Science.gov

Sample records for laser-driven ife power

  1. Preliminary Identification of Accident Initiating Events for IFE Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Latkowsk, J. F.

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents initial results of a task to identify accident initiating events for inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant designs. Initiating events (IEs) are a fundamental building block of a probabilistic risk assessment; they are the ‘accident starters’ that are analyzed to determine the risks posed to members of the public in the vicinity of the power plant. The IE results for the SOMBRERO design are presented in tabular form. The SOMBRERO design was analyzed since it is representative of dry chamber wall, laser driven designs. This work is used to characterize IFE plant risk and to identify potential design changes that would mitigate the plant risk.

  2. Systems Modeling for Z-IFE Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2006-11-08

    A preliminary systems model has been developed for Z-IFE power plants. The model includes cost and performance scaling for the target physics, z-pinch driver, chamber, power conversion system and target/RTL manufacturing plant. As the base case we consider the dynamic hohlraum target and a thick liquid wall chamber with flibe as the working fluid. Driver cost and efficiency are evaluated parametrically since various options are still being considered. The model allows for power plants made up of multiple chambers and power conversion units supplied by a central target/RTL manufacturing plant. Initial results indicate that plants with few chambers operating at high yield are economically more attractive than the 10-unit plant previously proposed. Various parametric and sensitivity studies have been completed and are discussed.

  3. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  4. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  5. Process Model of A Fusion Fuel Recovery System for a Direct Drive IFE Power Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, Saswathi; Aristova, Maria; Gentile, Charles

    2008-11-01

    A task has been initiated to develop a detailed representative model for the fuel recovery system (FRS) in the prospective direct drive inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor. As part of the conceptual design phase of the project, a chemical process model is developed in order to observe the interaction of system components. This process model is developed using FEMLAB Multiphysics software with the corresponding chemical engineering module (CEM). Initially, the reactants, system structure, and processes are defined using known chemical species of the target chamber exhaust. Each step within the Fuel recovery system is modeled compartmentally and then merged to form the closed loop fuel recovery system. The output, which includes physical properties and chemical content of the products, is analyzed after each step of the system to determine the most efficient and productive system parameters. This will serve to attenuate possible bottlenecks in the system. This modeling evaluation is instrumental in optimizing and closing the fusion fuel cycle in a direct drive IFE power reactor. The results of the modeling are presented in this paper.

  6. Laser driven nuclear science and applications: The need of high efficiency, high power and high repetition rate Laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.

    2015-10-01

    Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is a pan European research initiative selected on the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures Roadmap that aims to close the gap between the existing laboratory-based laser driven research and international facility-grade research centre. The ELI-NP facility, one of the three ELI pillars under construction, placed in Romania and to be operational in 2018, has as core elements a couple of new generation 10 PW laser systems and a narrow bandwidth Compton backscattering gamma source with photon energies up to 19 MeV. ELI-NP will address nuclear photonics, nuclear astrophysics and quantum electrodynamics involving extreme photon fields. Prospective applications of high power laser in nuclear astrophysics, accelerator physics, in particular towards future Accelerator Driven System, as well as in nuclear photonics, for detection and characterization of nuclear material, and for nuclear medicine, will be discussed. Key issues in these research areas will be at reach with significant increase of the repetition rates and of the efficiency at the plug of the high power laser systems as proposed by the ICAN collaboration.

  7. Present status and future prospects of IFE and high power laser research in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, Kunioki

    2004-12-01

    The present status and future prospects of IFE research and high power laser applications in Asia are reviewed. At ILE, Osaka University, the Gekko XII and the Peta Watt laser system have been operated to investigate implosion hydrodynamics, fast ignition and relativistic laser plasma interactions. In particular, fast ignition experiments with cone shell targets have been carried out as joint UK-Japan and US-Japan collaboration programmes. In the experiments, imploded high density plasmas are heated by a 500 J level petawatt laser pulse. The thermal neutron yield is found to increase by three orders of magnitude by petawatt laser injection to the cone shell target. Laser plasma physics related to laser fusion and other applications has been studied at many institutes in Asia. Areas of research include Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments, application of extreme ultraviolet radiation sources for lithography, laser particle acceleration, and x-ray lasers, to name a few.

  8. Conceptual Design for a 2 GW Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Direct-Drive Power Reactor Employing Magnetic Intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresemer, K. R.; Gentile, C. A.

    2007-11-01

    Presented is a conceptual design for a 2 GW IFE direct drive fusion power reactor. This design employs a cusp field to deflect IFE-generated ions away from the dry first wall of the target chamber and into specifically designed ion dumps. The reactor operates at 5 Hz, consuming ˜450,000 tritium targets/day, injected at >100 m/s into the target chamber and uniformly illuminated by laser light, stimulating detonation. The resulting fusion energy is collected by equatorial ion dumps equipped with heat exchangers. The reactor will breed and recycle its own fuel through the use of breeder blankets and a fuel recovery system. To minimize target-particle interference, the chamber will be kept at <0.5 mTorr through the use of magnetically levitated turbomolecular pumps (TMPs) and corresponding backing pumps. Under investigation are the principles of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) which may be applied to attenuate and harness the energy residing in the post detonation ion fields.

  9. MULTI-IFE-A one-dimensional computer code for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) target simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.

    2016-06-01

    The code MULTI-IFE is a numerical tool devoted to the study of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) microcapsules. It includes the relevant physics for the implosion and thermonuclear ignition and burning: hydrodynamics of two component plasmas (ions and electrons), three-dimensional laser light ray-tracing, thermal diffusion, multigroup radiation transport, deuterium-tritium burning, and alpha particle diffusion. The corresponding differential equations are discretized in spherical one-dimensional Lagrangian coordinates. Two typical application examples, a high gain laser driven capsule and a low gain radiation driven marginally igniting capsule are discussed. In addition to phenomena relevant for IFE, the code includes also components (planar and cylindrical geometries, transport coefficients at low temperature, explicit treatment of Maxwell's equations) that extend its range of applicability to laser-matter interaction at moderate intensities (<1016 W cm-2). The source code design has been kept simple and structured with the aim to encourage user's modifications for specialized purposes.

  10. Laser driven radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Sefcik, J.; Cowan, T.

    1997-12-20

    Intense laser (> 1021 W/cm{sup 3}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator Bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and potential cost advantage for multiple axis views. High spatial and temporal resolution is achievable as a result of the very small source size (<100 um) and short-duration of the laser pulse. We have begun a series of experiments with the Petawatt laser at LLNL to determine the photon flux achievable with these sources and assess their potential for Stewardship applications. Additionally, we are developing a conceptual design and cost estimate of a multi-pulse, multi-axis (up to five) radiographic facility utilizing the Contained Firing Facility at site 300 and existing laser hardware.

  11. High power laser-driven ceramic phosphor plate for outstanding efficient white light conversion in application of automotive lighting.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Hyun; Ji, Eun Kyung; Jeong, Byung Woo; Jung, Mong Kwon; Kim, Eun Young; Yoon, Dae Ho

    2016-01-01

    We report on Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) ceramic phosphor plate (CPP) using nano phosphor for high power laser diode (LD) application for white light in automotive lighting. The prepared CPP shows improved luminous properties as a function of Ce(3+) concentration. The luminous properties of the Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP nano phosphor are improved when compared to the Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP with bulk phosphor, and hence, the luminous emittance, luminous flux, and conversion efficiency are improved. The Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP with an optimal Ce(3+) content of 0.5 mol % shows 2733 lm/mm(2) value under high power blue radiant flux density of 19.1 W/mm(2). The results indicate that Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP using nano phosphor can serve as a potential material for solid-state laser lighting in automotive applications. PMID:27502730

  12. High power laser-driven ceramic phosphor plate for outstanding efficient white light conversion in application of automotive lighting

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Hyun; Ji, Eun Kyung; Jeong, Byung Woo; Jung, Mong Kwon; Kim, Eun Young; Yoon, Dae Ho

    2016-01-01

    We report on Y3Al5O12: Ce3+ ceramic phosphor plate (CPP) using nano phosphor for high power laser diode (LD) application for white light in automotive lighting. The prepared CPP shows improved luminous properties as a function of Ce3+ concentration. The luminous properties of the Y3Al5O12: Ce3+ CPP nano phosphor are improved when compared to the Y3Al5O12: Ce3+ CPP with bulk phosphor, and hence, the luminous emittance, luminous flux, and conversion efficiency are improved. The Y3Al5O12: Ce3+ CPP with an optimal Ce3+ content of 0.5 mol % shows 2733 lm/mm2 value under high power blue radiant flux density of 19.1 W/mm2. The results indicate that Y3Al5O12: Ce3+ CPP using nano phosphor can serve as a potential material for solid-state laser lighting in automotive applications. PMID:27502730

  13. High power laser-driven ceramic phosphor plate for outstanding efficient white light conversion in application of automotive lighting.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Hyun; Ji, Eun Kyung; Jeong, Byung Woo; Jung, Mong Kwon; Kim, Eun Young; Yoon, Dae Ho

    2016-08-09

    We report on Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) ceramic phosphor plate (CPP) using nano phosphor for high power laser diode (LD) application for white light in automotive lighting. The prepared CPP shows improved luminous properties as a function of Ce(3+) concentration. The luminous properties of the Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP nano phosphor are improved when compared to the Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP with bulk phosphor, and hence, the luminous emittance, luminous flux, and conversion efficiency are improved. The Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP with an optimal Ce(3+) content of 0.5 mol % shows 2733 lm/mm(2) value under high power blue radiant flux density of 19.1 W/mm(2). The results indicate that Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP using nano phosphor can serve as a potential material for solid-state laser lighting in automotive applications.

  14. High power laser-driven ceramic phosphor plate for outstanding efficient white light conversion in application of automotive lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Hyun; Ji, Eun Kyung; Jeong, Byung Woo; Jung, Mong Kwon; Kim, Eun Young; Yoon, Dae Ho

    2016-08-01

    We report on Y3Al5O12: Ce3+ ceramic phosphor plate (CPP) using nano phosphor for high power laser diode (LD) application for white light in automotive lighting. The prepared CPP shows improved luminous properties as a function of Ce3+ concentration. The luminous properties of the Y3Al5O12: Ce3+ CPP nano phosphor are improved when compared to the Y3Al5O12: Ce3+ CPP with bulk phosphor, and hence, the luminous emittance, luminous flux, and conversion efficiency are improved. The Y3Al5O12: Ce3+ CPP with an optimal Ce3+ content of 0.5 mol % shows 2733 lm/mm2 value under high power blue radiant flux density of 19.1 W/mm2. The results indicate that Y3Al5O12: Ce3+ CPP using nano phosphor can serve as a potential material for solid-state laser lighting in automotive applications.

  15. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 1, Executive summary and overview, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    Conceptual designs and assessments have been completed for two inertial fusion energy (IFE) electric power plants. The detailed designs and results of the assessment studies are presented in this report. Osiris is a heavy-ion-beam (HIB) driven power plant and SOMBRERO is a Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser-driven power plant. Both plants are sized for a net electric power of 1000 MWe.

  16. Progress and critical issues for IFE blanket and chamber research

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Latkowski, J.F.; Logan, B.G.; Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W.; Nobile, A.; Peterson, P.F.; Petti, D.; Schultz, K.R.; Tillack, M.S.

    1999-06-23

    Advances in high gain target designs for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and the initiation of construction of large megajoule-class laser facilities in the U.S. (National Ignition Facility) and France (Laser-Megajoule) capable of testing the requirements for inertial fusion ignition and propagating burn, have improved the prospects for IFE. Accordingly, there have recently been modest increases in the US fusion research program related to the feasibility of IFE. These research areas include heavy-ion accelerators, Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) gas lasers, diode-pumped, solid-state (DPSSL) lasers, IFE target designs for higher gains, feasibility of low cost IFE target fabrication and accurate injection, and long-lasting IFE fusion chambers and final optics. Since several studies of conceptual IFE power plant and driver designs were completed in 1992-1996 [1-5], U.S. research in the IFE blanket, chamber, and target technology areas has focused on the critical issues relating to the feasibility of IFE concepts towards the goal of achieving economically-competitive and environmentally-attractive fusion energy. This paper discusses the critical issues in these areas, and the approaches taken to address these issues. The U.S. research in these areas, called IFE Chamber and Target Technologies, is coordinated through the Virtual Laboratory for Technology (VLT) formed by the Department of Energy in December 1998.

  17. Laser driven grating linac

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R B

    1980-01-01

    The fields induced over a grating exposed to plane parallel light are explored. It is shown that acceleration is possible if either the particles travel skew to the grating lines, or if the radiation is falling at a skew angle onto the grating. A general theory of diffraction in this skew case is given. In one particular case numerical solutions are worked out for some deep grating. It is found that accelerating fields larger even than the initial fields can be obtained, the limit being set by resistive losses on the grating surface. Simple calculations are made to see what accelerating fields might be obtained using CO/sub 2/ lasers. Accelerations of 2 or 20 GeV per meter seem possible depending on whether the grating is allowed to be destroyed or not. Power requirements, injection and focussing are briefly discussed and no obvious difficulties are seen. It is concluded, therefore, that the proposed mechanism should be considered as a good candidate for the next generation of particle accelerators.

  18. Stop motion microphotography of laser driven plates

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Trott, W.M.

    1994-09-01

    Laser driven plates have been used for several years for high velocity shock wave and impact studies. Recent questions about the integrity and ablation rates of these plates coupled with an improved capability for microscopic stop motion photography led to this study. For these experiments, the plates were aluminum, coated on the ends of optical fibers. A high power laser pulse in the fiber ionizes the aluminum at the fiber/coating interface. The plasma thus created accelerates the remaining aluminum to high velocities, several kilometers per second. We defined {open_quotes}thick{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}thin{close_quotes} coatings as those where a flying plate (flyer) was launched vs. the material being completely ionized. Here we were specifically interested in the thick/thin boundary to develop data for the numerical models attempting to predict flyer behavior.

  19. Laser-driven fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrom, J.C.

    1973-10-01

    A laser-driven fusion reactor consisting of concentric spherical vessels in which the thermonuclear energy is derived from a deuterium-tritium (D + T) burn within a pellet'', located at the center of the vessels and initiated by a laser pulse. The resulting alpha -particle energy and a small fraction of the neutron energy are deposited within the pellet; this pellet energy is eventually transformed into sensible heat of lithium in a condenser outside the vessels. The remaining neutron energy is dissipated in a lithium blanket, located within the concentric vessels, where the fuel ingredient, tritium, is also produced. The heat content of the blanket and of the condenser lithium is eventually transferred to a conventional thermodynamic plant where the thermal energy is converted to electrical energy in a steam Rankine cycle. (Official Gazette)

  20. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  1. Space-based laser-driven MHD generator: Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of a laser-driven MHD generator, as a candidate receiver for a space-based laser power transmission system, was investigated. On the basis of reasonable parameters obtained in the literature, a model of the laser-driven MHD generator was developed with the assumptions of a steady, turbulent, two-dimensional flow. These assumptions were based on the continuous and steady generation of plasmas by the exposure of the continuous wave laser beam thus inducing a steady back pressure that enables the medium to flow steadily. The model considered here took the turbulent nature of plasmas into account in the two-dimensional geometry of the generator. For these conditions with the plasma parameters defining the thermal conductivity, viscosity, electrical conductivity for the plasma flow, a generator efficiency of 53.3% was calculated. If turbulent effects and nonequilibrium ionization are taken into account, the efficiency is 43.2%. The study shows that the laser-driven MHD system has potential as a laser power receiver for space applications because of its high energy conversion efficiency, high energy density and relatively simple mechanism as compared to other energy conversion cycles.

  2. Laser-driven particle and photon beams and some applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledingham, K. W. D.; Galster, W.

    2010-04-01

    Outstanding progress has been made in high-power laser technology in the last 10 years with laser powers reaching petawatt (PW) values. At present, there are 15 PW lasers built or being built around the world and plans are afoot for new, even higher power, lasers reaching values of exawatt (EW) or even zetawatt (ZW) powers. Petawatt lasers generate electric fields of 1012 V m-1 with a large fraction of the total pulse energy being converted to relativistic electrons with energies reaching in excess of 1 GeV. In turn these electrons result in the generation of beams of protons, heavy ions, neutrons and high-energy photons. These laser-driven particle beams have encouraged many to think of carrying out experiments normally associated with conventional nuclear accelerators and reactors. To this end a number of introductory articles have been written under a trial name 'Laser Nuclear Physics' (Ledingham and Norreys 1999 Contemp. Phys. 40 367, Ledingham et al 2002 Europhys. News. 33 120, Ledingham et al 2003 Science 300 1107, Takabe et al 2001 J. Plasma Fusion Res. 77 1094). However, even greater strides have been made in the last 3 or 4 years in laser technology and it is timely to reassess the potential of laser-driven particle and photon beams. It must be acknowledged right from the outset that to date laser-driven particle beams have yet to compete favourably with conventional nuclear accelerator-generated beams in any way and so this is not a paper comparing laser and conventional accelerators. However, occasionally throughout the paper as a reality check, it will be mentioned what conventional nuclear accelerators can do.

  3. Calculation of Coupling Efficiencies for Laser-Driven Photonic Bandgap Structures

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.; Noble, R.; Spencer, J. E.

    2010-11-04

    We present a technique for calculating the power coupling efficiency for a laser-driven photonic bandgap structure using electromagnetic finite element simulations, and evaluate the efficiency of several coupling scenarios for the case of a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber accelerator structure.

  4. Transition state theory for laser-driven reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Bandrauk, Andre D.; Jaffe, Charles; Bartsch, Thomas; Palacian, Jesus; Uzer, T.

    2007-04-28

    Recent developments in transition state theory brought about by dynamical systems theory are extended to time-dependent systems such as laser-driven reactions. Using time-dependent normal form theory, the authors construct a reaction coordinate with regular dynamics inside the transition region. The conservation of the associated action enables one to extract time-dependent invariant manifolds that act as separatrices between reactive and nonreactive trajectories and thus make it possible to predict the ultimate fate of a trajectory. They illustrate the power of our approach on a driven Henon-Heiles system, which serves as a simple example of a reactive system with several open channels. The present generalization of transition state theory to driven systems will allow one to study processes such as the control of chemical reactions through laser pulses.

  5. IFE Chamber Technology - Status and Future Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Raffrary, A R; Abdel-Khalik, S; Kulcinski, G; Latkowski, J F; Najmabadi, F; Olson, C L; Peterson, P F; Ying, A; Yoda, M

    2002-11-15

    Significant progress has been made on addressing critical issues for inertial fusion energy (IFE) chambers for heavy-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including dry-wall (currently favored for laser IFE), wetted-wall (applicable to both laser and ion drivers), and thick-liquid-wall favored by heavy ion and z-pinch drivers. Recent progress and remaining challenges in developing IFE chambers are reviewed.

  6. Review of laser-driven ion sources and their applications.

    PubMed

    Daido, Hiroyuki; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Pirozhkov, Alexander S

    2012-05-01

    For many years, laser-driven ion acceleration, mainly proton acceleration, has been proposed and a number of proof-of-principle experiments have been carried out with lasers whose pulse duration was in the nanosecond range. In the 1990s, ion acceleration in a relativistic plasma was demonstrated with ultra-short pulse lasers based on the chirped pulse amplification technique which can provide not only picosecond or femtosecond laser pulse duration, but simultaneously ultra-high peak power of terawatt to petawatt levels. Starting from the year 2000, several groups demonstrated low transverse emittance, tens of MeV proton beams with a conversion efficiency of up to several percent. The laser-accelerated particle beams have a duration of the order of a few picoseconds at the source, an ultra-high peak current and a broad energy spectrum, which make them suitable for many, including several unique, applications. This paper reviews, firstly, the historical background including the early laser-matter interaction studies on energetic ion acceleration relevant to inertial confinement fusion. Secondly, we describe several implemented and proposed mechanisms of proton and/or ion acceleration driven by ultra-short high-intensity lasers. We pay special attention to relatively simple models of several acceleration regimes. The models connect the laser, plasma and proton/ion beam parameters, predicting important features, such as energy spectral shape, optimum conditions and scalings under these conditions for maximum ion energy, conversion efficiency, etc. The models also suggest possible ways to manipulate the proton/ion beams by tailoring the target and irradiation conditions. Thirdly, we review experimental results on proton/ion acceleration, starting with the description of driving lasers. We list experimental results and show general trends of parameter dependences and compare them with the theoretical predictions and simulations. The fourth topic includes a review of

  7. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.; Gerardo, J.B.

    1987-08-25

    The surfaces of solids are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing a substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g., a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrence of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic substrates, e.g., LiNbO/sub 3/, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  8. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.; Gerardo, James B.

    1989-01-01

    The surfaces of solid ionic substrates are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing an ionic substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g. a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrance of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic salt substrates, e.g., a solid inorganic salt such as LiNbO.sub.3, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  9. Laser-Driven Mini-Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Enrique; Lin Jun; Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B. Jr.

    2006-05-02

    Laser-driven mini-thrusters were studied using Delrin registered and PVC (Delrin registered is a registered trademark of DuPont) as propellants. TEA CO2 laser ({lambda} = 10.6 {mu}m) was used as a driving laser. Coupling coefficients were deduced from two independent techniques: force-time curves measured with a piezoelectric sensor and ballistic pendulum. Time-resolved ICCD images of the expanding plasma and combustion products were analyzed in order to determine the main process that generates the thrust. The measurements were also performed in a nitrogen atmosphere in order to test the combustion effects on thrust. A pinhole transmission experiment was performed for the study of the cut-off time when the ablation/air breakdown plasma becomes opaque to the incoming laser pulse.

  10. Laser-driven nonlinear cluster dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Fennel, Th.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Dinh, P. M.; Suraud, E.

    2010-04-15

    Laser excitation of nanometer-sized atomic and molecular clusters offers various opportunities to explore and control ultrafast many-particle dynamics. Whereas weak laser fields allow the analysis of photoionization, excited-state relaxation, and structural modifications on these finite quantum systems, large-amplitude collective electron motion and Coulomb explosion can be induced with intense laser pulses. This review provides an overview of key phenomena arising from laser-cluster interactions with focus on nonlinear optical excitations and discusses the underlying processes according to the current understanding. A general survey covers basic cluster properties and excitation mechanisms relevant for laser-driven cluster dynamics. Then, after an excursion in theoretical and experimental methods, results for single-photon and multiphoton excitations are reviewed with emphasis on signatures from time- and angular-resolved photoemission. A key issue of this review is the broad spectrum of phenomena arising from clusters exposed to strong fields, where the interaction with the laser pulse creates short-lived and dense nanoplasmas. The implications for technical developments such as the controlled generation of ion, electron, and radiation pulses will be addressed along with corresponding examples. Finally, future prospects of laser-cluster research as well as experimental and theoretical challenges are discussed.

  11. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  12. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2007-07-11

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world.Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called ''dream beams on a table top'', which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators.

  13. Perspectives on Magnetized Target Fusion Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    One approach to Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) builds upon the ongoing experimental effort (FRX-L) to generate a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) target plasma suitable for translation and cylindrical-liner (i.e., converging flux conserver) implosion. Numerical modeling is underway to elucidate key performance drivers for possible future power-plant extrapolations. The fusion gain, Q (ratio of DT fusion yield to the sum of initial liner kinetic energy plus plasma formation energy), sets the power-plant duty cycle for a nominal design electric power [ e.g. 1,000 MWe(net)]. A pulsed MTF power plant of this type derives from the historic Fast Liner Reactor (FLR) concept and shares attributes with the recent Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Z-pinch and laser-driven pellet HYLIFE-II conceptual designs.

  14. Nuclear Design Considerations for Z-IFE Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Schmitt, R C; Abbott, R P; Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S

    2005-02-02

    Z-pinch driven IFE (Z-IFE) requires the design of a repetitive target insertion system that allows coupling of the pulsed power to the target with adequate standoff, and a chamber that can withstand blast and radiation effects from large yield targets. The present strategy for Z-IFE is to use high yield targets ({approx}2-3 GJ/shot), low repetition rate per chamber ({approx}0.1 Hz), and 10 chambers per power plant. In this study, we propose an alternative power plant configuration that uses very high yield targets (20 GJ/shot) in a single chamber operating at 0.1 Hz. A thick-liquid-wall chamber is proposed to absorb the target emission (x-rays, debris and neutrons) and mitigate the blast effects on the chamber wall. The target is attached to the end of a conical shaped Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) made from a solid coolant (e.g., frozen flibe), or a material that is easily separable from the coolant (e.g., steel). The RTL/target assembly is inserted through a single opening at the top of the chamber for each shot. This study looks at the RTL material choice from a safety and environmental point of view. Materials were assessed according to waste disposal rating (WDR) and contact dose rate (CDR). Neutronics calculations, using the TART2002 Monte Carlo code from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), were performed for the RTL and Z-IFE chamber, and key results reported here.

  15. Quantum Localization in Laser-Driven Molecular Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbukh, Ilya

    2016-05-01

    Recently we predicted that several celebrated solid state quantum localization phenomena - Anderson localization, Bloch oscillations, and Tamm-Shockley surface states - may manifest themselves in the rotational dynamics of laser-kicked molecules. In this talk, I will present these new rotational effects in a gas of linear molecules subject to a moderately long periodic train of femtosecond laser pulses. A small detuning of the train period from the rotational revival time causes Anderson localization in the angular momentum space above some critical value of J - the Anderson wall. This wall marks an impenetrable border stopping any further rotational excitation. Below the Anderson wall, the rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. I will present the results of the first experimental observation of the laser-induced rotational Bloch oscillations in molecular nitrogen at ambient conditions (Stanford & Weizmann, 2015). We will also discuss the prospects of observing the rotational analogues of the Tamm surface states in a similar experimental setup. Our results offer laser-driven molecular rotation as a new platform for studies on the localization phenomena in quantum transport. These effects are important for many processes involving highly excited rotational states, including coherent optical manipulations in molecular mixtures, and propagation of powerful laser pulses in atmosphere.

  16. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  17. Recent advances in laser-driven neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-11-01

    Due to the limited number and high cost of large-scale neutron facilities, there has been a growing interest in compact accelerator-driven sources. In this context, several potential schemes of laser-driven neutron sources are being intensively studied employing laser-accelerated electron and ion beams. In addition to the potential of delivering neutron beams with high brilliance, directionality and ultra-short burst duration, a laser-driven neutron source would offer further advantages in terms of cost-effectiveness, compactness and radiation confinement by closed-coupled experiments. Some of the recent advances in this field are discussed, showing improvements in the directionality and flux of the laser-driven neutron beams.

  18. Fiber-coupled laser-driven flyer plates system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xing-hai; Zhao, Xiang; Shan, Guang-cun; Gao, Yang

    2011-04-01

    A system for the launch of hypervelocity flyer plates has been developed and characterized. Laser-driven flyers were launched from the substrate backed aluminum-alumina-aluminum sandwiched films. A laser-induced plasma is used to drive flyers with typical thickness of 5.5 μm and diameters of less than 1 mm, to achieve velocities of a few km/s. These flyer plates have many applications, from micrometeorite simulation to laser ignition. The flyer plates considered here have up to three layers: an ablation layer, to form plasma; an insulating layer; and a final, thicker layer that forms the final flyer plates. This technique was developed aiming at improving the energy efficiency of the system. The kinetic energy of flyers launched with the additional layer was found to be enhanced by a factor of near 2 (up to 30%). The optical fiber delivery system governs the output spatial profile of the laser spot and power capacity. Moreover, a technique for coupling high-power laser pulses into an optical fiber has been developed. This fiber optic system has been successfully used to launch flyer plates, and the surface finishing quality of the fiber was found to be an important factor. Importantly, measurements of the flyer performance including the mean velocities and planarity were made by an optical time-of-arrival technique using an optical fiber array probe, demonstrating the good planarity of the flyer and the achievable average velocity of 1.7 km/s with approaching 1 mm diameter. Finally, the relationship between flyer velocities and incident laser pulses energy was also investigated.

  19. Fiber-coupled laser-driven flyer plates system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xing-hai; Zhao, Xiang; Shan, Guang-cun; Gao, Yang

    2011-04-01

    A system for the launch of hypervelocity flyer plates has been developed and characterized. Laser-driven flyers were launched from the substrate backed aluminum-alumina-aluminum sandwiched films. A laser-induced plasma is used to drive flyers with typical thickness of 5.5 μm and diameters of less than 1 mm, to achieve velocities of a few km/s. These flyer plates have many applications, from micrometeorite simulation to laser ignition. The flyer plates considered here have up to three layers: an ablation layer, to form plasma; an insulating layer; and a final, thicker layer that forms the final flyer plates. This technique was developed aiming at improving the energy efficiency of the system. The kinetic energy of flyers launched with the additional layer was found to be enhanced by a factor of near 2 (up to 30%). The optical fiber delivery system governs the output spatial profile of the laser spot and power capacity. Moreover, a technique for coupling high-power laser pulses into an optical fiber has been developed. This fiber optic system has been successfully used to launch flyer plates, and the surface finishing quality of the fiber was found to be an important factor. Importantly, measurements of the flyer performance including the mean velocities and planarity were made by an optical time-of-arrival technique using an optical fiber array probe, demonstrating the good planarity of the flyer and the achievable average velocity of 1.7 km/s with approaching 1 mm diameter. Finally, the relationship between flyer velocities and incident laser pulses energy was also investigated.

  20. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  1. IFE Final Optics and Chamber Dynamics Modeling and Experiments Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    F. Najmabadi; M. S. Tillack

    2006-01-11

    Our OFES-sponsored research on IFE technology originally focused on studies of grazing-incidence metal mirrors (GIMM's). After the addition of GIMM research to the High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program, our OFES-sponsored research evolved to include laser propagation studies, surface material evolution in IFE wetted-wall chambers, and magnetic intervention. In 2003, the OFES IFE Technology program was terminated. We continued to expend resources on a no-cost extension in order to complete student research projects in an orderly way and to help us explore new research directions. Those explorations led to funding in the field of extreme ultraviolet lithography, which shares many issues in common with inertial fusion chambers, and the field of radiative properties of laser-produced plasma.

  2. Characterization of laser-driven shock waves in solids using a fiber optic pressure probe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cranch, Geoffrey A.; Lunsford, Robert; Grun, Jacob; Weaver, James; Compton, Steve; May, Mark; Kostinski, Natalie

    2013-11-08

    Measurement of laser-driven shock wave pressure in solid blocks of polymethyl methacrylate is demonstrated using fiber optic pressure probes. Three probes based on a fiber Fabry–Perot, fiber Bragg grating, and interferometric fiber tip sensor are tested and compared. Shock waves are generated using a high-power laser focused onto a thin foil target placed in close proximity to the test blocks. The fiber Fabry–Perot sensor appears capable of resolving the shock front with a rise time of 91 ns. As a result, the peak pressure is estimated, using a separate shadowgraphy measurement, to be 3.4 GPa.

  3. Interferometry and high speed photography of laser-driven flyer plates

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Montoya, N.I.; Stahl, D.B.; Garcia, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    Laser-driven thin (2-10-/mu/ thick) plates of aluminum and copper are accelerated to velocities /ge/5 km/s by a 1.06-/mu/ wavelength Nd:YAG 8-10 ns FWHM laser pulse at power densities 0.7-4.0 GW/cm/sup 2/. Accelerations /ge/10/sup 9/ km/s/sup 2/ have been achieved. The acceleration and velocity of these 0.4-1.0-mm-diameter plates are experimentally recorded by velocity interferometry (VISAR) and the planarity of impact by streak photography. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Picosecond metrology of laser-driven proton bursts

    PubMed Central

    Dromey, B.; Coughlan, M.; Senje, L.; Taylor, M.; Kuschel, S.; Villagomez-Bernabe, B.; Stefanuik, R.; Nersisyan, G.; Stella, L.; Kohanoff, J.; Borghesi, M.; Currell, F.; Riley, D.; Jung, D.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lewis, C.L.S.; Zepf, M.

    2016-01-01

    Tracking primary radiation-induced processes in matter requires ultrafast sources and high precision timing. While compact laser-driven ion accelerators are seeding the development of novel high instantaneous flux applications, combining the ultrashort ion and laser pulse durations with their inherent synchronicity to trace the real-time evolution of initial damage events has yet to be realized. Here we report on the absolute measurement of proton bursts as short as 3.5±0.7 ps from laser solid target interactions for this purpose. Our results verify that laser-driven ion acceleration can deliver interaction times over a factor of hundred shorter than those of state-of-the-art accelerators optimized for high instantaneous flux. Furthermore, these observations draw ion interaction physics into the field of ultrafast science, opening the opportunity for quantitative comparison with both numerical modelling and the adjacent fields of ultrafast electron and photon interactions in matter. PMID:26861592

  5. Laser-driven electron acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong; Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-12-15

    We study the laser-driven electron acceleration in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma channel. We find that, in inhomogeneous plasma channel, the developing of instability for electron acceleration and the electron energy gain can be controlled by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of plasma channel. That is, we can short the accelerating length and enhance the energy gain in inhomogeneous plasma channel by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of the plasma channel.

  6. Directional Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration from Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Sokollik, T.; Schnuerer, M.; Steinke, S.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Amin, M.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.; Andreev, A. A.

    2009-09-25

    Laser-driven ion acceleration is capable of generating ion beams of MeV energy exhibiting unique attributes such as ultralow emittance. Research is still focusing on fundamental laser-target interactions to control further beam attributes. In this Letter we present the observation of directional ion acceleration of irradiated spherical targets through proton imaging. This feature, together with an earlier observed quasimonoenergetic proton burst makes spherical targets extremely attractive candidates for high quality, high repetition rate sources of laser accelerated particles.

  7. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-07-25

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of gamma-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  8. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Kawachi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-07-01

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  9. Sexual assault in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Badejoko, Olusegun Olalekan; Anyabolu, Henry Chineme; Badejoko, Bolaji Olusola; Ijarotimi, Adebimpe Omotade; Kuti, Oluwafemi; Adejuyigbe, Ebunoluwa Aderonke

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sexual assault (SA) is a shattering malevolence against women. This study determined the burden, periodicity, presentation and management of SA in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of the hospital records of 76 SA survivors managed over a 5-year period (2007-2011) in Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals complex (OAUTHC), Ile-Ife. Results: Sexual assault accounted for 0.69% of all female and 5.2% of all gynaecological emergencies in OAUTHC, Ile-Ife. The survivors’ ages ranged from 4 to 50 years (mean = 17.7 ± 8.8years) and adolescents made up for 48%. The peak prevalence of SA was in February and December and among adults and under-16-year-old survivors, respectively. Daytime and weekday SA were significantly more common among the under-16-year-old survivors (P = 0.008). Majority of the survivors (62%) knew their assailant(s). Neighbours were the commonest perpetrators identified (28.2%) and the assailants’ house was the commonest location (39.4%). Weapons were involved in 29.6% of cases and various injuries were identified in 28.2% of the survivors. Hospital presentation was within 24 hours in majority (76.1%) of the survivors, but rape kit examinations were not performed as the kits were not available. Although appropriate medical management was routinely commenced, only 12.7% of survivors returned for follow-up. Conclusions: Seasonal and diurnal patterns exist in the prevalence of SA in Ile-Ife and most survivors that reported in the hospital presented early. Rape kit examinations were, however, not executed, due to non-availability. Personnel training, protocol development, provision of rape kits and free treatment of SA survivors are, therefore, recommended. Public enlightenment on preventive strategies based on the observed periodicity and age patterns is also suggested. PMID:25013260

  10. Development of an energy selector system for laser-driven proton beam applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, V.; Bijan Jia, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.; Licciardello, T.; Maggiore, M.; Margarone, D.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Stancampiano, C.; Tramontana, A.

    2014-03-01

    Nowadays, laser-driven proton beams generated by the interaction of high power lasers with solid targets represent a fascinating attraction in the field of the new acceleration techniques. These beams can be potentially accelerated up to hundreds of MeV and, therefore, they can represent a promising opportunity for medical applications. Laser-accelerated proton beams typically show high flux (up to 1011 particles per bunch), very short temporal profile (ps), broad energy spectra and poor reproducibility. In order to overcome these limitations, these beams have be controlled and transported by means of a proper beam handling system. Furthermore, suitable dosimetric diagnostic systems must be developed and tested. In the framework of the ELIMED project, we started to design a dedicated beam transport line and we have developed a first prototype of a beam line key-element: an Energy Selector System (ESS). It is based on permanent dipoles, capable to control and select in energy laser-accelerated proton beams. Monte Carlo simulations and some preliminary experimental tests have been already performed to characterize the device. A calibration of the ESS system with a conventional proton beam will be performed in September at the LNS in Catania. Moreover, an experimental campaign with laser-driven proton beam at the Centre for Plasma Physics, Queens University in Belfast is already scheduled and will be completed within 2014.

  11. Seeding magnetic fields for laser-driven flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Gotchev, O V; Knauer, J P; Chang, P Y; Jang, N W; Shoup, M J; Meyerhofer, D D; Betti, R

    2009-04-01

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a <100 J capacitor bank, a laser-triggered switch, and a low-impedance (<1 Omega) strip line. The device has been integrated into a series of magnetic-flux-compression experiments on the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The initial application is a novel magneto-inertial fusion approach [O. V. Gotchev et al., J. Fusion Energy 27, 25 (2008)] to inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where the amplified magnetic field can inhibit thermal conduction losses from the hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity-a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF.

  12. Seeding Magnetic Fields for Laser-Driven Flux Compression in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gotchev, O.V.; Knauer, J.P.; Chang, P.Y.; Jang, N.W.; Shoup III, M.J.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Betti, R.

    2010-03-23

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a <100 J capacitor bank, a laser-triggered switch, and a low-impedance (<1 Omega) strip line. The device has been integrated into a series of magnetic-flux-compression experiments on the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The initial application is a novel magneto-inertial fusion approach [O. V. Gotchev et al., J. Fusion Energy 27, 25 (2008)] to inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where the amplified magnetic field can inhibit thermal conduction losses from the hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity—a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF.

  13. Seeding magnetic fields for laser-driven flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Gotchev, O V; Knauer, J P; Chang, P Y; Jang, N W; Shoup, M J; Meyerhofer, D D; Betti, R

    2009-04-01

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a <100 J capacitor bank, a laser-triggered switch, and a low-impedance (<1 Omega) strip line. The device has been integrated into a series of magnetic-flux-compression experiments on the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The initial application is a novel magneto-inertial fusion approach [O. V. Gotchev et al., J. Fusion Energy 27, 25 (2008)] to inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where the amplified magnetic field can inhibit thermal conduction losses from the hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity-a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF. PMID:19405657

  14. Laser driven electron acceleration in vacuum, gases and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Krall, J.

    1996-04-19

    This paper discusses some of the important issues pertaining to laser acceleration in vacuum, neutral gases and plasmas. The limitations of laser vacuum acceleration as they relate to electron slippage, laser diffraction, material damage and electron aperture effects, are discussed. An inverse Cherenkov laser acceleration configuration is presented in which a laser beam is self guided in a partially ionized gas. Optical self guiding is the result of a balance between the nonlinear self focusing properties of neutral gases and the diffraction effects of ionization. The stability of self guided beams is analyzed and discussed. In addition, aspects of the laser wakefield accelerator are presented and laser driven accelerator experiments are briefly discussed.

  15. Planar laser-driven ablation model for nonlocalized absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmani, F.; Kerdja, T. )

    1991-05-01

    A model for planar laser-driven ablation is presented. Nonlocalized inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of laser energy at a density {ital n}{sub 1}{lt}{ital n}{sub {ital c}} is assumed. A steady-state solution in the conduction zone is joined to a rarefaction wave in the underdense plasma. The calculations relate all steady-state fluid quantities to only the material, absorbed intensity, and laser wavelength. The theory agrees well with results from a computer hydrodynamics code MEDUSA (Comput. Phys. Commun. {bold 7}, 271 (1974)) and experiments.

  16. IFE14 and OSI Technologies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, R. H.; Macleod, G.

    2013-12-01

    The On-Site Inspection (OSI) regime is the final verification pillar of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. Unlike the International Monitoring System (IMS) and the International Data Centre (IDC) which are under interim operations during the CTBTO Preparatory Commission an OSI cannot occur until after entry into force of the treaty. The Preparatory Commission has been charged with developing the methodologies and the training curricula and determining the equipment required for conducting an OSI. An Integrated Field Exercise (IFE) of all the technologies and techniques following Treaty guidelines and structures is utilized to determine the progress being made by the Preparatory Commission in completing its OSI mandate. IFE14 will be conducted in a 1000 km2 area near the Dead Sea in Jordan next year. In order to adequately test the verification regimes the data utilized from the triggering event throughout the five weeks of the inspection must be scientifically credible and internally consistent so that the inspection team members performing the OSI remain immersed in the exercise and not distracted unrealistic or scientifically improbable data. This means the data simulation starts at the beginning with the triggering event(s) and carries on through the OSI techniques of visual observation including MSIR, measurement of seismic aftershocks, measurement of radioactivity fields, collection and analysis of environmental samples (solids, liquids, and gases, utilization of geophysical techniques: active seismic, resonance seismometry, gravimetry, magnetometry, and electrical conductivity measurements and lastly drilling to obtain radioactive samples. IFE14 will not utilize resonance seismometry or drilling to obtain radioactive samples for cost and time reasons but all other techniques will be utilized. A full understanding of the triggering event and the geologic and geophysical regime of the inspection area needs to be in place to ensure the scientifically credible

  17. Observation of gigawatt-class THz pulses from a compact laser-driven particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Gopal, A; Herzer, S; Schmidt, A; Singh, P; Reinhard, A; Ziegler, W; Brömmel, D; Karmakar, A; Gibbon, P; Dillner, U; May, T; Meyer, H-G; Paulus, G G

    2013-08-16

    We report the observation of subpicosecond terahertz (T-ray) pulses with energies ≥460 μJ from a laser-driven ion accelerator, thus rendering the peak power of the source higher even than that of state-of-the-art synchrotrons. Experiments were performed with intense laser pulses (up to 5×10(19) W/cm(2)) to irradiate thin metal foil targets. Ion spectra measured simultaneously showed a square law dependence of the T-ray yield on particle number. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show the presence of transient currents at the target rear surface which could be responsible for the strong T-ray emission.

  18. Progress Toward Heavy Ion IFE

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Logan, B G; Waldron, W L; Sabbi, G L; Callahan-Miller, D A; Peterson, P F; Goodin, D T

    2002-01-17

    Successful development of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) will require scientific and technology advances in areas of targets, drivers and chambers. Design work on heavy ion targets indicates that high gain (60-130) may be possible with a -3-6 MJ driver depending on the ability to focus the beams to small spot sizes. Significant improvements have been made on key components of heavy ion drivers, including sources, injectors, insulators and ferromagnetic materials for long-pulse induction accelerator cells, solid-state pulsers, and superconducting quadrupole magnets. The leading chamber concept for HIF is the thick-liquid-wall HYLEE-II design, which uses an array of flibe jets to protect chamber structures from x-ray, debris, and neutron damage. Significant progress has been made in demonstrating the ability to create and control the types of flow needed to form the protective liquid blanket. Progress has also been made on neutron shielding for the final focus magnet arrays with predicted lifetimes now exceeding the life of the power plant. Safety analyses have been completed for the HYLEE-II design using state-of-the-art codes. Work also continues on target fabrication and injection for HE. A target injector experiment capable of > 5 Hz operation has been designed and construction will start in 2002. Methods for mass production of hohlraum targets are being evaluated with small-scale experiments and analyses. Progress in these areas will be reviewed.

  19. 0.5MJ Targets for an IFE Fusion Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafortune, K. N.; Perkins, L. J.; Bedrossian, P.; Betti, R.; Schmitt, A.; Obenschain, S.

    2006-10-01

    There has been much recent progress in the development of both the source and targets for laser-driven, inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The next step to apply this approach to inertial fusion energy (IFE) is to build a facility that has all the required components of a reactor and demonstrates the reliability and robustness. The Fusion Test Facility proposed by NRL is one such facility [S.Obenschain, Bull. APS v50, 2005]. The cost, complexity and scale of any fusion test facility are driven by the energy required for the fusion target. As the laser-target physics has become better understood, target geometries that require less drive energy have been found. Using conventional hotspot ignition, rad-hydro-burn simulations using HYDRA of low-drive-energy, direct-drive reactor targets requiring just 0.5 MJ of drive energy to achieve gain of 10's are being studied. 1-D scoping studies have been performed to outline the source requirements. Good agreement with comprehensive, time-dependent 1-D simulations in LASNEX has been obtained for integral quantities such as gain, yield and ignition margins. The robustness of the small targets has been explored with 2-D stability studies. Shock ignition of similar targets could be employed to achieve yet higher gains with similar drive energies.

  20. Laser-driven Sisyphus cooling in an optical dipole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladyslav V.; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2011-12-15

    We propose a laser-driven Sisyphus-cooling scheme for atoms confined in a far-off resonance optical dipole trap. Utilizing the differential trap-induced ac Stark shift, two electronic levels of the atom are resonantly coupled by a cooling laser preferentially near the trap bottom. After absorption of a cooling photon, the atom loses energy by climbing the steeper potential, and then spontaneously decays preferentially away from the trap bottom. The proposed method is particularly suited to cooling alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms where two-level systems with narrow electronic transitions are present. Numerical simulations for the cases of {sup 88}Sr and {sup 174}Yb demonstrate the expected recoil and Doppler temperature limits. The method requires a relatively small number of scattered photons and can potentially lead to phase-space densities approaching quantum degeneracy in subsecond time scales.

  1. Laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlott, Dana; Shaw, William; Curtis, Alexander; Banishev, Alexandr

    2013-06-01

    A laser-driven mini flyer plate system was developed for shock compression spectroscopy. A commercial one-box 2J YAG laser produces a homogeneous top hat beam with a diffractive optic. An 8 GHz PDV characterizes flyer velocity profiles up to 5 km/s. Flyers are routinely launched with velocities reproducible to + ∖ -1%, and the 1 mm diameter flyers have enough energy to initiate energetic materials. High-speed spectroscopic diagnostics have been synchronized. Design elements such as diameter, thickness, laser pulse duration, substrate size, and so on will be discussed. Illustrations will be presented, including monitoring shock front structures with embedded optical gauges, and understanding mechanisms of reactive nanomaterial impact initiation. Supported by ARO W911NF-10-1-0072, AFOSR FA9550-09-1-0163, DTRA HDTRA1-12-1-0011 and NNSA Carnegie-DOE Alliance Center DOE CIW 4-3253-13.

  2. Laser-driven ICF experiments: Laboratory Report No. 223

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, R.L.

    1991-04-01

    Laser irradiation uniformity is a key issue and is treated in some detail. The basic irradiation uniformity requirements and practical ways of achieving these requirements are both discussed, along with two beam-smoothing techniques: induced spatial incoherence (ISI), and smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Experiments to measure and control the irradiation uniformity are also highlighted. Following the discussion of irradiation uniformity, a brief review of coronal physics is given, including the basic physical processes and their experimental signatures, together with a summary of pertinent diagnostics and results from experiments. Methods of determining ablation rates and thermal transport are also described. The hydrodynamics of laser-driven targets must be fully understood on the basis of experiments. Results from implosion experiments, including a brief description of the diagnostics, are presented. Future experiments aimed at determining ignition scaling and demonstrating hydrodynamically equivalent physics applicable to high-gain designs.

  3. Characterization of short-pulse laser driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Katerina; Jung, Daniel; Guler, Nevzat; Deppert, Oliver; Devlin, Matthew; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We present a full spectral characterization of a novel laser driven neutron source, which employed the Break Out Afterburner ion acceleration mechanism. Neutrons were produced by nuclear reactions of the ions deposited on Be or Cu converters. We observed neutrons at energies up to 150 MeV. The neutron spectra were measured by five neutron time-of-flight detectors at various positions and distances from the source. The nTOF detectors observed that emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component peaking at 3.5--5 MeV resulting from nuclear reactions in the converter and a directional component at 25--70 MeV, which was a product of break-up reaction of the forward moving deuterons. Energy shifts due to geometrical effects in BOA were also observed.

  4. Ultrafast laser-driven proton sources and dynamic proton imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nickles, Peter V.; Schnuerer, Matthias; Sokollik, Thomas; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis; Sandner, Wolfgang; Amin, Munib; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Andreev, Alexander

    2008-07-15

    Ion bursts, accelerated by an ultrafast (40 fs) laser-assisted target normal sheath acceleration mechanism, can be adjusted so as to deliver a nearly pure proton beam. Such laser-driven proton bursts have predominantly a low transverse emittance and a broad kinetic spectrum suitable for continuous probing of the temporal evolution of spatially extended electric fields that arise after laser irradiation of thin foils. Fields with a strength of up to 10{sup 10} V/m were measured with a new streaklike proton deflectometry setup. The data show the temporal and spatial evolution of electric fields that are due to target charge-up and ion-front expansion following intense laser-target interaction at intensities of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Measurement of the field evolution is important to gain further insight into lateral electron-transport processes and the influence of field dynamics on ion beam properties.

  5. Tomography of an ultrafast laser driven proton source

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Borghesi, M.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Nickles, P. V.; Nakamura, T.; Mima, K.

    2010-06-15

    Using a multichannel Thomson spectrometer we have implemented a tomographic approach allowing the reconstruction of the emission characteristic of a laser driven proton source with high energy and spatial resolution. The results demonstrate the complexity of the temporal and spatial characteristics of such a source. The emitted proton beam, which is laminar and divergent at high energies, becomes convergent at low energies. This implies that a fraction of the proton beam having this kinetic energy is emitted in a collimated way from the target at the ''turning point'' between these two behaviors. Only a finite fraction of the target surface is contributing to the ion spectrum, which is measured at a specific angle within the beam cone. Therefore the momentum distribution of the protons in the emitted beam at any point in space can be controlled by determining the proton source area.

  6. Pulsed radiobiology with laser-driven plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Grazia Andreassi, Maria; Greco, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, a high efficiency regime of acceleration in laser plasmas has been discovered, allowing table top equipment to deliver doses of interest for radiotherapy with electron bunches of suitable kinetic energy. In view of an R&D program aimed to the realization of an innovative class of accelerators for medical uses, a radiobiological validation is needed. At the present time, the biological effects of electron bunches from the laser-driven electron accelerator are largely unknown. In radiobiology and radiotherapy, it is known that the early spatial distribution of energy deposition following ionizing radiation interactions with DNA molecule is crucial for the prediction of damages at cellular or tissue levels and during the clinical responses to this irradiation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radio-biological effects obtained with electron bunches from a laser-driven electron accelerator compared with bunches coming from a IORT-dedicated medical Radio-frequency based linac's on human cells by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN). To this purpose a multidisciplinary team including radiotherapists, biologists, medical physicists, laser and plasma physicists is working at CNR Campus and University of Pisa. Dose on samples is delivered alternatively by the "laser-linac" operating at ILIL lab of Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and an RF-linac operating for IORT at Pisa S. Chiara Hospital. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of suitable radiobiological models as well as with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo codes. Possible collective effects are also considered in the case of ultrashort, ultradense bunches of ionizing radiation.

  7. Laser-driven x-ray and neutron source development for industrial applications of plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, C. M.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Rusby, D. R.; Armstrong, C.; Alejo, A.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed beams of energetic x-rays and neutrons from intense laser interactions with solid foils are promising for applications where bright, small emission area sources, capable of multi-modal delivery are ideal. Possible end users of laser-driven multi-modal sources are those requiring advanced non-destructive inspection techniques in industry sectors of high value commerce such as aerospace, nuclear and advanced manufacturing. We report on experimental work that demonstrates multi-modal operation of high power laser-solid interactions for neutron and x-ray beam generation. Measurements and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations show that neutron yield is increased by a factor ~2 when a 1 mm copper foil is placed behind a 2 mm lithium foil, compared to using a 2 cm block of lithium only. We explore x-ray generation with a 10 picosecond drive pulse in order to tailor the spectral content for radiography with medium density alloy metals. The impact of using  >1 ps pulse duration on laser-accelerated electron beam generation and transport is discussed alongside the optimisation of subsequent bremsstrahlung emission in thin, high atomic number target foils. X-ray spectra are deconvolved from spectrometer measurements and simulation data generated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. We also demonstrate the unique capability of laser-driven x-rays in being able to deliver single pulse high spatial resolution projection imaging of thick metallic objects. Active detector radiographic imaging of industrially relevant sample objects with a 10 ps drive pulse is presented for the first time, demonstrating that features of 200 μm size are resolved when projected at high magnification.

  8. Process Model of the Gas Recovery System in an IFE reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, Charles; Aristova, Maria

    2007-11-01

    It is necessary to develop a detailed representative model for the fuel recovery system (FRS) in the prospective direct drive inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor. In order to observe the interaction of all components, a chemical process model is developed as part of the conceptual design phase of the project. Initially, the reactants, system structure, and processes are defined using the known contents of the vacuum vessel exhaust. The output, which will include physical properties and chemical content of the products, is analyzed to determine the most efficient and productive system parameters. The results of the modeling will be presented in this paper. This modeling exercise will be instrumental in optimizing and closing the fusion fuel cycle in the IFE power reactor.

