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Sample records for laser-driven nonlinear cluster

  1. Laser-driven nonlinear cluster dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Fennel, Th.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Dinh, P. M.; Suraud, E.

    2010-04-15

    Laser excitation of nanometer-sized atomic and molecular clusters offers various opportunities to explore and control ultrafast many-particle dynamics. Whereas weak laser fields allow the analysis of photoionization, excited-state relaxation, and structural modifications on these finite quantum systems, large-amplitude collective electron motion and Coulomb explosion can be induced with intense laser pulses. This review provides an overview of key phenomena arising from laser-cluster interactions with focus on nonlinear optical excitations and discusses the underlying processes according to the current understanding. A general survey covers basic cluster properties and excitation mechanisms relevant for laser-driven cluster dynamics. Then, after an excursion in theoretical and experimental methods, results for single-photon and multiphoton excitations are reviewed with emphasis on signatures from time- and angular-resolved photoemission. A key issue of this review is the broad spectrum of phenomena arising from clusters exposed to strong fields, where the interaction with the laser pulse creates short-lived and dense nanoplasmas. The implications for technical developments such as the controlled generation of ion, electron, and radiation pulses will be addressed along with corresponding examples. Finally, future prospects of laser-cluster research as well as experimental and theoretical challenges are discussed.

  2. Laser-driven Acceleration in Clustered Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, X.; Wang, X.; Shim, B.; Downer, M. C.

    2009-01-22

    We propose a new approach to avoid dephasing limitation of laser wakefield acceleration by manipulating the group velocity of the driving pulse using clustered plasmas. We demonstrated the control of phase velocity in clustered plasmas by third harmonic generation and frequency domain interferometry experiments. The results agree with a numerical model. Based on this model, the group velocity of the driving pulse in clustered plasmas was calculated and the result shows the group velocity can approach the speed of light c in clustered plasmas.

  3. Investigation of Laser Driven Charge Clusters in Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njoya, Oumarou; Tsang, Thomas; Tarka, Michal; Fairbank, William; Kumar, Krishna; Rao, Triveni; nEXO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report on progress made in testing the concept of a laser driven in-situ electron lifetime monitoring system for a large Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber (LXe TPC). In our setup we use a 150-ns, 262-nm UV pulse (4th harmonic of YLF laser) to generate electrons from a gold photocathode; the laser couples to the photocathode via a 600- μm optical fiber. The electrons drift 20-mm in a uniform electric field inside the LXe-filled cell. The drift velocity and effects of diffusion are measured. Our setup is able to distinguish photo-emission due to gold from the multi-photon ionization of LXe by different drift times; this allows us to infer the cross section of the two-photon ionization process in LXe. Finally, we discuss preliminary studies of the stability, quantum efficiency, and work function of gold in a Xe environment. Department of Energy.

  4. Measurements of ultrafast laser-driven ionization and extreme gas nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedpour, Sina; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Wahlstrand, Jared; Milchberg, Howard

    2013-10-01

    A 2D spectral interferometry method for measuring high laser field phenomena such as laser-driven ionization and high field nonlinearity is introduced. The method is based on Single-shot Supercontinuum Spectral Interferometry, in which a chirped supercontinuum is used to probe the time-dependent refractive index induced by a pump pulse. A thin gas target ensures uniform intensity and minimizes refraction of the probe beam due to refractive index gradients. An imaging spectrometer allows measurement of the spatial dependence of the response along one direction. To measure in 2D, a motorized mirror scans the probe beam across the spectrometer slit. The technique has 3 micron spatial and 5 fs temporal resolution. The effective interaction length is measured interferometrically, allowing absolute calibration of the refractive index change. We present measurements of the absolute ionization rates of noble and molecular gases and their high field nonlinear response. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation, and the Dept. of Energy.

  5. Femtosecond-Laser-Driven Cluster-Based Plasma Source for High-Resolution Ionography

    SciTech Connect

    Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Homma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Mori, M.; Sakaki, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Pirozhkov, A.; Yogo, A.; Tampo, M.; Bolton, P.; Daido, H.; Tajima, T.; Pikuz, S. A. Jr.; Kartashev, V.

    2009-07-25

    The intense isotropic source of multicharged ions, with energy above 300 keV, was produced by femtosecond Ti:Sa laser pulses irradiation (intensity of approx4x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) of the He and CO{sub 2} gases mixture expanded in supersonic jet. High contrast ionography images have been obtained for 2000 dpi metal mesh, 1 mum polypropylene and 100 nm Zr foils, as well as for different biological objects. Images were recorded on 1 mm thick CR-39 ion detector placed in contact with back surface of the imaged samples, at the distances 140-160 mm from the plasma source. The obtained spatial resolution of the image was approx600 nm. A 100 nm object thickness difference was resolved very well for both Zr and polymer foils. The multicharged ion energy for Carbon and Oxygen ions passing through the 1 mum polypropylene foil is estimated to give the energy of more than 300 keV. An almost equal number of ions were measured with total number of about 10{sup 8} per shot at a different direction from plasma source. Easy production of different sub-MeV ions in wide space angle, recognizes femtosecond-laser-driven-cluster-based plasma as a well-suited bright source for novel type of submicron ionography to image different media, including nanofoils, membranes, and other low-contrast objects.

  6. Magnetic Field Generation by the Nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor Instability in Laser-Driven Planar Plastic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, L.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Hu, S. X.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.; Nilson, P. M.; Davies, J. R.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Haines, M. G.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic field generation during the nonlinear phase of the Rayleigh--Taylor (RT) instability in an ablatively driven plasma using ultrafast laser-driven proton radiography has been measured. Thin plastic foils were irradiated with ˜4-kJ, 2.5-ns laser pulses focused to an intensity of ˜10^14 W/cm^2 on the OMEGA EP Laser System. Target modulations were seeded by laser nonuniformities and amplified during target acceleration by the RT instability. The experimental data show the hydrodynamic evolution of the target and MG-level magnetic fields generated in the broken foil. The experimental data are in good agreement with predictions from 2-D magnetohydrodynamic simulations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  7. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E

    2010-05-01

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a nonrelativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for Langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three-velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for nonrelativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  8. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric

    2010-06-30

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically-intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a non-relativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined, and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for non-relativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  9. Thermal and log-normal distributions of plasma in laser driven Coulomb explosions of deuterium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, M.; Warrens, M.; Bonasera, A.; Lattuada, D.; Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Consoli, F.; de Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Kimura, S.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Schmidt, K.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Natowitz, J. B.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we explore the possibility that the motion of the deuterium ions emitted from Coulomb cluster explosions is highly disordered enough to resemble thermalization. We analyze the process of nuclear fusion reactions driven by laser-cluster interactions in experiments conducted at the Texas Petawatt laser facility using a mixture of D2+3He and CD4+3He cluster targets. When clusters explode by Coulomb repulsion, the emission of the energetic ions is “nearly” isotropic. In the framework of cluster Coulomb explosions, we analyze the energy distributions of the ions using a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution, a shifted MB distribution (sMB), and the energy distribution derived from a log-normal (LN) size distribution of clusters. We show that the first two distributions reproduce well the experimentally measured ion energy distributions and the number of fusions from d-d and d-3He reactions. The LN distribution is a good representation of the ion kinetic energy distribution well up to high momenta where the noise becomes dominant, but overestimates both the neutron and the proton yields. If the parameters of the LN distributions are chosen to reproduce the fusion yields correctly, the experimentally measured high energy ion spectrum is not well represented. We conclude that the ion kinetic energy distribution is highly disordered and practically not distinguishable from a thermalized one.

  10. Expansion of nanoplasmas and laser-driven nuclear fusion in single exploding clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Peano, F.; Martins, J. L.; Silva, L. O.; Peinetti, F.; Mulas, R.; Coppa, G.

    2008-09-07

    The expansion of laser-irradiated clusters can be controlled by acting on the amount of energy delivered to the electrons. When increasing the electron energy, the expansion regime varies smoothly from a quasineutral, hydrodinamic-like to a Coulomb explosion (CE), as revealed by self-consistent kinetic analysis. A double-pump irradiation scheme can produce hybrid expansion regimes wherein a slow hydrodynamic expansion is followed by a fast CE, leading to ion overtaking and producing multiple ion flows expanding with different velocities, which can lead to intracluster fusion reactions in homonuclear deuterium clusters.

  11. Steplike Intensity Threshold Behavior of Extreme Ionization in Laser-Driven Xenon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T.; Mueller, J. P.; Przystawik, A.; Goede, S.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Varin, C.; Ramunno, L.; Brabec, T.; Fennel, T.

    2010-07-30

    The generation of highly charged Xe{sup q+} ions up to q=24 is observed in Xe clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets and exposed to intense femtosecond laser pulses ({lambda}=800 nm). Laser intensity resolved measurements show that the high-q ion generation starts at an unexpectedly low threshold intensity of about 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Above threshold, the Xe ion charge spectrum saturates quickly and changes only weakly for higher laser intensities. Good agreement between these observations and a molecular dynamics analysis allows us to identify the mechanisms responsible for the highly charged ion production and the surprising intensity threshold behavior of the ionization process.

  12. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  13. Electron spectra of xenon clusters irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft-x-ray laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Takiyama, K.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2011-11-15

    Xenon clusters were irradiated with plasma soft-x-ray laser pulses (having a wavelength of 13.9 nm, time duration of 7 ps, and intensities of up to 10 GW/cm{sup 2}). The laser photon energy was high enough to photoionize 4d core electrons. The cross section is large due to a giant resonance. The interaction was investigated by measuring the electron energy spectra. The photoelectron spectra for small clusters indicate that the spectral width due to the 4d hole significantly broadens with increasing cluster size. For larger clusters, the electron energy spectra evolve into a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, as a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma is generated.

  14. Laser driven radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Sefcik, J.; Cowan, T.

    1997-12-20

    Intense laser (> 1021 W/cm{sup 3}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator Bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and potential cost advantage for multiple axis views. High spatial and temporal resolution is achievable as a result of the very small source size (<100 um) and short-duration of the laser pulse. We have begun a series of experiments with the Petawatt laser at LLNL to determine the photon flux achievable with these sources and assess their potential for Stewardship applications. Additionally, we are developing a conceptual design and cost estimate of a multi-pulse, multi-axis (up to five) radiographic facility utilizing the Contained Firing Facility at site 300 and existing laser hardware.

  15. Laser-driven fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrom, J.C.

    1973-10-01

    A laser-driven fusion reactor consisting of concentric spherical vessels in which the thermonuclear energy is derived from a deuterium-tritium (D + T) burn within a pellet'', located at the center of the vessels and initiated by a laser pulse. The resulting alpha -particle energy and a small fraction of the neutron energy are deposited within the pellet; this pellet energy is eventually transformed into sensible heat of lithium in a condenser outside the vessels. The remaining neutron energy is dissipated in a lithium blanket, located within the concentric vessels, where the fuel ingredient, tritium, is also produced. The heat content of the blanket and of the condenser lithium is eventually transferred to a conventional thermodynamic plant where the thermal energy is converted to electrical energy in a steam Rankine cycle. (Official Gazette)

  16. Nonlinear E -mode clustering in Lagrangian space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Pen, Ue-Li; Zhu, Hong-Ming

    2017-02-01

    We study the nonlinear E -mode clustering in Lagrangian space by using large scale structure N -body simulations and use the displacement field information in Lagrangian space to recover the primordial linear density field. We find that, compared to Eulerian nonlinear density fields, the E -mode displacement fields in Lagrangian space improves the cross-correlation scale k with initial density field by a factor of 6-7, containing 2 orders of magnitude more primordial information. This illustrates ability of potential density reconstruction algorithms, to improve the baryonic acoustic oscillation measurements from current and future large scale structure surveys.

  17. Electron Weibel Instability Mediated Laser Driven Electromagnetic Collisionless Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qing; Mima, Kunioki; Cai, Hong-Bo; Taguchi, Toshihiro; Nagatomo, Hideo; He, X. T.

    2015-11-01

    As a fundamental nonlinear structure, collisionless shock is widely studied in astrophysics. Recently, the rapidly-developing laser technology provides a good test-bed to study such shock physics in laboratory. In addition, the laser driven shock ion acceleration is also interested due to its potential applications. We explore the effect of external parallel magnetic field on the collisionless shock formation and resultant particle acceleration by using the 2D3V PIC simulations. We show that unlike the electrostatic shock generated in the unmagnetized plasma, the shock generated in the weakly-magnetized laser-driven plasma is mostly electromagnetic (EM)-like with higher Mach number. The generation mechanism is due to the stronger transverse magnetic field self-generated at the nonlinear stage of the electron Weibel instability which drastically scatters particles and leads to higher energy dissipation. Simulation results also suggest more ions are reflected by this EM shock and results in larger energy transfer rate from the laser to ions, which is of advantage for applications such as neutron production and ion fast ignition.

  18. Classical chaos and harmonic generation in laser driven nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglia, Giuseppe; Corso, Pietro Paolo; Cricchio, Dario; De Giovannini, Umberto; Frusteri, Biagio; Fiordilino, Emilio

    2016-12-01

    A quantum ring driven by an intense laser field emits light in the form of high-harmonic radiation resulting from the strong acceleration experienced by the active electrons forced to move on a curved trajectory. The spectrum of the emitted light is rich and strongly dependent on the parameters of the problem. In order to investigate the physical origin of such variability, we focus on the seemingly simple problem of a laser-driven charge constrained to a ring from a classical standpoint. As it turns out, the dynamics of such a classical electron is governed by a nonlinear equation which results into a chaotic motion—by nature depending on the initial conditions in an unpredictable way. Our results indicate that the quantum harmonic spectra are reminiscent of the classical counterpart and suggest the existence of a line connecting the quantum and classical realms.

  19. Laser-Driven Mini-Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Enrique; Lin Jun; Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B. Jr.

    2006-05-02

    Laser-driven mini-thrusters were studied using Delrin registered and PVC (Delrin registered is a registered trademark of DuPont) as propellants. TEA CO2 laser ({lambda} = 10.6 {mu}m) was used as a driving laser. Coupling coefficients were deduced from two independent techniques: force-time curves measured with a piezoelectric sensor and ballistic pendulum. Time-resolved ICCD images of the expanding plasma and combustion products were analyzed in order to determine the main process that generates the thrust. The measurements were also performed in a nitrogen atmosphere in order to test the combustion effects on thrust. A pinhole transmission experiment was performed for the study of the cut-off time when the ablation/air breakdown plasma becomes opaque to the incoming laser pulse.

  20. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.; Gerardo, James B.

    1989-01-01

    The surfaces of solid ionic substrates are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing an ionic substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g. a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrance of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic salt substrates, e.g., a solid inorganic salt such as LiNbO.sub.3, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  1. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.; Gerardo, J.B.

    1987-08-25

    The surfaces of solids are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing a substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g., a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrence of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic substrates, e.g., LiNbO/sub 3/, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  2. Laser-Driven Magnetized Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Derek

    2016-10-01

    Collisionless shocks - supersonic plasma flows in which the interaction length scale is much shorter than the collisional mean free path - are common phenomena in space and astrophysical systems, including the solar wind, coronal mass ejections, supernovae remnants, and the jets of active galactic nuclei. These systems have been studied for decades, and in many the shocks are believed to efficiently accelerate particles to some of the highest observed energies. Only recently, however, have laser and diagnostic capabilities evolved sufficiently to allow the detailed study in the laboratory of the microphysics of collisionless shocks over a large parameter regime. We present experiments that demonstrate the formation of collisionless shocks utilizing the Phoenix laser laboratory and the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. We also show recent observations of magnetized collisionless shocks on the Omega EP laser facility that extend the LAPD results to higher laser energy, background magnetic field, and ambient plasma density, and that may be relevant to recent experiments on strongly driven magnetic reconnection. Lastly, we discuss a new experimental regime for shocks with results from high-repetition (1 Hz), volumetric laser-driven measurements on the LAPD. These large parameter scales allow us to probe the formation physics of collisionless shocks over several Alfvénic Mach numbers (MA), from shock precursors (magnetosonic solitons with MA < 1) to subcritical (MA < 3) and supercritical (MA > 3) shocks. The results show that collisionless shocks can be generated using a laser-driven magnetic piston, and agree well with both 2D and 3D hybrid and PIC simulations. Additionally, using radiation-hydrodynamic modeling and measurements from multiple diagnostics, the different shock regimes are characterized with dimensionless formation parameters, allowing us to place disparate experiments in a common and predictive framework.

  3. Visualization of high-dimensional clusters using nonlinear magnification

    SciTech Connect

    Keahey, T.A.

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes a cluster visualization system used for data-mining fraud detection. The system can simultaneously show 6 dimensions of data, and a unique technique of 3D nonlinear magnification allows individual clusters of data points to be magnified while still maintaining a view of the global context. The author first describes the fraud detection problem, along with the data which is to be visualized. Then he describes general characteristics of the visualization system, and shows how nonlinear magnification can be used in this system. Finally he concludes and describes options for further work.

  4. Nonlinear plasmon response in highly excited metallic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Calvayrac, F.; Reinhard, P.G.; Suraud, E.

    1995-12-15

    We present a dynamical study of the electron response of metallic clusters in the nonlinear regime, as excited, e.g., in ion-cluster interactions or with intense laser beams. We use a quantal time-dependent local-density approximation in axial symmetry to describe the electron dynamics. Ions are either treated in a jellium approximation or explicitly. We find different dynamical regimes depending on the symmetries of the ionic background.

  5. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2007-07-11

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world.Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called ''dream beams on a table top'', which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators.

  6. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  7. Limit cycles in nonlinear excitation of clusters of classical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lauro, E.; De Martino, S.; Falanga, M.; Ixaru, L. Gr.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we develop a numerical procedure for detecting the existence of limit cycles in nonlinear excitation of clusters of classical harmonic oscillators. Our technique is able to compute also the main parameters of a limit cycle, that is the amplitudes and the period. The numerical method, based on the propagation matrix formalism, is transparent and easy to apply. It may find application in various areas where nonlinear excitations are involved, e.g., sound and mechanic vibrations in musical instruments, ground vibrations in volcanic areas, and sea tides.

  8. Nonlinear model-based method for clustering periodically expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li-Ping; Liu, Li-Zhi; Zhang, Qian-Wei; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Clustering periodically expressed genes from their time-course expression data could help understand the molecular mechanism of those biological processes. In this paper, we propose a nonlinear model-based clustering method for periodically expressed gene profiles. As periodically expressed genes are associated with periodic biological processes, the proposed method naturally assumes that a periodically expressed gene dataset is generated by a number of periodical processes. Each periodical process is modelled by a linear combination of trigonometric sine and cosine functions in time plus a Gaussian noise term. A two stage method is proposed to estimate the model parameter, and a relocation-iteration algorithm is employed to assign each gene to an appropriate cluster. A bootstrapping method and an average adjusted Rand index (AARI) are employed to measure the quality of clustering. One synthetic dataset and two biological datasets were employed to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that our method allows the better quality clustering than other clustering methods (e.g., k-means) for periodically expressed gene data, and thus it is an effective cluster analysis method for periodically expressed gene data.

  9. Recent advances in laser-driven neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-11-01

    Due to the limited number and high cost of large-scale neutron facilities, there has been a growing interest in compact accelerator-driven sources. In this context, several potential schemes of laser-driven neutron sources are being intensively studied employing laser-accelerated electron and ion beams. In addition to the potential of delivering neutron beams with high brilliance, directionality and ultra-short burst duration, a laser-driven neutron source would offer further advantages in terms of cost-effectiveness, compactness and radiation confinement by closed-coupled experiments. Some of the recent advances in this field are discussed, showing improvements in the directionality and flux of the laser-driven neutron beams.

  10. Frequency analysis of the laser driven nonlinear dynamics of HCN.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Pina, A; Losada, J C; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-12-28

    We study the vibrational dynamics of a model for the HCN molecule in the presence of a monochromatic laser field. The variation of the structural behavior of the system as a function of the laser frequency is analyzed in detail using the smaller alignment index, frequency maps, and diffusion coefficients. It is observed that the ergodicity of the system depends on the frequency of the excitation field, especially in its transitions from and into chaos. This provides a roadmap for the possibility of bond excitation and dissociation in this molecule.

  11. All-laser-driven Thomson X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, Donald P.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the development of a new generation of accelerator-based hard X-ray sources driven exclusively by laser light. High-intensity laser pulses serve the dual roles: first, accelerating electrons by laser-driven plasma wakefields, and second, generating X-rays by inverse Compton scattering. Such all-laser-driven X-rays have recently been demonstrated to be energetic, tunable, relatively narrow in bandwidth, short pulsed and well collimated. Such characteristics, especially from a compact source, are highly advantageous for numerous advanced X-ray applications - in metrology, biomedicine, materials, ultrafast phenomena, radiology and fundamental physics.

  12. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  13. Measuring Energy Scaling of Laser Driven Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jackson; Goyon, Clement; Mariscal, Derek; Pollock, Brad; Patankar, Siddharth; Moody, John

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven magnetic fields are of interest in particle confinement, fast ignition, and ICF platforms as an alternative to pulsed power systems to achieve many times higher fields. A comprehensive model describing the mechanism responsible for creating and maintaining magnetic fields from laser-driven coils has not yet been established. Understanding the scaling of key experimental parameters such as spatial and temporal uniformity and duration are necessary to implement coil targets in practical applications yet these measurements prove difficult due to the highly transient nature of the fields. We report on direct voltage measurements of laser-driven coil targets in which the laser energy spans more than four orders of magnitude. Results suggest that at low energies, laser-driven coils can be modeled as an electric circuit; however, at higher energies plasma effects dominate and a simple circuit treatment is insufficient to describe all observed phenomenon. The favorable scaling with laser power and pulse duration, observed in the present study and others at kilojoule energies, has positive implications for sustained, large magnetic fields for applications on the NIF. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Nonlinear mode coupling and vibrational energy transfer in Yukawa clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear mode coupling and the subsequent vibrational energy transfer that results is an important topic in chemical physics research, ranging from small molecules consisting of several atoms to macromolecules such as those found in proteins and DNA. Nonlinear mode coupling is recognized as the mechanism leading to ergodicity, which is a foundational tenet of statistical mechanics. Over the past two decades, Yukawa systems of particles such as those found in complex plasma, have been shown to be an effective model across a large number of physical systems. In this research, nonlinear mode coupling in Yukawa clusters consisting of 3-10 particles is examined via numerical simulation of the vibrational energy transfer between modes starting from an initial excited state. The relationship between the energy transfer process and the internal resonance between modes having a specified frequency ratio and the temporal evolution of the system to a state of equal energy across all modes, i.e., the state of ergodicity, will be discussed. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Tz. B. Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  16. Weibel instability mediated collisionless shocks using intense laser-driven plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald; Fernandez, Juan; Ma, Wenjun; Schreiber, Jorg; LANL Collaboration; LMU Team

    2016-10-01

    The origin of cosmic rays remains a long-standing challenge in astrophysics and continues to fascinate physicists. It is believed that ``collisionless shocks'' - where the particle Coulomb mean free path is much larger that the shock transition - are a dominant source of energetic cosmic rays. These shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments such as gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebula and coronal mass ejections from the sun. Several spacecraft observations have revealed acceleration of charged particles, mostly electrons, to very high energies with in the shock front. There is now also clear observational evidence that supernova remnant shocks accelerate both protons and electrons. The understanding of the microphysics behind collisionless shocks and their particle acceleration is tightly related with nonlinear basic plasma processes and remains a grand challenge. In this poster, we will present results from recent experiments at the LANL Trident laser facility studying collisionless shocks using intense ps laser (80J, 650 fs - peak intensity of 1020 W/cm2) driven near-critical plasmas using carbon nanotube foam targets. A second short pulse laser driven protons from few microns thick aluminum foil is used to image the laser-driven plasma.

  17. Picosecond metrology of laser-driven proton bursts

    PubMed Central

    Dromey, B.; Coughlan, M.; Senje, L.; Taylor, M.; Kuschel, S.; Villagomez-Bernabe, B.; Stefanuik, R.; Nersisyan, G.; Stella, L.; Kohanoff, J.; Borghesi, M.; Currell, F.; Riley, D.; Jung, D.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lewis, C.L.S.; Zepf, M.

    2016-01-01

    Tracking primary radiation-induced processes in matter requires ultrafast sources and high precision timing. While compact laser-driven ion accelerators are seeding the development of novel high instantaneous flux applications, combining the ultrashort ion and laser pulse durations with their inherent synchronicity to trace the real-time evolution of initial damage events has yet to be realized. Here we report on the absolute measurement of proton bursts as short as 3.5±0.7 ps from laser solid target interactions for this purpose. Our results verify that laser-driven ion acceleration can deliver interaction times over a factor of hundred shorter than those of state-of-the-art accelerators optimized for high instantaneous flux. Furthermore, these observations draw ion interaction physics into the field of ultrafast science, opening the opportunity for quantitative comparison with both numerical modelling and the adjacent fields of ultrafast electron and photon interactions in matter. PMID:26861592

  18. Intrinsic normalized emittance growth in laser-driven electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorati, M.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Antici, P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based electron sources are attracting strong interest from the conventional accelerator community due to their unique characteristics in terms of high initial energy, low emittance, and significant beam current. Extremely strong electric fields (up to hundreds of GV/m) generated in the plasma allow accelerating gradients much higher than in conventional accelerators and set the basis for achieving very high final energies in a compact space. Generating laser-driven high-energy electron beam lines therefore represents an attractive challenge for novel particle accelerators. In this paper we show that laser-driven electrons generated by the nowadays consolidated TW laser systems, when leaving the interaction region, are subject to a very strong, normalized emittance worsening which makes them quickly unusable for any beam transport. Furthermore, due to their intrinsic beam characteristics, controlling and capturing the full beam current can only be achieved improving the source parameters.

  19. Recent developments in laser-driven polarized sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, L.; Coulter, K. P.; Holt, R. J.; Kinney, E. R.; Kowalczyk, R. S.; Potterveld, D. H.; Zghiche, A.

    1990-12-01

    Recent progress in the performance of laser-driven sources of polarized hydrogen and deuterium is described. The current status of the prototype source, I = 2.5 times 10(exp 17)s(exp -1), polarization = 0.29 (including atomic fraction), is comparable to classical Stern-Gerlach sources. A scheme to improve source performance by approximately an order of magnitude, using a combination of optical-pumping spin-exchange and RF transitions, is outlined.

  20. Laser-driven electron acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong; Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-12-15

    We study the laser-driven electron acceleration in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma channel. We find that, in inhomogeneous plasma channel, the developing of instability for electron acceleration and the electron energy gain can be controlled by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of plasma channel. That is, we can short the accelerating length and enhance the energy gain in inhomogeneous plasma channel by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of the plasma channel.

  1. Space-based laser-driven MHD generator: Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of a laser-driven MHD generator, as a candidate receiver for a space-based laser power transmission system, was investigated. On the basis of reasonable parameters obtained in the literature, a model of the laser-driven MHD generator was developed with the assumptions of a steady, turbulent, two-dimensional flow. These assumptions were based on the continuous and steady generation of plasmas by the exposure of the continuous wave laser beam thus inducing a steady back pressure that enables the medium to flow steadily. The model considered here took the turbulent nature of plasmas into account in the two-dimensional geometry of the generator. For these conditions with the plasma parameters defining the thermal conductivity, viscosity, electrical conductivity for the plasma flow, a generator efficiency of 53.3% was calculated. If turbulent effects and nonequilibrium ionization are taken into account, the efficiency is 43.2%. The study shows that the laser-driven MHD system has potential as a laser power receiver for space applications because of its high energy conversion efficiency, high energy density and relatively simple mechanism as compared to other energy conversion cycles.

  2. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-07-25

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of gamma-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  3. Voids and constraints on nonlinear clustering of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogeley, Michael S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Park, Changbom; Huchra, John P.

    1994-01-01

    Void statistics of the galaxy distribution in the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Survey provide strong constraints on galaxy clustering in the nonlinear regime, i.e., on scales R equal to or less than 10/h Mpc. Computation of high-order moments of the galaxy distribution requires a sample that (1) densely traces the large-scale structure and (2) covers sufficient volume to obtain good statistics. The CfA redshift survey densely samples structure on scales equal to or less than 10/h Mpc and has sufficient depth and angular coverage to approach a fair sample on these scales. In the nonlinear regime, the void probability function (VPF) for CfA samples exhibits apparent agreement with hierarchical scaling (such scaling implies that the N-point correlation functions for N greater than 2 depend only on pairwise products of the two-point function xi(r)) However, simulations of cosmological models show that this scaling in redshift space does not necessarily imply such scaling in real space, even in the nonlinear regime; peculiar velocities cause distortions which can yield erroneous agreement with hierarchical scaling. The underdensity probability measures the frequency of 'voids' with density rho less than 0.2 -/rho. This statistic reveals a paucity of very bright galaxies (L greater than L asterisk) in the 'voids.' Underdensities are equal to or greater than 2 sigma more frequent in bright galaxy samples than in samples that include fainter galaxies. Comparison of void statistics of CfA samples with simulations of a range of cosmological models favors models with Gaussian primordial fluctuations and Cold Dark Matter (CDM)-like initial power spectra. Biased models tend to produce voids that are too empty. We also compare these data with three specific models of the Cold Dark Matter cosmogony: an unbiased, open universe CDM model (omega = 0.4, h = 0.5) provides a good match to the VPF of the CfA samples. Biasing of the galaxy distribution in the 'standard' CDM model

  4. Planar laser-driven ablation model for nonlocalized absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmani, F.; Kerdja, T. )

    1991-05-01

    A model for planar laser-driven ablation is presented. Nonlocalized inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of laser energy at a density {ital n}{sub 1}{lt}{ital n}{sub {ital c}} is assumed. A steady-state solution in the conduction zone is joined to a rarefaction wave in the underdense plasma. The calculations relate all steady-state fluid quantities to only the material, absorbed intensity, and laser wavelength. The theory agrees well with results from a computer hydrodynamics code MEDUSA (Comput. Phys. Commun. {bold 7}, 271 (1974)) and experiments.

  5. Nonlinear damage effect in graphene synthesis by C-cluster ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Rui; Zhang Zaodi; Wang Zesong; Wang Shixu; Wang Wei; Fu Dejun; Liu Jiarui

    2012-07-02

    We present few-layer graphene synthesis by negative carbon cluster ion implantation with C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 4} at energies below 20 keV. The small C-clusters were produced by a source of negative ion by cesium sputtering with medium beam current. We show that the nonlinear effect in cluster-induced damage is favorable for graphene precipitation compared with monomer carbon ions. The nonlinear damage effect in cluster ion implantation shows positive impact on disorder reduction, film uniformity, and the surface smoothness in graphene synthesis.

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea detection using clustering classification of nonlinear features from nocturnal oximetry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto; Marcos, J Víctor; del Campo, Félix; López, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    This study is focused on the classification of patients suspected of suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by means of cluster analysis. We assessed the diagnostic ability of three clustering algorithms: k-means, hierarchical and fuzzy c-means (FCM). Nonlinear features of blood oxygen saturation (SaO2) from nocturnal oximetry were used as inputs to the clustering methods. Three nonlinear methods were used: approximate entropy (ApEn), central tendency measure (CTM) and Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity. A population of 74 subjects (44 OSA positive and 30 OSA negative) was studied. 90.5%, 87.8% and 86.5% accuracies were reached with k-means, hierarchical and FCM algorithms, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy values improved those obtained with each nonlinear method individually. Our results suggest that nonlinear analysis and clustering classification could provide useful information to help in the diagnosis of OSA syndrome.

  7. Evolution of nonlinear optical properties: from gold atomic clusters to plasmonic nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Philip, Reji; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Qian, Huifeng; Jin, Rongchao; Thomas, Jayan

    2012-09-12

    Atomic clusters of metals are an emerging class of extremely interesting materials occupying the intermediate size regime between atoms and nanoparticles. Here we report the nonlinear optical (NLO) characteristics of ultrasmall, atomically precise clusters of gold, which are smaller than the critical size for electronic energy quantization (∼2 nm). Our studies reveal remarkable features of the distinct evolution of the optical nonlinearity as the clusters progress in size from the nonplasmonic regime to the plasmonic regime. We ascertain that the smallest atomic clusters do not show saturable absorption at the surface plasmon wavelength of larger gold nanocrystals (>2 nm). Consequently, the third-order optical nonlinearity in these ultrasmall gold clusters exhibits a significantly lower threshold for optical power limiting. This limiting efficiency, which is superior to that of plasmonic nanocrystals, is highly beneficial for optical limiting applications.

  8. Cluster Consensus of Nonlinearly Coupled Multi-Agent Systems in Directed Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Qing; Francis, Austin; Chen, Shi-Hua

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the cluster consensus problem in directed networks of nonlinearly coupled multi-agent systems by using pinning control. Depending on the community structure generated by the group partition of the underlying digraph, various clusters can be made coherently independent by applying feedback injections to a fraction of the agents. Sufficient conditions for cluster consensus are obtained using algebraic graph theory and matrix theory and some simulations results are included to illustrate the method.

  9. Review of laser-driven ion sources and their applications.

    PubMed

    Daido, Hiroyuki; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Pirozhkov, Alexander S

    2012-05-01

    For many years, laser-driven ion acceleration, mainly proton acceleration, has been proposed and a number of proof-of-principle experiments have been carried out with lasers whose pulse duration was in the nanosecond range. In the 1990s, ion acceleration in a relativistic plasma was demonstrated with ultra-short pulse lasers based on the chirped pulse amplification technique which can provide not only picosecond or femtosecond laser pulse duration, but simultaneously ultra-high peak power of terawatt to petawatt levels. Starting from the year 2000, several groups demonstrated low transverse emittance, tens of MeV proton beams with a conversion efficiency of up to several percent. The laser-accelerated particle beams have a duration of the order of a few picoseconds at the source, an ultra-high peak current and a broad energy spectrum, which make them suitable for many, including several unique, applications. This paper reviews, firstly, the historical background including the early laser-matter interaction studies on energetic ion acceleration relevant to inertial confinement fusion. Secondly, we describe several implemented and proposed mechanisms of proton and/or ion acceleration driven by ultra-short high-intensity lasers. We pay special attention to relatively simple models of several acceleration regimes. The models connect the laser, plasma and proton/ion beam parameters, predicting important features, such as energy spectral shape, optimum conditions and scalings under these conditions for maximum ion energy, conversion efficiency, etc. The models also suggest possible ways to manipulate the proton/ion beams by tailoring the target and irradiation conditions. Thirdly, we review experimental results on proton/ion acceleration, starting with the description of driving lasers. We list experimental results and show general trends of parameter dependences and compare them with the theoretical predictions and simulations. The fourth topic includes a review of

  10. Hydrodynamic analysis of laser-driven cylindrical implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramis, R.

    2013-08-15

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to study laser-driven cylindrical implosions in the context of experiments (F. Perez et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 124035 (2009)) carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the framework of the HiPER project. The analysis is carried out by using the 3D version of the hydrocode MULTI (R. Ramis et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 49, 475-505 (1988)). The influence of the main laser parameters on implosion performance and symmetry is consistently studied and compared with the results of 2D analysis. Furthermore, the effects of uncertainties in laser irradiation (pointing, focusing, power balance, and time jitter) on implosion performance (average peak density and temperature) are studied by means of statistical analysis.

  11. Flyer Velocity Characteristics of the Laser-Driven Miniflyer System

    SciTech Connect

    Gehr, R.J.; Harper, R.W.; Robbins, D.L.; Rupp, T.D.; Sheffield, S.A.; Stahl, D.B.

    1999-07-01

    The laser-driven MiniFlyer system is used to launch a small, thin flyer plate for impact on a target. Consequently, it is an indirect drive technique that de-couples the shock from the laser beam profile. The flyer velocity can be controlled by adjustment of the laser energy. The upper limits on the flyer velocity involve the ability of the substrate window to transmit the laser light without absorbing, reflecting, etc.; i.e., a maximum amount of laser energy is directly converted into kinetic energy of the flyer plate. We have investigated the use of sapphire, quartz, and BK-7 glass as substrate windows. In the past, a particular type of sapphire has been used for nearly all MiniFlyer experiments. Results of this study in terms of the performance of these window materials, based on flyer velocity, are discussed.

  12. Characterization of short-pulse laser driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Katerina; Jung, Daniel; Guler, Nevzat; Deppert, Oliver; Devlin, Matthew; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We present a full spectral characterization of a novel laser driven neutron source, which employed the Break Out Afterburner ion acceleration mechanism. Neutrons were produced by nuclear reactions of the ions deposited on Be or Cu converters. We observed neutrons at energies up to 150 MeV. The neutron spectra were measured by five neutron time-of-flight detectors at various positions and distances from the source. The nTOF detectors observed that emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component peaking at 3.5--5 MeV resulting from nuclear reactions in the converter and a directional component at 25--70 MeV, which was a product of break-up reaction of the forward moving deuterons. Energy shifts due to geometrical effects in BOA were also observed.

  13. Spectral and spatial characterisation of laser-driven positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarri, G.; Warwick, J.; Schumaker, W.; Poder, K.; Cole, J.; Doria, D.; Dzelzainis, T.; Krushelnick, K.; Kuschel, S.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Romagnani, L.; Samarin, G. M.; Symes, D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yeung, M.; Zepf, M.

