the typical PTD process have no longer fit well in NTD process modeling. In order to cope with the inherent differences between PTD and NTD processes accordingly get improvement on NTD modeling accuracy, several NTD models with different combinations of complementary terms were built to account for the NTD-specific resist shrinkage, developer depletion and diffusion, and wafer CD jump induced by sub threshold assistance feature (SRAF) effects. Each new complementary NTD term has its definite aim to deal with the NTD-specific phenomena. In this study, the modeling accuracy is compared among different models for the specific patterning characteristics on various feature types. Multiple complementary NTD terms were finally proposed to address all the NTD-specific behaviors simultaneously and further optimize the NTD modeling accuracy. The new algorithm of multiple complementary NTD term tested on our critical dark-field layers demonstrates consistent model accuracy improvement for both calibration and verification.

  6. Tunable Nanopatterning of Conductive Polymers via Electrohydrodynamic Lithography.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Jonathan James Stanley; Farrer, Ian; Oppenheimer, Pola Goldberg

    2016-03-22

    An increasing number of technologies require the fabrication of conductive structures on a broad range of scales and over large areas. Here, we introduce advanced yet simple electrohydrodynamic lithography (EHL) for patterning conductive polymers directly on a substrate with high fidelity. We illustrate the generality of this robust, low-cost method by structuring thin polypyrrole films via electric-field-induced instabilities, yielding well-defined conductive structures with feature sizes ranging from tens of micrometers to hundreds of nanometers. Exploitation of a conductive polymer induces free charge suppression of the field in the polymer film, paving the way for accessing scale sizes in the low submicron range. We show the feasibility of the polypyrrole-based structures for field-effect transistor devices. Controlled EHL pattering of conductive polymer structures at the micro and nano scale demonstrated in this study combined with the possibility of effectively tuning the dimensions of the tailor-made architectures might herald a route toward various submicron device applications in supercapacitors, photovoltaics, sensors, and electronic displays. PMID:26905779

  7. Highly charged ion beam applied to lithography technique.

    PubMed

    Momota, Sadao; Nojiri, Yoichi; Taniguchi, Jun; Miyamoto, Iwao; Morita, Noboru; Kawasegi, Noritaka

    2008-02-01

    In various fields of nanotechnology, the importance of nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) structures is increasing. In order to develop an efficient process to fabricate nanoscale 3D structures, we have applied highly charged ion (HCI) beams to the ion-beam lithography (IBL) technique. Ar-ion beams with various charge states (1+ to 9+) were applied to fabricate spin on glass (SOG) and Si by means of the IBL technique. The Ar ions were prepared by a facility built at Kochi University of Technology, which includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (NANOGAN, 10 GHz). IBL fabrication was performed as a function of not only the charge state but also the energy and the dose of Ar ions. The present results show that the application of an Ar(9+) beam reduces the etching time for SOG and enhances the etching depth compared with those observed with Ar ions in lower charged states. Considering the high-energy deposition of HCI at a surface, the former phenomena can be understood consistently. Also, the latter phenomena can be understood based on anomalously deep structural changes, which are remarkable for glasses. Furthermore, it has also been shown that the etching depth can be easily controlled with the kinetic energy of the Ar ions. These results show the possibilities of the IBL technique with HCI beams in the field of nanoscale 3D fabrication. PMID:18315242

  8. Nanoimprint lithography enables memristor crossbars and hybrid circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qiangfei; Wu, Wei; Jung, Gun-Young; Pi, Shuang; Lin, Peng; Chen, Yong; Li, Xuema; Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Williams, R. Stanley

    2015-11-01

    Memristive devices are promising building blocks for enhanced CMOS hardware in data storage and computing. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) has been an enabling technology in the past decade for exploring novel devices and circuits. In this paper, the authors review the progress and technical aspects of the fabrication and integration of memristor crossbar arrays using NIL. Since the key component of successful fabrication is the imprint mold, the material selection, master mold fabrication, anti-sticking treatment and cleaning are first discussed. The requirements and composition of imprint resists, in particular low-viscosity liquid resists that cross-link upon ultraviolet light radiation, are investigated next. After the description of imprint systems and alignment mechanisms, a disruptive self-alignment fabrication scheme for crossbar arrays is presented. Finally, the first implementation of a memristor/CMOS hybrid circuit using NIL on foundry-made CMOS substrates, together with more recent developments, is recounted. The challenges and possible solutions for NIL as a primary tool for crossbar fabrication are also proposed and discussed.

  9. Print-to-pattern dry film photoresist lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Shaun P.; Murphy, Terrence M., Jr.; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-05-01

    Here we present facile microfabrication processes, referred to as print-to-pattern dry film photoresist (DFP) lithography, that utilize the combined advantages of wax printing and DFP to produce micropatterned substrates with high resolution over a large surface area in a non-cleanroom setting. The print-to-pattern methods can be performed in an out-of-cleanroom environment making microfabrication much more accessible to minimally equipped laboratories. Two different approaches employing either wax photomasks or wax etchmasks from a solid ink desktop printer have been demonstrated that allow the DFP to be processed in a negative tone or positive tone fashion, respectively, with resolutions of 100 µm. The effect of wax melting on resolution and as a bonding material was also characterized. In addition, solid ink printers have the capacity to pattern large areas with high resolution, which was demonstrated by stacking DFP layers in a 50 mm × 50 mm woven pattern with 1 mm features. By using an office printer to generate the masking patterns, the mask designs can be easily altered in a graphic user interface to enable rapid prototyping.