  9. Generation and diagnostics of atmospheric pressure CO{sub 2} plasma by laser driven plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Tanaka, Kensaku; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Satoshi; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure CO{sub 2} plasma was generated by a laser driven plasma wind tunnel. At an ambient pressure of 0.38 MPa, a stable plasma was maintained by a laser power of 1000 W for more than 20 min. The translational temperature was measured using laser absorption spectroscopy with the atomic oxygen line at 777.19 nm. The measured absorption profiles were analyzed by a Voigt function considering Doppler, Stark, and pressure-broadening effects. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, all broadening effects were consistent with each other. The measured temperature ranged from 8500 K to 8900 K.

  10. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    importance for the fusion power plant research programmes. The objective of this Technical Meeting was to examine in an integrated way all the safety aspects anticipated to be relevant to the first fusion power plant prototype expected to become operational by the middle of the century, leading to the first generation of economically viable fusion power plants with attractive S&E features. After screening by guest editors and consideration by referees, 13 (out of 28) papers were accepted for publication. They are devoted to the following safety topics: power plant safety; fusion specific operational safety approaches; test blanket modules; accident analysis; tritium safety and inventories; decommissioning and waste. The paper `Main safety issues at the transition from ITER to fusion power plants' by W. Gulden et al (EU) highlights the differences between ITER and future fusion power plants with magnetic confinement (off-site dose acceptance criteria, consequences of accidents inside and outside the design basis, occupational radiation exposure, and waste management, including recycling and/or final disposal in repositories) on the basis of the most recent European fusion power plant conceptual study. Ongoing S&E studies within the US inertial fusion energy (IFE) community are focusing on two design concepts. These are the high average power laser (HAPL) programme for development of a dry-wall, laser-driven IFE power plant, and the Z-pinch IFE programme for the production of an economically-attractive power plant using high-yield Z-pinch-driven targets. The main safety issues related to these programmes are reviewed in the paper `Status of IFE safety and environmental activities in the US' by S. Reyes et al (USA). The authors propose future directions of research in the IFE S&E area. In the paper `Recent accomplishments and future directions in the US Fusion Safety & Environmental Program' D. Petti et al (USA) state that the US fusion programme has long recognized that the S

  11. Laser-driven ion acceleration with hollow laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brabetz, C. Kester, O.; Busold, S.; Bagnoud, V.; Cowan, T.; Deppert, O.; Jahn, D.; Roth, M.; Schumacher, D.

    2015-01-15

    The laser-driven acceleration of protons from thin foils irradiated by hollow high-intensity laser beams in the regime of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) is reported for the first time. The use of hollow beams aims at reducing the initial emission solid angle of the TNSA source, due to a flattening of the electron sheath at the target rear side. The experiments were conducted at the PHELIX laser facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH with laser intensities in the range from 10{sup 18} W cm{sup −2} to 10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}. We observed an average reduction of the half opening angle by (3.07±0.42)° or (13.2±2.0)% when the targets have a thickness between 12 μm and 14 μm. In addition, the highest proton energies were achieved with the hollow laser beam in comparison to the typical Gaussian focal spot.

  12. Laser-driven relativistic electron beam interaction with solid dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R. B.

    2012-07-01

    The multi-frames shadowgraphy, interferometry and polarimetry diagnostics with sub-ps time resolution were used for an investigation of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by laser-driven relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50 TW Leopard laser at the UNR. For a laser flux of ˜2×1018W/cm2 a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3. The maximum of the electron density inside the glass target is ˜2×1019cm-3. Magnetic and electric fields are less than ˜15 kG and ˜1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a maximum of ˜0.5 eV. 2D interference phase shift shows the "fountain effect" of electron beam. The very low ionization inside glass target ˜0.1% suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale. 2D PIC-simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields.

  13. Laser-driven ion acceleration from relativistically transparent nanotargets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. M.; Pomerantz, I.; Yin, L.; Wu, H. C.; Jung, D.; Albright, B. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Letzring, S.; Palaniyappan, S.; Shah, R.; Allinger, K.; Hörlein, R.; Schreiber, J.; Habs, D.; Blakeney, J.; Dyer, G.; Fuller, L.; Gaul, E.; Mccary, E.; Meadows, A. R.; Wang, C.; Ditmire, T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Here we present experimental results on laser-driven ion acceleration from relativistically transparent, overdense plasmas in the break-out afterburner (BOA) regime. Experiments were preformed at the Trident ultra-high contrast laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and at the Texas Petawatt laser facility, located in the University of Texas at Austin. It is shown that when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, an epoch of dramatic acceleration of ions occurs that lasts until the electron density in the expanding target reduces to the critical density in the non-relativistic limit. For given laser parameters, the optimal target thickness yielding the highest maximum ion energy is one in which this time window for ion acceleration overlaps with the intensity peak of the laser pulse. A simple analytic model of relativistically induced transparency is presented for plasma expansion at the time-evolving sound speed, from which these times may be estimated. The maximum ion energy attainable is controlled by the finite acceleration volume and time over which the BOA acts.

  14. Dynamic x-ray imaging of laser-driven nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    A major promise of current x-ray science at free electron lasers is the realization of unprecedented imaging capabilities for resolving the structure and ultrafast dynamics of matter with nanometer spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution or even below via single-shot x-ray diffraction. Laser-driven atomic clusters and nanoparticles provide an ideal platform for developing and demonstrating the required technology to extract the ultrafast transient spatiotemporal dynamics from the diffraction images. In this talk, the perspectives and challenges of dynamic x-ray imaging will be discussed using complete self-consistent microscopic electromagnetic simulations of IR pump x-ray probe imaging for the example of clusters. The results of the microscopic particle-in-cell simulations (MicPIC) enable the simulation-assisted reconstruction of corresponding experimental data. This capability is demonstrated by converting recently measured LCLS data into a ultrahigh resolution movie of laser-induced plasma expansion. Finally, routes towards reaching attosecond time resolution in the visualization of complex dynamical processes in matter by x-ray diffraction will be discussed.

  15. Laser-driven relativistic electron beam interaction with solid dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R. B.

    2012-07-30

    The multi-frames shadowgraphy, interferometry and polarimetry diagnostics with sub-ps time resolution were used for an investigation of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by laser-driven relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50 TW Leopard laser at the UNR. For a laser flux of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2} a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3. The maximum of the electron density inside the glass target is {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}cm{sup -3}. Magnetic and electric fields are less than {approx}15 kG and {approx}1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a maximum of {approx}0.5 eV. 2D interference phase shift shows the 'fountain effect' of electron beam. The very low ionization inside glass target {approx}0.1% suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale. 2D PIC-simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields.

  16. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-07-15

    Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator, plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses, and highly nonlinear regimes. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse diffraction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, and beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Experiments demonstrating key physics, such as the production of high-quality electron bunches at energies of 0.1-1 GeV, are summarized.

  17. Laser-driven flyer plates for reactive materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hiroki; Brown, Kathryn; Conner, Rusty; Dlott, Dana

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a laser-driven flyer plate apparatus to study shock-induced chemistry of reactive materials (RM) containing Al nanoparticles. Reactive materials are generally composed of fuel and oxidizer particles. Under shock compression these components mix and react to liberate energy and do work. Understanding how shocked nanoparticle compositions undergo exothermic chemistry is a difficult problem in materials science, since the reactivity is a function of both chemical and materials parameters. Laser-launched flyer plates coated with a small amount of the RM are made to impact a window and their emission spectrum is studied. Achieving a good reproducible launch is a problem, and is generally limited by the quality of the laser beam profile and the flyer target. Our approach exploits recent advances in beam shaping and microfabrication. This material is based on work supported by the US Army Research Office under award number W911NF-04-1-0178 and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under award number FA9550-06-1-0235. Kathryn Brown acknowledges support from the Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliance Program from the Carnegie-DOE Alliance Center under grant number DOE CIW 4-3253-13.

  18. Invited Review Article: "Hands-on" laser-driven ion acceleration: A primer for laser-driven source development and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, J; Bolton, P R; Parodi, K

    2016-07-01

    An overview of progress and typical yields from intense laser-plasma acceleration of ions is presented. The evolution of laser-driven ion acceleration at relativistic intensities ushers prospects for improved functionality and diverse applications which can represent a varied assortment of ion beam requirements. This mandates the development of the integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system, the multiple components of which are described. Relevant high field laser-plasma science and design of controlled optimum pulsed laser irradiation on target are dominant single shot (pulse) considerations with aspects that are appropriate to the emerging petawatt era. The pulse energy scaling of maximum ion energies and typical differential spectra obtained over the past two decades provide guidance for continued advancement of laser-driven energetic ion sources and their meaningful applications. PMID:27475539

  19. Invited Review Article: "Hands-on" laser-driven ion acceleration: A primer for laser-driven source development and potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, J.; Bolton, P. R.; Parodi, K.

    2016-07-01

    An overview of progress and typical yields from intense laser-plasma acceleration of ions is presented. The evolution of laser-driven ion acceleration at relativistic intensities ushers prospects for improved functionality and diverse applications which can represent a varied assortment of ion beam requirements. This mandates the development of the integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system, the multiple components of which are described. Relevant high field laser-plasma science and design of controlled optimum pulsed laser irradiation on target are dominant single shot (pulse) considerations with aspects that are appropriate to the emerging petawatt era. The pulse energy scaling of maximum ion energies and typical differential spectra obtained over the past two decades provide guidance for continued advancement of laser-driven energetic ion sources and their meaningful applications.

  20. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  1. Simplified laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Shaw, William L.; Zheng, Xianxu; Dlott, Dana D.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a simplified system of laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science and shock spectroscopy. We used commercially available one-box Nd:YAG lasers and beam homogenization solutions to create two launch systems, one based on a smaller (400 mJ) YAG laser and an inexpensive diffusive optic, and one based on a larger (2500 mJ) laser and a diffractive beam homogenizer. The flyer launch, flight, and impact processes were characterized by an 8 GHz fiberoptic photon Doppler velocimeter. We investigated effects of different substrates, adhesives, absorbers, ablative layers, and punching out disks from continuous foils versus fabricating individual foil disks, and found that a simple metal foil epoxied to a glass window was satisfactory in almost all cases. Our simplified system launched flyer plates with velocities up to 4.5 km s-1 and kinetic energies up to 250 mJ that can drive sustained steady shocks for up to 25 ns. The factor that limits these velocities and energies is the laser fluence that can be transmitted through the glass substrate to the flyer surface without optical damage. Methods to increase this transmission are discussed. Reproducible flyer launches were demonstrated with velocity variations of 0.06% and impact time variations of 1 ns. The usefulness of this flyer plate system is demonstrated by Hugoniot equation of state measurements of a polymer film, emission spectroscopy of a dye embedded in the polymer, and impact initiation and emission spectroscopy of a reactive material consisting of nanoscopic fuel and oxidizer particles.

  2. Simplified laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathryn E; Shaw, William L; Zheng, Xianxu; Dlott, Dana D

    2012-10-01

    We describe a simplified system of laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science and shock spectroscopy. We used commercially available one-box Nd:YAG lasers and beam homogenization solutions to create two launch systems, one based on a smaller (400 mJ) YAG laser and an inexpensive diffusive optic, and one based on a larger (2500 mJ) laser and a diffractive beam homogenizer. The flyer launch, flight, and impact processes were characterized by an 8 GHz fiberoptic photon Doppler velocimeter. We investigated effects of different substrates, adhesives, absorbers, ablative layers, and punching out disks from continuous foils versus fabricating individual foil disks, and found that a simple metal foil epoxied to a glass window was satisfactory in almost all cases. Our simplified system launched flyer plates with velocities up to 4.5 km s(-1) and kinetic energies up to 250 mJ that can drive sustained steady shocks for up to 25 ns. The factor that limits these velocities and energies is the laser fluence that can be transmitted through the glass substrate to the flyer surface without optical damage. Methods to increase this transmission are discussed. Reproducible flyer launches were demonstrated with velocity variations of 0.06% and impact time variations of 1 ns. The usefulness of this flyer plate system is demonstrated by Hugoniot equation of state measurements of a polymer film, emission spectroscopy of a dye embedded in the polymer, and impact initiation and emission spectroscopy of a reactive material consisting of nanoscopic fuel and oxidizer particles.

  3. Simplified laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Shaw, William L.; Zheng Xianxu; Dlott, Dana D.

    2012-10-15

    We describe a simplified system of laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science and shock spectroscopy. We used commercially available one-box Nd:YAG lasers and beam homogenization solutions to create two launch systems, one based on a smaller (400 mJ) YAG laser and an inexpensive diffusive optic, and one based on a larger (2500 mJ) laser and a diffractive beam homogenizer. The flyer launch, flight, and impact processes were characterized by an 8 GHz fiberoptic photon Doppler velocimeter. We investigated effects of different substrates, adhesives, absorbers, ablative layers, and punching out disks from continuous foils versus fabricating individual foil disks, and found that a simple metal foil epoxied to a glass window was satisfactory in almost all cases. Our simplified system launched flyer plates with velocities up to 4.5 km s{sup -1} and kinetic energies up to 250 mJ that can drive sustained steady shocks for up to 25 ns. The factor that limits these velocities and energies is the laser fluence that can be transmitted through the glass substrate to the flyer surface without optical damage. Methods to increase this transmission are discussed. Reproducible flyer launches were demonstrated with velocity variations of 0.06% and impact time variations of 1 ns. The usefulness of this flyer plate system is demonstrated by Hugoniot equation of state measurements of a polymer film, emission spectroscopy of a dye embedded in the polymer, and impact initiation and emission spectroscopy of a reactive material consisting of nanoscopic fuel and oxidizer particles.

  4. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher P; Brenner, Ceri M; Stitt, Camilla A; Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R; Mirfayzi, Seyed R; Wilson, Lucy A; Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad; Allott, Ric; Butler, Nicholas M H; Clarke, Robert J; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Higginson, Adam; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos; Jowsey, John; McKenna, Paul; Neely, David; Kar, Satya; Scott, Thomas B

    2016-11-15

    A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500keV), with a source size of <0.5mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30cm(2) scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned.

  5. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher P; Brenner, Ceri M; Stitt, Camilla A; Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R; Mirfayzi, Seyed R; Wilson, Lucy A; Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad; Allott, Ric; Butler, Nicholas M H; Clarke, Robert J; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Higginson, Adam; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos; Jowsey, John; McKenna, Paul; Neely, David; Kar, Satya; Scott, Thomas B

    2016-11-15

    A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500keV), with a source size of <0.5mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30cm(2) scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned. PMID:27484945

  6. Design of the prototype of a beam transport line for handling and selection of low energy laser-driven beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, F.; Maggiore, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Costa, M.; Rifuggiato, D.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.

    2016-11-01

    A first prototype of transport beam-line for laser-driven ion beams to be used for the handling of particles accelerated by high-power laser interacting with solid targets has been realized at INFN. The goal is the production of a controlled and stable beam in terms of energy and angular spread. The beam-line consists of two elements: an Energy Selection System (ESS), already realized and characterized with both conventional and laser-accelerated beams, and a Permanent Magnet Quadrupole system (PMQ) designed, in collaboration with SIGMAPHI (Fr), to improve the ESS performances. In this work a description of the ESS system and some results of its characterization with conventional beams are reported, in order to provide a complete explanation of the acceptance calculation. Then, the matching with the PMQ system is presented and, finally, the results of preliminary simulations with a realistic laser-driven energy spectrum are discussed demonstrating the possibility to provide a good quality beam downstream the systems.

  7. Laser-Driven Magnetic-Flux Compression: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Yu

    Laser-Driven Flux Compression (LDFC) is a technique used to compress the magnetic field in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets driven by a laser. The compressed field in the ICF target is beneficial to the target performance. Embedding a magnetic field in a conventional ICF target reduces the heat loss if the central hot spot becomes magnetized. Higher hot spot temperatures lower the requirements on the implosion velocities, leading to larger shell masses and therefore higher energy gains. For a typical hot spot density of ˜ 10 g/cc, and temperature of ˜ 5 keV, a magnetic field B > 10 MG is required to magnetize the hot spot. Such a strong magnetic field is difficult to be externally generated. Instead of providing the strong magnetic field directly, a seed magnetic field much lower than the required field was provided and compressed by the imploding shell. The field needs to be compressed faster than its diffusion due to the finite resistivity of the fill gas and the shell. This requires the gas in the target being ionized by the shock so that the flux is frozen in the gas region and compressed by the imploding shell. In this thesis, theoretical models, numerical calculations, and basic experiments of flux compression in ICF targets are investigated. A measurable Lawson criterion, developed as a metric to assess the performance of an ICF target, is used to evaluate the benefits of suppressing the heat conductivity. A simple model is used to describe the process of field compression by shock waves during the shell implosion. The magnetohydrodynamics codes, LILAC-MHD and LILAC-MHD-SP, are used to simulate the field compression and the target performance. The Magneto-Inertial-Fusion-Electrical-Discharge-System (MIFEDS), the device providing the seed magnetic field, is described in detail. LDFC experiments using the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics are presented. The results include the first demonstration of ˜ 550-fold amplification of a 50

  8. Nonthermal Electron Energization from Magnetic Reconnection in Laser-Driven Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Totorica, Samuel R; Abel, Tom; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of studying nonthermal electron energization in laser-driven plasma experiments of magnetic reconnection is studied using two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is demonstrated that nonthermal electrons with energies more than an order of magnitude larger than the initial thermal energy can be produced in plasma conditions currently accessible in the laboratory. Electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field, being injected at varied distances from the X points, and in some cases trapped in plasmoids, before escaping the finite-sized system. Trapped electrons can be further energized by the electric field arising from the motion of the plasmoid. This acceleration gives rise to a nonthermal electron component that resembles a power-law spectrum, containing up to ∼8% of the initial energy of the interacting electrons and ∼24% of the initial magnetic energy. Estimates of the maximum electron energy and of the plasma conditions required to observe suprathermal electron acceleration are provided, paving the way for a new platform for the experimental study of particle acceleration induced by reconnection. PMID:26991182

  9. Overview of laser-driven generation of electron-positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarri, G.; Dieckmann, M. E.; Kourakis, I.; di Piazza, A.; Reville, B.; Keitel, C. H.; Zepf, M.

    2015-08-01

    Electron-positron (e-p) plasmas are widely thought to be emitted, in the form of ultra-relativistic winds or collimated jets, by some of the most energetic or powerful objects in the Universe, such as black-holes, pulsars, and quasars. These phenomena represent an unmatched astrophysical laboratory to test physics at its limit and, given their immense distance from Earth (some even farther than several billion light years), they also provide a unique window on the very early stages of our Universe. However, due to such gigantic distances, their properties are only inferred from the indirect interpretation of their radiative signatures and from matching numerical models: their generation mechanism and dynamics still pose complicated enigmas to the scientific community. Small-scale reproductions in the laboratory would represent a fundamental step towards a deeper understanding of this exotic state of matter. Here we present recent experimental results concerning the laser-driven production of ultra-relativistic e-p beams. In particular, we focus on the possibility of generating beams that present charge neutrality and that allow for collective effects in their dynamics, necessary ingredients for the testing pair-plasma physics in the laboratory. A brief discussion of the analytical and numerical modelling of the dynamics of these plasmas is also presented in order to provide a summary of the novel plasma physics that can be accessed with these objects. Finally, general considerations on the scalability of laboratory plasmas up to astrophysical scenarios are given.

  10. Feasibility investigations on a novel micro-embossing using laser-driven flyer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huixia; Shen, Zongbao; Wang, Xiao; Li, Pin; Hu, Yang; Gu, Chunxing

    2012-09-01

    A novel micro-plastic microfabrication technique for embossing is presented, which uses laser-driven flyer as the loading method in forming. Experiments were performed by allowing the laser-driven flyer to impact the thin film, which is placed above a micromold. Micro-channel with dimension of 160 μm×45 μm was successfully fabricated on copper foil surface using laser-driven flyer. The effects of laser energy on deformation mechanism were investigated experimentally. Surface roughness changes on formed sample were discussed. The novel technique holds promise for achieving precise, well-controlled, low-cost, high efficiency of three-dimensional metallic microstructures. In addition, this technique can cold form high strength or difficult materials.

  11. Effect of nonthermal electrons on the shock formation in a laser driven plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaï, Ph. Feugeas, J.-L.; Nguyen-bui, T.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Batani, D.; Maheut, Y.; Antonelli, L.

    2015-04-15

    In the laser-driven inertial fusion schemes and specifically in the shock ignition concept, non thermal electrons may be generated. By depositing their energy far from the origin, they can significantly modify the target hydrodynamics. It is shown in this paper that these electrons may affect the laser-driven shock formation and its propagation through the target. These changes are induced by the target heating and depend on the electron energy spectrum. Furthermore, results of some passive diagnostic may be misinterpreted, indicating an apparent different pressure.

  12. Streaked Optical Pyrometer System for Laser-Driven Shock-Wave Experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Boehly, T.R.; Melchior, Meyerhofer, D.D.; Celliers, P.M.; Eggert, J.H.; Hicks, D.G.; Sorce, C.M.; Oertel, J.A.; Emmel, P.M.

    2007-03-23

    The temperature of laser-driven shock waves is of interest to inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics. We report on a streaked optical pyrometer that measures the self-emission of laser-driven shocks simultaneously with a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Together these diagnostics are used to obtain the temporally and spatially resolved temperatures of ~Mbar shocks driven by the OMEGA laser. We provide a brief description of the diagnostic and how it is used with VISAR. Key spectral calibration results are discussed and important characteristics of the recording system are presented.

  13. Streaked optical pyrometer system for laser-driven shock-wave experiments on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Miller, J E; Boehly, T R; Melchior, A; Meyerhofer, D D; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Sorce, C M; Oertel, J A; Emmel, P M

    2007-03-01

    The temperature of laser-driven shock waves is of interest to inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics. We report on a streaked optical pyrometer that measures the self-emission of laser-driven shocks simultaneously with a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Together these diagnostics are used to obtain the temporally and spatially resolved temperatures of approximately megabar shocks driven by the OMEGA laser. We provide a brief description of the diagnostic and how it is used with VISAR. Key spectral calibration results are discussed and important characteristics of the recording system are presented. PMID:17411209

  14. Toward IFE Oriented Laser Chains: Cryogenically Cooled Ytterbium Doped Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdet, G.; Casagrande, O.; Cardinali, V.; Deguil-Robin, N.; Le Garrec, B.

    2009-09-27

    With the aim to set up Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) driver, we develop the properties of the Ytterbium doped materials and the problems met when designing such a system: essentially thermal management and ASE gain depletion. We after present the experimental results obtained using sesquioxide Yb{sup 3+} doped ceramics at cryogenic temperature. We also propose a solution for minimizing the ASE problem.

  15. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  16. Structure Loaded Vacuum Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.; Lincoln, M.R.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-04-09

    We present an overview of the future laser-driven particle acceleration experiments. These will be carried out at the E163 facility at SLAC. Our objectives include a reconfirmation of the proof-of-principle experiment, a staged buncher laser-accelerator experiment, and longer-term future experiments that employ dielectric laser-accelerator microstructures.

  17. Intelligent Front-end Electronics for Silicon photodetectors (IFES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerzopf, Clemens; Gruber, Lukas; Suzuki, Ken; Zmeskal, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard

    2016-05-01

    While high channel density can be easily achieved for big experiments using custom made microchips, providing something similar for small and medium size experiments imposes a challenge. Within this work we describe a novel and cost effective solution to operate silicon photodetectors such as silicon photo multipliers (SiPM). The IFES modules provide the bias voltage for the detectors, a leading edge discriminator featuring time over threshold and a differential amplifier, all on one printed circuit board. We demonstrate under realistic conditions that the module is usable for high resolution timing measurements exploiting both charge and time information. Furthermore we show that the modules can be easily used in larger detector arrays. All in all this confirms that the IFES modules are a viable option for a broad range of experiments if cost-effectiveness and small form factor are required.

  18. Single shot cell irradiations with laser-driven protons

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, N.; Schmid, T. E.; Zlobinskaya, O.; Wilkens, J. J.; Allinger, K.; Hilz, P.; Ma, W.; Reinhardt, S.; Bin, J.; Kiefer, D.; Schreiber, J.; Drexler, G. A.; Friedl, A.

    2013-07-26

    Ion beams are relevant for radiobiological studies in basic research and for application in tumor therapy. Here we present a method to generate nanosecond proton bunches with single shot doses of up to 7 Gray by a tabletop high-power laser. Although in their infancy, laser-ion accelerators allow studying fast radiobiological processes at small-scale laboratories as exemplarily demonstrated by measurements of the relative biological effectiveness of protons in human tumor cells.

  19. Intense laser driven collision-less shock and ion acceleration in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, K.; Jia, Q.; Cai, H. B.; Taguchi, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Sanz, J. R.; Honrubia, J.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of strong magnetic field with a laser driven coil has been demonstrated by many experiments. It is applicable to the magnetized fast ignition (MFI), the collision-less shock in the astrophysics and the ion shock acceleration. In this paper, the longitudinal magnetic field effect on the shock wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense short pulse laser is investigated by theory and simulations. The transition of a laminar shock (electro static shock) to the turbulent shock (electromagnetic shock) occurs, when the external magnetic field is applied in near relativistic cut-off density plasmas. This transition leads to the enhancement of conversion of the laser energy into high energy ions. The enhancement of the conversion efficiency is important for the ion driven fast ignition and the laser driven neutron source. It is found that the total number of ions reflected by the shock increases by six time when the magnetic field is applied.

  20. Characterization of a novel, short pulse laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.; Deppert, O.; and others

    2013-05-15

    We present a full characterization of a short pulse laser-driven neutron source. Neutrons are produced by nuclear reactions of laser-driven ions deposited in a secondary target. The emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component into 4π and a forward directed, jet-like contribution, with energies ranging up to 80 MeV. A maximum flux of 4.4 × 10{sup 9} neutrons/sr has been observed and used for fast neutron radiography. On-shot characterization of the ion driver and neutron beam has been done with a variety of different diagnostics, including particle detectors, nuclear reaction, and time-of-flight methods. The results are of great value for future optimization of this novel technique and implementation in advanced applications.

  1. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker's review article on "Laser Acceleration and its future" [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],(1)) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated.

  2. Fast ignition by laser driven particle beams of very high intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Hora, H.; Read, M. N.; Badziak, J.; Glowacz, S.; Jablonski, S.; Wolowski, J.; Skladanowski, Z.; Li, Y.-T.; Liang, T.-J.; Liu Hong; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Cang Yu; Osman, F.; Miley, G. H.; Zhang Weiyan; He Xiantu; Peng Hansheng; Jungwirth, K.; Rohlena, K.

    2007-07-15

    Anomalous observations using the fast ignition for laser driven fusion energy are interpreted and experimental and theoretical results are reported which are in contrast to the very numerous effects usually observed at petawatt-picosecond laser interaction with plasmas. These anomalous mechanisms result in rather thin blocks (pistons) of these nonlinear (ponderomotive) force driven highly directed plasmas of modest temperatures. The blocks consist in space charge neutral plasmas with ion current densities above 10{sup 10} A/cm{sup 2}. For the needs of applications in laser driven fusion energy, much thicker blocks are required. This may be reached by a spherical configuration where a conical propagation may lead to thick blocks for interaction with targets. First results are reported in view of applications for the proton fast igniter and other laser-fusion energy schemes.

  3. Study of shockwave method for diagnosing the radiation fields of laser-driven gold hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Lan, Ke; Huo, Wenyi; Lai, Dongxian; Gao, Yaoming; Pei, Wenbing

    2013-11-01

    Besides the routinely used broad-band x-ray spectrometer (Dante or SXS), ablative shock-wave method is often used to diagnose the radiation fields of laser-driven Hohlraums. The x-ray ablation process of Aluminum and Titanium is studied numerically with a 1-D radiation hydrodynamic code RDMG [F. Tinggui et al., Chin. J. Comput. Phys. 16, 199 (1999)], based on which a new scaling relation of the equivalent radiation temperature with the ablative shock velocity in Aluminum plates is proposed, and a novel method is developed for determining simultaneously the radiation temperature and the M-band (2-4 keV) fraction in laser-driven gold Hohlraums.

  4. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams.

    PubMed

    Metzkes, J; Zeil, K; Kraft, S D; Karsch, L; Sobiella, M; Rehwald, M; Obst, L; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Schramm, U

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ∼4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source. PMID:27587116

  5. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m-1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  6. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences

    PubMed Central

    NAKAJIMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker’s review article on “Laser Acceleration and its future” [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],1) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  7. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzkes, J.; Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Karsch, L.; Sobiella, M.; Rehwald, M.; Obst, L.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schramm, U.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ˜4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source.

  8. A Laser-Driven Linear Collider: Sample Machine Parameters and Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; England, R.J.; Noble, R.J.; /SLAC

    2011-05-20

    We present a design concept for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider based on laser-driven dielectric accelerator structures, and discuss technical issues that must be addressed to realize such a concept. With a pulse structure that is quasi-CW, dielectric laser accelerators potentially offer reduced beamstrahlung and pair production, reduced event pileup, and much cleaner environment for high energy physics and. For multi-TeV colliders, these advantages become significant.

  9. The Laser-Driven X-ray Big Area Backlighter (BABL): Design, Optimization, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, Kirk; DeVolder, Barbara; Doss, Forrest; Kline, John; Merritt, Elizabeth; Loomis, Eric; Capelli, Deanna; Schmidt, Derek; Schmitt, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    The Big Area BackLigher (BABL) has been developed for large area laser-driven x-ray backlighting on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which can be used for general High Energy Density (HED) experiments. The BABL has been optimized via hydrodynamic simulations to produce laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiencies of up to nearly 5%. Four BABL foil materials, Zn, Fe, V, and Cu, have been used for He-α x ray production.

  10. Foam-induced smoothing studied through laser-driven shock waves

    PubMed

    Batani; Nazarov; Hall; Lower; Koenig; Faral; Benuzzi-Mounaix; Grandjouan

    2000-12-01

    The influence of foams on the uniformity of laser energy deposition has been studied by measuring laser-driven shock waves breakout from foam-aluminum layered targets. Well characterized laser nonuniformities have been produced first by using phase zone plates to get a smooth beam and then by inserting different opaque grids before the foam. Smoothing has been studied as a function of foam density and grid materials (producing different radiative effects). PMID:11138157

  11. Absolute equation of state measurements of iron using laser driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Huser, G.; Faral, B.; Batani, D.; Henry, E.; Tomasini, M.; Marchet, B.; Hall, T. A.; Boustie, M.; de Rességuier, Th.; Hallouin, M.; Guyot, F.; Andrault, D.; Charpin, Th.

    2002-06-01

    First absolute equation of state measurements obtained for iron with laser driven shock waves are presented. The shock velocity and the free surface velocity of compressed iron have been simultaneously measured by using a VISAR diagnostic, and step targets. The pressure range 1-8 Mbar has been investigated, which is directly relevant to planetary physics. The experiments have been performed at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses of the Ecole Polytechnique.

  12. Laser-driven Implosion Simulations with the Kull Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Thomas B.; Owen, J. Michael; Madsen, Niel K.

    1999-11-01

    We present results of two- and three-dimensional simulations of implosion of a gamma-law gas driven by absorption of energy from an external laser source. Laser light propagation and power deposition were modeled with a recently-developed package(T. B. Kaiser, J. L. Milovich, A. I. Shestakov, M. K. Prasad, Bulletin of the A.P.S. 43), paper R8Q 26 (1998). that uses geometrical optics and inverse-bremsstrahlung to model the relevant physical processes, while the hydrodynamics calculations used a finite-volume, staggered-grid ALE scheme, and electron heat transport was treated diffusively. The simulations were performed with Kull, an ASCI code currently being developed at LLNL to model ICF experiments and astrophysical phenomena.

  13. Monochromatic computed tomography with a compact laser-driven X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Achterhold, K; Bech, M; Schleede, S; Potdevin, G; Ruth, R; Loewen, R; Pfeiffer, F

    2013-01-01

    A laser-driven electron-storage ring can produce nearly monochromatic, tunable X-rays in the keV energy regime by inverse Compton scattering. The small footprint, relative low cost and excellent beam quality provide the prospect for valuable preclinical use in radiography and tomography. The monochromaticity of the beam prevents beam hardening effects that are a serious problem in quantitative determination of absorption coefficients. These values are important e.g. for osteoporosis risk assessment. Here, we report quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements using a laser-driven compact electron-storage ring X-ray source. The experimental results obtained for quantitative CT measurements on mass absorption coefficients in a phantom sample are compared to results from a rotating anode X-ray tube generator at various peak voltages. The findings confirm that a laser-driven electron-storage ring X-ray source can indeed yield much higher CT image quality, particularly if quantitative aspects of computed tomographic imaging are considered.

  14. Analyses in Support of Z-Pinch IFE and Actinide Transmutation - LLNL Progress Report for FY-06

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Moir, R W; Abbott, R

    2006-09-19

    This report documents results of LLNL's work in support of two studies being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL): the development of the Z-pinch driven inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE), and the use of Z-pinch driven inertial fusion as a neutron source to destroy actinides from fission reactor spent fuel. LLNL's efforts in FY06 included: (1) Development of a systems code for Z-IFE and use of the code to examine the operating parameter space in terms of design variables such as the Z-pinch driver energy, the chamber pulse repetition rate, the number of chambers making up the power plant, and the total net electric power of the plant. This is covered in Section 3 with full documentation of the model in Appendix A. (2) Continued development of innovative concepts for the design and operation of the recyclable transmission line (RTL) and chamber for Z-IFE. The work, which builds on our FY04 and FY05 contributions, emphasizes design features that are likely to lead to a more attractive power plant including: liquid jets to protect all structures from direct exposure to neutrons, rapid insertion of the RTL to maximize the potential chamber rep-rate, and use of cast flibe for the RTL to reduce recycling and remanufacturing costs and power needs. See Section 4 and Appendix B. (3) Description of potential figures of merit (FOMs) for actinide transmutation technologies and a discussion of how these FOMs apply and can be used in the ongoing evaluation of the Z-pinch actinide burner, referred to as the In-Zinerator. See Section 5. (4) A critique of, and suggested improvements to, the In-Zinerator chamber design in response to the SNL design team's request for feedback on its preliminary design. This is covered in Section 6.

  15. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets.

    PubMed

    Stockem Novo, A; Kaluza, M C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2016-07-20

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  16. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    PubMed Central

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  17. Science, technology and the industrialization of laser-driven processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. I.; Paisner, J. A.

    1985-05-01

    Members of the laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) potential applications of lasers in industry, some of which are: isotope separation, cleanup of radioactive waste, trace impurity removal, selective chemical reactions, photochemical activation or dissociation of gases, control of combustion particulates, crystal and powder chemistry, and laser induced biochemistry are reviewed. Many of these areas are currently under active study in the community. The investigation at LLNL focused on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium because of the large demand and high product enrichment price for material used as fuel in commercial light-water nuclear power reactors. They also believed that once the technology was fully developed and deployed, it could be applied directly to separating many elements economicprogram at LLNL has an extensive uranium and plutonium program of $100 M in Fy85 and a minor research program for other elements. This report describes the AVLIS program conducted covering the following topics: candidate elements, separative work units, sepctroscopic selectivety, major systems, facilities, integrated process model, multivariable sensitivity studies, world market, and US enrichment enterprise.

  18. Laser driven launch vehicles for continuous access to space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollins, C. J.; Bailey, A.; Gelb, A.; Gauthier, M.; Goldey, C.; Lo, E.; Resendes, D.; Rosen, D.; Weyl, G.

    1990-01-01

    The availability of megawatt laser systems in the next century will make laser launch systems from ground to orbit feasible and useful. Systems studies indicate launch capabilities of 1 ton payload per gigawatt laser power. Recent research in ground to orbit laser propulsion has emphasized laser supported detonation wave thrusters driven by repetitively pulsed infrared lasers. In this propulsion concept each laser repetition cycle consists of two pulses. A lower energy first pulse is used to vaporize a small amount of solid propellant and then after a brief expansion period, a second and higher energy laser pulse is used to drive a detonation wave through the expanded vapor. The results are reported of numerical studies comparing the detonation wave properties of various candidate propellants, and the simulation of thruster performance under realistic conditions. Experimental measurements designed to test the theoretical predictions are also presented. Measurements are discussed of radiance and opacity in absorption waves, and mass loss and momentum transfer. These data are interpreted in terms of specific impulse and energy conversion efficiency.

  19. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  20. Safety Issues of HG and PB as IFE Target Materials: Radiological Versus Chemical Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Cadwallader, L C; Moir, R W; Rio, G. D; Sanz, J

    2002-11-11

    We have performed a safety assessment of mercury and lead as possible hohlraum materials for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) targets, including for the first time a comparative analysis of the radiological and toxicological consequences of an accidental release. In order to calculate accident doses to the public, we have distinguished between accidents at the target fabrication facility and accidents at other areas of the power plant. Regarding the chemical toxicity assessment, we have used the USDOE regulations to determine the maximum allowable release in order to protect the public from adverse health effects. Opposite to common belief, it has been found that the chemical safety requirements for these materials appear to be more stringent than the concentrations that would result in an acceptable radiological dose.

  1. Design optimization and transverse coherence analysis for an x-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.

    1995-12-31

    I present a design study for an X-ray Free Electron Laser driven by the SLAC linac, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The study assumes the LCLS is based on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). Following a brief review of the fundamentals of SASE, I will provide without derivation a collection of formulas relating SASE performance to the system parameters. These formulas allow quick evaluation of FEL designs and provide powerful tools for optimization in multi-dimensional parameter space. Optimization is carried out for the LCLS over all independent system parameters modeled, subjected to a number of practical constraints. In addition to the optimizations concerning gain and power, another important consideration for a single pass FEL starting from noise is the transverse coherence property of the amplified radiation, especially at short wavelength. A widely used emittance criteria for FELs requires that the emittance is smaller than the radiation wavelength divided by 4{pi}. For the LCLS the criteria is violated by a factor of 5, at a normalized emittance of 1.5 mm-mrad, wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, and beam energy of 15 GeV. Thus it is important to check quantitatively the emittance effect on the transverse coherence. I will examine the emittance effect on transverse coherence by analyzing different transverse modes and show that full transverse coherence can be obtained even at the LCLS parameter regime.

  2. The light ion LMF and its relevance to IFE

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.E.; Allshouse, G.O.; Cook, D.L.; Lockner, T.R.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Olson, C.L.; Smith, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    The inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is directed toward validating light ions as an efficient driver for ICF defense and energy applications. The light ion laboratory microfusion facility (LMF) is envisioned as a facility in which high gain ICF targets could be developed and utilized in defense-related experiments. The relevance of LMF technology to eventual inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications is assessed via a comparison of LMF technologies with those projected in the Light Ion Beam Reactor Assessment (LIBRA) conceptual reactor design study.

  3. Evaluation of Fluidized Beds for Mass Production of IFE Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Vermillion, B.A.; Brown, L.C.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Goodin, D.T.; Stemke, R.W.; Stephens, R.B.

    2005-01-15

    Of the building blocks of an inertial fusion energy (IFE) plant, target fabrication remains a significant credibility issue. For this reason, an extensive parametric study has been conducted on mass production of glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells in a vertical fluidized bed. Trans-2-butene was used as a reactant gas with hydrogen as a diluting and etching agent. Coating rates in the range of 1 to 2 {mu}m/h were demonstrated on batches of 30 shells where National Ignition Facility-quality surfaces were obtained for 3- to 5-{mu}m-thick coatings. Thick coatings up to 325 {mu}m were also demonstrated that are visually transparent, without void and stress fracture. A phenomenological understanding of the GDP growth mechanisms to guide future experiments was further established. Specifically, gas-phase precipitation and high-impact collisions were identified as the main surface-roughening mechanisms. The former produces dense cauliflower-like surface patterns that can be eliminated by adjusting the gas flow rates and the flow ratio. The latter produces isolated domelike surface defects that can be reduced by introducing concerted motion between the shells. By converting from a vertical to a horizontal configuration, fully transparent coatings were obtained on 350 shells. Collisions in a fluidized bed have been identified as the limiting factor in meeting IFE specifications, and a related-rotary kiln technique is recommended for scale-up.

  4. Ultrafast Synchrotron-Enhanced Thermalization of Laser-Driven Colliding Pair Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lobet, M; Ruyer, C; Debayle, A; d'Humières, E; Grech, M; Lemoine, M; Gremillet, L

    2015-11-20

    We report on the first self-consistent numerical study of the feasibility of laser-driven relativistic pair shocks of prime interest for high-energy astrophysics. Using a QED-particle-in-cell code, we simulate the collective interaction between two counterstreaming electron-positron jets driven from solid foils by short-pulse (~60 fs), high-energy (~100 kJ) lasers. We show that the dissipation caused by self-induced, ultrastrong (>10^{6} T) electromagnetic fluctuations is amplified by intense synchrotron emission, which enhances the magnetic confinement and compression of the colliding jets.

  5. Three-dimensional Dielectric Photonic Crystal Structures for Laser-driven Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder /SLAC

    2007-12-14

    We present the design and simulation of a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide for linear laser-driven acceleration in vacuum. The structure confines a synchronous speed-of-light accelerating mode in both transverse dimensions. We report the properties of this mode, including sustainable gradient and optical-to-beam efficiency. We present a novel method for confining a particle beam using optical fields as focusing elements. This technique, combined with careful structure design, is shown to have a large dynamic aperture and minimal emittance growth, even over millions of optical wavelengths.

  6. Fountain effect of laser-driven relativistic electrons inside a solid dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R.; Leblanc, P.; Ivanov, V. V.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2011-09-26

    Ultrafast interferometry with sub-ps resolution has been applied for the direct measurement of an electron density induced by a laser-driven relativistic electron beam inside a solid dielectric. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the ''fountain effect,'' a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields. The very low ionization, {approx}0.1%, observed after the heating pulse suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale.

  7. Time- and Space-Resolved Optical Probing of Femtosecond-Laser-Driven Shock Waves in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.; Badger, A.D.; Fallies, F.; Mahdieh, M.; Hall, T.A.; Audebert, P.; Geindre, J.; Gauthier, J.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Grillon, G.; Antonetti, A.

    1996-10-01

    We present the first measurements of particle velocity histories at the interface between an aluminum sample shocked by a 120fs laser-driven pressure pulse and a fused silica window. Frequency-domain interferometry is used to provide space- and time-resolved measurements of the phase shift of a pair of probe pulses backscattered at the shocked interface. Pressures of 1{endash}3 Mbar are inferred from the simultaneous measurement of the particle and shock velocities along the aluminum Hugoniot curve for {approximately}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} laser irradiances. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Modeling laser-driven electron acceleration using WARP with Fourier decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, P.; Audet, T. L.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Maynard, G.; Cros, B.

    2016-09-01

    WARP is used with the recent implementation of the Fourier decomposition algorithm to model laser-driven electron acceleration in plasmas. Simulations were carried out to analyze the experimental results obtained on ionization-induced injection in a gas cell. The simulated results are in good agreement with the experimental ones, confirming the ability of the code to take into account the physics of electron injection and reduce calculation time. We present a detailed analysis of the laser propagation, the plasma wave generation and the electron beam dynamics.

  9. Laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE) for dynamically loading materials at high strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Eggert, J; Celliers, P; Jankowski, A; Lorenz, T; Moon, S; Edwards, M J; Collins, G

    2006-03-30

    We demonstrate the recently developed technique of laser driven isentropic compression (ICE) for dynamically compressing Al samples at high loading rates close to the room temperature isentrope and up to peak stresses above 100GPa. Upon analysis of the unloading profiles from a multi-stepped Al/LiF target a continuous path through Stress-Density space may be calculated. For materials with phase transformations ramp compression techniques reveals the location of equilibrium phase boundaries and provide information on the kinetics of the lattice re-ordering.

  10. Modeling of reflection-type laser-driven white lighting considering phosphor particles and surface topography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Ho; Joo, Jae-Young; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2015-07-27

    This paper presents a model of blue laser diode (LD)-based white lighting coupled with a yellow YAG phosphor, for use in the proper design and fabrication of phosphor in automotive headlamps. First, the sample consisted of an LD, collecting lens, and phosphor was prepared that matches the model. The light distribution of the LD and the phosphor were modeled to investigate an effect of the surface topography and phosphor particle properties on the laser-driven white lighting systems by using the commercially available optical design software. Based on the proposed model, the integral spectrum distribution and the color coordinates were discussed.

  11. Characterization of Heat-Wave Propagation through Laser-Driven Ti-Doped Underdense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Ohnishi, N; Fournier, K B; Fujioka, S; Iwamae, A; Hansen, S B; Nagai, K; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Brebion, D; Mima, K

    2009-02-23

    The propagation of a laser-driven heat-wave into a Ti-doped aerogel target was investigated. The temporal evolution of the electron temperature was derived by means of Ti K-shell x-ray spectroscopy, and compared with two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Reasonable agreement was obtained in the early stage of the heat-wave propagation. In the later phase, laser absorption, the propagation of the heat wave, and hydrodynamic motion interact in a complex manner, and the plasma is mostly re-heated by collision and stagnation at the target central axis.

  12. Ultrafast Synchrotron-Enhanced Thermalization of Laser-Driven Colliding Pair Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lobet, M; Ruyer, C; Debayle, A; d'Humières, E; Grech, M; Lemoine, M; Gremillet, L

    2015-11-20

    We report on the first self-consistent numerical study of the feasibility of laser-driven relativistic pair shocks of prime interest for high-energy astrophysics. Using a QED-particle-in-cell code, we simulate the collective interaction between two counterstreaming electron-positron jets driven from solid foils by short-pulse (~60 fs), high-energy (~100 kJ) lasers. We show that the dissipation caused by self-induced, ultrastrong (>10^{6} T) electromagnetic fluctuations is amplified by intense synchrotron emission, which enhances the magnetic confinement and compression of the colliding jets. PMID:26636856

  13. Using laser-driven flyer plates to study the shock initiation of nanoenergetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, W. L.; Williams, R. A.; Dreizin, E. L.; Dlott, D. D.

    2014-05-01

    A tabletop system has been developed to launch aluminium laser-driven flyer plates at speeds of up to 4 km/s. The flyers were used to initiate nanoenergetic reactive materials including aluminium/iron oxide and aluminium/molybdenum oxide thermites produced by arrested reactive milling. The flyer flight and impact was characterized by photon Doppler velocimetry and the initiation process by time-resolved emission spectroscopy. Impact initiation thresholds were determined for 50 μm thick flyer plates producing 10 ns shocks. The intensities, delays and durations of the emission bursts, and the effects of nanostructure and microstructure on them were used to investigate fundamental mechanisms of impact initiation.

  14. Particle simulation of high-energy-density laser-driven reconnection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Fox, W.; Germaschewski, K.

    2012-10-01

    Recently, reconnection between magnetic fields, self-generated through the Biermann battery effect, has been observed and studied in high-energy-density, laser-driven experiments on the Vulcan, OMEGA, and Shenguang laser facilities. This is a novel regime for magnetic reconnection study, characterized by extremely high magnetic fields, high plasma beta and strong, supersonic plasma inflow. Reconnection in this regime is investigated with particle-in-cell simulations using the PSC code. Previous 2-d particle-in-cell reconnection simulations with parameters and geometry relevant to the experiments identified key ingredients for obtaining the very fast reconnection rates, namely two-fluid reconnection mediated by collisionless effects (that is, the Hall current and electron pressure tensor), strong flux pile-up of the inflowing magnetic field [1], and secondary instabilities that lead to magnetic island formation. We present further detailed simulations of reconnection in this geometry, exploring the role of binary particle collisions and examining mechanisms for particle energization and acceleration, as has been recently observed in laser-driven reconnection experiments [2].[4pt] [1] W. Fox, et al, PRL 106, 215003 (2011).[0pt] [2] Q.L.Dong, et al., PRL 108, 215001 (2012).

  15. Quantum electrodynamical theory of high-efficiency excitation energy transfer in laser-driven nanostructure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeraddana, Dilusha; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-08-01

    A fundamental theory is developed for describing laser-driven resonance energy transfer (RET) in dimensionally constrained nanostructures within the framework of quantum electrodynamics. The process of RET communicates electronic excitation between suitably disposed emitter and detector particles in close proximity, activated by the initial excitation of the emitter. Here, we demonstrate that the transfer rate can be significantly increased by propagation of an auxiliary laser beam through a pair of nanostructure particles. This is due to the higher order perturbative contribution to the Förster-type RET, in which laser field is applied to stimulate the energy transfer process. We construct a detailed picture of how excitation energy transfer is affected by an off-resonant radiation field, which includes the derivation of second and fourth order quantum amplitudes. The analysis delivers detailed results for the dependence of the transfer rates on orientational, distance, and laser intensity factor, providing a comprehensive fundamental understanding of laser-driven RET in nanostructures. The results of the derivations demonstrate that the geometry of the system exercises considerable control over the laser-assisted RET mechanism. Thus, under favorable conformational conditions and relative spacing of donor-acceptor nanostructures, the effect of the auxiliary laser beam is shown to produce up to 70% enhancement in the energy migration rate. This degree of control allows optical switching applications to be identified.

  16. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  17. Laser driven single shock compression of fluid deuterium from 45 to 220 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Eggert, J; Moon, S; Meyerhofer, D; Collins, G

    2008-03-23

    The compression {eta} of liquid deuterium between 45 and 220 GPa under laser-driven shock loading has been measured using impedance matching to an aluminum (Al) standard. An Al impedance match model derived from a best fit to absolute Hugoniot data has been used to quantify and minimize the systematic errors caused by uncertainties in the high-pressure Al equation of state. In deuterium below 100 GPa results show that {eta} {approx_equal} 4.2, in agreement with previous impedance match data from magnetically-driven flyer and convergent-explosive shock wave experiments; between 100 and 220 GPa {eta} reaches a maximum of {approx}5.0, less than the 6-fold compression observed on the earliest laser-shock experiments but greater than expected from simple extrapolations of lower pressure data. Previous laser-driven double-shock results are found to be in good agreement with these single-shock measurements over the entire range under study. Both sets of laser-shock data indicate that deuterium undergoes an abrupt increase in compression at around 110 GPa.

  18. Study of transport of laser-driven relativistic electrons in solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Philippe

    With the ultra intense lasers available today, it is possible to generate very hot electron beams in solid density materials. These intense laser-matter interactions result in many applications which include the generation of ultrashort secondary sources of particles and radiation such as ions, neutrons, positrons, x-rays, or even laser-driven hadron therapy. For these applications to become reality, a comprehensive understanding of laser-driven energy transport including hot electron generation through the various mechanisms of ionization, and their subsequent transport in solid density media is required. This study will focus on the characterization of electron transport effects in solid density targets using the state-of- the-art particle-in-cell code PICLS. A number of simulation results will be presented on the topics of ionization propagation in insulator glass targets, non-equilibrium ionization modeling featuring electron impact ionization, and electron beam guiding by the self-generated resistive magnetic field. An empirically derived scaling relation for the resistive magnetic in terms of the laser parameters and material properties is presented and used to derive a guiding condition. This condition may prove useful for the design of future laser-matter interaction experiments.

  19. Fabrication of nanostructured targets for improved laser-driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Scisciò, M.; Veltri, S.; Antici, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel realization of nanostructured targets suitable for improving laser-driven proton acceleration experiments, in particular with regard to the Target-Normal-Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) acceleration mechanism. The nanostructured targets, produced as films, are realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques. The growth process includes a two step approach for the production of the gold nanoparticle layers: 1) Laser Ablation in Solution and 2) spray-dry technique using a colloidal solution on target surfaces (Aluminum, Mylar and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube). The obtained nanostructured films appear, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and the nanostructure distributed on the target surfaces without presence of oxides or external contaminants. The obtained targets show a broad optical absorption in all the visible region and a surface roughness that is two times greater than non-nanostructured targets, enabling a greater laser energy absorption during the laser-matter interaction experiments producing the laser-driven proton acceleration.

  20. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m−1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications. PMID:27089200

  1. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J.; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J.; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A.; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Murphy, Chris D.; Stockhausen, Luca C.; Carroll, David C.; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  2. Dynamic control of laser driven proton beams by exploiting self-generated, ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Hanton, F.; Giesecke, A. L.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    As part of the ultrafast charge dynamics initiated by high intensity laser irradiations of solid targets, high amplitude EM pulses propagate away from the interaction point and are transported along any stalks and wires attached to the target. The propagation of these high amplitude pulses along a thin wire connected to a laser irradiated target was diagnosed via the proton radiography technique, measuring a pulse duration of ˜20 ps and a pulse velocity close to the speed of light. The strong electric field associated with the EM pulse can be exploited for controlling dynamically the proton beams produced from a laser-driven source. Chromatic divergence control of broadband laser driven protons (upto 75% reduction in divergence of >5 MeV protons) was obtained by winding the supporting wire around the proton beam axis to create a helical coil structure. In addition to providing focussing and energy selection, the technique has the potential to post-accelerate the transiting protons by the longitudinal component of the curved electric field lines produced by the helical coil lens.