    2017-01-01

    The generation of high-quality relativistic positron beams is a central area of research in experimental physics, due to their potential relevance in a wide range of scientific and engineering areas, ranging from fundamental science to practical applications. There is now growing interest in developing hybrid machines that will combine plasma-based acceleration techniques with more conventional radio-frequency accelerators, in order to minimise the size and cost of these machines. Here we report on recent experiments on laser-driven generation of high-quality positron beams using a relatively low energy and potentially table-top laser system. The results obtained indicate that current technology allows to create, in a compact setup, positron beams suitable for injection in radio-frequency accelerators.

  14. Laser-driven ICF experiments: Laboratory Report No. 223

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, R.L.

    1991-04-01

    Laser irradiation uniformity is a key issue and is treated in some detail. The basic irradiation uniformity requirements and practical ways of achieving these requirements are both discussed, along with two beam-smoothing techniques: induced spatial incoherence (ISI), and smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Experiments to measure and control the irradiation uniformity are also highlighted. Following the discussion of irradiation uniformity, a brief review of coronal physics is given, including the basic physical processes and their experimental signatures, together with a summary of pertinent diagnostics and results from experiments. Methods of determining ablation rates and thermal transport are also described. The hydrodynamics of laser-driven targets must be fully understood on the basis of experiments. Results from implosion experiments, including a brief description of the diagnostics, are presented. Future experiments aimed at determining ignition scaling and demonstrating hydrodynamically equivalent physics applicable to high-gain designs.

  15. Compact Couplers for Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin; Lin, M.C.; Schwartz, Brian; Byer, Robert; McGuinness, Christopher; Colby, Eric; England, Robert; Noble, Robert; Spencer, James; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    Photonic crystal waveguides are promising candidates for laser-driven accelerator structures because of their ability to confine a speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure. Because of the difference between the group velocity of the waveguide mode and the particle bunch velocity, fields must be coupled into the accelerating waveguide at frequent intervals. Therefore efficient, compact couplers are critical to overall accelerator efficiency. We present designs and simulations of high-efficiency coupling to the accelerating mode in a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide from a waveguide adjoining it at 90{sup o}. We discuss details of the computation and the resulting transmission. We include some background on the accelerator structure and photonic crystal-based optical acceleration in general.

  16. Laser-Driven Shock Compression Results on Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Eggert, J. H.; Moon, S. J.; Foord, M. E.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Vianello, E.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2003-10-01

    Laser-driven shock wave experiments have been performed at OMEGA to explore the equation of state of deuterium under double and single shock compression. We have developed a new technique of using a calibrated, high-pressure transparent material, quartz, which has enabled precision optical interferometer measurements of shock velocities. This approach significantly reduces the possibility of systematic error arising from shock unsteadiness. In the double-shock experiments, where quartz is used as a re-shock anvil, the results indicate deuterium has a compressibility that is close to the new SESAME and ab initio models below 1 Mbar but exhibits higher compressibility at larger pressures. In the single-shock, aluminum impedance-match experiments, quartz is used to accurately infer the shock velocity in aluminum; results from these recent experiments will be presented.

  17. Spectral and spatial characterisation of laser-driven positron beams

    DOE PAGES

    Sarri, G.; Warwick, J.; Schumaker, W.; ...

    2016-10-18

    The generation of high-quality relativistic positron beams is a central area of research in experimental physics, due to their potential relevance in a wide range of scientific and engineering areas, ranging from fundamental science to practical applications. There is now growing interest in developing hybrid machines that will combine plasma-based acceleration techniques with more conventional radio-frequency accelerators, in order to minimise the size and cost of these machines. Here we report on recent experiments on laser-driven generation of high-quality positron beams using a relatively low energy and potentially table-top laser system. Lastly, the results obtained indicate that current technology allowsmore » to create, in a compact setup, positron beams suitable for injection in radio-frequency accelerators.« less

  18. Spectral and spatial characterisation of laser-driven positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sarri, G.; Warwick, J.; Schumaker, W.; Poder, K.; Cole, J.; Doria, D.; Dzelzainis, T.; Krushelnick, K.; Kuschel, S.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Romagnani, L.; Samarin, G. M.; Symes, D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yeung, M.; Zepf, M.

    2016-10-18

    The generation of high-quality relativistic positron beams is a central area of research in experimental physics, due to their potential relevance in a wide range of scientific and engineering areas, ranging from fundamental science to practical applications. There is now growing interest in developing hybrid machines that will combine plasma-based acceleration techniques with more conventional radio-frequency accelerators, in order to minimise the size and cost of these machines. Here we report on recent experiments on laser-driven generation of high-quality positron beams using a relatively low energy and potentially table-top laser system. Lastly, the results obtained indicate that current technology allows to create, in a compact setup, positron beams suitable for injection in radio-frequency accelerators.

  19. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration with laser-driven plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The acceleration of non-thermal particles in plasmas is critical for our understanding of explosive astrophysical phenomena, from solar flares to gamma ray bursts. Particle acceleration is thought to be mediated by collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection. The microphysics underlying these processes and their ability to efficiently convert flow and magnetic energy into non-thermal particles, however, is not yet fully understood. By performing for the first time ab initio 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of both magnetized and unmagnetized laser-driven plasmas, it is now possible to identify the optimal parameters for the study of particle acceleration in the laboratory relevant to astrophysical scenarios. It is predicted for the Omega and NIF laser conditions that significant non-thermal acceleration can occur during magnetic reconnection of laser-driven magnetized plasmas. Electrons are accelerated by the electric field near the X-points and trapped in contracting magnetic islands. This leads to a power-law tail extending to nearly a hundred times the thermal energy of the plasma and that contains a large fraction of the magnetic energy. The study of unmagnetized interpenetrating plasmas also reveals the possibility of forming collisionless shocks mediated by the Weibel instability on NIF. Under such conditions, both electrons and ions can be energized by scattering out of the Weibel-mediated turbulence. This also leads to power-law spectra that can be detected experimentally. The resulting experimental requirements to probe the microphysics of plasma particle acceleration will be discussed, paving the way for the first experiments of these important processes in the laboratory. As a result of these simulations and theoretical analysis, there are new experiments being planned on the Omega, NIF, and LCLS laser facilities to test these theoretical predictions. This work was supported by the SLAC LDRD program and DOE Office of Science, Fusion

  20. Nonlinear stopping of heavy clusters in matter: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2007-05-01

    When impacting on a solid, heavy cluster atoms are stopped less then equi-velocity atoms. Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study this so-called clearing-the-way effect systematically for the exemplary case of Au n clusters ( n = 1-402) bombarding a solid Ar target with energies in the range of Eat = 10-1000 eV/atom. We find that cluster stopping is reduced by a factor n- β with respect to that of equi-velocity atoms. The exponent β decreases from 0.46 at Eat = 10 eV/atom to 0.17 at Eat = 1000 eV/atom.

  1. Optimal control of ultrafast laser driven many-electron dynamics in a polyatomic molecule: N-methyl-6-quinolone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klamroth, Tillmann

    2006-04-01

    We report time-dependent configuration interaction singles calculations for the ultrafast laser driven many-electron dynamics in a polyatomic molecule, N-methyl-6-quinolone. We employ optimal control theory to achieve a nearly state-selective excitation from the S0 to the S1 state, on a time scale of a few (≈6) femtoseconds. The optimal control scheme is shown to correct for effects opposing a state-selective transition, such as multiphoton transitions and other, nonlinear phenomena, which are induced by the ultrashort and intense laser fields. In contrast, simple two-level π pulses are not effective in state-selective excitations when very short pulses are used. Also, the dependence of multiphoton and nonlinear effects on the number of states included in the dynamical simulations is investigated.

  2. SU-D-BRE-05: Feasibility and Limitations of Laser-Driven Proton Therapy: A Treatment Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, K; Wilkens, J; Masood, U; Pawelke, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Laser-acceleration of particles may offer a cost- and spaceefficient alternative for future radiation therapy with particles. Laser-driven particle beams are pulsed with very short bunch times, and a high number of particles is delivered within one laser shot which cannot be portioned or modulated during irradiation. The goal of this study was to examine whether good treatment plans can be produced for laser-driven proton beams and to investigate the feasibility of a laser-driven treatment unit. Methods: An exponentially decaying proton spectrum was tracked through a gantry and energy selection beam line design to produce multiple proton spectra with different energy widths centered on various nominal energies. These spectra were fed into a treatment planning system to calculate spot scanning proton plans using different lateral widths of the beam and different numbers of protons contained in the initial spectrum. The clinical feasibility of the resulting plans was analyzed in terms of dosimetric quality and the required number of laser shots as an estimation of the overall treatment time. Results: We were able to produce treatment plans with plan qualities of clinical relevance for a maximum initial proton number per laser shot of 6*10{sup 8}. However, the associated minimum number of laser shots was in the order of 10{sup 4}, indicating a long delivery time in the order of at least 15 minutes, when assuming an optimistic repetition rate of the laser system of 10 Hz. Conclusion: With the simulated beam line and the assumed shape of the proton spectrum it was impossible to produce clinically acceptable treatment plans that can be delivered in a reasonable time. The situation can be improved by a method or a device in the beam line which can modulate the number of protons from shot to shot. Supported by DFG Cluster of Excellence: Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics.

  3. Complete four-photon cluster-state analyzer based on cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Long; Su, Shi-Lei; Guo, Qi; Cheng, Liu-Yong; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2013-09-01

    We propose a method to construct an optical cluster-state analyzer based on cross-Kerr nonlinearity combined with linear optics elements. In the scheme, we employ two four-qubit parity gates and the controlled phase gate (CPG) from only the cross-Kerr nonlinearity and show that all the orthogonal four-qubit cluster states can be completely identified. The scheme is significant for the large-scale quantum communication and quantum information processing networks. In addition, the scheme is feasible and deterministic under current experimental conditions.

  4. Laser-Driven Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnak, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is an approach that combines the implosion and compression of fusion fuel (a hallmark of inertial fusion) with strongly magnetized plasmas that suppress electron heat losses (a hallmark of magnetic fusion). It is of interest because it could potentially reduce some of the traditional velocity, pressure, and convergence ratio requirements of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept being studied at the Z Pulsed-Power Facility is a key target concept in the U.S. ICF Program. Laser-driven MagLIF is being developed to enable a test of the scaling of MagLIF over a range of absorbed energy from of the order of 20 kJ (on OMEGA) to 500 kJ (on Z). It is also valuable as a platform for studying the key physics of MIF. An energy-scaled point design has been developed for the Omega Laser Facility that is roughly 10 × smaller in linear dimensions than Z MagLIF targets. A 0.6-mm-outer-diam plastic cylinder filled with 2.4 mg/cm3 of D2 is placed in a 10-T axial magnetic field, generated by MIFEDS (magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system), the cylinder is compressed by 40 OMEGA beams, and the gas fill is preheated by a single OMEGA beam propagating along the axis. Preheating to >100 eV and axially uniform compression over a 0.7-mm height have been demonstrated, separately, in a series of preparatory experiments that meet our initial expectations. Preliminary results from the first integrated experiments combining magnetization, compression, and preheat will be reported for the first time. The scaling of laser-driven MagLIF from OMEGA up to the 1800 kJ available on the NIF (National Ignition Facility) will also be described briefly. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. Nonlinear absorption and harmonic generation of laser in a gas with anharmonic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manoj; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-02-15

    The nonlinear absorption and harmonic generation of intense short pulse laser in a gas embedded with anharmonic clusters are investigated theoretically. When the laser induced excursion of cluster electrons becomes comparable to cluster radius, the restoration force on electrons no longer remains linearly proportional to the excursion. As a consequence, the plasmon resonance is broadened, leading to broadband laser absorption. It also leads to second and third harmonic generations, at much higher level than the one due to ponderomotive nonlinearity. The harmonic yield is resonantly enhanced at the plasmon resonance {omega}={omega}{sub pe}/{radical}(3), where {omega} is the frequency of the laser and {omega}{sub pe} is the plasma frequency of cluster electrons.

  6. Fast route to nonlinear clustering statistics in modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winther, Hans A.; Ferreira, Pedro G.

    2015-06-01

    We propose a simple and computationally fast method for performing N -body simulations for a large class of modified gravity theories with a screening mechanism such as chameleons, symmetrons, and Galileons. By combining the linear Klein-Gordon equation with a screening factor, calculated from analytical solutions of spherical symmetric configurations, we obtain a modified field equation of which the solution is exact in the linear regime while at the same time taking screening into account on nonlinear scales. The resulting modified field equation remains linear and can be solved just as quickly as the Poisson equation without any of the convergence problems that can arise when solving the full equation. We test our method with N -body simulations and find that it compares remarkably well with full simulations well into the nonlinear regime.

  7. Facile assembly of tetragonal Pt clusters on graphene oxide for enhanced nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chan; Li, Yubing; Huang, Li; Li, Wei; Chen, Wenzhe

    2015-11-01

    A facile method to assemble tetragonal Pt clusters on the surface of graphene oxide (Pt-cluster/GO) using anatase TiO2 as a template is proposed. The morphology and structure of Pt-cluster/GO were investigated, revealing that tetragonal Pt clusters with a diameter of 20-50 nm composed of 2-3 nm Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were homogenously decorated on the surface of GO. The nonlinear optical properties were characterized by the open-aperture Z-scan technique in the nanosecond regime using a laser with wavelength of 532 nm. The as-prepared Pt-cluster/GO hybrid was found to show strong optical limiting (OL) effects for nanosecond laser pulses at 532 nm, and the OL performance is superior to that of carbon nanotubes, a benchmark optical limiter. Furthermore, the Z-scan results showed that the OL performance of the Pt-cluster/GO hybrid is superior to that of GO and the Pt-NP/GO hybrid. The OL behavior of the metal/GO composite nanostructure can be effectively tailored by altering the aggregation means of metal NPs. Scattering measurements suggested that nonlinear scattering (NLS) played an important role in the observed OL behavior in the Pt-cluster/GO hybrid. The OL properties of the Pt-cluster/GO hybrid are attributed to the reverse saturable absorption in the GO sheet and NLS in the metal NPs.

  8. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-06-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1×1018atoms/s , where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells.

  9. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-06-15

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10{sup 18} atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells.

  10. Laser-driven ion acceleration from relativistically transparent nanotargets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. M.; Pomerantz, I.; Yin, L.; Wu, H. C.; Jung, D.; Albright, B. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Letzring, S.; Palaniyappan, S.; Shah, R.; Allinger, K.; Hörlein, R.; Schreiber, J.; Habs, D.; Blakeney, J.; Dyer, G.; Fuller, L.; Gaul, E.; Mccary, E.; Meadows, A. R.; Wang, C.; Ditmire, T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Here we present experimental results on laser-driven ion acceleration from relativistically transparent, overdense plasmas in the break-out afterburner (BOA) regime. Experiments were preformed at the Trident ultra-high contrast laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and at the Texas Petawatt laser facility, located in the University of Texas at Austin. It is shown that when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, an epoch of dramatic acceleration of ions occurs that lasts until the electron density in the expanding target reduces to the critical density in the non-relativistic limit. For given laser parameters, the optimal target thickness yielding the highest maximum ion energy is one in which this time window for ion acceleration overlaps with the intensity peak of the laser pulse. A simple analytic model of relativistically induced transparency is presented for plasma expansion at the time-evolving sound speed, from which these times may be estimated. The maximum ion energy attainable is controlled by the finite acceleration volume and time over which the BOA acts.

  11. Ultra-bright laser-driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M.; Favalli, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Bridgewater, J.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Falk, K.; Fernndez, J.; Gautier, D.; Guler, N.; Henzlova, D.; Hornung, J.; Iliev, M.; Ianakiev, K.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Koehler, K.; Palaniyappan, S.; Poth, P.; Schaumann, G.; Swinhoe, M.; Taddeucci, T.; Tebartz, A.; Wagner, Florian; Wurden, G.

    2015-11-01

    Short-pulse laser-driven neutron sources have become a topic of interest since their brightness and yield have recently increased by orders of magnitude. Using novel target designs, high contrast - high power lasers and compact converter/moderator setups, these neutron sources have finally reached intensities that make many interesting applications possible. We present the results of two experimental campaigns on the GSI PHELIX and the LANL Trident lasers from 2015. We have produced an unprecedented neutron flux, mapped the spatial distribution of the neutron production as well as its energy spectra and ultimately used the beam for first applications to show the prospect of these new compact sources. We also made measurements for the conversion of energetic neutrons into short epithermal and thermal neutron pulses in order to evaluate further applications in dense plasma research. The results address a large community as it paves the way to use short pulse lasers as a neutron source. This can open up neutron research to a broad academic community including material science, biology, medicine and high energy density physics to universities and therefore can complement large scale facilities like reactors or particle accelerators.

  12. A laser-driven source of polarized hydrogen and deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Holt, R.J.; Gilman, R.A.; Kowalczyk, R.; Coulter, K.

    1989-01-01

    A novel laser-driven polarized source of hydrogen and deuterium which operates on the principle of spin-exchange optical pumping is being developed. This source is designed to operate as an internal target in an electron storage ring for fundamental studies of spin-dependent structure of nuclei. It has the potential to exceed the flux from existing conventional sources (3 /times/ 10/sup 16//s) by an order of magnitude. Currently, the source delivers hydrogen at a flux of 8 /times/ 10/sup 16/ atoms/s with an atomic polarization of 24% and deuterium at 6 /times/ 10/sup 16/ atoms/s with a polarization of 29%. Technical obstacles which have been overcome, with varying degrees of success are complete Doppler-coverage in the optical-pumping stage without the use of a buffer gas, wall-induced depolarization and radiation-trapping. Future improvements should allow achievement of the design goals of 4 /times/ 10/sup 17/ atoms/s with a polarization of 50%. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Laser-driven relativistic electron beam interaction with solid dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R. B.

    2012-07-01

    The multi-frames shadowgraphy, interferometry and polarimetry diagnostics with sub-ps time resolution were used for an investigation of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by laser-driven relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50 TW Leopard laser at the UNR. For a laser flux of ˜2×1018W/cm2 a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3. The maximum of the electron density inside the glass target is ˜2×1019cm-3. Magnetic and electric fields are less than ˜15 kG and ˜1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a maximum of ˜0.5 eV. 2D interference phase shift shows the "fountain effect" of electron beam. The very low ionization inside glass target ˜0.1% suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale. 2D PIC-simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields.

  14. Laser-driven relativistic electron beam interaction with solid dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R. B.

    2012-07-30

    The multi-frames shadowgraphy, interferometry and polarimetry diagnostics with sub-ps time resolution were used for an investigation of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by laser-driven relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50 TW Leopard laser at the UNR. For a laser flux of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2} a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3. The maximum of the electron density inside the glass target is {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}cm{sup -3}. Magnetic and electric fields are less than {approx}15 kG and {approx}1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a maximum of {approx}0.5 eV. 2D interference phase shift shows the 'fountain effect' of electron beam. The very low ionization inside glass target {approx}0.1% suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale. 2D PIC-simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields.

  15. CO2 laser-driven Stirling engine. [space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G.; Perry, R. L.; Carney, B.

    1978-01-01

    A 100-W Beale free-piston Stirling engine was powered remotely by a CO2 laser for long periods of time. The engine ran on both continuous-wave and pulse laser input. The working fluid was helium doped with small quantities of sulfur hexafluoride, SF6. The CO2 radiation was absorbed by the vibrational modes of the sulfur hexafluoride, which in turn transferred the energy to the helium to drive the engine. Electrical energy was obtained from a linear alternator attached to the piston of the engine. Engine pressures, volumes, and temperatures were measured to determine engine performance. It was found that the pulse radiation mode was more efficient than the continuous-wave mode. An analysis of the engine heat consumption indicated that heat losses around the cylinder and the window used to transmit the beam into the engine accounted for nearly half the energy input. The overall efficiency, that is, electrical output to laser input, was approximately 0.75%. However, this experiment was not designed for high efficiency but only to demonstrate the concept of a laser-driven engine. Based on this experiment, the engine could be modified to achieve efficiencies of perhaps 25-30%.

  16. Particle acceleration in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totorica, Samuel; Abel, Tom; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    Particle acceleration induced by magnetic reconnection is a promising candidate for producing the nonthermal emissions associated with explosive astrophysical phenomena. We have used two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to explore the possibility of studying particle acceleration from reconnection in laser-driven plasma experiments. For current experimental conditions, we show that nonthermal electrons can be accelerated to energies up to two orders of magnitude larger than the initial thermal energy. The nonthermal electrons gain energy primarily by the reconnection electric field near the X-points, and particle injection into the reconnection layer and escape from the finite system establishes a distribution of energies resembling a power-law spectrum. Energetic electrons can also become trapped inside the plasmoids that form in the current layer and gain additional energy from the electric field arising from the motion of the plasmoid. Based on our findings, we provide an analytical estimate of the maximum electron energy and threshold condition for suprathermal electron acceleration in terms of experimentally tunable parameters. Finally, we investigate future experiments with a more energetic laser drive and larger system size. We discuss the influence of plasmoids on the particle acceleration, and the use of proton radiography to probe plasmoids. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  17. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. V. NONLINEAR ABSORPTION-LINE INDEX VERSUS METALLICITY RELATIONS AND BIMODAL INDEX DISTRIBUTIONS OF M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Lee, Young-Wook; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Kang, Yongbeom; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2013-05-10

    Recent spectroscopy on the globular cluster (GC) system of M31 with unprecedented precision witnessed a clear bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of old GCs. Such division of extragalactic GCs, so far asserted mainly by photometric color bimodality, has been viewed as the presence of merely two distinct metallicity subgroups within individual galaxies and forms a critical backbone of various galaxy formation theories. Given that spectroscopy is a more detailed probe into stellar population than photometry, the discovery of index bimodality may point to the very existence of dual GC populations. However, here we show that the observed spectroscopic dichotomy of M31 GCs emerges due to the nonlinear nature of metallicity-to-index conversion and thus one does not necessarily have to invoke two separate GC subsystems. We take this as a close analogy to the recent view that metallicity-color nonlinearity is primarily responsible for observed GC color bimodality. We also demonstrate that the metallicity-sensitive magnesium line displays non-negligible metallicity-index nonlinearity and Balmer lines show rather strong nonlinearity. This gives rise to bimodal index distributions, which are routinely interpreted as bimodal metallicity distributions, not considering metallicity-index nonlinearity. Our findings give a new insight into the constitution of M31's GC system, which could change much of the current thought on the formation of GC systems and their host galaxies.

  18. Time-dependent quantum chemistry of laser driven many-electron molecules.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Couture-Bienvenue, Étienne; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy; Sainjon, Amaury

    2014-12-28

    A Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction approach using multiple Feshbach partitionings, corresponding to multiple ionization stages of a laser-driven molecule, has recently been proposed [T.-T. Nguyen-Dang and J. Viau-Trudel, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244102 (2013)]. To complete this development toward a fully ab-initio method for the calculation of time-dependent electronic wavefunctions of an N-electron molecule, we describe how tools of multiconfiguration quantum chemistry such as the management of the configuration expansion space using Graphical Unitary Group Approach concepts can be profitably adapted to the new context, that of time-resolved electronic dynamics, as opposed to stationary electronic structure. The method is applied to calculate the detailed, sub-cycle electronic dynamics of BeH2, treated in a 3-21G bound-orbital basis augmented by a set of orthogonalized plane-waves representing continuum-type orbitals, including its ionization under an intense λ = 800 nm or λ = 80 nm continuous-wave laser field. The dynamics is strongly non-linear at the field-intensity considered (I ≃ 10(15) W/cm(2)), featuring important ionization of an inner-shell electron and strong post-ionization bound-electron dynamics.

  19. Parameter study of a laser-driven dielectric accelerator for radiobiology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Otsuki, Shohei; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Aimidula, Aimiding

    2014-12-01

    A parameter study for a transmission grating type laser-driven dielectric accelerator (TG-LDA) was performed. The optimum pulse laser width was concluded to be 2 ps from the restrictions on the optical damage threshold intensity and the nonlinear optical effects such as the self-phase modulation and self-focus. An irradiation intensity of 5× {{10}11} W c{{m}-2} (2 GV m-1) was suitable for a silica TG-LDA with a pulse width range from 1 ps to 10 ps. The higher order harmonics of the axial electric field distribution was capable of accelerating electrons provided that the electron speed approximately satisfies the conditions of v/c=1/2,1/3, or 1/4. The electrons at the initial energy of 20 kV are accelerated by an acceleration field strength of 20 MV m-1, and the electrons were accelerated by higher fields as the speed increased. For relativistic energy electrons,the acceleration gradient was 600 MV {{m}-1}.

  20. Time-dependent quantum chemistry of laser driven many-electron molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Couture-Bienvenue, Étienne; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy; Sainjon, Amaury

    2014-12-28

    A Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction approach using multiple Feshbach partitionings, corresponding to multiple ionization stages of a laser-driven molecule, has recently been proposed [T.-T. Nguyen-Dang and J. Viau-Trudel, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244102 (2013)]. To complete this development toward a fully ab-initio method for the calculation of time-dependent electronic wavefunctions of an N-electron molecule, we describe how tools of multiconfiguration quantum chemistry such as the management of the configuration expansion space using Graphical Unitary Group Approach concepts can be profitably adapted to the new context, that of time-resolved electronic dynamics, as opposed to stationary electronic structure. The method is applied to calculate the detailed, sub-cycle electronic dynamics of BeH{sub 2}, treated in a 3–21G bound-orbital basis augmented by a set of orthogonalized plane-waves representing continuum-type orbitals, including its ionization under an intense λ = 800 nm or λ = 80 nm continuous-wave laser field. The dynamics is strongly non-linear at the field-intensity considered (I ≃ 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}), featuring important ionization of an inner-shell electron and strong post-ionization bound-electron dynamics.

  1. Invited Review Article: "Hands-on" laser-driven ion acceleration: A primer for laser-driven source development and potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, J.; Bolton, P. R.; Parodi, K.

    2016-07-01

    An overview of progress and typical yields from intense laser-plasma acceleration of ions is presented. The evolution of laser-driven ion acceleration at relativistic intensities ushers prospects for improved functionality and diverse applications which can represent a varied assortment of ion beam requirements. This mandates the development of the integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system, the multiple components of which are described. Relevant high field laser-plasma science and design of controlled optimum pulsed laser irradiation on target are dominant single shot (pulse) considerations with aspects that are appropriate to the emerging petawatt era. The pulse energy scaling of maximum ion energies and typical differential spectra obtained over the past two decades provide guidance for continued advancement of laser-driven energetic ion sources and their meaningful applications.

  2. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  3. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A. M. Li, Song; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jie; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya

    2015-10-15

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  4. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A M; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  5. Nonlinear phenomenon in nanostructures creation by fast cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslem, W. M.; El-Said, A. S.; Sabry, R.; Shalouf, A.; El-Labany, S. K.; Bahlouli, H.

    2017-01-01

    The development of accelerators technology offers a new window for the creation of surface nanostructures in an efficient and accurate way. The use of 30 MeV C60 cluster ions enables the creation of nano-hillocks of size larger than the ones produced by GeV monoatomic ions. The physical mechanism underlying the realization of such nanostructures is elucidated using a plasma expansion approach. Numerical analysis showed that increasing the ionic temperature (number density) ratios would lead to decrease (increase) the nano-hillocks height.

  6. Nonlinear effects of dark energy clustering beyond the acoustic scales

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Stefano; Sefusatti, Emiliano E-mail: dlopez_n@ictp.it

    2014-07-01

    We extend the resummation method of Anselmi and Pietroni (2012) to compute the total density power spectrum in models of quintessence characterized by a vanishing speed of sound. For standard ΛCDM cosmologies, this resummation scheme allows predictions with an accuracy at the few percent level beyond the range of scales where acoustic oscillations are present, therefore comparable to other, common numerical tools. In addition, our theoretical approach indicates an approximate but valuable and simple relation between the power spectra for standard quintessence models and models where scalar field perturbations appear at all scales. This, in turn, provides an educated guess for the prediction of nonlinear growth in models with generic speed of sound, particularly valuable since no numerical results are yet available.

  7. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  8. Simplified laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Shaw, William L.; Zheng Xianxu; Dlott, Dana D.

    2012-10-15

    We describe a simplified system of laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science and shock spectroscopy. We used commercially available one-box Nd:YAG lasers and beam homogenization solutions to create two launch systems, one based on a smaller (400 mJ) YAG laser and an inexpensive diffusive optic, and one based on a larger (2500 mJ) laser and a diffractive beam homogenizer. The flyer launch, flight, and impact processes were characterized by an 8 GHz fiberoptic photon Doppler velocimeter. We investigated effects of different substrates, adhesives, absorbers, ablative layers, and punching out disks from continuous foils versus fabricating individual foil disks, and found that a simple metal foil epoxied to a glass window was satisfactory in almost all cases. Our simplified system launched flyer plates with velocities up to 4.5 km s{sup -1} and kinetic energies up to 250 mJ that can drive sustained steady shocks for up to 25 ns. The factor that limits these velocities and energies is the laser fluence that can be transmitted through the glass substrate to the flyer surface without optical damage. Methods to increase this transmission are discussed. Reproducible flyer launches were demonstrated with velocity variations of 0.06% and impact time variations of 1 ns. The usefulness of this flyer plate system is demonstrated by Hugoniot equation of state measurements of a polymer film, emission spectroscopy of a dye embedded in the polymer, and impact initiation and emission spectroscopy of a reactive material consisting of nanoscopic fuel and oxidizer particles.

  9. Simplified laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathryn E; Shaw, William L; Zheng, Xianxu; Dlott, Dana D

    2012-10-01

    We describe a simplified system of laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science and shock spectroscopy. We used commercially available one-box Nd:YAG lasers and beam homogenization solutions to create two launch systems, one based on a smaller (400 mJ) YAG laser and an inexpensive diffusive optic, and one based on a larger (2500 mJ) laser and a diffractive beam homogenizer. The flyer launch, flight, and impact processes were characterized by an 8 GHz fiberoptic photon Doppler velocimeter. We investigated effects of different substrates, adhesives, absorbers, ablative layers, and punching out disks from continuous foils versus fabricating individual foil disks, and found that a simple metal foil epoxied to a glass window was satisfactory in almost all cases. Our simplified system launched flyer plates with velocities up to 4.5 km s(-1) and kinetic energies up to 250 mJ that can drive sustained steady shocks for up to 25 ns. The factor that limits these velocities and energies is the laser fluence that can be transmitted through the glass substrate to the flyer surface without optical damage. Methods to increase this transmission are discussed. Reproducible flyer launches were demonstrated with velocity variations of 0.06% and impact time variations of 1 ns. The usefulness of this flyer plate system is demonstrated by Hugoniot equation of state measurements of a polymer film, emission spectroscopy of a dye embedded in the polymer, and impact initiation and emission spectroscopy of a reactive material consisting of nanoscopic fuel and oxidizer particles.

  10. Simplified laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Shaw, William L.; Zheng, Xianxu; Dlott, Dana D.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a simplified system of laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science and shock spectroscopy. We used commercially available one-box Nd:YAG lasers and beam homogenization solutions to create two launch systems, one based on a smaller (400 mJ) YAG laser and an inexpensive diffusive optic, and one based on a larger (2500 mJ) laser and a diffractive beam homogenizer. The flyer launch, flight, and impact processes were characterized by an 8 GHz fiberoptic photon Doppler velocimeter. We investigated effects of different substrates, adhesives, absorbers, ablative layers, and punching out disks from continuous foils versus fabricating individual foil disks, and found that a simple metal foil epoxied to a glass window was satisfactory in almost all cases. Our simplified system launched flyer plates with velocities up to 4.5 km s-1 and kinetic energies up to 250 mJ that can drive sustained steady shocks for up to 25 ns. The factor that limits these velocities and energies is the laser fluence that can be transmitted through the glass substrate to the flyer surface without optical damage. Methods to increase this transmission are discussed. Reproducible flyer launches were demonstrated with velocity variations of 0.06% and impact time variations of 1 ns. The usefulness of this flyer plate system is demonstrated by Hugoniot equation of state measurements of a polymer film, emission spectroscopy of a dye embedded in the polymer, and impact initiation and emission spectroscopy of a reactive material consisting of nanoscopic fuel and oxidizer particles.

  11. Methods for accurate analysis of galaxy clustering on non-linear scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Mohammadjavad

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of galaxy clustering with the low-redshift galaxy surveys provide sensitive probe of cosmology and growth of structure. Parameter inference with galaxy clustering relies on computation of likelihood functions which requires estimation of the covariance matrix of the observables used in our analyses. Therefore, accurate estimation of the covariance matrices serves as one of the key ingredients in precise cosmological parameter inference. This requires generation of a large number of independent galaxy mock catalogs that accurately describe the statistical distribution of galaxies in a wide range of physical scales. We present a fast method based on low-resolution N-body simulations and approximate galaxy biasing technique for generating mock catalogs. Using a reference catalog that was created using the high resolution Big-MultiDark N-body simulation, we show that our method is able to produce catalogs that describe galaxy clustering at a percentage-level accuracy down to highly non-linear scales in both real-space and redshift-space.In most large-scale structure analyses, modeling of galaxy bias on non-linear scales is performed assuming a halo model. Clustering of dark matter halos has been shown to depend on halo properties beyond mass such as halo concentration, a phenomenon referred to as assembly bias. Standard large-scale structure studies assume that halo mass alone is sufficient in characterizing the connection between galaxies and halos. However, modeling of galaxy bias can face systematic effects if the number of galaxies are correlated with other halo properties. Using the Small MultiDark-Planck high resolution N-body simulation and the clustering measurements of Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 main galaxy sample, we investigate the extent to which the dependence of galaxy bias on halo concentration can improve our modeling of galaxy clustering.

  12. Estimating {Omega} from galaxy redshifts: Linear flow distortions and nonlinear clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B.C. |; Warren, M.S.; Zurek, W.H.

    1997-02-01

    We propose a method to determine the cosmic mass density {Omega} from redshift-space distortions induced by large-scale flows in the presence of nonlinear clustering. Nonlinear structures in redshift space, such as fingers of God, can contaminate distortions from linear flows on scales as large as several times the small-scale pairwise velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub {nu}}. Following Peacock & Dodds, we work in the Fourier domain and propose a model to describe the anisotropy in the redshift-space power spectrum; tests with high-resolution numerical data demonstrate that the model is robust for both mass and biased galaxy halos on translinear scales and above. On the basis of this model, we propose an estimator of the linear growth parameter {beta}={Omega}{sup 0.6}/b, where b measures bias, derived from sampling functions that are tuned to eliminate distortions from nonlinear clustering. The measure is tested on the numerical data and found to recover the true value of {beta} to within {approximately}10{percent}. An analysis of {ital IRAS} 1.2 Jy galaxies yields {beta}=0.8{sub {minus}0.3}{sup +0.4} at a scale of 1000kms{sup {minus}1}, which is close to optimal given the shot noise and finite size of the survey. This measurement is consistent with dynamical estimates of {beta} derived from both real-space and redshift-space information. The importance of the method presented here is that nonlinear clustering effects are removed to enable linear correlation anisotropy measurements on scales approaching the translinear regime. We discuss implications for analyses of forthcoming optical redshift surveys in which the dispersion is more than a factor of 2 greater than in the {ital IRAS} data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  13. Mechanism and Model of Laser-Driven Mass Transport in Thin Films of Azo Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and Model of Laser-Driven Mass Transport in Thin Films of Azo Polymers by C. J. Barrett, A. Natansohn, and P. Rochon Submitted for publication in...DATE June 23, 1998 Tprhnjr.fil P^nnr I’: 4. TITLE AHO SU3TITLE Mechanism and Model of Laser-Driven Mass Transport in Thin Films of Azo Polymers...TRANSPORT IN THIN FILMS OF AZO POLYMERS Christopher J. Barrett’, Almeria L. Natansohn1, and Paul L. Rochon2. ’Dept. of Chemistry. Queen’s

  14. Effect of nonthermal electrons on the shock formation in a laser driven plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaï, Ph. Feugeas, J.-L.; Nguyen-bui, T.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Batani, D.; Maheut, Y.; Antonelli, L.

    2015-04-15

    In the laser-driven inertial fusion schemes and specifically in the shock ignition concept, non thermal electrons may be generated. By depositing their energy far from the origin, they can significantly modify the target hydrodynamics. It is shown in this paper that these electrons may affect the laser-driven shock formation and its propagation through the target. These changes are induced by the target heating and depend on the electron energy spectrum. Furthermore, results of some passive diagnostic may be misinterpreted, indicating an apparent different pressure.

  15. Optical response in a laser-driven quantum pseudodot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, D. Gul; Sakiroglu, S.; Ungan, F.; Yesilgul, U.; Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Sokmen, I.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the intense laser-induced optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a two-dimensional quantum pseudodot system under an uniform magnetic field. The effects of non-resonant, monochromatic intense laser field upon the system are treated within the framework of high-frequency Floquet approach in which the system is supposed to be governed by a laser-dressed potential. Linear and nonlinear absorption coefficients and relative changes in the refractive index are obtained by means of the compact-density matrix approach and iterative method. The results of numerical calculations for a typical GaAs quantum dot reveal that the optical response depends strongly on the magnitude of external magnetic field and characteristic parameters of the confinement potential. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the intense laser field modifies the confinement and thereby causes remarkable changes in the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the system.