  10. Plasma and Radiation Modelling of EUV Sources for Micro Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruecken, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Future extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography will require very high radiation intensities in a narrow wavelength range around 13.5 nm, which is most efficiently emitted as line radiation by highly ionized heavy particles. Currently the most intense EUV sources are based on Xenon or Tin discharges. After having investigated the limits of a hollow cathode triggered Xenon pinch discharge a Laser triggered Tin vacuum spark discharge is favored by Philips Extreme UV. Plasma and radiation properties of these highly transient discharges will be compared. Besides simple MHD-models the ADAS software package has been used to generate important atomic and spectral data of the relevant ion stages. To compute excitation and radiation properties, collisional radiative equilibria of individual ion stages are computed. For many lines opacity effects cannot be neglected. The optical depths, however, allow for a treatment based on escape factors. Due to the rapid change of plasma parameters the abundances of the different ionization stages must be computed dynamically. This requires effective ionization and recombination rates, which can also be supplied by ADAS.

  11. E-Beam Exposure Of Optical Resist For Mask Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Joseph; Walker, David M.

    1987-06-01

    E-Beam resists such as PBS have been used successfully by the mask making industry for many years, however, PBS suffers from a few major disadvantages. These disadvantages include safety issues stemming from solvent processing, lack of latitude, particularly with respect to humidity during development, poor plasma durability and a long, many step process which increases the probability of added defects. This paper describes a process developed to utilize MP 2400-17 optical photoresist for electron beam mask lithography and presents production results achieved. The benefits of optical photoresist over conventional positive EB resists are aqueous processing, wide and controllable process latitude, plasma durability, increased resolution and lower achievable defect densities. In addition, E-Beam exposed optical photo resists can be processed to produce a high resolution negative image, potentially replacing COP. One major drawback is decreased exposure sensitivity. Although the required multi-write scans increase total write time, the averaging effect of multiple exposures do produce superior line edge definition and resolution for a given address unit size. An analysis is presented demonstrating that the reduced process time and complexity, coupled with increased yield, can more than offset the cost of increased write time.

  12. Patterned assembly of colloidal particles by confined dewetting lithography.

    PubMed

    Celio, Hugo; Barton, Emily; Stevenson, Keith J

    2006-12-19

    We report the assembly of colloidal particles into confined arrangements and patterns on various cleaned and chemically modified solid substrates using a method which we term "confined dewetting lithography" or CDL for short. The experimental setup for CDL is a simple deposition cell where an aqueous suspension of colloidal particles (e.g., polystyrene spheres) is placed between a floating deposition template (i.e., metal microgrid) and the solid substrate. The voids of the deposition template serve as an array of micrometer-sized reservoirs where several hydrodynamic processes are confined. These processes include water evaporation, meniscus formation, convective flow, rupturing, dewetting, and capillary-bridge formation. We discuss the optimal conditions where the CDL has a high efficiency to deposit intricate patterns of colloidal particles using polystyrene spheres (PS; 4.5, 2.0, 1.7, 0.11, 0.064 microm diameter) and square and hexagonal deposition templates as model systems. We find that the optimization conditions of the CDL method, when using submicrometer, sulfate-functionalized PS particles, are primarily dependent on minimizing attractive particle-substrate interactions. The CDL methodology described herein presents a relatively simple and rapid method to assemble virtually any geometric pattern, including more complex patterns assembled using PS particles with different diameters, from aqueous suspensions by choosing suitable conditions and materials. PMID:17154636

  13. Design of a high positioning contact probe for plasmonic lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jinhee; Kim, Yongwoo; Kim, Seok; Jung, Howon; Hahn, Jae W.

    2012-03-01

    We suggest a geometrically modified probe to achieve high positioning accuracy for plasmonic lithography which can record nanometer scale features and has high throughput. Instead of a cantilever probe, we propose a circular probe which has arc-shaped arms that hold the tip at the center. The modified probe is based on the fixed-fixed beam in material mechanics. To calculate the tip displacement, we used a finite element method (FEM) for a circular probe and compared the results with cantilever probe. We considered a silicon-based micro-fabrication process to design the probe. The probe has a square outline boundary with a length of 50μm, four arms, and a pyramidal tip with a height of 5μm. The ratio of the lateral tip displacement to the vertical deflection was evaluated to indicate the positioning accuracy. The probe has higher accuracy by a factor of 103 and 10 in approach mode and scan mode, respectively, compared to a cantilever probe. We expect that a circular probe is appropriate for the applications that require high positioning accuracy, such as nanolithography with a contact probe and multiple-probe arrays.

  14. Development of procedures for programmable proximity aperture lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, H. J.; Gorelick, S.; Puttaraksa, N.; Napari, M.; Hokkanen, M. J.; Norarat, R.

    2013-07-01

    Programmable proximity aperture lithography (PPAL) with MeV ions has been used in Jyväskylä and Chiang Mai universities for a number of years. Here we describe a number of innovations and procedures that have been incorporated into the LabView-based software. The basic operation involves the coordination of the beam blanker and five motor-actuated translators with high accuracy, close to the minimum step size with proper anti-collision algorithms. By using special approaches, such writing calibration patterns, linearisation of position and careful backlash correction the absolute accuracy of the aperture size and position, can be improved beyond the standard afforded by the repeatability of the translator end-point switches. Another area of consideration has been the fluence control procedures. These involve control of the uniformity of the beam where different approaches for fluence measurement such as simultaneous aperture current and the ion current passing through the aperture using a Faraday cup are used. Microfluidic patterns may contain many elements that make-up mixing sections, reaction chambers, separation columns and fluid reservoirs. To facilitate conception and planning we have implemented a .svg file interpreter, that allows the use of scalable vector graphics files produced by standard drawing software for generation of patterns made up of rectangular elements.