  3. The ELIMED transport and dosimetry beamline for laser-driven ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Scuderi, V.; Allegra, L.; Amato, A.; Amico, A.; Candiano, G.; De Luca, G.; Gallo, G.; Giordanengo, S.; Guarachi, L. Fanola; Korn, G.; Larosa, G.; Leanza, R.; Manna, R.; Marchese, V.; Marchetto, F.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Pulvirenti, S.; Rizzo, D.; Sacchi, R.; Salamone, S.; Sedita, M.; Vignati, A.

    2016-09-01

    A growing interest of the scientific community towards multidisciplinary applications of laser-driven beams has led to the development of several projects aiming to demonstrate the possible use of these beams for therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, laser-accelerated particles differ from the conventional beams typically used for multiscipilinary and medical applications, due to the wide energy spread, the angular divergence and the extremely intense pulses. The peculiarities of optically accelerated beams led to develop new strategies and advanced techniques for transport, diagnostics and dosimetry of the accelerated particles. In this framework, the realization of the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and multidisciplinary applications) beamline, developed by INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy) and that will be installed in 2017 as a part of the ELIMAIA beamline at the ELI-Beamlines (Extreme Light Infrastructure Beamlines) facility in Prague, has the aim to investigate the feasibility of using laser-driven ion beams for multidisciplinary applications. In this contribution, an overview of the beamline along with a detailed description of the main transport elements as well as the detectors composing the final section of the beamline will be presented.

  4. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M H; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S; Murphy, Chris D; Stockhausen, Luca C; Carroll, David C; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  5. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  6. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J.; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J.; Powell, Haydn; MacLellan, David A.; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Murphy, Chris D.; Stockhausen, Luca C.; Carroll, David C.; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources.

  7. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure.

    PubMed

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L S; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P L; Schroer, Anna M; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m(-1), already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications. PMID:27089200

  8. April 25, 2003, FY2003 Progress Summary and FY2002 Program Plan, Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers,and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W; Bibeau, C

    2005-10-25

    The High Average Power Laser Program (HAPL) is a multi-institutional, synergistic effort to develop inertial fusion energy (IFE). This program is building a physics and technology base to complement the laser-fusion science being pursued by DOE Defense programs in support of Stockpile Stewardship. The primary institutions responsible for overseeing and coordinating the research activities are the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The current LLNL proposal is a companion document to the one submitted by NRL, for which the driver development element is focused on the krypton fluoride excimer laser option. The NRL and LLNL proposals also jointly pursue complementary activities with the associated rep-rated laser technologies relating to target fabrication, target injection, final optics, fusion chamber, target physics, materials and power plant economics. This proposal requests continued funding in FY03 to support LLNL in its program to build a 1 kW, 100 J, diode-pumped, crystalline laser, as well as research into high gain fusion target design, fusion chamber issues, and survivability of the final optic element. These technologies are crucial to the feasibility of inertial fusion energy power plants and also have relevance in rep-rated stewardship experiments. The HAPL Program pursues technologies needed for laser-driven IFE. System level considerations indicate that a rep-rated laser technology will be needed, operating at 5-10 Hz. Since a total energy of {approx}2 MJ will ultimately be required to achieve suitable target gain with direct drive targets, the architecture must be scaleable. The Mercury Laser is intended to offer such an architecture. Mercury is a solid state laser that incorporates diodes, crystals and gas cooling technologies.

  9. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  10. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heatingmore » uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.« less

  11. Preliminary safety assessment for an IFE target fabrication facility

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; Besenbruch, G E; Goodin, D T

    2000-10-13

    We estimate possible ranges of tritium inventories for an inertial fusion energy (IFE) target fabrication facility producing various types of targets and using various production technologies. Target fill is the key subtask in determining the overall tritium inventory for the plant. By segmenting the inventory into multiple, parallel production lines--each with its own fill canister--and including an expansion tank to limit releases, we are able to ensure that a target fabrication facility would meet the accident dose goals of 10 mSv (1 rem) set forth in the Department of Energy's Fusion Safety Standards. For indirect-drive targets, we calculate release fractions for elements from lithium to bismuth and show that nearly all elements meet the dose goal. Our work suggests directions for future R&D that will help reduce total tritium inventories and increase the flexibility of target fabrication facilities.

  12. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction-acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Orlandi, R.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Koura, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2016-04-01

    A combination of a petawatt laser and nuclear physics techniques can crucially facilitate the measurement of exotic nuclei properties. With numerical simulations and laser-driven experiments we show prospects for the Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction-acceleration method proposed in [M. Nishiuchi et al., Phys, Plasmas 22, 033107 (2015)]: a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly charged short-lived heavy exotic nuclei created in the target via nuclear reactions.

  13. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J. -L.; Geddes, C. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2014-07-13

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  14. Influence of electromagnetic oscillating two-stream instability on the evolution of laser-driven plasma beat-wave

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D. N.; Singh, K. P.; Suk, H.

    2007-01-15

    The electrostatic oscillating two-stream instability of laser-driven plasma beat-wave was studied recently by Gupta et al. [Phys. Plasmas 11, 5250 (2004)], who applied their theory to limit the amplitude level of a plasma wave in the beat-wave accelerator. As a self-generated magnetic field is observed in laser-produced plasma, hence, the electromagnetic oscillating two-stream instability may be another possible mechanism for the saturation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave. The efficiency of this scheme is higher than the former.

  15. 2D profile of poloidal magnetic field diagnosed by a laser-driven ion-beam trace probe (LITP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Chijie; Chen, Yihang; Xu, Tianchao; Lin, Chen; Wang, Long; Xu, Min; Yu, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Based on large energy spread of laser-driven ion beam (LIB), a new method, the Laser-driven Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP), was suggested recently to diagnose the poloidal magnetic field (Bp) and radial electric field (Er) in toroidal devices. Based on another property of LIB, a wide angular distribution, here we suggested that LITP could be extended to get 2D Bp profile or 1D profile of both poloidal and radial magnetic fields at the same time. In this paper, we show the basic principle, some preliminary simulation results, and experimental preparation to test the basic principle of LITP.

  16. Teller Medal Lecture IFSA2001: Problems and solutions in the design and analysis of early laser driven high energy density and ICF target physics experiments (IFSA 2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Mordecai D.

    2016-10-01

    The high energy density (HED) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) physics community relies on increasingly sophisticated high power laser driven experiments to advance the field. We review early work in the design and analysis of such experiments, and discuss the problems encountered. By finding solutions to those problems we put the field on firmer ground, allowing the community to develop it to the exciting stage it is in today. Specific examples include: drive and preheat in complex hohlraum geometries with the complicating effects of sample motion; and issues in the successful design of laboratory soft x-ray lasers and in the invention of methods to reduce the required optical laser driver energy by several orders of magnitude.

  17. Teller Medal Lecture IFSA2001: Problems and Solutions in the Design and Analysis of Early Laser Driven High Energy Density and ICF Target Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M D

    2001-08-20

    The high energy density (HED) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) physics community relies on increasingly sophisticated high power laser driven experiments to advance the field. We review early work in the design and analysis of such experiments, and discuss the problems encountered. By finding solutions to those problems we put the field on firmer ground, allowing the community to develop it to the exciting stage it is in today. Specific examples include: drive and preheat in complex hohlraum geometries with the complicating effects of sample motion; and issues in the successful design of laboratory soft x-ray lasers and in the invention of methods to reduce the required optical laser driver energy by several orders of magnitude.

  18. Characterisation of deuterium spectra from laser driven multi-species sources by employing differentially filtered image plate detectors in Thomson spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Alejo, A; Kar, S; Ahmed, H; Krygier, A G; Doria, D; Clarke, R; Fernandez, J; Freeman, R R; Fuchs, J; Green, A; Green, J S; Jung, D; Kleinschmidt, A; Lewis, C L S; Morrison, J T; Najmudin, Z; Nakamura, H; Nersisyan, G; Norreys, P; Notley, M; Oliver, M; Roth, M; Ruiz, J A; Vassura, L; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M

    2014-09-01

    A novel method for characterising the full spectrum of deuteron ions emitted by laser driven multi-species ion sources is discussed. The procedure is based on using differential filtering over the detector of a Thompson parabola ion spectrometer, which enables discrimination of deuterium ions from heavier ion species with the same charge-to-mass ratio (such as C(6+), O(8+), etc.). Commonly used Fuji Image plates were used as detectors in the spectrometer, whose absolute response to deuterium ions over a wide range of energies was calibrated by using slotted CR-39 nuclear track detectors. A typical deuterium ion spectrum diagnosed in a recent experimental campaign is presented, which was produced from a thin deuterated plastic foil target irradiated by a high power laser. PMID:25273715

  19. Chamber wall materials response to pulsed ions at power-plant level fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.; Provencio, P. P.; Tanaka, T. J.; Olson, C. L.; Peterson, R. R.; Stolp, J. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Knowles, T. R.

    2005-12-01

    Candidate dry-wall materials for the reactor chambers of future laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants have been exposed to ion pulses from RHEPP-1, located at Sandia National Laboratories. These pulses simulate the MeV-level ion pulses with fluences of up to 20 J/cm 2 that can be expected to impinge on the first wall of such future plants. Various forms of tungsten and tungsten alloy were subjected to up to 1600 pulses, usually while being heated to 600 °C. Other metals were exposed as well. Thresholds for roughening and material removal, and evolution of surface morphology were measured and compared with code predictions for materials response. Powder-metallurgy (PM) tungsten is observed to undergo surface roughening and subsurface crack formation that evolves over hundreds of pulses, and which can occur both below and above the melt threshold. This roughening is worse than for other metals, and worse than for either tungsten alloyed with rhenium (W25Re), or for CVD and single-crystal forms of tungsten. Carbon, particularly the form used in composite material, appears to suffer material loss well below its sublimation point. Some engineered materials were also investigated. It appears that some modification to PM tungsten is required for its successful use in a reactor environment.

  20. Diode-pumped solid state lasers (DPSSLs) for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Krupke, W.F.

    1996-10-01

    The status of diode-pumped, transverse-gas-flow cooled, Yb-S-FAP slab lasers is reviewed. Recently acquired experimental performance data are combined with a cost/performance IFE driver design code to define a cost-effective development path for IFE DPSSL drivers. Specific design parameters are described for the Mercury 100J/10 Hz, 1 kW system (first in the development scenario).

  1. A thin-film Hugoniot measurement using a laser-driven flyer plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hiroki; Brown, Kathryn; Dlott, Dana

    2011-06-01

    A laser-driven flyer plate and a high-speed 8 GHz all-fiber displacement interferometer (DISAR) were used to measure the Hugoniot of polymer thin films (a few micrometers thick) such as PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) under steady-state shockwave propagation. Results were obtained using conventional methods such as measuring the impact velocity and knowing the Hugoniot of the flyer-plate material, but these were inaccurate. Instead we incorporated nanometer-thick gauge layers in the thin film, whose locations were precisely known. This material is based on work supported by the US Army Research Office under grant W911NF-10-0072, and the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research under award number FAA9550-09-1-0163.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Laser-Driven Rayleigh-Taylor Instability using TVD MUSCL Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Hideo; Ohnishi, Naofumo; Takeuchi, Hajime; Takabe, Hideaki; Mima, Kunioki

    1996-11-01

    For the inertial confinement fusion, it is important to simulate and predict the hydrodynamic instabilities. The numerical simulation of the laser-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability was performed by using a newly developed numerical code which include the two temperature plasma effect and the equation of state. This code is robust and less dissipative because the scheme is based on flux vector splitting method. Furthermore, this method is coupled with high-order MUSCL TVD scheme which enable to capture the shock, the vortices and the contact discontinuity clearly. In the two temperature model, the relaxation of the ion and electron temperature is considered. Cowan ion equation and Thomas-Fermi fitting formula for electron are applied to the equation of state. The dependence on the equation of state will be discussed in this presentation. Also, some numerical results which are solved by the other numerical codes will be shown for the comparison.

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron energization in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Guo, Fan; Sheng, Zhengming; Wang, Huanyu; Wang, Shui

    2016-01-25

    Electrons can be energized during laser-driven magnetic reconnection, and the energized electrons form three super-Alfvénic electron jets in the outflow region (Lu et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 083021). In this paper, by performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the electrons can also be significantly energized before magnetic reconnection occurs. When two plasma bubbles with toroidal magnetic fields expand and squeeze each other, the electrons in the magnetic ribbons are energized through betatron acceleration due to the enhancement of the magnetic field, and an electron temperature anisotropymore » $${T}_{{\\rm{e}}\\perp }\\gt {T}_{{\\rm{e}}| | }$$ develops. Meanwhile, some electrons are trapped and bounced repeatedly between the two expanding/approaching bubbles and get energized through a Fermi-like process. Furthermore, the energization before magnetic reconnection is more significant (or important) than that during magnetic reconnection.« less

  4. High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Litzenberg, D. W.

    2013-09-30

    Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup −15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1μm) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%–100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

  5. Laser-Driven Shock-Timing Experiments in Planar CH and Cryogenic Deuterium Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, E.; Hicks, D. G.

    2005-07-01

    Direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion target designs use multiple shocks to stabilize and condition the imploding shell. The strength and timing of these shocks are critical to optimization of target designs. We present results from experiments on planar CH and cryogenic D2 targets that use two 100-ps pulses to produce two shocks at various conditions. The velocity profiles of these shocks (from VISAR) and self-emission are used to investigate the coupling of multiple beams to the targets and to validate the ability of hydrodynamic codes to simulate multiple, laser-driven shocks. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. The support of DOE does not constitute an endorsement by DOE of the views expressed in this article.

  6. Stable Laser-Driven Electron Beams from a Steady-State-Flow Gas Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, J.; Popp, A.; Karsch, S.; Major, Zs.; Marx, B.; Fuchs, M.; Hoerlein, R.; Gruener, F.; Habs, D.; Krausz, F.; Rowlands-Rees, T. P.; Hooker, S. M.

    2009-01-22

    Quasi-monoenergetic, laser-driven electron beams of up to {approx}200 MeV in energy have been generated from steady-state-flow gas cells [1]. These beams are emitted within a low-divergence cone of 2.1{+-}0.5 mrad FWHM and feature unparalleled shot-to-shot stability in energy (2.5% rms), pointing direction (1.4 mrad rms) and charge (16% rms) owing to a highly reproducible plasma-density profile within the laser-plasma-interaction volume. Laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in gas cells of this type constitutes a simple and reliable source of relativistic electrons with well defined properties, which should allow for applications such as the production of extreme-ultraviolet undulator radiation in the near future.

  7. An efficient computational approach for evaluating radiation flux for laser driven inertial confinement fusion targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiyan; Huang, Yunbao; Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei; Ding, Yongkun

    2015-08-01

    Radiation flux computation on the target is very important for laser driven Inertial Confinement Fusion, and view-factor based equation models (MacFarlane, 2003; Srivastava et al., 2000) are often used to compute this radiation flux on the capsule or samples inside the hohlraum. However, the equation models do not lead to sparse matrices and may involve an intensive solution process when discrete mesh elements become smaller and the number of equations increases. An efficient approach for the computation of radiation flux is proposed in this paper, in which, (1) symmetric and positive definite properties are achieved by transformation, and (2) an efficient Cholesky factorization algorithm is applied to significantly accelerate such equations models solving process. Finally, two targets on a laser facility built in China are considered to validate the computing efficiency of present approach. The results show that the radiation flux computation can be accelerated by a factor of 2.

  8. Flash Kα radiography of laser-driven solid sphere compression for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, H.; Lee, S.; Shiroto, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Ueda, T.; Shigemori, K.; Sunahara, A.; Ohnishi, N.; Beg, F. N.; Theobald, W.; Pérez, F.; Patel, P. K.; Fujioka, S.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved compression of a laser-driven solid deuterated plastic sphere with a cone was measured with flash Kα x-ray radiography. A spherically converging shockwave launched by nanosecond GEKKO XII beams was used for compression while a flash of 4.51 keV Ti Kα x-ray backlighter was produced by a high-intensity, picosecond laser LFEX (Laser for Fast ignition EXperiment) near peak compression for radiography. Areal densities of the compressed core were inferred from two-dimensional backlit x-ray images recorded with a narrow-band spherical crystal imager. The maximum areal density in the experiment was estimated to be 87 ± 26 mg/cm2. The temporal evolution of the experimental and simulated areal densities with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code is in good agreement.

  9. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-12-11

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. We report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ~5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (~1012 V m-1) and magnetic (~104 T) fields. Furthermore, these results contributemore » to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science.« less

  10. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas.

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C; Hamilton, Christopher E; Santiago, Miguel A; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B; Shah, Rahul C; Fernández, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Table-top laser-plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. Here we report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ∼5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (∼10(12) V m(-1)) and magnetic (∼10(4) T) fields. These results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science. PMID:26657147

  11. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Wei; Hao, Xiaolei; Chen, Yongju; Yu, Shaogang; Xu, Songpo; Wang, Yanlan; Sun, Renping; Lai, Xuanyang; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; He, Xiantu; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends.

  12. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-12-11

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. We report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ~5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (~1012 V m-1) and magnetic (~104 T) fields. Furthermore, these results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science.

  13. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Margarone, D.; Krasa, J.; Prokupek, J.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.; Rus, B.; Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Romano, F.; Picciotto, A.; Serra, E.; Giuffrida, L.; Mangione, A.; Rosinski, M.; Parys, P.; and others

    2012-02-15

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  14. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Wei; Hao, XiaoLei; Chen, YongJu; Yu, ShaoGang; Xu, SongPo; Wang, YanLan; Sun, RenPing; Lai, XuanYang; Wu, ChengYin; Gong, QiHuang; He, XianTu; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends. PMID:27256904

  15. Demonstration of the density dependence of x-ray flux in a laser-driven hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Young, P E; Rosen, M D; Hammer, J H; Hsing, W S; Glendinning, S G; Turner, R E; Kirkwood, R; Schein, J; Sorce, C; Satcher, J H; Hamza, A; Reibold, R A; Hibbard, R; Landen, O; Reighard, A; McAlpin, S; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B

    2008-07-18

    Experiments have been conducted using laser-driven cylindrical hohlraums whose walls are machined from Ta2O5 foams of 100 mg/cc and 4 g/cc densities. Measurements of the radiation temperature demonstrate that the lower density walls produce higher radiation temperatures than the high density walls. This is the first experimental demonstration of the prediction that this would occur [M. D. Rosen and J. H. Hammer, Phys. Rev. E 72, 056403 (2005)10.1103/PhysRevE.72.056403]. For high density walls, the radiation front propagates subsonically, and part of the absorbed energy is wasted by the flow kinetic energy. For the lower wall density, the front velocity is supersonic and can devote almost all of the absorbed energy to heating the wall.

  16. Laser-driven fast-electron transport in preheated foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Honrubia, J.J.; Kaluza, M.; Schreiber, J.; Tsakiris, G.D.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.

    2005-05-15

    Laser-driven relativistic electron transport through aluminum foils preheated and expanded by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) prepulses has been studied by means of two- and three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. This study is motivated by recent proton acceleration experiments [M. Kaluza, J. Schreiber, M. I. K. Santala, G. D. Tsakiris, K. Eidmann, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, and K. J. Witte, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 045003 (2004)] showing a significant effect of the ASE prepulse on the proton spectra. Here, it is found that electron-beam collimation due to magnetic fields is reduced and resistive heating by return currents is significantly enhanced, when considering ASE-expanded rather than unperturbed solid target foils. It is shown that this allows for a consistent picture of the new proton spectra and the parameters of the driving electron pulse (angular spread at injection, laser-to-electron conversion, and energy spectrum)

  17. Physical approach to adhesion testing using laser-driven shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolis, C.; Berthe, L.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.; Barradas, S.; Jeandin, M.

    2007-05-01

    This paper deals with an adhesion test of coatings using laser-driven shock waves. Physical aspects concerning laser-matter interaction, shock wave propagation and interface fracture strength are described. This comprehensive approach using two numerical codes (HUGO and SHYLAC) allows the determination of mechanisms responsible for coating debonding and a quantitative evaluation of fracture strength. From this description, a coating test protocol is also designed. To diagnose coating debonding, it is based on the analysis of experimental rear free surface velocity profiles measured by velocity interferometer system for any reflectors (VISAR). Ni electrolytic coating (70-90 µm) deposited on a Cu substrate (120-190 µm) is used for the experimental validation of the test. The fracture strength is 1.49 ± 0.01 GPa for a laser pulse duration of 10 ns at 1.064 µm.

  18. A simple model for estimating a magnetic field in laser-driven coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiksel, Gennady; Fox, William; Gao, Lan; Ji, Hantao

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic field generation by laser-driven coils is a promising way of magnetizing plasma in laboratory high-energy-density plasma experiments. A typical configuration consists of two electrodes—one electrode is irradiated with a high-intensity laser beam and another electrode collects charged particles from the expanding plasma. The two electrodes are separated by a narrow gap forming a capacitor-like configuration and are connected with a conducting wire-coil. The charge-separation in the expanding plasma builds up a potential difference between the electrodes that drives the electrical current in the coil. A magnetic field of tens to hundreds of Teslas generated inside the coil has been reported. This paper presents a simple model that estimates the magnetic field using simple assumptions. The results are compared with the published experimental data.

  19. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. Here we report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ∼5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (∼1012 V m−1) and magnetic (∼104 T) fields. These results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science. PMID:26657147

  20. Flyer velocity characteristics of the laser-driven MiniFlyer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, David B.; Gehr, Russell J.; Harper, Ron W.; Rupp, Ted D.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Robbins, David L.

    2000-04-01

    The laser-driven MiniFlyer system is used to launch a small, thin flyer plate for impact on a target. Consequently, it is an indirect drive technique that de-couples the shock from the laser beam profile. The flyer velocity can be controlled by adjustment of the laser energy. The upper limits on the flyer velocity involve the ability of the substrate window to transmit the laser light without absorbing, reflecting, etc.; i.e., a maximum amount of laser energy is directly converted into kinetic energy of the flyer plate. We have investigated the use of sapphire, quartz, and BK-7 glass as substrate windows. In the past, a particular type of sapphire has been used for nearly all MiniFlyer experiments. Results of this study in terms of the performance of these window materials, based on flyer velocity are discussed.

  1. Equation of state measurements of warm dense carbon using laser-driven shock and release technique.

    PubMed

    Falk, K; Gamboa, E J; Kagan, G; Montgomery, D S; Srinivasan, B; Tzeferacos, P; Benage, J F

    2014-04-18

    We present a new approach to equation of state experiments that utilizes a laser-driven shock and release technique combined with spatially resolved x-ray Thomson scattering, radiography, velocity interferometry, and optical pyrometry to obtain independent measurements of pressure, density, and temperature for carbon at warm dense matter conditions. The uniqueness of this approach relies on using a laser to create very high initial pressures to enable a very deep release when the shock moves into a low-density pressure standard. This results in material at near normal solid density and temperatures around 10 eV. The spatially resolved Thomson scattering measurements facilitate a temperature determination of the released material by isolating the scattering signal from a specific region in the target. Our results are consistent with quantum molecular dynamics calculations for carbon at these conditions and are compared to several equation of state models.

  2. Equation of State Measurements of Warm Dense Carbon Using Laser-Driven Shock and Release Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, K.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kagan, G.; Montgomery, D. S.; Srinivasan, B.; Benage, J. F.

    2014-04-01

    We present a new approach to equation of state experiments that utilizes a laser-driven shock and release technique combined with spatially resolved x-ray Thomson scattering, radiography, velocity interferometry, and optical pyrometry to obtain independent measurements of pressure, density, and temperature for carbon at warm dense matter conditions. The uniqueness of this approach relies on using a laser to create very high initial pressures to enable a very deep release when the shock moves into a low-density pressure standard. This results in material at near normal solid density and temperatures around 10 eV. The spatially resolved Thomson scattering measurements facilitate a temperature determination of the released material by isolating the scattering signal from a specific region in the target. Our results are consistent with quantum molecular dynamics calculations for carbon at these conditions and are compared to several equation of state models.

  3. Toward high-energy laser-driven ion beams: Nanostructured double-layer targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passoni, M.; Sgattoni, A.; Prencipe, I.; Fedeli, L.; Dellasega, D.; Cialfi, L.; Choi, Il Woo; Kim, I. Jong; Janulewicz, K. A.; Lee, Hwang Woon; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-06-01

    The development of novel target concepts is crucial to make laser-driven acceleration of ion beams suitable for applications. We tested double-layer targets formed of an ultralow density nanostructured carbon layer (˜7 mg/cm 3 , 8 - 12 μ m -thick) deposited on a μ m -thick solid Al foil. A systematic increase in the total number of the accelerated ions (protons and C6 + ) as well as enhancement of both their maximum and average energies was observed with respect to bare solid foil targets. Maximum proton energies up to 30 MeV were recorded. Dedicated three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations were in remarkable agreement with the experimental results, giving clear indication of the role played by the target nanostructures in the interaction process.

  4. Laser-driven generation of high-quality ultra-relativistic positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarri, G.

    2015-04-01

    An ultra-relativistic electron beam propagating through a high-Z solid triggers an electromagnetic cascade, whereby a large number of high-energy photons and electron-positron pairs are produced mainly via the bremsstrahlung and Bethe-Heitler processes, respectively. These mechanisms are routinely used to generate positron beams in conventional accelerators such as the electron-positron collider (LEP). Here we show that the application of similar physical mechanisms to a laser-driven electron source allows for the generation of high-quality positron beams in a much more compact and cheaper configuration. We anticipate that the application of these results to the next generation of lasers might open the pathway for the realization of an all-optical high-energy electron-positron collider.

  5. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, B; d'Humières, E; Lancia, L; Dervieux, V; Antici, P; Böcker, J; Bonlie, J; Breil, J; Cauble, B; Chen, S N; Feugeas, J L; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nicolaï, P; Romagnani, L; Shepherd, R; Sentoku, Y; Swantusch, M; Tikhonchuk, V T; Borghesi, M; Willi, O; Pépin, H; Fuchs, J

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle.

  6. Laser-driven flyer impact experiments at the LULI 2000 laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, N.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Vinci, T.; Ravasio, A.; Esposito, M.; Lepape, S.; Henry, E.; Hüser, G.; Tanaka, K. A.; Nazarov, W.; Nagai, K.; Yoshida, M.

    2006-06-01

    New laser-driven flyer impact experiments have been performed at the LULI laboratory. In these experiments, three types of targets (single Al flyer, multi-layered, and foam-buffered high-Z metal) were used. Impacted conditions in fused quartz were measured with rear-side (two VISARs and SOP) and transverse diagnostics (shadowgraph). In the foam-buffered target, Ta foil was accelerated up to a velocity of 55 km/s. Shock wave accelerated in fused quartz by an Al flyer impact was generated, and the shock wave passing a distinct boundary to a conductive state was directly observed. This method is a way to create unique conditions within the EOS diagram of material.

  7. Studies of laser-driven isentropic compression of iron in the context of geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazevet, S.; Huser, G.; Occelli, F.; Festa, F.; Brambrink, E.; Amadou, N.; Vinci, T.; Diziere, A.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Guyot, F.; Morard, G.; Myanishi, K.; Kodama, R.; Ozaki, N.; de Resseguier, Th.

    2010-11-01

    The study of iron using dynamic compression paths yielding parameters different from that achieved on the principal Hugoniot might allow to access parameters relevant for the understanding of the solid-liquid phase transition in the Earth core (330 GPa, 5000 K). Beside the geophysical interest, dynamic compression allows to study the dynamics of the alpha-epsilon phase transition, as compression characteristic times are comparable with reaction kinetics. We have performed laser-driven ramp compression experiments on iron samples using the LULI laser facility. Different pressure ramp shapes and target samples will be presented. These results are also important to design future experiments using very large-scale facilities, which would allow to explore pressure-temperature conditions relevant to terrestrial-type exoplanets, which were recently discovered.

  8. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, B; d'Humières, E; Lancia, L; Dervieux, V; Antici, P; Böcker, J; Bonlie, J; Breil, J; Cauble, B; Chen, S N; Feugeas, J L; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nicolaï, P; Romagnani, L; Shepherd, R; Sentoku, Y; Swantusch, M; Tikhonchuk, V T; Borghesi, M; Willi, O; Pépin, H; Fuchs, J

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle. PMID:25933857

  9. Focusing dynamics of high-energy density, laser-driven ion beams.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; d'Humières, E; Lefebvre, E; Romagnani, L; Toncian, T; Antici, P; Audebert, P; Brambrink, E; Cecchetti, C A; Kudyakov, T; Pipahl, A; Sentoku, Y; Borghesi, M; Willi, O; Fuchs, J

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of the focusing of laser-driven ion beams produced from concave solid targets was studied. Most of the ion beam energy is observed to converge at the center of the cylindrical targets with a spot diameter of 30  μm, which can be very beneficial for applications requiring high beam energy densities. Also, unbalanced laser irradiation does not compromise the focusability of the beam. However, significant filamentation occurs during the focusing, potentially limiting the localization of the energy deposition region by these beams at focus. These effects could impact the applicability of such high-energy density beams for applications, e.g., in proton-driven fast ignition. PMID:22400936

  10. Correlation of spectral, spatial, and angular characteristics of an ultrashort laser driven proton source

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Nakamura, T.; Mima, K.

    2009-04-15

    The laser driven ion source is a highly organized dynamical system. It relies on a well defined interrelation between the spatial and momentum distributions of emitted ions. This correlation is found by a consecutive spectral characterization of distinct proton beamlets emitted from different spatial target positions and under different angles. In case of a flat target and a perfectly round laser focal spot, the proton source is circular symmetric and each source point behaves similarly: the higher the proton energy the smaller the source size and the larger the emission angle for a similar source extension. Only the symmetry axis is unique; here all protons are emitted at 0 deg. to the target normal.

  11. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertazzi, B.; d'Humières, E.; Lancia, L.; Dervieux, V.; Antici, P.; Böcker, J.; Bonlie, J.; Breil, J.; Cauble, B.; Chen, S. N.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Nicolaï, P.; Romagnani, L.; Shepherd, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Swantusch, M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Borghesi, M.; Willi, O.; Pépin, H.; Fuchs, J.

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle.

  12. Characterization of the ELIMED Permanent Magnets Quadrupole system prototype with laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, F.; Pommarel, L.; Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Costa, M.; Giove, D.; Maggiore, M.; Russo, A. D.; Scuderi, V.; Malka, V.; Vauzour, B.; Flacco, A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2016-07-01

    Laser-based accelerators are gaining interest in recent years as an alternative to conventional machines [1]. In the actual ion acceleration scheme, energy and angular spread of the laser-driven beams are the main limiting factors for beam applications and different solutions for dedicated beam-transport lines have been proposed [2,3]. In this context a system of Permanent Magnet Quadrupoles (PMQs) has been realized [2] by INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) researchers, in collaboration with SIGMAPHI company in France, to be used as a collection and pre-selection system for laser driven proton beams. This system is meant to be a prototype to a more performing one [3] to be installed at ELI-Beamlines for the collection of ions. The final system is designed for protons and carbons up to 60 MeV/u. In order to validate the design and the performances of this large bore, compact, high gradient magnetic system prototype an experimental campaign have been carried out, in collaboration with the group of the SAPHIR experimental facility at LOA (Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée) in Paris using a 200 TW Ti:Sapphire laser system. During this campaign a deep study of the quadrupole system optics has been performed, comparing the results with the simulation codes used to determine the setup of the PMQ system and to track protons with realistic TNSA-like divergence and spectrum. Experimental and simulation results are good agreement, demonstrating the possibility to have a good control on the magnet optics. The procedure used during the experimental campaign and the most relevant results are reported here.

  13. Proposed Laser-driven, Dielectric Microstructure Few-cm Long Undulator for Attosecond Coherent X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2011-09-16

    This article presents the concept of an all-dielectric laser-driven undulator for the generation of coherent X-rays. The proposed laser-driven undulator is expected to produce internal deflection forces equivalent to a several-Tesla magnetic field acting on a speed-of-light particle. The key idea for this laser-driven undulator is its ability to provide phase synchronicity between the deflection force and the electron beam for a distance that is much greater than the laser wavelength. The potential advantage of this undulator is illustrated with a possible design example that assumes a small laser accelerator which delivers a 2 GeV, 1 pC, 1 kHz electron bunch train to a 10 cm long, 1/2 mm period laser-driven undulator. Such an undulator could produce coherent X-ray pulses with {approx}10{sup 9} photons of 64 keV energy. The numerical modeling for the expected X-ray pulse shape was performed with GENESIS, which predicts X-ray pulse durations in the few-attosecond range. Possible applications for nonlinear electromagnetic effects from these X-ray pulses are briefly discussed.

  14. Utilizing a Low-Cost, Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS) to Improve Learning in Developing Rural Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes an innovation Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS), utilizing general IWBs (Interactive Whiteboard) didactics, to support student learning for rural and developing regions. LaDIS is a system made to support traditional classroom practices between an instructor and a group of students. This invention effectively transforms a…

  15. Free electron lasers driven by linear induction accelerators: High power radiation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orzechowski, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    The technology of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and linear induction accelerators (LIAs) is addressed by outlining the following topics: fundamentals of FELs; basic concepts of linear induction accelerators; the Electron Laser Facility (a microwave FEL); PALADIN (an infrared FEL); magnetic switching; IMP; and future directions (relativistic klystrons). This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  16. Laser-driven high-power X- and γ-ray ultra-short pulse source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Kando, Masaki; Zhidkov, Alexei G.

    2009-07-01

    A novel ultra-bright high-intensity source of X-ray and gamma radiation is suggested. It is based on the double Doppler effect, where a relativistic flying mirror reflects counter-propagating electromagnetic radiation causing its frequency multiplication and intensification, and on the inverse double Doppler effect, where the mirror acquires energy from an ultra-intense co-propagating electromagnetic wave. The role of the flying mirror is played by a high-density thin plasma slab accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime. Frequencies of high harmonics generated at the flying mirror by relativistically strong counter-propagating radiation undergo multiplication with the same factor as the fundamental frequency of the reflected radiation, approximately equal to the quadruple of the square of the mirror Lorentz factor.

  17. Laser inertial fusion dry-wall materials response to pulsed ions at power-plant level fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.; Tanaka, T. J.; Olson, C. L.; Peterson, R. R.; Knowles, T. R.

    2004-08-01

    Pulses of MeV-level ions with fluences of up to 20 J/cm 2 can be expected to impinge on the first-wall of future laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants. To simulate the effect of these ions, we have exposed candidate dry-wall materials to ion pulses from RHEPP-1, located at Sandia National Laboratories. Various forms of tungsten and tungsten alloy were exposed to up to 1000 pulses, with some samples heated to 600 °C. Thresholds for roughening and material removal, and evolution of surface morphology were measured and compared with code predictions for materials response. Tungsten is observed to undergo surface roughening and subsurface crack formation that evolves over hundreds of pulses, and which can occur both below and above the melt threshold. Heating and Re-alloying mitigate, but do not eliminate, these apparently thermomechanically-caused effects. Use of a 3-D geometry, and/or use of the tungsten in thin-film form may offer improved survivability compared to bulk tungsten.

  18. Neutron imaging with the short-pulse laser driven neutron source at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Favalli, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Falk, K.; Jung, D.; Tybo, J. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Croft, S.; Danly, C.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Taddeucci, T.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Roth, M.

    2016-10-01

    Emerging approaches to short-pulse laser-driven neutron production offer a possible gateway to compact, low cost, and intense broad spectrum sources for a wide variety of applications. They are based on energetic ions, driven by an intense short-pulse laser, interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via breakup and nuclear reactions. Recent experiments performed with the high-contrast laser at the Trident laser facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism operating in the regime of relativistic transparency, featuring a volumetric laser-plasma interaction. This mechanism is distinct from previously studied ones that accelerate ions at the laser-target surface. The Trident experiments produced an intense beam of deuterons with an energy distribution extending above 100 MeV. This deuteron beam, when directed at a beryllium converter, produces a forward-directed neutron beam with ˜5 × 109 n/sr, in a single laser shot, primarily due to deuteron breakup. The neutron beam has a pulse duration on the order of a few nanoseconds with an energy distribution extending from a few hundreds of keV to almost 80 MeV. For the experiments on neutron-source spot-size measurements, our gated neutron imager was setup to select neutrons in the energy range of 2.5-35 MeV. The spot size of neutron emission at the converter was measured by two different imaging techniques, using a knife-edge and a penumbral aperture, in two different experimental campaigns. The neutron-source spot size is measured ˜1 mm for both experiments. The measurements and analysis reported here give a spatial characterization for this type of neutron source for the first time. In addition, the forward modeling performed provides an empirical estimate of the spatial characteristics of the deuteron ion-beam. These experimental observations, taken together, provide essential yet unique data to benchmark and verify theoretical work into the

  19. Analyses in Support of Z-IFE: LLNL Progress Report for FY-04

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W; Abbott, R; Latkowski, J; Moir, R; Reyes, S; Schmitt, R

    2004-10-06

    During the last quarter of FY2004, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducted a brief study of power plant options for a z-pinch-based inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) power plant. Areas that were covered include chamber design, thick-liquid response, neutronics and activation, and systems studies. This report summarizes the progress made in each of these areas, provides recommendations for improvements to the basic design concept, and identifies future work that is needed. As a starting point to the LLNL studies, we have taken information provided in several publications and presentations. In particular, many of the basic parameters were taken from the ZP-3 study, which is described in reference 4. The ZP-3 design called for 12 separate target chambers, with any 10 of them operating at a given time. Each chamber would be pulsed at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz with a target yield of 3 GJ. Thus, each chamber would have a fusion power of 300 MW for a power plant total of 3000 MW. The ZP-3 study considered several options for the recyclable transmission lines (RTL). Early in the study, the LLNL group questioned the use of many chambers as well as the yield limitation of 3 GJ. The feeling was that a large number of chambers would invariably lead to a considerably higher system cost than for a system with fewer chambers. Naturally, this trend would be somewhat offset by the increased availability that might be possible with many chambers. Reference 4 points out that target yields as high as 20 GJ would be possible with currently available manufacturing technology. The LLNL team considered yields ranging from 3 to 20 GJ. Our findings indicate that higher yields, which lead one to fewer chambers, make the most sense from an economic point of view. Systems modeling, including relative economics, is covered in Section 2. Regardless of the number of chambers of the fusion yield per target, a Z-IFE power plant would make use of a thick-liquid wall protection scheme

  20. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  1. Propagation of Laser-Driven Relativistic Electron Beam inside Solid Dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R.; Ivanov, V. V.; Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2011-10-01

    Laser probing diagnostics shadowgraphy, interferometry and polarimetry was used for comprehensive characterization of ionization wave dynamics inside glass target induced by laser-driven relativistic electron beam. Experiment was done using 50-TW Leopard laser at University of Nevada Reno. It has been shown that for laser flax ~2 ×1018W/cm2 hemispheric ionization wave propagates with c/3 speed has smooth electron density distribution, absorbing probing green beam in 2-10 times. Maximum of free-electron density inside glass target is ~2x1019cm-3, which correspond to ionization ~0.1%. Magnetic and electric fields do not exceed ~15 kG and ~1 MV/cm. Electron temperature has hot-ring structure with maximum 0.1-0.5 eV. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the ``fountain effect'', a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional PIC-simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields. The very low ionization, ~0.1%, observed after the heating pulse suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale. Work was supported by the DOE/NNSA under UNR grant DE-FC52-06NA27616 and grant DE-PS02-08ER08-16.

  2. Propagation of a laser-driven relativistic electron beam inside a solid dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R. B.

    2012-09-01

    Laser probe diagnostics: shadowgraphy, interferometry, and polarimetry were used for a comprehensive characterization of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by a laser-driven, relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50-TW Leopard laser at the University of Nevada, Reno. We show that for a laser flux of ˜2 × 1018 W/cm2 a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3 for 10 ps and has a smooth electron-density distribution. The maximum free-electron density inside the glass target is ˜2 × 1019 cm-3, which corresponds to an ionization level of ˜0.1%. Magnetic fields and electric fields do not exceed ˜15 kG and ˜1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a hot, ringlike structure with a maximum of ˜0.7 eV. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the “fountain effect”, a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields driven by laser. The very low ionization observed after the laser heating pulse suggests a fast recombination on the sub-ps time scale.

  3. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W.-M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J.; Ayyub, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈0.25 μm) layer of 25–30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2×1018  W/cm2. However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration. PMID:26153048

  4. X-ray scattering measurements of laser-driven shock compressed plastic and deuterated plastic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Maxence; Fletcher, Luke; Ravasio, Alessandra; Döppner, Tilo; Glenzer, Siegfried; HED science Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The study of materials under extreme conditions, i.e., high energy density, has gathered enormous scientific interest in various domains from inertial confinement fusion to planetary physics. The material response of plastic to shock and its behavior is important because of its common use as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion experiments. In this study, simultaneous measurements of spectrally and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering emission from laser-shock compressed plastic foils allow us to study the structural transition from a polymer to a liquid-like state. The 527 nm, 2 GW laser system available at the MEC station of the LCLS facility has been used to compress CH and CD foils using laser-driven shocks. 40 to 57 μm thick CH and CD targets were compressed using 3 ns square pulses with total laser energy of 6 J per beam. A drive intensity of 3x1013 W/cm2 on each irradiated surface was used to generate high-pressure shock waves into the sample, while 8 keV x-rays from LCLS was used to probe the target.

  5. Comparison study of in vivo dose response to laser-driven versus conventional electron beam.

    PubMed

    Oppelt, Melanie; Baumann, Michael; Bergmann, Ralf; Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Hartmann, Josefin; Karsch, Leonhard; Krause, Mechthild; Laschinsky, Lydia; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Nicolai, Maria; Reuter, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sävert, Alexander; Schnell, Michael; Schürer, Michael; Woithe, Julia; Kaluza, Malte; Pawelke, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The long-term goal to integrate laser-based particle accelerators into radiotherapy clinics not only requires technological development of high-intensity lasers and new techniques for beam detection and dose delivery, but also characterization of the biological consequences of this new particle beam quality, i.e. ultra-short, ultra-intense pulses. In the present work, we describe successful in vivo experiments with laser-driven electron pulses by utilization of a small tumour model on the mouse ear for the human squamous cell carcinoma model FaDu. The already established in vitro irradiation technology at the laser system JETI was further enhanced for 3D tumour irradiation in vivo in terms of beam transport, beam monitoring, dose delivery and dosimetry in order to precisely apply a prescribed dose to each tumour in full-scale radiobiological experiments. Tumour growth delay was determined after irradiation with doses of 3 and 6 Gy by laser-accelerated electrons. Reference irradiation was performed with continuous electron beams at a clinical linear accelerator in order to both validate the dedicated dosimetry employed for laser-accelerated JETI electrons and above all review the biological results. No significant difference in radiation-induced tumour growth delay was revealed for the two investigated electron beams. These data provide evidence that the ultra-high dose rate generated by laser acceleration does not impact the biological effectiveness of the particles. PMID:25600561

  6. Propagation of a laser-driven relativistic electron beam inside a solid dielectric.

    PubMed

    Sarkisov, G S; Ivanov, V V; Leblanc, P; Sentoku, Y; Yates, K; Wiewior, P; Chalyy, O; Astanovitskiy, A; Bychenkov, V Yu; Jobe, D; Spielman, R B

    2012-09-01

    Laser probe diagnostics: shadowgraphy, interferometry, and polarimetry were used for a comprehensive characterization of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by a laser-driven, relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50-TW Leopard laser at the University of Nevada, Reno. We show that for a laser flux of ∼2 × 10(18) W/cm2 a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3 for 10 ps and has a smooth electron-density distribution. The maximum free-electron density inside the glass target is ∼2 × 10(19) cm-3, which corresponds to an ionization level of ∼0.1%. Magnetic fields and electric fields do not exceed ∼15 kG and ∼1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a hot, ringlike structure with a maximum of ∼0.7 eV. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the "fountain effect", a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields driven by laser. The very low ionization observed after the laser heating pulse suggests a fast recombination on the sub-ps time scale. PMID:23031038

  7. Propagation of a laser-driven relativistic electron beam inside a solid dielectric.

    PubMed

    Sarkisov, G S; Ivanov, V V; Leblanc, P; Sentoku, Y; Yates, K; Wiewior, P; Chalyy, O; Astanovitskiy, A; Bychenkov, V Yu; Jobe, D; Spielman, R B

    2012-09-01

    Laser probe diagnostics: shadowgraphy, interferometry, and polarimetry were used for a comprehensive characterization of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by a laser-driven, relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50-TW Leopard laser at the University of Nevada, Reno. We show that for a laser flux of ∼2 × 10(18) W/cm2 a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3 for 10 ps and has a smooth electron-density distribution. The maximum free-electron density inside the glass target is ∼2 × 10(19) cm-3, which corresponds to an ionization level of ∼0.1%. Magnetic fields and electric fields do not exceed ∼15 kG and ∼1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a hot, ringlike structure with a maximum of ∼0.7 eV. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the "fountain effect", a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields driven by laser. The very low ionization observed after the laser heating pulse suggests a fast recombination on the sub-ps time scale.

  8. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A M; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  9. Towards controlled flyer acceleration by a laser-driven mini flyer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Fedotov, Vitalij; Baek, Wonkye; Yoh, Jack J.

    2014-06-01

    A laser driven flyer (LDF) system is designed to blast off a very small, thin flyer plate for impact on a target. When a Nd:YAG laser beam is focused through a transparent substrate onto thin metal, a fraction of the metal is ablated. The blow-off products being contained between the substrate and the flyer make the remaining thin film launch as a separate flyer. Some energy of the laser beam is lost by reflection at the boundary between substrate and metal because of the high reflectivity. By using a proper metal of high absorptance at 1.064 μm wavelength, the laser coupling to the flyer would define the system efficiency of a launch system. An effort is presented here to improve the coupling results in the enhancement of the flyer velocity for a given pulse energy. An optimum energy conversion between laser energy and kinetic energy of the flyer is achieved through a black paint coating technique as opposed to a more conventional means of a multi-layered approach requiring electron beaming or magnetron sputtering that are rather expensive and time consuming. The mini flyer flown under 1.4 km/s showed a controlled flight trajectory without fragmentation, suggesting that performance of this simple system is competitive to if not better than other attempts by the multi-layered LDF systems.

  10. Time-dependent quantum chemistry of laser driven many-electron molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Couture-Bienvenue, Étienne; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy; Sainjon, Amaury

    2014-12-28

    A Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction approach using multiple Feshbach partitionings, corresponding to multiple ionization stages of a laser-driven molecule, has recently been proposed [T.-T. Nguyen-Dang and J. Viau-Trudel, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244102 (2013)]. To complete this development toward a fully ab-initio method for the calculation of time-dependent electronic wavefunctions of an N-electron molecule, we describe how tools of multiconfiguration quantum chemistry such as the management of the configuration expansion space using Graphical Unitary Group Approach concepts can be profitably adapted to the new context, that of time-resolved electronic dynamics, as opposed to stationary electronic structure. The method is applied to calculate the detailed, sub-cycle electronic dynamics of BeH{sub 2}, treated in a 3–21G bound-orbital basis augmented by a set of orthogonalized plane-waves representing continuum-type orbitals, including its ionization under an intense λ = 800 nm or λ = 80 nm continuous-wave laser field. The dynamics is strongly non-linear at the field-intensity considered (I ≃ 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}), featuring important ionization of an inner-shell electron and strong post-ionization bound-electron dynamics.

  11. Time-dependent quantum chemistry of laser driven many-electron molecules.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Couture-Bienvenue, Étienne; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy; Sainjon, Amaury

    2014-12-28

    A Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction approach using multiple Feshbach partitionings, corresponding to multiple ionization stages of a laser-driven molecule, has recently been proposed [T.-T. Nguyen-Dang and J. Viau-Trudel, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244102 (2013)]. To complete this development toward a fully ab-initio method for the calculation of time-dependent electronic wavefunctions of an N-electron molecule, we describe how tools of multiconfiguration quantum chemistry such as the management of the configuration expansion space using Graphical Unitary Group Approach concepts can be profitably adapted to the new context, that of time-resolved electronic dynamics, as opposed to stationary electronic structure. The method is applied to calculate the detailed, sub-cycle electronic dynamics of BeH2, treated in a 3-21G bound-orbital basis augmented by a set of orthogonalized plane-waves representing continuum-type orbitals, including its ionization under an intense λ = 800 nm or λ = 80 nm continuous-wave laser field. The dynamics is strongly non-linear at the field-intensity considered (I ≃ 10(15) W/cm(2)), featuring important ionization of an inner-shell electron and strong post-ionization bound-electron dynamics.

  12. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ˜1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  13. Femtosecond-Laser-Driven Cluster-Based Plasma Source for High-Resolution Ionography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Homma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Pirozhkov, A.; Yogo, A.; Tampo, M.; Mori, M.; Sakaki, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Pikuz, S. A.; Kartashev, V.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Gasilov, S. V.; Giulietti, A.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Boldarev, A. S.; Gasilov, V. A.; Magunov, A.; Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Bolton, P.; Daido, H.; Tajima, T.; Kato, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2009-07-01

    The intense isotropic source of multicharged ions, with energy above 300 keV, was produced by femtosecond Ti:Sa laser pulses irradiation (intensity of ˜4×1017 W/cm2) of the He and CO2 gases mixture expanded in supersonic jet. High contrast ionography images have been obtained for 2000 dpi metal mesh, 1 μm polypropylene and 100 nm Zr foils, as well as for different biological objects. Images were recorded on 1 mm thick CR-39 ion detector placed in contact with back surface of the imaged samples, at the distances 140-160 mm from the plasma source. The obtained spatial resolution of the image was ˜600 nm. A 100 nm object thickness difference was resolved very well for both Zr and polymer foils. The multicharged ion energy for Carbon and Oxygen ions passing through the 1 μm polypropylene foil is estimated to give the energy of more than 300 keV. An almost equal number of ions were measured with total number of about 108 per shot at a different direction from plasma source. Easy production of different sub-MeV ions in wide space angle, recognizes femtosecond-laser-driven-cluster-based plasma as a well-suited bright source for novel type of submicron ionography to image different media, including nanofoils, membranes, and other low-contrast objects.

  14. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A. M. Li, Song; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jie; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya

    2015-10-15

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  15. Cost reduction study for the LANL KrF laser-driven LMF design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-27

    This report is in fulfillment of the deliverable requirements for the optical components portions of the LANL-KrF Laser-Driven LMF Design Cost Reduction Study. This report examines the future cost reductions that may accrue through the use of mass production, innovative manufacturing techniques, and new materials. Results are based on data collection and survey of optical component manufacturers, BDM experience, and existing cost models. These data provide a good representation of current methods and technologies from which future estimates can be made. From these data, a series of scaling relationships were developed to project future costs for a selected set of technologies. The scaling relationships are sensitive to cost driving parameters such as size and surface figure requirements as well as quantity requirements, production rate, materials, and manufacturing processes. In addition to the scaling relationships, descriptions of the selected processes were developed along with graphical representations of the processes. This report provides a useful tool in projecting the costs of advanced laser concepts at the component level of detail. A mix of the most diverse yet comparable technologies was chosen for this study. This yielded a useful, yet manageable number of variables to examine. The study has resulted in a first-order cost model which predicts the relative cost behavior of optical components within different variable constraints.

  16. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A M; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes. PMID:26520950

  17. Flyer Velocity Characteristics of the Laser-Driven MiniFlyer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, D. B.; Robbins, D. L.; Sheffield, S. A.

    1999-06-01

    The laser-driven MiniFlyer system is used to launch a small, thin flyer plate for subsequent impact on a target. Consequently, it is an indirect drive technique which de-couples the shock from the laser beam profile. The flyer velocity can be controlled by adjustment of the laser energy within certain limits. The upper limits on the flyer velocity involve the ability of the flyer substrate window to transmit the laser light without absorbing, reflecting, etc.; i.e., a maximum amount of laser energy (at 1064 nm wavelength) is directly converted into kinetic energy of the flyer plate. We have investigated the use of sapphire, quartz, BK-7 glass, and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as substrate windows. Quartz and BK-7 have performed the best with respect to optical damage threshold. In the past, a particular type of sapphire has been used for nearly all MiniFlyer experiments but this material has been found to be the worst in terms of transmission. Other types of sapphire have been found to be somewhat better but still not as good as the other materials. Results of this study in terms of the performance of these window materials, based on optical transmission and flyer velocity, are discussed.

  18. Fundamental Studies on the Use of Laser-Driven Proton Beams for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, C.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Theobald, W.; Habara, H.; Tanaka, K.; Yabuuchi, T.; Foord, M. E.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H. S.; Roth, M.; McKenna, P.

    2015-11-01

    A short-pulse-laser-driven intense proton beam remains a candidate for Fast Ignition heater due to its focusability and high current. However, the proton current density necessary for FI in practice has never been produced in the laboratory and there are many physics issues that should be addressed using current and near-term facilities. For example, the extraction of sufficient proton charge from the short-pulse laser target could be evaluated with the multi-kilojoule NIF ARC laser. Transport of the beam through matter, such as a cone tip, and deposition in the fuel must be considered carefully as it will isochorically heat any material it enters and produce a rapidly-evolving, warm dense matter state with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we share experimental measurements of the proton spectra after passing through metal cones and foils taken with the kilojoule-class, multi-picosecond OMEGA EP and LFEX lasers. We also present complementary PIC simulations of beam generation and transport to and in the foils. Upcoming experiments to further evaluate proton beam performance in proton FI will also be outlined. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA NLUF program, Contract DE-NA0002034 and by the AFOSR under Contract FA9550-14-1-0346.