  16. Laser-driven planar Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendinning, S. G.; Weber, S. V.; Bell, P.; Dasilva, L. B.; Dixit, S. N.; Henesian, M. A.; Kania, D. R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Powell, H. T.; Wallace, R. J.; Wegner, P. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.

    1992-08-01

    We have performed a series of experiments on the Nova Laser Facility to examine the hydrodynamic behavior of directly driven planar foils with initial perturbations of varying wavelength. The foils were accelerated with a single, frequency doubled, smoothed and temporally shaped laser beam at 0.8×1014 W/cm2. The experiments are in good agreement with numerical simulations using the computer codes LASNEX and ORCHID which show growth rates reduced to about 70% of classical for this nonlinear regime.

  17. Reconstructing the primordial spectrum of fluctuations of the universe from the observed nonlinear clustering of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.; Matthews, Alex; Kumar, P.; Lu, Edward

    1991-01-01

    It was discovered that the nonlinear evolution of the two point correlation function in N-body experiments of galaxy clustering with Omega = 1 appears to be described to good approximation by a simple general formula. The underlying form of the formula is physically motivated, but its detailed representation is obtained empirically by fitting to N-body experiments. In this paper, the formula is presented along with an inverse formula which converts a final, nonlinear correlation function into the initial linear correlation function. The inverse formula is applied to observational data from the CfA, IRAs, and APM galaxy surveys, and the initial spectrum of fluctuations of the universe, if Omega = 1.

  18. Calculation of Coupling Efficiencies for Laser-Driven Photonic Bandgap Structures

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.; Noble, R.; Spencer, J. E.

    2010-11-04

    We present a technique for calculating the power coupling efficiency for a laser-driven photonic bandgap structure using electromagnetic finite element simulations, and evaluate the efficiency of several coupling scenarios for the case of a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber accelerator structure.

  19. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  20. Structure Loaded Vacuum Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.; Lincoln, M.R.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-04-09

    We present an overview of the future laser-driven particle acceleration experiments. These will be carried out at the E163 facility at SLAC. Our objectives include a reconfirmation of the proof-of-principle experiment, a staged buncher laser-accelerator experiment, and longer-term future experiments that employ dielectric laser-accelerator microstructures.

  1. Prospects For and Progress Towards Laser-Driven Particle Therapy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T. E.; Schramm, U.; Burris-Mog, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kraft, S. D.; Zeil, K.; Bussmann, M.; Gaillard, S.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Kluge, T.; Schmidt, B.; Sobiella, M.; Sauerbrey, R.; Baumann, M.; Enghardt, W.; Pawelke, J.; Flippo, K.; Harres, K.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.

    2010-11-04

    Recent advances in laser-ion acceleration have motivated research towards laser-driven compact accelerators for medical therapy. Realizing laser-ion acceleration for medical therapy will require adapting the medical requirements to the foreseeable laser constraints, as well as advances in laser-acceleration physics, beam manipulation and delivery, real-time dosimetry, treatment planning and translational research into a clinical setting.

  2. Laser-Driven Corrugation Instability of Liquid Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilmann, Fritz

    1983-12-01

    During intense CO2-laser irradiation deep corrugations build up on liquid metals such as Hg, In, Sn, Al, and Pb. Spacing, orientation, growth, and decay of the corrugations are studied, by visible light diffraction; support is found for a model of stimulated scattering where the incident light parametrically decays into both the surface corrugation and a surface plasmon. Thermal evaporation supplies the nonlinearity. The instability provides polarization-dependent absorption and can be expected in laser-metalworking and laser-plasma situations.

  3. Laser-driven planar Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Weber, S.V.; Bell, P.; DaSilva, L.B.; Dixit, S.N.; Henesian, M.A.; Kania, D.R.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Powell, H.T.; Wallace, R.J.; Wegner, P.J. ); Knauer, J.P.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1992-08-24

    We have performed a series of experiments on the Nova Laser Facility to examine the hydrodynamic behavior of directly driven planar foils with initial perturbations of varying wavelength. The foils were accelerated with a single, frequency doubled, smoothed and temporally shaped laser beam at 0.8{times}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The experiments are in good agreement with numerical simulations using the computer codes LASNEX and ORCHID which show growth rates reduced to about 70% of classical for this nonlinear regime.

  4. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  5. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m-1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  6. Study of shockwave method for diagnosing the radiation fields of laser-driven gold hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Lan, Ke; Huo, Wenyi; Lai, Dongxian; Gao, Yaoming; Pei, Wenbing

    2013-11-01

    Besides the routinely used broad-band x-ray spectrometer (Dante or SXS), ablative shock-wave method is often used to diagnose the radiation fields of laser-driven Hohlraums. The x-ray ablation process of Aluminum and Titanium is studied numerically with a 1-D radiation hydrodynamic code RDMG [F. Tinggui et al., Chin. J. Comput. Phys. 16, 199 (1999)], based on which a new scaling relation of the equivalent radiation temperature with the ablative shock velocity in Aluminum plates is proposed, and a novel method is developed for determining simultaneously the radiation temperature and the M-band (2-4 keV) fraction in laser-driven gold Hohlraums.

  7. Intense laser driven collision-less shock and ion acceleration in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, K.; Jia, Q.; Cai, H. B.; Taguchi, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Sanz, J. R.; Honrubia, J.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of strong magnetic field with a laser driven coil has been demonstrated by many experiments. It is applicable to the magnetized fast ignition (MFI), the collision-less shock in the astrophysics and the ion shock acceleration. In this paper, the longitudinal magnetic field effect on the shock wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense short pulse laser is investigated by theory and simulations. The transition of a laminar shock (electro static shock) to the turbulent shock (electromagnetic shock) occurs, when the external magnetic field is applied in near relativistic cut-off density plasmas. This transition leads to the enhancement of conversion of the laser energy into high energy ions. The enhancement of the conversion efficiency is important for the ion driven fast ignition and the laser driven neutron source. It is found that the total number of ions reflected by the shock increases by six time when the magnetic field is applied.

  8. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  9. Generation of magnetized collisionless shocks by a novel, laser-driven magnetic piston

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Constantin, C. G.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Morton, L. A.; Niemann, C.; Winske, D.; Flippo, K. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Gaillard, S. A.

    2012-07-15

    We present experiments on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory which demonstrate key elements in the production of laser-driven, magnetized, laboratory-scaled astrophysical collisionless shocks. These include the creation of a novel magnetic piston to couple laser energy to a background plasma and the generation of a collisionless shock precursor. We also observe evidence of decoupling between a laser-driven fast ion population and a background plasma, in contrast to the coupling of laser-ablated slow ions with background ions through the magnetic piston. 2D hybrid simulations further support these developments and show the coupling of the slow to ambient ions, the formation of a magnetic and density compression pulses consistent with a collisionless shock, and the decoupling of the fast ions.

  10. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker's review article on "Laser Acceleration and its future" [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],(1)) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated.

  11. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences

    PubMed Central

    NAKAJIMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker’s review article on “Laser Acceleration and its future” [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],1) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  12. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure.

    PubMed

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L S; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P L; Schroer, Anna M; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-04-18

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m(-1), already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Laser-Driven In-Tube Accelerator Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, N.; Ogino, Y.; Sawada, K.; Ohtani, T.; Mori, K.; Sasoh, A.

    2006-05-02

    To achieve a higher thrust performance in the laser-driven in-tube accelerator operation, numerical analysises have been carried out. The computational code covers from the generation of the blast wave to its interactions with the projectile and the acceleration wall. The thrust history and the momentum coupling coefficient evaluated from the numerical simulation depend on the fill pressure and the projectile shape. The confinement effect can be clearly found using the projectile attached with a shroud.

  14. The MIT Laser-Driven Target of Nuclear Polarized Hydrogen Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.; Seely, J.; Xu, W.

    2007-04-01

    The laser-driven target at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) produced nuclear polarized hydrogen gas in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. The best result achieved was 50.5% polarization with 58.2% degree of dissociation of the sample beam exiting the storage cell at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1 × 1018 atoms/s.

  15. A Laser-Driven Linear Collider: Sample Machine Parameters and Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; England, R.J.; Noble, R.J.; /SLAC

    2011-05-20

    We present a design concept for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider based on laser-driven dielectric accelerator structures, and discuss technical issues that must be addressed to realize such a concept. With a pulse structure that is quasi-CW, dielectric laser accelerators potentially offer reduced beamstrahlung and pair production, reduced event pileup, and much cleaner environment for high energy physics and. For multi-TeV colliders, these advantages become significant.

  16. Line-imaging VISAR for laser-driven equations of state experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylyuk, A. V.; Koshkin, D. S.; Gubskii, K. L.; Kuznetsov, A. P.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the diagnostic system for velocity measurements in laser- driven equations of state experiments. Two Mach-Zehnder line-imaging VISAR-type (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) interferometers form a vernier measuring system and can measure velocity in the interval of 5 to 50 km/s. Also, the system includes a passive channel that records target luminescence in the shock wave front. Spatial resolution of the optical layout is about 5 μm.

  17. High Brightness, Laser-Driven X-ray Source for Nanoscale Metrology and Femtosecond Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Semenov, V; Betts, S; Kozioziemski, B; Wharton, K; Wilks, S; Barbee, T; Stuart, B; Kim, D E; An, J; Barty, C

    2007-02-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a new, bright, ultrafast x-ray source based upon laser-driven K-alpha generation, which can produce an x-ray flux 10 to 100 times greater than current microfocus x-ray tubes. The short-pulse (sub-picosecond) duration of this x-ray source also makes it ideal for observing time-resolved dynamics of atomic motion in solids and thin films.

  18. Towards a Table-Top Laser Driven XUV/X-Ray Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-27

    applications, including bright x-ray and Extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV or XUV) sources. The investigation was carried out in two phases. In the...of emission enhancement. The study also revealed that this laser-driven source of radiation has a small source size, short duration, and high photon...experimentally demonstrated. The study revealed that these advanced micro-engineered targets not only enhance the total number of electrons and their

  19. The Laser-Driven X-ray Big Area Backlighter (BABL): Design, Optimization, and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk Adler; DeVolder, Barbara Gloria; Doss, Forrest William; Kline, John L.; Merritt, Elizabeth Catherine; Loomis, Eric Nicholas; Capelli, Deanna; Schmidt, Derek William; Schmitt, Mark J

    2016-05-26

    The Big Area BackLigher (BABL) has been developed for large area laser-driven x-ray backlighting on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which can be used for general High Energy Density (HED) experiments. The BABL has been optimized via hydrodynamic simulations to produce laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiencies of up to nearly 5%. Lastly, four BABL foil materials, Zn, Fe, V, and Cu, have been used for He-α x ray production.

  20. Dependence of Initial Plasma Size on Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sukyum; Jeung, In-Seuck; Ohtani, Toshiro; Sasoh, Akihiro; Choi, Jeong-Yeol

    2004-03-30

    At Tohoku University, experiments of Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) have been carried out. In order to observe the initial state of plasma and blast wave, the visualization experiment was carried out using the shadowgraph method. In this paper, dependency of initial plasma size on LITA performance is investigated numerically. The plasma size is estimated using shadowgraph images and the numerical results are compared with the experimental data of pressure measurement and results of previous modeling.

  1. Nonlinear signaling on biological networks: The role of stochasticity and spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Hernandez, Gonzalo; Myers, Jesse; Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2017-03-01

    Signal transduction within biological cells is governed by networks of interacting proteins. Communication between these proteins is mediated by signaling molecules which bind to receptors and induce stochastic transitions between different conformational states. Signaling is typically a cooperative process which requires the occurrence of multiple binding events so that reaction rates have a nonlinear dependence on the amount of signaling molecule. It is this nonlinearity that endows biological signaling networks with robust switchlike properties which are critical to their biological function. In this study we investigate how the properties of these signaling systems depend on the network architecture. Our main result is that these nonlinear networks exhibit bistability where the network activity can switch between states that correspond to a low and high activity level. We show that this bistable regime emerges at a critical coupling strength that is determined by the spectral structure of the network. In particular, the set of nodes that correspond to large components of the leading eigenvector of the adjacency matrix determines the onset of bistability. Above this transition the eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix determine a hierarchy of clusters, defined by its spectral properties, which are activated sequentially with increasing network activity. We argue further that the onset of bistability occurs either continuously or discontinuously depending upon whether the leading eigenvector is localized or delocalized. Finally, we show that at low network coupling stochastic transitions to the active branch are also driven by the set of nodes that contribute more strongly to the leading eigenvector. However, at high coupling, transitions are insensitive to network structure since the network can be activated by stochastic transitions of a few nodes. Thus this work identifies important features of biological signaling networks that may underlie their biological

  2. OPTICAL AND INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN NGC 1399: EVIDENCE FOR COLOR-METALLICITY NONLINEARITY

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeslee, John P.; Ferrarese, Laura; Martel, Andre R.; Cho, Hyejeon; Peng, Eric W.; Jordan, Andres

    2012-02-10

    We combine new Wide Field Camera 3 IR Channel (WFC3/IR) F160W (H{sub 160}) imaging data for NGC 1399, the central galaxy in the Fornax cluster, with archival F475W (g{sub 475}), F606W (V{sub 606}), F814W (I{sub 814}), and F850LP (z{sub 850}) optical data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The purely optical g{sub 475} - I{sub 814}, V{sub 606} - I{sub 814}, and g{sub 475} - z{sub 850} colors of NGC 1399's rich globular cluster (GC) system exhibit clear bimodality, at least for magnitudes I{sub 814} > 21.5. The optical-IR I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} color distribution appears unimodal, and this impression is confirmed by mixture modeling analysis. The V{sub 606} - H{sub 160} colors show marginal evidence for bimodality, consistent with bimodality in V{sub 606} - I{sub 814} and unimodality in I{sub 814} - H{sub 160}. If bimodality is imposed for I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} with a double Gaussian model, the preferred blue/red split differs from that for optical colors; these 'differing bimodalities' mean that the optical and optical-IR colors cannot both be linearly proportional to metallicity. Consistent with the differing color distributions, the dependence of I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} on g{sub 475} - I{sub 814} for the matched GC sample is significantly nonlinear, with an inflection point near the trough in the g{sub 475} - I{sub 814} color distribution; the result is similar for the I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} dependence on g{sub 475} - z{sub 850} colors taken from the ACS Fornax Cluster Survey. These g{sub 475} - z{sub 850} colors have been calibrated empirically against metallicity; applying this calibration yields a continuous, skewed, but single-peaked metallicity distribution. Taken together, these results indicate that nonlinear color-metallicity relations play an important role in shaping the observed bimodal distributions of optical colors in extragalactic GC systems.

  3. Nonlinear susceptibilities as a probe to unambiguously distinguish between canonical and cluster spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitla, Yugandhar; Kaul, S. N.; Fernández Barquín, L.

    2012-09-01

    Treating the randomly Fe-substituted optimally hole-doped manganite La0.7Pb0.3(Mn1-yFey)O3 (y=0.2,0.3) as a test case, we demonstrate that a combined investigation of both odd and even harmonics of the ac magnetic response permits an unambiguous distinction between the canonical and cluster spin glasses. As expected for a spin glass (SG), the nonlinear ac magnetic susceptibilities χ3(T,ω) and χ5(T,ω) (odd harmonics) diverge at the SG freezing temperature Tg=80.00(3) K [Tg=56.25(5) K] in the static limit and, like the imaginary part of the linear susceptibility, follow dynamic scaling with the critical exponents β=0.56(3) [β=0.63(3)], γ=1.80(5) [γ=2.0(1)], and zν=10.1(1) [zν=8.0(5)] in the sample with composition y=0.2 (y=0.3). The nonlinear susceptibility χNL, which has contributions from both χ3 and χ5, satisfies static scaling with the same choice of Tg, β, and γ. Irrespective of the Fe concentration, the values of the critical exponents γ, ν, and η are in much better agreement with those theoretically predicted for a three-dimensional (d=3) Heisenberg chiral SG than for a d=3 Ising SG. The true thermodynamic nature of the “zero-field” spin-glass transition is preserved even in finite magnetic fields. Unlike odd harmonics, even harmonics χ2(T,ω) and χ4(T,ω) make it evident that, apart from the macroscopic length scale of the spin-glass order in the static limit, there exists a length scale that corresponds to the short-range ferromagnetic order.

  4. Characterization of laser-driven shock waves in solids using a fiber optic pressure probe

    DOE PAGES

    Cranch, Geoffrey A.; Lunsford, Robert; Grun, Jacob; ...

    2013-11-08

    Measurement of laser-driven shock wave pressure in solid blocks of polymethyl methacrylate is demonstrated using fiber optic pressure probes. Three probes based on a fiber Fabry–Perot, fiber Bragg grating, and interferometric fiber tip sensor are tested and compared. Shock waves are generated using a high-power laser focused onto a thin foil target placed in close proximity to the test blocks. The fiber Fabry–Perot sensor appears capable of resolving the shock front with a rise time of 91 ns. As a result, the peak pressure is estimated, using a separate shadowgraphy measurement, to be 3.4 GPa.

  5. Femtosecond laser-driven shock-induced dislocation structures in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Sano, Tomokazu; Arakawa, Kazuto; Sakata, Osami; Tajiri, Hiroo; Hirose, Akio

    2014-12-01

    We found that a femtosecond laser-driven shock wave induces marked changes in dislocation structure in iron over a fluence range from 1.3 to 8.3 J/cm2. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed a change in dislocation structure from lath structures with twist boundaries to only laths, and an increase in depth where laths begin to appear, with increasing fluence. X-ray diffraction results showed the distribution of crystallite sizes corresponding to the change in dislocation structure. We proposed that the dislocation structure is determined by the laser fluence, through the change in the duration of the shock wave.

  6. Characterization and application of a laser-driven intense pulsed neutron source using Trident

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven C.

    2016-08-25

    A team of Los Alamos researchers supported a final campaign to use the Trident laser to produce neutrons, contributed their multidisciplinary expertise to experimentally assess if laser-driven neutron sources can be useful for MaRIE. MaRIE is the Laboratory’s proposed experimental facility for the study of matter-radiation interactions in extremes. Neutrons provide a radiographic probe that is complementary to x-rays and protons, and can address imaging challenges not amenable to those beams. The team's efforts characterize the Laboratory’s responsiveness, flexibility, and ability to apply diverse expertise where needed to perform successful complex experiments.

  7. Electricity production from laser-driven fusion reactors: technological aspects of power conversion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important considerations for laser driven fusion power plants is the safe and efficient operation of the chamber that contains the thermonuclear energy released from the target. Several approaches to the design of such a chamber are described in this paper and the critical issues associated with protection of the first wall, the performance of the structural materials, and the cost are discussed. Presently, the need for direct drive illumination of the cryogenic targets makes the use of liquid first wall protection problematical at best. The use of dry first walls protected with a few torr of an inert gas seems to hold the most promise.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator on Supersonic Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sukyum; Jeung, In-Seuck; Choi, Jeong-Yeol

    2004-03-01

    Recently, several laser propulsion vehicles have been launched successfully. But these vehicles remained in a very low subsonic flight. Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) is developed as unique laser propulsion system at Tohoku University. In this paper, flow characteristics and momentum coupling coefficients are studied numerically in the supersonic condition with the same configuration of LITA. Because of the aerodynamic drag, the coupling coefficient could not get correctly especially at the low energy input. In this study, the coupling coefficient was calculated using the concept of the effective impulse.

  9. Laser-Driven Micro-Ship and Micro-Turbine by Water-Powered Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Yabe, Takashi; Aoki, Keiichi; Oozono, Hirokazu; Oku, Takehiro; Taniguchi, Kazumoto; Nakagawa, Masamichi

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we report experimental demonstration of propulsion of 100-weight object with only 668mJ/5ns YAG laser. This is made possible by water overlay structure and the effort to reduce the friction by putting the object on water surface or using a levitating system which we call on ``air-slider''. Furthermore, several water supply systems provided the repetitive propulsion. In addition, we found the laser-driven micro-turbine would provide an interesting application area in driving micro-obstacle.

  10. Characterization of Heat-Wave Propagation through Laser-Driven Ti-Doped Underdense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Ohnishi, N; Fournier, K B; Fujioka, S; Iwamae, A; Hansen, S B; Nagai, K; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Brebion, D; Mima, K

    2009-02-23

    The propagation of a laser-driven heat-wave into a Ti-doped aerogel target was investigated. The temporal evolution of the electron temperature was derived by means of Ti K-shell x-ray spectroscopy, and compared with two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Reasonable agreement was obtained in the early stage of the heat-wave propagation. In the later phase, laser absorption, the propagation of the heat wave, and hydrodynamic motion interact in a complex manner, and the plasma is mostly re-heated by collision and stagnation at the target central axis.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator on Supersonic Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sukyum; Jeung, In-Seuck; Choi, Jeong-Yeol

    2004-03-30

    Recently, several laser propulsion vehicles have been launched successfully. But these vehicles remained in a very low subsonic flight. Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) is developed as unique laser propulsion system at Tohoku University. In this paper, flow characteristics and momentum coupling coefficients are studied numerically in the supersonic condition with the same configuration of LITA. Because of the aerodynamic drag, the coupling coefficient could not get correctly especially at the low energy input. In this study, the coupling coefficient was calculated using the concept of the effective impulse.

  12. Laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE) for dynamically loading materials at high strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Eggert, J; Celliers, P; Jankowski, A; Lorenz, T; Moon, S; Edwards, M J; Collins, G

    2006-03-30

    We demonstrate the recently developed technique of laser driven isentropic compression (ICE) for dynamically compressing Al samples at high loading rates close to the room temperature isentrope and up to peak stresses above 100GPa. Upon analysis of the unloading profiles from a multi-stepped Al/LiF target a continuous path through Stress-Density space may be calculated. For materials with phase transformations ramp compression techniques reveals the location of equilibrium phase boundaries and provide information on the kinetics of the lattice re-ordering.

  13. Modeling laser-driven electron acceleration using WARP with Fourier decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, P.; Audet, T. L.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Maynard, G.; Cros, B.

    2016-09-01

    WARP is used with the recent implementation of the Fourier decomposition algorithm to model laser-driven electron acceleration in plasmas. Simulations were carried out to analyze the experimental results obtained on ionization-induced injection in a gas cell. The simulated results are in good agreement with the experimental ones, confirming the ability of the code to take into account the physics of electron injection and reduce calculation time. We present a detailed analysis of the laser propagation, the plasma wave generation and the electron beam dynamics.

  14. Identification of biomarkers for genotyping Aspergilli using non-linear methods for clustering and classification

    PubMed Central

    Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Yang, Zhiyong; Jónsdóttir, Svava Ó; Olsson, Lisbeth; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2008-01-01

    Background In the present investigation, we have used an exhaustive metabolite profiling approach to search for biomarkers in recombinant Aspergillus nidulans (mutants that produce the 6- methyl salicylic acid polyketide molecule) for application in metabolic engineering. Results More than 450 metabolites were detected and subsequently used in the analysis. Our approach consists of two analytical steps of the metabolic profiling data, an initial non-linear unsupervised analysis with Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) to identify similarities and differences among the metabolic profiles of the studied strains, followed by a second, supervised analysis for training a classifier based on the selected biomarkers. Our analysis identified seven putative biomarkers that were able to cluster the samples according to their genotype. A Support Vector Machine was subsequently employed to construct a predictive model based on the seven biomarkers, capable of distinguishing correctly 14 out of the 16 samples of the different A. nidulans strains. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that it is possible to use metabolite profiling for the classification of filamentous fungi as well as for the identification of metabolic engineering targets and draws the attention towards the development of a common database for storage of metabolomics data. PMID:18226195

  15. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J.; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J.; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A.; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Murphy, Chris D.; Stockhausen, Luca C.; Carroll, David C.; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  16. Fabrication of nanostructured targets for improved laser-driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Scisciò, M.; Veltri, S.; Antici, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel realization of nanostructured targets suitable for improving laser-driven proton acceleration experiments, in particular with regard to the Target-Normal-Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) acceleration mechanism. The nanostructured targets, produced as films, are realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques. The growth process includes a two step approach for the production of the gold nanoparticle layers: 1) Laser Ablation in Solution and 2) spray-dry technique using a colloidal solution on target surfaces (Aluminum, Mylar and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube). The obtained nanostructured films appear, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and the nanostructure distributed on the target surfaces without presence of oxides or external contaminants. The obtained targets show a broad optical absorption in all the visible region and a surface roughness that is two times greater than non-nanostructured targets, enabling a greater laser energy absorption during the laser-matter interaction experiments producing the laser-driven proton acceleration.

  17. Seeding magnetic fields for laser-driven flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Gotchev, O V; Knauer, J P; Chang, P Y; Jang, N W; Shoup, M J; Meyerhofer, D D; Betti, R

    2009-04-01

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a <100 J capacitor bank, a laser-triggered switch, and a low-impedance (<1 Omega) strip line. The device has been integrated into a series of magnetic-flux-compression experiments on the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The initial application is a novel magneto-inertial fusion approach [O. V. Gotchev et al., J. Fusion Energy 27, 25 (2008)] to inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where the amplified magnetic field can inhibit thermal conduction losses from the hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity-a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF.

  18. Quantum electrodynamical theory of high-efficiency excitation energy transfer in laser-driven nanostructure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeraddana, Dilusha; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-08-01

    A fundamental theory is developed for describing laser-driven resonance energy transfer (RET) in dimensionally constrained nanostructures within the framework of quantum electrodynamics. The process of RET communicates electronic excitation between suitably disposed emitter and detector particles in close proximity, activated by the initial excitation of the emitter. Here, we demonstrate that the transfer rate can be significantly increased by propagation of an auxiliary laser beam through a pair of nanostructure particles. This is due to the higher order perturbative contribution to the Förster-type RET, in which laser field is applied to stimulate the energy transfer process. We construct a detailed picture of how excitation energy transfer is affected by an off-resonant radiation field, which includes the derivation of second and fourth order quantum amplitudes. The analysis delivers detailed results for the dependence of the transfer rates on orientational, distance, and laser intensity factor, providing a comprehensive fundamental understanding of laser-driven RET in nanostructures. The results of the derivations demonstrate that the geometry of the system exercises considerable control over the laser-assisted RET mechanism. Thus, under favorable conformational conditions and relative spacing of donor-acceptor nanostructures, the effect of the auxiliary laser beam is shown to produce up to 70% enhancement in the energy migration rate. This degree of control allows optical switching applications to be identified.

  19. Laser driven single shock compression of fluid deuterium from 45 to 220 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Eggert, J; Moon, S; Meyerhofer, D; Collins, G

    2008-03-23

    The compression {eta} of liquid deuterium between 45 and 220 GPa under laser-driven shock loading has been measured using impedance matching to an aluminum (Al) standard. An Al impedance match model derived from a best fit to absolute Hugoniot data has been used to quantify and minimize the systematic errors caused by uncertainties in the high-pressure Al equation of state. In deuterium below 100 GPa results show that {eta} {approx_equal} 4.2, in agreement with previous impedance match data from magnetically-driven flyer and convergent-explosive shock wave experiments; between 100 and 220 GPa {eta} reaches a maximum of {approx}5.0, less than the 6-fold compression observed on the earliest laser-shock experiments but greater than expected from simple extrapolations of lower pressure data. Previous laser-driven double-shock results are found to be in good agreement with these single-shock measurements over the entire range under study. Both sets of laser-shock data indicate that deuterium undergoes an abrupt increase in compression at around 110 GPa.

  20. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  1. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m−1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications. PMID:27089200

  2. Dynamic control of laser driven proton beams by exploiting self-generated, ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Hanton, F.; Giesecke, A. L.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    As part of the ultrafast charge dynamics initiated by high intensity laser irradiations of solid targets, high amplitude EM pulses propagate away from the interaction point and are transported along any stalks and wires attached to the target. The propagation of these high amplitude pulses along a thin wire connected to a laser irradiated target was diagnosed via the proton radiography technique, measuring a pulse duration of ˜20 ps and a pulse velocity close to the speed of light. The strong electric field associated with the EM pulse can be exploited for controlling dynamically the proton beams produced from a laser-driven source. Chromatic divergence control of broadband laser driven protons (upto 75% reduction in divergence of >5 MeV protons) was obtained by winding the supporting wire around the proton beam axis to create a helical coil structure. In addition to providing focussing and energy selection, the technique has the potential to post-accelerate the transiting protons by the longitudinal component of the curved electric field lines produced by the helical coil lens.

  3. The ELIMED transport and dosimetry beamline for laser-driven ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Scuderi, V.; Allegra, L.; Amato, A.; Amico, A.; Candiano, G.; De Luca, G.; Gallo, G.; Giordanengo, S.; Guarachi, L. Fanola; Korn, G.; Larosa, G.; Leanza, R.; Manna, R.; Marchese, V.; Marchetto, F.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Pulvirenti, S.; Rizzo, D.; Sacchi, R.; Salamone, S.; Sedita, M.; Vignati, A.

    2016-09-01

    A growing interest of the scientific community towards multidisciplinary applications of laser-driven beams has led to the development of several projects aiming to demonstrate the possible use of these beams for therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, laser-accelerated particles differ from the conventional beams typically used for multiscipilinary and medical applications, due to the wide energy spread, the angular divergence and the extremely intense pulses. The peculiarities of optically accelerated beams led to develop new strategies and advanced techniques for transport, diagnostics and dosimetry of the accelerated particles. In this framework, the realization of the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and multidisciplinary applications) beamline, developed by INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy) and that will be installed in 2017 as a part of the ELIMAIA beamline at the ELI-Beamlines (Extreme Light Infrastructure Beamlines) facility in Prague, has the aim to investigate the feasibility of using laser-driven ion beams for multidisciplinary applications. In this contribution, an overview of the beamline along with a detailed description of the main transport elements as well as the detectors composing the final section of the beamline will be presented.

  4. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  5. Study of transport of laser-driven relativistic electrons in solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Philippe

    With the ultra intense lasers available today, it is possible to generate very hot electron beams in solid density materials. These intense laser-matter interactions result in many applications which include the generation of ultrashort secondary sources of particles and radiation such as ions, neutrons, positrons, x-rays, or even laser-driven hadron therapy. For these applications to become reality, a comprehensive understanding of laser-driven energy transport including hot electron generation through the various mechanisms of ionization, and their subsequent transport in solid density media is required. This study will focus on the characterization of electron transport effects in solid density targets using the state-of- the-art particle-in-cell code PICLS. A number of simulation results will be presented on the topics of ionization propagation in insulator glass targets, non-equilibrium ionization modeling featuring electron impact ionization, and electron beam guiding by the self-generated resistive magnetic field. An empirically derived scaling relation for the resistive magnetic in terms of the laser parameters and material properties is presented and used to derive a guiding condition. This condition may prove useful for the design of future laser-matter interaction experiments.

  6. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J.; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J.; Powell, Haydn; MacLellan, David A.; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Murphy, Chris D.; Stockhausen, Luca C.; Carroll, David C.; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources.

  7. X-ray phase-contrast tomography with a compact laser-driven synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Eggl, Elena; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Loewen, Roderick; Ruth, Ronald D; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-05-05

    Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced--and more challenging--X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches.

  8. Determination of critical energy criteria for hexanitrostilbene using laser-driven flyer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Mike D.; Maisey, Matthew P.

    2008-08-01

    Laser-driven flyer plates comprise of one or more thin layers forming a foil coated onto a transparent substrate. Irradiation of the foil/substrate interface with a Q-switched laser pulse produces a plasma, the expansion of which forms a flyer plate, which can reach velocities in excess of 5 km/s. These plates impart shocks in excess of 50 GPa, with duration of less than a nanosecond. This shock is sufficient to initiate secondary explosives such as Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) and Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN). Thresholds of detonators based on laser-driven flyer plates are typically measured in terms of energy. By using a Photonic Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) we measure the velocity of the flyer plate at the threshold energy. This allows calculation of the shock pressure and duration imparted to the explosive. By initiating HNS with a variety of flyer thicknesses, from 3 to 5 μm, we are able to evaluate Pnτ in this extreme shock regime. The calculated value of n is compared to published values and discussed for similar systems. We are also able to use the James Criterion to analyze the initiation, with values of Ec and Σc being determined from experimental data, providing a predictive capability to model other configurations such as different flyer thicknesses and materials.

  9. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  10. Quantum signature for laser-driven correlated excitation of Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaizhi; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Zheng, Shi-Biao

    2017-01-01

    The excitation dynamics of a laser-driven Rydberg-atom system exhibits a cooperative effect due to the interatomic Rydberg-Rydberg interaction, but the large many-body system with inhomogeneous Rydberg coupling is hard to exactly solve or numerically study by density-matrix equations. In this paper, we find that the laser-driven Rydberg-atom system with most of the atoms being in the ground state can be described by a simplified interaction model resembling the optical Kerr effect if the distance-dependent Rydberg-Rydberg interaction is replaced by an infinite-range coupling. We can then quantitatively study the effect of the quantum fluctuations on the Rydberg excitation with the interatomic correlation involved and analytically calculate the statistical characteristics of the excitation dynamics in the steady state, revealing the quantum signature of the driven-dissipative Rydberg-atom system. The results obtained here will be of great interest for other spin-1/2 systems with spin-spin coupling.

  11. Shielded radiography with a laser-driven MeV-energy X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Grigory; Miller, Cameron; Haden, Daniel; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara; Umstadter, Donald

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of experimental and numerical-simulation studies of shielded radiography using narrowband MeV-energy X-rays from a compact all-laser-driven inverse-Compton-scattering X-ray light source. This recently developed X-ray light source is based on a laser-wakefield accelerator with ultra-high-field gradient (GeV/cm). We demonstrate experimentally high-quality radiographic imaging (image contrast of 0.4 and signal-to-noise ratio of 2:1) of a target composed of 8-mm thick depleted uranium shielded by 80-mm thick steel, using a 6-MeV X-ray beam with a spread of 45% (FWHM) and 107 photons in a single shot. The corresponding dose of the X-ray pulse measured in front of the target is ∼100 nGy/pulse. Simulations performed using the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX accurately reproduce the experimental results. These simulations also demonstrate that the narrow bandwidth of the Compton X-ray source operating at 6 and 9 MeV leads to a reduction of deposited dose as compared to broadband bremsstrahlung sources with the same end-point energy. The X-ray beam's inherently low-divergence angle (∼mrad) is advantageous and effective for interrogation at standoff distance. These results demonstrate significant benefits of all-laser driven Compton X-rays for shielded radiography.

  12. Structure and dynamics of plasma interfaces in laser-driven hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Birkel, A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Amendt, P. A.; Remington, B. A.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Laffite, S.; Tassin, V.; Betti, R.; Sanster, T. C.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Farrell, M.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of plasma interfaces in laser-driven hohlraums is important because of their potential effects on capsule implosion dynamics. To that end, a series of experiments was performed to explore critical aspects of the hohlraum environment, with particular emphasis on the role of self-generated spontaneous electric and magnetic fields at plasma interfaces, including the interface between fill-gas and Au-blowoff. The charged fusion products (3-MeV DD protons and 14.7-MeV D3He protons generated in shock-driven, D3He filled backlighter capsule) pass through the subject hohlraum and form images on CR-39 nuclear track detectors, providing critical information. Important physics topics, including ion diffusive mix and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, will be studied to illuminate ion kinetic dynamics and hydrodynamic instability at plasma interfaces in laser-driven hohlraums. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  13. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE /E ˜20 %, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. The robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  14. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; ...

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heatingmore » uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.« less

  15. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  16. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams.

    PubMed

    Bang, W; Albright, B J; Bradley, P A; Vold, E L; Boettger, J C; Fernández, J C

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E∼20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. The robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  17. Influence of electromagnetic oscillating two-stream instability on the evolution of laser-driven plasma beat-wave

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D. N.; Singh, K. P.; Suk, H.

    2007-01-15

    The electrostatic oscillating two-stream instability of laser-driven plasma beat-wave was studied recently by Gupta et al. [Phys. Plasmas 11, 5250 (2004)], who applied their theory to limit the amplitude level of a plasma wave in the beat-wave accelerator. As a self-generated magnetic field is observed in laser-produced plasma, hence, the electromagnetic oscillating two-stream instability may be another possible mechanism for the saturation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave. The efficiency of this scheme is higher than the former.

  18. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J. -L.; Geddes, C. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2014-07-13

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  19. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments aiming to demonstrate magnetic field amplification via turbulent dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Rigby, A.; Bott, A.; Bell, A. R.; Bingham, R.; Casner, A.; Cattaneo, F.; Churazov, E. M.; Emig, J.; Flocke, N.; Fiuza, F.; Forest, C. B.; Foster, J.; Graziani, C.; Katz, J.; Koenig, M.; Li, C.-K.; Meinecke, J.; Petrasso, R.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.; Ryu, D.; Ryutov, D.; Weide, K.; White, T. G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2017-04-01

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model behind cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the values observed. We have conceived experiments that aim to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through simulation campaigns using FLASH, a highly capable radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that we have developed, and large-scale three-dimensional simulations on the Mira supercomputer at the Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results indicate that the experimental platform may be capable of reaching a turbulent plasma state and determining the dynamo amplification. We validate and compare our numerical results with a small subset of experimental data using synthetic diagnostics.