  15. Exposure tool chuck flatness study and effects on lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee-Roy, Moitreyee; Tan, Cher-Huan; Tan, Yong K.; Samudra, Ganesh S.

    2001-04-01

    The flatness of the chuck on the stepper or scanner is critical to obtain good patterning performance especially in the sub quarter micron regime. In this study an attempt has been made to u7nderstand the flatness signature of the chuck by measuring the flatness of a super flat wafer in two different notch orientations and subtracting the signatures. If the chuck or the wafer were ideally flat then there would be no different in flatness signatures between the two orientations. However in practice difference was found as neither the chuck nor the wafer is perfectly flat. This difference could be used to obtain an understanding about the flatness signature on the scanner chuck itself. This signature could be used by equipment manufacturers as an additional method to measure chuck flatness so that only superior chucks are used for equipment that are being made for sub quarter micron lithography. The second part of this study consisted of finding out the effect of this flatness on the resulting CD on wafers. Wafers, with different flatness signatures, were exposed at different orientations and the CD variations were evaluated. All wafers showed improvements in the orientation of better flatness. For some wafers the improvements was significant but for others the result was close to the CD variation due to rework. This could be attributed to the inherent signatures on the wafers and how abrupt the change in flatness was. The wafer deformation factor was not analyzed for brevity as this would make the problem far more complex.

  16. Tunable Nanopatterning of Conductive Polymers via Electrohydrodynamic Lithography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of technologies require the fabrication of conductive structures on a broad range of scales and over large areas. Here, we introduce advanced yet simple electrohydrodynamic lithography (EHL) for patterning conductive polymers directly on a substrate with high fidelity. We illustrate the generality of this robust, low-cost method by structuring thin polypyrrole films via electric-field-induced instabilities, yielding well-defined conductive structures with feature sizes ranging from tens of micrometers to hundreds of nanometers. Exploitation of a conductive polymer induces free charge suppression of the field in the polymer film, paving the way for accessing scale sizes in the low submicron range. We show the feasibility of the polypyrrole-based structures for field-effect transistor devices. Controlled EHL pattering of conductive polymer structures at the micro and nano scale demonstrated in this study combined with the possibility of effectively tuning the dimensions of the tailor-made architectures might herald a route toward various submicron device applications in supercapacitors, photovoltaics, sensors, and electronic displays. PMID:26905779

  17. Dots-on-the-fly electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isotalo, Tero J.; Niemi, Tapio

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for electron-beam lithography (EBL) of periodic nanostructures. This technique can rapidly produce arrays of various metallic and etched nanostructures with line and pitch dimensions approaching the beam spot size. Our approach is based on often neglected functionality which is inherent in most modern EBL systems. The raster/vector beam exposure system of the EBL software is exploited to produce arrays of pixel-like spots without the need to define coordinates for each spot in the array. Producing large arrays with traditional EBL techniques is cumbersome during pattern design, usually leads to large data files and easily results in system memory overload during patterning. In Dots-on-the-fly (DOTF) patterning, instead of specifying the locations of individual spots, a boundary for the array is given and the spacing between spots within the boundary is specified by the beam step size. A designed pattern element thus becomes a container object, with beam spacing acting as a parameterized location list for an array of spots confined by that container. With the DOTF method, a single pattern element, such as a square, rectangle or circle, can be used to produce a large array containing thousands of spots. In addition to simple arrays of nano-dots, we expand the technique to produce more complex, highly tunable arrays and structures on substrates of silicon, ITO/ FTO coated glass, as well as uncoated fused silica, quartz and sapphire.

  18. Fabrication of Microcoils Using X-ray Lithography and Metallizaiton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Daiji; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Setomoto, Masaru; Hattori, Tadashi

    Coils and actuators are finding an increasing number of uses in various fields. The demand for microcoils and microactuators is increasing due to the recent progress in downsizing and the increasing sophistication of various industrial products. Actuators account for a large percentage of the total volume and weight of many product compared with other parts and devices that are typically included. However, coils are unsuitable for miniaturization because of their structure. Therefore, we have proposed the use of high aspect ratio microcoils in order to reduce their size and to increase their performance. To realize microcoils such as these, we have developed a fabrication process based on three-dimensional deep X-ray lithography and metallization techniques. We have also used a dipping method in order to obtain thick layers of photoresist on metal bar with diameters of 1 mm. In this paper, we have fabricated microcoils with 10 μm line widths, 20 μm pitch, and aspect ratio of over 5. There is every expectation that high performance microcoils with high aspect ratio coil lines could be manufactured by this process, despite their miniature size.