  19. Comparison study of in vivo dose response to laser-driven versus conventional electron beam.

    PubMed

    Oppelt, Melanie; Baumann, Michael; Bergmann, Ralf; Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Hartmann, Josefin; Karsch, Leonhard; Krause, Mechthild; Laschinsky, Lydia; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Nicolai, Maria; Reuter, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sävert, Alexander; Schnell, Michael; Schürer, Michael; Woithe, Julia; Kaluza, Malte; Pawelke, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The long-term goal to integrate laser-based particle accelerators into radiotherapy clinics not only requires technological development of high-intensity lasers and new techniques for beam detection and dose delivery, but also characterization of the biological consequences of this new particle beam quality, i.e. ultra-short, ultra-intense pulses. In the present work, we describe successful in vivo experiments with laser-driven electron pulses by utilization of a small tumour model on the mouse ear for the human squamous cell carcinoma model FaDu. The already established in vitro irradiation technology at the laser system JETI was further enhanced for 3D tumour irradiation in vivo in terms of beam transport, beam monitoring, dose delivery and dosimetry in order to precisely apply a prescribed dose to each tumour in full-scale radiobiological experiments. Tumour growth delay was determined after irradiation with doses of 3 and 6 Gy by laser-accelerated electrons. Reference irradiation was performed with continuous electron beams at a clinical linear accelerator in order to both validate the dedicated dosimetry employed for laser-accelerated JETI electrons and above all review the biological results. No significant difference in radiation-induced tumour growth delay was revealed for the two investigated electron beams. These data provide evidence that the ultra-high dose rate generated by laser acceleration does not impact the biological effectiveness of the particles.

  20. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2014-10-15

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  1. Time-dependent quantum chemistry of laser driven many-electron molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Couture-Bienvenue, Étienne; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy; Sainjon, Amaury

    2014-12-01

    A Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction approach using multiple Feshbach partitionings, corresponding to multiple ionization stages of a laser-driven molecule, has recently been proposed [T.-T. Nguyen-Dang and J. Viau-Trudel, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244102 (2013)]. To complete this development toward a fully ab-initio method for the calculation of time-dependent electronic wavefunctions of an N-electron molecule, we describe how tools of multiconfiguration quantum chemistry such as the management of the configuration expansion space using Graphical Unitary Group Approach concepts can be profitably adapted to the new context, that of time-resolved electronic dynamics, as opposed to stationary electronic structure. The method is applied to calculate the detailed, sub-cycle electronic dynamics of BeH2, treated in a 3-21G bound-orbital basis augmented by a set of orthogonalized plane-waves representing continuum-type orbitals, including its ionization under an intense λ = 800 nm or λ = 80 nm continuous-wave laser field. The dynamics is strongly non-linear at the field-intensity considered (I ≃ 1015 W/cm2), featuring important ionization of an inner-shell electron and strong post-ionization bound-electron dynamics.

  2. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W-M; Trivikram, T Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J; Ayyub, P; Sheng, Z M; Krishnamurthy, M

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈ 0.25 μm) layer of 25-30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2 × 10(18)  W/cm(2). However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration. PMID:26153048

  3. Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Schumer, Joseph Wade (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Alexander (High Currents Institute, Tomsk, Russia); Kulcinski, Gerald L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kammer, Daniel C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Nedoseev, Sergei L. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P.; Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Bruner, Nichelle "Nicki" (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Barkey, Mark E. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL); Guthrie, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Genoni, Tom C. (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Langston, William L.; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos

    2007-01-01

    Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy (Z-IFE) complements and extends the single-shot z-pinch fusion program on Z to a repetitive, high-yield, power plant scenario that can be used for the production of electricity, transmutation of nuclear waste, and hydrogen production, all with no CO{sub 2} production and no long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. The Z-IFE concept uses a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) accelerator, and a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the LTD driver to a high-yield fusion target inside a thick-liquid-wall power plant chamber. Results of RTL and LTD research are reported here, that include: (1) The key physics issues for RTLs involve the power flow at the high linear current densities that occur near the target (up to 5 MA/cm). These issues include surface heating, melting, ablation, plasma formation, electron flow, magnetic insulation, conductivity changes, magnetic field diffusion changes, possible ion flow, and RTL mass motion. These issues are studied theoretically, computationally (with the ALEGRA and LSP codes), and will work at 5 MA/cm or higher, with anode-cathode gaps as small as 2 mm. (2) An RTL misalignment sensitivity study has been performed using a 3D circuit model. Results show very small load current variations for significant RTL misalignments. (3) The key structural issues for RTLs involve optimizing the RTL strength (varying shape, ribs, etc.) while minimizing the RTL mass. Optimization studies show RTL mass reductions by factors of three or more. (4) Fabrication and pressure testing of Z-PoP (Proof-of-Principle) size RTLs are successfully reported here. (5) Modeling of the effect of initial RTL imperfections on the buckling pressure has been performed. Results show that the curved RTL offers a much greater buckling pressure as well as less sensitivity to imperfections than three other RTL designs. (6) Repetitive operation of a 0.5 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavity with gas purging between shots and automated operation is

  4. Gas dynamics and radiative heat transfer in IFE chambers with emphasis on the HYLIFE-II design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantzen, Caron Ann

    Gas dynamics in a heavy-ion inertial-fusion energy power plant have been modeled using the two-dimensional code, TSUNAMI. After fusion, approximately 2/3 of the yield energy will be given off as 14 Mev neutrons and the remaining third partitioned between target x-rays and debris energy. The chamber dynamic events which follow the fusion event occur over three distinct time periods, permitting separation of the underlying phenomena. Simulations of the HYLIFE-II reactor design were then run and results compared using both ideal-gas and partialionization equations of state. Results from a cylindrically symmetric simulation indicate that an initial, low density, burst of high-energy particles enters the final focus section of the heavy ion driver within 120mus of the blast and a second, larger, density rise occurs approximately 100mus later. Uncertainty in IFE target design motivated a parametric study of the x-ray to debris kinetic energy. Increasing this ratio lead to more jet ablation by target x-rays and, therefore, higher chamber densities. Chamber averaged temperature remained high, around 2.1 eV. Therefore, a subsequent study considered secondary radiation emitted by this hot vapor. The photon transport equation was applied in a finite difference model to both the target and ablation regions. Result indicated that radiation from the expanding target debris supplies 15MJ of energy to the liquid jets within the first 12mus of target ignition and becomes negligible beyond that time. In an inertial fusion energy (IFE) target chamber using thick-liquid protection, placing liquid surfaces close to the fusion target helps reduce pumping cost and final-focus stand-off distance. An additional issue then becomes the impulse load delivered to protective jets by target debris and x-ray ablated material since this pressure load provides the most important boundary condition for the subsequent liquid hydraulic response, pocket disruption, droplet generation, and pocket

  5. Investigation of the forming pressure and formability of metal foil by laser-driven multi-layered flyer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Yuan, Yaoqiang; Shen, Zongbao; Gu, Chunxing; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Huixia

    2014-06-01

    Metal foil forming by laser-driven flyer (LDF) is a new micro-forming technology. The performance of the flyer is one of the main factors affecting the forming quality of workpiece. Considering the features of this technology, this paper presents a novel multi-layered flyer. Via magnetron sputtering, the absorption layer (titanium) and the ablation layer (aluminum) are produced on the confining medium. The impactor layer is manufactured by special cutting (a micro-punching method) and adhered to the center of the ablation layer by a gluing method. A pressure measurement system is conducted to measure the shockwave forming pressure of the laser-driven flyer, and a series of forming experiments are carried out to investigate the forming ability of the multi-layered flyer. Experimental results show that the multi-layered flyer can enhance the laser coupling efficiency to the flyer and achieve higher forming pressure than the single-layered flyer. Especially, the multi-layered flyer with the nonmetallic impactor layer of 100 μm polyurethane rubber has good forming quality in the laser-driven flyer micro-forming (LDFμF).

  6. Measurements of laser-driven magnetic fields in quasi-hohlraum geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Bradley; Turnbull, D.; Goyon, C.; Ross, S.; Farmer, W.; Hazi, A.; Tubman, E.; Woolsey, N.; Law, K.; Fujioka, S.; Moody, J.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fields of 10-100 T have been produced with a laser-driven scheme using a parallel-plate target geometry, where a laser is directed through a hole in the front plate and irradiates the plate behind it. Hot electrons generated from the rear plate collect on the front plate, creating a voltage difference (~ 10-100 keV) between them. When the plates are connected via a quasi-loop conductor, this voltage sources current in the range of ~ 0.1-1 MA which produces a magnetic field along the axis of the loop. The field is generated on fast (~ ns) timescales, and can be scaled by changing the drive laser parameters. Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility have allowed temporally-resolved measurements of the voltage between the plates with ~ 1 J laser drive. Separate experiments at the Omega EP laser system have allowed direct Faraday rotation (in fused SiO2) measurements of the field strength inside the current loop by employing the 4w polarimetry capability of EP. We have also measured the extent and structure of the field with proton deflectometry at EP. The maximum field recorded along the axis of the quasi-loop is ~ 5 T at moderate (100 J) laser drive, and measurements of fringing fields outside the loop at 1 kJ indicate that the field increases to ~ 40 T. These results are compared with modeling to determine the current driven in the target, and infer information about the plasma conditions which sourced the current. This work was performed under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction with laser-driven field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropers, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in solids and nanostructures can be investigated by an increasing number of sophisticated electron and x-ray diffraction techniques. Electrons are particularly suited for this purpose, exhibiting high scattering cross-sections and allowing for beam control by versatile electrostatic or magnetic lens systems. The capabilities of time-resolved electron imaging techniques critically depend on the employed source of laser-driven ultrashort electron pulses. Nanoscopic sources offer exceptional possibilities for the generation of electron probe pulses with very short durations and high spatial beam coherence. In this talk, I will discuss recent progress in the development of ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction based on nanoscopic photocathodes. In particular, we implemented ultrafast low-energy electron diffraction (ULEED) and ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM) driven by nonlinear photoemission from field emission tips. ULEED enables the study of structural changes with high temporal resolution and ultimate surface sensitivity, at sub-keV electron energies. As a first application of this technique, we studied the structural phase transition in a stripe-like polymer superstructure on freestanding monolayer graphene. An advanced UTEM instrument was realized by custom modifications of a standard transmission electron microscope, leading to electron focal spot sizes in the microscope's sample plane of about 10 nm and electron pulse durations of less than 700 fs. Utilizing these features, we investigate the quantum-coherent interaction between the ultrashort electron pulse and the optical near-field of an illuminated nanostructure. Finally, further applications and prospects of ultrafast electron imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy using nanoscale field emitters will be discussed.

  8. Recreating planetary interiors in the laboratory by laser-driven ramp-compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppari, Federica

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in laser-driven compression now allow to reproduce conditions existing deep inside large planets in the laboratory. Ramp-compression allows to compress matter along a thermodynamic path not accessible through standard shock compression techniques, and opens the way to the exploration of new pressure, density and temperature conditions. By carefully tuning the laser pulse shape we can compress the material to extremely high pressure and keep the temperature relatively low (i.e. below the melting temperature). In this way, we can probe solid states of matter at unprecedented high pressures. This loading technique has been combined with diagnostics generally used in condensed matter physics, such as x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, in particular), to provide a complete picture of the behavior of matter in-situ during compression. X-ray diffraction provides a snapshot of the structure and density of the material, while EXAFS has been used to infer the temperature. Simultaneous optical velocimetry measurements using VISAR (Velocity Interferometer for Any Reflector) yield an accurate determination of the pressure history during compression. In this talk I will present some of the results obtained in ramp-compression experiments performed at the Omega Laser Facility (University of Rochester) where the phase maps of planetary relevant materials, such as Fe, FeO and MgO, have been studied to unprecedented high pressures. Our data provide experimental constraints on the equations of state, strength and structure of these materials expected to dominate the interiors of massive rocky extra-solar planets and a benchmark for theoretical simulations. Combination of these new experimental data with models for planetary formation and evolutions is expected to improve our understanding of complex dynamics occurring in the Universe. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of

  9. Recent developments in laser-driven and hollow-core fiber optic gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digonnet, M. J. F.; Chamoun, J. N.

    2016-05-01

    Although the fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) continues to be a commercial success, current research efforts are endeavoring to improve its precision and broaden its applicability to other markets, in particular the inertial navigation of aircraft. Significant steps in this direction are expected from the use of (1) laser light to interrogate the FOG instead of broadband light, and (2) a hollow-core fiber (HCF) in the sensing coil instead of a conventional solid-core fiber. The use of a laser greatly improves the FOG's scale-factor stability and eliminates the source excess noise, while an HCF virtually eliminates the Kerr-induced drift and significantly reduces the thermal and Faraday-induced drifts. In this paper we present theoretical evidence that in a FOG with a 1085-m coil interrogated with a laser, the two main sources of noise and drift resulting from the use of coherent light can be reduced below the aircraft-navigation requirement by using a laser with a very broad linewidth, in excess of 40 GHz. We validate this concept with a laser broadened with an external phase modulator driven with a pseudo-random bit sequence at 2.8 GHz. This FOG has a measured noise of 0.00073 deg/√h, which is 30% below the aircraft-navigation requirement. Its measured drift is 0.03 deg/h, the lowest reported for a laser-driven FOG and only a factor of 3 larger than the navigation-grade specification. To illustrate the potential benefits of a hollow-core fiber in the FOG, this review also summarizes the previously reported performance of an experimental FOG utilizing 235 m of HCF and interrogated with broadband light.

  10. Developing target injection and tracking for inertial fusion energy power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodin, D. T.; Alexander, N. B.; Gibson, C. R.; Nobile, A.; Petzoldt, R. W.; Siegel, N. P.; Thompson, L.

    2001-05-01

    Fuelling of a commercial inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant consists of supplying about 500 000 fusion targets each day. The most challenging type of target in this regard is that for laser driven direct drive IFE power plants. Spherical capsules with cryogenic DT fuel must be injected into the centre of a reaction chamber operating at temperatures as high as 1500° C and possibly containing as much as 0.5 torr of xenon fill gas. The DT layer must remain highly symmetric, have a smooth inner ice surface finish and reach the chamber centre (CC) at a temperature of about 18.5 K. This target must be positioned at the centre of the chamber with a placement accuracy of +/-5 mm. The accuracy of alignment of the laser driver beams and the target in its final position must be within +/-20 μm. All this must be repeated six times per second. The method proposed to meet these requirements is to inject the targets into the reaction chamber at high speed ( approx 400 m/s), track them, and hit them in flight with steerable driver beams. The challenging scientific and technological issues associated with this task are being addressed through a combination of analyses, modelling, materials property measurements and demonstration tests with representative injection equipment. Measurements of relevant DT properties are planned at Los Alamos National Laboratory. An experimental target injection and tracking system is now being designed to support the development of survivable targets and demonstrate successful injection scenarios. Analyses of target heating are under way. Calculations have shown that a direct drive target must have a highly reflective outer surface to prevent excess heating by thermal radiation. In addition, heating by hot chamber fill gas during injection far outweighs that by the thermal radiation. It is concluded that the dry wall, gas filled reaction chambers must have gas pressures and wall temperatures less than previously assumed in order to prevent

  11. Neutronics Evaluation of Lithium-Based Ternary Alloys in IFE Blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Jolodosky, A.; Fratoni, M.

    2015-09-22

    , low electrical conductivity and therefore low MHD pressure drop, low chemical reactivity, and extremely low tritium inventory; the addition of sodium (FLiNaBe) has been considered because it retains the properties of FliBe but also lowers the melting point. Although many of these blanket concepts are promising, challenges still remain. The limited amount of beryllium available poses a problem for ceramic breeders such as the HCPB. FLiBe and FLiNaBe are highly viscous and have a low thermal conductivity. Lithium lead possesses a poor thermal conductivity which can cause problems in both DCLL and LiPb blankets. Additionally, the tritium permeation from these two blankets into plant components can be a problem and must be reduced. Consequently, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is attempting to develop a lithium-based alloy—most likely a ternary alloy—which maintains the beneficial properties of lithium (e.g. high tritium breeding and solubility) while reducing overall flammability concerns for use in the blanket of an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The LLNL concept employs inertial confinement fusion (ICF) through the use of lasers aimed at an indirect-driven target composed of deuterium-tritium fuel. The fusion driver/target design implements the same physics currently experimented at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The plant uses lithium in both the primary coolant and blanket; therefore, lithium-related hazards are of primary concern. Although reducing chemical reactivity is the primary motivation for the development of new lithium alloys, the successful candidates will have to guarantee acceptable performance in all their functions. The scope of this study is to evaluate the neutronics performance of a large number of lithium-based alloys in the blanket of the IFE engine and assess their properties upon activation. This manuscript is organized as follows: Section 12 presents the models and methodologies used for the analysis; Section

  12. Management of Primary Dysmenorrhea by School Adolescents in ILE-IFE, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunfowokan, Adesola A.; Babatunde, Oluwayemisi A.

    2010-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is a problem that girls and women face and often manage themselves with or without support from health professionals. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted among adolescents with dysmenorrhea (N = 150) in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The aims of the study were to determine their knowledge of menstruation and primary dysmenorrhea,…

  13. Parental Socio-Economic Status as Correlate of Child Labour in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elegbeleye, O. S.; Olasupo, M. O.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental socio-economic status and child labour practices in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The study employed survey method to gather data from 200 parents which constituted the study population. Pearson Product Moment Correlation and t-test statistics were used for the data analyses. The outcome of the study…

  14. SU-D-BRE-05: Feasibility and Limitations of Laser-Driven Proton Therapy: A Treatment Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, K; Wilkens, J; Masood, U; Pawelke, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Laser-acceleration of particles may offer a cost- and spaceefficient alternative for future radiation therapy with particles. Laser-driven particle beams are pulsed with very short bunch times, and a high number of particles is delivered within one laser shot which cannot be portioned or modulated during irradiation. The goal of this study was to examine whether good treatment plans can be produced for laser-driven proton beams and to investigate the feasibility of a laser-driven treatment unit. Methods: An exponentially decaying proton spectrum was tracked through a gantry and energy selection beam line design to produce multiple proton spectra with different energy widths centered on various nominal energies. These spectra were fed into a treatment planning system to calculate spot scanning proton plans using different lateral widths of the beam and different numbers of protons contained in the initial spectrum. The clinical feasibility of the resulting plans was analyzed in terms of dosimetric quality and the required number of laser shots as an estimation of the overall treatment time. Results: We were able to produce treatment plans with plan qualities of clinical relevance for a maximum initial proton number per laser shot of 6*10{sup 8}. However, the associated minimum number of laser shots was in the order of 10{sup 4}, indicating a long delivery time in the order of at least 15 minutes, when assuming an optimistic repetition rate of the laser system of 10 Hz. Conclusion: With the simulated beam line and the assumed shape of the proton spectrum it was impossible to produce clinically acceptable treatment plans that can be delivered in a reasonable time. The situation can be improved by a method or a device in the beam line which can modulate the number of protons from shot to shot. Supported by DFG Cluster of Excellence: Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics.

  15. Using Laser-driven Shocks to Study the Phase Diagrams Of Low-Z Materials at Mbar Pressures and eV Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Boehly, T. R.; Miller, J. E.; Brygoo, S.; Loubeyre, P.; McWilliams, R. S.; Jeanloz, R.

    2007-08-02

    Accurate phase diagrams for simple molecular fluids and solids (H2, He, H2O, SiO2, and C) and their constituent elements at eV temperatures and pressures up to tens of Mbar are integral to planetary models of the gas giant planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune), and the rocky planets. Laboratory experiments at high pressure have, until recently, been limited to around 1 Mbar. These pressures are usually achieved dynamically with explosives and two-stage light-gas guns, or statically with diamond anvil cells. Current and future high energy laser and pulsed power facilities will be able to produce tens of Mbar pressures in these light element materials. This presentation will describe the capabilities available at current high energy laser facilities to achieve these extreme conditions, and focus on several examples including water, silica, diamond-phase-carbon, helium and hydrogen. Under strong shock compression all of these materials become electronic conductors, and are transformed eventually to dense plasmas. The experiments reveal some details of the nature of this transition. To obtain high pressure data closer to planetary isentropes advanced compression techniques are required. We are developing a promising technique to achieve higher density states: precompression of samples in a static diamond anvil cell followed by laser driven shock compression. This technique and results from the first experiments with it will be described. Details about this topic can be found in some of our previous publications.

  16. In Situ Raman Monitoring of Silver(I)-Aided Laser-Driven Cleavage Reaction of Cyclobutane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengtai; Han, Xijiang; Du, Yunchen; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The cyclobutane cleavage reaction is an important process and has received continuous interest. Herein, we demonstrate the visible laser-driven cleavage reaction of cyclobutane in crystal form by using in situ Raman spectroscopy. Silver(I) coordination-induced strain and thermal effects from the laser irradiation are the two main driving forces for the cleavage of cyclobutane crystals. This work may open up a new avenue for studying cyclobutane cleavage reactions, as compared to the conventional routes using ex situ techniques. PMID:26510491

  17. Laser-Driven Coherent Betatron Oscillation in a Laser-Wakefield Cavity: Formation of Sinusoid Beam Shapes and Coherent Trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Li Yuelin; Shang Hairong; Harkay, Katherine C.; Shen Baifei; Crowell, Robert; Cary, John R.

    2009-01-22

    High amplitude coherent electron-trajectories have been seen in 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the colliding pulse injection scheme of laser-wakefield accelerators in the bubble regime, and explained as a consequence of laser-driven coherent betatron oscillation in our recent paper [K. Nemeth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 095002 (2008)]. In the present paper we provide more details on the shape of the trajectories, their relationship to the phase velocity of the laser and indicate the dependence of the phenomenon on the accuracy of the numerical representation and choice of laser/plasma parameters.

  18. Full-Trajectory Diagnosis of Laser-Driven Radiative Blast Waves in Search of Thermal Plasma Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Lazarus, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Robinson, J. S.; Smith, R. A.; Plant, T. J. A.; Symes, D. R.; Dunne, M.

    2008-02-08

    Experimental investigations into the dynamics of cylindrical, laser-driven, high-Mach-number shocks are used to study the thermal cooling instability predicted to occur in astrophysical radiative blast waves. A streaked Schlieren technique measures the full blast-wave trajectory on a single-shot basis, which is key for observing shock velocity oscillations. Electron density profiles and deceleration parameters associated with radiative blast waves were recorded, enabling the calculation of important blast-wave parameters including the fraction of radiated energy, {epsilon}, as a function of time for comparison with radiation-hydrodynamics simulations.

  19. Full-trajectory diagnosis of laser-driven radiative blast waves in search of thermal plasma instabilities.

    PubMed

    Moore, A S; Gumbrell, E T; Lazarus, J; Hohenberger, M; Robinson, J S; Smith, R A; Plant, T J A; Symes, D R; Dunne, M

    2008-02-01

    Experimental investigations into the dynamics of cylindrical, laser-driven, high-Mach-number shocks are used to study the thermal cooling instability predicted to occur in astrophysical radiative blast waves. A streaked Schlieren technique measures the full blast-wave trajectory on a single-shot basis, which is key for observing shock velocity oscillations. Electron density profiles and deceleration parameters associated with radiative blast waves were recorded, enabling the calculation of important blast-wave parameters including the fraction of radiated energy, epsilon, as a function of time for comparison with radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. PMID:18352379

  20. Laser-driven shock experiments in pre-compressed water: Implications for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K; Benedetti, L R; Jeanloz, R; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Moon, S J; Mackinnon, A; Henry, E; Koenig, M; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Collins, G W

    2005-11-10

    Laser-driven shock compression of pre-compressed water (up to 1 GPa precompression) produces high-pressure, -temperature conditions in the water inducing two optical phenomena: opacity and reflectivity in the initially transparent water. The onset of reflectivity at infrared wavelengths can be interpreted as a semi-conductor to electronic conductor transition in water and is found at pressures above {approx}130 GPa for single-shocked samples pre-compressed to 1 GPa. This electronic conduction provides an additional contribution to the conductivity required for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets like Uranus and Neptune.

  1. Addressing Key Science and Technology Issues for IFE Chambers, Target Fabrication and Target Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Goodin, D T; Nobile, A; Besenbruch, G; Haynes, D; Hoffer, J; Latkowski, J; Maxwell, J; Najmabadi, F; Nikroo, A; Peterson, P; Petzoldt, R; Rickman, W; Sethian, J; Steckle, W; Stephens, E; Tillack, M; Ying, A; Yoda, M

    2002-09-25

    Significant progress has been made in addressing critical issues for high repetition rate chambers, target fabrication and injection for inertial fusion energy (IFE) for both heavy ion and laser drivers. Research is being conducted in a coordinated manner by national laboratories, universities and industry. This paper provides an overview of U.S. research activities and discusses how interface considerations (such as beam propagation and target survival during injection) impact design choices.

  2. Traumatic spinal cord injuries in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, and its environs.

    PubMed

    Olasode, Babatunde J; Komolafe, I E; Komolafe, M; Olasode, Olayinka A

    2006-07-01

    In Ile-Ife, Nigeria, traumatic brain injuries are largely due to traffic accidents caused mainly by the bad maintenance of the roads and unsafe driving. Young men in the productive stage of their lives are those most affected. The resultant disabilities include quadriplegia (in more than half the patients) and paraplegia. The cost of treating and providing adequate facilities for these patients imposes a heavy economic burden upon developing countries.

  3. The solenoidal transport option: IFE drivers, near term research facilities, and beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Briggs, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    Solenoidal magnets have been used as the beam transport system in all the high current electron induction accelerators that have been built in the past several decades. They have also been considered for the front end transport system for heavy ion accelerators for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) drivers, but this option has received very little attention in recent years. The analysis reported here was stimulated mainly by the recent effort to define an affordable {open_quotes}Integrated Research Experiment{close_quotes} (IRE) that can meet the near term needs of the IFE program. The 1996 FESAC IFE review panel agreed that an integrated experiment is needed to fully resolve IFE heavy ion driver science and technology issues; specifically, {open_quotes}the basic beam dynamics issues in the accelerator, the final focusing and transport issues in a reactor-relevant beam parameter regime, and the target heating phenomenology{close_quotes}. The development of concepts that can meet these technical objectives and still stay within the severe cost constraints all new fusion proposals will encounter is a formidable challenge. Solenoidal transport has a very favorable scaling as the particle mass is decreased (the main reason why it is preferred for electrons in the region below 50 MeV). This was recognized in a recent conceptual study of high intensity induction linac-based proton accelerators for Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technologies, where solenoidal transport was chosen for the front end. Reducing the ion mass is an obvious scaling to exploit in an IRE design, since the output beam voltage will necessarily be much lower than that of a full scale driver, so solenoids should certainly be considered as one option for this experiment as well.

  4. Scaled impulse loading for liquid hydraulic response in IFE thick-liquid chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantzen, C.; Peterson, P. F.

    2001-05-01

    In an inertial fusion energy (IFE) target chamber using thick-liquid protection, placing liquid surfaces close to the fusion target helps to reduce pumping cost and final-focus stand-off distance. The impulse loading generated by the target on the adjacent jet surfaces provides the most important boundary condition for the subsequent liquid hydraulic response, pocket disruption, droplet generation, and pocket clearing and regeneration. However, liquid jets are difficult to use in current X-ray facilities that can simulate the X-ray ablation process. Instead, it is desirable to study liquid hydraulic response using water jets, employing scaled impulse loads delivered by chemical detonations or shock tubes. Because the pressure load generated by IFE targets is extremely short compared to the time required for significant liquid motion, only the time integrated impulse load is important to the liquid motion, not the detailed pressure history from ablation and venting. In this work, this impulse loading is determined using the 2-D gas dynamic code, TSUNAMI, and a comparison made between the impulse loads generated by IFE targets and by scaled chemical detonations.

  5. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    importance for the fusion power plant research programmes. The objective of this Technical Meeting was to examine in an integrated way all the safety aspects anticipated to be relevant to the first fusion power plant prototype expected to become operational by the middle of the century, leading to the first generation of economically viable fusion power plants with attractive S&E features. After screening by guest editors and consideration by referees, 13 (out of 28) papers were accepted for publication. They are devoted to the following safety topics: power plant safety; fusion specific operational safety approaches; test blanket modules; accident analysis; tritium safety and inventories; decommissioning and waste. The paper `Main safety issues at the transition from ITER to fusion power plants' by W. Gulden et al (EU) highlights the differences between ITER and future fusion power plants with magnetic confinement (off-site dose acceptance criteria, consequences of accidents inside and outside the design basis, occupational radiation exposure, and waste management, including recycling and/or final disposal in repositories) on the basis of the most recent European fusion power plant conceptual study. Ongoing S&E studies within the US inertial fusion energy (IFE) community are focusing on two design concepts. These are the high average power laser (HAPL) programme for development of a dry-wall, laser-driven IFE power plant, and the Z-pinch IFE programme for the production of an economically-attractive power plant using high-yield Z-pinch-driven targets. The main safety issues related to these programmes are reviewed in the paper `Status of IFE safety and environmental activities in the US' by S. Reyes et al (USA). The authors propose future directions of research in the IFE S&E area. In the paper `Recent accomplishments and future directions in the US Fusion Safety & Environmental Program' D. Petti et al (USA) state that the US fusion programme has long recognized that the S

  6. Spatial and temporal translational control of germ cell mRNAs mediated by the eIF4E isoform IFE-1.

    PubMed

    Friday, Andrew J; Henderson, Melissa A; Morrison, J Kaitlin; Hoffman, Jenna L; Keiper, Brett D

    2015-12-15

    Regulated mRNA translation is vital for germ cells to produce new proteins in the spatial and temporal patterns that drive gamete development. Translational control involves the de-repression of stored mRNAs and their recruitment by eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) to ribosomes. C. elegans expresses five eIF4Es (IFE-1-IFE-5); several have been shown to selectively recruit unique pools of mRNA. Individual IFE knockouts yield unique phenotypes due to inefficient translation of certain mRNAs. Here, we identified mRNAs preferentially translated through the germline-specific eIF4E isoform IFE-1. Differential polysome microarray analysis identified 77 mRNAs recruited by IFE-1. Among the IFE-1-dependent mRNAs are several required for late germ cell differentiation and maturation. Polysome association of gld-1, vab-1, vpr-1, rab-7 and rnp-3 mRNAs relies on IFE-1. Live animal imaging showed IFE-1-dependent selectivity in spatial and temporal translation of germline mRNAs. Altered MAPK activation in oocytes suggests dual roles for IFE-1, both promoting and suppressing oocyte maturation at different stages. This single eIF4E isoform exerts positive, selective translational control during germ cell differentiation.

  7. The Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) for OSI - Experiences from IFE14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestermann, Nicolai; Sick, Benjamin; Häge, Martin; Blake, Thomas; Labak, Peter; Joswig, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    An on-site inspection (OSI) is the third of four elements of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The sole purpose of an OSI is to confirm whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of the treaty and to gather any facts which might assist in identifying any possible violator. It thus constitutes the final verification measure under the CTBT if all other available measures are not able to confirm the nature of a suspicious event. The Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) carried out the Integrated Field Exercise 2014 (IFE14) in the Dead Sea Area of Jordan from 3 November to 9. December 2014. It was a fictitious OSI whose aim was to test the inspection capabilities in an integrated manner. The technologies allowed during an OSI are listed in the Treaty. The aim of the Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) is to detect and localize aftershocks of low magnitudes of the triggering event or collapses of underground cavities. The locations of these events are expected in the vicinity of a possible previous explosion and help to narrow down the search area within an inspection area (IA) of an OSI. The success of SAMS depends on the main elements, hardware, software, deployment strategy, the search logic and not least the effective use of personnel. All elements of SAMS were tested and improved during the Built-Up Exercises (BUE) which took place in Austria and Hungary. IFE14 provided more realistic climatic and hazardous terrain conditions with limited resources. Significant variations in topography of the IA of IFE14 in the mountainous Dead Sea Area of Jordan led to considerable challenges which were not expected from experiences encountered during BUE. The SAMS uses mini arrays with an aperture of about 100 meters and with a total of 4 elements. The station network deployed during IFE14 and results of the data analysis will be presented. Possible aftershocks of

  8. Enhanced electron injection in laser-driven bubble acceleration by ultra-intense laser irradiating foil-gas targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Bo; Ma, Yan-Yun; Xu, Han; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Chen, Min; Yu, Tong-Pu; Zou, De-Bin; Liu, Jian-Xun; Yan, Jian-Feng; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Gan, Long-Fei; Tian, Li-Chao; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Yin, Yan; Kawata, S.

    2015-08-01

    A scheme for enhancing the electron injection charge in a laser-driven bubble acceleration is proposed. In this scheme, a thin foil target is placed in front of a gas target. Upon interaction with an ultra-intense laser pulse, the foil emits electrons with large longitudinal momenta, allowing them to be trapped into the transmitted shaped laser-excited bubble in the gaseous plasma target. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to demonstrate this scheme, and an electron beam with a total electron number of 4.21 × 10 8 μ m - 1 can be produced, which is twice the number of electrons produced without the foil. Such scheme may be widely used for applications that require high electron yields such as positron and gamma ray generation from relativistic electron beams interacting with solid targets.

  9. Study on the dynamic behavior of matters using laser-driven shock waves in the water confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Yoh, Jack J.

    2015-06-01

    The strain rates achievable in laser-driven shock experiments overlap with gas gun and can reach much higher values. The laser-based method also has advantages in terms of system size, cost, repeatability, and controllability. In this research, we aim to measure equation of state, Hugoniot elastic limit, strain rate, and compressive yield strength of target samples by making use of the velocity interferometer or the VISAR. High pressure shock wave is generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm wavelength with pulse energy up to 3 joules and 9 ns pulse duration. All the experiments are conducted in the water confinement to increase the peak stresses to an order of GPa. Furthermore, quantitative comparisons are made to the existing shock data in order to emphasize the novelty of the proposed setup which is relatively simple and reliable. Corresponding author.

  10. Laser-driven microflow-induced bistable orientation of a nematic liquid crystal in perfluoropolymer-treated unrubbed cells.

    PubMed

    Jampani, V S R; Skarabot, M; Takezoe, H; Muševič, I; Dhara, S

    2013-01-14

    We demonstrate laser-driven microflow-induced orientational change (homeotropic to planar) in a dye-doped nematic liquid crystal. The homeotropic to planar director alignment is achieved in unrubbed cells in the thermal hysteresis range of a discontinuous anchoring reorientation transition due to the local heating by light absorption in dye-doped sample. Various bistable patterns were recorded in the cell by a programmable laser tweezers. The width of the patterns depend on the scanning speed of the tightly focussed laser beam and the minimum width obtained is approximately equal to 0.57μm which is about 35 times smaller than the earlier report in the rubbed cells. We show that the motion of the microbeam spot causes local flow as a result the liquid crystal director is aligned along that direction. PMID:23388965

  11. First Observations of Laser-Driven Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in a Semi-Infinite Vacuum Space

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Smith, T.I.; Colby, E.; Cowan, B.; Sears, C.M.S.; Spencer, J.E.; Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2006-02-17

    We have observed acceleration of relativistic electrons in vacuum driven by a linearly polarized visible laser beam incident on a thin gold-coated reflective boundary. The observed energy modulation effect follows all the characteristics expected for linear acceleration caused by a longitudinal electric field. As predicted by the Lawson-Woodward theorem the laser driven modulation only appears in the presence of the boundary. It shows a linear dependence with the strength of the electric field of the laser beam and also it is critically dependent on the laser polarization. Finally, it appears to follow the expected angular dependence of the inverse transition radiation process. experiment as the Laser Electron Accelerator Project (LEAP).

  12. P-ρ-T measurements of H2O up to 260 GPa under laser-driven shock loading.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Ozaki, N; Sano, T; Okuchi, T; Sano, T; Shimizu, K; Miyanishi, K; Terai, T; Kakeshita, T; Sakawa, Y; Kodama, R

    2015-04-28

    Pressure, density, and temperature data for H2O were obtained up to 260 GPa by using laser-driven shock compression technique. The shock compression technique combined with the diamond anvil cell was used to assess the equation of state models for the P-ρ-T conditions for both the principal Hugoniot and the off-Hugoniot states. The contrast between the models allowed for a clear assessment of the equation of state models. Our P-ρ-T data totally agree with those of the model based on quantum molecular dynamics calculations. These facts indicate that this model is adopted as the standard for modeling interior structures of Neptune, Uranus, and exoplanets in the liquid phase in the multi-Mbar range. PMID:25933771

  13. Time-resolved x-ray scattering measurements of shock propagation in laser-driven CH foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbrel, Benjamin; Koenig, Michel; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Brambrink, Erik; Brown, Colin; Khattak, Fida; Nagler, Bob; Rabec-Le-Gloaec, Marc; Spindloe, Chris; Tolley, Marc; Vinko, Samuel; Riley, David; Wark, Justin; Gregori, Gianluca

    2008-11-01

    We have performed time-resolved x-ray scattering measurements in the warm dense matter regime at the LULI 2000 laser facility (Ecole Polytechnique, France). The laser-driven shocked CH samples were probed with 30ps, 8keV Cu Kalpha radiation, delayed with respect to the shock propagation. The angularly resolved scattered x-ray signal, collected over a wide angle range (25-55 degrees), gives access to the plasma structure factor. For the first time, the use of a short pulse x-ray source allows ourselves to probe the microscopic properties of WDM at different plasma conditions as the shock travels. Spectrum shows evidence of strong coupling behaviour in the CH plasma. Results are compared to simulations taking account strong coupling effect and appropriate multi ionic-species treatment. The data analysis and the models used will be presented and discussed.

  14. Direct laser-driven ramp compression studies of iron: A first step toward the reproduction of planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Guyot, F.; Mazevet, S.; Morard, G.; de Resseguier, T.; Vinci, T.; Myanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Boehly, T.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Koenig, M.

    2013-06-01

    The study of iron under quasi-isentropic compression using high energy lasers, might allow to understand its thermodynamical properties, in particular its melting line in conditions of pressure and temperature relevant to Earth-like planetary cores (330-1500 GPa, 5000-8000 K). However, the iron alpha-epsilon solid-solid phase transition at 13 GPa favors shock formation during the quasi-isentropic compression process which can depart from the appropriate thermodynamical path. Understanding this shock formation mechanism is a key issue for being able to reproduce Earth-like planetary core conditions in the laboratory by ramp compression. In this article, we will present recent results of direct laser-driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments on iron samples obtained on the LULI 2000 and LIL laser facilities.

  15. P-ρ-T measurements of H2O up to 260 GPa under laser-driven shock loading.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Ozaki, N; Sano, T; Okuchi, T; Sano, T; Shimizu, K; Miyanishi, K; Terai, T; Kakeshita, T; Sakawa, Y; Kodama, R

    2015-04-28

    Pressure, density, and temperature data for H2O were obtained up to 260 GPa by using laser-driven shock compression technique. The shock compression technique combined with the diamond anvil cell was used to assess the equation of state models for the P-ρ-T conditions for both the principal Hugoniot and the off-Hugoniot states. The contrast between the models allowed for a clear assessment of the equation of state models. Our P-ρ-T data totally agree with those of the model based on quantum molecular dynamics calculations. These facts indicate that this model is adopted as the standard for modeling interior structures of Neptune, Uranus, and exoplanets in the liquid phase in the multi-Mbar range.

  16. Laser-driven γ-ray, positron, and neutron source from ultra-intense laser-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Hayakawa, Takehito

    2015-08-15

    In ultra-intense laser-matter interactions, γ-rays are effectively generated via the radiation reaction effect. Since a significant fraction of the laser energy is converted into γ-rays, understanding of the energy transport inside of the target is important. We have developed a Particle-in-Cell code which includes generation of the γ-rays, their energy transport, and photo-nuclear reactions. Using the code, we have investigated the characteristics of the quantum beams generated by the transport of the laser-driven γ-rays. It is shown that collimated, mono-energetic positron beams with hundreds of MeV are generated by using thick targets. Neutron beams are also effectively generated by using beryllium targets via photo-nuclear reactions. These lead to the proposal of quantum beam sources of γ-rays, positrons, and neutrons with distinctive characters, which are selectively generated by choosing target conditions.

  17. High-Precision Measurements of the Equation of State of Polymers at 100 to 1000 GPa Using Laser-Driven Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M. A.

    2009-11-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of materials at extreme temperatures and pressures is of interest to astrophysics, high-energy-density physics, and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The high-pressure (>100 GPa) behavior of polymer materials is essential to the understanding of ablator materials for ignition targets. EOS measurements on CHx provide benchmarks on the behavior of polymers under extreme conditions and the effect of stoichiometry (i.e., the C:H ratio) on that behavior. High-power lasers produce shock pressures greater than 100 GPa, and recent advances in diagnostics and analysis have made it possible to perform highly accurate measurements of shock velocity. This improves upon the impedance-matching technique for laser-driven shock experiments, producing ˜1% precision at extreme pressures. The OMEGA laser is used to produce principal (single-shock) Hugoniot EOS measurements on polystyrene (CH), polypropylene (CH2), GDP (C43H56O), and Ge-doped GDP at shock pressures of ˜100 to 1000 GPa. We also present a novel target design that provides double-shock (re-shock) data together with the above data. These data are pertinent to ICF target designs that use multiple shocks to approximate an isentropic compression. Results of the single- and double-shock experiments on these polymers are presented and compared to various EOS models. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with T.R. Boehly, D.E. Fratanduono, D.D. Meyerhofer (LLE), D.G. Hicks, P.M. Celliers, and G.W. Collins (LLNL).

  18. Hydrophobic anticancer drug delivery by a 980 nm laser-driven photothermal vehicle for efficient synergistic therapy of cancer cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dong, Kai; Liu, Zhen; Li, Zhenhua; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-08-27

    A novel 980 nm laser-driven hydrophobic anticancer drug-delivery platform based on hollow CuS nanoparticles is constructed in this work. The excellent synergistic therapy combining drug treatment and photothermal ablation of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo is demonstrated, which opens up new opportunities for biological and medical applications.

  19. Idiopathic Focal Eosinophilic Enteritis (IFEE), an Emerging Cause of Abdominal Pain in Horses: The Effect of Age, Time and Geographical Location on Risk

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Debra C.; Costain, Deborah A.; Sherlock, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background Idiopathic focal eosinophilic enteritis (IFEE) is an emerging cause of abdominal pain (colic) in horses that frequently requires surgical intervention to prevent death. The epidemiology of IFEE is poorly understood and it is difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. The aetiology of this condition and methods of possible prevention are currently unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate temporal and spatial heterogeneity in IFEE risk and to ascertain the effect of horse age on risk. Methodology/Principal Findings A retrospective, nested case-control study was undertaken using data from 85 IFEE cases and 848 randomly selected controls admitted to a UK equine hospital for exploratory laparotomy to investigate the cause of colic over a 10-year period. Generalised additive models (GAMs) were used to quantify temporal and age effects on the odds of IFEE and to provide mapped estimates of ‘residual’ risk over the study region. The relative risk of IFEE increased over the study period (p = 0.001) and a seasonal pattern was evident (p<0.01) with greatest risk of IFEE being identified between the months of July and November. IFEE risk decreased with increasing age (p<0.001) with younger (0–5 years old) horses being at greatest risk. The mapped surface estimate exhibited significantly atypical sub-regions (p<0.001) with increased IFEE risk in horses residing in the North-West of the study region. Conclusions/Significance IFEE was found to exhibit both spatial and temporal variation in risk and is more likely to occur in younger horses. This information may help to identify horses at increased risk of IFEE, provide clues about the aetiology of this condition and to identify areas that require further research. PMID:25463382

  20. Radioactivity in the community water supplies of Ife-Central and Ife-East local government areas of Osun State, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchokossa, P.; Olomo, J. B.; Osibote, O. A.

    1999-02-01

    The average concentrations of radionuclides in the various types of community water supplies of the Ife-Central and Ife-East Local Government areas with a population of 200 000 people were estimated from the measurements of mean specific activity using a well-calibrated Canberra vertical coaxial high-purity germanium detector system. Water samples were collected from dam, streams, boreholes, wells, tap water, etc., being the most frequently used water sources in the study area. The radionuclides observed with reliable regularity belonged to the series - decay naturally occurring radionuclides headed by 238U and 232Th as well as the non-series nuclide, 40K. The average specific activity values obtained for 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K, respectively, were 8.67±4.28, 2.31±1.48 and 98.99±6.23 Bq l -1 for well water; 12.45±3.39, 3.02±0.64 and 97.46±6.35 Bq l -1 for borehole water; 12.41±1.37, 2.47±0.09 and 85.06±17.27 Bq l -1 for tap water; 10.40±1.70, 2.70±1.30 and 72.60±9.10 Bq l -1 for dam water; 7.04±0.66, 3.55±0.13 and 69.18±20.80 Bq l -1 for stream water.

  1. Modeling Laser Effects on the Final Optics in Simulated IFE Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr Ghoniem

    2004-08-14

    When laser light interacts with a material's surface, photons rapidly heat the electronic system, resulting in very fast energy transfer to the underlying atomic crystal structure. The intense rate of energy deposition in the shallow sub-surface layer creates atomic defects, which alter the optical characteristics of the surface itself. In addition, the small fraction of energy absorbed in the mirror leads to its global deformation by thermal and gravity loads (especially for large surface area mirrors). The aim of this research was to model the deformation of mirror surfaces at multiple length and time scales for applications in advanced Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) systems. The goal is to control micro- and macro-deformations by material system and structural design. A parallel experimental program at UCSD has been set up to validate the modeling efforts. The main objective of the research program was to develop computer models and simulations for Laser-Induced Damage (LID) in reflective and transmissive final optical elements in IFE laser-based systems. A range of materials and material concepts were investigated and verified by experiments at UCSD. Four different classes of materials were considered: (1) High-reflectivity FCC metals (e.g. Cu, Au, Ag, and Al), (2) BCC metals (e.g. Mo, Ta and W), (3) Advanced material concepts (e.g. functionally graded material systems, amorphous coatings, and layered structures), and (4) Transmissive dielectrics (e.g. fused SiO2). In this report, we give a summary of the three-year project, followed by details in three areas: (1) Characterization of laser-induced damage; (2) Theory development for LIDT; and (3) Design of IFE reflective laser mirrors.

  2. Geometric and blast effects of thin film cavity protection schemes for IFE reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, N.B.; Ying, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    The flow of thin liquid films of liquids in geometric orientations and under blast conditions of an IFE reactor chamber is investigated. A inertial jet on an inverted hemispherical surface, indicative of the PROMETHEUS design, is modeled with a 1-D analysis. The behavior of the film and the conditions for adhesion of the jet are explored. Also, vertical film flow is modeled with a 2-D fluid code that tracts the free surface. A test case is presented where the development of a wavy surface is seen. This surface is subjected to pressure pulses typical of reactor cavity gas fluctuations and the surface is seen to be disrupted.

  3. Analyses in Support of Z-IFE LLNL Progress Report for FY-05

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W; Abbott, R P; Callahan, D A; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Reyes, S

    2005-10-17

    The FY04 LLNL study of Z-IFE [1] proposed and evaluated a design that deviated from SNL's previous baseline design. The FY04 study included analyses of shock mitigation, stress in the first wall, neutronics and systems studies. In FY05, the subject of this report, we build on our work and the theme of last year. Our emphasis continues to be on alternatives that hold promise of considerable improvements in design and economics compared to the base-line design. Our key results are summarized here.

  4. Laser driven terahertz generation in hot plasma with step density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manoj Jeong, Young Uk; Tripathi, Vipin Kumar

    2015-06-15

    An analytical formalism of terahertz (THz) radiation generation by beating of two lasers in a hot plasma with step density profile is developed. The lasers propagate obliquely to plasma surface normal, and the nonlinearity arises through the ponderomotive force. The THz is emitted in the specular reflection direction, and the yield is enhanced due to coupling with the Langmuir wave when the plasma frequency is close to THz frequency. The power conversion efficiency maximizes at an optimum angle of incidence.

  5. Mechanical response and fatigue analysis of the first wall of the prometheus IFE reactor

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, A.; Ghoniem, N.M.

    1994-12-31

    Following the micro explosions in an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) reactor, the first wall structures are subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loads, which result in stresses and displacements that vary with time. In the Prometheus IFE reactor the first wall is protected by a flowing thin film of liquid lead. The mechanical loading on the first wall includes two different mechanisms: (1) surface ablation momentum due to the early deposition of x-rays and the instantaneous evaporation of the protecting film, at the instant of the micro explosion, and (2) time dependent pressure due to propagating pressure waves that travel between the first wall and the center of the reactor chamber. Careful determination of the resulting stresses in the first wall structures helps choose and design these structures for maximum fatigue life time. In the present work, a solution of the equation of motion of the first wall structural elements and the associated stresses and displacements is presented. It is found that segmentation of the first wall into smaller plates minimizes the resulting stresses and, in turn, prolongs the fatigue life time of the first wall.

  6. Propulsion Utilizing Laser-Driven Ponderomotive Fields for Deep-Space Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, George J.; Gilland, James H.

    2009-03-16

    The generation of large amplitude electric fields in plasmas by high-power lasers has been studied for several years in the context of high-energy particle acceleration. Fields on the order of GeV/m are generated in the plasma wake of the laser by non-linear ponderomotive forces. The laser fields generate longitudinal and translational electron plasma waves with phase velocities close to the speed of light. These fields and velocities offer the potential to revolutionize spacecraft propulsion, leading to extended deep space robotic probes. Based on these initial calculations, plasma acceleration by means of laser-induced ponderomotive forces appears to offer significant potential for spacecraft propulsion. Relatively high-efficiencies appear possible with proper beam conditioning, resulting in an order of magnitude more thrust than alternative concepts for high I{sub SP} (>10{sup 5} s) and elimination of the primary life-limiting erosion phenomena associated with conventional electric propulsion systems. Ponderomotive propulsion readily lends itself to beamed power which might overcome some of the constraints of power-limited propulsion concepts. A preliminary assessment of the impact of these propulsion systems for several promising configurations on mission architectures has been conducted. Emphasizing interstellar and interstellar-precursor applications, performance and technical requirements are identified for a number of missions. The use of in-situ plasma and gas for propellant is evaluated as well.

  7. Propulsion Utilizing Laser-Driven Ponderomotive Fields for Deep-Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, George J.; Gilland, James H.

    2009-03-01

    The generation of large amplitude electric fields in plasmas by high-power lasers has been studied for several years in the context of high-energy particle acceleration. Fields on the order of GeV/m are generated in the plasma wake of the laser by non-linear ponderomotive forces. The laser fields generate longitudinal and translational electron plasma waves with phase velocities close to the speed of light. These fields and velocities offer the potential to revolutionize spacecraft propulsion, leading to extended deep space robotic probes. Based on these initial calculations, plasma acceleration by means of laser-induced ponderomotive forces appears to offer significant potential for spacecraft propulsion. Relatively high-efficiencies appear possible with proper beam conditioning, resulting in an order of magnitude more thrust than alternative concepts for high ISP (>105 s) and elimination of the primary life-limiting erosion phenomena associated with conventional electric propulsion systems. Ponderomotive propulsion readily lends itself to beamed power which might overcome some of the constraints of power-limited propulsion concepts. A preliminary assessment of the impact of these propulsion systems for several promising configurations on mission architectures has been conducted. Emphasizing interstellar and interstellar-precursor applications, performance and technical requirements are identified for a number of missions. The use of in-situ plasma and gas for propellant is evaluated as well.

  8. High-power laser-driven source of ultra-short X-ray and gamma-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.

    2009-11-01

    A novel ultra-bright high-intensity source of X-ray and gamma radiation is suggested. It is based on the double Doppler effect, where a relativistic flying mirror reflects a counter-propagating electromagnetic radiation causing its frequency multiplication and intensification, and on the inverse double Doppler effect, where the mirror acquires energy from an ultra-intense co-propagating electromagnetic wave. The role of the flying mirror is played by a high-density thin plasma slab accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime. Frequencies of high harmonics generated at the flying mirror by a relativistically strong counter-propagating radiation udergo multiplication with the same factor as the fundamental frequency of the reflected radiation, approximately equal to the quadruple of the square of the mirror Lorentz factor.

  9. Laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science: launch and target impact probed by photon Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Alexander D; Banishev, Alexandr A; Shaw, William L; Dlott, Dana D

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the launch and target impact of laser-driven Al flyer plates using photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). We studied different flyer designs launched by laser pulses of different energies, pulse durations and beam diameters, that produced km s(-1) impacts with transparent target materials. Laser-launching Al flyers 25-100 μm thick cemented to glass substrates is usually thought to involve laser vaporization of a portion of the flyer, which creates many difficulties associated with loss of integrity and heating of the flyer material. However, in the system used here, the launch mechanism was surprising and unexpected: it involved optical damage at the glass/cement/flyer interface, with very little laser light reaching the flyer itself. In fact the flyers launched in this manner behaved almost identically to multilayer flyers that were optically shielded from the laser pulses and insulated from heat generated by the pulses. Launching flyers with nanosecond laser pulses creates undesirable reverberating shocks in the flyer. In some cases, with 10 ns launch pulses, the thickest flyers were observed to lose integrity. But with stretched 20 ns pulses, we showed that the reverberations damped out prior to impact with targets, and that the flyers maintained their integrity during flight. Flyer impacts with salt, glass, fused silica, and acrylic polymer were studied by PDV, and the durations of fully supported shocks in those media were determined, and could be varied from 5 to 23 ns.