  20. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Wei; Hao, XiaoLei; Chen, YongJu; Yu, ShaoGang; Xu, SongPo; Wang, YanLan; Sun, RenPing; Lai, XuanYang; Wu, ChengYin; Gong, QiHuang; He, XianTu; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends. PMID:27256904

  1. Flash Kα radiography of laser-driven solid sphere compression for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, H.; Lee, S.; Shiroto, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Ueda, T.; Shigemori, K.; Sunahara, A.; Ohnishi, N.; Beg, F. N.; Theobald, W.; Pérez, F.; Patel, P. K.; Fujioka, S.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved compression of a laser-driven solid deuterated plastic sphere with a cone was measured with flash Kα x-ray radiography. A spherically converging shockwave launched by nanosecond GEKKO XII beams was used for compression while a flash of 4.51 keV Ti Kα x-ray backlighter was produced by a high-intensity, picosecond laser LFEX (Laser for Fast ignition EXperiment) near peak compression for radiography. Areal densities of the compressed core were inferred from two-dimensional backlit x-ray images recorded with a narrow-band spherical crystal imager. The maximum areal density in the experiment was estimated to be 87 ± 26 mg/cm2. The temporal evolution of the experimental and simulated areal densities with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code is in good agreement.

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron energization in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Guo, Fan; ...

    2016-01-25

    Electrons can be energized during laser-driven magnetic reconnection, and the energized electrons form three super-Alfvénic electron jets in the outflow region (Lu et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 083021). In this paper, by performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the electrons can also be significantly energized before magnetic reconnection occurs. When two plasma bubbles with toroidal magnetic fields expand and squeeze each other, the electrons in the magnetic ribbons are energized through betatron acceleration due to the enhancement of the magnetic field, and an electron temperature anisotropymore » $${T}_{{\\rm{e}}\\perp }\\gt {T}_{{\\rm{e}}| | }$$ develops. Meanwhile, some electrons are trapped and bounced repeatedly between the two expanding/approaching bubbles and get energized through a Fermi-like process. Furthermore, the energization before magnetic reconnection is more significant (or important) than that during magnetic reconnection.« less

  3. A simple model for estimating a magnetic field in laser-driven coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiksel, Gennady; Fox, William; Gao, Lan; Ji, Hantao

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic field generation by laser-driven coils is a promising way of magnetizing plasma in laboratory high-energy-density plasma experiments. A typical configuration consists of two electrodes—one electrode is irradiated with a high-intensity laser beam and another electrode collects charged particles from the expanding plasma. The two electrodes are separated by a narrow gap forming a capacitor-like configuration and are connected with a conducting wire-coil. The charge-separation in the expanding plasma builds up a potential difference between the electrodes that drives the electrical current in the coil. A magnetic field of tens to hundreds of Teslas generated inside the coil has been reported. This paper presents a simple model that estimates the magnetic field using simple assumptions. The results are compared with the published experimental data.

  4. A simple model for estimating a magnetic field in laser-driven coils

    DOE PAGES

    Fiksel, Gennady; Fox, William; Gao, Lan; ...

    2016-09-26

    Magnetic field generation by laser-driven coils is a promising way of magnetizing plasma in laboratory high-energy-density plasma experiments. A typical configuration consists of two electrodes—one electrode is irradiated with a high-intensity laser beam and another electrode collects charged particles from the expanding plasma. The two electrodes are separated by a narrow gap forming a capacitor-like configuration and are connected with a conducting wire-coil. The charge-separation in the expanding plasma builds up a potential difference between the electrodes that drives the electrical current in the coil. A magnetic field of tens to hundreds of Teslas generated inside the coil has beenmore » reported. This paper presents a simple model that estimates the magnetic field using simple assumptions. Lastly, the results are compared with the published experimental data.« less

  5. A simple model for estimating a magnetic field in laser-driven coils

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, Gennady; Fox, William; Gao, Lan; Ji, Hantao

    2016-09-26

    Magnetic field generation by laser-driven coils is a promising way of magnetizing plasma in laboratory high-energy-density plasma experiments. A typical configuration consists of two electrodes—one electrode is irradiated with a high-intensity laser beam and another electrode collects charged particles from the expanding plasma. The two electrodes are separated by a narrow gap forming a capacitor-like configuration and are connected with a conducting wire-coil. The charge-separation in the expanding plasma builds up a potential difference between the electrodes that drives the electrical current in the coil. A magnetic field of tens to hundreds of Teslas generated inside the coil has been reported. This paper presents a simple model that estimates the magnetic field using simple assumptions. Lastly, the results are compared with the published experimental data.

  6. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. Here we report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ∼5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (∼1012 V m−1) and magnetic (∼104 T) fields. These results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science. PMID:26657147

  7. Laser-driven proton scaling laws and new paths towards energy increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; D'Humières, E.; Lefebvre, E.; Borghesi, M.; Brambrink, E.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Kaluza, M.; Malka, V.; Manclossi, M.; Meyroneinc, S.; Mora, P.; Schreiber, J.; Toncian, T.; Pépin, H.; Audebert, P.

    2006-01-01

    The past few years have seen remarkable progress in the development of laser-based particle accelerators. The ability to produce ultrabright beams of multi-megaelectronvolt protons routinely has many potential uses from engineering to medicine, but for this potential to be realized substantial improvements in the performances of these devices must be made. Here we show that in the laser-driven accelerator that has been demonstrated experimentally to produce the highest energy protons, scaling laws derived from fluid models and supported by numerical simulations can be used to accurately describe the acceleration of proton beams for a large range of laser and target parameters. This enables us to evaluate the laser parameters needed to produce high-energy and high-quality proton beams of interest for radiography of dense objects or proton therapy of deep-seated tumours.

  8. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Albertazzi, B.; D'Humières, E.; Lancia, L.; Antici, P.; Dervieux, V.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Fuchs, J.; Böcker, J.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O.; Bonlie, J.; Cauble, B.; Shepherd, R.; Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, P.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Chen, S. N.; Sentoku, Y.; and others

    2015-04-15

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle.

  9. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-12-11

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. We report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ~5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (~1012 V m-1) and magnetic (~104 T) fields. Furthermore, these results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science.

  10. Micro-punching process based on spallation delamination induced by laser driven-flyer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Jianke; Zhou, Ming; Li, Jian; Li, Chen; Zhang, Wei; Amoako, George

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we proposed a micro-punching process for microstructure on films based on laser driven-flyer induced spallation delamination phenomenon at the interface between a film and its substrate. To validate such a micro-punching process, a series of experiments were carried out for fabrication of microstructures on Au films coated on K9 glass substrates and polyimide substrate. Results show that through such a punching process, the microstructure on Au films can be fabricated efficiently and the spatial resolution is able to reach micron level. Moreover, we found that this method was more suitable for films coated on soft substrates rather than that coated on brittle substrates due to the additional destruction of the brittle substrate. This micro-punching process has a wide range of potential application in microfluidic devices, biodevices and other MEMS devices.

  11. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, B; d'Humières, E; Lancia, L; Dervieux, V; Antici, P; Böcker, J; Bonlie, J; Breil, J; Cauble, B; Chen, S N; Feugeas, J L; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nicolaï, P; Romagnani, L; Shepherd, R; Sentoku, Y; Swantusch, M; Tikhonchuk, V T; Borghesi, M; Willi, O; Pépin, H; Fuchs, J

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle.

  12. Laser-driven plasma beat-wave propagation in a density-modulated plasma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Devki Nandan; Nam, In Hyuk; Suk, Hyyong

    2011-11-01

    A laser-driven plasma beat wave, propagating through a plasma with a periodic density modulation, can generate two sideband plasma waves. One sideband moves with a smaller phase velocity than the pump plasma wave and the other propagates with a larger phase velocity. The plasma beat wave with a smaller phase velocity can accelerate modest-energy electrons to gain substantial energy and the electrons are further accelerated by the main plasma wave. The large phase velocity plasma wave can accelerate these electrons to higher energies. As a result, the electrons can attain high energies during the acceleration by the plasma waves in the presence of a periodic density modulation. The analytical results are compared with particle-in-cell simulations and are found to be in reasonable agreement.

  13. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration.

    PubMed

    Margarone, D; Krasa, J; Prokupek, J; Velyhan, A; Torrisi, L; Picciotto, A; Giuffrida, L; Gammino, S; Cirrone, P; Cutroneo, M; Romano, F; Serra, E; Mangione, A; Rosinski, M; Parys, P; Ryc, L; Limpouch, J; Laska, L; Jungwirth, K; Ullschmied, J; Mocek, T; Korn, G; Rus, B

    2012-02-01

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10(16)-10(19) W∕cm(2). The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  14. Beam quality study for a grating-based dielectric laser-driven accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Jamison, S.; Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Li, Y.; Smith, J. D. A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric laser-driven accelerators (DLAs) based on grating structures are considered to be one of the most promising technologies to reduce the size and cost of future particle accelerators. They offer high accelerating gradients of up to several GV/m in combination with mature lithographic techniques for structure fabrication. This paper numerically investigates the beam quality for acceleration of electrons in a realistic dual-grating DLA. In our simulations, we use beam parameters of the future Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications facility to load an electron bunch into an optimized 100-period dual-grating structure where it interacts with a realistic laser pulse. The emittance, energy spread, and loaded accelerating gradient for modulated electrons are then analyzed in detail. Results from simulations show that an accelerating gradient of up to 1.13 ± 0.15 GV/m with an extremely small emittance growth, 3.6%, can be expected.

  15. Demonstration of a low electromagnetic pulse laser-driven argon gas jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugland, N. L.; Aurand, B.; Brown, C. G.; Constantin, C. G.; Everson, E. T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Tauschwitz, A.; Niemann, C.

    2012-07-01

    Laser-produced plasmas are often used as bright x-ray backlighters for time-resolved plasma diagnostics, but such backlighters simultaneously generate damaging electromagnetic pulse (EMP). A laser-driven Ar gas jet x-ray source has been measured with magnetic flux B-dot probes to produce 20 times ±37% less integrated EMP in the 0.5-2.5 GHz band than a solid chlorinated plastic foil, while retaining 85% of the laser to ≈3 keV x-ray conversion efficiency. These results are important for future backlighter development, since tailoring target density may provide a way to reduce EMP even as laser power increases.

  16. Equation of state measurements of warm dense carbon using laser-driven shock and release technique.

    PubMed

    Falk, K; Gamboa, E J; Kagan, G; Montgomery, D S; Srinivasan, B; Tzeferacos, P; Benage, J F

    2014-04-18

    We present a new approach to equation of state experiments that utilizes a laser-driven shock and release technique combined with spatially resolved x-ray Thomson scattering, radiography, velocity interferometry, and optical pyrometry to obtain independent measurements of pressure, density, and temperature for carbon at warm dense matter conditions. The uniqueness of this approach relies on using a laser to create very high initial pressures to enable a very deep release when the shock moves into a low-density pressure standard. This results in material at near normal solid density and temperatures around 10 eV. The spatially resolved Thomson scattering measurements facilitate a temperature determination of the released material by isolating the scattering signal from a specific region in the target. Our results are consistent with quantum molecular dynamics calculations for carbon at these conditions and are compared to several equation of state models.

  17. Stable Laser-Driven Electron Beams from a Steady-State-Flow Gas Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, J.; Popp, A.; Karsch, S.; Major, Zs.; Marx, B.; Fuchs, M.; Hoerlein, R.; Gruener, F.; Habs, D.; Krausz, F.; Rowlands-Rees, T. P.; Hooker, S. M.

    2009-01-22

    Quasi-monoenergetic, laser-driven electron beams of up to {approx}200 MeV in energy have been generated from steady-state-flow gas cells [1]. These beams are emitted within a low-divergence cone of 2.1{+-}0.5 mrad FWHM and feature unparalleled shot-to-shot stability in energy (2.5% rms), pointing direction (1.4 mrad rms) and charge (16% rms) owing to a highly reproducible plasma-density profile within the laser-plasma-interaction volume. Laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in gas cells of this type constitutes a simple and reliable source of relativistic electrons with well defined properties, which should allow for applications such as the production of extreme-ultraviolet undulator radiation in the near future.

  18. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; ...

    2015-12-11

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. We report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ~5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (~1012 V m-1) and magnetic (~104 T) fields. Furthermore, these results contributemore » to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science.« less

  19. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  20. A new experimental design for laser-driven shocks on precompressed and preheated water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sollier, A.; Auroux, E.; Vauthier, J.-S.; Desbiens, N.; Bourasseau, E.; Maillet, J.-B.; Boustie, M.; He, H.; Resseguier, T. de; Berterretche, P.

    2007-12-12

    Laser driven shock measurements have been performed on precompressed and preheated water samples in order to reach states lying above the standard water Hugoniot in the pressure versus temperature diagram, which are representative of the thermodynamic parameters of water in the detonation products of high condensed explosives. In this experimental system, water is used as both target sample and window medium for VISAR diagnosis. We report the first experiments performed with the LCD's laser system at low shock pressure, on water samples preheated up to 300 deg. C and precompressed up to 300 bar. The results are used to check the predictions of the CARTE thermochemical code, and compared with the Sesame equation of state and with molecular Monte Carlo calculations.

  1. Biological cell irradiation at ultrahigh dose rate employing laser driven protons

    SciTech Connect

    Doria, D.; Kakolee, K. F.; Kar, S.; and others

    2012-07-09

    The ultrashort duration of laser-driven multi-MeV ion bursts offers the possibility of radiobiological studies at extremely high dose rates. Employing the TARANIS Terawatt laser at Queen's University, the effect of proton irradiation at MeV-range energies on live cells has been investigated at dose rates exceeding 10{sup 9}Gy/s as a single exposure. A clonogenic assay showed consistent lethal effects on V-79 live cells, which, even at these dose rates, appear to be in line with previously published results employing conventional sources. A Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of 1.4{+-}0.2 at 10% survival is estimated from a comparison with a 225 kVp X-ray source.

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron energization in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Guo, Fan; Sheng, Zhengming; Wang, Huanyu; Wang, Shui

    2016-01-25

    Electrons can be energized during laser-driven magnetic reconnection, and the energized electrons form three super-Alfvénic electron jets in the outflow region (Lu et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 083021). In this paper, by performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the electrons can also be significantly energized before magnetic reconnection occurs. When two plasma bubbles with toroidal magnetic fields expand and squeeze each other, the electrons in the magnetic ribbons are energized through betatron acceleration due to the enhancement of the magnetic field, and an electron temperature anisotropy ${T}_{{\\rm{e}}\\perp }\\gt {T}_{{\\rm{e}}| | }$ develops. Meanwhile, some electrons are trapped and bounced repeatedly between the two expanding/approaching bubbles and get energized through a Fermi-like process. Furthermore, the energization before magnetic reconnection is more significant (or important) than that during magnetic reconnection.

  3. Physical approach to adhesion testing using laser-driven shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolis, C.; Berthe, L.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.; Barradas, S.; Jeandin, M.

    2007-05-01

    This paper deals with an adhesion test of coatings using laser-driven shock waves. Physical aspects concerning laser-matter interaction, shock wave propagation and interface fracture strength are described. This comprehensive approach using two numerical codes (HUGO and SHYLAC) allows the determination of mechanisms responsible for coating debonding and a quantitative evaluation of fracture strength. From this description, a coating test protocol is also designed. To diagnose coating debonding, it is based on the analysis of experimental rear free surface velocity profiles measured by velocity interferometer system for any reflectors (VISAR). Ni electrolytic coating (70-90 µm) deposited on a Cu substrate (120-190 µm) is used for the experimental validation of the test. The fracture strength is 1.49 ± 0.01 GPa for a laser pulse duration of 10 ns at 1.064 µm.

  4. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Dong; Huang, Zhirong

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU) is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  5. Demonstartion of density dependence of x-ray flux in a laser-driven hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P E; Rosen, M D; Hammer, J H; Hsing, W S; Glendinning, S G; Turner, R E; Kirkwood, R; Schein, J; Sorce, C; Satcher, J; Hamza, A; Reibold, R A; Hibbard, R; Landen, O; Reighard, A; McAlpin, S; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B

    2008-02-11

    Experiments have been conducted using laser-driven cylindrical hohlraums whose walls are machined from Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} foams of 100 mg/cc and 4 g/cc densities. Measurements of the radiation temperature demonstrate that the lower density walls produce higher radiation temperatures than the high density walls. This is the first experimental demonstration of the prediction that this would occur [M. D. Rosen and J. H. Hammer, Phys. Rev. E 72, 056403 (2005)]. For high density walls, the radiation front propagates subsonically, and part of the absorbed energy is wasted by the flow kinetic energy. For the lower wall density, the front velocity is supersonic and can devote almost all of the absorbed energy to heating the wall.

  6. Scaling the Yield of Laser-Driven Electron-Positron Jets to Laboratory Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Fiuza, F.; Link, A.; Hazi, A.; Hill, M.; Hoarty, D.; James, S.; Kerr, S.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Sentoku, Y.; Williams, G. J.

    2015-05-01

    We report new experimental results obtained on three different laser facilities that show directed laser-driven relativistic electron-positron jets with up to 30 times larger yields than previously obtained and a quadratic (˜EL2 ) dependence of the positron yield on the laser energy. This favorable scaling stems from a combination of higher energy electrons due to increased laser intensity and the recirculation of MeV electrons in the mm-thick target. Based on this scaling, first principles simulations predict the possibility of using such electron-positron jets, produced at upcoming high-energy laser facilities, to probe the physics of relativistic collisionless shocks in the laboratory.

  7. Influence of radiation reaction force on ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration.

    PubMed

    Capdessus, R; McKenna, P

    2015-05-01

    The role of the radiation reaction force in ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated. For laser intensities ∼10(23)W/cm(2), the action of this force on electrons is demonstrated in relativistic particle-in-cell simulations to significantly enhance the energy transfer to ions in relativistically transparent targets, but strongly reduce the ion energy in dense plasma targets. An expression is derived for the revised piston velocity, and hence ion energy, taking account of energy loses to synchrotron radiation generated by electrons accelerated in the laser field. Ion mass is demonstrated to be important by comparing results obtained with proton and deuteron plasma. The results can be verified in experiments with cryogenic hydrogen and deuterium targets.

  8. Laser-driven localization of collective CO vibrations in metal-carbonyl complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisaj, Mateusz; Kühn, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    Using the example of a cobalt dicarbonyl complex it is shown that two perpendicular linearly polarized IR laser pulses can be used to trigger an excitation of the delocalized CO stretching modes, which corresponds to an alternating localization of the vibration within one CO bond. The switching time for localization in either of the two bonds is determined by the energy gap between the symmetric and asymmetric fundamental transition frequencies. The phase of the oscillation between the two local bond excitations can be tuned by the relative phase of the two pulses. The extend of control of bond localization is limited by the anharmonicity of the potential energy surfaces leading to wave packet dispersion. This prevents such a simple pulse scheme from being used for laser-driven bond breaking in the considered example.

  9. Observation of gigawatt-class THz pulses from a compact laser-driven particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Gopal, A; Herzer, S; Schmidt, A; Singh, P; Reinhard, A; Ziegler, W; Brömmel, D; Karmakar, A; Gibbon, P; Dillner, U; May, T; Meyer, H-G; Paulus, G G

    2013-08-16

    We report the observation of subpicosecond terahertz (T-ray) pulses with energies ≥460 μJ from a laser-driven ion accelerator, thus rendering the peak power of the source higher even than that of state-of-the-art synchrotrons. Experiments were performed with intense laser pulses (up to 5×10(19) W/cm(2)) to irradiate thin metal foil targets. Ion spectra measured simultaneously showed a square law dependence of the T-ray yield on particle number. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show the presence of transient currents at the target rear surface which could be responsible for the strong T-ray emission.

  10. Femtosecond powder diffraction with a laser-driven hard X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, F; Ansari, Z; Woerner, M; Elsaesser, T

    2010-01-18

    X-ray powder diffraction with a femtosecond time resolution is introduced to map ultrafast structural dynamics of polycrystalline condensed matter. Our pump-probe approach is based on photoexcitation of a powder sample with a femtosecond optical pulse and probing changes of its structure by diffracting a hard X-ray pulse generated in a laser-driven plasma source. We discuss the key aspects of this scheme including an analysis of detection sensitivity and angular resolution. Applying this technique to the prototype molecular material ammonium sulfate, up to 20 powder diffraction rings are recorded simultaneously with a time resolution of 100 fs. We describe how to derive transient charge density maps of the material from the extensive set of diffraction data in a quantitative way.

  11. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Kerstin M; Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Laser-accelerated particles are a promising option for radiation therapy of cancer by potentially combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages of charged particle beams. To design such a treatment unit we consider different dose delivery schemes and analyze the necessary devices in the required particle beam line for each case. Furthermore, we point out that laser-driven treatment units may be ideal tools for motion adaptation during radiotherapy. Reasons for this are the potential of a flexible gantry and the time structure of the beam with high particle numbers in ultrashort bunches. One challenge that needs to be addressed is the secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements. (© 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim) PMID:22930653

  12. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Kerstin M; Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J

    2012-11-01

    Laser-accelerated particles are a promising option for radiation therapy of cancer by potentially combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages of charged particle beams. To design such a treatment unit we consider different dose delivery schemes and analyze the necessary devices in the required particle beam line for each case. Furthermore, we point out that laser-driven treatment units may be ideal tools for motion adaptation during radiotherapy. Reasons for this are the potential of a flexible gantry and the time structure of the beam with high particle numbers in ultrashort bunches. One challenge that needs to be addressed is the secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements.

  13. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas.

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C; Hamilton, Christopher E; Santiago, Miguel A; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B; Shah, Rahul C; Fernández, Juan C

    2015-12-11

    Table-top laser-plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. Here we report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ∼5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (∼10(12) V m(-1)) and magnetic (∼10(4) T) fields. These results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science.

  14. Numerical Study of a Multi-stage Dielectric Laser-driven Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yelong; Xia, Guoxing; Smith, Jonathan. D. A.; Hanahoe, Kieran; Mete, Oznur; Jamison, Steve P.; Welsch, Carsten P.

    In order to overcome the limits of commonly used radiofrequency accelerators, it is highly desirable to reduce the unit cost and increase the maximum achievable accelerating gradient. Dielectric laser-driven accelerators (DLAs) based on grating structures have received considerable attention due to maximum acceleration gradients of several GV/m and mature lithographic techniques for structure fabrication. This paper explores different spatial harmonics excited by an incident laser pulse and their interaction with the electron beam from the non-relativistic (25 keV) to the highly relativistic regime in double-grating silica structures. The achievable acceleration gradient for different spatial harmonics and the optimal compromise between maximum acceleration gradient and simplicity of structure fabrication are discussed. Finally, the suitability of a multi-stage DLA which would enable the acceleration of electrons from 25 keV to relativistic energies is discussed.

  15. Terahertz generation by nonlinear mixing of laser pulses in a clustered gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manoj; Tripathi, V. K.

    2011-05-15

    A scheme of terahertz (THz) generation by two collinear laser pulses of finite spot size in a clustered gas is investigated theoretically. The lasers quickly ionize the atoms of the clusters, converting them into plasma balls, and exert a ponderomotive force on the cluster electrons, producing a beat frequency longitudinal current of limited transverse extent. The current acts as an antenna to produce beat frequency terahertz radiation. As the cluster expands under the hydrodynamic pressure, plasma frequency of cluster electrons {omega}{sub pe} decreases and approaches {radical}(3) times the frequency of laser, resonant heating and expansion of clusters occurs. On further expansion of clusters as {omega}{sub pe} approaches {radical}(3) times the terahertz frequency, resonant enhancement in THz radiated power occurs.

  16. Laser-driven x-ray and neutron source development for industrial applications of plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, C. M.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Rusby, D. R.; Armstrong, C.; Alejo, A.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed beams of energetic x-rays and neutrons from intense laser interactions with solid foils are promising for applications where bright, small emission area sources, capable of multi-modal delivery are ideal. Possible end users of laser-driven multi-modal sources are those requiring advanced non-destructive inspection techniques in industry sectors of high value commerce such as aerospace, nuclear and advanced manufacturing. We report on experimental work that demonstrates multi-modal operation of high power laser-solid interactions for neutron and x-ray beam generation. Measurements and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations show that neutron yield is increased by a factor ~2 when a 1 mm copper foil is placed behind a 2 mm lithium foil, compared to using a 2 cm block of lithium only. We explore x-ray generation with a 10 picosecond drive pulse in order to tailor the spectral content for radiography with medium density alloy metals. The impact of using  >1 ps pulse duration on laser-accelerated electron beam generation and transport is discussed alongside the optimisation of subsequent bremsstrahlung emission in thin, high atomic number target foils. X-ray spectra are deconvolved from spectrometer measurements and simulation data generated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. We also demonstrate the unique capability of laser-driven x-rays in being able to deliver single pulse high spatial resolution projection imaging of thick metallic objects. Active detector radiographic imaging of industrially relevant sample objects with a 10 ps drive pulse is presented for the first time, demonstrating that features of 200 μm size are resolved when projected at high magnification.

  17. Characterization of the ELIMED Permanent Magnets Quadrupole system prototype with laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, F.; Pommarel, L.; Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Costa, M.; Giove, D.; Maggiore, M.; Russo, A. D.; Scuderi, V.; Malka, V.; Vauzour, B.; Flacco, A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2016-07-01

    Laser-based accelerators are gaining interest in recent years as an alternative to conventional machines [1]. In the actual ion acceleration scheme, energy and angular spread of the laser-driven beams are the main limiting factors for beam applications and different solutions for dedicated beam-transport lines have been proposed [2,3]. In this context a system of Permanent Magnet Quadrupoles (PMQs) has been realized [2] by INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) researchers, in collaboration with SIGMAPHI company in France, to be used as a collection and pre-selection system for laser driven proton beams. This system is meant to be a prototype to a more performing one [3] to be installed at ELI-Beamlines for the collection of ions. The final system is designed for protons and carbons up to 60 MeV/u. In order to validate the design and the performances of this large bore, compact, high gradient magnetic system prototype an experimental campaign have been carried out, in collaboration with the group of the SAPHIR experimental facility at LOA (Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée) in Paris using a 200 TW Ti:Sapphire laser system. During this campaign a deep study of the quadrupole system optics has been performed, comparing the results with the simulation codes used to determine the setup of the PMQ system and to track protons with realistic TNSA-like divergence and spectrum. Experimental and simulation results are good agreement, demonstrating the possibility to have a good control on the magnet optics. The procedure used during the experimental campaign and the most relevant results are reported here.

  18. Laser-driven electron beam acceleration and future application to compact light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hafz, N.; Jeong, T. M.; Lee, S. K.; Pae, K. H.; Sung, J. H.; Choi, I. W.; Yu, T. J.; Lee, J.; Jeong, Y. U.

    2009-07-25

    Laser-driven plasma accelerators are gaining much attention by the advanced accelerator community due to the potential these accelerators hold in miniaturizing future high-energy and medium-energy machines. In the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA), the ponderomotive force of an ultrashort high intensity laser pulse excites a longitudinal plasma wave or bubble. Due to huge charge separation, electric fields created in the plasma bubble can be several orders of magnitude higher than those available in conventional microwave and RF-based accelerator facilities which are limited (up to approx100 MV/m) by material breakdown. Therefore, if an electron bunch is injected into the bubble in phase with its field, it will gain relativistic energies within an extremely short distance. Here, in the LWFA we show the generation of high-quality and high-energy electron beams up to the GeV-class within a few millimeters of gas-jet plasmas irradiated by tens of terawatt ultrashort laser pulses. Thus we realize approximately four orders of magnitude acceleration gradients higher than available by conventional technology. As a practical application of the stable high-energy electron beam generation, we are planning on injecting the electron beams into a few-meters long conventional undulator in order to realize compact X-ray synchrotron (immediate) and FEL (future) light sources. Stable laser-driven electron beam and radiation devices will surely open a new era in science, medicine and technology and will benefit a larger number of users in those fields.

  19. Laser-driven electron beamlines generated by coupling laser-plasma sources with conventional transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antici, P.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Rossi, A. R.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Serafini, L.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-driven electron beamlines are receiving increasing interest from the particle accelerator community. In particular, the high initial energy, low emittance, and high beam current of the plasma based electron source potentially allow generating much more compact and bright particle accelerators than what conventional accelerator technology can achieve. Using laser-generated particles as injectors for generating beamlines could significantly reduce the size and cost of accelerator facilities. Unfortunately, several features of laser-based particle beams need still to be improved before considering them for particle beamlines and thus enable the use of plasma-driven accelerators for the multiple applications of traditional accelerators. Besides working on the plasma source itself, a promising approach to shape the laser-generated beams is coupling them with conventional accelerator elements in order to benefit from both a versatile electron source and a controllable beam. In this paper, we perform start-to-end simulations to generate laser-driven beamlines using conventional accelerator codes and methodologies. Starting with laser-generated electrons that can be obtained with established multi-hundred TW laser systems, we compare different options to capture and transport the beams. This is performed with the aim of providing beamlines suitable for potential applications, such as free electron lasers. In our approach, we have analyzed which parameters are critical at the source and from there evaluated different ways to overcome these issues using conventional accelerator elements and methods. We show that electron driven beamlines are potentially feasible, but exploiting their full potential requires extensive improvement of the source parameters or innovative technological devices for their transport and capture.

  20. Utilizing a Low-Cost, Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS) to Improve Learning in Developing Rural Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes an innovation Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS), utilizing general IWBs (Interactive Whiteboard) didactics, to support student learning for rural and developing regions. LaDIS is a system made to support traditional classroom practices between an instructor and a group of students. This invention effectively transforms a…

  1. Laser-Driven Ultra-Relativistic Plasmas - Nuclear Fusion in Coulomb Shock Waves, Rouge Waves, and Background Matter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-05

    non-relativistic matter , radiation, and dark energy components. - 10 - In application to astrophysics and cosmology, our theory can describe the...AND SUBTITLE LASER-DRIVEN ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC PLASMAS - NUCLEAR FUSION IN COULOMB SHOCK WAVES, ROUGE WAVES, AND BACKGROUND MATTER . 5a.  CONTRACT

  2. Nonlinear biosynthetic gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Jeroen G; Ebbendorf, Bjorg; Woszczynska, Marta; Boer, Rémon; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2010-11-01

    Industrial penicillin production levels by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum increased dramatically by classical strain improvement. High-yielding strains contain multiple copies of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes three key enzymes of the β-lactam biosynthetic pathway. We have analyzed the gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production using the high-yielding P. chrysogenum strain DS17690 that was cured from its native clusters. The amount of penicillin V produced increased with the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster number but was saturated at high copy numbers. Likewise, transcript levels of the biosynthetic genes pcbAB [δ-(l-α-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine synthetase], pcbC (isopenicillin N synthase), and penDE (acyltransferase) correlated with the cluster copy number. Remarkably, the protein level of acyltransferase, which localizes to peroxisomes, was saturated already at low cluster copy numbers. At higher copy numbers, intracellular levels of isopenicillin N increased, suggesting that the acyltransferase reaction presents a limiting step at a high gene dose. Since the number and appearance of the peroxisomes did not change significantly with the gene cluster copy number, we conclude that the acyltransferase activity is limiting for penicillin biosynthesis at high biosynthetic gene cluster copy numbers. These results suggest that at a high penicillin production level, productivity is limited by the peroxisomal acyltransferase import activity and/or the availability of coenzyme A (CoA)-activated side chains.

  3. Nonlinear femtosecond laser induced scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dey, Shirshendu; Mirell, Daniel; Perez, Alejandro Rodriguez; Lee, Joonhee; Apkarian, V Ara

    2013-04-21

    We demonstrate ultrafast laser driven nonlinear scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), under ambient conditions. The design is an adaptation of the recently introduced cross-polarized double beat method, whereby z-polarized phase modulated fields are tightly focused at a tunneling junction consisting of a sharp tungsten tip and an optically transparent gold film as substrate. We demonstrate the prerequisites for ultrafast time-resolved STM through an operative mechanism of nonlinear laser field-driven tunneling. The spatial resolution of the nonlinear laser driven STM is determined by the local field intensity. Resolution of 0.3 nm-10 nm is demonstrated for the intensity dependent, exponential tunneling range. The demonstration is carried out on a junction consisting of tungsten tip and gold substrate. Nano-structured gold is used for imaging purposes, to highlight junction plasmon controlled tunneling in the conductivity limit.

  4. High-speed imaging of Raleigh-Taylor instabilities in laser-driven plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Alan M.; Gillespie, Calvin H.; Trott, Wayne M.

    1997-05-01

    We have previously reported our observations of the dynamic behavior of laser driven plates. Recent improvements and modification of the imaging techniques have identified and provided measurements of Raleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities that occur in these events. The microscope system in the LLNL Micro Detonics Facility, was converted to an epi- illuminated polarization configuration. A double pulse nanosecond illuminator and a second independently focusable frame camera were also added to the system. A laser driven plate, that is a dense solid driven by a laser heated, lower density plasma, is inherently R-T unstable. The characteristics and growth of the instability determine whether or not the plate remains intact. In earlier reports we correlated the surface patterning of thin plates with the fiber-optical transmission modes. In subsequent experiments we noted that the plasma burn through patterning in thin plates and the surface patterning of thicker plates did not correspond to the thin plate early time patterning. These observations led to the suspicion of R-T instability. A series of experiments correlating plate thickness and pattern spatial frequency has verified the instability. The plates are aluminum, deposited on the ends of optical fibers. They are launched by a YAG laser pulse traveling down the fiber. Plate velocities are several kilometers per second and characteristic dimensions of the instabilities are a few to tens of microns. Several techniques were used to examine the plates, the most successful being specularly reflecting polarization microscopy looking directly at the plate as it flies toward the camera. These images gave data on the spatial frequencies of the instabilities but could not give the amplitudes. To measure the amplitude of the instability a semi-transparent witness plate was placed a known distance from the plate. As above, the plate was observed using the polarization microscope but using the streak camera as the detector

  5. Neutron imaging with the short-pulse laser driven neutron source at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Favalli, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Falk, K.; Jung, D.; Tybo, J. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Croft, S.; Danly, C.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Taddeucci, T.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Roth, M.

    2016-10-01

    Emerging approaches to short-pulse laser-driven neutron production offer a possible gateway to compact, low cost, and intense broad spectrum sources for a wide variety of applications. They are based on energetic ions, driven by an intense short-pulse laser, interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via breakup and nuclear reactions. Recent experiments performed with the high-contrast laser at the Trident laser facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism operating in the regime of relativistic transparency, featuring a volumetric laser-plasma interaction. This mechanism is distinct from previously studied ones that accelerate ions at the laser-target surface. The Trident experiments produced an intense beam of deuterons with an energy distribution extending above 100 MeV. This deuteron beam, when directed at a beryllium converter, produces a forward-directed neutron beam with ˜5 × 109 n/sr, in a single laser shot, primarily due to deuteron breakup. The neutron beam has a pulse duration on the order of a few nanoseconds with an energy distribution extending from a few hundreds of keV to almost 80 MeV. For the experiments on neutron-source spot-size measurements, our gated neutron imager was setup to select neutrons in the energy range of 2.5-35 MeV. The spot size of neutron emission at the converter was measured by two different imaging techniques, using a knife-edge and a penumbral aperture, in two different experimental campaigns. The neutron-source spot size is measured ˜1 mm for both experiments. The measurements and analysis reported here give a spatial characterization for this type of neutron source for the first time. In addition, the forward modeling performed provides an empirical estimate of the spatial characteristics of the deuteron ion-beam. These experimental observations, taken together, provide essential yet unique data to benchmark and verify theoretical work into the

  6. Laser-driven, magnetized quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks on the Large Plasma Devicea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Winske, D.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C.

    2014-05-01

    The interaction of a laser-driven super-Alfvénic magnetic piston with a large, preformed magnetized ambient plasma has been studied by utilizing a unique experimental platform that couples the Raptor kJ-class laser system [Niemann et al., J. Instrum. 7, P03010 (2012)] to the Large Plasma Device [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the University of California, Los Angeles. This platform provides experimental conditions of relevance to space and astrophysical magnetic collisionless shocks and, in particular, allows a detailed study of the microphysics of shock formation, including piston-ambient ion collisionless coupling. An overview of the platform and its capabilities is given, and recent experimental results on the coupling of energy between piston and ambient ions and the formation of collisionless shocks are presented and compared to theoretical and computational work. In particular, a magnetosonic pulse consistent with a low-Mach number collisionless shock is observed in a quasi-perpendicular geometry in both experiments and simulations.

  7. Rf and space-charge induced emittances in laser-driven rf guns

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    1988-10-01

    Laser-driven rf electron guns are potential sources of high-current, low-emittance, short bunch-length electron beams, which are required for many advanced accelerator applications, such as free-electron lasers and injectors for high-energy machines. In such guns the design of which was pioneered at Los Alamos National Laboratory and which is currently being developed at several other laboratories, a high-power laser beam illuminates a photo-cathode surface placed on an end wall of an rf cavity. The main advantages of this type of gun are that the time structure of the electron beam is controlled by the laser, eliminating the need for bunchers, and that the electric field in rf cavities can be made very strong, so that the effects due to space-charge repulsion can be minimized. In this paper, we present an approximate but simple analysis for the transverse and longitudinal emittances in rf guns that takes into account both the time variation of the rf field and the space-charge effect. The results are compared and found to agree well with those from simulation. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Does laser-driven heat front propagation depend on material microstructure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, J. D.; Matsukuma, H.; Fournier, K. B.; Yoga, A.; Kemp, G. E.; Tanaka, N.; Zhang, Z.; Kota, K.; Tosaki, S.; Ikenouchi, T.; Nishimura, H.