  19. Print-to-Pattern Dry Film Photoresist Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Shaun P.; Murphy, Terrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Here we present facile microfabrication processes, referred to as Print-to-Pattern dry film photoresist (DFP) lithography, that utilize the combined advantages of wax printing and DFP to produce micropatterned substrates with high resolution over a large surface area in a non-cleanroom setting. The Print-to-Pattern methods can be performed in an out-of-cleanroom environment making microfabrication much more accessible to minimally equipped laboratories. Two different approaches employing either wax photomasks or wax etchmasks from a solid ink desktop printer have been demonstrated that allow the DFP to be processed in a negative tone or positive tone fashion, respectively, with resolutions of 100 μm. The effect of wax melting on resolution and as a bonding material was also characterized. In addition, solid ink printers have the capacity to pattern large areas with high resolution which was demonstrated by stacking DFP layers in a 50 mm × 50 mm woven pattern with 1 mm features. By using an office printer to generate the masking patterns, the mask designs can be easily altered in a graphic user interface to enable rapid prototyping. PMID:25125799

  20. Print-to-Pattern Dry Film Photoresist Lithography.

    PubMed

    Garland, Shaun P; Murphy, Terrence M; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-05-01

    Here we present facile microfabrication processes, referred to as Print-to-Pattern dry film photoresist (DFP) lithography, that utilize the combined advantages of wax printing and DFP to produce micropatterned substrates with high resolution over a large surface area in a non-cleanroom setting. The Print-to-Pattern methods can be performed in an out-of-cleanroom environment making microfabrication much more accessible to minimally equipped laboratories. Two different approaches employing either wax photomasks or wax etchmasks from a solid ink desktop printer have been demonstrated that allow the DFP to be processed in a negative tone or positive tone fashion, respectively, with resolutions of 100 μm. The effect of wax melting on resolution and as a bonding material was also characterized. In addition, solid ink printers have the capacity to pattern large areas with high resolution which was demonstrated by stacking DFP layers in a 50 mm × 50 mm woven pattern with 1 mm features. By using an office printer to generate the masking patterns, the mask designs can be easily altered in a graphic user interface to enable rapid prototyping.

  1. Plasma and Radiation Modelling of EUV Sources for Micro Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kruecken, Thomas

    2007-04-06

    Future extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography will require very high radiation intensities in a narrow wavelength range around 13.5 nm, which is most efficiently emitted as line radiation by highly ionized heavy particles. Currently the most intense EUV sources are based on Xenon or Tin discharges. After having investigated the limits of a hollow cathode triggered Xenon pinch discharge a Laser triggered Tin vacuum spark discharge is favored by Philips Extreme UV.Plasma and radiation properties of these highly transient discharges will be compared. Besides simple MHD-models the ADAS software package has been used to generate important atomic and spectral data of the relevant ion stages. To compute excitation and radiation properties, collisional radiative equilibria of individual ion stages are computed. For many lines opacity effects cannot be neglected. The optical depths, however, allow for a treatment based on escape factors. Due to the rapid change of plasma parameters the abundances of the different ionization stages must be computed dynamically. This requires effective ionization and recombination rates, which can also be supplied by ADAS.

  2. Microintaglio Printing for Soft Lithography-Based in Situ Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Biyani, Manish; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Advances in lithographic approaches to fabricating bio-microarrays have been extensively explored over the last two decades. However, the need for pattern flexibility, a high density, a high resolution, affordability and on-demand fabrication is promoting the development of unconventional routes for microarray fabrication. This review highlights the development and uses of a new molecular lithography approach, called “microintaglio printing technology”, for large-scale bio-microarray fabrication using a microreactor array (µRA)-based chip consisting of uniformly-arranged, femtoliter-size µRA molds. In this method, a single-molecule-amplified DNA microarray pattern is self-assembled onto a µRA mold and subsequently converted into a messenger RNA or protein microarray pattern by simultaneously producing and transferring (immobilizing) a messenger RNA or a protein from a µRA mold to a glass surface. Microintaglio printing allows the self-assembly and patterning of in situ-synthesized biomolecules into high-density (kilo-giga-density), ordered arrays on a chip surface with µm-order precision. This holistic aim, which is difficult to achieve using conventional printing and microarray approaches, is expected to revolutionize and reshape proteomics. This review is not written comprehensively, but rather substantively, highlighting the versatility of microintaglio printing for developing a prerequisite platform for microarray technology for the postgenomic era.

  3. Thermochemical scanning probe lithography of protein gradients at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albisetti, E.; Carroll, K. M.; Lu, X.; Curtis, J. E.; Petti, D.; Bertacco, R.; Riedo, E.

    2016-08-01

    Patterning nanoscale protein gradients is crucial for studying a variety of cellular processes in vitro. Despite the recent development in nano-fabrication technology, combining nanometric resolution and fine control of protein concentrations is still an open challenge. Here, we demonstrate the use of thermochemical scanning probe lithography (tc-SPL) for defining micro- and nano-sized patterns with precisely controlled protein concentration. First, tc-SPL is performed by scanning a heatable atomic force microscopy tip on a polymeric substrate, for locally exposing reactive amino groups on the surface, then the substrate is functionalized with streptavidin and laminin proteins. We show, by fluorescence microscopy on the patterned gradients, that it is possible to precisely tune the concentration of the immobilized proteins by varying the patterning parameters during tc-SPL. This paves the way to the use of tc-SPL for defining protein gradients at the nanoscale, to be used as chemical cues e.g. for studying and regulating cellular processes in vitro.