  10. Laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science: Launch and target impact probed by photon Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Alexander D.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Shaw, William L.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the launch and target impact of laser-driven Al flyer plates using photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). We studied different flyer designs launched by laser pulses of different energies, pulse durations and beam diameters, that produced km s-1 impacts with transparent target materials. Laser-launching Al flyers 25-100 μm thick cemented to glass substrates is usually thought to involve laser vaporization of a portion of the flyer, which creates many difficulties associated with loss of integrity and heating of the flyer material. However, in the system used here, the launch mechanism was surprising and unexpected: it involved optical damage at the glass/cement/flyer interface, with very little laser light reaching the flyer itself. In fact the flyers launched in this manner behaved almost identically to multilayer flyers that were optically shielded from the laser pulses and insulated from heat generated by the pulses. Launching flyers with nanosecond laser pulses creates undesirable reverberating shocks in the flyer. In some cases, with 10 ns launch pulses, the thickest flyers were observed to lose integrity. But with stretched 20 ns pulses, we showed that the reverberations damped out prior to impact with targets, and that the flyers maintained their integrity during flight. Flyer impacts with salt, glass, fused silica, and acrylic polymer were studied by PDV, and the durations of fully supported shocks in those media were determined, and could be varied from 5 to 23 ns.

  11. The initiation of high surface area Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate using fiber-coupled laser-driven flyer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, M. D.; Drake, R. C.

    2007-09-01

    A system for launching flyer plates using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been developed for shock initiation of secondary explosives. Flyer plates have been launched at velocities exceeding 4 km s -1. These flyers produce sub-nanosecond duration shocks in excess of 30 GPa on impact. Flyer planarity and integrity have been studied by impacting polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) windows and using a high-speed streak camera to record the light generated. Analysis of this data has provided an insight of the key mechanisms and enabled the system attributes to be controlled and optimized for explosive initiation. Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) has been tested with specific surface areas (SSA) ranging from 12,700 cm2 g -1 to 25,100 cm2 g -1 and the effect of SSA on initiation threshold in this extremely short duration shock regime is examined. A minimum surface area size for initiation is evident. Calculations show that the pulse width is on the order of the particle size. We observed partial reactions in some firings, and we propose a mechanism to explain this. The normalized initiation thresholds are compared to electrical slapper thresholds on the same explosives, and these data have been used to evaluate P2τ for both laser driven flyer plates and electrically driven flyer plates. The critical energy fluence calculated is compared to published values and discussed for similar systems.

  12. An efficient, selective collisional ejection mechanism for inner-shell population inversion in laser-driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    SCHROEDER,W. ANDREAS; NELSON,THOMAS R.; BORISOV,A.B.; LONGWORTH,J.W.; BOYER,K.; RHODES,C.K.

    2000-06-07

    A theoretical analysis of laser-driven collisional ejection of inner-shell electrons is presented to explain the previously observed anomalous kilovolt L-shell x-ray emission spectra from atomic Xe cluster targets excited by intense sub-picosecond 248nrn ultraviolet radiation. For incident ponderomotively-driven electrons photoionized by strong above threshold ionization, the collisional ejection mechanism is shown to be highly l-state and significantly n-state (i.e. radially) selective for time periods shorter than the collisional dephasing time of the photoionized electronic wavefunction. The resulting preference for the collisional ejection of 2p electrons by an ionized 4p state produces the measured anomalous Xe(L) emission which contains direct evidence for (i) the generation of Xe{sup 27+}(2p{sup 5}3d{sup 10}) and Xe{sup 28+}(2p{sup 5}3d{sup 9}) ions exhibiting inner-shell population inversion and (ii) a coherent correlated electron state collision responsible for the production of double 2p vacancies. For longer time periods, the selectivity of this coherent impact ionization mechanism is rapidly reduced by the combined effects of intrinsic quantum mechanical spreading and dephasing--in agreement with the experimentally observed and extremely strong {minus}{lambda}{sup {minus}6} pump-laser wavelength dependence of the efficiency of inner-shell (2p) vacancy production in Xe clusters excited in underdense plasmas.

  13. A bright attosecond x-ray pulse train generation in a double-laser-driven cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Luo, Wen; Yin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the generation of a high-brightness attosecond x-ray pulse train in a double-laser-driven cone target. The scheme makes use of two lasers: the first high-intensity laser with a laser peak intensity 1.37 × 1020 W/cm2 irradiates the cone and produces overdense attosecond electron bunches; the second counterpropagating weakly relativistic laser with a laser peak intensity 4.932 × 1017 W/cm2 interacts with the produced electron bunches and a bright x-ray pulse train is generated by Thomson backscattering of the second laser off the attosecond electron bunches. It is shown that the photon flux rises by 5 times using the cone target as compared with a normal channel. Meanwhile, the x-ray peak brightness increases significantly from 1.4 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV) to 6.0 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV), which is much higher than that of the Thomson x-ray source generated from traditional accelerators. We also discuss the influence of the laser and target parameters on the x-ray pulse properties. This compact bright x-ray source may have diverse applications, e.g., the study of electric dynamics and harmonics emission in the atomic scale.

  14. Simulation study of enhancing laser-driven multi-keV line-radiation through application of external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. Elijah; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Koning, J. M.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven, spectrally tailored, high-flux x-ray sources have been developed over the past decade for testing the radiation hardness of materials used in various civilian, space and military applications. The optimal electron temperatures for these x-ray sources occur around twice the desired photon energy. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, the available energy can produce plasmas with ~ 10keV electron temperatures which result in highly-efficient ~ 5keV radiation but less than optimal emission from the > 10keV sources. In this work, we present a possible venue for enhancing multi-keV x-ray emission on existing laser platforms through the application of an external magnetic field. Preliminary radiation-hydrodynamics calculations with Hydra suggest as much as 2 - 14 × increases in laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiency for 22 - 68keV K-shell sources are possible on the NIF laser - without any changes in laser-drive conditions - through the application of an external axial 50 T field. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Laser-driven short-duration heating angioplasty: chronic artery lumen patency and histology in porcine iliac artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Natsumi; Kunio, Mie; Naruse, Sho; Arai, Tsunenori; Sakurada, Masami

    2012-02-01

    We proposed a short-duration heating balloon angioplasty. We designed a prototype short-duration heating balloon catheter that can heat artery media to 60-70°C within 15-25 s with a combination of laser-driven heat generation and continuous fluid irrigation in the balloon. The purpose of this study was to investigate chronic artery lumen patency as well as histological alteration of artery wall after the short-duration heating balloon dilatation with porcine healthy iliac artery. The short-term heating balloon dilated sites were angiographically patent in acute (1 hour) and in chronic phases (1 and 4 weeks). One week after the dilatation, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) density in the artery media measured from H&E-stained specimens was approx. 20% lower than that in the reference artery. One and four weeks after the dilatations, normal structure of artery adventitia was maintained without any incidence of thermal injury. Normal lamellar structure of the artery media was also maintained. We found that the localized heating restricted to artery media by the short-duration heating could maintain adventitial function and artery normal structure in chronic phase.

  16. Laser-driven high-energy-density deuterium and tritium ions for neutron production in a double-cone configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu Shao, Fu-Qiu; Yin, Yan; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhu, Qing-Jun

    2015-12-15

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate laser-driven ion acceleration and compression from a thin DT foil in a double-cone configuration. By using two counterpropagating laser pulses, it is shown that a double-cone structure can effectively guide, focus, and strengthen the incident laser pulses, resulting in the enhanced acceleration and compression of D{sup +} and T{sup +}. Due to the ion Coulomb repulsion and the effective screening from the external laser electric fields, the transverse diffusion of ions is significantly suppressed. Finally, the peak energy density of the compressed ions exceeds 2.73 × 10{sup 16 }J/m{sup 3}, which is about five orders of magnitude higher than the threshold for high energy density physics, 10{sup 11 }J/m{sup 3}. Under this condition, DT fusion reactions are initiated and the neutron production rate per volume is estimated to be as high as 7.473 × 10{sup 35}/m{sup 3} s according to Monte Carlo simulations. It is much higher than that of the traditional large neutron sources, which may facilitate many potential applications.

  17. Laser-driven 6-16 keV x-ray imaging and backlighting with spherical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Smith, I. C.; Porter, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    Laser-driven x-ray self-emission imaging or backlighting of High Energy Density Physics experiments requires brilliant sources with keV energies and x-ray crystal imagers with high spatial resolution of about 10 μ m. Spherically curved crystals provide the required resolution when operated at near-normal incidence, which minimizes image aberrations due to astigmatism. However, this restriction dramatically limits the range of suitable crystal and spectral line combinations. We present a survey of crystals and spectral lines for x-ray backlighting and self-emission imaging with energies between 6 and 16 keV. Ray-tracing simulations including crystal rocking curves have been performed to predict image brightness and spatial resolution. Results have been benchmarked to experimental data using both Sandia's 4 kJ, ns Z-Beamlet and 200 J, ps Z-Petawatt laser systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND NO. 2014-15552A.

  18. Laser-driven coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Quantum mechanical simulation of molecular photodesorption from metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klamroth, Tillmann; Kröner, Dominik; Saalfrank, Peter

    2005-11-01

    In this paper we report dynamical simulations of laser-driven, coupled nuclear-electron dynamics for a molecule-surface system. Specifically, the laser desorption of a small molecule (NO) from a metal slab (Pt) in the so-called DIET limit (Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions), is studied. The excitation of the metal electrons by a laser pulse followed by the formation of a negative ion resonance, its subsequent decay, and the simultaneous desorption of the molecule are all treated within a single quantum mechanical model. This model is based on an earlier theory of Harris and others [S. M. Harris, S. Holloway, and G. R. Darling, J. Chem. Phys. 102, 8235 (1995)], according to which a nuclear degree of freedom is coupled to an electronic one, both propagated on a single non-Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. The goals of the present contribution are (i) to make a conceptual connection of this model to the frequently adopted nonadiabatic “multi-state” models of photodesorption, (ii) to understand details of the desorption mechanism, (iii) to explicitly account for the laser pulse, and (iv) to study the photodesorption as a function of the thickness of the metal film, and the laser parameters. As an important methodological aspect we also present a highly efficient numerical scheme to propagate the wave packet in a problem-adapted diabatic basis.

  19. Laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science: Launch and target impact probed by photon Doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Alexander D.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Shaw, William L.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-04-15

    We investigated the launch and target impact of laser-driven Al flyer plates using photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). We studied different flyer designs launched by laser pulses of different energies, pulse durations and beam diameters, that produced km s{sup −1} impacts with transparent target materials. Laser-launching Al flyers 25–100 μm thick cemented to glass substrates is usually thought to involve laser vaporization of a portion of the flyer, which creates many difficulties associated with loss of integrity and heating of the flyer material. However, in the system used here, the launch mechanism was surprising and unexpected: it involved optical damage at the glass/cement/flyer interface, with very little laser light reaching the flyer itself. In fact the flyers launched in this manner behaved almost identically to multilayer flyers that were optically shielded from the laser pulses and insulated from heat generated by the pulses. Launching flyers with nanosecond laser pulses creates undesirable reverberating shocks in the flyer. In some cases, with 10 ns launch pulses, the thickest flyers were observed to lose integrity. But with stretched 20 ns pulses, we showed that the reverberations damped out prior to impact with targets, and that the flyers maintained their integrity during flight. Flyer impacts with salt, glass, fused silica, and acrylic polymer were studied by PDV, and the durations of fully supported shocks in those media were determined, and could be varied from 5 to 23 ns.

  20. Demonstration of electron acceleration in a laser-driven dielectric microstructure.

    PubMed

    Peralta, E A; Soong, K; England, R J; Colby, E R; Wu, Z; Montazeri, B; McGuinness, C; McNeur, J; Leedle, K J; Walz, D; Sozer, E B; Cowan, B; Schwartz, B; Travish, G; Byer, R L

    2013-11-01

    The enormous size and cost of current state-of-the-art accelerators based on conventional radio-frequency technology has spawned great interest in the development of new acceleration concepts that are more compact and economical. Micro-fabricated dielectric laser accelerators (DLAs) are an attractive approach, because such dielectric microstructures can support accelerating fields one to two orders of magnitude higher than can radio-frequency cavity-based accelerators. DLAs use commercial lasers as a power source, which are smaller and less expensive than the radio-frequency klystrons that power today's accelerators. In addition, DLAs are fabricated via low-cost, lithographic techniques that can be used for mass production. However, despite several DLA structures having been proposed recently, no successful demonstration of acceleration in these structures has so far been shown. Here we report high-gradient (beyond 250 MeV m(-1)) acceleration of electrons in a DLA. Relativistic (60-MeV) electrons are energy-modulated over 563 ± 104 optical periods of a fused silica grating structure, powered by a 800-nm-wavelength mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. The observed results are in agreement with analytical models and electrodynamic simulations. By comparison, conventional modern linear accelerators operate at gradients of 10-30 MeV m(-1), and the first linear radio-frequency cavity accelerator was ten radio-frequency periods (one metre) long with a gradient of approximately 1.6 MeV m(-1) (ref. 5). Our results set the stage for the development of future multi-staged DLA devices composed of integrated on-chip systems. This would enable compact table-top accelerators on the MeV-GeV (10(6)-10(9) eV) scale for security scanners and medical therapy, university-scale X-ray light sources for biological and materials research, and portable medical imaging devices, and would substantially reduce the size and cost of a future collider on the multi-TeV (10(12)

  1. Demonstration of electron acceleration in a laser-driven dielectric microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, E. A.; Soong, K.; England, R. J.; Colby, E. R.; Wu, Z.; Montazeri, B.; McGuinness, C.; McNeur, J.; Leedle, K. J.; Walz, D.; Sozer, E. B.; Cowan, B.; Schwartz, B.; Travish, G.; Byer, R. L.

    2013-11-01

    The enormous size and cost of current state-of-the-art accelerators based on conventional radio-frequency technology has spawned great interest in the development of new acceleration concepts that are more compact and economical. Micro-fabricated dielectric laser accelerators (DLAs) are an attractive approach, because such dielectric microstructures can support accelerating fields one to two orders of magnitude higher than can radio-frequency cavity-based accelerators. DLAs use commercial lasers as a power source, which are smaller and less expensive than the radio-frequency klystrons that power today's accelerators. In addition, DLAs are fabricated via low-cost, lithographic techniques that can be used for mass production. However, despite several DLA structures having been proposed recently, no successful demonstration of acceleration in these structures has so far been shown. Here we report high-gradient (beyond 250MeVm-1) acceleration of electrons in a DLA. Relativistic (60-MeV) electrons are energy-modulated over 563+/-104 optical periods of a fused silica grating structure, powered by a 800-nm-wavelength mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. The observed results are in agreement with analytical models and electrodynamic simulations. By comparison, conventional modern linear accelerators operate at gradients of 10-30MeVm-1, and the first linear radio-frequency cavity accelerator was ten radio-frequency periods (one metre) long with a gradient of approximately 1.6MeVm-1 (ref. 5). Our results set the stage for the development of future multi-staged DLA devices composed of integrated on-chip systems. This would enable compact table-top accelerators on the MeV-GeV (106-109eV) scale for security scanners and medical therapy, university-scale X-ray light sources for biological and materials research, and portable medical imaging devices, and would substantially reduce the size and cost of a future collider on the multi-TeV (1012eV) scale.

  2. Ultrafast proton radiography of the magnetic fields generated by a laser-driven coil current

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gao, Lan; Ji, Hantao; Fiksel, Gennady; Fox, William; Evans, Michelle; Alfonso, Noel

    2016-04-15

    Magnetic fields generated by a current flowing through a U-shaped coil connecting two copper foils were measured using ultrafast proton radiography. Two ~ 1.25 kJ, 1-ns laser pulses propagated through laser entrance holes in the front foil and were focused to the back foil with an intensity of ~ 3 x 1016 W/cm2. The intense laser-solid interaction induced a high voltage between the copper foils and generated a large current in the connecting coil. The proton data show ~ 40-50 T magnetic fields at the center of the coil ~ 3-4 ns after laser irradiation. In conclusion, the experiments providemore » significant insight for future target designs that aim to develop a powerful source of external magnetic fields for various applications in high-energy-density science.« less

  3. Synthesis of WS2 Nanowires as Efficient 808 nm-Laser-Driven Photothermal Nanoagents.

    PubMed

    Macharia, Daniel K; Yu, Nuo; Zhong, Runzhi; Xiao, Zhiyin; Yang, Jianmao; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A prerequisite for the development of photothermal ablation therapy for cancer is to obtain efficient photothermal nanoagents that can be irradiated by near-infrared (NIR) laser. Herein, we have reported the synthesis of WS2 nanowires as photothermal nanoagents by the reaction of WCl6 with CS2 in oleylamine at 280 degrees C. WS2 nanowires have the thickness of -2 nm and length of -100 nm. Importantly, the chloroform dispersion of WS2 nanowires exhibits strong photoabsorption in NIR region. The temperature of the dispersion (0.10-0.50 mg/mL) can increase by 12.8-23.9 degrees C in 5 min under the irradiation of 808 nm laser with a power density of 0.80 W/cm2. Therefore, WS2 nanowires have a great superiority as a new nanoagent for NIR-induced photothermal ablation of cancer, due to their small size and excellent photothermal performance.

  4. Laser-driven formation of a high-pressure phase in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Salleo, Alberto; Taylor, Seth T.; Martin, Michael C.; Panero, Wendy R.; Jeanloz, Raymond; Genin, Francois Y.; Sands, Timothy

    2002-05-31

    A combination of electron diffraction and infrared reflectance measurements shows that synthetic silica transforms partially into stishovite under high-intensity (GW/cm2) laser irradiation, probably by the formation of a dense ionized plasma above the silica surface. During the transformation the silicon coordination changes from four-fold to six-fold and the silicon-oxygen bond changes from mostly covalent to mostly ionic, such that optical properties of the transformed material differ significantly from those of the original glass. This phase transformation offers one suitable mechanism by which laser-induced damage grows catastrophically once initiated, thereby dramatically shortening the service lifetime of optics used for high-power photonics applications such as inertial confinement fusion.

  5. Synthesis of WS2 Nanowires as Efficient 808 nm-Laser-Driven Photothermal Nanoagents.

    PubMed

    Macharia, Daniel K; Yu, Nuo; Zhong, Runzhi; Xiao, Zhiyin; Yang, Jianmao; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A prerequisite for the development of photothermal ablation therapy for cancer is to obtain efficient photothermal nanoagents that can be irradiated by near-infrared (NIR) laser. Herein, we have reported the synthesis of WS2 nanowires as photothermal nanoagents by the reaction of WCl6 with CS2 in oleylamine at 280 degrees C. WS2 nanowires have the thickness of -2 nm and length of -100 nm. Importantly, the chloroform dispersion of WS2 nanowires exhibits strong photoabsorption in NIR region. The temperature of the dispersion (0.10-0.50 mg/mL) can increase by 12.8-23.9 degrees C in 5 min under the irradiation of 808 nm laser with a power density of 0.80 W/cm2. Therefore, WS2 nanowires have a great superiority as a new nanoagent for NIR-induced photothermal ablation of cancer, due to their small size and excellent photothermal performance. PMID:27427645

  6. Ultrafast proton radiography of the magnetic fields generated by a laser-driven coil current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lan; Ji, Hantao; Fiksel, Gennady; Fox, William; Evans, Michelle; Alfonso, Noel

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields generated by a current flowing through a U-shaped coil connecting two copper foils were measured using ultrafast proton radiography. Two ˜1.25 kJ, 1-ns laser pulses propagated through laser entrance holes in the front foil and were focused to the back foil with an intensity of ˜3 × 1016 W/cm2. The intense laser-solid interaction induced a high voltage between the copper foils and generated a large current in the connecting coil. The proton data show ˜40-50 T magnetic fields at the center of the coil ˜3-4 ns after laser irradiation. The experiments provide significant insight for future target designs that aim to develop a powerful source of external magnetic fields for various applications in high-energy-density science.

  7. Nanometer-scale characterization of laser-driven plasmas, compression, shocks and phase transitions, by coherent small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Combining ultra-intense short-pulse and high-energy long-pulse lasers, with brilliant coherent hard X-ray FELs, such as the Helmholtz International Beamline for Extreme Fields (HIBEF) under construction at the HED Instrument of European XFEL, or MEC at LCLS, holds the promise to revolutionize our understanding of many High Energy Density Physics phenomena. Examples include the relativistic electron generation, transport, and bulk plasma response, and ionization dynamics and heating in relativistic laser-matter interactions, or the dynamics of laser-driven shocks, quasi-isentropic compression, and the kinetics of phase transitions at high pressure. A particularly promising new technique is the use of coherent X-ray diffraction to characterize electron density correlations, and by resonant scattering to characterize the distribution of specific charge-state ions, either on the ultrafast time scale of the laser interaction, or associated with hydrodynamic motion. As well one can image slight density changes arising from phase transitions inside of shock-compressed high pressure matter. The feasibility of coherent diffraction techniques in laser-driven matter will be discussed. including recent results from demonstration experiments at MEC. Among other things, very sharp density changes from laser-driven compression are observed, having an effective step width of 10 nm or smaller. This compares to a resolution of several hundred nm achievedpreviously with phase contrast imaging. and on behalf of HIBEF User Consortium, for the Helmholtz International Beamline for Extreme Fields at the European XFEL.

  8. Particle acceleration on a chip: A laser-driven micro-accelerator for research and industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, R. B.; Travish, G.

    2013-03-01

    Particle accelerators are conventionally built from radio-frequency metal cavities, but this technology limits the maximum energy available and prevents miniaturization. In the past decade, laser-powered acceleration has been intensively studied as an alternative technology promising much higher accelerating fields in a smaller footprint and taking advantage of recent advances in photonics. Among the more promising approaches are those based on dielectric field-shaping structures. These ``dielectric laser accelerators'' (DLAs) scale with the laser wavelength employed and can be many orders of magnitude smaller than conventional accelerators; DLAs may enable the production of high-intensity, ultra-short relativistic electron bunches in a chip-scale device. When combined with a high- Z target or an optical-period undulator, these systems could produce high-brilliance x-rays from a breadbox-sized device having multiple applications in imaging, medicine, and homeland security. In our research program we have developed one such DLA, the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP). We describe the fundamental physics, our fabrication and testing program, and experimental results to date, along with future prospects for MAP-based light-sources and some remaining challenges. Supported in part by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and National Nuclear Security Administration.

  9. Generation and amplification of magnetic fields in laser-driven collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sptikovsky, Anatoly; Huntington, Channing; Ross, Steven; Silva, Luis; Mori, Warren; Remington, Bruce; Park, Hye-Sook

    2014-10-01

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysical plasmas and are believed to play an important role in magnetic field amplification; however, the magnetic field dynamics in shocks is still poorly understood as in situ measurements are not available. Recent developments in high-power lasers are bringing the study of collisionless shocks into the realm of laboratory experiments. We have performed detailed 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations to explore the generation of collisionless shocks for laboratory conditions associated with counter-streaming high-velocity plasma flows. We capture all the relevant physics, which range from the generation of Biermann battery fields at the laser-foil region, to the micro-instabilities associated with the counter-streaming flows, and to the generation of turbulence at the shock. We show the generation of strong (>1% of equipartition) magnetic fields mediated by the Weibel instability and the conversion from well-defined filaments to magnetic turbulence as the shock is formed. We identify the conditions required to observe this magnetic field dynamics in shocks for the first time in the upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  10. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  11. Laser-driven Beat-Wave Current Drive in Dense Plasmas with Demo on CTIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Horton, Robert; Hwang, David; Zhu, Ben; Evans, Russell; Hong, Sean; Hsu, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The ability to remotely generate plasma current in dense plasmas hanging freely in vacuum in voluminous amount without obstruction to diagnostics will greatly enhance our ability to study the physics of high energy density plasmas in strong magnetic fields. Plasma current can be generated through nonlinear beat-wave process by launching two intense electromagnetic waves into unmagnetized plasma. Beat-wave acceleration of electrons has been demonstrated in a low-density plasma using microwaves [1]. The proposed PLX experimental facility presently under construction at Los Alamos offers the opportunity to test the method at a density level scalable to the study of HED plasmas. For PLX beat-wave experiments, CO2 lasers will be used as pump waves due to their high power and tunability. For a typical PLX density ne=10^17cm-3, two CO2 lasers can be separately tuned to 9P(28) and 10P(20) to match the 2.84THz plasma frequency. The beat-wave demo experiment will be conducted on CTIX. The laser arrangement is being converted to two independent single lasers. Frequency-tuning methods, optics focusing system and diagnostics system will be discussed. The laser measurements and results of synchronization of two lasers will be presented, and scaling to PLX experiments will be given. [1] Rogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., PRL. v68 p3877 (1992).

  12. Laser-driven phosphor-converted white light source for solid-state illumination.

    PubMed

    George, Anthony F; Al-waisawy, Sara; Wright, Jason T; Jadwisienczak, Wojciech M; Rahman, Faiz

    2016-03-10

    Energy efficiency and lighting quality considerations are driving research into laser-pumped white light sources. Laser diodes as pump sources for downconversion phosphors promise freedom from "droop" that adversely affects the efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). High-intensity laser diode-pumped light sources for applications such as search lights and automobile headlights have been demonstrated recently. Our paper describes the design and construction of a domestic/office-type solid-state luminaire driven by light from an integrated violet laser-diode module. A trichromatic phosphor made from a blend of separate europium-containing rare-earth phosphors was used as the downconversion medium. Mechanical and optical design of the reflector and the phosphor plate are described. Characteristics of both the pump light and the downconverted light are also described. Our studies also looked at the variation of chromaticity coordinates with variation in pump power and the effect of laser speckle on the lamp's light output. Finally, there is a brief discussion of energy conversion efficiency and longevity considerations, comparing pumping with LEDs versus pumping with laser diodes. PMID:26974780

  13. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  14. A laser driven pulsed X-ray backscatter technique for enhanced penetrative imaging.

    PubMed

    Deas, R M; Wilson, L A; Rusby, D; Alejo, A; Allott, R; Black, P P; Black, S E; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C M; Bryant, J; Clarke, R J; Collier, J C; Edwards, B; Foster, P; Greenhalgh, J; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Kar, S; Lockley, D; Moss, R M; Najmudin, Z; Pattathil, R; Symes, D; Whittle, M D; Wood, J C; McKenna, P; Neely, D

    2015-01-01

    X-ray backscatter imaging can be used for a wide range of imaging applications, in particular for industrial inspection and portal security. Currently, the application of this imaging technique to the detection of landmines is limited due to the surrounding sand or soil strongly attenuating the 10s to 100s of keV X-rays required for backscatter imaging. Here, we introduce a new approach involving a 140 MeV short-pulse (< 100 fs) electron beam generated by laser wakefield acceleration to probe the sample, which produces Bremsstrahlung X-rays within the sample enabling greater depths to be imaged. A variety of detector and scintillator configurations are examined, with the best time response seen from an absorptive coated BaF2 scintillator with a bandpass filter to remove the slow scintillation emission components. An X-ray backscatter image of an array of different density and atomic number items is demonstrated. The use of a compact laser wakefield accelerator to generate the electron source, combined with the rapid development of more compact, efficient and higher repetition rate high power laser systems will make this system feasible for applications in the field. Content includes material subject to Dstl (c) Crown copyright (2014). Licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@ nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk. PMID:26756414

  15. A laser driven pulsed X-ray backscatter technique for enhanced penetrative imaging.

    PubMed

    Deas, R M; Wilson, L A; Rusby, D; Alejo, A; Allott, R; Black, P P; Black, S E; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C M; Bryant, J; Clarke, R J; Collier, J C; Edwards, B; Foster, P; Greenhalgh, J; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Kar, S; Lockley, D; Moss, R M; Najmudin, Z; Pattathil, R; Symes, D; Whittle, M D; Wood, J C; McKenna, P; Neely, D

    2015-01-01

    X-ray backscatter imaging can be used for a wide range of imaging applications, in particular for industrial inspection and portal security. Currently, the application of this imaging technique to the detection of landmines is limited due to the surrounding sand or soil strongly attenuating the 10s to 100s of keV X-rays required for backscatter imaging. Here, we introduce a new approach involving a 140 MeV short-pulse (< 100 fs) electron beam generated by laser wakefield acceleration to probe the sample, which produces Bremsstrahlung X-rays within the sample enabling greater depths to be imaged. A variety of detector and scintillator configurations are examined, with the best time response seen from an absorptive coated BaF2 scintillator with a bandpass filter to remove the slow scintillation emission components. An X-ray backscatter image of an array of different density and atomic number items is demonstrated. The use of a compact laser wakefield accelerator to generate the electron source, combined with the rapid development of more compact, efficient and higher repetition rate high power laser systems will make this system feasible for applications in the field. Content includes material subject to Dstl (c) Crown copyright (2014). Licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@ nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

  16. Femtosecond-laser-driven photoelectron-gun for time-resolved cathodoluminescence measurement of GaN.

    PubMed

    Onuma, T; Kagamitani, Y; Hazu, K; Ishiguro, T; Fukuda, T; Chichibu, S F

    2012-04-01

    A rear-excitation femtosecond-laser-driven photoelectron gun (PE-gun) is developed for measuring time-resolved cathodoluminescence (TRCL) spectrum of wide bandgap materials and structures such as semiconductors and phosphors. The maximum quantum efficiency of a 20-nm-thick Au photocathode excited using a frequency-tripled Al(2)O(3):Ti laser under a rear-excitation configuration is 3.6×10(-6), which is a reasonable value for a PE-gun. When the distance between the front edge of the PE-gun and the observation point is 10 mm, the narrowest electron-beam (e-beam) diameter is 19 μm, which corresponds to one tenth of the laser-beam diameter and is comparable to the initial e-beam diameter of a typical W hair-pin filament of thermionic electron-gun. From the results of TRCL measurements on the freestanding GaN grown by the ammonothermal method and a GaN homoepitaxial film grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, overall response time for the present TRCL system is estimated to be 8 ps. The value is the same as that of time-resolved photoluminescence measurement using the same excitation laser pulses, meaning that the time-resolution is simply limited by the streak-camera, not by the PE-gun performance. The result of numerical simulation on the temporal e-beam broadening caused by the space-charge-effect suggests that the present PE-gun can be used as a pulsed e-beam source for spatio-time-resolved cathodoluminescence, when equipped in a scanning electron microscope.

  17. Acceleration{endash}deceleration process of thin foils confined in water and submitted to laser driven shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Romain, J.P.; Auroux, E.

    1997-08-01

    An experimental, numerical, and analytical study of the acceleration and deceleration process of thin metallic foils immersed in water and submitted to laser driven shocks is presented. Aluminum and copper foils of 20 to 120 {mu}m thickness, confined on both sides by water, have been irradiated at 1.06 {mu}m wavelength by laser pulses of {approximately}20ns duration, {approximately}17J energy, and {approximately}4GW/cm{sup 2} incident intensity. Time resolved velocity measurements have been made, using an electromagnetic velocity gauge. The recorded velocity profiles reveal an acceleration{endash}deceleration process, with a peak velocity up to 650 m/s. Predicted profiles from numerical simulations reproduce all experimental features, such as wave reverberations, rate of increase and decrease of velocity, peak velocity, effects of nature, and thickness of the foils. A shock pressure of about 2.5 GPa is inferred from the velocity measurements. Experimental points on the evolution of plasma pressure are derived from the measurements of peak velocities. An analytical description of the acceleration{endash}deceleration process, involving multiple shock and release waves reflecting on both sides of the foils, is presented. The space{endash}time diagrams of waves propagation and the successive pressure{endash}particle velocity states are determined, from which theoretical velocity profiles are constructed. All characteristics of experimental records and numerical simulations are well reproduced. The role of foil nature and thickness, in relation with the shock impedance of the materials, appears explicitly. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Chamber dynamic research with pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSON,ROBERT R.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; RENK,TIMOTHY J.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; SWEENEY,MARY ANN

    2000-05-15

    In Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), Target Chamber Dynamics (TCD) is an integral part of the target chamber design and performance. TCD includes target output deposition of target x-rays, ions and neutrons in target chamber gases and structures, vaporization and melting of target chamber materials, radiation-hydrodynamics in target chamber vapors and gases, and chamber conditions at the time of target and beam injections. Pulsed power provides a unique environment for IFE-TCD validation experiments in two important ways: they do not require the very clean conditions which lasers need and they currently provide large x-ray and ion energies.

  19. Anthropometric Indices Associated with Variation in Cardiovascular Parameters among Primary School Pupils in Ile-Ife

    PubMed Central

    Abiodun, Adedeji G.; Egwu, Michael O.; Adedoyin, Rufus A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigated the anthropometric indices associated with variations in cardiovascular parameters among primary school pupils in Ile-Ife. Method. One thousand and twenty-six pupils (age range 6–14 years, mean age 10.12 years) from ten schools were recruited with parents' informed consent. Anthropometric (Height (Ht), Weight (Wt), Abdominal Circumference (AC)) and cardiovascular (Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP), Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP), Heart Rate (HR)) parameters were measured using standard instruments and procedures. Blood pressure (BP) was measured after ten minutes of quiet sitting. Body Mass Index (BMI), Rate Pressure Product (RPP) and Pulse Pressure (PP) were estimated. Results. Age, Ht, Wt, BMI, and AC correlated significantly (P < .01) with BP and PP. AC and BMI were predictors of BP, HR, RPP, and PP. Conclusion. Significant correlations exist between age, Ht, Wt, BMI, AC, and BP with weight being a more viable predictor of SBP and age a more viable predictor of DBP. PMID:21747972

  20. Chronic Airflow Obstruction in a Black African Population: Results of BOLD Study, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Obaseki, Daniel O; Erhabor, Gregory E; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Adewole, Olufemi O; Buist, Sonia A; Burney, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Global estimates suggest that Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is emerging as a leading cause of death in developing countries but there are few spirometry-based general population data on its prevalence and risk factors in sub-Saharan Africa. We used the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) protocol to select a representative sample of adults aged 40 years and above in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. All the participants underwent spirometry and provided information on smoking history, biomass and occupational exposures as well as diagnosed respiratory diseases and symptoms. Chronic Airflow Obstruction (CAO) was defined as the ratio of post-bronchodilator (BD) one second Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) to Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) below the lower limit of normal (LLN) of the population distribution for FEV1/FVC. The overall prevalence of obstruction (post-BD FEV1/FVC < LLN) was 7.7% (2.7% above LLN) using Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) equations. It was associated with few respiratory symptoms; 0.3% reported a previous doctor-diagnosed chronic bronchitis, emphysema or COPD. Independent predictors included a lack of education (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 6.4) and a diagnosis of either TB (OR 23.4, 95% CI: 2.0, 278.6) or asthma (OR 35.4, 95%CI: 4.9, 255.8). There was no association with the use of firewood or coal for cooking or heating. The vast majority of this population (89%) are never smokers. We conclude that the prevalence of CAO is low in Ile-Ife, Nigeria and unrelated to biomass exposure. The key independent predictors are poor education, and previous diagnosis of tuberculosis or asthma.

  1. Chronic Airflow Obstruction in a Black African Population: Results of BOLD Study, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Obaseki, Daniel O; Erhabor, Gregory E; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Adewole, Olufemi O; Buist, Sonia A; Burney, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Global estimates suggest that Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is emerging as a leading cause of death in developing countries but there are few spirometry-based general population data on its prevalence and risk factors in sub-Saharan Africa. We used the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) protocol to select a representative sample of adults aged 40 years and above in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. All the participants underwent spirometry and provided information on smoking history, biomass and occupational exposures as well as diagnosed respiratory diseases and symptoms. Chronic Airflow Obstruction (CAO) was defined as the ratio of post-bronchodilator (BD) one second Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) to Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) below the lower limit of normal (LLN) of the population distribution for FEV1/FVC. The overall prevalence of obstruction (post-BD FEV1/FVC < LLN) was 7.7% (2.7% above LLN) using Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) equations. It was associated with few respiratory symptoms; 0.3% reported a previous doctor-diagnosed chronic bronchitis, emphysema or COPD. Independent predictors included a lack of education (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 6.4) and a diagnosis of either TB (OR 23.4, 95% CI: 2.0, 278.6) or asthma (OR 35.4, 95%CI: 4.9, 255.8). There was no association with the use of firewood or coal for cooking or heating. The vast majority of this population (89%) are never smokers. We conclude that the prevalence of CAO is low in Ile-Ife, Nigeria and unrelated to biomass exposure. The key independent predictors are poor education, and previous diagnosis of tuberculosis or asthma. PMID:26451840

  2. FY00 LDRD Final Report High Power IFE Driver Component Development 00-SI-009

    SciTech Connect

    Bibeau, C; Schaffers, K; Tassano, J; Waide, P; Bayramian, A

    2001-02-26

    We have begun building the ''Mercury'' laser system as the first in a series of new generation diode-pumped solid-state lasers for target physics research. Mercury will integrate three key technologies: diodes, crystals, and gas cooling, within a unique laser architecture that is scalable to kilojoule and megajoule energy levels for fusion energy applications. The primary near-term performance goals include 10% electrical efficiencies at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length at 1.047 {micro}m wavelength. Currently, this review concentrates on the critical development and production of Yb:S-FAP crystals. After solving many defect issues that can be present in the crystals, reproducibility is the final issue that needs to be resolved. We have enlisted the help of national experts and have strongly integrated two capable commercial crystal growth companies (Litton-Airton/Synoptics and Scientific Materials) into the effort, and have solicited the advice of Robert Morris (retired from Allied Signal), a recognized international expert in high temperature oxide growth.

  3. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  4. P - ρ - T data for H2O up to 260 GPa under laser-driven shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.; Ozaki, N.; Sano, T.; Okuchi, T.; Shimizu, K.; Miyanishi, K.; Terai, T.; Kakeshita, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Kodama, R.

    2014-12-01

    H2O is believed to be one of the most abundant compounds in ice giants including Neptune and Uranus1. Therefore, equation of state (EOS) for H2O is critical for understanding the formation and evolution of these planets. Various EOS models have been suggested for modeling the interior structure of the ice giants2-4. The recent shock experiments reported that their P - ρ data of H2O are in agreement with those of the QMD based EOS model5, indicating that this model is most suitable for modeling H2O in the ice giants. Whether H2O is in the solid or liquid state in the planetary interior has a great importance to understand their internal structures6. While the QMD model predicted that the solid H2O is present in deep interior of their planets above ~100 GPa4, the recent measurements revealed that H2O remains in the liquid state even at the deep interior conditions7. This discrepancy between experimental and theoretical studies suggests that the QMD based EOS model is disputable for modeling the planetary interior. Indeed, the comparison between data obtained from the shock experiments and the QMD based EOS did not cover the temperature5. We have obtained P - ρ - T data for H2O up to 260 GPa by using laser-driven shock compression technique. The diamond cell applied for the laser shock experiments was used as the sample container in order to achieve temperature conditions lower than the principal Hugoniot states. This shock technique combined with the cell can be used for an assessment the EOS models because it is possible to compare the states under the conditions that the contrast between the models clearly appears. Our data covering P - ρ - T on both the principal and the off Hugoniot curves agree with those of the QMD model, indicating this model to be adopted as the standard for modeling the interior structures of Neptune, Uranus, and exoplanets. References 1W. B. Hubbard et al., The interior of Neptune: Neptune and Triton(Univ. Arizona Press, Tucson, 1995) p

  5. High-precision measurements of the equation of state of hydrocarbons at 1-10 Mbar using laser-driven shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Barrios, M. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Hicks, D. G.; Eggert, J. H.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Boehly, T. R.; Fratanduono, D. E.

    2010-05-15

    The equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene and polypropylene were measured using laser-driven shock waves with pressures from 1 to 10 Mbar. Precision data resulting from the use of alpha-quartz as an impedance-matching (IM) standard tightly constrains the EOS of these hydrocarbons, even with the inclusion of systematic errors inherent to IM. The temperature at these high pressures was measured, which, combined with kinematic measurements, provide a complete shock EOS. Both hydrocarbons were observed to reach similar compressions and temperatures as a function of pressure. The materials were observed to transition from transparent insulators to reflecting conductors at pressures of 1 to 2 Mbar.

  6. The Prevalence and Pattern of Superficial Fungal Infections among School Children in Ile-Ife, South-Western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oke, Olaide Olutoyin; Onayemi, Olaniyi; Olasode, Olayinka Abimbola; Omisore, Akinlolu Gabriel; Oninla, Olumayowa Abimbola

    2014-01-01

    Fungal infections of the skin and nails are common global problems with attendant morbidity among affected individuals. Children are mostly affected due to predisposing factors such as overcrowding and low socioeconomic factors. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and the clinical patterns of superficial fungal infections among primary school children in Ile-Ife. A multistage sampling was conducted to select eight hundred pupils from ten primary schools in Ile-Ife. Data on epidemiological characteristics and clinical history was collected using a semistructured questionnaire and skin scrapings were done. The prevalence of superficial fungal infections among the 800 respondents was 35.0%. Male pupils constituted 51.0% of respondents while the females were 49.0%. The mean age for all the respondents was 9.42 ± 2.00. Tinea capitis was the commonest infection with a prevalence of 26.9% and tinea unguium, tinea corporis, and tinea faciei had a prevalence of 0.8%, 0.6%, and 0.5%, respectively. Tinea manuum had the least prevalence of 0.1%. Pityriasis versicolor had a prevalence of 4.4%. Microsporum audouinii was the leading organism isolated. The study shows that the prevalence of superficial fungal infection (SFI) among primary school children in Ile-Ife is high with tinea capitis as the commonest SFI. PMID:25574161

  7. Correlates of Self-Report of Rape Among Male School Adolescents in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogunfowokan, Adesola A; Olagunju, Oluwayemisi E; Olajubu, Aanuoluwapo O; Faremi, Funmilola A; Oloyede, Ajoke S; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2016-02-01

    This study examined male adolescents' self-report of rape of adolescent girls and the socio-demographic variables that correlated with self-report of rape. Descriptive-correlational design was used and the study was conducted in five public senior secondary schools in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Three hundred and thirty-eight male adolescents participated in the study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Findings from the study revealed the mean age of the adolescent males to be 16 years, with the majority (73%) of them in the middle adolescent stage. Six percent of the adolescent males reported they had raped an adolescent girl in the past. Among the boys who reported rape, 55% reported they had raped their sexual partners, and 55% reported they had perpetrated gang rape. Smoking (p = .0001), alcohol consumption (p = .001), and birth order (p = .006) predicted self-report of rape. The coefficient of birth order showed that odds of self-report of rape by first-born male increases by 6 times compared with other children. Study findings also provided evidence that adolescent males are moving from lone rape to gang rape in intimate partner relationships. Male adolescents are important group to target in rape prevention programs.

  8. Correlates of Self-Report of Rape Among Male School Adolescents in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogunfowokan, Adesola A; Olagunju, Oluwayemisi E; Olajubu, Aanuoluwapo O; Faremi, Funmilola A; Oloyede, Ajoke S; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2016-02-01

    This study examined male adolescents' self-report of rape of adolescent girls and the socio-demographic variables that correlated with self-report of rape. Descriptive-correlational design was used and the study was conducted in five public senior secondary schools in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Three hundred and thirty-eight male adolescents participated in the study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Findings from the study revealed the mean age of the adolescent males to be 16 years, with the majority (73%) of them in the middle adolescent stage. Six percent of the adolescent males reported they had raped an adolescent girl in the past. Among the boys who reported rape, 55% reported they had raped their sexual partners, and 55% reported they had perpetrated gang rape. Smoking (p = .0001), alcohol consumption (p = .001), and birth order (p = .006) predicted self-report of rape. The coefficient of birth order showed that odds of self-report of rape by first-born male increases by 6 times compared with other children. Study findings also provided evidence that adolescent males are moving from lone rape to gang rape in intimate partner relationships. Male adolescents are important group to target in rape prevention programs. PMID:25381280

  9. Investigation of Ionospheric response to Geomagnetic Storms over a Low Latitude Station, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimoh, Oluwaseyi E.; Yesufu, Thomas K.; Ariyibi, Emmanuel A.

    2016-05-01

    Due to several complexities associated with the equatorial ionosphere, and the significant role which the total electron content (TEC) variability plays in GPS signal transmission, there is the need to monitor irregularities in TEC during storm events. The GPS SCINDA receiver data at Ile-Ife, Nigeria, was analysed with a view to characterizing the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms on 9 March and 1 October 2012. Presently, positive storm effects, peaks in TEC which were associated with prompt penetration of electric fields and changes in neutral gas composition were observed for the storms. The maximum percentage deviation in TEC of about 120 and 45% were observed for 9 March and 1 October 2012, respectively. An obvious negative percentage TEC deviation subsequent to sudden storm commencement (SSC) was observed and besides a geomagnetic storm does not necessarily suggest a high scintillation intensity (S4) index. The present results show that magnetic storm events at low latitude regions may have an adverse effect on navigation and communication systems.

  10. Thermomechanical design of the grazing incidence metal mirror of the prometheus-L IFE reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoniem, N.M.; El-Azab, A.

    1994-12-31

    In Laser IFE reactors the reflectivity and absorptivity of the grazing metal mirror depend on the neutron dose received by the mirror surface. In addition to these irradiation effects, the surface deformation due to neutron irradiation-induced swelling and due to thermal loads change the focusing quality of the mirror. In the present work, a thorough review of the irradiation effects on the changes in mirror surface quality is presented. A mirror design methodology, which considers the deformation due to the loads associated with laser beam and the deformation due to neutron-irradiation induced swelling is discussed. The basic philosophy considered in the design is to separate the functions and choose the best possible materials to perform these specific functions. An aluminum thin layer, for the purpose of reflection of the laser beam, is deposited on a SiC substrate. The SiC substrate provides a rigid bulk, through which coolant is provided to remove the heat absorbed during laser pulses, and avoids the need for a thicker aluminum layer that undergoes more swelling than SiC. A concrete frame is designed to provide the ultimate resistance against thermally-induced deformation. Other features of the design will also be presented.

  11. OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs, Volume 1: Executive Summary & Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W. R.; Bieri, R. L.; Monsler, M. J.; Hendricks, C.D.; Laybourne, P.; Shillito, K. R.

    1992-03-01

    This is a comprehensive design study of two Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) electric power plants. Conceptual designs are presented for a fusion reactor (called Osiris) using an induction-linac heavy-ion beam driver, and another (called SOMBRERO) using a KrF laser driver. The designs covered all aspects of IFE power plants, including the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, balance-of-plant facilities, target fabrication, target injection and tracking, as well as the heavy-ion and KrF drivers. The point designs were assessed and compared in terms of their environmental & safety aspects, reliability and availability economics, and technology development needs.

  12. OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs, Volume 2: Designs, Assessments, and Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W. R.; Bieri, R. L.; Monsler, M. J.; Hendricks, C. D.; Laybourne, P.; Shillito, K. R.

    1992-03-01

    This is a comprehensive design study of two Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) electric power plants. Conceptual designs are presented for a fusion reactor (called Osiris) using an induction-linac heavy-ion beam driver, and another (called SOMBRERO) using a KrF laser driver. The designs covered all aspects of IFE power plants, including the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, balance-of-plant facilities, target fabrication, target injection and tracking, as well as the heavy-ion and KrF drivers. The point designs were assessed and compared in terms of their environmental & safety aspects, reliability and availability, economics, and technology development needs.

  13. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  14. P-ρ-T measurements of H{sub 2}O up to 260 GPa under laser-driven shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, T.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Sano, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Okuchi, T.; Sano, T.; Miyanishi, K.; Terai, T.; Kakeshita, T.; Shimizu, K.

    2015-04-28

    Pressure, density, and temperature data for H{sub 2}O were obtained up to 260 GPa by using laser-driven shock compression technique. The shock compression technique combined with the diamond anvil cell was used to assess the equation of state models for the P-ρ-T conditions for both the principal Hugoniot and the off-Hugoniot states. The contrast between the models allowed for a clear assessment of the equation of state models. Our P-ρ-T data totally agree with those of the model based on quantum molecular dynamics calculations. These facts indicate that this model is adopted as the standard for modeling interior structures of Neptune, Uranus, and exoplanets in the liquid phase in the multi-Mbar range.

  15. Direct measurement of kilo-tesla level magnetic field generated with laser-driven capacitor-coil target by proton deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, K. F. F.; Bailly-Grandvaux, M.; Morace, A.; Sakata, S.; Matsuo, K.; Kojima, S.; Lee, S.; Vaisseau, X.; Arikawa, Y.; Yogo, A.; Kondo, K.; Zhang, Z.; Bellei, C.; Santos, J. J.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H.

    2016-02-01

    A kilo-tesla level, quasi-static magnetic field (B-field), which is generated with an intense laser-driven capacitor-coil target, was measured by proton deflectometry with a proper plasma shielding. Proton deflectometry is a direct and reliable method to diagnose strong, mm3-scale laser-produced B-field; however, this was not successful in the previous experiment. A target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam is deflected by Lorentz force in the laser-produced magnetic field with the resulting deflection pattern recorded on a radiochromic film stack. A 610 ± 30 T of B-field amplitude was inferred by comparing the experimental proton pattern with Monte-Carlo calculations. The amplitude and temporal evolutions of the laser-generated B-field were also measured by a differential magnetic probe, independently confirming the proton deflectometry measurement results.

  16. Revealing the second harmonic generation in a femtosecond laser-driven cluster-based plasma by analyzing shapes of Ar XVII spectral lines.

    PubMed

    Oks, Eugene; Dalimier, Elisabeth; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Fukuda, Yuji; Andreev, Alexander; Koga, James; Sakaki, Hironao; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Pirozhkov, Alexander; Hayashi, Yukio; Skobelev, Igor; Pikuz, Sergei; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Kiminori; Zhidkov, Alexei; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2015-12-14

    We present experiments dealing with a femtosecond laser-driven cluster-based plasma, where by analyzing the nonlinear phenomenon of satellites of spectral lines of Ar XVII, we revealed the nonlinear phenomenon of the generation of the second harmonic of the laser frequency. For performing this analysis we developed new results in the theory of satellites of spectral lines. From such lineshape analysis we found, in particular, that the efficiency of converting the short (40 fs) intense (3x10¹⁸ W/cm²) incident laser light into the second harmonic was 2%. This result is in the excellent agreement with the 2-Dimensional Particle-In-Cell (2D PIC) simulation that we also performed. There is also an order of magnitude agreement between the thresholds for the SHG found from the line shape analysis and from the 2D PIC simulations.

  17. Technology Issues and Benefits of a Fast Ignition Power Plant with Cone Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, W J; Meier, W R

    2003-08-29

    The use of cone focus, fast ignition targets, either for direct or indirect drive, promises to lower the required driver size and relax the symmetry requirements in IFE power plants. It may also allow use of chamber concepts previously thought infeasible with a laser driver. These benefits will lower the COE and make IFE plants more competitive at smaller size. Their use also raises unique issues that will impact the design and development of power plant subsystems. Cone targets have a significant mass of high Z material whether or not they have a hohlraum and they are not spherically symmetric. This has implications for target injection, tracking and chamber background gas allowable.