    2016-10-01

    We showed earlier that the laser-driven heat front propagation velocity in low-density Ti-silica aerogel and TiO2 foam targets was slower than that simulated with a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code incorporating an atomic kinetics model in non-LTE and assuming initially homogeneous material. Some theoretical models suggest that the heat front is slowed over what it would be in a homogeneous medium by the microstructure of the foam. In order to test this hypothesis we designed and conducted a comparison experiment on the GEKKO laser to measure heat front propagation velocity in two targets, one an Ar/CO2 gas mixture and the other a TiO2 foam, that had identical initial densities and average ionization states. We found that the heat front traveled about ten times faster in the gas than in the foam. We present the details of the experiment design and a comparison of the data with the simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the joint research project of ILE Osaka U. (contract Nos. 2014A1-04 and 2015A1-02).

  9. Propagation of a laser-driven relativistic electron beam inside a solid dielectric.

    PubMed

    Sarkisov, G S; Ivanov, V V; Leblanc, P; Sentoku, Y; Yates, K; Wiewior, P; Chalyy, O; Astanovitskiy, A; Bychenkov, V Yu; Jobe, D; Spielman, R B

    2012-09-01

    Laser probe diagnostics: shadowgraphy, interferometry, and polarimetry were used for a comprehensive characterization of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by a laser-driven, relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50-TW Leopard laser at the University of Nevada, Reno. We show that for a laser flux of ∼2 × 10(18) W/cm2 a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3 for 10 ps and has a smooth electron-density distribution. The maximum free-electron density inside the glass target is ∼2 × 10(19) cm-3, which corresponds to an ionization level of ∼0.1%. Magnetic fields and electric fields do not exceed ∼15 kG and ∼1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a hot, ringlike structure with a maximum of ∼0.7 eV. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the "fountain effect", a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields driven by laser. The very low ionization observed after the laser heating pulse suggests a fast recombination on the sub-ps time scale.

  10. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W-M; Trivikram, T Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J; Ayyub, P; Sheng, Z M; Krishnamurthy, M

    2015-07-08

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈ 0.25 μm) layer of 25-30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2 × 10(18)  W/cm(2). However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration.

  11. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  12. Heat Loss in a Laser-Driven, Magnetized, X-Ray Source with Thermoelectric Terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Koning, J.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-10-01

    The efficiency of laser-driven K-shell radiation sources, i.e., pipes containing a gas or a metal foam, may be improved by using an axial magnetic field to thermally insulate the pipe wall from the hot interior. A planar, self-similar solution for the magnetic and thermal diffusion is developed to model the near wall physics that includes the thermoelectric Nernst and Ettingshausen effects. This solution extends previous work for the MagLIF concept to include the full dependence of the transport coefficients on the electron Hall parameter. The analytic solution assumes a constant pressure. This case is matched with a 1D MHD code, which is then applied to the case allowing for pressure gradients. These numerical solutions are found to evolve toward the self-similar ones. The variation of the time integrated heat loss with and without the thermoelectric terms will be examined. The present work provides a verification test for general MHD codes that use Braginskii's or Epperlein-Haines' transport model to account for thermoelectric effects. NRL supported by the DOE/NNSA. LLNL work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. A Transformative Imaging Capability Using Laser Driven Multi MeV Photon Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Donald; Espy, Michelle; Palaniyappan, Sasi; Mendez, Jacob; Nelson, Ronald; Hunter, James; Fernandez, Juan; los alamos national laboratory Team

    2016-10-01

    Recent results from the LANL Trident Laser demonstrate the practical use of a laser of this class ( 70 J, 600 fs) as a multi MeV photon source. The utilization of novel targets operating in the relativistic transparency regime of laser-plasmas has enabled this development. The electron population made from these targets, when coupled to a suitable high-Z converter foil placed near the laser target, produces an intense >1 MeV photon source with a small source size compared to conventional sources. When coupled with efficient imaging detectors, this laser-driven hard x-ray source provides new capabilities to address current non-destructive and dynamic testing problems that require a quantum jump in resolution. ``Flash'' (pulse picosecond) photon imaging, micro-focus resolution enhancement, good object penetration, and magnification (4x) with sufficient dose (>10 Rad/sr) for practical application have all been demonstrated at the LANL Trident Laser, as summarized in this presentation.

  14. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W.-M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J.; Ayyub, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈0.25 μm) layer of 25–30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2×1018  W/cm2. However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration. PMID:26153048

  15. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2014-10-15

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  16. TOF technique for laser-driven proton beam diagnostics for the ELIMED beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milluzzo, G.; Scuderi, V.; Amico, A. G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Dostal, J.; Larosa, G.; Leanza, R.; Margarone, D.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Velyhan, A.

    2017-03-01

    The Time of Flight (TOF) method for laser-driven ion beam diagnostics has been extensively investigated so far for low energy ion diagnostics and several works, reported in literature [1,2], have shown its efficiency in the measurement of particle beam characteristics such as ion species, energy spectrum and current. Moreover, such technique allows obtaining a shot-to-shot on-line monitoring of optically accelerated particles, necessary to control the reproducibility of the accelerated beam and to deliver a beam suitable for any kind of applications. For this reason, the ELIMED beamline [3,4], which will be entirely developed at INFN-LNS and installed in 2017 within the ion beamline ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser-Ion Acceleration) experimental hall at ELI-Beamlines in Prague, will be equipped with an on-line diagnostics system composed by silicon carbide and diamond detectors, using the TOF technique. In this contribution, the procedure developed for TOF signal analysis will be briefly reported.

  17. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  18. Overview of laser-driven generation of electron-positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarri, G.; Dieckmann, M. E.; Kourakis, I.; di Piazza, A.; Reville, B.; Keitel, C. H.; Zepf, M.

    2015-08-01

    Electron-positron (e-p) plasmas are widely thought to be emitted, in the form of ultra-relativistic winds or collimated jets, by some of the most energetic or powerful objects in the Universe, such as black-holes, pulsars, and quasars. These phenomena represent an unmatched astrophysical laboratory to test physics at its limit and, given their immense distance from Earth (some even farther than several billion light years), they also provide a unique window on the very early stages of our Universe. However, due to such gigantic distances, their properties are only inferred from the indirect interpretation of their radiative signatures and from matching numerical models: their generation mechanism and dynamics still pose complicated enigmas to the scientific community. Small-scale reproductions in the laboratory would represent a fundamental step towards a deeper understanding of this exotic state of matter. Here we present recent experimental results concerning the laser-driven production of ultra-relativistic e-p beams. In particular, we focus on the possibility of generating beams that present charge neutrality and that allow for collective effects in their dynamics, necessary ingredients for the testing pair-plasma physics in the laboratory. A brief discussion of the analytical and numerical modelling of the dynamics of these plasmas is also presented in order to provide a summary of the novel plasma physics that can be accessed with these objects. Finally, general considerations on the scalability of laboratory plasmas up to astrophysical scenarios are given.

  19. Propagation of Laser-Driven Relativistic Electron Beam inside Solid Dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R.; Ivanov, V. V.; Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2011-10-01

    Laser probing diagnostics shadowgraphy, interferometry and polarimetry was used for comprehensive characterization of ionization wave dynamics inside glass target induced by laser-driven relativistic electron beam. Experiment was done using 50-TW Leopard laser at University of Nevada Reno. It has been shown that for laser flax ~2 ×1018W/cm2 hemispheric ionization wave propagates with c/3 speed has smooth electron density distribution, absorbing probing green beam in 2-10 times. Maximum of free-electron density inside glass target is ~2x1019cm-3, which correspond to ionization ~0.1%. Magnetic and electric fields do not exceed ~15 kG and ~1 MV/cm. Electron temperature has hot-ring structure with maximum 0.1-0.5 eV. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the ``fountain effect'', a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional PIC-simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields. The very low ionization, ~0.1%, observed after the heating pulse suggests a fast recombination at the sub-ps time scale. Work was supported by the DOE/NNSA under UNR grant DE-FC52-06NA27616 and grant DE-PS02-08ER08-16.

  20. Propagation of a laser-driven relativistic electron beam inside a solid dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Ivanov, V. V.; Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y.; Yates, K.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Jobe, D.; Spielman, R. B.

    2012-09-01

    Laser probe diagnostics: shadowgraphy, interferometry, and polarimetry were used for a comprehensive characterization of ionization wave dynamics inside a glass target induced by a laser-driven, relativistic electron beam. Experiments were done using the 50-TW Leopard laser at the University of Nevada, Reno. We show that for a laser flux of ˜2 × 1018 W/cm2 a hemispherical ionization wave propagates at c/3 for 10 ps and has a smooth electron-density distribution. The maximum free-electron density inside the glass target is ˜2 × 1019 cm-3, which corresponds to an ionization level of ˜0.1%. Magnetic fields and electric fields do not exceed ˜15 kG and ˜1 MV/cm, respectively. The electron temperature has a hot, ringlike structure with a maximum of ˜0.7 eV. The topology of the interference phase shift shows the signature of the “fountain effect”, a narrow electron beam that fans out from the propagation axis and heads back to the target surface. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations demonstrate radial spreading of fast electrons by self-consistent electrostatic fields driven by laser. The very low ionization observed after the laser heating pulse suggests a fast recombination on the sub-ps time scale.

  1. On the Properties of Plastic Ablators in Laser-Driven Material Dynamics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D C; Kraus, R G

    2007-11-15

    Radiation hydrodynamics simulations were used to study the effect of plastic ablators in laser-driven shock experiments. The sensitivity to composition and equation of state was found to be 5-10% in ablation pressure. As was found for metals, a laser pulse of constant irradiance gave a pressure history which decreased by several percent per nanosecond. The pressure history could be made more constant by adjusting the irradiance history. The impedance mismatch with the sample gave an increase o(100%) in the pressure transmitted into the sample, for a reduction of several tens of percent in the duration of the peak load applied to the sample, and structured the release history by adding a release step to a pressure close to the ablation pressure. Algebraic relations were found between the laser pulse duration, the ablator thickness, and the duration of the peak pressure applied to the sample, involving quantities calculated from the equations of state of the ablator and sample using shock dynamics.

  2. A high velocity impact experiment of micro-scale ice particles using laser-driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Kim, Jungwook; Yoh, Jack J.

    2014-11-01

    A jet engine for high speed air breathing propulsion is subject to continuous wear as a result of impacts of micro-scale ice particles during a flight in the atmosphere. The inlet duct and compressor blades are exposed to on-coming frozen moisture particles that may result in the surface damage and significantly shorten the designed lifetime of the aircraft. Under such prolonged high-speed impact loading, the performance parameters such as flight instability and power loss of a jet engine can be significantly degraded. In this work, a laser-driven system was designed to accelerate micro-scale ice particles to the velocity up to Mach 2 using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser beam at 100-600 mJ with 1064 nm wavelength and 9 ns pulse duration. The high speed images (Phantom v711) and double exposure shadowgraphs were used to calculate the average velocity of ice particles and their deceleration. Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measurements were also utilized for the analysis of free surface velocity of a metal foil in order to understand the interfacial dynamics between the impacting particles and accepting metal target. The velocity of our ice particles is sufficiently fast for studying the effect of moisture particle collision on an air-breathing duct of high speed aircraft, and thus the results can provide insight into how minute space debris or micrometeorites cause damage to the orbiting spacecraft at large.

  3. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  4. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W.-M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J.; Ayyub, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈0.25 μm) layer of 25-30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2×1018  W/cm2. However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration.

  5. Lasers As Particle Accelerators In Medicine: From Laser-Driven Protons To Imaging With Thomson Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Babzien, M.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Yakimenko, V.; Dover, N. P.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Najmudin, Z.; Shkolnikov, P.; Williams, O.; Rosenzweig, J.; Oliva, P.; Carpinelli, M.; Golosio, B.; Delogu, P.; Stefanini, A.; Endrizzi, M.

    2011-06-01

    We report our recent progress using a high-power, picosecond CO{sub 2} laser for Thomson scattering and ion acceleration experiments. These experiments capitalize on certain advantages of long-wavelength CO{sub 2} lasers, such as their high number of photons per energy unit and beneficial wavelength- scaling of the electrons' ponderomotive energy and critical plasma frequency. High X-ray fluxes produced in the interactions of the counter-propagating laser- and electron-beams for obtaining single-shot, high-contrast images of biological objects. The laser, focused on a hydrogen jet, generated a monoenergetic proton beam via the radiation-pressure mechanism. The energy of protons produced by this method scales linearly with the laser's intensity. We present a plan for scaling the process into the range of 100-MeV proton energy via upgrading the CO{sub 2} laser. This development will enable an advance to the laser-driven proton cancer therapy.

  6. Does laser-driven heat front propagation depend on material microstructure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, J. D.; Pérez, F.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Felter, T. E.; Bagge-Hansen, M.; Kucheyev, S.

    2014-10-01

    We showed earlier that the laser-driven heat front propagation velocity in low-density Ti-silica aerogel and TiO2 foam targets was slower than that simulated with a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code incorporating an atomic kinetics model in non-LTE and assuming initially homogeneous material (F. Pérez et al., Physics of Plasmas 21, 023102 (2014)). Some theoretical models suggest that the heat front is slowed over what it would be in a homogeneous medium by the microstructure of the foam. In more recent experiments with Cu-loaded carbon nanotube foam, however, we find the opposite behavior; that is, the simulations under-predict the measured heat-front velocity. We present details of the Cu foam experiments and comparisons with simulations, and then discuss implications for models of heat-front slowing in foams of a more-recent gas vs. foam comparison experiment. F. Pérez presents the design and results of this comparison experiment in a companion presentation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, with partial support from a DTRA Basic Research grant.

  7. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher P; Brenner, Ceri M; Stitt, Camilla A; Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R; Mirfayzi, Seyed R; Wilson, Lucy A; Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad; Allott, Ric; Butler, Nicholas M H; Clarke, Robert J; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Higginson, Adam; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos; Jowsey, John; McKenna, Paul; Neely, David; Kar, Satya; Scott, Thomas B

    2016-11-15

    A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500keV), with a source size of <0.5mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30cm(2) scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned.

  8. Dosimetric effects of energy spectrum uncertainties in radiation therapy with laser-driven particle beams.

    PubMed

    Schell, S; Wilkens, J J

    2012-03-07

    Laser-driven particle acceleration is a potentially cost-efficient and compact new technology that might replace synchrotrons or cyclotrons for future proton or heavy-ion radiation therapy. Since the energy spectrum of laser-accelerated particles is rather wide, compared to the monoenergetic beams of conventional machines, studies have proposed the usage of broader spectra for the treatment of at least certain parts of the target volume to make the process more efficient. The thereby introduced additional uncertainty in the applied energy spectrum is analysed in this note. It is shown that the uncertainty can be categorized into a change of the total number of particles, and a change in the energy distribution of the particles. The former one can be monitored by a simple fluence detector and cancels for a high number of statistically fluctuating shots. The latter one, the redistribution of a fixed number of particles to different energy bins in the window of transmitted energies of the energy selection system, only introduces smaller changes to the resulting depth dose curve. Therefore, it might not be necessary to monitor this uncertainty for all applied shots. These findings might enable an easier uncertainty management for particle therapy with broad energy spectra.

  9. Comparison study of in vivo dose response to laser-driven versus conventional electron beam.

    PubMed

    Oppelt, Melanie; Baumann, Michael; Bergmann, Ralf; Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Hartmann, Josefin; Karsch, Leonhard; Krause, Mechthild; Laschinsky, Lydia; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Nicolai, Maria; Reuter, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sävert, Alexander; Schnell, Michael; Schürer, Michael; Woithe, Julia; Kaluza, Malte; Pawelke, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The long-term goal to integrate laser-based particle accelerators into radiotherapy clinics not only requires technological development of high-intensity lasers and new techniques for beam detection and dose delivery, but also characterization of the biological consequences of this new particle beam quality, i.e. ultra-short, ultra-intense pulses. In the present work, we describe successful in vivo experiments with laser-driven electron pulses by utilization of a small tumour model on the mouse ear for the human squamous cell carcinoma model FaDu. The already established in vitro irradiation technology at the laser system JETI was further enhanced for 3D tumour irradiation in vivo in terms of beam transport, beam monitoring, dose delivery and dosimetry in order to precisely apply a prescribed dose to each tumour in full-scale radiobiological experiments. Tumour growth delay was determined after irradiation with doses of 3 and 6 Gy by laser-accelerated electrons. Reference irradiation was performed with continuous electron beams at a clinical linear accelerator in order to both validate the dedicated dosimetry employed for laser-accelerated JETI electrons and above all review the biological results. No significant difference in radiation-induced tumour growth delay was revealed for the two investigated electron beams. These data provide evidence that the ultra-high dose rate generated by laser acceleration does not impact the biological effectiveness of the particles.

  10. THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN THE CONTEXT OF NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICTY RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeslee, John P.; Cantiello, Michele; Peng, Eric W.

    2010-02-10

    Two recent empirical developments in the study of extragalactic globular cluster (GC) populations are the color-magnitude relation of the blue GCs (the 'blue tilt') and the nonlinearity of the dependence of optical GC colors on metallicity. The color-magnitude relation, interpreted as a mass-metallicity relation, is thought to be a consequence of self-enrichment. Nonlinear color-metallicity relations have been shown to produce bimodal color distributions from unimodal metallicity distributions. We simulate GC populations including both a mass-metallicity scaling relation and nonlinear color-metallicity relations motivated by theory and observations. Depending on the assumed range of metallicities and the width of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we find that the simulated populations can have bimodal color distributions with a 'blue tilt' similar to observations, even though the metallicity distribution appears unimodal. The models that produce these features have the relatively high mean GC metallicities and nearly equal blue and red peaks characteristic of giant elliptical galaxies. The blue tilt is less apparent in the models with metallicities typical of dwarf ellipticals; the narrower GCLF in these galaxies has an even bigger effect in reducing the significance of their color-magnitude slopes. We critically examine the evidence for nonlinearity versus bimodal metallicities as explanations for the characteristic double-peaked color histograms of giant ellipticals and conclude that the question remains open. We discuss the prospects for further theoretical and observational progress in constraining the models presented here and for uncovering the true metallicity distributions of extragalactic GC systems.

  11. Blast Wave Formation by Laser-Sustained Nonequilibrium Plasma in the Laser-Driven In-Tube Accelerator Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sawada, Keisuke; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2006-05-02

    Understanding the dynamics of laser-produced plasma is essentially important for increasing available thrust force in a gas-driven laser propulsion system such as laser-driven in-tube accelerator. A computer code is developed to explore the formation of expanding nonequilibrium plasma produced by laser irradiation. Various properties of the blast wave driven by the nonequilibrium plasma are examined. It is found that the blast wave propagation is substantially affected by radiative cooling effect for lower density case.

  12. Observation of 690 MV m-1 Electron Accelerating Gradient with a Laser-Driven Dielectric Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, K. P.; Wu, Z.; Cowan, B. M.; Hanuka, A.; Makasyuk, I. V.; Peralta, E. A.; Soong, K.; Byer, R. L.; England, R. J.

    2016-06-27

    Acceleration of electrons using laser-driven dielectric microstructures is a promising technology for the miniaturization of particle accelerators. In this work, experimental results are presented of relativistic electron acceleration with 690±100 MVm-1 gradient. This is a record-high accelerating gradient for a dielectric microstructure accelerator, nearly doubling the previous record gradient. To reach higher acceleration gradients the present experiment employs 90 fs duration laser pulses.

  13. A systematic investigation of cooperativity between two types of hydrogen bonding in the nonlinear clusters of an aromatic molecule: Pyrazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Saeed K.

    2014-06-01

    Crystalline pyrazole consists of nonlinear chains of an aromatic molecule. It includes two independent molecules which in turn causes two different types of hydrogen bonds (HBs). These two types of HBs with slight differences in their Nsbnd H⋯N geometries can be considered as interesting ones in the recent studies of cooperativity between different HBs. These HBs are investigated in several pyrazole clusters by electronic structure calculations. Parameters such as structure, binding energy, charge transfer, chemical shielding and electric field gradient (EFG) parameters calculated at the second order Moller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) and density functional (DF) levels of theory. Both the basis set superposition error (BSSE) and zero point vibrational energy (ZPVE) corrections on the cooperativity enhancement were considered. Changes of different properties of clusters against crystal size were investigated by proposed diagrams fitted to a logarithmic function which renders their extrema in the crystal limit. In each cluster, pyrazole molecules for which their parameters are more affected by cooperativity enhancement were explored employing these fitted diagrams. Most calculated energetic and spectroscopic parameters were in good linear correlations with both the structural parameters and charge transfer along HB (q). These correlations in the cases of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) parameters, were explained in the terms of natural charges of bonding (σ(N1sbnd H1)) and antibonding (σ*(N1sbnd H1)) orbitals. Organizing calculated data for mental clusters with similar molecules and HB types produced better regression values in all linear correlations. According to the experimental CQ of N(2) in solid state and zero charge transfer in the gas phase, the value of charge transfer in the crystalline pyrazole and gas phase value of CQ of N(2) were assessed, respectively. Diagrams of the structural parameters against either

  14. A Bayesian Hierarchical Non-Linear Regression Model in Receiver Operating Characteristic Analysis of Clustered Continuous Diagnostic Data

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Kelly H.; O’Malley, A. James

    2005-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis is a useful evaluative method of diagnostic accuracy. A Bayesian hierarchical nonlinear regression model for ROC analysis was developed. A validation analysis of diagnostic accuracy was conducted using prospective multi-center clinical trial prostate cancer biopsy data collected from three participating centers. The gold standard was based on radical prostatectomy to determine local and advanced disease. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of PSA level at fixed levels of Gleason score, a normality transformation was applied to the outcome data. A hierarchical regression analysis incorporating the effects of cluster (clinical center) and cancer risk (low, intermediate, and high) was performed, and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was estimated. PMID:16161801

  15. Long pulse laser driven shock wave loading for dynamic materials experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. N.; Greenfield, S. R.; Paisley, D. L.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Byler, D. D.; Loomis, E. N.; DiGiacomo, S. N.; Patterson, B. M.; McClellan, K. J.; Dickerson, R. M.; Peralta, P. D.; Koskelo, A. C.; Tonks, D. L.

    2008-05-01

    We present two laser driven shock wave loading techniques utilizing long pulse lasers, laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation, and their applications to shock physics. The full width at half maximum of the drive laser pulse ranges from 100 ns to 10 μs, and its energy, from 10 J to 1000 J. The drive pulse is smoothed with a holographic optical element to achieve spatial homogeneity in loading. We characterize the flyer plate during flight and dynamically loaded target with temporally and spatially resolved diagnostics. The long duration and high energy of the drive pulse allow for shockless acceleration of thick flyer plates with 8 mm diameter and 0.1-2 mm thickness. With transient imaging displacement interferometry and line-imaging velocimetry, we demonstrate that the planarity (bow and tilt) of the loading is within 2-7 mrad (with an average of 4+/-1 mrad), similar to that in conventional techniques including gas gun loading. Plasma heating of target is negligible in particular when a plasma shield is adopted. For flyer plate loading, supported shock waves can be achieved. Temporal shaping of the drive pulse in confined laser ablation enables flexible loading, e.g., quasi-isentropic, Taylor-wave, and off-Hugoniot loading. These dynamic loading techniques using long pulse lasers (0.1-10 μs) along with short pulse lasers (1-10 ns) can be an accurate, versatile and efficient complement to conventional shock wave loading for investigating such dynamic responses of materials as Hugoniot elastic limit, plasticity, spall, shock roughness, equation of state, phase transition, and metallurgical characteristics of shock-recovered samples, in a wide range of strain rates and pressures at meso- and macroscopic scales.

  16. Recreating planetary interiors in the laboratory by laser-driven ramp-compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppari, Federica

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in laser-driven compression now allow to reproduce conditions existing deep inside large planets in the laboratory. Ramp-compression allows to compress matter along a thermodynamic path not accessible through standard shock compression techniques, and opens the way to the exploration of new pressure, density and temperature conditions. By carefully tuning the laser pulse shape we can compress the material to extremely high pressure and keep the temperature relatively low (i.e. below the melting temperature). In this way, we can probe solid states of matter at unprecedented high pressures. This loading technique has been combined with diagnostics generally used in condensed matter physics, such as x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, in particular), to provide a complete picture of the behavior of matter in-situ during compression. X-ray diffraction provides a snapshot of the structure and density of the material, while EXAFS has been used to infer the temperature. Simultaneous optical velocimetry measurements using VISAR (Velocity Interferometer for Any Reflector) yield an accurate determination of the pressure history during compression. In this talk I will present some of the results obtained in ramp-compression experiments performed at the Omega Laser Facility (University of Rochester) where the phase maps of planetary relevant materials, such as Fe, FeO and MgO, have been studied to unprecedented high pressures. Our data provide experimental constraints on the equations of state, strength and structure of these materials expected to dominate the interiors of massive rocky extra-solar planets and a benchmark for theoretical simulations. Combination of these new experimental data with models for planetary formation and evolutions is expected to improve our understanding of complex dynamics occurring in the Universe. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of

  17. Recent developments in laser-driven and hollow-core fiber optic gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digonnet, M. J. F.; Chamoun, J. N.

    2016-05-01

    Although the fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) continues to be a commercial success, current research efforts are endeavoring to improve its precision and broaden its applicability to other markets, in particular the inertial navigation of aircraft. Significant steps in this direction are expected from the use of (1) laser light to interrogate the FOG instead of broadband light, and (2) a hollow-core fiber (HCF) in the sensing coil instead of a conventional solid-core fiber. The use of a laser greatly improves the FOG's scale-factor stability and eliminates the source excess noise, while an HCF virtually eliminates the Kerr-induced drift and significantly reduces the thermal and Faraday-induced drifts. In this paper we present theoretical evidence that in a FOG with a 1085-m coil interrogated with a laser, the two main sources of noise and drift resulting from the use of coherent light can be reduced below the aircraft-navigation requirement by using a laser with a very broad linewidth, in excess of 40 GHz. We validate this concept with a laser broadened with an external phase modulator driven with a pseudo-random bit sequence at 2.8 GHz. This FOG has a measured noise of 0.00073 deg/√h, which is 30% below the aircraft-navigation requirement. Its measured drift is 0.03 deg/h, the lowest reported for a laser-driven FOG and only a factor of 3 larger than the navigation-grade specification. To illustrate the potential benefits of a hollow-core fiber in the FOG, this review also summarizes the previously reported performance of an experimental FOG utilizing 235 m of HCF and interrogated with broadband light.

  18. The novel drug delivery to vascular wall using laser driven thermal balloon: basic study ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Kao; Homma, Rie; Shimazaki, Natsumi; Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2016-10-01

    To enhance drug delivery performance of popular drug eluting balloon against re-stenosis after angioplasty, we have an idea regarding to adjacent use of our unique laser driven thermal balloon of which characteristics could realize short term and uniform temperature elevation to modify drug delivery characteristics. We have already reported a delivery enhancement effect using this idea, however, detailed characteristics have not been studied yet. We studied balloon dilatation in terms of vascular circumferential tension on the heating drug delivery performance using porcine carotid artery wall ex vivo. The extracted carotid artery was used and circumferential tension of 0-30 mN/mm2 was added. Heating drug delivery was performed on this carotid artery with the heated solution of hydrophobic fluorescent Rhodamine B with 3 μg/ml in concentration at 37 and 70°C. We obtained a defined drug delivery quantity as well as delivery depth by a microscopic fluorescence measurement on a cross section of the drug delivered vessel wall. In the cases of 70°C, we found the drug penetration increase against 3°C case. We predict that the collagen thermal denaturation of the vessel wall may play important role to this penetration. In the case of 3°C, we found the drug concentration on the intimal surface with 7 mN/mm2 was increased as 10-30 times as other tension values. We found surface grooves in this case using an electron micrography. Therefore, we think that the drug delivery enhancement might be related to the groove formations of the vessel wall.

  19. Efficient algorithms for solving the non-linear vibrational coupled-cluster equations using full and decomposed tensors.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Niels K; Godtliebsen, Ian H; Christiansen, Ove

    2017-04-07

    Vibrational coupled-cluster (VCC) theory provides an accurate method for calculating vibrational spectra and properties of small to medium-sized molecules. Obtaining these properties requires the solution of the non-linear VCC equations which can in some cases be hard to converge depending on the molecule, the basis set, and the vibrational state in question. We present and compare a range of different algorithms for solving the VCC equations ranging from a full Newton-Raphson method to approximate quasi-Newton models using an array of different convergence-acceleration schemes. The convergence properties and computational cost of the algorithms are compared for the optimization of VCC states. This includes both simple ground-state problems and difficult excited states with strong non-linearities. Furthermore, the effects of using tensor-decomposed solution vectors and residuals are investigated and discussed. The results show that for standard ground-state calculations, the conjugate residual with optimal trial vectors algorithm has the shortest time-to-solution although the full Newton-Raphson method converges in fewer macro-iterations. Using decomposed tensors does not affect the observed convergence rates in our test calculations as long as the tensors are decomposed to sufficient accuracy.

  20. Nonlinear time series analysis and clustering for jet axis identification in vertical turbulent heated jets.

    PubMed

    Charakopoulos, A K; Karakasidis, T E; Papanicolaou, P N; Liakopoulos, A

    2014-03-01

    In the present work we approach the hydrodynamic problem of discriminating the state of the turbulent fluid region as a function of the distance from the axis of a turbulent jet axis. More specifically, we analyzed temperature fluctuations in vertical turbulent heated jets where temperature time series were recorded along a horizontal line through the jet axis. We employed data from different sets of experiments with various initial conditions out of circular and elliptical shaped nozzles in order to identify time series taken at the jet axis, and discriminate them from those taken near the boundary with ambient fluid using nonconventional hydrodynamics methods. For each temperature time series measured at a different distance from jet axis, we estimated mainly nonlinear measures such as mutual information combined with descriptive statistics measures, as well as some linear and nonlinear dynamic detectors such as Hurst exponent, detrended fluctuation analysis, and Hjorth parameters. The results obtained in all cases have shown that the proposed methodology allows us to distinguish the flow regime around the jet axis and identify the time series corresponding to the jet axis in agreement with the conventional statistical hydrodynamic method. Furthermore, in order to reject the null hypothesis that the time series originate from a stochastic process, we applied the surrogate data method.

  1. Multi-Fluid Interpenetration Mixing in X-ray and Directly Laser driven ICF Capsule Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Douglas

    2003-10-01

    Mix between a surrounding shell and the fuel leads to degradation in ICF capsule performance. Both indirectly (X-ray) and directly laser driven implosions provide a wealth of data to test mix models. One model, the multi-fluid interpenetration mix model of Scannapieco and Cheng (Phys. Lett. A., 299, 49, 2002), was implemented in an ICF code and applied to a wide variety of experiments (e.g. J. D. Kilkenny et al., Proc. Conf Plasm. Phys. Contr. Nuc. Fus. Res. 3, 29(1988), P. Amendt, R. E. Turner, O. L. Landen, Phy. Rev. Lett., 89, 165001 (2002), or Li et al., Phy. Rev. Lett, 89, 165002 (2002)). With its single adjustable parameter fixed, it replicates well the yield degradation with increasing convergence ratio for both directly and indirectly driven capsules. Often, but not always the ion temperatures with mixing are calculated to be higher than in an unmixed implosion, agreeing with observations. Comparison with measured directly driven implosion yield rates ( from the neutron temporal diagnostic or NTD) shows mixing increases rapidly during the burn. The model also reproduces the decrease of the fuel "rho-r" with fill gas pressure, measured by observing escaping deuterons or secondary neutrons. The mix model assumes fully atomically mixed constituents, but when experiments with deuterated plastic layers and 3He fuel are modeled, less that full atomic mix is appropriate. Applying the mix model to the ablator - solid DT interface in indirectly driven ignition capsules for the NIF or LMJ suggests that the capsules will ignite, but that burn after ignition may be somewhat degraded. Situations in which the Scannapieco and Cheng model fails to agree with experiments can guide us to improvements or the development of other models. Some directly driven symmetric implosions suggest that in highly mixed situations, a higher value of the mix parameter may needed. Others show the model underestimating the fuel burn temperature. This work was performed by the Los Alamos

  2. ELIMED: a new hadron therapy concept based on laser driven ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Margarone, Daniele; Maggiore, Mario; Anzalone, Antonello; Borghesi, Marco; Jia, S. Bijan; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Bulanov, Sergei; Carpinelli, Massimo; Cavallaro, Salvatore; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Cuttone, Giacomo; Favetta, Marco; Gammino, Santo; Klimo, Ondrej; Manti, Lorenzo; Korn, Georg; La Malfa, Giuseppe; Limpouch, Jiri; Musumarra, Agatino; Petrovic, Ivan; Prokupek, Jan; Psikal, Jan; Ristic-Fira, Aleksandra; Renis, Marcella; Romano, Francesco P.; Romano, Francesco; Schettino, Giuseppe; Schillaci, Francesco; Scuderi, Valentina; Stancampiano, Concetta; Tramontana, Antonella; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis; Tomasello, Barbara; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Tudisco, Salvo; Velyhan, Andriy

    2013-05-01

    Laser accelerated proton beams have been proposed to be used in different research fields. A great interest has risen for the potential replacement of conventional accelerating machines with laser-based accelerators, and in particular for the development of new concepts of more compact and cheaper hadrontherapy centers. In this context the ELIMED (ELI MEDical applications) research project has been launched by INFN-LNS and ASCR-FZU researchers within the pan-European ELI-Beamlines facility framework. The ELIMED project aims to demonstrate the potential clinical applicability of optically accelerated proton beams and to realize a laser-accelerated ion transport beamline for multi-disciplinary user applications. In this framework the eye melanoma, as for instance the uveal melanoma normally treated with 62 MeV proton beams produced by standard accelerators, will be considered as a model system to demonstrate the potential clinical use of laser-driven protons in hadrontherapy, especially because of the limited constraints in terms of proton energy and irradiation geometry for this particular tumour treatment. Several challenges, starting from laser-target interaction and beam transport development up to dosimetry and radiobiology, need to be overcome in order to reach the ELIMED final goals. A crucial role will be played by the final design and realization of a transport beamline capable to provide ion beams with proper characteristics in terms of energy spectrum and angular distribution which will allow performing dosimetric tests and biological cell irradiation. A first prototype of the transport beamline has been already designed and other transport elements are under construction in order to perform a first experimental test with the TARANIS laser system by the end of 2013. A wide international collaboration among specialists of different disciplines like Physics, Biology, Chemistry, Medicine and medical doctors coming from Europe, Japan, and the US is growing up

  3. Laser-IORT: a laser-driven source of relativistic electrons suitable for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy of tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gamucci, A.; Giulietti, A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Marques, J. R.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz, S.; D'Oliveira, P.; Monot, P.; Popescu, H.; Reau, F.; Martin, Ph.; Galy, J.; Giulietti, D.; Hamilton, D. J.; Sarri, G.

    2010-02-02

    In a recent experiment [1] a high efficiency regime of stable electron acceleration to kinetic energies ranging from 10 to 40 MeV has been achieved. The main parameters of the electron bunches are comparable with those of bunches provided by commercial Radio-Frequency based Linacs currently used in Hospitals for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). IORT is an emerging technique applied in operating theaters during the surgical treatment of tumors. Performances and structure of a potential laser-driven Hospital accelerator are compared in detail with the ones of several commercial devices. A number of possible advantages of the laser based technique are also discussed.

  4. Generation and diagnostics of atmospheric pressure CO{sub 2} plasma by laser driven plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Tanaka, Kensaku; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Satoshi; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure CO{sub 2} plasma was generated by a laser driven plasma wind tunnel. At an ambient pressure of 0.38 MPa, a stable plasma was maintained by a laser power of 1000 W for more than 20 min. The translational temperature was measured using laser absorption spectroscopy with the atomic oxygen line at 777.19 nm. The measured absorption profiles were analyzed by a Voigt function considering Doppler, Stark, and pressure-broadening effects. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, all broadening effects were consistent with each other. The measured temperature ranged from 8500 K to 8900 K.

  5. Laser-driven shock experiments in pre-compressed water: Implications for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K; Benedetti, L R; Jeanloz, R; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Moon, S J; Mackinnon, A; Henry, E; Koenig, M; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Collins, G W

    2005-11-10

    Laser-driven shock compression of pre-compressed water (up to 1 GPa precompression) produces high-pressure, -temperature conditions in the water inducing two optical phenomena: opacity and reflectivity in the initially transparent water. The onset of reflectivity at infrared wavelengths can be interpreted as a semi-conductor to electronic conductor transition in water and is found at pressures above {approx}130 GPa for single-shocked samples pre-compressed to 1 GPa. This electronic conduction provides an additional contribution to the conductivity required for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets like Uranus and Neptune.

  6. Laser-Driven Coherent Betatron Oscillation in a Laser-Wakefield Cavity: Formation of Sinusoid Beam Shapes and Coherent Trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Li Yuelin; Shang Hairong; Harkay, Katherine C.; Shen Baifei; Crowell, Robert; Cary, John R.

    2009-01-22

    High amplitude coherent electron-trajectories have been seen in 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the colliding pulse injection scheme of laser-wakefield accelerators in the bubble regime, and explained as a consequence of laser-driven coherent betatron oscillation in our recent paper [K. Nemeth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 095002 (2008)]. In the present paper we provide more details on the shape of the trajectories, their relationship to the phase velocity of the laser and indicate the dependence of the phenomenon on the accuracy of the numerical representation and choice of laser/plasma parameters.