  4. Revisiting the layout decomposition problem for double patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahng, Andrew B.; Park, Chul-Hong; Xu, Xu; Yao, Hailong

    2008-10-01

    In double patterning lithography (DPL) layout decomposition for 45nm and below process nodes, two features must be assigned opposite colors (corresponding to different exposures) if their spacing is less than the minimum coloring spacing.5, 11, 14 However, there exist pattern configurations for which pattern features separated by less than the minimum coloring spacing cannot be assigned different colors. In such cases, DPL requires that a layout feature be split into two parts. We address this problem using a layout decomposition algorithm that incorporates integer linear programming (ILP), phase conflict detection (PCD), and node-deletion bipartization (NDB) methods. We evaluate our approach on both real-world and artificially generated testcases in 45nm technology. Experimental results show that our proposed layout decomposition method effectively decomposes given layouts to satisfy the key goals of minimized line-ends and maximized overlap margin. There are no design rule violations in the final decomposed layout. While we have previously reported other facets of our research on DPL pattern decomposition,6 the present paper differs from that work in the following key respects: (1) instead of detecting conflict cycles and splitting nodes in conflict cycles to achieve graph bipartization,6 we split all nodes of the conflict graph at all feasible dividing points and then formulate a problem of bipartization by ILP, PCD8 and NDB9 methods; and (2) instead of reporting unresolvable conflict cycles, we report the number of deleted conflict edges to more accurately capture the needed design changes in the experimental results.

  5. Overcoming pattern collapse on e-beam and EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouve, A.; Simon, J.; Pikon, A.; Solak, H.; Vannuffel, C.; Tortai, J.-H.

    2006-03-01

    In this study we investigate the pattern collapse mechanism of dense patterns with resolution under 60nm printed in Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV-IL) and Electron Beam Lithographies (EBL). Pattern collapse occurs when physical properties of the material can't imbalanced the capillary force exerted on the pattern during the drying of the rinse liquid. In former simulation models, the height of the pattern at which collapse occurs (critical height, H c) was predicted using either elastic deformation properties, or plasticizing limit value of the resist. Experimental observations of unstuck patterns, lead us to develop 2 new models considering the adhesion properties of the resist film on the substrate. By comparing simulated to experimental results for varying pattern pitchs printed in 2 Chemically Amplified Resists (CARS), we show that pattern collapse behaviour of EUV-IL and EBL patterns is not only ruled by rigidity or strength of the resist but can be perfectly described with equation defining the unsticking of a non bending pattern. Finally by using surfactinated solution on sub-60nm dense patterns, great improvements in H c values and increase of process window latitude are shown. However, due to larger capillary force, this efficiency decreases with pattern pitch and appears limited on patterns width smaller than 40 nm.

  6. Correcting Laser-Based Water Stable Isotope Readings Biased by Carrier Gas Changes.

    PubMed

    Gralher, Benjamin; Herbstritt, Barbara; Weiler, Markus; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Stumpp, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Recently, laser-based water stable isotope spectrometers have become popular as they enable previously impossible approaches of environmental observations. Consequently, they have been subjected to increasingly heterogeneous atmospheric conditions. However, there is still a severe lack of data on the impact of nonstandardized gas matrices on analyzer performances. Against this background, we investigated the influence of changing proportions of N2, O2, and CO2 in the carrier gas on the isotope measurements of a typical laser-based water stable isotope analyzer (Picarro L2120-i). We combined environmentally relevant mixtures of N2, O2, and CO2 with referenced, flash-evaporated water and found that isotope readings of the same water were altered by up to +14.57‰ for δ(18)O and -35.9‰ for δ(2)H. All tested relationships between carrier gas changes and respective isotope readings were strongly linearly correlated (R(2) > 0.99). Furthermore, an analyzer-measured variable allowed for reliable postcorrection of the biased isotope readings, which we additionally tested on field data. Our findings are of importance for environmental data obtained by analyzers based on the same technology. They are relevant for assays where inconsistent gas matrices or a mismatch in this regard between unknown and reference analyses cannot be excluded, which is in particular common when investigating the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. PMID:27291718

  7. Measurement of nitrous acid (HONO) by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Maamary, Rabih; Gao, Xiaoming; Sigrist, Markus W.; Fertein, Eric; Chen, Weidong

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic detection of short-lived gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) at 1254.85 cm-1 was realized by off-beam coupled quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) in conjunction with an external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL). High sensitivity monitoring of HONO was performed within a very small gas-sample volume (of ~40 mm3) allowing a significant reduction (of about 4 orders of magnitude) of air sampling residence time which is highly desired for accurate quantification of chemically reactive short-lived species. Calibration of the developed QEPAS-based HONO sensor was carried out by means of lab-generated HONO samples whose concentrations were determined by simultaneous measurements of direct HONO absorption spectra in a 109.5 m multipass cell using a distributed feedback (DBF) QCL. A minimum detection limit (MDL @ SNR=1) of 66 ppbv HONO was achieved at 70 mbar using a laser output power of 50 mW and 1 s integration time, which corresponded to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6×10-8 cm-1.W/Hz1/2. This MDL was down to 7 ppbv at the optimal integration time of 150 s. The corresponding minimum detected absorption coefficient (SNR=1) is ~1.1×10-7 cm-1 (MDL: ~3 ppbv) in 1 s and ~1.1×10-8 cm-1 (MDL~330 pptv) in 150 s, respectively, with 1 W laser power. Acknowledgements The authors acknowledge financial supports from the CaPPA project (ANR-10-LABX-005) and the CPER CLIMIBIO program. References H. Yi, R. Maamary, X. Gao, M. W. Sigrist, E. Fertein, W. Chen, "Short-lived species detection of nitrous acid by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy", Appl. Phys. Lett. 106 (2015) 101109

  8. Blue surface-emitting distributed feedback lasers based on TPD-doped films.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Eva M; Villalvilla, Jose M; Boj, Pedro G; Quintana, Jose A; Postigo, Pablo A; Díaz-García, María A

    2010-01-20

    Single-mode second-order distributed feedback (DFB) lasers with low threshold, based on polystyrene films doped with 30 wt. % of the hole-transporting organic molecule N,N'-bis (3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD) are reported. The laser emission wavelength was tuned between 415 and 427 nm by film thickness variation. The effectiveness of the DFB grating in improving the laser performance is evidenced by the observation of linewidths and laser thresholds lower than those of the amplified spontaneous emission characteristics shown by films without gratings. The use of holographic lithography as the technique for grating recording has allowed us to prepare large samples in a fast, versatile, and simple manner.