  18. Ion-driver fast ignition: Reducing heavy-ion fusion driver energy and cost, simplifying chamber design, target fab, tritium fueling and power conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.; Callahan-Miller, D.; Perkins, J.; Caporaso, G.; Tabak, M.; Moir, R.; Meier, W.; Bangerter, Roger; Lee, Ed

    1998-04-01

    Ion fast ignition, like laser fast ignition, can potentially reduce driver energy for high target gain by an order of magnitude, while reducing fuel capsule implosion velocity, convergence ratio, and required precisions in target fabrication and illumination symmetry, all of which should further improve and simplify IFE power plants. From fast-ignition target requirements, we determine requirements for ion beam acceleration, pulse-compression, and final focus for advanced accelerators that must be developed for much shorter pulses and higher voltage gradients than today's accelerators, to deliver the petawatt peak powers and small focal spots ({approx}100 {micro}m) required. Although such peak powers and small focal spots are available today with lasers, development of such advanced accelerators is motivated by the greater likely efficiency of deep ion penetration and deposition into pre-compressed 1000x liquid density DT cores. Ion ignitor beam parameters for acceleration, pulse compression, and final focus are estimated for two examples based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator; (1) a small target with {rho}r {approx} 2 g/cm{sup 2} for a small demo/pilot plant producing {approx}40 MJ of fusion yield per target, and (2) a large target with {rho}r {approx} 10 g/cm{sup 2} producing {approx}1 GJ yield for multi-unit electricity/hydrogen plants, allowing internal T-breeding with low T/D ratios, >75 % of the total fusion yield captured for plasma direct conversion, and simple liquid-protected chambers with gravity clearing. Key enabling development needs for ion fast ignition are found to be (1) ''Close-coupled'' target designs for single-ended illumination of both compressor and ignitor beams; (2) Development of high gradient (>25 MV/m) linacs with high charge-state (q {approx} 26) ion sources for short ({approx}5 ns) accelerator output pulses; (3) Small mm-scale laser-driven plasma lens of {approx}10 MG fields to provide steep focusing angles close-in to the target

  19. Hydro*Star: A Directed Water-Cooled DD-Fueled IFE Fusion-Chamber Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C D

    2001-04-01

    We introduce a new IFE fusion-chamber concept called Hydro*Star that uses DT-ignited DD targets and a water blanket. The driver can be either a 13 to 16-MJ diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) with fast ignition, or a 4-MJ heavy-ion accelerator operating at a reprate 10 times faster than the fusion chamber to accumulate sufficient energy in storage rings to direct 40 MJ at the target. The driver employs a prepulse system to burn an ionized path through the ambient fusion-chamber vapors, whose operating pressure is about 20 atm. We assume that the targets, which have a yield of about 2800 MJ, can be indirectly driven with two-sided illumination. The blanket, which is 1 to 2-m thick and placed immediately inside the structural wall, is operated just over 100 C either in a liquid or frothed-liquid state, the latter being preferred to reduce stresses in the structural wall. The structural wall, at a radius of 4 to 5 m, is composed of low-carbon steels to avoid the stress-corrosion cracking problems that have plagued certain light-water-reactor (LWR) systems. The functions of the blanket are (1) to shield the structural wall and exterior components from neutron and gamma-ray target emissions, and (2) to supply water for the direct generation of steam. Each fusion pulse vaporizes nearly one-half centimeter of the inside surface of the water blanket, thereby creating hot steam which is vented directly from the fusion chamber into ordinary steam turbines. Thus, Hydro*Star operates just like a simple steam engine, with a basic reprate of only 0.8 Hz per GWe of net output. Because the steam temperature is 900 to 1200 K, the plant thermal efficiency is nearly 50%. This efficiency is much better than the typical 35-40% now being achieved in commercial reactors, and much better than the efficiencies estimated for previous fusion-chamber concepts except CASCADE (55%). Other advantages for the new concept include reduced plant radioactivity (reduced radionuclides inventory

  20. Z-inertial fusion energy: power plant final report FY 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark; Kulcinski, Gerald; Zhao, Haihua; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Olson, Craig Lee; Sierra, Dannelle P.; Meier, Wayne; McConnell, Paul E.; Ghiaasiaan, M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Kern, Brian (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tajima, Yu (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Campen, Chistopher (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Sketchley, Tomas (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Moir, R (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories); Bardet, Philippe M. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Durbin, Samuel; Morrow, Charles W.; Vigil, Virginia L (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Modesto-Beato, Marcos A.; Franklin, James Kenneth; Smith, James Dean; Ying, Alice; Cook, Jason T.; Schmitz, Lothar (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Abdel-Khalik, S. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Bonazza, Riccardo; Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Sridharan, Kumar (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rochau, Gary Eugene; Gudmundson, Jesse; Peterson, Per F.; Marriott, Ed; Oakley, Jason

    2006-10-01

    This report summarizes the work conducted for the Z-inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) late start Laboratory Directed Research Project. A major area of focus was on creating a roadmap to a z-pinch driven fusion power plant. The roadmap ties ZIFE into the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative through the use of high energy fusion neutrons to burn the actinides of spent fuel waste. Transmutation presents a near term use for Z-IFE technology and will aid in paving the path to fusion energy. The work this year continued to develop the science and engineering needed to support the Z-IFE roadmap. This included plant system and driver cost estimates, recyclable transmission line studies, flibe characterization, reaction chamber design, and shock mitigation techniques.

  1. An improved low-temperature equation of state model for integrated IFE target-chamber response simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltemes, Thad; Moses, Gregory

    2010-11-01

    A new quotidian equation of state model (QEOS) has been developed to perform integrated inertial fusion energy (IFE) target explosion-chamber response simulations. This QEOS model employs a scaled binding energy model for the ion EOS and utilizes both n- and l-splitting for determining the ionization state and electron EOS. This QEOS model, named BADGER, can perform both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS calculations. BADGER has been integrated with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY to simulate the chamber response of an exploding indirect-drive deuterium-tritium (DT) target, xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor. The simulated system is a prototypical configuration for the LIFE reactor study being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  2. Texturing of high T(sub c) superconducting polycrystalline fibers/wires by laser-driven directional solidification in an thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varshney, Usha; Eichelberger, B. Davis, III

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the technique of laser-driven directional solidification in a controlled thermal gradient of yttria stabilized zirconia core coated Y-Ba-Cu-O materials to produce textured high T(sub c) superconducting polycrystalline fibers/wires with improved critical current densities in the extended range of magnetic fields at temperatures greater than 77 K. The approach involves laser heating to minimize phase segregation by heating very rapidly through the two-phase incongruent melt region to the single phase melt region and directionally solidifying in a controlled thermal gradient to achieve highly textured grains in the fiber axis direction. The technique offers a higher grain growth rate and a lower thermal budget compared with a conventional thermal gradient and is amenable as a continuous process for improving the J(sub c) of high T(sub c) superconducting polycrystalline fibers/wires. The technique has the advantage of suppressing weak-link behavior by orientation of crystals, formation of dense structures with enhanced connectivity, formation of fewer and cleaner grain boundaries, and minimization of phase segregation in the incongruent melt region.

  3. LESM: a laser-driven sub-MeV electron source delivering ultra-high dose rate on thin biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labate, L.; Andreassi, M. G.; Baffigi, F.; Bizzarri, R.; Borghini, A.; Bussolino, G. C.; Fulgentini, L.; Ghetti, F.; Giulietti, A.; Köster, P.; Lamia, D.; Levato, T.; Oishi, Y.; Pulignani, S.; Russo, G.; Sgarbossa, A.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a laser-driven source of electron bunches with average energy 260~\\text{keV} and picosecond duration, which has been setup for radiobiological tests covering the previously untested sub-MeV energy range. Each bunch combines high charge with short duration and sub-millimeter range into a record instantaneous dose rate, as high as {{10}9}~\\text{Gy}~{{\\text{s}}-1} . The source can be operated at 10~\\text{Hz} and its average dose rate is 35~\\text{mGy}~{{\\text{s}}-1} . Both the high instantaneous dose rate and high level of relative biological effectiveness, attached to sub-MeV electrons, make this source very attractive for studies of ultrafast radiobiology on thin cell samples. The source reliability, in terms of shot-to-shot stability of features such as mean energy, bunch charge and transverse beam profile, is discussed, along with a dosimetric characterization. Finally, a few preliminary biological tests performed with this source are presented.

  4. Monolithic translucent BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphors for laser-driven solid state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzan, Clayton; Brady, Michael J.; O'Dea, Nicholas; Levin, Emily E.; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Seshadri, Ram

    2016-10-01

    With high power light emitting diodes and laser diodes being explored for white light generation and visible light communication, thermally robust encapsulation schemes for color-converting inorganic phosphors are essential. In the current work, the canonical blue-emitting phosphor, high purity Eu-doped BaMgAl10O17, has been prepared using microwave-assisted heating (25 min) and densified into translucent ceramic phosphor monoliths using spark plasma sintering (30 min). The resulting translucent ceramic monoliths convert UV laser light to blue light with the same efficiency as the starting powder and provide superior thermal management in comparison with silicone encapsulation.

  5. Observation of strong emission from NeIX and NeX transitions in a laser-driven plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.K.; Ditmire, T.; Nguyen, H.; Perry, M.D.

    1994-07-01

    The authors observe strong emission from the 1s{sup 2}-1snp Rydberg series in He-like neon and from the Lyman-{alpha} transition in H-like neon. These emissions are observed when 1.05 {mu}m light from a 650 femtosecond laser is focused into the dense, localized output of a pulsed, supersonic nozzle. The maximum focal irradiance of the laser was measured at full power in a vacuum to be 2 {times} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Although emissions from lower charge states such as Ne{sup 6+} and Ne{sup 7+} closely follow rates predicted by tunneling theory, emissions from Ne{sup 8+} and Ne{sup 9+} are observed at irradiances two order of magnitude below tunneling theory estimates (e.g. the He-{alpha} line appears at 2 {times} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). They discuss the origins of these anomalously high charge states and the implications to recombination-pumped x-rays lasers.

  6. Relativistic Electrons Produced by Reconnecting Electric Fields in a Laser-driven Bench-top Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, J. Y.; Lin, J.; Li, Y. T.; Wang, X.; Li, Y.; Zhang, K.; Yuan, D. W.; Ping, Y. L.; Wei, H. G.; Wang, J. Q.; Su, L. N.; Li, F.; Han, B.; Liao, G. Q.; Yin, C. L.; Fang, Y.; Yuan, X.; Wang, C.; Sun, J. R.; Liang, G. Y.; Wang, F. L.; Ding, Y. K.; He, X. T.; Zhu, J. Q.; Sheng, Z. M.; Li, G.; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to model the magnetic reconnection process in a solar flare with powerful lasers. Relativistic electrons with energy up to megaelectronvolts are detected along the magnetic separatrices bounding the reconnection outflow, which exhibit a kappa-like distribution with an effective temperature of ˜109 K. The acceleration of non-thermal electrons is found to be more efficient in the case with a guide magnetic field (a component of a magnetic field along the reconnection-induced electric field) than in the case without a guide field. Hardening of the spectrum at energies ≥500 keV is observed in both cases, which remarkably resembles the hardening of hard X-ray and γ-ray spectra observed in many solar flares. This supports a recent proposal that the hardening in the hard X-ray and γ-ray emissions of solar flares is due to a hardening of the source-electron spectrum. We also performed numerical simulations that help examine behaviors of electrons in the reconnection process with the electromagnetic field configurations occurring in the experiments. The trajectories of non-thermal electrons observed in the experiments were well duplicated in the simulations. Our numerical simulations generally reproduce the electron energy spectrum as well, except for the hardening of the electron spectrum. This suggests that other mechanisms such as shock or turbulence may play an important role in the production of the observed energetic electrons.

  7. First lasing of the KAERI compact far-infrared free-electron laser driven by a magnetron-based microtron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Young U.; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Cho, Sung Oh; Cha, Byung Heon; Lee, Jongmin; Kazakevitch, Grigori M.; Vobly, Pavel D.; Gavrilov, Nicolai G.; Kubarev, Vitaly V.; Kulipanov, Gennady N.

    2001-12-01

    The KAERI compact far-infrared (FIR) free-electron laser (FEL) has been operated successfully in the wavelength range of 97-150 μm. It is the first demonstration of FEL lasing by using a magnetron-based classical microtron. We developed a high precision undulator consisting of 80 periods, with each period being 25 mm. The field strength of the undulator can be changed from 4.5 to 6.8 kG with an amplitude deviation of only 0.05% in r.m.s value. The kinetic energy of the electron beam is 6.5 MeV. The average current and pulse duration of the electron beam macropulses are 45 mA and 5.5 μs, respectively. The measured power of the FEL with the electron beam parameters was more than 50 W for a FIR macropulse having a duration of 4 μs. The spectral width of the FEL was measured to be 0.5% of the central wavelength. The FEL system, aside from the racks for the controlling units, is compact enough to be located inside an area of 3×4 m 2.

  8. Low-Charge, Hard X-Ray Free Electron Laser Driven with an X-Band Injector and Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-04-17

    After the successful operation of the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), soft and hard x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) are being built, designed, or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency rf cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic rf system is employed to linearize the beam's longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency rf acceleration process. In this paper, a hard x-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photocathode rf gun to linac end) is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic rf linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient, and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (rms), low-charge (10 pC) electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macroparticle 3D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, and incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low-charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters), which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

  9. Low-charge, hard x-ray free electron laser driven with an X-band injector and accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao

    2012-03-01

    After the successful operation of the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), soft and hard x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) are being built, designed, or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency rf cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic rf system is employed to linearize the beam’s longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency rf acceleration process. In this paper, a hard x-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photocathode rf gun to linac end) is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic rf linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient, and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (rms), low-charge (10 pC) electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macroparticle 3D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, and incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low-charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters), which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

  10. Bidimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations for laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-high contrast laser

    SciTech Connect

    Scisciò, M.; Palumbo, L.; D'Humières, E.; Fourmaux, S.; Kieffer, J. C.; Antici, P.

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we report on bi-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations performed in order to reproduce the laser-driven proton acceleration obtained when a commercial 200 TW Ti:Sa Laser hits a solid target. The laser-to prepulse contrast was enhanced using plasma mirrors yielding to a main-to-prepulse contrast of ∼10{sup 12}. We varied the pulse duration from 30 fs to 500 fs and the target thickness from 30 nm to several tens of μm. The on-target laser energy was up to 1.8 J leading to an intensity in excess of 10{sup 20 }W cm{sup −2}. A comparison between numerical and existing experimental data [S. Fourmaux et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 013110 (2013)] is performed, showing a good agreement between experimental results and simulations which confirms that for ultra-thin targets there is an optimum expansion regime. This regime depends on the target thickness and on the laser intensity: if the target is too expanded, the laser travels through the target without being able to deposit its energy within the target. If the target is not sufficiently expanded, the laser energy is reflected by the target. It is important to note that maximum proton energies are reached at longer pulse durations (in the 100 fs regime) than what is currently the best compression pulse length for this type of lasers (typically 20–30 fs). This duration, around 50–100 fs, can be considered a minimum energy transfer time between hot electrons to ions during the considered acceleration process.

  11. Effects of the P2 M-band flux asymmetry of laser-driven gold Hohlraums on the implosion of ICF ignition capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Gu, Jianfa; Wu, Changshu; Song, Peng; Dai, Zhensheng; Li, Shuanggui; Li, Xin; Kang, Dongguo; Gu, Peijun; Zheng, Wudi; Zou, Shiyang; Ding, Yongkun; Lan, Ke; Ye, Wenhua; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    Low-mode asymmetries in the laser-indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] are deemed the main obstacles hindering further improvement of the nuclear performance of deuterium-tritium-layered capsules. The dominant seeds of these asymmetries include the P2 and P4 asymmetries of x-ray drives and P2 asymmetry introduced by the supporting "tent." Here, we explore the effects of another possible seed that can lead to low-mode asymmetric implosions, i.e., the M-band flux asymmetry (MFA) in laser-driven cylindrical gold Hohlraums. It is shown that the M-band flux facilitates the ablation and acceleration of the shell, and that positive P2 MFAs can result in negative P2 asymmetries of hot spots and positive P2 asymmetries of shell's ρR. An oblate or toroidal hot spot, depending on the P2 amplitude of MFA, forms at stagnation. The energy loss of such a hot spot via electron thermal conduction is seriously aggravated not only due to the enlarged hot spot surface but also due to the vortices that develop and help transferring thermal energy from the hotter center to the colder margin of such a hot spot. The cliffs of nuclear performance for the two methodologies of applying MFA (i.e., symmetric flux in the presence of MFA and MFA added for symmetric soft x-ray flux) are obtained locating at 9.5% and 5.0% of P2/P0 amplitudes, respectively.

  12. Spectrometer system using a modular echelle spectrograph and a laser-driven continuum source for simultaneous multi-element determination by graphite furnace absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Sebastian; Okruss, Michael; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Huang, Mao Dong; Esser, Norbert; Florek, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    A multi-element absorption spectrometer system has been developed based on a laser-driven xenon continuum source and a modular simultaneous echelle spectrograph (MOSES), which is characterized by a minimized number of optical components resulting in high optical throughput, high transmittance and high image quality. The main feature of the new optical design is the multifunction usage of a Littrow prism, which is attached on a rotation stage. It operates as an order-sorter for the echelle grating in a double-pass mode, as a fine positioning device moving the echelle spectrum on the detector, and as a forwarder to address different optical components, e.g., echelle gratings, in the setup. Using different prisms, which are mounted back to back on the rotation stage, a multitude of different spectroscopic modes like broad-range panorama observations, specific UV-VIS and NIR studies or high resolution zoom investigations of variable spectral channels can be realized. In the UV panorama mode applied in this work, MOSES has simultaneously detectable wavelength coverage from 193 nm to 390 nm with a spectral resolution λ/Δλ of 55,000 (3-pixel criterion). In the zoom mode the latter can be further increased by a factor of about two for a selectable section of the full wavelength range. The applicability and the analytical performance of the system were tested by simultaneous element determination in a graphite furnace, using eight different elements. Compared to an instrument operating in the optimized single line mode, the achieved analytical sensitivity using the panorama mode was typically a factor of two lower. Using the zoom mode for selected elements, comparable sensitivities were obtained. The results confirm the influence of the different spectral resolutions.

  13. Numerical studies of petawatt laser-driven proton generation from two-species targets using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domański, J.; Badziak, J.; Jabloński, S.

    2016-04-01

    Laser-driven generation of high-energy ion beams has recently attracted considerable interest due to a variety of potential applications including proton radiography, ICF fast ignition, nuclear physics or hadron therapy. The ion beam parameters depend on both laser pulse and target parameters, and in order to produce the ion beam of properties required for a particular application the laser and target parameters must be carefully selected, and the mechanism of the ion beam generation should be well understood and controlled. Convenient and commonly used tools for studies of the ion acceleration process are particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. Using two-dimensional PIC simulations, the properties of a proton beam generated from a thin erbium hydride (ErH3) target irradiated by a 25fs laser pulse of linear or circular polarization and of intensity ranging from 1020 to 1021 W/cm2 are investigated and compared with the features of a proton beam produced from a hydrocarbon (CH) target. It has been found that using erbium hydride targets instead of hydrocarbon ones creates an opportunity to generate more compact proton beams of higher mean energy, intensity and of better collimation. This is especially true for the linear polarization of the laser beam, for which the mean proton energy, the amount of high energy protons and the intensity of the proton beam generated from the hydride target is by an order of magnitude higher than for the hydrocarbon target. For the circular polarization, the proton beam parameters are lower than those for the linear one, and the effect of target composition on the acceleration process is weaker.

  14. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 2, Designs, assessments, and comparisons, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    The primary objective of the of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was to provide the Office of Fusion Energy with an evaluation of the potential of inertial fusion for electric power production. The term reactor studies is somewhat of a misnomer since these studies included the conceptual design and analysis of all aspects of the IFE power plants: the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, other balance of plant facilities, target systems (including the target production, injection, and tracking systems), and the two drivers. The scope of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was quite ambitious. The majority of our effort was spent on the conceptual design of two IFE electric power plants, one using an induction linac heavy ion beam (HIB) driver and the other using a Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser driver. After the two point designs were developed, they were assessed in terms of their (1) environmental and safety aspects; (2) reliability, availability, and maintainability; (3) technical issues and technology development requirements; and (4) economics. Finally, we compared the design features and the results of the assessments for the two designs.

  15. Anthropometry and cardiovascular disease risk factors among retirees and non-retirees in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Israel Arogundade; Mohammed, Jibril

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increasing affluence in low-income countries has been associated with lifestyle-related conditions, which may afford some people the opportunity to retire from gainful employment. This study examined the relationship between selected anthropometric variables and cardiovascular disease risk factors among age-matched retirees and non-retirees in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Self-reported healthy adults (104 retirees and 99 age-matched non-retirees) were purposively recruited. Weight, height, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were measured with standard equipment and procedures. An established questionnaire was used to classify the subjects into high, medium and low cardiovascular disease risk categories. The data were analysed with basic description and inferential statistics. Results: Mean ages for the retirees and non-retirees were 64.8 ± 7.0 years and 63.8 ± 4.5 years, respectively. The mean systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and waist circumference were higher for the retirees than for the non-retirees (all P < 0.01) as were the mean cardiovascular disease risk factors scores (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The study concludes that retirees have a higher risk for cardiovascular disease than non-retirees and weight and Body Mass Index are the major determinants. Studies are needed to explain the differences in body composition indices and cardiovascular disease risk factors between retirees and age-matched non-retirees PMID:23901177

  16. Multi-unit Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) plants producing hydrogen fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, B. G.

    1993-12-01

    A quantitative energy pathway comparison is made between a modern oil refinery and genetic fusion hydrogen plant supporting hybrid-electric cars powered by gasoline and hydrogen-optimized internal combustion engines, respectively, both meeting President Clinton's goal for advanced car goal of 80 mpg gasoline equivalent. The comparison shows that a fusion electric plant producing hydrogen by water electrolysis at 80% efficiency must have an electric capacity of 10 GWe to support as many hydrogen-powered hybrid cars as one modern 200,000 bbl/day-capacity oil refinery could support in gasoline-powered hybrid cars. A 10 GWe fusion electric plant capital cost is limited to $12.5 billion to produce electricity at 2.3 cents/kWehr, and hydrogen production by electrolysis at $8/GJ, for equal consumer fuel cost per passenger mile as in the oil-gasoline-hybrid pathway.

  17. Personality profiles and psychopathology among students exposed to dating violence at theObafemi AwolowoUniversity, Ile-Ife.

    PubMed

    Boladale, Mapayi; Yetunde, Oladimeji; Adesanmi, Akinsulore; Olutayo, Aloba; Olanrewaju, Ibigbami

    2015-01-01

    Dating violence is a complex phenomenon, and researchers continue to examine a wide range of precursors and contributing factors. Evidence indicates that violent intimate partners may be more likely to have personality disorders and dependency and attachment problems compared with non-violent ones. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the interaction between the personality profiles, pattern of psychopathology, and dating violence among university students in Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. The study utilized a cross-sectional survey design with a total of 400 students selected using a multistage sampling technique. They completed the Sociodemographic Data Schedule, the Conflict Tactic Scale (CTS), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Univariate analysis was used to determine the prevalence of dating violence, psychopathology, and personality traits, and these were expressed in percentages. Association at bivariate level was assessed using chi-square and at multivariate level using logistic regression and correlations as was appropriate depending on the type of variable. The age of the respondents ranged between 18 and 35 years (M = 21.44, SD = 2.99). The prevalence of dating violence in the previous 12 months was 34%, and the prevalence of psychopathology was 15%. In the logistic regression model constructed, it was found that the significant predictors of dating violence were the psychoticism and neuroticism personality traits, which were also found to be positive correlates of psychopathology. The magnitude of dating violence found in this study is comparable with those found in other countries of the world. This study found an association between dating violence and personality in the study population and also between certain personality traits and psychopathology. The personality profiles of students could affect their interpersonal relationships greatly, and this fact must feature in dating violence

  18. Effect of community level intervention on nutritional status and feeding practices of under five children in Ile Ife, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogundele, Olorunfemi Akinbode; Ogundele, Tolulope

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Childhood malnutrition remains a widespread problem in developing world like Nigeria. The country ranks second among the ten countries contributing to sixty percent of the world's wasted under-five children. Community Integrated Management of Childhood illness (CIMCI) is a programme that employs the use of community based counsellors to address child health and nutritional challenges of the under-five and has the potential to reduce the morbidity and mortality resulting from poor nutritional and feeding practices. The study assessed the effect of community level intervention on nutritional status and feeding practices of children in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional comparative study that employed the use of multi stage cluster sampling techniques in selecting 722 mothers of index under five children. The study was done in two Local Government Areas of Osun State, Nigeria. Quantitative techniques were used in data collection. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 20.0. Descriptive and bivariate analyses was performed. Results The two Local Government Area (LGA) did not differ significantly in their wealth index (p = 0.344). However, more children in the non-implementing LGA (16.1%) had low weight for age compared with 3.6% in the CIMCI implementing LGA (p = 0.000). A statistically significant difference exist in the MUAC measurement of children 12-23 months between the CIMCI implementing and non-implementing communities (p = 0.007). A higher percentage of caregivers (19.3%) introduced complementary feeding earlier than 6 months in the non-implementing area (p < 0.001). Conclusion Using community level nutritional counseling can greatly improve nutritional status and feeding practices of under five children. PMID:26958118

  19. NDCX-II, an Induction Linac for HEDP and IFE Research

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J.W.; Arbelaez, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Galvin, J.; Greenway, W.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D. P.; Jung, J.Y.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S. M.; Reginato, L.L.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W. M.; Takakuwa, J.; Waldron, W.L.

    2011-04-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory in the USA is constructing a new Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II) at LBNL. This facility is being developed for high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy research. The 12 m long induction linac in NDCX-II will produce a Li{sup +} beam pulse, at energies of 1.2-3 MeV, to heat target material to the warm dense matter regime ({approx} 1 eV). By making use of special acceleration voltage waveforms, 2.5T solenoid focusing, and neutralized drift compression, 20 - 50 nC of beam charge from the ion source will be compressed longitudinally and radially to achieve a subnanosecond pulse length and mm-scale target spot size. The original Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-I) has successfully demonstrated simultaneous radial and longitudinal compression by imparting a velocity ramp to the ion beam, which then drifts in a neutralizing plasma to and through the final focussing solenoid and onto the target. At higher kinetic energy and current, NDCX-II will offer more than 100 times the peak energy fluence on target of NDCX-I. NDCX-II makes use of many parts from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at LLNL. It includes 27 lattice periods between the injector and the neutralized drift compression section (Figure 1). There are 12 energized induction cells, 9 inactive cells which provide drift space, and 6 diagnostic cells which provide beam diagnostics and pumping. Custom pulsed power systems generate ramped waveforms for the first 7 induction cells, so as to quickly compress the beam from 600 ns at the injector down to 70 ns. After this compression, the high voltages of the ATA Blumleins are then used to rapidly add energy to the beam. The Blumleins were designed to match the ferrite core volt-seconds with pulses up to 250 kV and a fixed FWHM of 70 ns. The machine is limited to a pulse repetition rate of once every 20 seconds due to cooling requirements. The NDCX

  20. Geomagnetic Storm Main Phase effect on the Equatorial Ionosphere as measured from GPS observations at Ile-Ife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabode, Ayomide; Ariyibi, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the main phase of two intense geomagnetic storm events which occurred on August 5-6 and September 26-27, 2011 on the equatorial ionosphere have been investigated using Global Positioning System (GPS) data obtained from an Ile-Ife station (geomagnetic lat. 9.84°N, long. 77.25°E). The WinTEC-P and GPS-TEC analysis software programs were used to process the GPS data to obtain Total Electron Content (TEC) and Scintillation Index (S4). TEC profiles during the main phase of the two geomagnetically disturbed days were compared with quiet time average profiles to examine the response of the equatorial ionosphere. International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 TEC model was also obtained from Virtual Ionosphere, Thermosphere, Mesosphere Observatory (VITMO) and the extents of deviation from measured GPS-derived TEC were examined for the main phase of the storm events. The results showed that the intensity of both storm events during the main phase which occurred at night-time correlated well with a strong southward direction of the z-component of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF-Bz) and Solar Wind Speed (Vsw), with the Disturbance storm time (Dst) profile showing multiple step development. TEC depletion was observed during the main phase of the August 5-6, 2011 storm event with TEC recording a maximum value of 9.31 TECU. A maximum TEC value of 55.8 TECU was recorded during the main phase of the September 26-27, 2011 storm event depicting TEC enhancement. Significant scintillation index value of 0.57 was observed when the main phase started on August 5-6, 2011 followed by a prolonged suppression while there was less significant scintillation impact on September 26-27, 2011 with a maximum value of 0.33. The study concluded that the intensification of the ring current during the main phase of geomagnetic storm events was responsible for the intensity of the storm events causing large variations in TEC and significant scintillation phenomenon.

  1. The Mercury Project: A High Average Power, Gas-Cooled Laser For Inertial Fusion Energy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A; Armstrong, P; Ault, E; Beach, R; Bibeau, C; Caird, J; Campbell, R; Chai, B; Dawson, J; Ebbers, C; Erlandson, A; Fei, Y; Freitas, B; Kent, R; Liao, Z; Ladran, T; Menapace, J; Molander, B; Payne, S; Peterson, N; Randles, M; Schaffers, K; Sutton, S; Tassano, J; Telford, S; Utterback, E

    2006-11-03

    Hundred-joule, kilowatt-class lasers based on diode-pumped solid-state technologies, are being developed worldwide for laser-plasma interactions and as prototypes for fusion energy drivers. The goal of the Mercury Laser Project is to develop key technologies within an architectural framework that demonstrates basic building blocks for scaling to larger multi-kilojoule systems for inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications. Mercury has requirements that include: scalability to IFE beamlines, 10 Hz repetition rate, high efficiency, and 10{sup 9} shot reliability. The Mercury laser has operated continuously for several hours at 55 J and 10 Hz with fourteen 4 x 6 cm{sup 2} ytterbium doped strontium fluoroapatite (Yb:S-FAP) amplifier slabs pumped by eight 100 kW diode arrays. The 1047 nm fundamental wavelength was converted to 523 nm at 160 W average power with 73% conversion efficiency using yttrium calcium oxy-borate (YCOB).

  2. Laser-driven growth of silver nanoplates on p-Type GaAs substrates and their surface-enhanced raman scattering activity.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Pelton, M.

    2009-03-20

    Contact between aqueous solutions of silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}) and pristine surfaces of p-type gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafers results in essentially no reaction at room temperature and in the dark. The galvanic reactions between the GaAs wafers and AgNO{sub 3} can be triggered under illumination of laser beams with power densities higher than a critical value ({approx}15 mW/cm{sup 2} for a 630 nm laser), resulting in the growth of silver (Ag) nanoplates on the GaAs surface. The density and dimensions (including both thickness and edge length) of the resulting nanoplates can be readily tuned by controlling the growth time and laser power density. The as-grown Ag nanoplates on the substrates significantly enhance Raman signals of interesting molecules and serve as a new class of promising surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for sensitive chemical detection.

  3. Fiber laser driven dual photonic crystal fiber femtosecond mid-infrared source tunable in the range of 4.2 to 9 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuhong; Knox, Wayne H.

    2014-02-01

    We report a fiber based approach to broadly tunable femtosecond mid-IR source based on difference frequency mixing of the outputs from dual photonic crystal fibers (PCF) pumped by a femtosecond fiber laser, which is a custom-built Yb-doped fiber chirped pulse amplifier (CPA) delivering 1.35 W, 300 fs, 40 MHz pulses centered at 1035 nm. The CPA output is split into two arms to pump two different types of PCFs for generation of the spectrally separated pulses. The shorter wavelength pulses are generated in one PCF with its single zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) at 1040 nm. Low normal dispersion around the pumping wavelength enables spectral broadening dominated by self-phase modulation (SPM), which extends from 970 to 1092 nm with up to 340 mW of average power. The longer wavelength pulses are generated in a second PCF which has two closely spaced ZDWs around the laser wavelength. Facilitated by its special dispersion profile, the laser wavelength is converted to the normal dispersion region of the fiber, leading to the generation of the narrow-band intense Stokes pulses with 1 to 1.25 nJ of pulse energy at a conversion efficiency of ~30% from the laser pulses. By difference mixing the outputs from both PCFs in a type-II AgGaS2 crystal, mid-IR pulses tunable from 4.2 to 9 μm are readily generated with its average power ranging from 135 - 640 μW, corresponding to 3 - 16 pJ of pulse energy which is comparable to the reported fiber based mid-IR sources enabled by the solitons self-frequency shift (for example, 3 - 10 μm with 10 pJ of maximum pulse energy in [10]). The reported approach provides a power-scalable route to the generation of broadly tunable femtosecond mid-IR pulses, which we believe to be a promising solution for developing compact, economic and high performance mid-IR sources.

  4. The effect of Oja-titun market effluent on the chemical quality of receiving OPA reservoir in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Eludoyin, A O; Ofoezie, I E; Ogunkoya, O O

    2004-09-01

    The effect of market effluent from the Oja-titun market in Ile-Ife, Nigeria on the chemical quality of the Opa Reservoir located 3.5 km downstream was investigated between February and November 2000. Water samples were collected in February, May, August and November from 16 sites, four along each of the market drainage channels (MDC), market stream, tributary stream and the Opa River and Reservoir. The peak level of each variable-biochemical oxygen demand, temperature, total alkalinity, Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), PO(4)(3+), SO(4)(2+), Cl(-), NO(3)(-), Pb and Zn-occurred at the MDC, and decreased significantly downstream, except pH, conductivity and dissolved oxygen, which increased. Seasonal fluctuation in most variables was pronounced. Generally, there were high values in the early dry and dry seasons and low values in the rainy and early rainy seasons. Comparison of the reservoir water with international limitation standards for drinking water supply showed that the quality of the reservoir water was very low and that treatment required to achieve minimum limitation standards for drinking water would be both intensive and expensive. The study concluded that the stream borne effluent from the market impacts significantly on the chemical quality of the reservoir water although other tributaries within the Reservoir's catchment are other possible sources of pollutants in the reservoir.

  5. Relative Advantages of Direct and Indirect Drive for an Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Driven by a Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D.

    2001-03-06

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the relative advantages of direct drive (DD) and indirect drive (ID) for a 1 GWe inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant driven by a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL). This comparison is motivated by a recent study (1) that shows that the projected cost of electricity (COE) for DD is actually about the same as that for ID even though the target gain for DD can be much larger. We can therefore no longer assume that DD is the ultimate targeting scenario for IFE, and must begin a more rigorous comparison of these two drive options. The comparison begun here shows that ID may actually end up being preferred, but the uncertainties are still rather large.

  6. Paediatric endoscopy by adult gastroenterologists in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A viable option to increase the access to paediatric endoscopy in low resource countries

    PubMed Central

    Alatise, Olusegun I.; Anyabolu, Henry Chineme; Sowande, Oludayo; Akinola, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists is a service delivery model that increases the access of children to endoscopy in countries where paediatric gastroenterologists with endoscopy skills are scarce. However, studies on the usefulness of this model in Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. We aimed to evaluate the indications, procedures, diagnostic yield and safety of paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists in a Nigerian tertiary health facility. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study that evaluated the records of paediatric (≤18 years old) endoscopies carried out in the endoscopy suite of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex Ile-Ife, Nigeria from January 2007 to December 2014. Results: A total of 63 procedures were successfully completed in children of whom 4 were repeat procedures which were excluded. Thus, 59 endoscopies performed on children were analysed. Most (49; 83.1%) of these procedures on the children were diagnostic with oesophagogastroduodenoscopy being the commonest (43; 72.9%). Epigastric pain (22; 37.3%), haematemesis (17; 28.8%) and dysphagia (9; 15.3%) were the predominant indication for upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy while haematochezia (9; 15.3%) and rectal protrusion (2; 3.4%) were the indications for colonoscopy. Injection sclerotherapy (3; 5.1%) and variceal banding (2; 3.4%) were the therapeutic upper GI endoscopic procedures conducted while polypectomies were performed during colonoscopy in 5 children (8.5%). Abnormal endoscopy findings were observed in 53 out of the 59 children making the positive diagnostic yield to be 89.8%. No complication, either from the procedure or anaesthesia was observed. Conclusion: Paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists is useful, feasible and safe. It is being encouraged as a viable option to fill the gap created by dearth of skilled paediatric gastroenterologists. PMID:26712292

  7. Undernutrition and anaemia among HAART-naïve HIV infected children in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: a case-controlled, hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Anyabolu, Henry Chineme; Adejuyigbe, Ebunoluwa Aderonke; Adeodu, Oluwagbemiga Oyewole

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Case control studies that assess the burden and factors associated with undernutrition and anaemia among HAART naïve HIV infected children in Nigeria is very sparse. This will help to formulate nutritional programs among these children. Methods Seventy HAART naive HIV infected children aged 18 months and above were as well as seventy age and sex matched HIV negative children were recruited from August 2007 to January 2009 at Paediatric Clinic of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Their bio data, WHO clinical stage, anthropometric measurements, haematocrit, serum albumin and CD4 counts were taken with other parameters according to a study proforma. Results The prevalence of stunting, underweight and wasting among the HIV infected subjects were 48. 6%,58. 6% and 31. 4% respectively which as significantly higher than 28. 1%, 7. 1% and 28. 1% among the HIV negative controls. 20. 1% of the HIV infected children were marasmic compared to 2. 3% of the controls. Triple anthropometric failure was found in 7. 1% of the subjects as compared to none among the controls. Anaemia is significantly more prevalent among the subjects than the controls (70. 0% vs 31. 4%; p<0. 001). The prevalence of anaemia was higher in the HIV infected subjects with undernutrition. Low socioeconomic status, hypoalbuminemia and severe immunosuppression are significantly associated with higher undernutrition prevalence. Conclusion Several years after availability of HAART, undernutrition and anaemia remain widely prevalent among newly presenting HAART naïve HIV infected Nigerian children. Nutritional supplementation and evaluation for anaemia still need close attention in the management of these children. PMID:25400844

  8. Groundwater contamination in the basement-complex area of Ile-Ife, southwestern Nigeria: A case study using the electrical-resistivity geophysical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adepelumi, A. A.; Ako, B. D.; Ajayi, T. R.

    2001-11-01

    Hydrogeoenvironmental studies were carried out at the sewage-disposal site of Obafemi Awolowo University campus, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The objective of the survey was to determine the reliability of the electrical-resistivity method in mapping pollution plumes in a bedrock environment. Fifty stations were occupied with the ABEM SAS 300C Terrameter using the Wenner array. The electrical-resistivity data were interpreted by a computer-iteration technique. Water samples were collected at a depth of 5.0 m in 20 test pits and analyzed for quality. The concentrations of Cr, Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu are moderately above the World Health Organization recommended guidelines. Plumes of contaminated water issuing from the sewage ponds were delineated. The geoelectric sections reveal four subsurface layers, with increasing depth, lateritic clay, clayey sand/sand, and weathered/fractured bedrock, and fresh bedrock. The deepest layers, 3 and 4, constitute the main aquifer, which has a thickness of 3.1-67.1 m. The distribution of the elements in the sewage effluent confirms a hydrological communication between the disposal ponds and groundwater. The groundwater is contaminated, as shown by sampling and the geophysical results. Thus, the results demonstrate the reliability of the direct-current electrical-resistivity geophysical method in sensing and mapping pollution plumes in a crystalline bedrock environment. Résumé. Des études géo-environnementales ont été réalisées sur le site d'épandages du campus universitaire d'Obafemi Awolowo, à Ile-Ife (Nigeria). L'objectif de ce travail était de déterminer la fiabilité de la méthode des résistivités électriques pour cartographier les panaches de pollution dans un environnement de socle. Cinquante stations ont été soumises à mesures au moyen d'un ABEM SAS 300C Terrameter en utilisant le dispositif de Wenner. Les données de résistivité électrique ont été interprétées au moyen d'une technique de calcul itérative. Des

  9. Groundwater contamination in the basement-complex area of Ile-Ife, southwestern Nigeria: A case study using the electrical-resistivity geophysical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adepelumi, A. A.; Ako, B. D.; Ajayi, T. R.

    2001-11-01

    Hydrogeoenvironmental studies were carried out at the sewage-disposal site of Obafemi Awolowo University campus, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The objective of the survey was to determine the reliability of the electrical-resistivity method in mapping pollution plumes in a bedrock environment. Fifty stations were occupied with the ABEM SAS 300C Terrameter using the Wenner array. The electrical-resistivity data were interpreted by a computer-iteration technique. Water samples were collected at a depth of 5.0 m in 20 test pits and analyzed for quality. The concentrations of Cr, Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu are moderately above the World Health Organization recommended guidelines. Plumes of contaminated water issuing from the sewage ponds were delineated. The geoelectric sections reveal four subsurface layers, with increasing depth, lateritic clay, clayey sand/sand, and weathered/fractured bedrock, and fresh bedrock. The deepest layers, 3 and 4, constitute the main aquifer, which has a thickness of 3.1-67.1 m. The distribution of the elements in the sewage effluent confirms a hydrological communication between the disposal ponds and groundwater. The groundwater is contaminated, as shown by sampling and the geophysical results. Thus, the results demonstrate the reliability of the direct-current electrical-resistivity geophysical method in sensing and mapping pollution plumes in a crystalline bedrock environment. Résumé. Des études géo-environnementales ont été réalisées sur le site d'épandages du campus universitaire d'Obafemi Awolowo, à Ile-Ife (Nigeria). L'objectif de ce travail était de déterminer la fiabilité de la méthode des résistivités électriques pour cartographier les panaches de pollution dans un environnement de socle. Cinquante stations ont été soumises à mesures au moyen d'un ABEM SAS 300C Terrameter en utilisant le dispositif de Wenner. Les données de résistivité électrique ont été interprétées au moyen d'une technique de calcul itérative. Des

  10. Laser-driven shock experiments at PALS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, Dimitri; Stabile, H.; Ravasio, A.; Desai, Tara; Lucchini, G.; Strati, F.; Ullschmied, Jiri; Krousky, E.; Skala, Jiri; Kralikova, Bozena; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Kadlec, Christelle; Mocek, Tomas; Prag, A. R.; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Zvorykin, Vladimir D.

    2004-04-01

    Here we discuss the results of the experiments performed using the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) of wavelength 0.44 μm (3ω of Iodine laser) and energy ~ 250 J in 450 ps (FWHM). Two sets of experiments were carried out, firstly, generation of high quality shocks which were steady in time and uniform in space using Phase Zone Plates (PZP), to establish the scaling laws of shock pressure Vs. laser intensity for aluminum foil target of thickness 8 μm. Our results show a good agreement with the delocalized laser absorption model. Secondly, measurements of the Equation of State of carbon compressed by shocks at megabars of pressure have been realized. Equation of State were obtained for carbon using the impedance mismatch technique. Step targets allowed the simultaneous measurements of shock velocity in two different materials. Aluminum was used as a reference material and relative EOS data for carbon have been obtained up to ~ 14 Mbar pressure.

  11. Miniature shock tube for laser driven shocks.

    PubMed

    Busquet, Michel; Barroso, Patrice; Melse, Thierry; Bauduin, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We describe in this paper the design of a miniature shock tube (smaller than 1 cm(3)) that can be placed in a vacuum vessel and allows transverse optical probing and longitudinal backside extreme ultraviolet emission spectroscopy in the 100-500 A range. Typical application is the study of laser launched radiative shocks, in the framework of what is called "laboratory astrophysics."

  12. Laser driven hydrodynamic instability experiments. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Haan, S.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.J.; Goldstein, W.H.; Wilson, B.G.; Nash, J.K.

    1993-02-17

    An extensive series of experiments has been conducted on the Nova laser to measure hydrodynamic instabilities in planar foils accelerated by x-ray ablation. Single mode experiments allow a measurement of the fundamental growth rates from the linear well into the nonlinear regime. Two-mode foils allow a first direct observation of mode coupling. Surface-finish experiments allow a measurement of the evolution of a broad spectrum of random initial modes.

  13. Laser-driven Acceleration in Clustered Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, X.; Wang, X.; Shim, B.; Downer, M. C.

    2009-01-22

    We propose a new approach to avoid dephasing limitation of laser wakefield acceleration by manipulating the group velocity of the driving pulse using clustered plasmas. We demonstrated the control of phase velocity in clustered plasmas by third harmonic generation and frequency domain interferometry experiments. The results agree with a numerical model. Based on this model, the group velocity of the driving pulse in clustered plasmas was calculated and the result shows the group velocity can approach the speed of light c in clustered plasmas.

  14. Bacterial cells enhance laser driven ion acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Kundu, M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Rajeev, R.; Ray, Krishanu; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration. Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics. Here, we present a simple, albeit, unconventional target that succeeds in generating 700 keV carbon ions where conventional targets for the same laser parameters generate at most 40 keV. A few layers of micron sized bacteria coating on a polished surface increases the laser energy coupling and generates a hotter plasma which is more effective for the ion acceleration compared to the conventional polished targets. Particle-in-cell simulations show that micro-particle coated target are much more effective in ion acceleration as seen in the experiment. We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications. PMID:25102948

  15. Laser-driven inertial ion focusing.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, H B; Yu, Wei; Yu, M Y; Xu, H; Wang, X; Shen, B F; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2009-01-01

    A Hohlraum-like configuration is proposed for realizing a simple compact source for neutrons. A laser pulse enters a tiny thin-shelled hollow-sphere target through a small opening and is self-consistently trapped in the cavity. The electrons in the inner shell-wall region are expelled by the light pressure. The resulting space-charge field compresses the local ions into a thin layer that becomes strongly heated. An inward expansion of ions into the shell cavity then occurs, resulting in the formation at the cavity center of a hot spot of ions at high density and temperature, similar to that in inertial electrostatic confinement.

  16. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Tz. B. Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  17. Laser-driven polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte-black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 200 milliwatt green solid-state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the DLP chip, the optomechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  18. Laser driven acceleration in vacuum and gases

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Hafizi, B.; Hubbard, R.; Krall, J.; Ting, A.

    1997-03-01

    Several important issues pertaining to particle acceleration in vacuum and gases are discussed. The limitations of laser vacuum acceleration as they relate to electron slippage, laser diffraction, material damage, and electron aperture effects are presented. Limitations on the laser intensity and particle self-fields due to material breakdown are quantified. In addition, the reflection of the self-fields associated with the accelerated particles places a limit on the number of particles. Two configurations for the inverse Cherenkov accelerator (ICA) are considered, in which the electromagnetic driver is propagated in a waveguide that is (i) lined with a dielectric material or (ii) filled with a neutral gas. The acceleration gradient in the ICA is limited by tunneling and collisional ionization in the dielectric liner or gas. Ionization can lead to significant modification of the optical properties of the waveguide, altering the phase velocity and causing particle slippage, thus disrupting the acceleration process. Maximum accelerating gradients and pulse durations are presented for a 10 {mu}m and a 1 mm wavelength driver. We show that the use of an unguided Bessel (axicon) beam can enhance the energy gain compared to a higher order Gaussian beam. The enhancement factor is N{sup 1/2}, where N is the number of lobes in the Bessel beam. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. High density laser-driven target

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, John D.

    1981-01-01

    A high density target for implosion by laser energy composed of a central quantity of fuel surrounded by a high-Z pusher shell with a low-Z ablator-pusher shell spaced therefrom forming a region filled with low-density material.

  20. Inertial fusion energy power reactor fuel recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, C. A.; Kozub, T.; Langish, S. W.; Ciebiera, L. P.; Nobile, A.; Wermer, J.; Sessions, K.

    2008-07-15

    A conceptual design is proposed to support the recovery of un-expended fuel, ash, and associated post-detonation products resident in plasma exhaust from a {approx}2 GWIFE direct drive power reactor. The design includes systems for the safe and efficient collection, processing, and purification of plasma exhaust fuel components. The system has been conceptually designed and sized such that tritium bred within blankets, lining the reactor target chamber, can also be collected, processed, and introduced into the fuel cycle. The system will nominally be sized to process {approx}2 kg of tritium per day and is designed to link directly to the target chamber vacuum pumping system. An effort to model the fuel recovery system (FRS) using the Aspen Plus engineering code has commenced. The system design supports processing effluent gases from the reactor directly from the exhaust of the vacuum pumping system or in batch mode, via a buffer vessel in the Receiving and Analysis System. Emphasis is on nuclear safety, reliability, and redundancy as to maximize availability. The primary goal of the fuel recovery system design is to economically recycle components of direct drive IFE fuel. The FRS design is presented as a facility sub-system in the context of supporting the larger goal of producing safe and economical IFE power. (authors)

  1. Meat and poultry consumption contribution to the natural radionuclide intake of the inhabitants of the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinloye, M. K.; Olomo, J. B.; Olubunmi, P. A.

    1999-02-01

    The mean activity concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides ( 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K) in three types of meat (goat meat, beef and pork) from stock animals as well as free-range and intensive poultry raised within the OAU environment of the Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), Ile-Ife, were measured by means of a well-calibrated high-purity germanium detector. The specific activities of 226Ra in the three types of meat ranged from 1.11 to 5.83 Bq kg -1 with a mean of 3.10±1.52 Bq kg -1. 228Ra was not detectable in both beef and pork but had a range of 1.53-1.63 Bq kg -1 with a mean of 1.58±0.30 Bq kg -1 in goat meat while 40K recorded an average specific activity of 360.00±54.20 Bq kg -1 for the various samples of meat. The mean activity values of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K for the poultry were 2.59±0.48, 0.78±0.13 and 265.01±15.90 Bq kg -1, respectively. The results obtained for the daily radionuclide intake of the various meat types showed that those of 226Ra ranged from 0.4 to 8.1 mBq d -1 with a mean of 4.9±0.4 mBq d -1. Since 228Ra was not detectable in beef and pork its daily intake could not be estimated. However, a mean value of intake of 2.2±0.4 mBq d -1 was obtained for goat meat. The values of 40K intake ranged from 150.0 to 672.7 mBq d -1 with an average of 455.5±19.0 mBq d -1. The mean daily intakes of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K for the two types of poultry were 6.15±0.70, 1.9±0.3 and 633.4±38.0 mBq d -1, respectively.

  2. Tritium Breeding Blanket for a Commercial Fusion Power Plant - A System Engineering Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Wayne R.

    2014-04-14

    The goal of developing a new source of electric power based on fusion has been pursued for decades. If successful, future fusion power plants will help meet growing world-wide demand for electric power. A key feature and selling point for fusion is that its fuel supply is widely distributed globally and virtually inexhaustible. Current world-wide research on fusion energy is focused on the deuterium-tritium (DT for short) fusion reaction since it will be the easiest to achieve in terms of the conditions (e.g., temperature, density and confinement time of the DT fuel) required to produce net energy. Over the past decades countless studies have examined various concepts for TBBs for both magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). At this time, the key organizations involved are government sponsored research organizations world-wide. The near-term focus of the MFE community is on the development of TBB mock-ups to be tested on the ITER tokamak currently under construction in Caderache France. TBB concepts for IFE tend to be different from MFE primarily due to significantly different operating conditions and constraints. This report focuses on longer-term commercial power plants where the key stakeholders include: electric utilities, plant owner and operator, manufacturer, regulators, utility customers, and in-plant subsystems including the heat transfer and conversion systems, fuel processing system, plant safety systems, and the monitoring control systems.

  3. Design of On-chip Power Transport and Coupling Components for a Silicon Woodpile Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ziran; Ng, C.; McGuinness, C.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2011-05-23

    Three-dimensional woodpile photonic bandgap (PBG) waveguide enables high-gradient and efficient laser driven acceleration, while various accelerator components, including laser couplers, power transmission lines, woodpile accelerating and focusing waveguides, and energy recycling resonators, can be potentially integrated on a single monolithic structure via lithographic fabrications. This paper will present designs of this on-chip accelerator based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide. Laser power is coupled from free-space or fiber into SOI waveguide by grating structures on the silicon surface, split into multiple channels to excite individual accelerator cells, and eventually gets merged into the power recycle pathway. Design and simulation results will be presented regarding various coupling components involved in this network.

  4. High-energy density experiments on planetary materials using high-power lasers and X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Norimasa

    2015-06-01

    Laser-driven dynamic compression allows us to investigate the behavior of planetary and exoplanetary materials at extreme conditions. Our high-energy density (HED) experiments for applications to planetary sciences began over five years ago. We measured the equation-of-state of cryogenic liquid hydrogen under laser-shock compression up to 55 GPa. Since then, various materials constituting the icy giant planets and the Earth-like planets have been studied using laser-driven dynamic compression techniques. Pressure-volume-temperature EOS data and optical property data of water and molecular mixtures were obtained at the planetary/exoplanetary interior conditions. Silicates and oxides data show interesting behaviors in the warm-dense matter regime due to their phase transformations. Most recently the structural changes of iron were observed for understanding the kinetics under the bcc-hcp transformation phenomena on a new HED science platform coupling power-lasers and the X-ray free electron laser (SACLA). This work was performed under the joint research project at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. It was partially supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 20654042, 22224012, 23540556, and 24103507) and also by grants from the Core-to-Core Program of JSPS on International Alliance for Material Science in Extreme States with High Power Laser and XFEL, and the X-ray Free Electron Laser Priority Strategy Program of MEXT.

  5. NDCX-II PULSED POWER SYSTEM AND INDUCTION CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.L.; Reginato, L.L.; Leitner, M.

    2009-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is currently finalizing the design of NDCX-II, the second phase of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, which will use an ion beam to explore Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) target hydrodynamics. The ion induction accelerator will include induction cells and Blumleins from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A test stand has been built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to test refurbished ATA induction cells and pulsed power hardware for voltage holding and ability to produce various compression and acceleration waveforms. The performance requirements, design modifications, and test results will be presented.

  6. Rep-rated Z-Pinch Power Plant Concept - Direct Energy Conversion and Shrapnel Generation*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, John S.; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels; Miller, Greg; Olsen, Craig L.; Rochau, Gary E.; Derzon, Mark S.; Slutz, Steven A.; Spielman, Rick B.; Peterson, Per F.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Pederson, Robert R.