  7. Proof-Of-Principle Experiment for Laser-Driven Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in a Semi-Infinite Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.; Cowan, B.; Sears, C.M.S.; Spencer, J.E.; Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2006-03-01

    We recently achieved the first experimental observation of laser-driven particle acceleration of relativistic electrons from a single Gaussian near-infrared laser beam in a semi-infinite vacuum. This article presents an in-depth account of key aspects of the experiment. An analysis of the transverse and longitudinal forces acting on the electron beam is included. A comparison of the observed data to the acceleration viewed as an inverse transition radiation process is presented. This is followed by a detailed description of the components of the experiment and a discussion of future measurements.

  8. Cold gas in cluster cores: global stability analysis and non-linear simulations of thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Prakriti Pal; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-04-01

    We perform global linear stability analysis and idealized numerical simulations in global thermal balance to understand the condensation of cold gas from hot/virial atmospheres (coronae), in particular the intracluster medium (ICM). We pay particular attention to geometry (e.g. spherical versus plane-parallel) and the nature of the gravitational potential. Global linear analysis gives a similar value for the fastest growing thermal instability modes in spherical and Cartesian geometries. Simulations and observations suggest that cooling in haloes critically depends on the ratio of the cooling time to the free-fall time (tcool/tff). Extended cold gas condenses out of the ICM only if this ratio is smaller than a threshold value close to 10. Previous works highlighted the difference between the nature of cold gas condensation in spherical and plane-parallel atmospheres; namely, cold gas condensation appeared easier in spherical atmospheres. This apparent difference due to geometry arises because the previous plane-parallel simulations focused on in situ condensation of multiphase gas but spherical simulations studied condensation anywhere in the box. Unlike previous claims, our non-linear simulations show that there are only minor differences in cold gas condensation, either in situ or anywhere, for different geometries. The amount of cold gas depends on the shape of tcool/tff; gas has more time to condense if gravitational acceleration decreases towards the centre. In our idealized plane-parallel simulations with heating balancing cooling in each layer, there can be significant mass/energy/momentum transfer across layers that can trigger condensation and drive tcool/tff far beyond the critical value close to 10.

  9. Design of the prototype of a beam transport line for handling and selection of low energy laser-driven beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, F.; Maggiore, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Costa, M.; Rifuggiato, D.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.

    2016-11-01

    A first prototype of transport beam-line for laser-driven ion beams to be used for the handling of particles accelerated by high-power laser interacting with solid targets has been realized at INFN. The goal is the production of a controlled and stable beam in terms of energy and angular spread. The beam-line consists of two elements: an Energy Selection System (ESS), already realized and characterized with both conventional and laser-accelerated beams, and a Permanent Magnet Quadrupole system (PMQ) designed, in collaboration with SIGMAPHI (Fr), to improve the ESS performances. In this work a description of the ESS system and some results of its characterization with conventional beams are reported, in order to provide a complete explanation of the acceptance calculation. Then, the matching with the PMQ system is presented and, finally, the results of preliminary simulations with a realistic laser-driven energy spectrum are discussed demonstrating the possibility to provide a good quality beam downstream the systems.

  10. A hierarchical spectral clustering and nonlinear dimensionality reduction scheme for detection of prostate cancer from magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Rosen, Mark; Madabhushi, Anant

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been shown to have great clinical potential as a supplement to magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of prostate cancer (CaP). MRS provides functional information in the form of changes in the relative concentration of specific metabolites including choline, creatine, and citrate which can be used to identify potential areas of CaP. With a view to assisting radiologists in interpretation and analysis of MRS data, some researchers have begun to develop computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes for CaP identification from spectroscopy. Most of these schemes have been centered on identifying and integrating the area under metabolite peaks which is then used to compute relative metabolite ratios. However, manual identification of metabolite peaks on the MR spectra, and especially via CAD, is a challenging problem due to low signal-to-noise ratio, baseline irregularity, peak overlap, and peak distortion. In this article the authors present a novel CAD scheme that integrates nonlinear dimensionality reduction (NLDR) with an unsupervised hierarchical clustering algorithm to automatically identify suspicious regions on the prostate using MRS and hence avoids the need to explicitly identify metabolite peaks. The methodology comprises two stages. In stage 1, a hierarchical spectral clustering algorithm is used to distinguish between extracapsular and prostatic spectra in order to localize the region of interest (ROI) corresponding to the prostate. Once the prostate ROI is localized, in stage 2, a NLDR scheme, in conjunction with a replicated clustering algorithm, is used to automatically discriminate between three classes of spectra (normal appearing, suspicious appearing, and indeterminate). The methodology was quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated on a total of 18 1.5 T in vivo prostate T2-weighted (w) and MRS studies obtained from the multisite, multi-institutional American College of Radiology (ACRIN) trial. In the

  11. Laser driven terahertz generation in hot plasma with step density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manoj Jeong, Young Uk; Tripathi, Vipin Kumar

    2015-06-15

    An analytical formalism of terahertz (THz) radiation generation by beating of two lasers in a hot plasma with step density profile is developed. The lasers propagate obliquely to plasma surface normal, and the nonlinearity arises through the ponderomotive force. The THz is emitted in the specular reflection direction, and the yield is enhanced due to coupling with the Langmuir wave when the plasma frequency is close to THz frequency. The power conversion efficiency maximizes at an optimum angle of incidence.

  12. P-ρ-T measurements of H2O up to 260 GPa under laser-driven shock loading.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Ozaki, N; Sano, T; Okuchi, T; Sano, T; Shimizu, K; Miyanishi, K; Terai, T; Kakeshita, T; Sakawa, Y; Kodama, R

    2015-04-28

    Pressure, density, and temperature data for H2O were obtained up to 260 GPa by using laser-driven shock compression technique. The shock compression technique combined with the diamond anvil cell was used to assess the equation of state models for the P-ρ-T conditions for both the principal Hugoniot and the off-Hugoniot states. The contrast between the models allowed for a clear assessment of the equation of state models. Our P-ρ-T data totally agree with those of the model based on quantum molecular dynamics calculations. These facts indicate that this model is adopted as the standard for modeling interior structures of Neptune, Uranus, and exoplanets in the liquid phase in the multi-Mbar range.

  13. Laser-driven γ-ray, positron, and neutron source from ultra-intense laser-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Hayakawa, Takehito

    2015-08-15

    In ultra-intense laser-matter interactions, γ-rays are effectively generated via the radiation reaction effect. Since a significant fraction of the laser energy is converted into γ-rays, understanding of the energy transport inside of the target is important. We have developed a Particle-in-Cell code which includes generation of the γ-rays, their energy transport, and photo-nuclear reactions. Using the code, we have investigated the characteristics of the quantum beams generated by the transport of the laser-driven γ-rays. It is shown that collimated, mono-energetic positron beams with hundreds of MeV are generated by using thick targets. Neutron beams are also effectively generated by using beryllium targets via photo-nuclear reactions. These lead to the proposal of quantum beam sources of γ-rays, positrons, and neutrons with distinctive characters, which are selectively generated by choosing target conditions.

  14. Improved performances of CIBER-X: a new tabletop laser-driven electron and x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardeau-Montaut, Jean-Pierre; Kiraly, Bela; Girardeau-Montaut, Claire

    2000-11-01

    We present the most recent data concerning the performances of the table-top laser driven electron and x-ray source developed in our laboratory. X-ray pulses are produced by a three-step process which consists of the photoelectron emission from a thin metallic photocathode illuminated by 16 ps duration laser pulse at 213 nm. The e-gun is a standard pierce diode electrode type, in which electrons are accelerated by a cw electric fields of 12 MV/m. The photoinjector produced a train of 90 - 100 keV electron pulses of approximately 1 nC and 40 A peak current at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The electrons, transported outside the diode, are focused onto a target of thulium by magnetic fields produced by two electromagnetic coils to produce x-rays. Applications to low dose imagery of inert and living materials are also presented.

  15. A treatment planning study to assess the feasibility of laser-driven proton therapy using a compact gantry design

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Kerstin M. Wilkens, Jan J.; Masood, Umar; Pawelke, Joerg

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Laser-driven proton acceleration is suggested as a cost- and space-efficient alternative for future radiation therapy centers, although the properties of these beams are fairly different compared to conventionally accelerated proton beams. The laser-driven proton beam is extremely pulsed containing a very high proton number within ultrashort bunches at low bunch repetition rates of few Hz and the energy spectrum of the protons per bunch is very broad. Moreover, these laser accelerated bunches are subject to shot-to-shot fluctuations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a compact gantry design for laser-driven proton therapy and to determine limitations to comply with. Methods: Based on a published gantry beam line design which can filter parabolic spectra from an exponentially decaying broad initial spectrum, a treatment planning study was performed on real patient data sets. All potential parabolic spectra were fed into a treatment planning system and numerous spot scanning proton plans were calculated. To investigate limitations in the fluence per bunch, the proton number of the initial spectrum and the beam width at patient entrance were varied. A scenario where only integer shots are delivered as well as an intensity modulation from shot to shot was studied. The resulting plans were evaluated depending on their dosimetric quality and in terms of required treatment time. In addition, the influence of random shot-to-shot fluctuations on the plan quality was analyzed. Results: The study showed that clinically relevant dose distributions can be produced with the system under investigation even with integer shots. For small target volumes receiving high doses per fraction, the initial proton number per bunch must remain between 1.4 × 10{sup 8} and 8.3 × 10{sup 9} to achieve acceptable delivery times as well as plan qualities. For larger target volumes and standard doses per fraction, the initial proton number is even

  16. Biological effectiveness on live cells of laser driven protons at dose rates exceeding 10{sup 9} Gy/s

    SciTech Connect

    Doria, D.; Kakolee, K. F.; Kar, S.; Litt, S. K.; Ahmed, H.; Lewis, C. L.; Nersisyan, G.; Prasad, R.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Fiorini, F.; Kirby, D.; Green, S.; Jeynes, J. C. G.; Kirkby, K. J.; Merchant, M. J.; Kavanagh, J.; Prise, K. M.; Schettino, G.

    2012-03-15

    The ultrashort duration of laser-driven multi-MeV ion bursts offers the possibility of radiobiological studies at extremely high dose rates. Employing the TARANIS Terawatt laser at Queen's University, the effect of proton irradiation at MeV-range energies on live cells has been investigated at dose rates exceeding 10{sup 9} Gy/s as a single exposure. A clonogenic assay showed consistent lethal effects on V-79 live cells, which, even at these dose rates, appear to be in line with previously published results employing conventional sources. A Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of 1.4{+-}0.2 at 10% survival is estimated from a comparison with a 225 kVp X-ray source.

  17. Study on the dynamic behavior of matters using laser-driven shock waves in the water confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Yoh, Jack J.

    2015-06-01

    The strain rates achievable in laser-driven shock experiments overlap with gas gun and can reach much higher values. The laser-based method also has advantages in terms of system size, cost, repeatability, and controllability. In this research, we aim to measure equation of state, Hugoniot elastic limit, strain rate, and compressive yield strength of target samples by making use of the velocity interferometer or the VISAR. High pressure shock wave is generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm wavelength with pulse energy up to 3 joules and 9 ns pulse duration. All the experiments are conducted in the water confinement to increase the peak stresses to an order of GPa. Furthermore, quantitative comparisons are made to the existing shock data in order to emphasize the novelty of the proposed setup which is relatively simple and reliable. Corresponding author.

  18. Precision Mapping of Laser-Driven Magnetic Fields and Their Evolution in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lan; Nilson, P.; Igumenshchev, I.; Haines, M. G.; Froula, D. H.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic fields generated at the surface of a laser-irradiated planar solid target are mapped using ultrafast proton radiography. Thick (50 μm) plastic foils are irradiated with 4-kJ, 2.5-ns laser pulses focused to an intensity of 4 x 1014 W/cm2. The data show magnetic fields concentrated at the edge of the laser-focal region, well within the expanding coronal plasma. The magnetic-field spatial distribution is tracked and shows good agreement with 2D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations using the code DRACO when the Biermann battery source, fluid and Nernst advection, resistive magnetic diffusion, and Righi-Leduc heat flow are included. The work provides significant insight into the generation and transport of Biermann fields in laser-produced plasmas, particularly those used in laser-driven magnetic reconnection and laboratory astrophysics experiments. deceased.

  19. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. II. A TEST ON THE NONLINEARITY SCENARIO FOR COLOR BIMODALITY USING THE u-BAND COLORS: THE CASE OF M87 (NGC 4486)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Hak-Sub; Cho, Jaeil; Chung, Chul; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Blakeslee, John P.

    2011-12-20

    The optical color distributions of globular clusters (GCs) in most large elliptical galaxies are bimodal. Based on the assumed linear relationship between GC colors and their metallicities, the bimodality has been taken as evidence of two GC subsystems with different metallicities in each galaxy and has led to a number of theories in the context of galaxy formation. More recent observations and modeling of GCs, however, suggests that the color-metallicity relations (CMRs) are inflected, and thus colors likely trace metallicities in a nonlinear manner. The nonlinearity could produce bimodal color distributions from a broad underlying metallicity spread, even if it is unimodal. Despite the far-reaching implications, whether CMRs are nonlinear and whether the nonlinearity indeed causes the color bimodality are still open questions. Given that the spectroscopic refinement of CMRs is still very challenging, we here propose a new photometric technique to probe the possible nonlinear nature of CMRs. In essence, a color distribution of GCs is a 'projected' distribution of their metallicities. Since the form of CMRs hinges on which color is used, the shape of color distributions varies depending significantly on the colors. Among other optical colors, the u-band related colors (e.g., u - g and u - z) are theoretically predicted to exhibit significantly less inflected CMRs than other preferred CMRs (e.g., for g - z). As a case study, we performed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFPC2 archival u-band photometry for the M87 (NGC 4486) GC system with confirmed color bimodality. We show that the u-band color distributions are significantly different from that of g - z and consistent with our model predictions. With more u-band measurements, this method will support or rule out the nonlinear CMR scenario for the origin of GC color bimodality with high confidence. The HST/WFC3 observations in F336W for nearby large elliptical galaxies are highly anticipated in this regard.

  20. Self-accommodation of B19' martensite in Ti-Ni shape memory alloys. Part III. Analysis of habit plane variant clusters by the geometrically nonlinear theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, T.; Nishiura, T.; Kawano, H.; Hosoda, H.; Nishida, M.

    2012-06-01

    Competition between the invariant plane (IP) condition at the habit plane, the twin orientation relation (OR) and the kinematic compatibility (KC) at the junction plane (JP) of self-accommodated B19‧ martensite in Ti-Ni was investigated via the geometrically nonlinear theory to understand the habit plane variant (HPV) clusters presented in Parts I and II of this work. As the IP condition cannot be satisfied simultaneously with KC, an additional rotation Q is necessary to form compatible JPs for all HPV pairs. The rotation J necessary to form the exact twin OR between the major correspondence variants (CVs) in each HPV was also examined. The observed HPV cluster was not the cluster with the smallest Q but the one satisfying Q = J with a { ? 1}B19‧ type I twin at JP. Both Q and J are crucial to understanding the various HPV clusters in realistic transformations. Finally, a scheme for the ideal HPV cluster composed of six HPVs is also proposed.

  1. Propulsion Utilizing Laser-Driven Ponderomotive Fields for Deep-Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, George J.; Gilland, James H.

    2009-03-01

    The generation of large amplitude electric fields in plasmas by high-power lasers has been studied for several years in the context of high-energy particle acceleration. Fields on the order of GeV/m are generated in the plasma wake of the laser by non-linear ponderomotive forces. The laser fields generate longitudinal and translational electron plasma waves with phase velocities close to the speed of light. These fields and velocities offer the potential to revolutionize spacecraft propulsion, leading to extended deep space robotic probes. Based on these initial calculations, plasma acceleration by means of laser-induced ponderomotive forces appears to offer significant potential for spacecraft propulsion. Relatively high-efficiencies appear possible with proper beam conditioning, resulting in an order of magnitude more thrust than alternative concepts for high ISP (>105 s) and elimination of the primary life-limiting erosion phenomena associated with conventional electric propulsion systems. Ponderomotive propulsion readily lends itself to beamed power which might overcome some of the constraints of power-limited propulsion concepts. A preliminary assessment of the impact of these propulsion systems for several promising configurations on mission architectures has been conducted. Emphasizing interstellar and interstellar-precursor applications, performance and technical requirements are identified for a number of missions. The use of in-situ plasma and gas for propellant is evaluated as well.

  2. Propulsion Utilizing Laser-Driven Ponderomotive Fields for Deep-Space Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, George J.; Gilland, James H.

    2009-03-16

    The generation of large amplitude electric fields in plasmas by high-power lasers has been studied for several years in the context of high-energy particle acceleration. Fields on the order of GeV/m are generated in the plasma wake of the laser by non-linear ponderomotive forces. The laser fields generate longitudinal and translational electron plasma waves with phase velocities close to the speed of light. These fields and velocities offer the potential to revolutionize spacecraft propulsion, leading to extended deep space robotic probes. Based on these initial calculations, plasma acceleration by means of laser-induced ponderomotive forces appears to offer significant potential for spacecraft propulsion. Relatively high-efficiencies appear possible with proper beam conditioning, resulting in an order of magnitude more thrust than alternative concepts for high I{sub SP} (>10{sup 5} s) and elimination of the primary life-limiting erosion phenomena associated with conventional electric propulsion systems. Ponderomotive propulsion readily lends itself to beamed power which might overcome some of the constraints of power-limited propulsion concepts. A preliminary assessment of the impact of these propulsion systems for several promising configurations on mission architectures has been conducted. Emphasizing interstellar and interstellar-precursor applications, performance and technical requirements are identified for a number of missions. The use of in-situ plasma and gas for propellant is evaluated as well.

  3. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. IV. TESTING THE NONLINEARITY SCENARIO FOR COLOR BIMODALITY VIA HST/WFC3 u-BAND PHOTOMETRY OF M84 (NGC 4374)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Kim, Hak-Sub; Chung, Chul; Cho, Jaeil; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Blakeslee, John P.

    2013-05-10

    Color distributions of globular clusters (GCs) in most massive galaxies are bimodal. Assuming linear color-to-metallicity conversions, bimodality is viewed as the presence of merely two GC subsystems with distinct metallicities, which serves as a critical backbone of various galaxy formation theories. Recent studies, however, revealed that the color-metallicity relations (CMRs) often used to derive GC metallicities (e.g., CMRs of g - z, V - I, and C - T{sub 1}) are in fact inflected. Such inflection can create bimodal color distributions if the underlying GC metallicity spread is simply broad as expected from the hierarchical merging paradigm of galaxy formation. In order to test the nonlinear-CMR scenario for GC color bimodality, the u-band photometry is proposed because the u-related CMRs (e.g., CMRs of u - g and u - z) are theoretically predicted to be least inflected and most distinctive among commonly used optical CMRs. Here, we present Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFC3 F336W (u-band) photometry of the GC system in M84, a giant elliptical in the Virgo galaxy cluster. Combining the u data with the existing HST ACS/WFC g and z data, we find that the u - z and u - g color distributions are different from the g - z distribution in a very systematic manner and remarkably consistent with our model predictions based on the nonlinear-CMR hypothesis. The results lend further confidence to the validity of the nonlinear-CMR scenario as an explanation for GC color bimodality. There are some GC systems showing bimodal spectroscopic metallicity, and in such systems the inflected CMRs often create stronger bimodality in the color domain.

  4. Laser-driven gel microtool for single-cell manipulation based on temperature control with a photothermal conversion material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, T.; Kikukawa, M.; Maruyama, H.; Arai, F.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a laser-driven hybrid gel microtool for stable single-cell manipulation. The microtool is made of a microbead dyed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and thermosensitive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) gel coating. The gel adheres to cells at high temperatures but not at low temperatures. We can manipulate single cells without direct laser irradiation by adhering the cells to the gel on the microtool using the cell-adhesion property of the gel. The microtool is heated by trapping it with optical tweezers to make its surface cell-adhesive during the manipulation. Furthermore, we can control the optical heating property of the microtool by dyeing the microbeads with MWNT ink. The laser-heating-induced temperature increase of the microtool can be controlled from 4.2 °C to 23.5 °C by varying the concentration of MWNT ink. We succeeded in fabricating the proposed microtool and demonstrated single-cell transportation using the microtool without direct laser irradiation of the cell.

  5. Theory of Strength and High-Rate Plasticity in BCC Metals Laser-Driven to High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, Robert E.; Barton, N. R.; Cavallo, R. M.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Comley, A. J.; Ross, P. W.; Brickner, N.

    2012-10-01

    High-rate plastic deformation is the subject of increasing experimental activity. High energy laser platforms such as those at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics offer the possibility to study plasticity at extremely high rates in shock waves and, importantly, in non-shock ramp-compression waves. Here we describe the theory of high-rate deformation of metals and how high energy lasers can be, and are, used to study the mechanical strength of materials under extreme conditions. Specifically, we describe how LLNL's multiscale strength model has been used to interpret the microscopic plastic flow in laser-driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength experiments, and how molecular dynamics (MD) and plasticity theory have been used to help understand in-situ diffraction based strength experiments for tantalum. The multiscale model provides information about the dislocation flow associated with plasticity and makes predictions that are compared with the experimental in-situ radiography of the Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate. We also use multi-million atom MD simulations inform the analytic theory of 1D to 3D plastic relaxation and compare to diffraction.

  6. Laser-driven short-duration heating angioplasty: chronic artery lumen patency and histology in porcine iliac artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Natsumi; Kunio, Mie; Naruse, Sho; Arai, Tsunenori; Sakurada, Masami

    2012-02-01

    We proposed a short-duration heating balloon angioplasty. We designed a prototype short-duration heating balloon catheter that can heat artery media to 60-70°C within 15-25 s with a combination of laser-driven heat generation and continuous fluid irrigation in the balloon. The purpose of this study was to investigate chronic artery lumen patency as well as histological alteration of artery wall after the short-duration heating balloon dilatation with porcine healthy iliac artery. The short-term heating balloon dilated sites were angiographically patent in acute (1 hour) and in chronic phases (1 and 4 weeks). One week after the dilatation, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) density in the artery media measured from H&E-stained specimens was approx. 20% lower than that in the reference artery. One and four weeks after the dilatations, normal structure of artery adventitia was maintained without any incidence of thermal injury. Normal lamellar structure of the artery media was also maintained. We found that the localized heating restricted to artery media by the short-duration heating could maintain adventitial function and artery normal structure in chronic phase.

  7. Laser-driven high-energy-density deuterium and tritium ions for neutron production in a double-cone configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu Shao, Fu-Qiu; Yin, Yan; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhu, Qing-Jun

    2015-12-15

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate laser-driven ion acceleration and compression from a thin DT foil in a double-cone configuration. By using two counterpropagating laser pulses, it is shown that a double-cone structure can effectively guide, focus, and strengthen the incident laser pulses, resulting in the enhanced acceleration and compression of D{sup +} and T{sup +}. Due to the ion Coulomb repulsion and the effective screening from the external laser electric fields, the transverse diffusion of ions is significantly suppressed. Finally, the peak energy density of the compressed ions exceeds 2.73 × 10{sup 16 }J/m{sup 3}, which is about five orders of magnitude higher than the threshold for high energy density physics, 10{sup 11 }J/m{sup 3}. Under this condition, DT fusion reactions are initiated and the neutron production rate per volume is estimated to be as high as 7.473 × 10{sup 35}/m{sup 3} s according to Monte Carlo simulations. It is much higher than that of the traditional large neutron sources, which may facilitate many potential applications.

  8. Laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science: Launch and target impact probed by photon Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Alexander D.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Shaw, William L.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the launch and target impact of laser-driven Al flyer plates using photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). We studied different flyer designs launched by laser pulses of different energies, pulse durations and beam diameters, that produced km s-1 impacts with transparent target materials. Laser-launching Al flyers 25-100 μm thick cemented to glass substrates is usually thought to involve laser vaporization of a portion of the flyer, which creates many difficulties associated with loss of integrity and heating of the flyer material. However, in the system used here, the launch mechanism was surprising and unexpected: it involved optical damage at the glass/cement/flyer interface, with very little laser light reaching the flyer itself. In fact the flyers launched in this manner behaved almost identically to multilayer flyers that were optically shielded from the laser pulses and insulated from heat generated by the pulses. Launching flyers with nanosecond laser pulses creates undesirable reverberating shocks in the flyer. In some cases, with 10 ns launch pulses, the thickest flyers were observed to lose integrity. But with stretched 20 ns pulses, we showed that the reverberations damped out prior to impact with targets, and that the flyers maintained their integrity during flight. Flyer impacts with salt, glass, fused silica, and acrylic polymer were studied by PDV, and the durations of fully supported shocks in those media were determined, and could be varied from 5 to 23 ns.

  9. Laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science: launch and target impact probed by photon Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Alexander D; Banishev, Alexandr A; Shaw, William L; Dlott, Dana D

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the launch and target impact of laser-driven Al flyer plates using photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). We studied different flyer designs launched by laser pulses of different energies, pulse durations and beam diameters, that produced km s(-1) impacts with transparent target materials. Laser-launching Al flyers 25-100 μm thick cemented to glass substrates is usually thought to involve laser vaporization of a portion of the flyer, which creates many difficulties associated with loss of integrity and heating of the flyer material. However, in the system used here, the launch mechanism was surprising and unexpected: it involved optical damage at the glass/cement/flyer interface, with very little laser light reaching the flyer itself. In fact the flyers launched in this manner behaved almost identically to multilayer flyers that were optically shielded from the laser pulses and insulated from heat generated by the pulses. Launching flyers with nanosecond laser pulses creates undesirable reverberating shocks in the flyer. In some cases, with 10 ns launch pulses, the thickest flyers were observed to lose integrity. But with stretched 20 ns pulses, we showed that the reverberations damped out prior to impact with targets, and that the flyers maintained their integrity during flight. Flyer impacts with salt, glass, fused silica, and acrylic polymer were studied by PDV, and the durations of fully supported shocks in those media were determined, and could be varied from 5 to 23 ns.

  10. Laser driven nuclear science and applications: The need of high efficiency, high power and high repetition rate Laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.

    2015-10-01

    Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is a pan European research initiative selected on the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures Roadmap that aims to close the gap between the existing laboratory-based laser driven research and international facility-grade research centre. The ELI-NP facility, one of the three ELI pillars under construction, placed in Romania and to be operational in 2018, has as core elements a couple of new generation 10 PW laser systems and a narrow bandwidth Compton backscattering gamma source with photon energies up to 19 MeV. ELI-NP will address nuclear photonics, nuclear astrophysics and quantum electrodynamics involving extreme photon fields. Prospective applications of high power laser in nuclear astrophysics, accelerator physics, in particular towards future Accelerator Driven System, as well as in nuclear photonics, for detection and characterization of nuclear material, and for nuclear medicine, will be discussed. Key issues in these research areas will be at reach with significant increase of the repetition rates and of the efficiency at the plug of the high power laser systems as proposed by the ICAN collaboration.

  11. Recent developments in the Thomson Parabola Spectrometer diagnostic for laser-driven multi-species ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Gwynne, D.; Doria, D.; Ahmed, H.; Carroll, D. C.; Clarke, R. J.; Neely, D.; Scott, G. G.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-10-01

    Ongoing developments in laser-driven ion acceleration warrant appropriate modifications to the standard Thomson Parabola Spectrometer (TPS) arrangement in order to match the diagnostic requirements associated to the particular and distinctive properties of laser-accelerated beams. Here we present an overview of recent developments by our group of the TPS diagnostic aimed to enhance the capability of diagnosing multi-species high-energy ion beams. In order to facilitate discrimination between ions with same Z/A, a recursive differential filtering technique was implemented at the TPS detector in order to allow only one of the overlapping ion species to reach the detector, across the entire energy range detectable by the TPS. In order to mitigate the issue of overlapping ion traces towards the higher energy part of the spectrum, an extended, trapezoidal electric plates design was envisaged, followed by its experimental demonstration. The design allows achieving high energy-resolution at high energies without sacrificing the lower energy part of the spectrum. Finally, a novel multi-pinhole TPS design is discussed, that would allow angularly resolved, complete spectral characterization of the high-energy, multi-species ion beams.

  12. Development of long-duration, laser driven, cold x-ray sources on the National Ignition Facility laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. Elijah; May, M. J.; Blue, B. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Thorn, D. B.; Brown, C. G.; Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D.; Davis, J. F.; Seiler, S. W.

    2016-10-01

    We present experimental and simulation results from an x-ray source development campaign on the National Ignition Facility laser that focused on temporally and spectrally tailoring the non-equilibrium x-ray emission from laser driven Xe gas-pipe targets. The goal of this work was to create a long-duration (> 10ns) x-ray environment that emulates 1keV blackbody emission. In one experiment, we investigated the use of sequentially driven 6ns trapezoidal pulses - which deliver more optimized laser performance than equivalent single pulse configurations - to create a 13ns total emission duration. While a successful demonstration of x-ray pulse shaping control, these sources resulted in too much low-photon-energy emission along the desired line-of-sight. Several filtering schemes were explored in subsequent experiments to remove the sub- 1.5keV emission, where we commissioned a new DIM-based, 16 channel, filtered x-ray diode array, SENTINEL, to assess line-of-sight filtering effectiveness. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Table-top laser-driven ultrashort electron and X-ray source: the CIBER-X source project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardeau-Montaut, Jean-Pierre; Kiraly, Bélà; Girardeau-Montaut, Claire; Leboutet, Hubert

    2000-09-01

    We report on the development of a new laser-driven table-top ultrashort electron and X-ray source, also called the CIBER-X source . X-ray pulses are produced by a three-step process which consists of the photoelectron emission from a thin metallic photocathode illuminated by 16 ps duration laser pulses at 213 nm. The e-gun is a standard Pierce diode electrode type, in which electrons are accelerated by a cw electric field of ˜11 MV/m up to a hole made in the anode. The photoinjector produces a train of 70-80 keV electron pulses of ˜0.5 nC and 20 A peak current at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The electrons are then transported outside the diode along a path of 20 cm length, and are focused onto a target of thullium by magnetic fields produced by two electromagnetic coils. X-rays are then produced by the impact of electrons on the target. Simulations of geometrical, electromagnetic fields and energetic characteristics of the complete source were performed previously with the assistance of the code PIXEL1 also developed at the laboratory. Finally, experimental electron and X-ray performances of the CIBER-X source as well as its application to very low dose imagery are presented and discussed. source Compacte d' Impulsions Brèves d' Electrons et de Rayons X

  14. Laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science: Launch and target impact probed by photon Doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Alexander D.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Shaw, William L.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-04-15

    We investigated the launch and target impact of laser-driven Al flyer plates using photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). We studied different flyer designs launched by laser pulses of different energies, pulse durations and beam diameters, that produced km s{sup −1} impacts with transparent target materials. Laser-launching Al flyers 25–100 μm thick cemented to glass substrates is usually thought to involve laser vaporization of a portion of the flyer, which creates many difficulties associated with loss of integrity and heating of the flyer material. However, in the system used here, the launch mechanism was surprising and unexpected: it involved optical damage at the glass/cement/flyer interface, with very little laser light reaching the flyer itself. In fact the flyers launched in this manner behaved almost identically to multilayer flyers that were optically shielded from the laser pulses and insulated from heat generated by the pulses. Launching flyers with nanosecond laser pulses creates undesirable reverberating shocks in the flyer. In some cases, with 10 ns launch pulses, the thickest flyers were observed to lose integrity. But with stretched 20 ns pulses, we showed that the reverberations damped out prior to impact with targets, and that the flyers maintained their integrity during flight. Flyer impacts with salt, glass, fused silica, and acrylic polymer were studied by PDV, and the durations of fully supported shocks in those media were determined, and could be varied from 5 to 23 ns.

  15. Design optimization and transverse coherence analysis for an x-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.

    1995-12-31

    I present a design study for an X-ray Free Electron Laser driven by the SLAC linac, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The study assumes the LCLS is based on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). Following a brief review of the fundamentals of SASE, I will provide without derivation a collection of formulas relating SASE performance to the system parameters. These formulas allow quick evaluation of FEL designs and provide powerful tools for optimization in multi-dimensional parameter space. Optimization is carried out for the LCLS over all independent system parameters modeled, subjected to a number of practical constraints. In addition to the optimizations concerning gain and power, another important consideration for a single pass FEL starting from noise is the transverse coherence property of the amplified radiation, especially at short wavelength. A widely used emittance criteria for FELs requires that the emittance is smaller than the radiation wavelength divided by 4{pi}. For the LCLS the criteria is violated by a factor of 5, at a normalized emittance of 1.5 mm-mrad, wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, and beam energy of 15 GeV. Thus it is important to check quantitatively the emittance effect on the transverse coherence. I will examine the emittance effect on transverse coherence by analyzing different transverse modes and show that full transverse coherence can be obtained even at the LCLS parameter regime.

  16. A bright attosecond x-ray pulse train generation in a double-laser-driven cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Luo, Wen; Yin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the generation of a high-brightness attosecond x-ray pulse train in a double-laser-driven cone target. The scheme makes use of two lasers: the first high-intensity laser with a laser peak intensity 1.37 × 1020 W/cm2 irradiates the cone and produces overdense attosecond electron bunches; the second counterpropagating weakly relativistic laser with a laser peak intensity 4.932 × 1017 W/cm2 interacts with the produced electron bunches and a bright x-ray pulse train is generated by Thomson backscattering of the second laser off the attosecond electron bunches. It is shown that the photon flux rises by 5 times using the cone target as compared with a normal channel. Meanwhile, the x-ray peak brightness increases significantly from 1.4 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV) to 6.0 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV), which is much higher than that of the Thomson x-ray source generated from traditional accelerators. We also discuss the influence of the laser and target parameters on the x-ray pulse properties. This compact bright x-ray source may have diverse applications, e.g., the study of electric dynamics and harmonics emission in the atomic scale.

  17. Simulation study of enhancing laser-driven multi-keV line-radiation through application of external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. Elijah; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Koning, J. M.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven, spectrally tailored, high-flux x-ray sources have been developed over the past decade for testing the radiation hardness of materials used in various civilian, space and military applications. The optimal electron temperatures for these x-ray sources occur around twice the desired photon energy. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, the available energy can produce plasmas with ~ 10keV electron temperatures which result in highly-efficient ~ 5keV radiation but less than optimal emission from the > 10keV sources. In this work, we present a possible venue for enhancing multi-keV x-ray emission on existing laser platforms through the application of an external magnetic field. Preliminary radiation-hydrodynamics calculations with Hydra suggest as much as 2 - 14 × increases in laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiency for 22 - 68keV K-shell sources are possible on the NIF laser - without any changes in laser-drive conditions - through the application of an external axial 50 T field. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Measurements of the temporal onset of mega-Gauss magnetic fields in a laser-driven solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyon, Clement; Polllock, B. B.; Turnbull, D. T.; Hazi, A.; Ross, J. S.; Mariscal, D. A.; Patankar, S.; Williams, G. J.; Farmer, W. A.; Moody, J. D.; Fujioka, S.; Law, K. F. F.

    2016-10-01

    We report on experimental results obtained at Omega EP showing a nearly linear increase of the B-field up to about 2 mega-Gauss in 0.75 ns in a 1 mm3 region. The field is generated using 1 TW of 351 nm laser power ( 8*1015 W/cm2) incident on a laser-driven solenoid target. The coil target converts about 1% of the laser energy into the B-field measured both inside and outside the coil using proton deflectometry with a grid and Faraday rotation of probe beam through SiO2 glass. Proton data indicates a current rise up to hundreds of kA with a spatial distribution in the Au solenoid conductor evolving in time. These results give insight into the generating mechanism of the current between the plates and the time behavior of the field. These experiments are motivated by recent efforts to understand and utilize High Energy Density (HED) plasmas in the presence of external magnetic fields in areas of research from Astrophysics to Inertial Confinement Fusion. We will describe the experimental results and scale them to a NIF hohlraum size. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Localized Turing patterns in nonlinear optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreff, G.

    2012-05-01

    The subcritical Turing instability is studied in two classes of models for laser-driven nonlinear optical cavities. In the first class of models, the nonlinearity is purely absorptive, with arbitrary intensity-dependent losses. In the second class, the refractive index is real and is an arbitrary function of the intracavity intensity. Through a weakly nonlinear analysis, a Ginzburg-Landau equation with quintic nonlinearity is derived. Thus, the Maxwell curve, which marks the existence of localized patterns in parameter space, is determined. In the particular case of the Lugiato-Lefever model, the analysis is continued to seventh order, yielding a refined formula for the Maxwell curve and the theoretical curve is compared with recent numerical simulation by Gomila et al. [D. Gomila, A. Scroggie, W. Firth, Bifurcation structure of dissipative solitons, Physica D 227 (2007) 70-77.