  9. Polymer and Material Design for Lithography From 50 nm Node to the sub-16 nm Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefonas, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Microlithography is one of the technologies which enabled the Information Age. Developing at the intersection of optical physics, polymer science and photochemistry, the need for ever smaller high fidelity patterns to build integrated circuits is currently pushing the technology evolution from 193 nm immersion lithography to extreme ultraviolet lithography (13.5 nm) to alternate patterning technologies such as directed self assembly (DSA) of block copolymers. Essential to the success of this progression is a rapid application of new concepts and materials in polymer science. We will discuss the requirements for 193 immersion lithography and how advanced acrylic random polymers are being designed with chemical amplification functionality to meet these needs. The special requirements of a water immersion lithography led to the invention and rapid commercial application of surface assembled embedded barrier layer polymers. Design of polymers for EUV lithography is having to respond to much different challenges, prominent being the dearth of photons in the exposure step, and the other being how to maximize the efficiency of photoacid production. In parallel, alternative lithographic approaches are being developed using directed self assembly of block copolymers which realize pattern frequency multiplication. We will update with our progress in the applications of polymers designed for DSA.

  10. Advanced electric-field scanning probe lithography on molecular resist using active cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestner, Marcus; Aydogan, Cemal; Lipowicz, Hubert-Seweryn; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Lenk, Steve; Ahmad, Ahmad; Angelov, Tihomir; Reum, Alexander; Ishchuk, Valentyn; Atanasov, Ivaylo; Krivoshapkina, Yana; Hofer, Manuel; Holz, Mathias; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2015-03-01

    The routine "on demand" fabrication of features smaller than 10 nm opens up new possibilities for the realization of many novel nanoelectronic, NEMS, optical and bio-nanotechnology-based devices. Based on the thermally actuated, piezoresistive cantilever technology we have developed a first prototype of a scanning probe lithography (SPL) platform able to image, inspect, align and pattern features down to single digit nano regime. The direct, mask-less patterning of molecular resists using active scanning probes represents a promising path circumventing the problems in today's radiation-based lithography. Here, we present examples of practical applications of the previously published electric field based, current-controlled scanning probe lithography on molecular glass resist calixarene by using the developed tabletop SPL system. We demonstrate the application of a step-and-repeat scanning probe lithography scheme including optical as well as AFM based alignment and navigation. In addition, sequential read-write cycle patterning combining positive and negative tone lithography is shown. We are presenting patterning over larger areas (80 x 80 μm) and feature the practical applicability of the lithographic processes.

  11. Systematic framework for evaluating standard cell middle-of-line robustness for multiple patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoqing; Cline, Brian; Yeric, Greg; Yu, Bei; Pan, David Z.

    2016-04-01

    For robust standard cell design, designers need to improve the intercell compatibility for all combinations of cells and cell placements. Multiple patterning lithography colorability check breaks the locality of traditional rule check, and N-wise checks are strongly needed to verify the colorability for layout interactions across cell boundaries. A systematic framework is proposed to evaluate the library-level robustness over multiple patterning lithography from two perspectives, including complete checks on two-row combinations of cells and long-range interactions. With complete checks on two-row combinations of cells, the vertical and horizontal boundary checks are explored to predict illegal cell combinations. For long-range interactions, random benchmarks are generated by cell shifting and tested to evaluate the placement-level efforts needed to reduce the manufacturing complexity from quadruple patterning lithography to triple patterning lithography for the middle-of-line (MOL) layers. Our framework is tested on the MOL layers but can be easily adapted to other critical layers with multiple patterning lithography constraints.

  12. Exposure uniformity analysis and optimization for scanning mirror system in Hefei lithography beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Congliang; Yin, Chuanshi; Liu, Tonghui; Zhong, Aijuan; Qian, Shinan

    2001-10-01

    It is a new technology to use synchrotron radiation lithography for making large scale integral circuit. Synchrotron radiation lithography System is composed of lithography beam line and exposure chamber. A scanning mirror system is making the largest linear exposure area for integrate circuit. By means of increasing control fineness and optimizing scanning frequency in on-line control system, the uniformity of exposure grating is improved quite well. It is opening good idea for every scientist and technician to continue study. It is shown that inspect and control system is still reliable, noise reduced and very convenient after several years operation. It shows operating status of each equipment and vacuum figures on beam line and station, mirror scanning linearity, exposure time, beam current, and so on. Some successful soft X-ray lithography sub-micrometer results are achieved by different users in this system, they are showing very good resolution, more clear leakage and enough depth for example. A convenient and smart optimum analysis system will be developed soon. It is easy to find very good oscillation frequency for mirror vibrating, and the strong interference from current monitor in synchrotron radiation storage ring is reduced very well. Convenient, compact, reliability and safety are the basic but important idea of system design, and what is higher level consideration for getting fine result of micro lithography. There will have enough database space for a different kind user to storage on- line test datum in system.