    2000-10-01

    We are developing direct energy conversion schemes and shrapnel generation models to be used to optimize a high yield z-pinch IFE power plant concept. The concept uses high yield ( 10 GJ) at low rep-rate ( 0.1 Hz), with a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to provide the necessary standoff between the fusion target and the power plant chamber. The RTL would be cast out of a conventional power plant coolant material (such as Li or Flibe) that can be used to absorb the fusion energy, breed tritium, and mitigate the shock to the first wall. Current results of initial work on this concept will be discussed. *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy Under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Final Focus Shielding Designs for Modern Heavy-Ion Fusion Power Plant Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R

    2000-07-05

    Recent work in heavy-ion fusion accelerators and final focusing systems shows a trend towards less current per beam, and thus, a greater number of beams. Final focusing magnets are susceptible to nuclear heating, radiation damage, and neutron activation. The trend towards more beams, however, means that there can be less shielding for each magnet, Excessive levels of nuclear heating may lead to magnet quench or an intolerable recirculating power for magnet cooling. High levels of radiation damage may result in short magnet lifetimes and low reliability. Finally, neutron activation of the magnet components may lead to difficulties in maintenance, recycling, and waste disposal. The present work expands upon previous, three-dimensional magnet shielding calculations for a modified version of the HYLIFE-I1 IFE power plant design. We present key magnet results as a function of the number of beams.

  8. Use of Clearance Indexes to Assess Waste Disposal Issues for the HYLIFE-II Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Sanz, J

    2002-01-17

    Traditionally, waste management studies for fusion energy have used the Waste Disposal Rating (WDR) to evaluate if radioactive material from irradiated structures could qualify for shallow land burial. However, given the space limitations and the negative public perception of large volumes of waste, there is a growing international motivation to develop a fusion waste management system that maximizes the amount of material that can be cleared or recycled. In this work, we present an updated assessment of the waste management options for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant, using the concept of Clearance Index (CI) for radioactive waste disposal. With that purpose, we have performed a detailed neutronics analysis of the HYLIFE-II design, using the TART and ACAB computer codes for neutron transport and activation, respectively. Whereas the traditional version of ACAB only provided the user with the WDR as an index for waste considerations, here we have modified the code to calculate Clearance Indexes using the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) clearance limits for radiological waste disposal. The results from the analysis are used to perform an assessment of the waste management options for the HYLIFE-II IFE design.

  9. PEGylated Cu3BiS3 hollow nanospheres as a new photothermal agent for 980 nm-laser-driven photothermochemotherapy and a contrast agent for X-ray computed tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shu-Mei; Ma, De-Kun; Zhang, Sheng-Hui; Wang, Wei; Chen, Wei; Huang, Shao-Ming; Yu, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Developing multifunctional near-infrared (NIR) light-driven photothermal agents is in high demand for efficient cancer therapy. Herein, PEGylated Cu3BiS3 hollow nanospheres (HNSs) with an average diameter of 80 nm were synthesized through a facile ethylene glycol-mediated solvothermal route. The obtained PEGylated Cu3BiS3 HNSs exhibited strong NIR optical absorption with a large molar extinction coefficient of 4.1 × 109 cm-1 M-1 at 980 nm. Under the irradiation of a 980 nm laser with a safe power density of 0.72 W cm-2, Cu3BiS3 HNSs produced significant photothermal heating with a photothermal transduction efficiency of 27.5%. The Cu3BiS3 HNSs also showed a good antitumoral drug doxorubicin (DOX) loading capacity and pH- and NIR-responsive DOX release behaviors. At a low dosage of 10 μg mL-1, HeLa cells could be efficiently killed through a synergistic effect of chemo- and photothermo-therapy respectively based on the DOX release and the photothermal effect of Cu3BiS3 HNSs. In addition, Cu3BiS3 HNSs displayed a good X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging capability. Furthermore, Cu3BiS3 HNSs could be used for efficient in vivo photothermochemotherapy and X-ray CT imaging of mice bearing melanoma skin cancer. This multifunctional theranostic nanomaterial shows potential promise for cancer therapy.Developing multifunctional near-infrared (NIR) light-driven photothermal agents is in high demand for efficient cancer therapy. Herein, PEGylated Cu3BiS3 hollow nanospheres (HNSs) with an average diameter of 80 nm were synthesized through a facile ethylene glycol-mediated solvothermal route. The obtained PEGylated Cu3BiS3 HNSs exhibited strong NIR optical absorption with a large molar extinction coefficient of 4.1 × 109 cm-1 M-1 at 980 nm. Under the irradiation of a 980 nm laser with a safe power density of 0.72 W cm-2, Cu3BiS3 HNSs produced significant photothermal heating with a photothermal transduction efficiency of 27.5%. The Cu3BiS3 HNSs also showed a good

  10. PEGylated Cu3BiS3 hollow nanospheres as a new photothermal agent for 980 nm-laser-driven photothermochemotherapy and a contrast agent for X-ray computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shu-Mei; Ma, De-Kun; Zhang, Sheng-Hui; Wang, Wei; Chen, Wei; Huang, Shao-Ming; Yu, Kang

    2016-01-21

    Developing multifunctional near-infrared (NIR) light-driven photothermal agents is in high demand for efficient cancer therapy. Herein, PEGylated Cu3BiS3 hollow nanospheres (HNSs) with an average diameter of 80 nm were synthesized through a facile ethylene glycol-mediated solvothermal route. The obtained PEGylated Cu3BiS3 HNSs exhibited strong NIR optical absorption with a large molar extinction coefficient of 4.1 × 10(9) cm(-1) M(-1) at 980 nm. Under the irradiation of a 980 nm laser with a safe power density of 0.72 W cm(-2), Cu3BiS3 HNSs produced significant photothermal heating with a photothermal transduction efficiency of 27.5%. The Cu3BiS3 HNSs also showed a good antitumoral drug doxorubicin (DOX) loading capacity and pH- and NIR-responsive DOX release behaviors. At a low dosage of 10 μg mL(-1), HeLa cells could be efficiently killed through a synergistic effect of chemo- and photothermo-therapy respectively based on the DOX release and the photothermal effect of Cu3BiS3 HNSs. In addition, Cu3BiS3 HNSs displayed a good X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging capability. Furthermore, Cu3BiS3 HNSs could be used for efficient in vivo photothermochemotherapy and X-ray CT imaging of mice bearing melanoma skin cancer. This multifunctional theranostic nanomaterial shows potential promise for cancer therapy. PMID:26488908

  11. Progress in accident analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-10-11

    The present work continues our effort to perform an integrated safety analysis for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design. Recently we developed a base case for a severe accident scenario in order to calculate accident doses for HYLIFE-II. It consisted of a total loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in which all the liquid flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) was lost at the beginning of the accident. Results showed that the off-site dose was below the limit given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for public protection in case of accident, and that his dose was dominated by the tritium released during the accident.

  12. Stability study for matching in laser driven plasma acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A. R.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A.; Belleveglia, M.; Bisesto, F. G.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Gallo, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F.; Mostacci, A.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Serafini, L.; Tomassini, P.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2016-09-01

    In a recent paper [14], a scheme for inserting and extracting high brightness electron beams to/from a plasma based acceleration stage was presented and proved to be effective with an ideal bi-Gaussian beam, as could be delivered by a conventional photo-injector. In this paper, we extend that study, assessing the method stability against some jitters in the properties of the injected beam. We find that the effects of jitters in Twiss parameters are not symmetric in results; we find a promising configuration that yields better performances than the setting proposed in [14]. Moreover we show and interpret what happens when the beam charge profiles are modified.

  13. Laser-driven polarized hydrogen and deuterium internal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    After completing comprehensive tests of the performance of the source with both hydrogen and deuterium gas, we began tests of a realistic polarized deuterium internal target. These tests involve characterizing the atomic polarization and dissociation fraction of atoms in a storage cell as a function of flow and magnetic field, and making direct measurements of the average nuclear tensor polarization of deuterium atoms in the storage cell. Transfer of polarization from the atomic electron to the nucleus as a result of D-D spin-exchange collisions was observed in deuterium, verifying calculations suggesting that high vector polarization in both hydrogen and deuterium can be obtained in a gas in spin temperature equilibrium without inducing RF transitions between the magnetic substates. In order to improve the durability of the system, the source glassware was redesigned to simplify construction and installation and eliminate stress points that led to frequent breakage. Improvements made to the nuclear polarimeter, which used the low energy {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He reaction to analyze the tensor polarization of the deuterium, included installing acceleration lenses constructed of wire mesh to improve pumping conductance, construction of a new holding field coil, and elimination of the Wien filter from the setup. These changes substantially simplified operation of the polarimeter and should have reduced depolarization in collisions with the wall. However, when a number of tests failed to show an improvement of the nuclear polarization, it was discovered that extended operation of the system with a section of teflon as a getter for potassium caused the dissociation fraction to decline with time under realistic operating conditions, suggesting that teflon may not be a suitable material to eliminate potassium from the target. We are replacing the teflon surfaces with drifilm-coated ones and plan to continue tests of the polarized internal target in this configuration.

  14. Laser-driven ablation through fast electrons in PALS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Chodukowski, T.; Demchenko, N.; Kalinowska, Z.; Kasperczuk, A.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Pisarczyk, P.; Pisarczyk, T.; Renner, O.; Skala, J.; Smid, M.; Ullschmied, J.

    2016-03-01

    Energy transfer to shock wave in Al and Cu targets irradiated by a laser pulse with intensity of I≈1-50 PW/cm2 and duration of 250 ps was investigated at Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS). The iodine laser provided energy in the range of 100-600 J at the first and third harmonic frequencies. The focal spot radius of laser beam on the target was varied from 160 to 40 μm. The dominant contribution of fast electron energy transfer into the ablation process was found when using the first harmonic radiation, the focal spot radius of 40-100 μm, and the energy of 300-600 J. The fast electron heating results in the growth of ablation pressure from 60 Mbar at the intensity of 10 PW/cm2 to 180 Mbar at the intensity of 50 PW/cm2 and in the growth of the efficiency of the energy conversion into the shock wave from 2 to 7% under the conditions of 2D ablation.

  15. Advances in laser driven accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2004-08-23

    Current activities (last few years) at different laboratories, towards the development of a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) are reviewed, followed by a more in depth discussion of results obtained at the L'OASIS laboratory of LBNL. Recent results on laser guiding of relativistically intense beams in preformed plasma channels are discussed. The observation of mono-energetic beams in the 100 MeV energy range, produced by a channel guided LWFA at LBNL, is described and compared to results obtained in the unguided case at LOA, RAL and LBNL. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator has a very beneficial impact on the electron energy distribution. Progress on laser triggered injection is reviewed. Results are presented on measurements of bunch duration and emittance of the accelerated electron beams, that indicate the possibility of generating femtosecond duration electron bunches. Future challenges and plans towards the development of a 1 GeV LWFA module are discussed.

  16. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  17. Emittance measurements from a laser-driven electron injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, David A.

    1999-11-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 Å, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately I π mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance- compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, S-band, high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be ~13 π mm-mrad for 5 ps, and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.15 π mm-mrad.

  18. Laser Driven Ion accelerators - current status and perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Zepf, M.; Robinson, A. P. L.

    2009-01-22

    The interaction of ultra-intense lasers with thin foil targets has recently emerged as a route to achieving extreme acceleration gradients and hence ultra-compact proton and ion accelerators. There are a number of distinct physical processes by which the protons/ions can be accelerated to energies in excess of 10 MeV. The recent development is discussed and a new mechanism--Radiation Pressure Acceleration is highlighted as a route to achieving efficient production of relativistic ions beams.

  19. Chirped pulse reflectivity in laser driven shock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benuzzi, Alessandra; Koenig, Michel; Faral, Bernard; Batani, Dimitri; Scianitti, Francesca; di Santo, Domenico; Hall, Tom

    1998-11-01

    We performed an experiment based on using two pulses delivered by the 100 TW LULI laser. The first one is an uncompressed (FWHM =89 600 ps) chirped main pulse generating a shock wave in a CH-Al target coated into 2 mm fused quartz. The target rear side emissivity was recorded by a visible streak camera in order to check the shock uniformity. The second one is a partially compressed (FWHM =89 100 ps) chirped probe pulse which irradiates the rear face of the target (the quartz side). We measured on the same laser shot a)the chirped pulse reflectometry(1) which allowed us to obtain a very high temporal resolution, thus a good precision in the shock breakout time determination b) the reflected probe phase change as a function of time using the frequency domain interferometry technique(2). Such measurement allowed us to deduce the interface Al-quartz displacement velocity which yields information on preheating effects and on fluid velocity. [1] D. M. Gold, A. Sullivan, R. Sheperd, J. Dunn & R. Stewart, Proceedings of 26th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference, Fairbanks, Alaska (1996). [2] J. P. Geindre, P. Audebert, A. Rousse, F. Falli=E8s, J. C. Gauthier, A. Mysyrowicz, A. D. Santos, G. Hammoniaux & A. Antonetti, Optics Lett. 19, 1997 (1994).

  20. Methods and system for controlled laser-driven explosive bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Hackel, Lloyd; Rankin, Jon

    2015-11-19

    A technique for bonding two dissimilar materials includes positioning a second material over a first material at an oblique angle and applying a tamping layer over the second martial. A laser beam is directed at the second material that generates a plasma at the location of impact on the second material. The plasma generates pressure that accelerates a portion of the second material to a very high velocity and towards the first material. The second material impacts the first material causing bonding of the two materials.

  1. Laser-Driven Corrugation Instability of Liquid Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilmann, Fritz

    1983-12-01

    During intense CO2-laser irradiation deep corrugations build up on liquid metals such as Hg, In, Sn, Al, and Pb. Spacing, orientation, growth, and decay of the corrugations are studied, by visible light diffraction; support is found for a model of stimulated scattering where the incident light parametrically decays into both the surface corrugation and a surface plasmon. Thermal evaporation supplies the nonlinearity. The instability provides polarization-dependent absorption and can be expected in laser-metalworking and laser-plasma situations.

  2. Multiple Ionization Bursts in Laser-Driven Hydrogen Molecular Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Takemoto, Norio; Becker, Andreas

    2010-11-12

    Theoretical study on H{sub 2}{sup +} in an intense infrared laser field on the attosecond time scale reveals that the molecular ion shows multiple bursts of ionization within a half-cycle of the laser field oscillation, in contrast to the widely accepted tunnel ionization picture for an atom. These bursts are found to be induced by transient localization of the electron at one of the nuclei, and a relation between the time instants of the localization and the vector potential of the laser light is derived. A scheme is proposed to probe the localization dynamics by an extreme ultraviolet laser pulse.

  3. Incoherent synchrotron emission of laser-driven plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Serebryakov, D. A. Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    When a relativistically intense linearly polarized laser pulse is incident on an overdense plasma, a dense electron layer is formed on the plasma edge which relativistic motion results in high harmonic generation, ion acceleration, and incoherent synchrotron emission of gamma-photons. Here we present a self-consistent analytical model that describes the edge motion and apply it to the problem of incoherent synchrotron emission by ultrarelativistic plasma electrons. The model takes into account both coherent radiation reaction from high harmonics and incoherent radiation reaction in the Landau–Lifshitz form. The analytical results are in agreement with 3D particle-in-cell simulations in a certain parameter region that corresponds to the relativistic electronic spring interaction regime.

  4. Ultrafast laser driven spin generation in metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Gyung-Min

    This dissertation presents experimental studies of spin generation in metallic ferromagnets (FM) driven by ultrafast laser light using a pump-probe technique. The pump light gives a driving force for spin generation by depositing energy or spin angular momentum on FM. The probe light measures spin responses by magneto-optical Kerr effect or temperature responses by time-domain thermoreflectance. I find that ultrafast laser light generates spins in FM in three distinct mechanisms: (i) demagnetization; (ii) spin-dependent Seebeck effect (SDSE); (iii) optical helicity. The demagnetization-driven spin generation is due to energy transport between electrons and magnons of FM and conservation of angular momentum for electron-magnon coupling. Ultrafast laser light deposits its energy in electrons of metallic layers and leads to a sharp increase of the electron temperature. The excited electrons transport energy to magnons of FM by the electron-magnon coupling. The magnon excitation results in ultrafast demagnetization of FM. I find that the spin loss by magnon excitations during the demagnetization process is converted to the spin generation in electrons of FM by the conservation of angular momentum for electron-magnon coupling. The generated spins diffuse to other layers and leads to spin accumulation in nonmagnetic metals (NM) or spin transfer torque on other FMs. I measure the demagnetization-driven spin accumulation in a NM/FM1/NM structure and spin transfer torque in a NM/FM1/NM/FM2 structure. The SDSE-driven spin generation is due to a heat current at FM/NM interfaces and spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of FM. Ultrafast laser light deposits its energy in a heat absorbing layer of a multilayer structure and leads to a heat current from the heat absorbing layer to heat sinking layer. When an FM is incorporated in the multilayer structure, the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of FM converts the heat current to spin generation at interfaces between FM and NM. The interfacial spin generation rate is proportional to the heat current through FM and spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of FM. I find that the heat current and spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient can be controlled by thickness of the heat sink layer and composition of FM, respectively. The generated spins diffuse to other layers and leads to spin accumulation on NM or spin transfer torque on other FM. I measure the SDSE-driven spin accumulation in a NM/FM1/NM structure and spin transfer torque in a NM/FM1/NM/FM2 structure. The optical helicity-driven spin generation is due to angular momentum transport between light and electrons of FM and spin-orbit splitting of FM. A circularly polarized light with a wavelength of 785 nm triggers a dipolar transition from occupied 3d to unoccupied 4p bands of 3d transition FMs. The selection rule predicts a significant spin polarization for the dipolar transition from spin-orbit 3 d-sub-bands (3d3/2 and 3d 5/2) to 4p band. However, energy degeneracy between 3d3/2 and 3d5/2 leads to zero spin polarization. I find that a small-but-finite spin-orbit splitting of the 3d bands leads to a finite spin generation from a circularly polarized light. The generated spins in electrons can be absorbed by magnetization of FM and lead to spin transfer torque. I measure the optical helicity-driven spin transfer torque in a single FM structure.

  5. Integrated simulation approach for laser-driven fast ignition.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-M; Gibbon, P; Sheng, Z-M; Li, Y-T

    2015-01-01

    An integrated simulation approach fully based on the particle-in-cell (PIC) model is proposed, which involves both fast-particle generation via laser solid-density plasma interaction and transport and energy deposition of the particles in extremely high-density plasma. It is realized by introducing two independent systems in a simulation, where the fast-particle generation is simulated by a full PIC system and the transport and energy deposition computed by a second PIC system with a reduced field solver. Data of the fast particles generated in the full PIC system are copied to the reduced PIC system in real time as the fast-particle source. Unlike a two-region approach, which takes a single PIC system and two field solvers in two plasma density regions, respectively, the present one need not match the field solvers since the reduced field solver and the full solver adopted respectively in the two systems are independent. A simulation case is presented, which demonstrates that this approach can be applied to integrated simulation of fast ignition with real target densities, e.g., 300 g/cm(3). PMID:25679717

  6. DDT Characteristics of Laser Driven Exploding Bridgewire Detonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welle, Eric

    2005-07-01

    The initiation and performance characteristics of Laser Exploding Bridgewire (LEBW) detonators loaded with CL-20, CP and BNCP were examined. LEBW devices, in name, as well as in function, exhibit similarities to their electrically driven counterparts with the exception that the means for energy deposition into the driving metal media results from photon absorption instead of electrical joule heating. CP and BNCP were chosen due to their well-known propensity to rapidly undergo a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) and CL-20 was chosen to explore its utility as a DDT explosive. The explosive loading within the LEBW detonators were similar in nature to traditional EBW devices with regard to %TMD loading of the initial increment as well as quantity of energetic materials. Comparisons of the energy fluences required for initiation of the explosives will be discussed. Additionally, streak camera measurements will be reviewed that were conducted at what would be considered ``hard-fire'' fluence levels as well as conditions closer to the mean firing fluence levels of initiation.

  7. Laser-driven proton acceleration using a conical nanobrush target

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jinqing; Zhao Zongqing; Yan Yonghong; Zhou Weimin; Cao Leifeng; Gu Yuqiu; Jin Xiaolin; Li Bin; Wu Fengjuan

    2012-05-15

    A conical nanobrush target is proposed to improve the total proton energy-conversion efficiency in proton beam acceleration and investigated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D-PIC) simulations. Results indicate a significant enhancement of the number and energies of hot electrons through the target rear side of the conical nanobrush target. Compared with the plain target, the field increases several times. We observe enhancements of the average proton energy and total laser-proton energy conversion efficiency of 105%. This enhancement is attributed to both nanobrush and conical configurations. The proton beam is well collimated with a divergence angle less than 28{sup Degree-Sign }. The proposed target may serve as a new method for increasing laser to proton energy-conversion efficiency.

  8. Ion acceleration from laser-driven electrostatic shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fiuza, F.; Stockem, A.; Boella, E.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Haberberger, D.; Tochitsky, S.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    2013-05-15

    Multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are used to study the generation of electrostatic shocks in plasma and the reflection of background ions to produce high-quality and high-energy ion beams. Electrostatic shocks are driven by the interaction of two plasmas with different density and/or relative drift velocity. The energy and number of ions reflected by the shock increase with increasing density ratio and relative drift velocity between the two interacting plasmas. It is shown that the interaction of intense lasers with tailored near-critical density plasmas allows for the efficient heating of the plasma electrons and steepening of the plasma profile at the critical density interface, leading to the generation of high-velocity shock structures and high-energy ion beams. Our results indicate that high-quality 200 MeV shock-accelerated ion beams required for medical applications may be obtained with current laser systems.

  9. Proton radiography of a laser-driven implosion.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Borghesi, M; Clarke, R C; Freeman, R R; Habara, H; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D; Hicks, D G; Kar, S; Key, M H; King, J A; Lancaster, K; Neely, D; Nikkro, A; Norreys, P A; Notley, M M; Phillips, T W; Romagnani, L; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B; Town, R P J

    2006-07-28

    Protons accelerated by a picosecond laser pulse have been used to radiograph a 500 microm diameter capsule, imploded with 300 J of laser light in 6 symmetrically incident beams of wavelength 1.054 microm and pulse length 1 ns. Point projection proton backlighting was used to characterize the density gradients at discrete times through the implosion. Asymmetries were diagnosed both during the early and stagnation stages of the implosion. Comparison with analytic scattering theory and simple Monte Carlo simulations were consistent with a 3+/-1 g/cm3 core with diameter 85+/-10 microm. Scaling simulations show that protons>50 MeV are required to diagnose asymmetry in ignition scale conditions.

  10. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with a relatively low intensity (3  ×  1016 W cm-2) allowed the enhancing of the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the ‘ultraclean’ proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as a target. A combination of the specific target composition and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed the enhancing of the yield of alpha particles up to 109 per steradian. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long-laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  11. Divergence of laser-driven relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, A.; Honrubia, J. J.; D'Humières, E.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2010-09-01

    Electron acceleration by ultrahigh intensity lasers is studied by means of two-dimensional planar particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that the full divergence of the fast electron beam is defined by two complementary physical effects: the regular radial beam deviation depending on the electron radial position and the angular dispersion. If the scale length of the preplasma surrounding the solid target is sufficiently low, the radial deviation is determined by the transverse component of the laser ponderomotive force. The random angular dispersion is due to the small scale magnetic fields excited near the critical density due to the collisionless Weibel instability. When a preplasma is present, the radial beam deviation increases due to the electron acceleration in larger volumes and can become comparable to the local angular dispersion. This effect has been neglected so far in most of the fast electron transport calculations, overestimating significantly the beam collimation by resistive magnetic fields. Simulations with a two-dimensional cylindrically-symmetric hybrid code accounting for the electron radial velocity demonstrate a substantially reduced strength and a shorter penetration of the azimuthal magnetic field in solid targets.

  12. Intense tera-hertz laser driven proton acceleration in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the acceleration of a proton beam driven by intense tera-hertz (THz) laser field from a near critical density hydrogen plasma. Two-dimension-in-space and three-dimension-in-velocity particle-in-cell simulation results show that a relatively long wavelength and an intense THz laser can be employed for proton acceleration to high energies from near critical density plasmas. We adopt here the electromagnetic field in a long wavelength (0.33 THz) regime in contrast to the optical and/or near infrared wavelength regime, which offers distinct advantages due to their long wavelength ( λ = 350 μ m ), such as the λ 2 scaling of the electron ponderomotive energy. Simulation study delineates the evolution of THz laser field in a near critical plasma reflecting the enhancement in the electric field of laser, which can be of high relevance for staged or post ion acceleration.

  13. Influence of shock waves on laser-driven proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lundh, O.; Lindau, F.; Persson, A.; Wahlstroem, C.-G.; McKenna, P.; Batani, D.

    2007-08-15

    The influence of shock waves, driven by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), on laser-accelerated proton beams is investigated. A local deformation, produced by a cold shock wave launched by the ablation pressure of the ASE pedestal, can under oblique laser irradiation significantly direct the proton beam toward the laser axis. This can be understood in the frame of target normal sheath acceleration as proton emission from an area of the target where the local target normal is shifted toward the laser axis. Hydrodynamic simulations and experimental data show that there exists a window in laser and target parameter space where the target can be significantly deformed and yet facilitate efficient proton acceleration. The dependence of the magnitude of the deflection on target material, foil thickness, and ASE pedestal intensity and duration is experimentally investigated. The deflection angle is found to increase with increasing ASE intensity and duration and decrease with increasing target thickness. In a comparison between aluminum and copper target foils, aluminum is found to yield a larger proton beam deflection. An analytic model is successfully used to predict the proton emission direction.

  14. Vibrational- and Laser-Driven Electronic Dynamics in the Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolow, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Electronic dynamics within molecules can be driven by both motions of the atoms, via non-Born-Oppenheimer coupling, and by applied laser fields, driving electron motions on sub-cycle time scales. The challenging but most general case of Molecular Dynamics is where electronic and vibrational motions are fully coupled, the making and breaking of chemical bonds being the most prominent example. Time-Resolved Coincidence Imaging Spectroscopy (TRCIS) is a ultrafast photoelectron probe of Molecular Frame dynamics in polyatomic molecules. It makes use of full 3D recoil momentum vector determination of coincident photoions and photoelectrons as a function of time, permitting observations of coupled electronic-vibrational dynamics from the Molecular Frame rather than the Lab Frame point of view. Methods in non-resonant quantum control, based on the dynamic Stark effect, have also emerged as important tools for enhancing molecular dynamics studies. In particular, molecular alignment can fix the Molecular Frame within the Lab Frame, avoiding loss of information due to orientational averaging. Provided that the molecular dynamics are fast compared to rotational dephasing, this method also permits time-resolved Molecular Frame observations. As laser fields get stronger, a sub-cycle (attosecond) physics emerges, leading to new probes of driven multi-electron dynamics in polyatomic molecules. Understanding driven multi-electron responses will be central to advancing attosecond science towards polyatomic molecules and complex systems.

  15. Inactivation of enveloped virus by laser-driven protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Chapa, Travis; Beatty, Wandy; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Yu, Dong; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-12-01

    Ultrafast lasers in the visible and near-infrared range have emerged as a potential new method for pathogen reduction of blood products and pharmaceuticals. However, the mechanism of enveloped virus inactivation by this method is unknown. We report the inactivation as well as the molecular and structural effects caused by visible (425 nm) femtosecond laser irradiation on murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), an enveloped, double-stranded DNA virus. Our results show that laser irradiation (1) caused a 5-log reduction in MCMV titer, (2) did not cause significant changes to the global structure of MCMV virions including membrane and capsid, as assessed by electron microscopy, (3) produced no evidence of double-strand breaks or crosslinking in MCMV genomic DNA, and (4) caused selective aggregation of viral capsid and tegument proteins. We propose a model in which ultrafast laser irradiation induces partial unfolding of viral proteins by disrupting hydrogen bonds and/or hydrophobic interactions, leading to aggregation of closely associated viral proteins and inactivation of the virus. These results provide new insight into the inactivation of enveloped viruses by visible femtosecond lasers at the molecular level, and help pave the way for the development of a new ultrafast laser technology for pathogen reduction.

  16. Ultraintense Laser-Driven Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Plane Symmetric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamo, James

    We consider the relativistic hydrodynamics of a plane symmetric, charged fluid system driven by an ultra-violent, ultra-intense laser. The resulting particle motion will be relativistic due to the strength of the laser. The fluid will accelerate violently with respect to an observer in the laboratory, so although the arena for the evolution is a smooth Minkowski spacetime, methods of general relativity will be invoked. Many systems in relativity can be cast into field theories, and we first extend the variational formulation of special relativity to laser-matter interactions. From this, a full set of four Euler equations arise that govern the hydrodynamics of a general 4-dimensional laser-matter system. The plane symmetry, however, naturally gives rise to two Killing vectors. This allows for a 2+2 reduction process to be used to analyze the system. This will allow for a reformulation of the 4-dimensional system of interacting particles as a 2-dimensional system of interacting plasma sheets. The transverse particle motion is shown to produce a change in the "effective mass" of the plasma sheets, which allows one to consider the sheets as a single entity. To achieve this, we first give the details of this 2+2 formalism and show how it can be used to write the underlying space time as a product of a base manifold and transverse Euclidean planes. We then establish a natural isomorphism between the geometrical objects (vectors, covectors, and tensors) on these manifolds. By examining the effects of this procedure in the LAB and comoving coordinate systems, we establish a coordinate transformation between them. Finally, we apply the results of the 2+2 split to the 4-dimensional Euler equations, which admit two constants of motion. This allows for us to define a plasma sheet as an equivalence class of particles whose spacetime positions differ only longitudinally and define a sheet proper time. Furthermore, the notion of particle thermodynamics can be, and is, generalized to these plasma sheets. The constants of motion along with the plasma sheet thermodynamics allow the 4-dimensional Euler equations to be recast into two equations on the base manifold that refer only to the sheet thermodynamics and sheet velocities. The internal dynamics (transverse motion) within the plasma sheets is modeled by a change in the effective mass of the sheets. Consequently, each sheet can be viewed as a single object and the 4-dimensional Euler equations reduce to a 1+1 dimensional set of equations for a relativistic gas.

  17. Investigation of ultrafast laser-driven radiative blast waves.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M J; MacKinnon, A J; Zweiback, J; Shigemori, K; Ryutov, D; Rubenchik, A M; Keilty, K A; Liang, E; Remington, B A; Ditmire, T

    2001-08-20

    We have examined the evolution of cylindrically symmetric blast waves produced by the deposition of femtosecond laser pulses in gas jets. In high- Z gases radiative effects become important. We observe the production of an ionization precursor ahead of the shock front and deceleration parameters below the adiabatic value of 1/2 (for a cylinder), an effect expected when the blast wave loses energy by radiative cooling. Despite significant radiative cooling, the blast waves do not appear to develop thin shell instabilities expected for strongly radiative waves. This is believed to be due to the stabilizing effect of a relatively thick blast wave shell resulting in part from electron thermal conduction effects. PMID:11497951

  18. Measurement of RT amplitudes and wavelengths of laser driven plates

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Gillespie, C.H.

    1997-10-16

    A laser drive plate, that is a dense solid plate drive by a laser heated, lower density plasma, is inherently Raleigh-Taylor (R-T) unstable, We have previously indicated that observed surface perturbation on the plate are probably R-T instabilities, initiated by the mode structure of the driving laser beam. Using a semi- transparent impact target viewed with a polarized Epi-Illuminated Confocal Streak Microscope, has allowed us to measure the amplitude and growth of the instability.

  19. Laser-driven planar Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendinning, S. G.; Weber, S. V.; Bell, P.; Dasilva, L. B.; Dixit, S. N.; Henesian, M. A.; Kania, D. R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Powell, H. T.; Wallace, R. J.; Wegner, P. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.

    1992-08-01

    We have performed a series of experiments on the Nova Laser Facility to examine the hydrodynamic behavior of directly driven planar foils with initial perturbations of varying wavelength. The foils were accelerated with a single, frequency doubled, smoothed and temporally shaped laser beam at 0.8×1014 W/cm2. The experiments are in good agreement with numerical simulations using the computer codes LASNEX and ORCHID which show growth rates reduced to about 70% of classical for this nonlinear regime.

  20. Laser-driven planar Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Weber, S.V.; Bell, P.; DaSilva, L.B.; Dixit, S.N.; Henesian, M.A.; Kania, D.R.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Powell, H.T.; Wallace, R.J.; Wegner, P.J. ); Knauer, J.P.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1992-08-24

    We have performed a series of experiments on the Nova Laser Facility to examine the hydrodynamic behavior of directly driven planar foils with initial perturbations of varying wavelength. The foils were accelerated with a single, frequency doubled, smoothed and temporally shaped laser beam at 0.8{times}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The experiments are in good agreement with numerical simulations using the computer codes LASNEX and ORCHID which show growth rates reduced to about 70% of classical for this nonlinear regime.

  1. Observation of laser driven supercritical radiative shock precursors.

    PubMed

    Bouquet, S; Stéhlé, C; Koenig, M; Chièze, J-P; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Batani, D; Leygnac, S; Fleury, X; Merdji, H; Michaut, C; Thais, F; Grandjouan, N; Hall, T; Henry, E; Malka, V; Lafon, J-P J

    2004-06-01

    We present a supercritical radiative shock experiment performed with the LULI nanosecond laser facility. Using targets filled with xenon gas at low pressure, the propagation of a strong shock with a radiative precursor is evidenced. The main measured shock quantities (electronic density and propagation velocity) are shown to be in good agreement with theory and numerical simulations. PMID:15245230

  2. Laser-driven quasimonoenergetic proton burst from water spray target

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishna, B.; Murakami, M.; Borghesi, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Ehrentraut, L.; Schnuerer, M.; Steinke, S.; Nickles, P. V.; Psikal, J.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2010-08-15

    A narrow band proton bursts at energies of 1.6{+-}0.08 MeV were observed when a water spray consisting of (150 nm)-diameter droplets was irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse of about 45 fs duration and at an intensity of 5x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The results are explained by a Coulomb explosion of sub-laser-wavelength droplets composed of two ion species. The laser prepulse plays an important role. By pre-evaporation of the droplets, its diameter is reduced so that the main pulse can interact with a smaller droplet, and this remaining bulk can be ionized to high states. In the case of water, the mixture of quite differently charged ions establishes an 'iso-Coulomb-potential' during the droplet explosion such that protons are accelerated to a peak energy with a narrow energy spread. The model explains this crucial point, which differs critically from usual Coulomb explosion or ion sheath acceleration mechanisms.

  3. Anomalous inverse bremsstrahlung heating of laser-driven plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Mrityunjay

    2016-05-01

    Absorption of laser light in plasma via electron-ion collision (inverse bremsstrahlung) is known to decrease with the laser intensity as I 0 -3/2 or with the electron temperature as T e -3/2 where Coulomb logarithm ln Λ = 0.5ln(1 + k 2 min/k 2 max) in the expression of electron-ion collision frequency v ei is assumed to be independent of ponderomotive velocity v 0 = E0/ω which is unjustified. Here k -1 min = v th/max(ω, ω p), and k -1 max = Z/v 2 th are maximum and minimum cut-off distances of the colliding electron from the ion, v th = √T e is its thermal velocity, ω, ω p are laser and plasma frequency. Earlier with a total velocity v = (v 2 0 + v 2 th)1/2 dependent ln Λ(v) it was reported that v ei and corresponding fractional laser absorption (α) initially increases with increasing intensity, reaches a maximum value, and then fall according to the conventional I 0 -3/2 scaling. This anomalous increase in v ei and α may be objected due to an artifact introduced in ln Λ(v) through k-1 min ∝ v. Here we show similar anomalous increase of v ei and α versus I 0 (in the low temperature and under-dense density regime) with quantum and classical kinetic models of v ei without using ln Λ, but a proper choice of the total velocity dependent inverse cut-off length kmax -1 ∝ v 2 (in classical case) or kmax ∝ v (in quantum case). For a given I 0 < 5 × 1014Wcm-2, v ei versus T e also exhibits so far unnoticed identical anomalous increase as v ei versus Io, even if the conventional k max ∝ v2 th, or k max ∝ v th is chosen. However, for higher T e > 15 eV, anomalous growth of vei and a disappear. The total velocity dependent k max in kinetic models, as proposed here, may explain anomalous increase of a with I 0 measured in some earlier laser-plasma experiments. This work may be important to understand collisional absorption in the under-dense pre-plasma region due to low intensity pre-pulses and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) pedestal in the context of laser induced inertial confinement fusion.

  4. Beam Extraction from Laser Driven Multi-Charged Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O A; Logan, B G

    2001-03-19

    A newly proposed type of multicharged ion source offers the possibility of an economically advantageous high-charge-state fusion driver. Multiphoton absorption in an intense uniform laser focus can give multiple charge states of high purity, simplifying or eliminating the need for charge-state separation downstream. Very large currents (hundreds of amperes) can be extracted from this type of source. Several arrangements are possible. For example, the laser plasma could be tailored for storage in a magnetic bucket, with beam extracted from the bucket. A different approach, described in this report, is direct beam extraction from the expanding laser plasma. They discuss extraction and focusing for the particular case of a 4.1-MV beam of Xe{sup 16+} ions. The maximum duration of the beam pulse is limited by the total charge in the plasma, while the practical pulse length is determined by the range of plasma radii over which good beam optics can be achieved. The extraction electrode contains a solenoid for beam focusing. The design studies were carried out first with an envelope code and then with a self-consistent particle code. Results from the initial model showed that hundreds of amperes could be extracted, but that most of this current missed the solenoid entrance or was intercepted by the wall and that only a few amperes were able to pass through. They conclude with an improved design which increases the surviving beam to more than 70 amperes.

  5. A "slingshot" laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Gaetano; De Nicola, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed Fiore et al. [1] and Fiore and De Nicola [2] electron acceleration mechanism named "slingshot effect": under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  6. Initial experiments with a laser driven Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Operation of a Beale free piston Stirling engine with a 40-W CO2 laser is described. Advantages of such a system include: closed-cycle operation, long life, inexpensive construction, and size scalability to 100 MW.

  7. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  8. Inactivation of enveloped virus by laser-driven protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D; Chapa, Travis; Beatty, Wandy; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Yu, Dong; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-12-01

    Ultrafast lasers in the visible and near-infrared range have emerged as a potential new method for pathogen reduction of blood products and pharmaceuticals. However, the mechanism of enveloped virus inactivation by this method is unknown. We report the inactivation as well as the molecular and structural effects caused by visible (425 nm) femtosecond laser irradiation on murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), an enveloped, double-stranded DNA virus. Our results show that laser irradiation (1) caused a 5-log reduction in MCMV titer, (2) did not cause significant changes to the global structure of MCMV virions including membrane and capsid, as assessed by electron microscopy, (3) produced no evidence of double-strand breaks or crosslinking in MCMV genomic DNA, and (4) caused selective aggregation of viral capsid and tegument proteins. We propose a model in which ultrafast laser irradiation induces partial unfolding of viral proteins by disrupting hydrogen bonds and/or hydrophobic interactions, leading to aggregation of closely associated viral proteins and inactivation of the virus. These results provide new insight into the inactivation of enveloped viruses by visible femtosecond lasers at the molecular level, and help pave the way for the development of a new ultrafast laser technology for pathogen reduction. PMID:23224114

  9. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-02-23

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work a set of computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) has been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here the authors consider a severe lost of coolant accident (LOCA) producing simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the containment) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and containment building it self). Even though containment failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product release and transport. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 6 mSv (0.6 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  10. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, W; Albrecht, G; Trenholme, J; Newton, M

    2007-04-19

    Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNL annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has

  11. Chamber and target technology development for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M; Besenbruch, G; Duke, J; Forman, L; Goodin, D; Gulec, K; Hoffer, J; Khater, H; Kulcinsky, G; Latkowski, J F; Logan, B G; Margevicious, B; Meier, W R; Moir, R W; Morley, N; Nobile, A; Payne, S; Peterson, P F; Peterson, R; Petzoldt, R; Schultz, K; Steckle, W; Sviatoslavsky, L; Tillack, M; Ying, A

    1999-04-07

    Fusion chambers and high pulse-rate target systems for inertial fusion energy (IFE) must: regenerate chamber conditions suitable for target injection, laser propagation, and ignition at rates of 5 to 10 Hz; extract fusion energy at temperatures high enough for efficient conversion to electricity; breed tritium and fuel targets with minimum tritium inventory; manufacture targets at low cost; inject those targets with sufficient accuracy for high energy gain; assure adequate lifetime of the chamber and beam interface (final optics); minimize radioactive waste levels and annual volumes; and minimize radiation releases under normal operating and accident conditions. The primary goal of the US IFE program over the next four years (Phase I) is to develop the basis for a Proof-of-Performance-level driver and target chamber called the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE will explore beam transport and focusing through prototypical chamber environment and will intercept surrogate targets at high pulse rep-rate. The IRE will not have enough driver energy to ignite targets, and it will be a non-nuclear facility. IRE options are being developed for both heavy ion and laser driven IFE. Fig. 1 shows that Phase I is prerequisite to an IRE, and the IRE plus NIF (Phase II) is prerequisite to a high-pulse rate. Engineering Test Facility and DEMO for IFE, leading to an attractive fusion power plant. This report deals with the Phase-I R&D needs for the chamber, driver/chamber interface (i.e., magnets for accelerators and optics for lasers), target fabrication, and target injection; it is meant to be part of a more comprehensive IFE development plan which will include driver technology and target design R&D. Because of limited R&D funds, especially in Phase I, it is not possible to address the critical issues for all possible chamber and target technology options for heavy ion or laser fusion. On the other hand, there is risk in addressing only one approach to each technology

  12. Measurement of pulsed-power-driven magnetic fields via proton deflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mariscal, D.; McGuffey, C.; Valenzuela, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Presura, R.; Haque, S.; Wallace, M.; Arias, A.; Covington, A.; Sawada, H.; Wiewior, P.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring magnetic field and current distribution in Z-pinch plasma systems is crucial to the validation of Z-pinch theory. In this letter, the demonstration of proton deflectometry to pulsed-power-driven loads at the mega-amp scale is presented, which is capable of making more detailed field maps in high-density regions of plasmas. In this method, a laser-driven, broad-spectrum, MeV-energy proton beam is directed through a pulsed-power-driven plasma system, and the resulting deflections are measured to examine configuration of magnetic fields and to infer the currents that support them. The technique was first demonstrated on simple short-circuit loads, and the results are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations providing reliable estimates of the field and current configurations. It was then applied to a more complex—radial foil—plasma load. The measurements show unexpected proton deflections that exhibit the complexity of the plasma load and that with further analysis will reveal details about the current and magnetic field topology in this complex configuration.

  13. Gas transport and control in thick-liquid inertial fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

    Among the numerous potential routes to a commercial fusion power plant, the inertial path with thick-liquid protection is explored in this doctoral dissertation. Gas dynamics phenomena in such fusion target chambers have been investigated since the early 1990s with the help of a series of simulation codes known as TSUNAMI. For this doctoral work, the code was redesigned and rewritten entirely to enable the use of modern programming techniques, languages and software; improve its user-friendliness; and refine its ability to model thick-liquid protected chambers. The new ablation and gas dynamics code is named "Visual Tsunami" to emphasize its graphics-based pre- and post-processors. It is aimed at providing a versatile and user-friendly design tool for complex systems for which transient gas dynamics phenomena play a key role. Simultaneously, some of these improvements were implemented in a previous version of the code; the resulting code constitutes the version 2.8 of the TSUNAMI series. Visual Tsunami was used to design and model the novel Condensation Debris Experiment (CDE), which presents many aspects of a typical Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) system and has therefore been used to exercise the code. Numerical and experimental results are in good agreement. In a heavy-ion IFE target chamber, proper beam and target propagation set stringent requirements for the control of ablation debris transport in the target chamber and beam tubes. When the neutralized ballistic transport mode is employed, the background gas density should be adequately low and the beam tube metallic surfaces upstream of the neutralizing region should be free of contaminants. TSUNAMI 2.8 was used for the first simulation of gas transport through the complex geometry of the liquid blanket of a hybrid target chamber and beam lines. Concurrently, the feasibility of controlling the gas density was addressed with a novel beam tube design, which introduces magnetic shutters and a long low

  14. Gas Transport and Control in Thick-Liquid Inertial Fusion PowerPlants

    SciTech Connect

    Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

    2006-01-01

    Among the numerous potential routes to a commercial fusion power plant, the inertial path with thick-liquid protection is explored in this doctoral dissertation. Gas dynamics phenomena in such fusion target chambers have been investigated since the early 1990s with the help of a series of simulation codes known as TSUNAMI. For this doctoral work, the code was redesigned and rewritten entirely to enable the use of modern programming techniques, languages and software; improve its user-friendliness; and refine its ability to model thick-liquid protected chambers. The new ablation and gas dynamics code is named “Visual Tsunami” to emphasize its graphics-based pre- and post-processors. It is aimed at providing a versatile and user-friendly design tool for complex systems for which transient gas dynamics phenomena play a key role. Simultaneously, some of these improvements were implemented in a previous version of the code; the resulting code constitutes the version 2.8 of the TSUNAMI series. Visual Tsunami was used to design and model the novel Condensation Debris Experiment (CDE), which presents many aspects of a typical Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) system and has therefore been used to exercise the code. Numerical and experimental results are in good agreement. In a heavy-ion IFE target chamber, proper beam and target propagation set stringent requirements for the control of ablation debris transport in the target chamber and beam tubes. When the neutralized ballistic transport mode is employed, the background gas density should be adequately low and the beam tube metallic surfaces upstream of the neutralizing region should be free of contaminants. TSUNAMI 2.8 was used for the first simulation of gas transport through the complex geometry of the liquid blanket of a hybrid target chamber and beam lines. Concurrently, the feasibility of controlling the gas density was addressed with a novel beam tube design, which introduces magnetic shutters and a long low

  15. Power processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Processing of electric power has been presented as a discipline that draws on almost every field of electrical engineering, including system and control theory, communications theory, electronic network design, and power component technology. The cost of power processing equipment, which often equals that of expensive, sophisticated, and unconventional sources of electrical energy, such as solar batteries, is a significant consideration in the choice of electric power systems.

  16. Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Appropriate directions for the applied research and technology programs that will develop space power systems for U.S. future space missions beyond 1995 are explored. Spacecraft power supplies; space stations, space power reactors, solar arrays, thermoelectric generators, energy storage, and communication satellites are among the topics discussed.

  17. Power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Hamilton, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2007-12-04

    A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

  18. Power Source

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schooley, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Principals are powerful: They are the primary catalysts for creating a lasting foundation for learning, driving school and student performance, and shaping the long-term impact of school improvement efforts. Yet few principals would characterize themselves as powerful. Rather, they're self-effacing, adaptable, pragmatic, and quick to share credit…

  19. Powerful Literacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Jim, Ed.; Hamilton, Mary, Ed.; Tett, Lyn, Ed.

    These 15 papers share a common theme: seeking to promote literacy as a powerful tool for challenging existing inequalities and dependencies. "Powerful Literacies" (Jim Crowther et al.) is an introduction. Section 1 establishes the theoretical and policy frameworks that underpin the book and shows how literacy is situated in different geographical…

  20. Power Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Power Teaching weaves four factors into a seamless whole: standards, teaching thinking, research based strategies, and critical inquiry. As a prototype in its first year of development with an urban fifth grade class, the power teaching model connects selected district standards, thinking routines from Harvard University Project Zero Research…

  1. Power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, G.

    1982-01-01

    Significant events in current, prototype, and experimental utility power generating systems in 1981 are reviewed. The acceleration of licensing and the renewal of plans for reprocessing of fuel for nuclear power plants are discussed, including the rise of French reactor-produced electricity to over 40% of the country's electrical output. A 4.5 MW fuel cell neared completion in New York City, while three 2.5 MW NASA-designed windpowered generators began producing power in the state of Washington. Static bar compensators, nonflammable-liquid cooled power transformers, and ZnO surge arrestors were used by utilities for the first time, and the integration of a coal gasifier-combined cycle power plant approached the planning phase. An MHD generator was run for 1000 hours and produced 50-60 kWe, while a 20 MVA superconducting generator was readied for testing.

  2. Power system

    DOEpatents

    Hickam, Christopher Dale

    2008-03-18

    A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

  3. Progress in safety and environmental aspects of inertial fusion energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; Meier, W R

    2000-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is making significant progress in several areas related to the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of inertial fusion energy (IFE). A detailed accident analysis has been completed for the HYLIFE-II power plant design. Additional accident analyses are underway for both the HYLIFE-II and Sombrero designs. Other S and E work at LLNL has addressed the issue of the driver-chamber interface and its importance for both heavy-ion and laser-driven IFE. Radiation doses and fluences have been calculated for final focusing mirrors and magnets and shielding optimization is underway to extend the anticipated lifetimes for key components. Target designers/fabrication specialists have been provided with ranking information related to the S and E characteristics of candidate target materials (e.g., ability to recycle, accident consequences, and waste management). Ongoing work in this area will help guide research directions and the selection of target materials. Published and continuing work on fast ignition has demonstrated some of the potentially attractive S and E features of such designs. In addition to reducing total driver energies, fast ignition may ease target fabrication requirements, reduce radiation damage rates, and enable the practical use of advanced (e.g., tritium-lean) labels with significantly reduced neutron production rates, the possibility of self-breeding targets, and dramatically increased flexibility in blanket design. Domestic and international collaborations are key to success in the above areas. A brief summary of each area is given and plans for future work are outlined.

  4. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  5. Power performance

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.

    1996-04-01

    Two power generation engineering and construction firms with international markets are briefly described in this article. Bibb and Associates and Black & Veatch, both Kansas-based companies, are discussed. Current projects and services provided by the companies are described.

  6. Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Maxwell Laboratories capacitor charging power supply is the first commercial spinoff from the NASA CCDS program - a consortia of industries and government establishments to accelerate development of ground and space based commercial applications of NASA technology. The power supply transforms and conditions large voltages to charge capacitors used in x-ray sources, medical accelerators, etc. It is lighter, more reliable, more compact and efficient. Originally developed for space lasers, its commercial potential was soon recognized.

  7. Power combiner

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  8. Power inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David H.; Korich, Mark D.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2011-11-15

    Power inverters include a frame and a power module. The frame has a sidewall including an opening and defining a fluid passageway. The power module is coupled to the frame over the opening and includes a substrate, die, and an encasement. The substrate includes a first side, a second side, a center, an outer periphery, and an outer edge, and the first side of the substrate comprises a first outer layer including a metal material. The die are positioned in the substrate center and are coupled to the substrate first side. The encasement is molded over the outer periphery on the substrate first side, the substrate second side, and the substrate outer edge and around the die. The encasement, coupled to the substrate, forms a seal with the metal material. The second side of the substrate is positioned to directly contact a fluid flowing through the fluid passageway.

  9. Stigma power.

    PubMed

    Link, Bruce G; Phelan, Jo

    2014-02-01

    When people have an interest in keeping other people down, in or away, stigma is a resource that allows them to obtain ends they desire. We call this resource "stigma power" and use the term to refer to instances in which stigma processes achieve the aims of stigmatizers with respect to the exploitation, control or exclusion of others. We draw on Bourdieu (1987, 1990) who notes that power is often most effectively deployed when it is hidden or "misrecognized." To explore the utility of the stigma-power concept we examine ways in which the goals of stigmatizers are achieved but hidden in the stigma coping efforts of people with mental illnesses. We developed new self-report measures and administered them to a sample of individuals who have experienced mental illness to test whether results are consistent with the possibility that, in response to negative societal conceptions, the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of people with psychosis lead them to be concerned with staying in, propelled to stay away and induced to feel downwardly placed - precisely the outcomes stigmatizers might desire. Our introduction of the stigma-power concept carries the possibility of seeing stigmatizing circumstances in a new light.

  10. Power, Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscigno, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    Power is a core theoretical construct in the field with amazing utility across substantive areas, levels of analysis and methodologies. Yet, its use along with associated assumptions--assumptions surrounding constraint vs. action and specifically organizational structure and rationality--remain problematic. In this article, and following an…

  11. Stigma power.

    PubMed

    Link, Bruce G; Phelan, Jo

    2014-02-01

    When people have an interest in keeping other people down, in or away, stigma is a resource that allows them to obtain ends they desire. We call this resource "stigma power" and use the term to refer to instances in which stigma processes achieve the aims of stigmatizers with respect to the exploitation, control or exclusion of others. We draw on Bourdieu (1987, 1990) who notes that power is often most effectively deployed when it is hidden or "misrecognized." To explore the utility of the stigma-power concept we examine ways in which the goals of stigmatizers are achieved but hidden in the stigma coping efforts of people with mental illnesses. We developed new self-report measures and administered them to a sample of individuals who have experienced mental illness to test whether results are consistent with the possibility that, in response to negative societal conceptions, the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of people with psychosis lead them to be concerned with staying in, propelled to stay away and induced to feel downwardly placed - precisely the outcomes stigmatizers might desire. Our introduction of the stigma-power concept carries the possibility of seeing stigmatizing circumstances in a new light. PMID:24507908

  12. Power sprouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, M. M. J.

    2014-05-01

    This paper explains how a large number of sprouts were used as a battery of cells and connected together to power a set of LED Christmas lights. All relevant calculations to find the number of sprouts needed, their arrangement in series and parallel, the charge stored on the required capacitor and the capacitor charging time are illustrated.