  20. Nonresonant third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of CdS clusters encapsulated in zeolite A and X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Noriaki; Koiwai, Akihiko; Hyodo, Shi-aki; Hioki, Tatsumi; Noda, Shoji

    1995-02-01

    Nonresonant third-order harmonic generation from CdS clusters encapsulated in zeolite A and X was observed at a fundamental wavelength of 1900 nm. To avoid scattering from the surfaces of the small zeolite crystals, the powder samples were dispersed in a liquid with nearly the same refractive index as that of the samples. The third-order optical susceptibilities of CdS-encapsulated zeolite A and X estimated from the intensity of their Maker fringe patterns were 4.1×10-12 and 1.1×10-11 esu, respectively. These values were slightly smaller than those reported for the 1.5 nm surface-capped CdS cluster. The hyperpolarizabilities of CdS clusters encapsulated in zeolite A and X were estimated by assuming the Lorentz local field to be in the range of 380-480×10-36 and 270-390×10-36 esu, respectively.

  1. Mechanisms of formation of nonlinear optical light guide structures in metal cluster composites produced by ion beam implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, S.S.; Williams, E.K.; Curley, M.; Smith, C.C.; Ila, D.; Venkateswarlu, P.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

    1997-11-01

    Ion implantation has been shown to produce a high density of metal colloids in glasses and crystalline materials. The high-precipitate volume fraction and small size of metal nanoclusters formed leads to values for the third-order susceptibility much greater than those for metal doped solids. This has stimulated interest in use of ion implantation to make nonlinear optical materials. On the other side, LiNbO{sub 3} has proved to be a good material for optical waveguides produced by MeV ion implantation. Light confinement in these waveguides is produced by refractive index step difference between the implanted region and the bulk material. Implantation of LiNbO{sub 3} with MeV metal ions can therefore result into nonlinear optical waveguide structures with great potential in a variety of device applications. The authors describe linear and nonlinear optical properties of a waveguide structure in LiNbO{sub 3}-based composite material produced by silver ion implantation in connection with mechanisms of its formation.

  2. Nonlinear Landau damping, and nonlinear envelope equation, for a driven plasma wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent; Strozzi, David

    2009-11-01

    A nonlinear envelope equation for a laser-driven electron plasma wave (EPW) is derived in a 3-D geometry, starting from first principles. This equation accounts the nonlinear variations of the EPW Landau damping rate, frequency, and group velocity, as well as for the nonlinear variations of the coupling of the EPW to the electromagnetic waves. All these quantities are moreover shown to be nonlocal because of nonlocal variations of the electron distribution function. Each piece of our model is carefully tested against Vlasov simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and very good agreement is found between the numerical and theoretical results. Our envelope equations for both, the electrostatic and electromagnetic waves, are solved numerically, and comparisons with Vlasov simulations regarding the growth of SRS are provided. Finally, from our theory we can straightforwardly deduce a nonlinear gain factor which provides an alternate, simpler and faster method to quantify the SRS reflectivity. First results using this method will be shown.

  3. Model updating of a full-scale FE model with nonlinear constraint equations and sensitivity-based cluster analysis for updating parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jinwoo; Smyth, Andrew W.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of structural model updating is to reduce inherent modeling errors in Finite Element (FE) models due to simplifications, idealized connections, and uncertainties of material properties. Updated FE models, which have less discrepancies with real structures, give more precise predictions of dynamic behaviors for future analyses. However, model updating becomes more difficult when applied to civil structures with a large number of structural components and complicated connections. In this paper, a full-scale FE model of a major long-span bridge has been updated for improved consistency with real measured data. Two methods are applied to improve the model updating process. The first method focuses on improving the agreement of the updated mode shapes with the measured data. A nonlinear inequality constraint equation is used to an optimization procedure, providing the capability to regulate updated mode shapes to remain within reasonable agreements with those observed. An interior point algorithm deals with nonlinearity in the objective function and constraints. The second method finds very efficient updating parameters in a more systematic way. The selection of updating parameters in FE models is essential to have a successful updating result because the parameters are directly related to the modal properties of dynamic systems. An in-depth sensitivity analysis is carried out in an effort to precisely understand the effects of physical parameters in the FE model on natural frequencies. Based on the sensitivity analysis, cluster analysis is conducted to find a very efficient set of updating parameters.

  4. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  5. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  6. An evaluation of the various aspects of the progress in clinical applications of laser driven ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hideghéty, K.; Szabó, E. R.; Polanek, R.; Szabó, Z.; Ughy, B.; Brunner, S.; Tőkés, T.

    2017-03-01

    There has been a vast development of laser-driven particle acceleration (LDPA) using high power lasers. This has initiated by the radiation oncology community to use the dose distribution and biological advantages of proton/heavy ion therapy in cancer treatment with a much greater accessibility than currently possible with cyclotron/synchrotron acceleration. Up to now, preclinical experiments have only been performed at a few LDPA facilities; technical solutions for clinical LDPA have been theoretically developed but there is still a long way to go for the clinical introduction of LDPA. Therefore, to explore the further potential bio-medical advantages of LDPA has pronounced importance. The main characteristics of LDPA are the ultra-high beam intensity, the flexibility in beam size reduction and the potential particle and energy selection whilst conventional accelerators generate single particle, quasi mono-energetic beams. There is a growing number of studies on the potential advantages and applications of Energy Modulated X-ray Radiotherapy, Modulated Electron Radiotherapy and Very High Energy Electron (VHEE) delivery system. Furthermore, the ultra-high space and/or time resolution of super-intense beams are under intensive investigation at synchrotrons (microbeam radiation and very high dose rate (> 40 Gy/s) electron accelerator flash irradiation) with growing evidence of significant improvement of the therapeutic index. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is an advanced cell targeted binary treatment modality. Because of the high linear energy transfer (LET) of the two particles (7Li and 4He) released by 10BNC reaction, all of the energy is deposited inside the tumour cells, killing them with high probability, while the neighbouring cells are not damaged. The limited availability of appropriate neutron sources, prevent the more extensive exploration of clinical benefit of BNCT. Another boron-based novel binary approach is the 11B-Proton Fusion, which result in

  7. Control of focusing fields for positron acceleration in nonlinear plasma wakes using multiple laser modes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.-L. Li, F.-Y.; Chen, M.; Weng, S.-M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Sheng, Z.-M.

    2014-12-15

    Control of transverse wakefields in the nonlinear laser-driven bubble regime using a combination of Hermite-Gaussian laser modes is proposed. By controlling the relative intensity ratio of the two laser modes, the focusing force can be controlled, enabling matched beam propagation for emittance preservation. A ring bubble can be generated with a large longitudinal accelerating field and a transverse focusing field suitable for positron beam focusing and acceleration.

  8. Computational Study of Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Single Molecules and Clusters of Organic Electro-Optic Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Kerry

    Organic electro-optic (OEO) materials integrated into silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) devices afford significant improvements in size, weight, power, and bandwidth (SWAP) performance of integrated electronic/photonic systems critical for current and next generation telecommunication, computer, sensor, transportation, and defense technologies. Improvement in molecular first hyperpolarizability, and in turn electro-optic activity, is crucial to further improvement in the performance of SOH devices. The timely preparation of new chromophores with improved molecular first hyperpolarizability requires theoretical guidance; however, common density functional theory (DFT) methods often perform poorly for optical properties in systems with substantial intramolecular charge transfer character. The first part of this dissertation describes the careful evaluation of popular long-range correction (LC) and range-separated hybrid (RSH) density functional theory (DFT) for definition of structure/function relationships crucial for the optimization of molecular first hyperpolarizability, beta. In particular, a benchmark set of well-characterized OEO chromophores is used to compare calculated results with the corresponding experimentally measured linear and nonlinear optical properties; respectively, the wavelength of the peak one-photon absorption energy, lambdamax, and beta. A goal of this work is to systematically determine the amount of exact exchange in LC/RSH-DFT methods required for accurately computing these properties for a variety OEO chromophores. High-level electron correlation (post-Hartree-Fock) methods are also investigated and compared with DFT. Included are results for the computation of beta using second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and the double-hybrid method, B2PLYP. The second part of this work transitions from single-molecule studies to computing bulk electronic and nonlinear optical properties of molecular crystals and isotropic ensembles of a

  9. High-precision measurements of the equation of state of hydrocarbons at 1-10 Mbar using laser-driven shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Barrios, M. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Hicks, D. G.; Eggert, J. H.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Boehly, T. R.; Fratanduono, D. E.

    2010-05-15

    The equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene and polypropylene were measured using laser-driven shock waves with pressures from 1 to 10 Mbar. Precision data resulting from the use of alpha-quartz as an impedance-matching (IM) standard tightly constrains the EOS of these hydrocarbons, even with the inclusion of systematic errors inherent to IM. The temperature at these high pressures was measured, which, combined with kinematic measurements, provide a complete shock EOS. Both hydrocarbons were observed to reach similar compressions and temperatures as a function of pressure. The materials were observed to transition from transparent insulators to reflecting conductors at pressures of 1 to 2 Mbar.

  10. Modelling non-linear redshift-space distortions in the galaxy clustering pattern: systematic errors on the growth rate parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, Sylvain; Guzzo, Luigi

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the ability of state-of-the-art redshift-space distortion models for the galaxy anisotropic two-point correlation function, ξ(r⊥, r∥), to recover precise and unbiased estimates of the linear growth rate of structure f, when applied to catalogues of galaxies characterized by a realistic bias relation. To this aim, we make use of a set of simulated catalogues at z = 0.1 and 1 with different luminosity thresholds, obtained by populating dark matter haloes from a large N-body simulation using halo occupation prescriptions. We examine the most recent developments in redshift-space distortion modelling, which account for non-linearities on both small and intermediate scales produced, respectively, by randomized motions in virialized structures and non-linear coupling between the density and velocity fields. We consider the possibility of including the linear component of galaxy bias as a free parameter and directly estimate the growth rate of structure f. Results are compared to those obtained using the standard dispersion model, over different ranges of scales. We find that the model of Taruya et al., the most sophisticated one considered in this analysis, provides in general the most unbiased estimates of the growth rate of structure, with systematic errors within ±4 per cent over a wide range of galaxy populations spanning luminosities between L > L* and L > 3L*. The scale dependence of galaxy bias plays a role on recovering unbiased estimates of f when fitting quasi-non-linear scales. Its effect is particularly severe for most luminous galaxies, for which systematic effects in the modelling might be more difficult to mitigate and have to be further investigated. Finally, we also test the impact of neglecting the presence of non-negligible velocity bias with respect to mass in the galaxy catalogues. This can produce an additional systematic error of the order of 1-3 per cent depending on the redshift, comparable to the statistical errors the we

  11. Role of laser-driven electron multi-scattering in resonance-enhanced below-threshold harmonic generation of He atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng-Cheng; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    We perform an ab initio study of the resonance-enhanced harmonic generation of He atoms below the ionization threshold by solving the time-dependent Schr ∖''odinger equation and Maxwell's equation simultaneously. An accurate angular-momentum-dependent model potential is constructed for the description of the He atoms low-lying and Rydberg states. We find that the process of laser-driven electron multi-scattering can play a crucial role in resonance-enhanced below-threshold harmonic generation. This result is confirmed by simulations with an extended semiclassical model and time-frequency analysis of macroscopic harmonic spectra by means of the synchrosqueezed transform based on short time Fourier transform. Our results emphasize that the laser-driven electron multi-scattering must be taken into account to fully understand the quantum path contribution related to resonance-enhanced below-threshold harmonic spectra. This work was partially supported by DOE and by MOE-NSC-NTU-Taiwan.

  12. New skeletal 3D polymeric inorganic cluster [W4S16Cu16Cl16]n with Cu in mixed-valence states: solid-state synthesis, crystal structure, and third-order nonlinear optical properties.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ya; Wang, Yan; Li, Yizhi; Wang, Xiaoshu; Xin, Xinquan; Liu, Caiming; Zheng, Hegen

    2005-12-12

    A new 3D polymeric inorganic cluster with Cu in mixed-valence states was synthesized by the solid-state reaction of (NH4)2WS4, S8, CuCl, and Et4NCl; S8 may be regarded as the oxidizing agent converting Cu(I) to Cu(II) and causing the polymerization of [WS4]2-. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties are determined, and the results show that the cluster exhibits both large NLO absorptive and strong refractive behaviors.

  13. Physical Processes of the Interaction Between Laser-Generated Plasma and Blast Wave Appearing in Laser-Driven In-Tube Accelerator Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Sasoh, Akihiro; Mori, Koichi; Ohtani, Toshiro; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Ogino, Yosuke; Sawada, Keisuke

    2006-05-02

    Flow visualizations of the interaction between a laser-pulse-generated plasma and a shock wave driven by it have been experimentally conducted. The configuration of the experimental set-up corresponds to the laser-driven, in-tube accelerator. Primary-mode deformation of the plasma is governed by Richtmyer-Meshkov instability which is produced by the vector product between the pressure and density gradients, which in turn correspond to a reflected shock wave and to the plasma, respectively. Higher-mode contact surface deformations are supposedly originated in Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the shrinkage phase of the plasma, and is enhanced due to the passage of the reflected shock wave.

  14. Teller Medal Lecture IFSA2001: Problems and Solutions in the Design and Analysis of Early Laser Driven High Energy Density and ICF Target Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M D

    2001-08-20

    The high energy density (HED) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) physics community relies on increasingly sophisticated high power laser driven experiments to advance the field. We review early work in the design and analysis of such experiments, and discuss the problems encountered. By finding solutions to those problems we put the field on firmer ground, allowing the community to develop it to the exciting stage it is in today. Specific examples include: drive and preheat in complex hohlraum geometries with the complicating effects of sample motion; and issues in the successful design of laboratory soft x-ray lasers and in the invention of methods to reduce the required optical laser driver energy by several orders of magnitude.

  15. Teller Medal Lecture IFSA2001: Problems and solutions in the design and analysis of early laser driven high energy density and ICF target physics experiments (IFSA 2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Mordecai D.

    2016-10-01

    The high energy density (HED) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) physics community relies on increasingly sophisticated high power laser driven experiments to advance the field. We review early work in the design and analysis of such experiments, and discuss the problems encountered. By finding solutions to those problems we put the field on firmer ground, allowing the community to develop it to the exciting stage it is in today. Specific examples include: drive and preheat in complex hohlraum geometries with the complicating effects of sample motion; and issues in the successful design of laboratory soft x-ray lasers and in the invention of methods to reduce the required optical laser driver energy by several orders of magnitude.

  16. P-ρ-T measurements of H{sub 2}O up to 260 GPa under laser-driven shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, T.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Sano, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Okuchi, T.; Sano, T.; Miyanishi, K.; Terai, T.; Kakeshita, T.; Shimizu, K.

    2015-04-28

    Pressure, density, and temperature data for H{sub 2}O were obtained up to 260 GPa by using laser-driven shock compression technique. The shock compression technique combined with the diamond anvil cell was used to assess the equation of state models for the P-ρ-T conditions for both the principal Hugoniot and the off-Hugoniot states. The contrast between the models allowed for a clear assessment of the equation of state models. Our P-ρ-T data totally agree with those of the model based on quantum molecular dynamics calculations. These facts indicate that this model is adopted as the standard for modeling interior structures of Neptune, Uranus, and exoplanets in the liquid phase in the multi-Mbar range.

  17. Electrical Properties of Polycrystalline Cadmium Sulfide Films Produced by Laser-Driven Physical Vapor Deposition for Cadmium Sulfide/cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsien, Li-Hua

    1992-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, carrier density, and mobilities have been measured for CdS films grown on glass substrates by laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD). This work was part of an overall effort to gain a better understanding of the processes that are important in determining the efficiency of CdTe-based thin film solar cells. Films were grown from several target materials including pure CdS, CdS doped with indium, and CdS mixed with cadmium chloride. Some films were also subjected to post-growth chemical and thermal treatments. Generally, grain boundary effects dominate the mobility between 80K and 350K. The data is interpreted using a model for polycrystalline and powdered semiconductors which was developed by Orton and Powell (J. S. Orton and M. J. Powell, Rep. Prog. Phys. 43, 81 (1980)) and is discussed using the concept of effective doping levels.

  18. Characterisation of deuterium spectra from laser driven multi-species sources by employing differentially filtered image plate detectors in Thomson spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Krygier, A. G.; Doria, D.; Clarke, R.; Fernandez, J.; Freeman, R. R.; Fuchs, J.; Green, A.; Green, J. S.; Jung, D.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Nersisyan, G.; Norreys, P.; Notley, M.; Oliver, M.; Roth, M.; Ruiz, J. A.; Vassura, L.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2014-09-01

    A novel method for characterising the full spectrum of deuteron ions emitted by laser driven multi-species ion sources is discussed. The procedure is based on using differential filtering over the detector of a Thompson parabola ion spectrometer, which enables discrimination of deuterium ions from heavier ion species with the same charge-to-mass ratio (such as C6 +, O8 +, etc.). Commonly used Fuji Image plates were used as detectors in the spectrometer, whose absolute response to deuterium ions over a wide range of energies was calibrated by using slotted CR-39 nuclear track detectors. A typical deuterium ion spectrum diagnosed in a recent experimental campaign is presented, which was produced from a thin deuterated plastic foil target irradiated by a high power laser.

  19. GV /m Single-Cycle Terahertz Fields from a Laser-Driven Large-Size Partitioned Organic Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicario, Carlo; Monoszlai, Balazs; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2014-05-01

    We report on compact and efficient laser-based THz generation in the terahertz frequency gap (1-10 THz). The radiation is generated by optical rectification of a midinfrared laser in a large-size, partitioned nonlinear organic crystal assembly. This enables up-scaling of presently field-limited tabletop THz sources to GV /m electric and several tesla magnetic field at millijoule pulse energy. In agreement with simulations, the THz beam properties at focus are shown to be not deteriorated by the discontinuity of the emitter surface. The high laser-to-THz energy conversion efficiency exceeds the Manley-Rowe limit and is explained by a cascaded χ(2) process in the organic crystals accompanied by a significant redshift of the pump spectrum. The scheme provides a compact, tabletop THz source for single-cycle transients at field strength equivalent or even higher to linear accelerator and FEL-based THz sources. This opens an avenue toward novel nonlinear THz applications.

  20. Broadband white light emission from Ce:AlN ceramics: High thermal conductivity down-converters for LED and laser-driven solid state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieg, A. T.; Penilla, E. H.; Hardin, C. L.; Kodera, Y.; Garay, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) as a transparent ceramic host for Ce3+, a well-known active ion dopant. We show that the Ce:AlN ceramics have overlapping photoluminescent (PL) emission peaks that cover almost the entire visible range resulting in a white appearance under 375 nm excitation without the need for color mixing. The PL is due to a combination of intrinsic AlN defect complexes and Ce3+ electronic transitions. Importantly, the peak intensities can be tuned by varying the Ce concentration and processing parameters, causing different shades of white light without the need for multiple phosphors or light sources. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates calculated from the measured spectra confirm white light emission. In addition, we demonstrate the viability of laser driven white light emission by coupling the Ce:AlN to a readily available frequency tripled Nd-YAG laser emitting at 355 nm. The high thermal conductivity of these ceramic down-converters holds significant promise for producing higher power white light sources than those available today.

  1. Using Laser-driven Shocks to Study the Phase Diagrams Of Low-Z Materials at Mbar Pressures and eV Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Boehly, T. R.; Miller, J. E.; Brygoo, S.; Loubeyre, P.; McWilliams, R. S.; Jeanloz, R.

    2007-08-02

    Accurate phase diagrams for simple molecular fluids and solids (H2, He, H2O, SiO2, and C) and their constituent elements at eV temperatures and pressures up to tens of Mbar are integral to planetary models of the gas giant planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune), and the rocky planets. Laboratory experiments at high pressure have, until recently, been limited to around 1 Mbar. These pressures are usually achieved dynamically with explosives and two-stage light-gas guns, or statically with diamond anvil cells. Current and future high energy laser and pulsed power facilities will be able to produce tens of Mbar pressures in these light element materials. This presentation will describe the capabilities available at current high energy laser facilities to achieve these extreme conditions, and focus on several examples including water, silica, diamond-phase-carbon, helium and hydrogen. Under strong shock compression all of these materials become electronic conductors, and are transformed eventually to dense plasmas. The experiments reveal some details of the nature of this transition. To obtain high pressure data closer to planetary isentropes advanced compression techniques are required. We are developing a promising technique to achieve higher density states: precompression of samples in a static diamond anvil cell followed by laser driven shock compression. This technique and results from the first experiments with it will be described. Details about this topic can be found in some of our previous publications.

  2. Multidimensional high harmonic spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules: detecting sub-cycle laser-driven hole dynamics upon ionization in strong mid-IR laser fields.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Barry D; Mašín, Zdeněk; Negro, Matteo; Morales, Felipe; Brambila, Danilo; Devetta, Michele; Faccialà, Davide; Harvey, Alex G; Ivanov, Misha; Mairesse, Yann; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Serbinenko, Valeria; Soifer, Hadas; Stagira, Salvatore; Vozzi, Caterina; Dudovich, Nirit; Smirnova, Olga

    2016-12-16

    High harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy has opened up a new frontier in ultrafast science, where electronic dynamics can be measured on an attosecond time scale. The strong laser field that triggers the high harmonic response also opens multiple quantum pathways for multielectron dynamics in molecules, resulting in a complex process of multielectron rearrangement during ionization. Using combined experimental and theoretical approaches, we show how multi-dimensional HHG spectroscopy can be used to detect and follow electronic dynamics of core rearrangement on sub-laser cycle time scales. We detect the signatures of laser-driven hole dynamics upon ionization and reconstruct the relative phases and amplitudes for relevant ionization channels in a CO2 molecule on a sub-cycle time scale. Reconstruction of channel-resolved complex ionization amplitudes on attosecond time scales has been a long-standing goal of high harmonic spectroscopy. Our study brings us one step closer to fulfilling this initial promise and developing robust schemes for sub-femtosecond imaging of multielectron rearrangement in complex molecular systems.

  3. Texturing of high T(sub c) superconducting polycrystalline fibers/wires by laser-driven directional solidification in an thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varshney, Usha; Eichelberger, B. Davis, III

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the technique of laser-driven directional solidification in a controlled thermal gradient of yttria stabilized zirconia core coated Y-Ba-Cu-O materials to produce textured high T(sub c) superconducting polycrystalline fibers/wires with improved critical current densities in the extended range of magnetic fields at temperatures greater than 77 K. The approach involves laser heating to minimize phase segregation by heating very rapidly through the two-phase incongruent melt region to the single phase melt region and directionally solidifying in a controlled thermal gradient to achieve highly textured grains in the fiber axis direction. The technique offers a higher grain growth rate and a lower thermal budget compared with a conventional thermal gradient and is amenable as a continuous process for improving the J(sub c) of high T(sub c) superconducting polycrystalline fibers/wires. The technique has the advantage of suppressing weak-link behavior by orientation of crystals, formation of dense structures with enhanced connectivity, formation of fewer and cleaner grain boundaries, and minimization of phase segregation in the incongruent melt region.

  4. Design, Construction and Calibration of a Near-Infrared Four-Color Pyrometry System for Laser-Driven High Pressure Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S. J.; Jeanloz, R.; Collins, G.; Spaulding, D. K.

    2010-12-01

    Current dynamic compression experiments, using both quasi-isentropic and shock-compression, allow access to pressure-temperature states both on and off the principle Hugoniot and over a wide range of conditions of direct relevance to planetary interiors. Such studies necessitate reliable temperature measurements below 4000-5000 K. Such relatively low temperature states are also of particular interest for materials such as methane and water that do not experience much heating under shock compression. In order to measure these temperatures as a function of time across the sample, a four-color, near-infrared pyrometry system is being developed for use at the Janus laser facility (LLNL) with channels at wavelengths of 932nm-1008nm, 1008nm-1108nm, 1108nm-1208nm, and 1208nm-1300nm. Each color band is fiber-coupled to an InGaAs PIN photodiode with a rise time of less than 60 ps, read using an 18 GHz oscilloscope in order to ensure time resolutions of under 200 ps. This will allow for high temporal resolution measurements of laser-driven shock compression experiments with total durations of 5-15 ns as well as correlation with simultaneous time-resolved velocity interferometry and visual-wavelength pyrometry. Calibration of the system is being accomplished using quartz targets, as the EOS for quartz is well known, along with a calibrated integrating sphere of known spectral radiance.

  5. Laser energized traveling wave accelerator - a novel scheme for simultaneous focusing, energy selection and post-acceleration of laser-driven ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyabrata

    2015-11-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Where intense laser driven proton beams, mainly by the so called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, have attractive properties such as brightness, laminarity and burst duration, overcoming some of the inherent shortcomings, such as large divergence, broad spectrum and slow ion energy scaling poses significant scientific and technological challenges. High power lasers are capable of generating kiloampere current pulses with unprecedented short duration (10s of picoseconds). The large electric field from such localized charge pulses can be harnessed in a traveling wave particle accelerator arrangement. By directing the ultra-short charge pulse along a helical path surrounding a laser-accelerated ion beams, one can achieve simultaneous beam shaping and re-acceleration of a selected portion of the beam by the components of the associated electric field within the helix. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a 200 TW university-scale laser, we demonstrated post-acceleration of ~108 protons by ~5 MeV over less than a cm of propagation - i.e. an accelerating gradient ~0.5 GeV/m, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  6. Low-charge, hard x-ray free electron laser driven with an X-band injector and accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao

    2012-03-01

    After the successful operation of the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), soft and hard x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) are being built, designed, or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency rf cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic rf system is employed to linearize the beam’s longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency rf acceleration process. In this paper, a hard x-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photocathode rf gun to linac end) is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic rf linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient, and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (rms), low-charge (10 pC) electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macroparticle 3D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, and incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low-charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters), which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

  7. Effects of the P2 M-band flux asymmetry of laser-driven gold Hohlraums on the implosion of ICF ignition capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Gu, Jianfa; Wu, Changshu; Song, Peng; Dai, Zhensheng; Li, Shuanggui; Li, Xin; Kang, Dongguo; Gu, Peijun; Zheng, Wudi; Zou, Shiyang; Ding, Yongkun; Lan, Ke; Ye, Wenhua; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    Low-mode asymmetries in the laser-indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] are deemed the main obstacles hindering further improvement of the nuclear performance of deuterium-tritium-layered capsules. The dominant seeds of these asymmetries include the P2 and P4 asymmetries of x-ray drives and P2 asymmetry introduced by the supporting "tent." Here, we explore the effects of another possible seed that can lead to low-mode asymmetric implosions, i.e., the M-band flux asymmetry (MFA) in laser-driven cylindrical gold Hohlraums. It is shown that the M-band flux facilitates the ablation and acceleration of the shell, and that positive P2 MFAs can result in negative P2 asymmetries of hot spots and positive P2 asymmetries of shell's ρR. An oblate or toroidal hot spot, depending on the P2 amplitude of MFA, forms at stagnation. The energy loss of such a hot spot via electron thermal conduction is seriously aggravated not only due to the enlarged hot spot surface but also due to the vortices that develop and help transferring thermal energy from the hotter center to the colder margin of such a hot spot. The cliffs of nuclear performance for the two methodologies of applying MFA (i.e., symmetric flux in the presence of MFA and MFA added for symmetric soft x-ray flux) are obtained locating at 9.5% and 5.0% of P2/P0 amplitudes, respectively.

  8. The laser driven short-term heating balloon catheter: Relation between the chronic neointimal hyperplasia formation and thermal damage to arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Natsumi; Hayashi, Tomoaki; Kunio, Mie; Igami, Yuka; Arai, Tsunenori; Sakurada, Masami

    2010-01-01

    We proposed a novel laser-driven short-term heating angioplasty to realize restenosis-suppressive angioplasty for peripheral artery disease. In this study, we investigated the chronic intimal hyperplasia formation after the short-term heating dilatation in vivo, as well as the thermal damage calculation on arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The prototype short-term heating balloon catheter with 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 mm φ in balloon diameter and 25 mm in balloon length were employed. The short-term heating dilatation was performed in porcine iliac arteries with dilatation conditions of 75°C (N=4) and 65°C (N=5) as peak balloon temperature, 18 ± 4s as heating duration, 3.5 atm as balloon dilatation pressure. Four weeks after the balloon dilatation, the balloon-dilated artery segments were extracted and were stained with HE and picrosirius red for histological observation. In the case of 75°C as the peak balloon temperature, neointimal hyperplasia formation was significantly reduced. In this case, the SMCs density in the artery media measured from the HE-stained specimen was 20% lower than that in the reference artery. According to the thermal damage calculation, it was estimated that the SMCs lethality in artery media after the short-term heating angioplasty was 20% in the case of 75°C as the peak balloon temperature. We demonstrated that the short-term heating dilatation reduced the number of SMCs in artery media. We think this SMCs reduction might contribute to the suppression of chronic neointimal hyperplasia.

  9. Numerical studies of petawatt laser-driven proton generation from two-species targets using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domański, J.; Badziak, J.; Jabloński, S.

    2016-04-01

    Laser-driven generation of high-energy ion beams has recently attracted considerable interest due to a variety of potential applications including proton radiography, ICF fast ignition, nuclear physics or hadron therapy. The ion beam parameters depend on both laser pulse and target parameters, and in order to produce the ion beam of properties required for a particular application the laser and target parameters must be carefully selected, and the mechanism of the ion beam generation should be well understood and controlled. Convenient and commonly used tools for studies of the ion acceleration process are particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. Using two-dimensional PIC simulations, the properties of a proton beam generated from a thin erbium hydride (ErH3) target irradiated by a 25fs laser pulse of linear or circular polarization and of intensity ranging from 1020 to 1021 W/cm2 are investigated and compared with the features of a proton beam produced from a hydrocarbon (CH) target. It has been found that using erbium hydride targets instead of hydrocarbon ones creates an opportunity to generate more compact proton beams of higher mean energy, intensity and of better collimation. This is especially true for the linear polarization of the laser beam, for which the mean proton energy, the amount of high energy protons and the intensity of the proton beam generated from the hydride target is by an order of magnitude higher than for the hydrocarbon target. For the circular polarization, the proton beam parameters are lower than those for the linear one, and the effect of target composition on the acceleration process is weaker.

  10. MODELING THE NONLINEAR CLUSTERING IN MODIFIED GRAVITY MODELS. I. A FITTING FORMULA FOR THE MATTER POWER SPECTRUM OF f(R) GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Based on a suite of N-body simulations of the Hu-Sawicki model of f(R) gravity with different sets of model and cosmological parameters, we develop a new fitting formula with a numeric code, MGHalofit, to calculate the nonlinear matter power spectrum P(k) for the Hu-Sawicki model. We compare the MGHalofit predictions at various redshifts (z ≤ 1) to the f(R) simulations and find that the relative error of the MGHalofit fitting formula of P(k) is no larger than 6% at k ≤ 1 h Mpc{sup –1} and 12% at k in (1, 10] h Mpc{sup –1}, respectively. Based on a sensitivity study of an ongoing and a future spectroscopic survey, we estimate the detectability of a signal of modified gravity described by the Hu-Sawicki model using the power spectrum up to quasi-nonlinear scales.

  11. Laser-driven flyer plate

    DOEpatents

    Paisley, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for producing high velocity flyer plates involving placing a layer of dielectric material between a first metal foil and a second metal foil. With laser irradiation through an optical substrate, the first metal foil forms a plasma in the area of the irradiation, between the substrate and the solid portion of the first metal foil. When the pressure between the substrate and the foil reaches the stress limit of the dielectric, the dielectric will break away and launch the flyer plate out of the second metal foil. The mass of the flyer plate is controlled, as no portion of the flyer plate is transformed into a plasma.

  12. Laser Driven, Extreme Compression Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Jon

    2014-03-01

    Extreme-compression science is blessed by a number of new techniques and facilities that are shattering previous experimental limitations: static pressures above 600 GPa, equation of state (EOS) experiments on pulsed-power machines, picosecond-resolved x-ray diffraction on free-electron lasers, and many new experiments on high-energy lasers. Our goals, using high-energy lasers, have been to push the limits of high pressure accessible to measurement and to bridge the gap between static- and dynamic-compression experiments by exploring off-Hugoniot states. I will review laser techniques for both shock- and ramp-compression experiments, and discuss a variety of diagnostics. I will present recent results including: impedance-matching Hugoniot experiments, absolute-Hugoniot implosive-shock radiography, coupled radiometry and velocimetry, ramp-compression EOS, and in-situ x-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy into the TPa regime. As the National Ignition Facility (NIF) transitions to a laser user facility for basic and applied science, we are transferring many of these techniques. The unprecedented quality and variety of diagnostics available, coupled with exquisite pulse-shaping predictability and control make the NIF a premier facility for extreme-compression experiments.

  13. Laser Driven, Extreme Compression Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Jon

    2013-06-01

    Extreme-compression science is blessed by a number of new techniques and facilities that are shattering previous experimental limitations: static pressures above 600 GPa, equation of state (EOS) experiments on pulsed-power machines, picosecond-resolved x-ray diffraction on free-electron lasers, and many new experiments on high-energy lasers. Our goals, using high-energy lasers, have been to push the limits of high pressure accessible to measurement and to bridge the gap between static- and dynamic-compression experiments by exploring off-Hugoniot states. I will review laser techniques for both shock- and ramp-compression experiments, and discuss a variety of diagnostics. I will present recent results including: impedance-matching Hugoniot experiments, absolute-Hugoniot implosive-shock radiography, coupled radiometry and velocimetry, ramp-compression EOS, and in-situ x-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy into the TPa regime. As the National Ignition Facility (NIF) transitions to a laser user facility for basic and applied science, we are transferring many of these techniques. The unprecedented quality and variety of diagnostics available, coupled with exquisite pulse-shaping predictability and control make the NIF a premier facility for extreme-compression experiments.

  14. Information-based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Slonim, Noam; Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2005-01-01

    In an age of increasingly large data sets, investigators in many different disciplines have turned to clustering as a tool for data analysis and exploration. Existing clustering methods, however, typically depend on several nontrivial assumptions about the structure of data. Here, we reformulate the clustering problem from an information theoretic perspective that avoids many of these assumptions. In particular, our formulation obviates the need for defining a cluster “prototype,” does not require an a priori similarity metric, is invariant to changes in the representation of the data, and naturally captures nonlinear relations. We apply this approach to different domains and find that it consistently produces clusters that are more coherent than those extracted by existing algorithms. Finally, our approach provides a way of clustering based on collective notions of similarity rather than the traditional pairwise measures. PMID:16352721

  15. Clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhlinin, A. A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Markevich, M. L.; Sunyaev, R. A.; Churazov, E. M.

    2014-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are formed via nonlinear growth of primordial density fluctuations and are the most massive gravitationally bound objects in the present Universe. Their number density at different epochs and their properties depend strongly on the properties of dark matter and dark energy, making clusters a powerful tool for observational cosmology. Observations of the hot gas filling the gravitational potential well of a cluster allows studying gasdynamic and plasma effects and the effect of supermassive black holes on the heating and cooling of gas on cluster scales. The work of Yakov Borisovich Zeldovich has had a profound impact on virtually all cosmological and astrophysical studies of galaxy clusters, introducing concepts such as the Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum, the Zeldovich approximation, baryon acoustic peaks, and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Here, we review the most basic properties of clusters and their role in modern astrophysics and cosmology.

  16. Cosmological constraints from the CFHTLenS shear measurements using a new, accurate, and flexible way of predicting non-linear mass clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Raul E.; Hilbert, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We explore the cosmological constraints from cosmic shear using a new way of modelling the non-linear matter correlation functions. The new formalism extends the method of Angulo & White, which manipulates outputs of N-body simulations to represent the 3D non-linear mass distribution in different cosmological scenarios. We show that predictions from our approach for shear two-point correlations at 1-300 arcmin separations are accurate at the ˜10 per cent level, even for extreme changes in cosmology. For moderate changes, with target cosmologies similar to that preferred by analyses of recent Planck data, the accuracy is close to ˜5 per cent. We combine this approach with a Monte Carlo Markov chain sampler to explore constraints on a Λ cold dark matter model from the shear correlation functions measured in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We obtain constraints on the parameter combination σ8(Ωm/0.27)0.6 = 0.801 ± 0.028. Combined with results from cosmic microwave background data, we obtain marginalized constraints on σ8 = 0.81 ± 0.01 and Ωm = 0.29 ± 0.01. These results are statistically compatible with previous analyses, which supports the validity of our approach. We discuss the advantages of our method and the potential it offers, including a path to model in detail (i) the effects of baryons, (ii) high-order shear correlation functions, and (iii) galaxy-galaxy lensing, among others, in future high-precision cosmological analyses.

  17. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; Campbell, Edward Michael; Gomez, Matthew R.; Harding, Eric; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Kimmel, Mark W.; Knapp, Patrick; Lewis, Sean M.; McBride, Ryan D.; Peterson, Kyle; Schollmeier, Marius; Scoglietti, Daniel; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shores, Jonathon; Sinars, Daniel; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Speas, Christopher; Vesey, Roger A.; Porter, John L.

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. We determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  18. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; ...

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Wemore » determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.« less

  19. Laser-optical path to nuclear energy without radioactivity: Fusion of hydrogen-boron by nonlinear force driven plasma blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Malekynia, B.; Azizi, N.

    2009-10-01

    Anomalous interaction of terawatt-picosecond laser pulses allows side-on ignition of solid state density fusion fuel with the unexpected possibility of igniting uncompressed hydrogen-boron p- 11B. Suppression of relativistic self-focusing by using very clean laser pulses with an extremely high contrast ratio is essential to achieve ignition thresholds only ten times more difficult than fusion of deuterium-tritium (DT). This opens the possibility for laser driven fusion energy without neutrons and less radioactivity than from burning coal. The complex nonlinear optical properties involved are elaborated.