  13. Wafer scale fabrication of submicron chessboard gratings using phase masks in proximity lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuerzebecher, Lorenz; Harzendorf, Torsten; Fuchs, Frank; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2012-03-01

    One and two dimensional grating structures with submicron period have a huge number of applications in optics and photonics. Such structures are conventionally fabricated using interference or e-beam lithography. However, both technologies have significant drawbacks. Interference lithography is limited to rather simple geometries and the sequential writing scheme of e-beam lithography leads to time consuming exposures for each grating. We present a novel fabrication technique for this class of microstructures which is based on proximity lithography in a mask aligner. The technology is capable to pattern a complete wafer within less than one minute of exposure time and offers thereby high lateral resolution and a reliable process. Our advancements compared to standard mask aligner lithography are twofold: First of all, we are using periodic binary phase masks instead of chromium masks to generate an aerial image of high resolution and exceptional light efficiency at certain distances behind the mask. Second, a special mask aligner illumination set-up is employed which allows to precisely control the incidence angles of the exposure light. This degree of freedom allows both, to shape the aerial image (e. g. transformation of a periodic spot pattern into a chessboard pattern) and to increase its depth of focus considerably. That way, our technology enables the fabrication of high quality gratings with arbitrary geometry in a fast and stable wafer scale process.

  14. E-beam to complement optical lithography for 1D layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, David K.; Liu, Enden D.; Smayling, Michael C.; Prescop, Ted

    2011-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is moving to highly regular designs, or 1D gridded layouts, to enable scaling to advanced nodes, as well as improve process latitude, chip size and chip energy consumption. The fabrication of highly regular ICs is straightforward. Poly and metal layers are arranged into 1D layouts. These 1D layouts facilitate a two-step patterning approach: a line-creation step, followed by a line-cutting step, to form the desired IC pattern (See Figure 1). The first step, line creation, can be accomplished with a variety of lithography techniques including 193nm immersion (193i) and Self-Aligned Double Patterning (SADP). It appears feasible to create unidirectional parallel lines to at least 11 nm half-pitch, with two applications of SADP for pitch division by four. Potentially, this step can also be accomplished with interference lithography or directed self assembly in the future. The second step, line cutting, requires an extremely high-resolution lithography technique. At advanced nodes, the only options appear to be the costly quadruple patterning with 193i, or EUV or E-Beam Lithography (EBL). This paper focuses on the requirements for a lithography system for "line cutting", using EBL to complement Optical. EBL is the most cost-effective option for line cutting at advanced nodes for HVM.

  15. Material design for immersion lithography with high refractive index fluid (HIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamatsu, Takashi; Wang, Yong; Shima, Motoyuki; Kusumoto, Shiro; Chiba, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hiroki; Hieda, Katsuhiko; Shimokawa, Tsutomu

    2005-05-01

    ArF immersion lithography is considered as the most promising next generation technology which enables to a 45 nm node device manufacturing and below. Not only depth of focus enlargement, immersion lithography enables to use hyper numerical aperture (NA) larger than 1.0 and achieve higher resolution capability. For 193nm lithography, water is an ideal immersion fluid, providing suitable refractive index and transmission properties. Furthermore the higher refractive index fluid is expected to provide a potential extension of optical lithography to the 32 nm node. This paper describes the material design for immersion lithography with high refractive index fluid. We have developed promising high refractive index fluids which satisfy the requirement for immersion fluid by screening wide variety of organic compounds. The physical and chemical properties of this high refractive index fluid are discussed in detail. Also the topcoat material which has good matching with high refractive index fluid is developed. While this topcoat material is soluble into aqueous TMAH developer, it does not dissolve into water or high refractive index fluid and gives suitable contact angle for immersion scan exposure. Immersion exposure experiments using high refractive index fluid with and w/o topcoat material was carried out and its lithographic performance is presented in this paper.

  16. Design and study of resist materials for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shintaro; Cho, Sungseo; Zampini, Anthony

    2003-06-01

    We investigated the structure-property relationships of several polymer platforms containing hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and tertiary alkyl ester functionalities in order to identify and develop fluorine-containing polymers suitable for 157nm lithography. We observed that the aqueous base solubility of homopolymers containing HFIP was highly dependent on the monomer structure, number of HFIP group per monomer unit, substituent on the alcohol and the polymer architecture. Copolymers of tert-butyl acrylate (TBA), tert-butyl 2-fluoroacrylate (TBFA) and tert-butyl 2-trifluoromethylacrylate (TBTFMA) with styrene hexafluoroisopropanol (STYHFIP) or norborene hexafluoro-isopropanol (NBHFIP) were also investigated to determine the effect of substitution at the acrylate α-position. Under the same ration of STYHFIP, the transparency of the co-polymers improved in the or der of CF3>F>H while the dry etch stability decreased in the order of CF3>F>H. When exposed to 157 nm radiation, photoresists of P(STYHFIP-TBA), P(STYHFIP-TBFA) and P(STYHFIP-TBTFMA) showed an increase in E0 ni the order of H

  17. Segmented waveguide array gratings made by electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grondin, Etienne; Genest, Jonathan; Duguay, Michel A.; Beauvais, Jacques; Aimez, Vincent

    2006-09-01

    We have designed and studied the fabrication limitations for a new type of optical waveguide filter based on the concept of a "Segmented Waveguide Array Grating" (SWAG, see refs. 1,2). The idea is to make an optical waveguide consisting of a large number of segments which differ from each other by their precise length and by a precise change in one of their transverse dimensions. The transitions between different segments are abrupt in the transverse dimension on the scale of one tenth the wavelength of light in the medium and are positioned with nanometer precision along the propagation axis of light. Reflections from a given subset of these transitions add up coherently and can give a grating-like reflection spectrum. By precisely positioning the segment transitions and by setting the variable transverse dimension at precise values one can design a large variety of filtering functions. As an example we have designed a filtering function that has a nearly rectangular profile, something that would be very useful in applications of WDM optical communications. The light scattering losses at segment transitions can be minimized by choosing average transverse dimensions such that the waveguide operates near the diffraction minimum. The lithography step of simple planar SWAG devices has been carried out by means of electron beam direct writing. The waveguide materials used were 6-micron thick silica/germania layers (index 1.454) spaced from a silicon substrate by a 14-micron thick pure silica layer. Trapped electron phenomena in the silica layer were eliminated by depositing metal layers on top of the silica in order to stop electrons traversing the photoresist. SWAG patterns with sharp features were obtained and are expected to give the expected spectral filtering functions.