  13. Power Trains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukuk, Marvin; Mathis, Joe

    This curriculum guide is part of a series designed to teach students about diesel engines. The materials in this power trains guide apply to both on-road and off-road vehicles and include information about chain and belt drives used in tractors and combines. These instructional materials, containing nine units, are written in terms of student…

  14. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  15. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  16. Power Struggle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    California's "power struggle" will probably not be replicated in the other 23 states that have deregulated electricity, but costs are rising everywhere. The Environmental Protection Agency/Department of Energy's new Energy Star online rating system should help school officials measure their buildings' efficiency and remove barriers to improvement.…

  17. Accumulation and Effects of Stray Electrons in IFE Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. H.; Molvik, A. W.; Vay, J. L.

    2002-11-01

    Stray electrons can be introduced in positive-charge accelerators for heavy ion fusion (or other applications) as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. Electron accumulation is impacted by the ion beam potential, accelerating fields, multipole magnetic fields used for beam focus, and the pulse duration. We present electron particle orbit studies and estimates showing the various dependences. We also present ion simulations with prescribed random electron neutralization to elucidate electron effects on ion beam quality. Finally we contrast electron effects to be expected on the proposed Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) with those for the High-Current Experiment (HCX), and discuss ways to measure these differences.

  18. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  19. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  20. The Power of Power Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Florence S.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional college algebra courses focus almost exclusively on power functions such as y = x[superscript 2] and y = x[superscript 3] rather than the more general y = x[superscript p]. However, it is the more general form that is the basis of the mathematical models that arise throughout the natural sciences in a host of unexpected and highly…

  1. Optical Investigations of Powerful Laser Actions on Massive and Flyer Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarczyk, T.; Borodziuk, S.; Kasperczuk, A.; Demchenko, N. N.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Jungwirth, K.; Kralikova, B.; Krousky, E.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Rozanov, V. B.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Kalal, M.; Limpouch, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2006-01-15

    In this paper we present experimental, theoretical, and computer simulation studies of craters formation produced by high power lasers in single and double layer targets. The experimental investigation was carried out using the PALS (Prague Asterix Laser System) facility working with two different laser beam wavelengths: {lambda}1 = 1.315 {mu}m and {lambda}3 0.438 {mu}m. Two types of targets made of Al were used: single massive targets, and double targets consisting of a foil or disk (6 {mu}m thick for both cases) placed in front of the massive target part at a distance of 200-500 {mu}m. Experiments with single massive targets were performed at laser intensities in the range of 1013-1015 W/cm2 by varying the laser beam diameters on the target surface from 70 {mu}m up to 1200 {mu}m (i.e. moving the target away from the focus). The double targets were illuminated by laser energies EL = 100-500 J focused always on a diameter of 250 {mu}m. In all experiments performed the laser pulse duration was equal to 400 ps. 3-frame interferometry was employed to investigate the plasma dynamics through measurements of the electron density distribution time development as well as of the disks and foil fragments velocities. The dimensions and shapes of craters were obtained by crater replica technology and microscopy measurement. The experiments were complemented by a 2-D analytical theory and computer simulations, which helped at interpretation of the results. This way the values of laser energy absorption coefficient, ablation loading efficiency and efficiency of energy transfer, as well as two-dimensional shock wave generation at the laser-driven macroparticle impact were obtained from the measured crater parameters for both the wavelengths of laser radiation.

  2. Proton acceleration in the interaction of high power laser and cryogenic hydrogen targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2014-10-01

    High intensity laser driven ion acceleration has attracted great interest due to many prospective applications ranging from inertial confinement fusion, cancer therapy, particle accelerators. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed to model and design experiments at MEC for high power laser interaction with cryogenic hydrogen targets of tunable density and thickness. Preliminary 1D and 2D simulations, using fully relativistic particle-in-cell code PICLS, show a unique regime of proton acceleration, e.g. ~ 300 MeV peak energy protons are observed in the 1D run for interaction of ~1020 W/cm2, 110 fs intense laser with 6nc dense (nc = 1021 cm-3) and 2 micron thin target. The target is relativistically under-dense for the laser and we observe that a strong (multi-terawatt) shock electric field is produced and protons are reflected to high velocities by this field. Further, the shock field and the laser field keep propagating through the hydrogen target and meets up with target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) electric field produced at the target rear edge and vacuum interface and this superposition amplifies the TNSA fields resulting in higher proton energy. In addition, the electrons present at the rear edge of the target continue to gain energy via strong interaction with laser that crosses the target and these accelerated electrons maintains higher electric sheath fields which further provides acceleration to protons. We will also present detailed investigation with 2D PICLS simulations to gain a better insight of such physical processes to characterize multidimensional effects and establish analytical scaling between laser and target conditions for the optimization of proton acceleration.

  3. Power supply

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Edward J.; Leeman, James E.; MacDougall, Hugh R.; Marron, John J.; Smith, Calvin C.

    1976-01-01

    An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

  4. Stigma Power

    PubMed Central

    Link, Bruce G.; Phelan, Jo

    2015-01-01

    When people have an interest in keeping other people down, in or away, stigma is a resource that allows them to obtain ends they desire. We call this resource “stigma power” and use the term to refer to instances in which stigma processes achieve the aims of stigmatizers with respect to the exploitation, control or exclusion of others. We draw on Bourdieu (1987; 1990) who notes that power is often most effectively deployed when it is hidden or “misrecognized.” To explore the utility of the stigma power concept we examine ways in which the goals of stigmatizers are achieved but hidden in the stigma coping efforts of people with mental illnesses. We developed new self-report measures and administered them to a sample of individuals who have experienced mental illness to test whether results are consistent with the possibility that, in response to negative societal conceptions, the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of people with psychosis lead them to be concerned with staying in, propelled to stay away and induced to feel downwardly placed –precisely the outcomes stigmatizers might desire. Our introduction of the stigma power concept carries the possibility of seeing stigmatizing circumstances in a new light. PMID:24507908

  5. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, S.; Latkowski, J. F.; Gomez del Rio, J.; Sanz, J.

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work, computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) have been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here we consider a severe loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in conjunction with simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the confinement) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and confinement building itself). Even though confinement failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product transport and release. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 5 mSv (0.5 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  6. Exploration of laser-driven electron-multirescattering dynamics in high-order harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Cheng; Sheu, Yae-Lin; Jooya, Hossein Z; Zhou, Xiao-Xin; Chu, Shih-I

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rescattering processes play an important role in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in an intense laser field. However, the underlying multi-rescattering dynamics are still largely unexplored. Here we investigate the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG associated with the odd and even number of returning times of the electron to the parent ion. We perform fully ab initio quantum calculations and extend the empirical mode decomposition method to extract the individual multiple scattering contributions in HHG. We find that the tunneling ionization regime is responsible for the odd number times of rescattering and the corresponding short trajectories are dominant. On the other hand, the multiphoton ionization regime is responsible for the even number times of rescattering and the corresponding long trajectories are dominant. Moreover, we discover that the multiphoton- and tunneling-ionization regimes in multiple rescattering processes occur alternatively. Our results uncover the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG for the first time. It also provides new insight regarding the control of the multiple rescattering processes for the optimal generation of ultrabroad band supercontinuum spectra and the production of single ultrashort attosecond laser pulse. PMID:27596056

  7. Extreme ultraviolet diagnostics of preformed plasma in laser-driven proton acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ragozin, Eugene N.; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Yogo, Akifumi; Ma Jinglong; Ogura, Koichi; Orimo, Satoshi; Sagisaka, Akito; Mori, Michiaki; Li, Zhong; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Daido, Hiroyuki

    2006-12-15

    Proton acceleration experiments involving a 5 {mu}m thick Ti foil target irradiation are carried out with the femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser JLITE-X. The plasma emission at 13.5 nm is recorded employing concave multilayer mirrors, which image the front- and rear-side plasmas onto the sensitive surfaces of a fast x-ray photodiode and a backside-illuminated charge coupled device. Online time-of-flight fast-particle measurements are performed simultaneously with the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) measurements. A strong correlation is observed between the energetic proton signal and the spatiotemporal behavior of the XUV plasma emission. In particular, the longer duration of the prepulse-produced XUV plasma emission indicates a lowering of the maximum proton energy. This allows using the XUV emission for the diagnostics of the high-intensity laser-solid-target interaction.

  8. Transport and dosimetric solutions for the ELIMED laser-driven beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.; Amato, A.; Candiano, G.; Cuttone, G.; Giove, D.; Korn, G.; Krasa, J.; Leanza, R.; Manna, R.; Maggiore, M.; Marchese, V.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Petringa, G.; Sabini, M. G.; Schillaci, F.; Tramontana, A.; Valastro, L.; Velyhan, A.

    2015-10-01

    Within 2017, the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical applications) transport beam-line and dosimetric systems for laser-generated beams will be installed at the ELI-Beamlines facility in Prague (CZ), inside the ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser-Ion Acceleration) interaction room. The beam-line will be composed of two sections: one in vacuum, devoted to the collecting, focusing and energy selection of the primary beam and the second in air, where the ELIMED beam-line dosimetric devices will be located. This paper briefly describes the transport solutions that will be adopted together with the main dosimetric approaches. In particular, the description of an innovative Faraday Cup detector with its preliminary experimental tests will be reported.

  9. First demonstration of a free-electron laser driven by electrons from a laser irradiated photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, Mark; Bennett, Glenn; Burke, Robert; Benson, Stephen; Madey, J. M. J.

    Results are reported from the first observation of a free-electron laser (FEL) driven by an electron beam from a laser-irradiated photocathode. The Rocketdyne/Stanford FEL achieved sustained oscillations lasting over three hours and driven by photoelectrons accelerated by the Stanford Mark III radio-frequency linac. A LaB6 cathode, irradiated by a tripled Nd:YAG mode-locked drive laser, is the source of the photoelectrons. The drive laser, operating at 95.2 MHz, is phase-locked to the 30th subharmonic of the S-band linac. Peak currents in excess of 125 amps are observed and delivered to the Rocketdyne two-meter undulator, which is operated as a stand-alone oscillator. The electron beam has an energy spread of 0.8 percent (FWHM) at 38.5 MeV and an emittance, at the undulator, comparable to that observed for thermionic operation of the electron source. Small signal gain in excess of 150 percent is observed. Preliminary estimates of the electron beam brightness deliverable to the undulator range from 3.5 to 5.0 x 10 to the 11 amps/sq m.

  10. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S. Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Jung, D.; Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R.; Clarke, R.; Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-07-15

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  11. A platform to study magnetic field amplification of laser driven shocks due to induced turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinecke, Jena; Doyle, Hugo; Bell, A. R.; Crowston, Robert; Drake, Paul; Fatenejad, M.; Hartley, Nick; Koenig, Michel; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kuranz, Carolyn; Lamb, Don; MacDonald, Mike; Miniati, F.; Murphy, Chris; Pelka, Alex; Ravasio, Alessandra; Reville, Brian; Sakawa, Y.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Scopatz, Anthony; Tzeferacos, Petros; Wan, Wesley; Woolsey, Nigel; Gregori, Gianluca

    2012-10-01

    Misaligned pressure and temperature gradients associated with asymmetrical shock waves generate currents which seed magnetic fields (Biermann battery process). These fields could then be further amplified by increasing particle gyration driven by vorticity and turbulence. Studies of such phenomena have been conducted at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and scaled to astrophysical conditions (e.g., protogalacitc structure formation) using magnetohydrodynamic scaling techniques. Shock waves were driven in a 1 mbar Argon gas filled chamber from ablation of 500 micron Carbon rods using 300 J of 527 nm, 1 ns pulse light. A plastic grid was positioned 1 cm from the target to drive turbulence with outer scale ˜1 mm (the size of the grid opening). An induction coil, located 2 cm from the grid, was used to measure the magnetic field while optical diagnostics were used to track the fluid flow. Preliminary results and comparisons with hydrodynamic codes will be shown.

  12. Semiconductor lasers driven by self-sustained chaotic electronic oscillators and applications to optical chaos cryptography.

    PubMed

    Kingni, Sifeu Takougang; Mbé, Jimmi Hervé Talla; Woafo, Paul

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we numerically study the dynamics of vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) firstly when it is driven by Chua's oscillator, secondly in case where it is driven by a broad frequency spectral bandwidth chaotic oscillator developed by Nana et al. [Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 14, 2266 (2009)]. We demonstrated that the VCSEL generated robust chaotic dynamics compared to the ones found in VCSEL subject to a sinusoidally modulated current and therefore it is more suitable for chaos encryption techniques. The synchronization characteristics and the communication performances of unidirectional coupled VCSEL driven by the broad frequency spectral bandwidth chaotic oscillators are investigated numerically. The results show that high-quality synchronization and transmission of messages can be realized for suitable system parameters. Chaos shift keying method is successfully applied to encrypt a message at a high bitrate.

  13. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Gruener, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by a high-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source ({approx}10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (> or approx.10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10{sup 13} photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  14. Generation of femtosecond γ-ray bursts stimulated by laser-driven hosing evolution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong; Chen, Liming; Li, Dazhang; Yan, Wenchao; Huang, Kai; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Tajima, Toshiki; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The promising ability of a plasma wiggler based on laser wakefield acceleration to produce betatron X-rays with photon energies of a few keV to hundreds of keV and a peak brilliance of 10(22)-10(23) photons/s/mm(2)/mrad(2)/0.1%BW has been demonstrated, providing an alternative to large-scale synchrotron light sources. Most methods for generating betatron radiation are based on two typical approaches, one relying on an inherent transverse focusing electrostatic field, which induces transverse oscillation, and the other relying on the electron beam catching up with the rear part of the laser pulse, which results in strong electron resonance. Here, we present a new regime of betatron γ-ray radiation generated by stimulating a large-amplitude transverse oscillation of a continuously injected electron bunch through the hosing of the bubble induced by the carrier envelope phase (CEP) effect of the self-steepened laser pulse. Our method increases the critical photon energy to the MeV level, according to the results of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The highly collimated, energetic and femtosecond γ-ray bursts that are produced in this way may provide an interesting potential means of exploring nuclear physics in table top photo nuclear reactions. PMID:27457890

  15. Noise reduction in a Raman ring laser driven by a chaotic pump: numerical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Teubel, A.; Rza-cedillaz-dotewski, K.

    1989-04-01

    The theory of a single-mode, ring-cavity Raman laser is investigated for a broadband, chaotic pump. The numerical simulations are performed with a realistic model of the noisy pump. A significant reduction of the fluctuations, found in an approximate approach of an earlier paper (M. Lewenstein and K. Rza-cedillaz-dotewski, Opt. Commun. 63, 174 (1987)), is confirmed. In addition we find a dramatic narrowing of the spectral line.

  16. Characterization of warm dense matter (WDM) from high intensity laser driven shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine; Wei, Mingsheng; Santos, Joao; Belancourt, Patrick; Theobald, Wolfgang; Keiter, Paul; Beg, Farhat

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the transport physics of an intense relativistic electron beam in various plasma regimes is crucial for many high-energy-density applications, such as fast heating for advanced ICF schemes and ion sources. Most short pulse laser-matter interaction experiments for electron transport studies have been performed with initially cold targets where the resistivity is far from that in warm dense and hot dense plasmas. In order to extend fast electron transport and energy coupling studies in pre-assembled plasmas, we must first characterize those regime possibilities. We present initial experiments conducted on the OMEGA EP laser (~ 1014 W/cm2) to characterize WDM created from the shock compression of low density (ρ0 ~ 330 mg/cc) CRF foams and solid Al foil targets. In foam targets, imaging x-ray Thomson scattering is used to measure spatial profiles of the temperature, ionization state and relative material density. The ASBO diagnostic and radiation hydrodynamics simulations deduce shock pressure in Al targets of various thicknesses. Details of the experiment and available data will be presented. The work was funded by the US DOE/NNSA NLUF Program.

  17. In-Flight Measurements of Capsule Shell Adiabats in Laser-Driven Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A. L.; Doeppner, T.; Ma, T.; Landen, O. L.; Wallace, R.; Glenzer, S. H.; Fortmann, C.

    2011-07-01

    We present the first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of temperature and density from spherically imploding matter. The shape of the Compton downscattered spectrum provides a first-principles measurement of the electron velocity distribution function, dependent on T{sub e} and the Fermi temperature T{sub F}{approx}n{sub e}{sup 2/3}. In-flight compressions of Be and CH targets reach 6-13 times solid density, with T{sub e}/T{sub F}{approx}0.4-0.7 and {Gamma}{sub ii}{approx}5, resulting in minimum adiabats of {approx}1.6-2. These measurements are consistent with low-entropy implosions and predictions by radiation-hydrodynamic modeling.

  18. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Cooper, A. B.R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Graham, P.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Comley, A. J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Foster, J.; Young, B.; Young, P.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  19. Numerical simulatin of supernova-relevant laser-driven hydro experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Leibrandt, D; Robey, H F; Edwards, M J; Braun, D G; Miles, A R; Drake, R P

    2004-02-10

    In ongoing experiments performed on the OMEGA laser [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2108 (1996)] at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), nanosecond laser pulses are used to drive strong blast waves into two-layer targets. Perturbations on the interface between the two materials are unstable to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability as a result of shock transit and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability during the deceleration-phase behind the shock front. These experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. The authors are, at present, particularly interested in the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability through the late nonlinear stage, the transition to turbulence, and the subsequent transport of material within the turbulent region. In this paper, the results of numerical simulations of 2D single and multimode experiments are presented. These simulations are run using the 2D Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) radiation hydrodynamics code CALE [R. T. Barton, Numerical Astrophysics (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985)]. The simulation results are shown to compare well with experimental radiography. A buoyancy-drag model captures the behavior of the single-mode interface, but gives only partial agreement in the multi-mode cases. The Richtmyer-Meshkov and target decompression contributions to the perturbation growth are both estimated and shown to be significant. Significant dependence of the simulation results on the material equation of state (EOS) is demonstrated, and the prospect of continuing the experiments to conclusively demonstrate the transition to turbulence is discussed.

  20. Revealing the Microscopic Real-Space Excursion of a Laser-Driven Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Heiko G.; Kretschmar, Martin; Binhammer, Thomas; Nagy, Tamas; Ristau, Detlev; Lein, Manfred; Morgner, Uwe; Kovačev, Milutin

    2016-07-01

    High-order harmonic spectroscopy allows one to extract information on fundamental quantum processes, such as the exit time in the tunneling of an electron through a barrier with attosecond time resolution and molecular structure with angstrom spatial resolution. Here, we study the spatial motion of the electron during high-order harmonic generation in an in situ pump-probe measurement using high-density liquid water droplets as a target. We show that molecules adjacent to the emitting electron-ion pair can disrupt the electron's trajectory when positioned within the range of the maximum electronic excursion distance. This allows us to use the parent ion and the neighboring molecules as boundaries for the electronic motion to measure the maximum electronic excursion distance during the high-order harmonic generation process. Our analysis of the process is relevant for optimizing high-harmonic yields in dense media.

  1. Consistency Properties of a Chaotic Semiconductor Laser Driven by Optical Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Neus; Jüngling, Thomas; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally study consistency properties of a semiconductor laser in response to a coherent optical drive originating from delayed feedback. The laser is connected to a short and a long optical fiber loop, switched such that only one is providing input to the laser at a time. This way, repeating the exact same optical drive twice, we find consistent or inconsistent responses depending on the pump parameter and we relate the kind of response to strong and weak chaos. Moreover, we are able to experimentally determine the sub-Lyapunov exponent, underlying the consistency properties.

  2. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E

    2010-05-01

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a nonrelativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for Langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three-velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for nonrelativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  3. Free electron laser-driven ultrafast rearrangement of the electronic structure in Ti

    PubMed Central

    Principi, E.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Cucini, R.; Bencivenga, F.; Battistoni, A.; Gessini, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Saito, M.; Di Fonzo, S.; D'Amico, F.; Di Cicco, A.; Gunnella, R.; Filipponi, A.; Giglia, A.; Nannarone, S.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy density extreme ultraviolet radiation delivered by the FERMI seeded free-electron laser has been used to create an exotic nonequilibrium state of matter in a titanium sample characterized by a highly excited electron subsystem at temperatures in excess of 10 eV and a cold solid-density ion lattice. The obtained transient state has been investigated through ultrafast absorption spectroscopy across the Ti M2,3-edge revealing a drastic rearrangement of the sample electronic structure around the Fermi level occurring on a time scale of about 100 fs. PMID:26798835

  4. Time-dependent renormalized-natural-orbital theory applied to laser-driven H2 +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanusch, A.; Rapp, J.; Brics, M.; Bauer, D.

    2016-04-01

    Recently introduced time-dependent renormalized-natural-orbital theory (TDRNOT) is extended towards a multicomponent approach in order to describe H2 + beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Two kinds of natural orbitals, describing the electronic and the nuclear degrees of freedom are introduced, and the exact equations of motion for them are derived. The theory is benchmarked by comparing numerically exact results of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for an H2 + model system with the corresponding TDRNOT predictions. Ground-state properties, linear-response spectra, fragmentation, and high-order harmonic generation are investigated.

  5. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hessling, T.; Blazevic, A.; Stoehlker, T.; Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2011-07-15

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 {mu}m were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved.

  6. Heating in short-pulse laser-driven cone-capped wire targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Wei, M.; King, J.; Beg, F.; Stephens, R. B.

    2007-11-01

    The 2-D implicit hybrid simulation code e-PLAS has been used to study heating in cone-capped copper wire targets. The code e-PLAS tracks collisional particle-in-cell (PIC) electrons traversing background plasma of collisional Eulerian cold electron and ion fluids. It computes E- and B-fields by the Implicit Moment Method [1,2]. In recent experiments [3] at the Vulcan laser facility, sub- picosecond laser pulses at 1.06 μm, and 4.0 x 10^20 W/cm^2 intensity were focused into thin-walled (˜10 μm) cones attached to copper wires. The wire diameter was varied from 10-40 μm with a typical length of 1 mm. We characterize heating of the wires as a function of their diameters and length, and relate modifications of this heating to changes in the assumed laser-generated hot electron spectrum and directivity. As in recent nail experiments [4], the cones can serve as reservoirs for hot electrons, diverting them from passage down the wires. [1] R. J. Mason, and C. Cranfill, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 45 (1986). [2] R. J. Mason, J. Comp. Phys. 71, 429 (1987). [3] J. King et al., to be submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett.. [4] R. J. Mason, M. Wei, F. Beg, R. Stephens, and C. Snell, in Proc. of ICOPS07, Albuquerque, NM, June 17-22, 2007, Talk 7D4.

  7. Enhancement of laser-driven electron acceleration in an ion channel

    SciTech Connect

    Arefiev, Alexey V.; Khudik, Vladimir N.; Schollmeier, Marius

    2014-03-15

    A laser beam with duration longer than the period of plasma oscillations propagating through an underdense plasma produces a steady-state positively charged channel in the electron density. We consider a test electron in the two-dimensional plane channel under the combined action of the laser field and the transverse static electric field of the channel. At ultrarelativistic laser wave amplitude (a≫1), the electron is pushed primarily forward. As the electron gradually dephases from the wave, the field it samples and its relativistic γ-factor strongly oscillate. The natural frequency of electron oscillations across the channel (betatron frequency) depends on γ, which couples the betatron oscillations to the longitudinal motion induced by the wave. We show that the modulation of the natural frequency makes the oscillations unstable. The resulting amplification of the oscillations across the channel reduces the axial dephasing between the electron and the wave, leading to a considerable electron energy enhancement well above the ponderomotive energy. We find that there is a well-pronounced laser amplitude threshold a{sub *}, above which the enhancement takes place, that scales as a{sub *}∝1/√(n{sub 0}), where n{sub 0} is the ion density. The presented mechanism of energy enhancement is robust with respect to a longitudinal variation of the density, because it relies on a threshold phenomenon rather than on a narrow linear resonance.

  8. Controlling two plasmon decay instability in intense femtosecond laser driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Chatterjee, Gourab; Ravindra Kumar, G.; Brijesh, P.

    2015-11-15

    We investigate the onset of the two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability in intense femtosecond laser-solid interaction. In particular, this instability, originating at the quarter critical electron density surface in the inhomogeneous plasma, is explored for a wide range of laser parameters-energy, pulse duration, and intensity contrast. By varying these laser parameters, we demonstrate ways to excite and control the growth of the TPD process. The pulse duration scan carried out under a constant laser fluence reveals the pulse width dependent nature of TPD growth. The spectral splitting of the TPD induced three-halves harmonic emission is used to infer the electron temperature near the quarter critical density surface. Moreover, by varying the laser contrast over four orders of magnitude, we find that the intensity threshold of three-halves harmonic emission increases by nearly two orders of magnitude. This contrast dependent intensity threshold for the emission of three-halves harmonic can be a useful diagnostic of the laser contrast.

  9. Study of high Mach number laser driven blast waves in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Edens, A. D.; Adams, R. G.; Rambo, P.; Ruggles, L.; Smith, I. C.; Porter, J. L.; Ditmire, T.

    2010-11-15

    A series of experiments were performed examining the evolution of blast waves produced by laser irradiation of a target immersed in gas. Blast waves were produced by illumination of wires by 1 kJ, 1 ns laser pulses from the Z-Beamlet laser at Sandia National Laboratories. The blast waves were imaged by probe laser pulses at various times to examine the trajectory, radiative precursor, and induced perturbations on the blast wave front. Well defined perturbations were induced on the blast wave front with arrays of wires placed in the gas and the results of the experiments are compared to the theoretical predictions for the Vishniac overstability. It is found that the experimental results are in general agreement with these theoretical predictions on thin blast wave shells and are in quantitative agreement in the simplest case.

  10. Matching sub-fs electron bunches for laser-driven plasma acceleration at SINBAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Assmann, R. W.; Dorda, U.; Marchetti, B.

    2016-09-01

    We present theoretical and numerical studies of matching sub-femtosecond space-charge-dominated electron bunch into the Laser-plasma Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA) foreseen at the SINBAD facility. The longitudinal space-charge (SC) effect induced growths of the energy spread and longitudinal phase-space chirp are major issues in the matching section, which will result in bunch elongation, emittance growth and spot size dilution. In addition, the transverse SC effect would lead to a mismatch of the beam optics if it were not compensated for. Start-to-end simulations and preliminary optimizations were carried out in order to understand the achievable beam parameters at the entrance of the plasma accelerator.

  11. Direct heating of a laser-imploded core by ultraintense laser-driven ions.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Y; Mori, Y; Komeda, O; Ishii, K; Hanayama, R; Fujita, K; Okihara, S; Sekine, T; Satoh, N; Kurita, T; Takagi, M; Watari, T; Kawashima, T; Kan, H; Nishimura, Y; Sunahara, A; Sentoku, Y; Nakamura, N; Kondo, T; Fujine, M; Azuma, H; Motohiro, T; Hioki, T; Kakeno, M; Miura, E; Arikawa, Y; Nagai, T; Abe, Y; Ozaki, S; Noda, A

    2015-05-15

    A novel direct core heating fusion process is introduced, in which a preimploded core is predominantly heated by energetic ions driven by LFEX, an extremely energetic ultrashort pulse laser. Consequently, we have observed the D(d,n)^{3}He-reacted neutrons (DD beam-fusion neutrons) with the yield of 5×10^{8} n/4π sr. Examination of the beam-fusion neutrons verified that the ions directly collide with the core plasma. While the hot electrons heat the whole core volume, the energetic ions deposit their energies locally in the core, forming hot spots for fuel ignition. As evidenced in the spectrum, the process simultaneously excited thermal neutrons with the yield of 6×10^{7} n/4π sr, raising the local core temperature from 0.8 to 1.8 keV. A one-dimensional hydrocode STAR 1D explains the shell implosion dynamics including the beam fusion and thermal fusion initiated by fast deuterons and carbon ions. A two-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell code predicts the core heating due to resistive processes driven by hot electrons, and also the generation of fast ions, which could be an additional heating source when they reach the core. Since the core density is limited to 2 g/cm^{3} in the current experiment, neither hot electrons nor fast ions can efficiently deposit their energy and the neutron yield remains low. In future work, we will achieve the higher core density (>10 g/cm^{3}); then hot electrons could contribute more to the core heating via drag heating. Together with hot electrons, the ion contribution to fast ignition is indispensable for realizing high-gain fusion. By virtue of its core heating and ignition, the proposed scheme can potentially achieve high gain fusion. PMID:26024175

  12. Generation and Beaming of Early Hot Electrons onto the Capsule in Laser-Driven Ignition Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, E. L.; Hartemann, F.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Pak, A.; Landen, O. L.; Divol, L.; Robey, H. F.; Hurricane, O. A.; Döppner, T.; Albert, F.; Bachmann, B.; Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Callahan, D.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    In hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions on the National Ignition Facility, suprathermal hot electrons, generated by laser plasma instabilities early in the laser pulse ("picket") while blowing down the laser entrance hole (LEH) windows, can preheat the capsule fuel. Hard x-ray imaging of a Bi capsule surrogate and of the hohlraum emissions, in conjunction with the measurement of time-resolved bremsstrahlung spectra, allows us to uncover for the first time the directionality of these hot electrons and infer the capsule preheat. Data and Monte Carlo calculations indicate that for most experiments the hot electrons are emitted nearly isotropically from the LEH. However, we have found cases where a significant fraction of the generated electrons are emitted in a collimated beam directly towards the capsule poles, where their local energy deposition is up to 10 × higher than the average preheat value and acceptable levels for ICF implosions. The observed "beaming" is consistent with a recently unveiled multibeam stimulated Raman scattering model [P. Michel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055003 (2015)], where laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave on axis. Finally, we demonstrate that we can control the amount of generated hot electrons by changing the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma.

  13. High field terahertz emission from relativistic laser-driven plasma wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2015-10-15

    We propose a method to generate high field terahertz (THz) radiation with peak strength of GV/cm level in the THz frequency gap range of 1–10 THz using a relativistic laser interaction with a gaseous plasma target. Due to the effect of local pump depletion, an initially Gaussian laser pulse undergoes leading edge erosion and eventually evolves to a state with leading edge being step function. Interacting with such a pulse, electrons gain transverse residual momentum and excite net transverse currents modulated by the relativistic plasma frequency. These currents give rise to the low frequency THz emission. We demonstrate this process with one and two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  14. Laser-driven hole boring and gamma-ray emission in high-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Y.

    2015-03-01

    Ion acceleration in laser-produced dense plasmas is a key topic of many recent investigations thanks to its potential applications. Indeed, at forthcoming laser intensities (I ≳ 1023 W cm-2) interaction of laser pulses with plasmas can be accompanied by copious gamma-ray emission. Here we demonstrate the mutual influence of gamma-ray emission and ion acceleration during relativistic hole boring in high-density plasmas with ultra-intense laser pulses. If the gamma-ray emission is abundant, laser pulse reflection and hole-boring velocity are lower and gamma-ray radiation pattern is narrower than in the case of low emission. Conservation of energy and momentum allows one to elucidate the effects of the gamma-ray emission which are more pronounced at higher hole-boring velocities.

  15. Emitting Shock Waves by a Laser Driven Collapsing Bubble in Glycerine and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garen, W.; Hegedüs, F.; Koch, S.; Meyerer, B.; Neu, W.; Teubner, U.

    In this investigation our interest is focused on the conditions of emitting shocks in glycerine and distilled water during the first bubble collapse as a function of liquid temperature, viscosity, and the position distance between the laser breakdown spot and the boundary of liquid-air

  16. Subsonic and Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Visco, A.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Bono, M. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-05-01

    Shear flows arise in many high-energy-density (HED) and astrophysical systems, yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their evolution in these extreme environments. Fundamentally, shear flows can initiate mixing via the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and may eventually drive a transition to turbulence. We present two dedicated shear flow experiments that created subsonic and supersonic shear layers in HED plasmas. In the subsonic case the Omega laser was used to drive a shock wave along a rippled plastic interface, which subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices. In the supersonic shear experiment the Nike laser was used to drive Al plasma across a low-density foam surface also seeded with a ripple. Unlike the subsonic case, detached shocks developed around the ripples in response to the supersonic Al flow.

  17. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Doppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Forster, E.; Gode, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Mithen, J. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbaumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; White, T. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.; Tschentscher, T.

    2015-09-25

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities of ${10}^{15}-{10}^{16}\\;$ W cm–2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about $25$ and $40\\;\\mathrm{eV}$ for simulated delay times up to $+70\\;\\mathrm{fs}$ after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8–18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and $30\\;$eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. In conclusion, we resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser–matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.

  18. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric

    2010-06-30

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically-intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a non-relativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined, and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for non-relativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  19. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Döppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Mithen, J. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; White, T. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.; Tschentscher, T.

    2015-11-01

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities of {10}15-{10}16 W cm-2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about 25 and 40 {eV} for simulated delay times up to +70 {fs} after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8-18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and 30 eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. We resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser-matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.

  20. Development of a broadband reflectivity diagnostic for laser driven shock compression experiments.

    PubMed

    Ali, S J; Bolme, C A; Collins, G W; Jeanloz, R

    2015-04-01

    A normal-incidence visible and near-infrared shock wave optical reflectivity diagnostic was constructed to investigate changes in the optical properties of materials under dynamic laser compression. Documenting wavelength- and time-dependent changes in the optical properties of laser-shock compressed samples has been difficult, primarily due to the small sample sizes and short time scales involved, but we succeeded in doing so by broadening a series of time delayed 800-nm pulses from an ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser to generate high-intensity broadband light at nanosecond time scales. This diagnostic was demonstrated over the wavelength range 450-1150 nm with up to 16 time displaced spectra during a single shock experiment. Simultaneous off-normal incidence velocity interferometry (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) characterized the sample under laser-compression and also provided an independent reflectivity measurement at 532 nm wavelength. The shock-driven semiconductor-to-metallic transition in germanium was documented by the way of reflectivity measurements with 0.5 ns time resolution and a wavelength resolution of 10 nm.

  1. Parabolic lithium mirror for a laser-driven hot plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Baird, James K.

    1979-06-19

    A hot plasma producing device is provided, wherein pellets, singly injected, of frozen fuel are each ignited with a plurality of pulsed laser beams. Ignition takes place within a void area in liquid lithium contained within a pressure vessel. The void in the liquid lithium is created by rotating the pressure vessel such that the free liquid surface of molten lithium therein forms a paraboloid of revolution. The paraboloid functions as a laser mirror with a reflectivity greater than 90%. A hot plasma is produced when each of the frozen deuterium-tritium pellets sequentially arrive at the paraboloid focus, at which time each pellet is illuminated by the plurality of pulsed lasers whose rays pass through circular annuli across the top of the paraboloid. The beams from the lasers are respectively directed by associated mirrors, or by means of a single conical mirror in another embodiment, and by the mirror-like paraboloid formed by the rotating liquid lithium onto the fuel pellet such that the optical flux reaching the pellet can be made to be uniform over 96% of the pellet surface area. The very hot plasma produced by the action of the lasers on the respective singly injected fuel pellets in turn produces a copious quantity of neutrons and X-rays such that the device has utility as a neutron source or as an x-ray source. In addition, the neutrons produced in the device may be utilized to produce tritium in a lithium blanket and is thus a mechanism for producing tritium.

  2. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J.

    2013-07-26

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  3. Expansion of nanoplasmas and laser-driven nuclear fusion in single exploding clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peano, F.; Martins, J. L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Peinetti, F.; Mulas, R.; Coppa, G.; Silva, L. O.

    2008-09-01

    The expansion of laser-irradiated clusters can be controlled by acting on the amount of energy delivered to the electrons. When increasing the electron energy, the expansion regime varies smoothly from a quasineutral, hydrodinamic-like to a Coulomb explosion (CE), as revealed by self-consistent kinetic analysis. A double-pump irradiation scheme can produce hybrid expansion regimes wherein a slow hydrodynamic expansion is followed by a fast CE, leading to ion overtaking and producing multiple ion flows expanding with different velocities, which can lead to intracluster fusion reactions in homonuclear deuterium clusters.

  4. Characterization of Laser-Driven Electron Beams for Thomson X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Rahul; Korbiak, Katherine; Valenzuela, Anthony; Banerjee, Sudeep; Umstadter, Donald

    2002-11-01

    The relativistic nonlinear motions of a free electron resulting from extreme intensity light fields results in harmonic generation, referred to as nonlinear Thomson scattering. Up to the 30th harmonic has been observed experimentally, and the role of energetic electrons has been inferred from the narrow angular spread of the scattered light[1]. Both experiment and theory lead us to the conclusion that the electron beam emittance, flux, and energy are critical factors. Here we report on recent studies to accurately characterize and improve the laser produced electron beam. The relationship of the gas delivery conditions is first investigated by interferometric characterization of gas output from both optimized supersonic nozzles[2] and typical nozzles utilized in past experiments at Michigan. These nozzles are then compared with respect to quality of electron beam generation. Electron beam emittance is measured using the pepperpot technique, and the charge is quantified non-perturbatively by utilizing an integrating current transformer. Aluminum and mylar filters allow us to examine emittance and flux for various components of the electron spectrum. These details of the scattering electron beam are critical considerations for the creation of an all-optical, short pulse, and high-spatial-coherence source of x-rays for time resolved diffraction and absorption studies. Work supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy and NSF Grants 0078581 and 0114336. [1] S. Banerjee, A. Valenzuela, R. Shah, A Maksimchuk, and D. Umstadter, Phys. Plasmas 9, 2392 (2002). [2] S. Semushin and V. Malka, Rev. of Sci. Inst. 72, 2961 (2001).

  5. Laser-driven deflection arrangements and methods involving charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Plettner, Tomas; Byer, Robert L.

    2011-08-09

    Systems, methods, devices and apparatus are implemented for producing controllable charged particle beams. In one implementation, an apparatus provides a deflection force to a charged particle beam. A source produces an electromagnetic wave. A structure, that is substantially transparent to the electromagnetic wave, includes a physical structure having a repeating pattern with a period L and a tilted angle .alpha., relative to a direction of travel of the charged particle beam, the pattern affects the force of the electromagnetic wave upon the charged particle beam. A direction device introduces the electromagnetic wave to the structure to provide a phase-synchronous deflection force to the charged particle beam.

  6. Foreshock magnetic structure ahead of a laser-driven shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowston, Robert; Doyle, H.; Gregori, G.; Meinecke, J.; Bell, A. R.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Morita, T.; Sano, T.; Moritaka, T.; Yamura, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Yoneda, H.; Pelka, A.; Woolsey, Nigel

    2015-11-01

    The Earth's bow shock contains many wave species that propagate upstream from the shock, against the incoming flow. The mechanism by which these waves are produced remains an open problem. Here, we present an experiment for studying one proposed excitation mechanism. A shock is launched by laser irradiation of a carbon pin immersed in a nitrogen gas. A shock forms, propagates parallel to an externally imposed magnetic field and is diagnosed using interferometry, streaked optical emission imaging and a three axis induction coil. Imaging aids establishing the shock conditions and the induction coil data is used to infer the time evolution of magnetic fields. Analysis extracts the frequency, amplitude and polarisation of magnetic waves arriving ahead of the shock. The results are consistent with instabilities and magnetic waves driven by warm electrons generated at the shock mixing with cold electrons. These waves propagate along magnetic field lines, transport energy and matter ahead of the shock ultimately resulting in an extended foreshock consisting of shock-reflected ions and electrons.

  7. Steplike Intensity Threshold Behavior of Extreme Ionization in Laser-Driven Xenon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T.; Mueller, J. P.; Przystawik, A.; Goede, S.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Varin, C.; Ramunno, L.; Brabec, T.; Fennel, T.

    2010-07-30

    The generation of highly charged Xe{sup q+} ions up to q=24 is observed in Xe clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets and exposed to intense femtosecond laser pulses ({lambda}=800 nm). Laser intensity resolved measurements show that the high-q ion generation starts at an unexpectedly low threshold intensity of about 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Above threshold, the Xe ion charge spectrum saturates quickly and changes only weakly for higher laser intensities. Good agreement between these observations and a molecular dynamics analysis allows us to identify the mechanisms responsible for the highly charged ion production and the surprising intensity threshold behavior of the ionization process.

  8. In-Flight Measurements of Capsule Adiabats in Laser Driven Spherical Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Fortman, C; Ma, T; Landen, O L; Wallace, R; Glenzer, S H

    2011-03-07

    We present the first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of temperature and density from spherically imploding matter. The shape of the Compton downscattered spectrum provides a first-principles measurement of the electron velocity distribution function, dependent on T{sub e} and the Fermi temperature T{sub F} {approx} n{sub e}{sup 2/3}. In flight compressions of Be and CH targets reach 6-13 times solid density, with T{sub e}/T{sub F} {approx} 0.4-0.7, resulting in minimum adiabats of {approx}1.6-2. These measurements are consistent with low-entropy implosions and predictions by simulations using radiation-hydrodynamic modeling.

  9. Laser-driven miniature flyer plates for shock initiation of secondary explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Miniature flyer plates (<1-mm diameter X <5-micron thick) of aluminum and other materials are accelerated by a 10-ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser to velocities >5 km/s. Velocity profiles are recorded by velocity interferometry (VISAR) techniques and impact planarity by electronic streak photography. Techniques for improving energy coupling from laser to flyer plate will be discussed. Flyer plate performance parameters will be compared with material properties. The P/sup n/t criteria for shock initiation of explosives will be compared for various flyer materials, pressure, and pulse duration. Performance of secondary explosives (PETN, HNS, HMX, various PBX, others) will be reported. These data will detail the experimental effect of t (in P/sup n/t) approaching values of a few nanoseconds. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  10. First Results from Laser-Driven MagLIF Experiments on OMEGA: Optimization of Illumination Uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P.-Y.; Barnak, D. H.; Betti, R.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.

    2015-11-01

    The physics principles of magnetic liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) are investigated on the Omega Laser Facility using 40 beams for compression and 1 beam for preheating a small (300- μm-radius, 1-mm-long) cylindrical plastic shell. Here we report of the first implosion experiments to optimize the illumination uniformity. These initial experiments do not include laser preheat. The beams in ring 3 and ring 4 around the symmetric axis are used to implode a cylindrical target. Beams in different rings illuminate the target surface with different incident angles, leading to different energy-coupling efficiencies. The beams in ring 3 have a shallower angle of incident than ring 4. When implosion velocities are compared for targets driven by either ring 3 or ring 4, we find that ring 3 couples ~ 40 % less kinetic energy than ring 4. One- and two-dimensional simulations using LILAC (1-D) and FLASH (2-D) are used to compare to the experimental results and to optimize the illumination uniformity. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and by DE-FG02-04ER54786 and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (Fusion Science Center).

  11. Laser-driven microsecond temperature cycles analyzed by fluorescence polarization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zondervan, Rob; Kulzer, Florian; van der Meer, Harmen; Disselhorst, Jos A J M; Orrit, Michel

    2006-04-15

    We demonstrate a novel technique to achieve fast thermal cycles of a small sample (a few femtoliters). Modulating a continuous near-infrared laser focused on a metal film, we can drive the local temperature from 130 to 300 K and back, within a few microseconds. By fluorescence microscopy of dyes in a thin glycerol film, we record images of the hot spot, calibrate its temperature, and follow its variations in real time. The temperature dependence of fluorescence anisotropy, due to photophysics and rotational diffusion, gives a steady-state temperature calibration between 200 and 350 K. From 200 to 220 K, we monitor temperature more accurately by fluorescence autocorrelation, a probe for rotational diffusion. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence anisotropy give heating and cooling times of a few microseconds, short enough to supercool pure water. We designed our method to repeatedly cycle a single (bio)molecule between ambient and cryostat temperatures with microsecond time resolution. Successive measurements of a structurally relevant variable will decompose a dynamical process into structural snapshots. Such temperature-cycle experiments, which combine a high time resolution with long observation times, can thus be expected to yield new insights into complex processes such as protein folding. PMID:16443653

  12. Synthesis of diamond-like phase from graphite by ultrafast laser driven dynamical compression.

    PubMed

    Maia, Francisco C B; Samad, Ricardo E; Bettini, Jefferson; Freitas, Raul O; Vieira Junior, Nilson D; Souza-Neto, Narcizo M

    2015-07-07

    Rapid variations of the environmental energy caused by ultrashort laser pulses have induced phase transitions in carbon allotropes, therefore bringing the promise of revealing new carbon phases. Here, by exposing polycrystalline graphite to 25 fs laser pulses at 4 J/cm(2) fluence under standard air atmosphere, we demonstrated the synthesis of translucent micrometer-sized structures carrying diamond-like and onion-like carbon phases. Texturized domains of the diamond phase were also identified. Concerning different synthesized carbon forms, pulse superposition and singularities of the thermodynamical process, we pinpoint the synthesis mechanism by the laser-induced subsequent products energetically evolving to attain the diamond-like phase.

  13. Table-top solar flares produced with laser driven magnetic reconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, J. Y.; Li, Y. T.; Wang, X. G.; Wang, J. Q.; Dong, Q. L.; Liu, X.; Lin, X. X.; Yuan, D. W.; Du, F.; Wang, S. J.; Zhang, L.; An, L.; Xiao, C. J.; Wei, H. G.; Zhang, K.; Wang, F. L.; Jiang, S. E.; Ding, Y. K.; Cao, Z. R.; Yuan, Z.; Zhang, H. Y.; Yang, Z. W.; Zhu, J. Q.; He, X. T.; Cai, H. B.; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2013-11-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) has presented the prestigious Edward Teller award to Dr. Bruce A. Remington during the 2011 IFSA conference due to his "pioneering scientific work in the fields of inertial confinement fusion (ICF), and especially developing an international effort in high energy density laboratory astrophysics" [1,2]. This is a great acknowledgement to the subject of high energy density laboratory astrophysics. In this context, we report here one experiment conducted to model solar flares in the laboratory with intense lasers [3]. The mega-gauss -scale magnetic fields produced by laser produced plasmas can be used to make magnetic reconnection topology. We have produced one table-top solar flare in our laboratory experiment with the same geometric setup as associated with solar flares.

  14. Thermal and log-normal distributions of plasma in laser driven Coulomb explosions of deuterium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, M.; Warrens, M.; Bonasera, A.; Lattuada, D.; Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Consoli, F.; de Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Kimura, S.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Schmidt, K.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Natowitz, J. B.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we explore the possibility that the motion of the deuterium ions emitted from Coulomb cluster explosions is highly disordered enough to resemble thermalization. We analyze the process of nuclear fusion reactions driven by laser-cluster interactions in experiments conducted at the Texas Petawatt laser facility using a mixture of D2+3He and CD4+3He cluster targets. When clusters explode by Coulomb repulsion, the emission of the energetic ions is “nearly” isotropic. In the framework of cluster Coulomb explosions, we analyze the energy distributions of the ions using a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution, a shifted MB distribution (sMB), and the energy distribution derived from a log-normal (LN) size distribution of clusters. We show that the first two distributions reproduce well the experimentally measured ion energy distributions and the number of fusions from d-d and d-3He reactions. The LN distribution is a good representation of the ion kinetic energy distribution well up to high momenta where the noise becomes dominant, but overestimates both the neutron and the proton yields. If the parameters of the LN distributions are chosen to reproduce the fusion yields correctly, the experimentally measured high energy ion spectrum is not well represented. We conclude that the ion kinetic energy distribution is highly disordered and practically not distinguishable from a thermalized one.

  15. GeV electron beams from a centimeter-scale laser-driven plasmaaccelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, A.; Nakamura, K.; Panasenko, D.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey,E.; Schroeder; Hooker, S.M.; and Leemans, W.P.; Hooker, S.M.

    2007-06-25

    esults are presented on the generation ofquasi-monoenergeticelectron beams with energy up to 1GeV using a 40TWlaser and a 3.3 cm-long hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide.Electron beams were not observed without a plasma channel, indicatingthat self-focusing alone could not be relied upon for effective guidingofthe laser pulse. Results are presented of the electronbeam spectra, andthe dependence of the reliability of producingelectron beams as afunction of laser and plasma parameters.

  16. Synthesis of diamond-like phase from graphite by ultrafast laser driven dynamical compression

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Francisco C. B.; Samad, Ricardo E.; Bettini, Jefferson; Freitas, Raul O.; Vieira Junior, Nilson D.; Souza-Neto, Narcizo M.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid variations of the environmental energy caused by ultrashort laser pulses have induced phase transitions in carbon allotropes, therefore bringing the promise of revealing new carbon phases. Here, by exposing polycrystalline graphite to 25 fs laser pulses at 4 J/cm2 fluence under standard air atmosphere, we demonstrated the synthesis of translucent micrometer-sized structures carrying diamond-like and onion-like carbon phases. Texturized domains of the diamond phase were also identified. Concerning different synthesized carbon forms, pulse superposition and singularities of the thermodynamical process, we pinpoint the synthesis mechanism by the laser-induced subsequent products energetically evolving to attain the diamond-like phase. PMID:26149413

  17. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven proton-boron fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Morrissey, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-02-01

    A low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with relatively low intensity (3 × 1016 W cm-2) was used to enhance the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the "ultraclean" proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha-particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as target. The combination of the specific target geometry and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed enhancing the yield of alpha-particles up to 109 per steradian, i.e 100 times higher than previous experimental achievements. Moreover the alpha particle stream presented a clearly peaked angular and energy distribution, which make this secondary source attractive for potential applications. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  18. Simple and Flexible Model for Laser-Driven Antibody-Gold Surface Interactions: Functionalization and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Della Ventura, Bartolomeo; Ambrosio, Antonio; Fierro, Annalisa; Funari, Riccardo; Gesuele, Felice; Maddalena, Pasquale; Mayer, Dirk; Pica Ciamarra, Massimo; Velotta, Raffaele; Altucci, Carlo

    2016-08-24

    Interactions between biomolecules and between substrates and biomolecules is a crucial issue in physics and applications to topics such as biotechnology and organic electronics. The efficiency of bio- and mechanical sensors, of organic electronics systems, and of a number of other devices critically depends on how molecules are deposited on a surface so that these acquire specific functions. Here, we tackle this vast problem by developing a coarse grained model of biomolecules having a recognition function, such as antibodies, capable to quantitatively describe in a simple manner essential phenomena: antigen-antibody and antibody substrate interactions. The model is experimentally tested to reproduce the results of a benchmark case, such as (1) gold surface functionalization with antibodies and (2) antibody-antigen immune-recognition function. The agreement between experiments and model prediction is excellent, thus unveiling the mechanism for antibody immobilization onto metals at the nanoscale in various functionalization schemes. These results shed light on the geometrical packing properties of the deposited molecules, and may open the way to a novel coarse-grained based approach to describe other processes where molecular packing is a key issue with applications in a huge number of fields from nano- to biosciences.

  19. A spherical shell target scheme for laser-driven neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    He, Min-Qing Zhang, Hua; Wu, Si-Zhong; Wu, Jun-Feng; Chen, Mo; Cai, Hong-Bo Zhou, Cang-Tao; Cao, Li-Hua; Zheng, Chun-Yang; Zhu, Shao-Ping; He, X. T.; Dong, Quan-Li; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Pei, Wen-Bing

    2015-12-15

    A scheme for neutron production is investigated in which an ultra-intense laser is irradiated into a two-layer (deuterium and aurum) spherical shell target through the cone shaped entrance hole. It is found that the energy conversion efficiency from laser to target can reach as high as 71%, and deuterium ions are heated to a maximum energy of several MeV from the inner layer surface. These ions are accelerated towards the center of the cavity and accumulated finally with a high density up to tens of critical density in several picoseconds. Two different mechanisms account for the efficient yield of the neutrons in the cavity: (1) At the early stage, the neutrons are generated by the high energy deuterium ions based on the “beam-target” approach. (2) At the later stage, the neutrons are generated by the thermonuclear fusion when the most of the deuterium ions reach equilibrium in the cavity. It is also found that a large number of deuterium ions accelerated inward can pass through the target center and the outer Au layer and finally stopped in the CD{sub 2} layer. This also causes efficient yield of neutrons inside the CD{sub 2} layer due to “beam-target” approach. A postprocessor has been designed to evaluate the neutron yield and the neutron spectrum is obtained.

  20. Exploration of laser-driven electron-multirescattering dynamics in high-order harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng-Cheng; Sheu, Yae-Lin; Jooya, Hossein Z.; Zhou, Xiao-Xin; Chu, Shih-I

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rescattering processes play an important role in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in an intense laser field. However, the underlying multi-rescattering dynamics are still largely unexplored. Here we investigate the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG associated with the odd and even number of returning times of the electron to the parent ion. We perform fully ab initio quantum calculations and extend the empirical mode decomposition method to extract the individual multiple scattering contributions in HHG. We find that the tunneling ionization regime is responsible for the odd number times of rescattering and the corresponding short trajectories are dominant. On the other hand, the multiphoton ionization regime is responsible for the even number times of rescattering and the corresponding long trajectories are dominant. Moreover, we discover that the multiphoton- and tunneling-ionization regimes in multiple rescattering processes occur alternatively. Our results uncover the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG for the first time. It also provides new insight regarding the control of the multiple rescattering processes for the optimal generation of ultrabroad band supercontinuum spectra and the production of single ultrashort attosecond laser pulse. PMID:27596056