  18. Applications of nanoimprint lithography/hot embossing: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yifang

    2015-11-01

    This review concentrates on the applications of nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and hot embossing for the fabrications of nanolectronic devices, nanophotonic metamaterials and other nanostructures. Technical challenges and solutions in NIL such as nanofabrication of templates, removal of residual resist, pattern displacement in thermal NIL arising from thermal expansion are first discussed. In the nanofabrication of templates, dry etch in plasma for the formation of multi-step structures and ultra-sharp tip arrays in silicon, nanophotonic chiral structures with high aspect ratio in SiC are demonstrated. A bilayer technique for nondestructive removal of residual resist in thermal NIL is described. This process is successfully applied for the fabrication of T-shape gates and functional high electron mobility transistors. However, pattern displacement intrinsically existing in thermal NIL/hot embossing owing to different thermal expansions in the template and substrate, respectively, limits its further development and scale-up. Low temperature even room temperature NIL (RTNIL) was then proposed on HSQ, trying to eliminate the pattern distortion by avoiding a thermal loop in the imprint. But, considerable pressure needed in RTNIL turned the major attentions to the development of UV-curing NIL in UV-curable monomers at low temperature. A big variety of applications by low-temperature UV-curing NIL in SU-8 are described, including high-aspect-ratio phase gratings, tagging technology by nanobarcode for DNA sequencing, nanofluidic channels, nanophotonic metamaterials and biosensors. Hot embossing, as a parallel technique to NIL, was also developed, and its applications on ferroelectric polymers as well as metals are reviewed. Therefore, it is necessary to emphasize that this review is mainly attempted to review the applications of NIL/embossing instead of NIL technique advances.

  19. Development of liquid-jet laser-produced plasma light source for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tamotsu; Suganuma, Takashi; Imai, Yousuke; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Someya, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Hideo; Soumagne, Georg; Komori, Hiroshi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Endo, Akira; Toyoda, Koichi

    2003-06-01

    The Extreme UV Lithography System Development Association (EUVA) was established in Japan in May 2002 and is supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). EUVA started the light soruce development in September 2002. This development is done by the assocaition members Gigaphoton, Ushio, Komatsu, Canon, Nikon, the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Sciecne and Technology (AIST) and several Japanese universities. The target of the four-year project is the development of a EUV light source with 10W clean focus point power. For the end of the fiscal year 2003 the development of a 4W EUV light source (clean focus point power) is planned. Both, Laser-Produced-Plasma (LPP) and Discharge-Produced-Plasma (DPP) EUV light sources are investigated at first. Our group at the EUVA Hiratsuka R&D Center is working on LPP sources. We are currently focusing on the development of a driver laser and a liquid Xenon plasma target. The laser is a Nd:YAG MOPA (Master Oscillator and Power Amplifier) system oscillating at 1064 nm. Average power, repetition rate and pulse duration of the laser system are 500 Watt, 10 kHa and 30nsec, respectively. The Xenon liquefication system operates at a maximum pressure of 5MPa and a temperature range between 160 K and 190 K. The pressure inside the vacuum chamber is below 0.1Pa during system operation. This paper presents the current status of the EUV system component development as well as first experimental results of generated EUV radiation.

  20. Super diffraction lithography (SDL): fine random line pattern formation by single-exposure with binary mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Abe, J.; Nakae, A.; Imai, A.; Narimatsu, K.; Suko, K.

    2005-05-01

    A novel RET named Super Diffraction Lithography (SDL), which enables 90~80 nm random line by single exposure in KrF wavelength, has been developed. A pair of bright lines, which sandwiches binary or Atten-PSM line and is surrounded by attenuating non-phase-shifting (Atten-NPS) area, is formed on a mask. The Atten-NPS area of the mask is composed with a small pad array whose pitch is finer than the resolution limit of projection optics. Then, this mask can be fabricated with a single layer patterning. When this mask is illuminated by an obliquely incident light with a specific incident angle, very sharp dark line image is formed at center of the bright lines. Because the outside of the pair is Atten-NPS area, image intensity for this area can become much higher than a slice level of the central dark line image, resulting in no resist pattern at the outside of the pair. By application of a sub-resolution assist feature (SRAF) for semi-dense pattern, fine line can be imaged throughout pattern pitch. Then, utilizing SDL, very fine random line can be formed by SINGLE EXPOSURE of SIMPLE STRUCTURE MASK. In KrF exposure at NA=0.82, 90 nm line with pitch of down to 240 nm can be achieved by a binary mask. Using 6% transmission Atten-PSM, 80 nm becomes possible. Moreover, 50 nm isolated line becomes feasible in KrF exposure by application of high transmission Atten-PSM. We believe that SDL is the most cost-effective and easily applicable RET for gate pattern formation in advanced logic devices.