  20. Cluster Headache

    MedlinePlus

    Cluster headache Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cluster headaches, which occur in cyclical patterns or clusters, are one of the most painful types of headache. A cluster headache commonly awakens you ...

  1. Nonlinear Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-15

    following surprising situation. Namely associated with the integrable nonlinear Schrodinger equations are standard numerical schemes which exhibit at...36. An Initial Boundary Value Problem for the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equations , A.S. Fokas, Physica D March 1989. 37. Evolution Theory, Periodic... gravity waves and wave excitation phenomena related to moving pressure distributions; numerical approximation and computation; nonlinear optics; and

  2. Nonlinear functional connectivity network recovery in the human brain with mutual connectivity analysis (MCA): convergent cross-mapping and non-metric clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; Abidin, Anas Z.; D'Souza, Adora M.; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Leistritz, Lutz; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.

    2015-03-01

    We explore a computational framework for functional connectivity analysis in resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data acquired from the human brain for recovering the underlying network structure and understanding causality between network components. Termed mutual connectivity analysis (MCA), this framework involves two steps, the first of which is to evaluate the pair-wise cross-prediction performance between fMRI pixel time series within the brain. In a second step, the underlying network structure is subsequently recovered from the affinity matrix using non-metric network clustering approaches, such as the so-called Louvain method. Finally, we use convergent cross-mapping (CCM) to study causality between different network components. We demonstrate our MCA framework in the problem of recovering the motor cortex network associated with hand movement from resting state fMRI data. Results are compared with a ground truth of active motor cortex regions as identified by a task-based fMRI sequence involving a finger-tapping stimulation experiment. Our results regarding causation between regions of the motor cortex revealed a significant directional variability and were not readily interpretable in a consistent manner across subjects. However, our results on whole-slice fMRI analysis demonstrate that MCA-based model-free recovery of regions associated with the primary motor cortex and supplementary motor area are in close agreement with localization of similar regions achieved with a task-based fMRI acquisition. Thus, we conclude that our MCA methodology can extract and visualize valuable information concerning the underlying network structure between different regions of the brain in resting state fMRI.

  3. Nonlinear supratransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geniet, F.; Leon, J.

    2003-05-01

    A nonlinear system possessing a natural forbidden band gap can transmit energy of a signal with a frequency in the gap, as recently shown for a nonlinear chain of coupled pendulums (Geniet and Leon 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 134102). This process of nonlinear supratransmission, occurring at a threshold that is exactly predictable in many cases, is shown to have a simple experimental realization with a mechanical chain of pendulums coupled by a coil spring. It is then analysed in more detail. First we go to different (nonintegrable) systems which do sustain nonlinear supratransmission. Then a Josephson transmission line (a one-dimensional array of short Josephson junctions coupled through superconducting wires) is shown to also sustain nonlinear supratransmission, though being related to a different class of boundary conditions, and despite the presence of damping, finiteness, and discreteness. Finally, the mechanism at the origin of nonlinear supratransmission is found to be a nonlinear instability, and this is briefly discussed here.

  4. Generation of strongly coupled Xe cluster nanoplasmas by low intensive soft x-ray laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2012-07-11

    A seeding gas jet including Xe clusters was irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft x-ray laser pulse ({lambda}=13.9 nm, {approx}7 ps, {<=}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}), where the laser photon energy is high enough to ionize 4d core electrons. In order to clarify how the innershell ionization followed by the Auger electron emission is affected under the intense laser irradiation, the electron energy distribution was measured. Photoelectron spectra showed that the peak position attributed to 4d hole shifted to lower energy and the spectral width was broadened with increasing cluster size. Moreover, the energy distribution exhibited that a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma with several eV was generated.

  5. Nonlinear nanomechanical resonators for quantum optoelectromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rips, S.; Wilson-Rae, I.; Hartmann, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a scheme for tuning and controlling nanomechanical resonators by subjecting them to electrostatic gradient fields, provided by nearby tip electrodes. We show that this approach enables access to a regime of optomechanics where the intrinsic nonlinearity of the nanoresonator can be explored. In this regime, one or several laser-driven cavity modes coupled to the nanoresonator and suitably adjusted gradient fields make it possible to control the motional state of the nanoresonator at the single-phonon level. Some applications of this platform have been presented previously [S. Rips, M. Kiffner, I. Wilson-Rae, and M. J. Hartmann, New J. Phys. 14, 023042 (2012), 10.1088/1367-2630/14/2/023042; S. Rips and M. J. Hartmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 120503 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.120503]. Here we provide a detailed description of the corresponding setup and its optomechanical coupling mechanisms together with an in-depth analysis of possible sources of damping or decoherence and a discussion of the readout of the nanoresonator state.

  6. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  7. Generation of 9 MeV γ-rays by all-laser-driven Compton scattering with second-harmonic laser light.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Golovin, Grigory; Chen, Shouyuan; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen; Haden, Daniel; Banerjee, Sudeep; Silano, Jack; Karwowski, Hugon; Umstadter, Donald

    2014-07-15

    Gamma-ray photons with energy >9  MeV were produced when second-harmonic-generated laser light (3 eV) inverse-Compton-scattered from a counterpropagating relativistic (~450  MeV) laser-wakefield-accelerated electron beam. Two laser pulses from the same laser system were used: one to accelerate electrons and one to scatter. Since the two pulses play very different roles in the γ-ray generation process, and thus have different requirements, a novel laser system was developed. It separately and independently optimized the optical properties of the two pulses. This approach also mitigated the deleterious effects on beam focusing that generally accompany nonlinear optics at high peak-power levels.

  8. Nonlinear channelizer.

    PubMed

    In, Visarath; Longhini, Patrick; Kho, Andy; Neff, Joseph D; Leung, Daniel; Liu, Norman; Meadows, Brian K; Gordon, Frank; Bulsara, Adi R; Palacios, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The nonlinear channelizer is an integrated circuit made up of large parallel arrays of analog nonlinear oscillators, which, collectively, serve as a broad-spectrum analyzer with the ability to receive complex signals containing multiple frequencies and instantaneously lock-on or respond to a received signal in a few oscillation cycles. The concept is based on the generation of internal oscillations in coupled nonlinear systems that do not normally oscillate in the absence of coupling. In particular, the system consists of unidirectionally coupled bistable nonlinear elements, where the frequency and other dynamical characteristics of the emergent oscillations depend on the system's internal parameters and the received signal. These properties and characteristics are being employed to develop a system capable of locking onto any arbitrary input radio frequency signal. The system is efficient by eliminating the need for high-speed, high-accuracy analog-to-digital converters, and compact by making use of nonlinear coupled systems to act as a channelizer (frequency binning and channeling), a low noise amplifier, and a frequency down-converter in a single step which, in turn, will reduce the size, weight, power, and cost of the entire communication system. This paper covers the theory, numerical simulations, and some engineering details that validate the concept at the frequency band of 1-4 GHz.

  9. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  10. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  11. About the Clusters Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Technology Innovation Clusters Program advises cluster organizations, encourages collaboration between clusters, tracks U.S. environmental technology clusters, and connects EPA programs to cluster needs.

  12. Nonlinear Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seider, Warren D.; Ungar, Lyle H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a course in nonlinear mathematics courses offered at the University of Pennsylvania which provides an opportunity for students to examine the complex solution spaces that chemical engineers encounter. Topics include modeling many chemical processes, especially those involving reaction and diffusion, auto catalytic reactions, phase…

  13. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  14. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.

    This report discusses research in the area of slowly varying nonlinear oscillatory systems. Some of the topics discussed are as follows: adiabatic invariants and transient resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; sustained resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; free-electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillators.

  15. Nonlinear absorption dynamics using field-induced surface hopping: zinc porphyrin in water.

    PubMed

    Röhr, Merle I S; Petersen, Jens; Wohlgemuth, Matthias; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Mitrić, Roland

    2013-05-10

    We wish to present the application of our field-induced surface-hopping (FISH) method to simulate nonlinear absorption dynamics induced by strong nonresonant laser fields. We provide a systematic comparison of the FISH approach with exact quantum dynamics simulations on a multistate model system and demonstrate that FISH allows for accurate simulations of nonlinear excitation processes including multiphoton electronic transitions. In particular, two different approaches for simulating two-photon transitions are compared. The first approach is essentially exact and involves the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in an extended manifold of excited states, while in the second one only transiently populated nonessential states are replaced by an effective quadratic coupling term, and dynamics is performed in a considerably smaller manifold of states. We illustrate the applicability of our method to complex molecular systems by simulating the linear and nonlinear laser-driven dynamics in zinc (Zn) porphyrin in the gas phase and in water. For this purpose, the FISH approach is connected with the quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical approach (QM/MM) which is generally applicable to large classes of complex systems. Our findings that multiphoton absorption and dynamics increase the population of higher excited states of Zn porphyrin in the nonlinear regime, in particular in solution, provides a means for manipulating excited-state properties, such as transient absorption dynamics and electronic relaxation.

  16. Recovering map static nonlinearities from chaotic data using dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Luis Antonio

    1997-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the estimation from chaotic data of maps with static nonlinearities. A number of issues concerning model construction such as structure selection, over-parametrization and model validation are discussed in the light of the shape of the static non-linearities reproduced by the estimated maps. A new interpretation of term clusters and cluster coefficients of polynomial models is provided based on this approach. The paper discusses model limitations and some useful principles to select the structure of nonlinear maps. Some of the ideas have been tested using several nonlinear systems including a boost voltage regulator map and a set of real data from a chaotic circuit.

  17. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  18. Circular rogue wave clusters.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, David J; Ankiewicz, Adrian; Akhmediev, Nail

    2011-11-01

    Using the Darboux transformation technique and numerical simulations, we study the hierarchy of rational solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that can be considered as higher order rogue waves in this model. This analysis reveals the existence of rogue wave clusters with a high level of symmetry in the (x,t) plane. These structures arise naturally when the shifts in the Darboux scheme are taken to be eigenvalue dependent. We have found single-shell structures where a central higher order rogue wave is surrounded by a ring of first order peaks on the (x,t) plane.

  19. Anharmonic resonance absorption of short laser pulses in clusters: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, S. S.; Kundu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Linear resonance (LR) absorption of an intense 800 nm laser light in a nano-cluster requires a long laser pulse >100 fs when Mie-plasma frequency ( ω M ) of electrons in the expanding cluster matches the laser frequency (ω). For a short duration of the pulse, the condition for LR is not satisfied. In this case, it was shown by a model and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 123401 (2006)] that electrons absorb laser energy by anharmonic resonance (AHR) when the position-dependent frequency Ω [ r ( t ) ] of an electron in the self-consistent anharmonic potential of the cluster satisfies Ω [ r ( t ) ] = ω . However, AHR remains to be a debate and still obscure in multi-particle plasma simulations. Here, we identify AHR mechanism in a laser driven cluster using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By analyzing the trajectory of each MD electron and extracting its Ω [ r ( t ) ] in the self-generated anharmonic plasma potential, it is found that electron is outer ionized only when AHR is met. An anharmonic oscillator model, introduced here, brings out most of the features of MD electrons while passing the AHR. Thus, we not only bridge the gap between PIC simulations, analytical models, and MD calculations for the first time but also unequivocally prove that AHR process is a universal dominant collisionless mechanism of absorption in the short pulse regime or in the early time of longer pulses in clusters.

  20. Nonlinear gravitational growth inside and outside the standard cosmology.

    PubMed

    Gaztañaga, E; Lobo, J A

    2001-06-01

    We reconsider the problem of nonlinear structure formation inside and outside General Relativity (GR), both in the weakly and strongly nonlinear regime. We show how these regimes can be explored observationally through clustering of high-order cumulants and through the epoch of formation, abundance and clustering of collapse structures, using Press and Schechter (1974, Astrophys. J. 187: 425-438) formalism and its extensions.

  1. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  2. Sinterable Powders from Laser Driven Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    151.5 Ether 19 Isopentyl Ether 2.82 a 22.9 a 173.2 Aliphatic Acids 20 Propionic Acid 3.30 e 26.7 a 141.0 1.10 a 21 Butyric Acid 2.97 a 26.5 a 163.5 1.54...A 0 17 2-Pent anone A 00 18 2-Heptanone A O Ether 19 Isopentyl Ether B* Aliphatic Acids 20 Propionic Acid B 0 21 Butyric Acid B* Aldehydes 22...Not Measured 60 with a very low dielectric constants such as n-hexane, cyclohexane, n-octane, benzene, toluene, xylene, isopentyl ether, propionic

  3. High density laser-driven target

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, John D.

    1981-01-01

    A high density target for implosion by laser energy composed of a central quantity of fuel surrounded by a high-Z pusher shell with a low-Z ablator-pusher shell spaced therefrom forming a region filled with low-density material.

  4. Light sailboats: Laser driven autonomous microrobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Búzás, Anrdás; Kelemen, Lóránd; Mathesz, Anna; Oroszi, László; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Vicsek, Tamás; Ormos, Pál

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a system of light driven microscopic autonomous moving particles that move on a flat surface. The design is simple, yet effective: Micrometer sized objects with wedge shape are produced by photopolymerization, and they are covered with a reflective surface. When the area of motion is illuminated perpendicularly from above, the light is deflected to the side by the wedge shaped objects, in the direction determined by the position and orientation of the particles. The momentum change during reflection provides the driving force for an effectively autonomous motion. The system is an efficient tool to study self propelled microscopic robots.

  5. Inertial effects in laser-driven ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.; Szeoke, A.; Howard, W.M.

    1983-07-15

    The gasdynamic partial differential equations (PDE's) governing the motion of an ablatively accelerated target (rocket) contain an inertial force term that arises from acceleration of the reference frame in which the PDE's are written. We give a simple, intuitive description of this effect, and estimate its magnitude and parametric dependences by means of approximate analytical formulas inferred from our computer hydrocode calculations. Often this inertial term is negligible, but for problems in the areas of laser fusion and laser equation of state studies we find that it can substantially reduce the attainable hydrodynamic efficiency of acceleration and implosion.

  6. Bacterial cells enhance laser driven ion acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Kundu, M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Rajeev, R.; Ray, Krishanu; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration. Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics. Here, we present a simple, albeit, unconventional target that succeeds in generating 700 keV carbon ions where conventional targets for the same laser parameters generate at most 40 keV. A few layers of micron sized bacteria coating on a polished surface increases the laser energy coupling and generates a hotter plasma which is more effective for the ion acceleration compared to the conventional polished targets. Particle-in-cell simulations show that micro-particle coated target are much more effective in ion acceleration as seen in the experiment. We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications. PMID:25102948

  7. Sinterable Powders from Laser Driven Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    4 flow rate on the resulting Si powder particle size (reaction cell pressure of 0.6 atm). 39 21. The effect of SiR 4 flow rate on the ratio of Si...should be expected, therefore, that the relative emissivity of the SiR 4 flame will fall somewhere between following a /K dependence and following...electron diffraction. The diffraction patterns were identical to those for Si powder made from SiH 4 . The powders from SiR 4 and C2H4 runs showed

  8. Experiments with laser driven plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolai, Philippe

    2008-04-01

    Laboratory studies can address issues relevant to astrophysics^1 and in some cases improve our understanding of the physical processes that occur in astrophysical objects. So issues related to the jet propagation and collimation over considerable distance and their interactions with surrounding media have begun to be addressed these last years. Laboratory plasmas and astrophysical objects have different length, time and density scales. However, the typical velocities are the same, of a few hundred km/s and the similarity criteria^2 can be applied to scale the laboratory jets to astrophysical conditions. In this presentation, we use a method of jet formation^3 which allows to launch a very fast jet having a velocity around 400 km/s by using a relatively small laser energy, of the order of 100 J. The jet has a Mach number greater than 10, a length of a few mm, and a radius of a few tenths of mm. The interaction of these jets with a gas puff has been recently studied in an experiment carried out at the PALS laser facility. Varying gas pressure and composition, we show that the nature of interaction zone changes from a quasi adiabatic outflow to a strongly radiatively cooling jet. The use of various diagnostics, allows to relate the x-ray emission to the density map of the interaction zone. Already observed in astrophysical objets for strongly different time and space scales, these structures are interpreted in our laboratory experiment by using a semi-analytical model and 2D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. [1] B. Remington et al, Rev. Mod. Phys. 78, 755 (2007) [2] D. Ryutov et al, Phys . Plasmas 8, 1804 (2001) [3] Ph. Nicolai et al, Phys. Plasmas 13, 062701 (2007)

  9. Laser-driven Ion Acceleration using Nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hauthuille, Luc; Nguyen, Tam; Dollar, Franklin

    2016-10-01

    Interactions of high-intensity lasers with mass-limited nanoparticles enable the generation of extremely high electric fields. These fields accelerate ions, which has applications in nuclear medicine, high brightness radiography, as well as fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion. Previous studies have been performed with ensembles of nanoparticles, but this obscures the physics of the interaction due to the wide array of variables in the interaction. The work presented here looks instead at the interactions of a high intensity short pulse laser with an isolated nanodiamond. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanoparticle size and intensity of the laser on the interaction. A novel target scheme was developed to isolate the nanodiamond. Particle-in-cell simulations were performed using the EPOCH framework to show the sheath fields and resulting energetic ion beams.

  10. Laser driven instabilities in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1990-06-04

    Parametric instabilities excited by an intense electromagnetic wave in a plasma is a fundamental topic relevant to many applications. These applications include laser fusion, heating of magnetically-confined plasmas, ionospheric modification, and even particle acceleration for high energy physics. In laser fusion, these instabilities have proven to play an essential role in the choice of laser wavelength. Characterization and control of the instabilities is an ongoing priority in laser plasma experiments. Recent progress and some important trends will be discussed. 8 figs.

  11. Sinterable Powders from Laser Driven Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    18) line was based on information from the liter- ature (Tindal, et. al., 1942) rather than direct correlation with spectro- graphic data. Amonia ...number of lines to be measured; (2) laser intensity was sufficiently low to preclude virtually any heating of the silane or amonia . Two methods were used...manometer. Electronic grade (Airco) silane was used from the tank after many freeze-pump-thaw cycles; anhydrous (Airco) NH3 was treated similarly. The

  12. Laser-driven polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte-black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 200 milliwatt green solid-state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the DLP chip, the optomechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  13. Dynamics of Laser Driven, Ablatively Accelerated Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-08

    Tenierature Hydrodynamic Phenomena," V.I. II. pg. 676. Academic Press NY (1966) 21. R. Resnick , and 1). lHalliday, "Physics." Vol. I. pg. 178, J. Wiley...Attn: Prof. Gan Fu-xi GI. Barifi Prof. Yu Wen-yan Istituto Fisica Application Prof. Xu Zhi-2han Universita di Paria Prof. Deng Xi-ming Pavia 27100 Italy

  14. Spitzer Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Kessica

    This proposal is a specific response to the strategic goal of NASA's research program to "discover how the universe works and explore how the universe evolved into its present form." Towards this goal, we propose to mine the Spitzer archive for all observations of galaxy groups and clusters for the purpose of studying galaxy evolution in clusters, contamination rates for Sunyaev Zeldovich cluster surveys, and to provide a database of Spitzer observed clusters to the broader community. Funding from this proposal will go towards two years of support for a Postdoc to do this work. After searching the Spitzer Heritage Archive, we have found 194 unique galaxy groups and clusters that have data from both the Infrared array camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) at 3.6 - 8 microns and the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; Rieke et al. 2004) at 24microns. This large sample will add value beyond the individual datasets because it will be a larger sample of IR clusters than ever before and will have sufficient diversity in mass, redshift, and dynamical state to allow us to differentiate amongst the effects of these cluster properties. An infrared sample is important because it is unaffected by dust extinction while at the same time is an excellent measure of both stellar mass (IRAC wavelengths) and star formation rate (MIPS wavelengths). Additionally, IRAC can be used to differentiate star forming galaxies (SFG) from active galactic nuclei (AGN), due to their different spectral shapes in this wavelength regime. Specifically, we intend to identify SFG and AGN in galaxy groups and clusters. Groups and clusters differ from the field because the galaxy densities are higher, there is a large potential well due mainly to the mass of the dark matter, and there is hot X-ray gas (the intracluster medium; ICM). We will examine the impact of these differences in environment on galaxy formation by comparing cluster properties of AGN and SFG to those in the field. Also, we will

  15. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  16. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  17. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  18. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  19. New Nonlinear Multigrid Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Dexuan

    1996-01-01

    The nonlinear multigrid is an efficient algorithm for solving the system of nonlinear equations arising from the numerical discretization of nonlinear elliptic boundary problems. In this paper, we present a new nonlinear multigrid analysis as an extension of the linear multigrid theory presented by Bramble. In particular, we prove the convergence of the nonlinear V-cycle method for a class of mildly nonlinear second order elliptic boundary value problems which do not have full elliptic regularity.

  20. Filtering by nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Campos Cantón, E; González Salas, J S; Urías, J

    2008-12-01

    Synchronization of nonlinear systems forced by external signals is formalized as the response of a nonlinear filter. Sufficient conditions for a nonlinear system to behave as a filter are given. Some examples of generalized chaos synchronization are shown to actually be special cases of nonlinear filtering.

  1. A new nonlinear reconstruction method based on total variation regularization of neutron penumbral imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Weixin; Qi Shuangxi; Wang Wanli; Cheng Jinming; Liu Dongbing

    2011-09-15

    Neutron penumbral imaging is a significant diagnostic technique in laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiment. It is very important to develop a new reconstruction method to improve the resolution of neutron penumbral imaging. A new nonlinear reconstruction method based on total variation (TV) regularization is proposed in this paper. A TV-norm is used as regularized term to construct a smoothing functional for penumbral image reconstruction in the new method, in this way, the problem of penumbral image reconstruction is transformed to the problem of a functional minimization. In addition, a fixed point iteration scheme is introduced to solve the problem of functional minimization. The numerical experimental results show that, compared to linear reconstruction method based on Wiener filter, the TV regularized nonlinear reconstruction method is beneficial to improve the quality of reconstructed image with better performance of noise smoothing and edge preserving. Meanwhile, it can also obtain the spatial resolution with 5 {mu}m which is higher than the Wiener method.

  2. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method was developed to identify spatial patterns of planetary flow regimes, and to study transitions between them. This method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and second to Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500 mb data. The dynamical model is governed by the fully-nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. Clusters of point in the model's phase space are associated with either a few persistent or with many transient events. Two stationary clusters have patterns similar to unstable stationary model solutions, zonal, or blocked. Transient clusters of wave trains serve as way stations between the stationary ones. For the NH data, cluster analysis was performed in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters are found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, and transient clusters in the bandpass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band three pairs of clusters determine, respectively, EOFs 1, 2, and 3. They exhibit well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data show strong bimodality. Clusters in the bandpass window show wave-train patterns in the two jet exit regions. They are related, as in the model, to transitions between stationary clusters.

  3. Cluster bulleticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025-12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary 'baryonic' matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. Constraints on the properties of dark matter, such as its interaction cross-section, are therefore restricted by uncertainties in the individual systems' impact velocity, impact parameter and orientation with respect to the line of sight. Here we develop a complementary, statistical measurement in which every piece of substructure falling into every massive cluster is treated as a bullet. We define 'bulleticity' as the mean separation between dark matter and ordinary matter, and we measure the signal in hydrodynamical simulations. The phase space of substructure orbits also exhibits symmetries that provide an equivalent control test. Any detection of bulleticity in real data would indicate a difference in the interaction cross-sections of baryonic and dark matter that may rule out hypotheses of non-particulate dark matter that are otherwise able to model individual systems. A subsequent measurement of bulleticity could constrain the dark matter cross-section. Even with conservative estimates, the existing Hubble Space Telescope archive should yield an independent constraint tighter than that from the bullet cluster. This technique is then trivially extendable to and benefits enormously from larger, future surveys.

  4. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaret, J.; Béquin, P.; Theocharis, G.; Andreev, V.; Gusev, V. E.; Tournat, V.

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found to be nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other types of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short-term memory, as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  5. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves.

    PubMed

    Cabaret, J; Béquin, P; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

    2015-07-31

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found to be nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other types of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short-term memory, as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  6. Cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Elizabeth; Ducros, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke) and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms) has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments) and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments). Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the hypothalamus and

  7. Formation of Cluster Complexes by Cluster-Cluster-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihashi, Masahiko; Odaka, Hideho

    2015-03-01

    Multi-element clusters are interested in their chemical and physical properties, and it is expected that they are utilized as catalysts, for example. Their properties critically depend on the size, composition and atomic ordering, and it should be important to adjust the above parameters for their functionality. One of the ways to form a multi-element cluster is to employ a low-energy collision between clusters. Here, we show characteristic results obtained in the collision between a neutral Ar cluster and a size-selected Co cluster ion. Low-energy collision experiment was accomplished by using a newly developed merging-beam apparatus. Cobalt cluster ions were produced by laser ablation, and mass-selected. On the other hand, argon clusters were prepared by the supersonic expansion of Ar gas. Both cluster beams were merged together in an ion guide, and ionic cluster complexes were mass-analyzed. In the collision of Co2+ and ArN, Co2Arn+ (n = 1 - 30) were observed, and the total intensity of Co2Arn+ (n >= 1) is inversely proportional to the relative velocity between Co2+ and ArN. This suggests that the charge-induced dipole interaction between Co2+ and a neutral Ar cluster is dominant in the formation of the cluster complex, Co2+Arn.

  8. Nonlinear phenomena in multiferroic nanocapacitor: Joule heating and electromechanical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yunseok; Kumar, Amit; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach for probing nonlinear electromechanical responses in BiFeO3 thin film nanocapacitors using half-harmonic band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Nonlinear PFM images of nanocapacitor arrays show clearly visible clusters of capacitors associated with variations of local leakage current through the BiFeO3 film. Strain spectroscopy measurements and finite element modeling point to significance of the Joule heating and show that the thermal effects caused by the Joule heating can provide nontrivial contributions to the nonlinear electromechanical responses in ferroic nanostructures. This approach can be further extended to unambiguous mapping of electrostatic signal contributions to PFM and related techniques.

  9. Nonlinear phenomena in multiferroic nanocapacitors: joule heating and electromechanical effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunseok; Kumar, Amit; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Han, Hee; Vrejoiu, Ionela; Lee, Woo; Hesse, Dietrich; Alexe, Marin; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2011-11-22

    We demonstrate an approach for probing nonlinear electromechanical responses in BiFeO(3) thin film nanocapacitors using half-harmonic band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Nonlinear PFM images of nanocapacitor arrays show clearly visible clusters of capacitors associated with variations of local leakage current through the BiFeO(3) film. Strain spectroscopy measurements and finite element modeling point to significance of the Joule heating and show that the thermal effects caused by the Joule heating can provide nontrivial contributions to the nonlinear electromechanical responses in ferroic nanostructures. This approach can be further extended to unambiguous mapping of electrostatic signal contributions to PFM and related techniques.

  10. Degenerate four-wave mixing from layered semiconductor clusters in the quantum size regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Rhee, Bum Ku; McGinnis, Brian P.; Sandroff, Claude J.

    1986-11-01

    We report the first measurement of the third-order nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) in layered semiconductor clusters exhibiting pronounced quantum size effects at room temperature. BiI3 clusters prepared in colloidal form in acetonitrile had a thickness of ≂7 Å and lateral dimensions between 60 and 90 Å. Using degenerate four-wave mixing, we observed that the conjugate pulses from the small and the large gratings had comparable intensities, verifying the electronic origin of the nonlinearity. The nonlinear susceptibility was found to be 2.3×10-11 esu for a colloid with a cluster volume fraction of 10-5.

  11. Nonlinear rotordynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The special nonlinearities of the Jeffcott equations in rotordynamics are examined. The immediate application of this analysis is directed toward understanding the excessive vibrations recorded in the LOX pump of the SSME during hot firing ground testing. Deadband, side force and rubbing are three possible sources of inducing nonlinearity in the Jeffcott equations. The present analysis initially reduces these problems to the same mathematical description. A special frequency, named the nonlinear natural frequency is defined and used to develop the solutions of the nonlinear Jeffcott equations as asympotic expansions. This nonlinear natural frequency which is the ratio of the cross-stiffness and the damping, plays a major role in determining response frequencies. Numerical solutions are included for comparison with the analysis. Also, nonlinear frequency-response tables are made for a typical range of values.

  12. Principles of Nonlinear Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    Holography 74 6.2 Semiclassical Analysis 77 7. The Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation and Soliton Propagation 81 8. Conclusion Ancession For 86 ETis -GRA...is analyzed through the nonlinear Schrodinger equation , which is first heuristically derived. The distortionless pulses arising out of a balance...Eq. (71) has the same form as the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (2], (4], [17], (20], which is used to explain soliton propagation through fibers (21

  13. Nonlinear Ship Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-07

    mrtegrating the original governing differential equation. 2. A. H. Nayfeh, " Parametric Identification of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems," Computers...Structures, Vol. 20. No. 1-3. 1985, pp. 487-493. A parametric identification technique that exploits nonlinear resonances and comparisons of the behavior of...617-631. Presentations 1. A. H. Vn’.yfeh, " Parametric Identification of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems," Symposium on Advances and Trends in Structures

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopy of nitromethane anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, Carrie Jo M.; Albury, Rachael M.; Goebbert, Daniel J.

    2016-08-01

    Nitromethane anion and nitromethane dimer, trimer, and hydrated cluster anions were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. Vertical detachment energies, estimated electron affinities, and solvation energies were obtained from the photoelectron spectra. Cluster structures were investigated using theoretical calculations. Predicted detachment energies agreed with experiment. Calculations show water binds to nitromethane anion through two hydrogen bonds. The dimer has a non-linear structure with a single ionic Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond. The trimer has two different solvent interactions, but both involve the weak Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond.

  15. Nonlinear magnetic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Shadrivov, Ilya V; Kozyrev, Alexander B; van der Weide, Daniel W; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2008-12-08

    We study experimentally nonlinear tunable magnetic metamaterials operating at microwave frequencies. We fabricate the nonlinear metamaterial composed of double split-ring resonators where a varactor diode is introduced into each resonator so that the magnetic resonance can be tuned dynamically by varying the input power. We demonstrate that at higher powers the transmission of the metamaterial becomes power-dependent and, as a result, such metamaterial can demonstrate various nonlinear properties. In particular, we study experimentally the power-dependent shift of the transmission band and demonstrate nonlinearity-induced enhancement (or suppression) of wave transmission.

  16. Nonlinearity-reduced interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chien-ming

    2007-12-01

    Periodic nonlinearity is a systematic error limiting the accuracy of displacement measurements at the nanometer level. It results from many causes such as the frequency mixing, polarization mixing, polarization-frequency mixing, and the ghost reflections. An interferometer having accuracy in displacement measurement of less than one-nanometer is necessary in nanometrology. To meet the requirement, the periodic nonlinearity should be less than deep sub-nanometer. In this paper, a nonlinearity-reduced interferometry has been proposed. Both the linear- and straightness-interferometer were tested. The developed interferometer demonstrated of a residual nonlinearity less than 25 pm.

  17. Nonextensivity and galaxy clustering in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuensche, C. A.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Ramos, F. M.; Rosa, R. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate two important questions about the use of the nonextensive thermostatistics (NETS) formalism in the context of nonlinear galaxy clustering in the Universe. Firstly, we define a quantitative criterion for justifying nonextensivity at different physical scales. Then, we discuss the physics behind the ansatz of the entropic parameter q(r). Our results suggest the approximate range where nonextensivity can be justified and, hence, give some support to the applicability of NETS to the study of large-scale structures.

  18. Spacecraft nonlinear control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheen, Jyh-Jong; Bishop, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    The feedback linearization technique is applied to the problem of spacecraft attitude control and momentum management with control moment gyros (CMGs). The feedback linearization consists of a coordinate transformation, which transforms the system to a companion form, and a nonlinear feedback control law to cancel the nonlinear dynamics resulting in a linear equivalent model. Pole placement techniques are then used to place the closed-loop poles. The coordinate transformation proposed here evolves from three output functions of relative degree four, three, and two, respectively. The nonlinear feedback control law is presented. Stability in a neighborhood of a controllable torque equilibrium attitude (TEA) is guaranteed and this fact is demonstrated by the simulation results. An investigation of the nonlinear control law shows that singularities exist in the state space outside the neighborhood of the controllable TEA. The nonlinear control law is simplified by a standard linearization technique and it is shown that the linearized nonlinear controller provides a natural way to select control gains for the multiple-input, multiple-output system. Simulation results using the linearized nonlinear controller show good performance relative to the nonlinear controller in the neighborhood of the TEA.

  19. Optically Nonlinear Polymeric Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    optical chromophores into the hydrophobic portions of the polymer, second order . ,nonlinear optical effects may be obtained. Experimental 01 0...8217V cinnamaldehyde , giving the polymer shown in Figure 3. This chromophore should have greater optical nonlinearity because of its better electron

  20. Nonlinear Optics and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin A. (Editor); Frazier, Donald O. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear optics is the result of laser beam interaction with materials and started with the advent of lasers in the early 1960s. The field is growing daily and plays a major role in emerging photonic technology. Nonlinear optics play a major role in many of the optical applications such as optical signal processing, optical computers, ultrafast switches, ultra-short pulsed lasers, sensors, laser amplifiers, and many others. This special review volume on Nonlinear Optics and Applications is intended for those who want to be aware of the most recent technology. This book presents a survey of the recent advances of nonlinear optical applications. Emphasis will be on novel devices and materials, switching technology, optical computing, and important experimental results. Recent developments in topics which are of historical interest to researchers, and in the same time of potential use in the fields of all-optical communication and computing technologies, are also included. Additionally, a few new related topics which might provoke discussion are presented. The book includes chapters on nonlinear optics and applications; the nonlinear Schrodinger and associated equations that model spatio-temporal propagation; the supercontinuum light source; wideband ultrashort pulse fiber laser sources; lattice fabrication as well as their linear and nonlinear light guiding properties; the second-order EO effect (Pockels), the third-order (Kerr) and thermo-optical effects in optical waveguides and their applications in optical communication; and, the effect of magnetic field and its role in nonlinear optics, among other chapters.

  1. Nonlinear Maneuver Autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Badgett, M. E.; Walker, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Trajectory-control laws based on singular-perturbation theory and nonlinear dynamical modeling. Nonlinear maneuver autopilot commands flight-test trajectories of F-15 airplane. Underlying theory of controller enables separation of variables processed in fast and slow control loops, reducing amount of computation required.

  2. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  3. Scatter/Gather Clustering: Flexibly Incorporating User Feedback to Steer Clustering Results.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M S; Ojili, Praveen Kumar Reddy; Grimm, C; Muller, R; Watson, L T; Ramakrishnan, N

    2012-12-01

    Significant effort has been devoted to designing clustering algorithms that are responsive to user feedback or that incorporate prior domain knowledge in the form of constraints. However, users desire more expressive forms of interaction to influence clustering outcomes. In our experiences working with diverse application scientists, we have identified an interaction style scatter/gather clustering that helps users iteratively restructure clustering results to meet their expectations. As the names indicate, scatter and gather are dual primitives that describe whether clusters in a current segmentation should be broken up further or, alternatively, brought back together. By combining scatter and gather operations in a single step, we support very expressive dynamic restructurings of data. Scatter/gather clustering is implemented using a nonlinear optimization framework that achieves both locality of clusters and satisfaction of user-supplied constraints. We illustrate the use of our scatter/gather clustering approach in a visual analytic application to study baffle shapes in the bat biosonar (ears and nose) system. We demonstrate how domain experts are adept at supplying scatter/gather constraints, and how our framework incorporates these constraints effectively without requiring numerous instance-level constraints.

  4. On the origin of nonlinear elasticity in disparate rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Riviere, Jacques Vincent; Shokouhi, Parisa; Guyer, Robert A.; Johnson, Paul Allan

    2015-03-31

    Dynamic acousto-elastic (DAE) studies are performed on a set of 6 rock samples (four sandstones, one soapstone, and one granite). From these studies, at 20 strain levels 10-7 < ϵ < 10-5, four measures characterizing the nonlinear elastic response of each sample are found. Additionally, each sample is tested with nonlinear resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy (NRUS) and a fth measure of nonlinear elastic response is found. The ve measures of the nonlinear elastic response of the samples (approximately 3 x 6 x 20 x 5 numbers as each measurement is repeated 3 times) are subjected to careful analysis using model independent statistical methods, principal component analysis and fuzzy clustering. This analysis reveals di erences among the samples and di erences among the nonlinear measures. Four of the nonlinear measures are sensing much the same physical mechanism in the samples. The fth is seeing something di erent. This is the case for all samples. Although the same physical mechanisms (two) are operating in all samples there are distinctive features in the way the physical mechanisms present themselves from sample to sample. This suggests classi cation of the samples into two groups. The numbers in this study and the classi cation of the measures/samples constitute an empirical characterization of rock nonlinear elastic properties that can serve as a valuable testing ground for physically based theories that relate rock nonlinear elastic properties to microscopic elastic features.

  5. On the origin of nonlinear elasticity in disparate rocks

    DOE PAGES

    Riviere, Jacques Vincent; Shokouhi, Parisa; Guyer, Robert A.; ...

    2015-03-31

    Dynamic acousto-elastic (DAE) studies are performed on a set of 6 rock samples (four sandstones, one soapstone, and one granite). From these studies, at 20 strain levels 10-7 < ϵ < 10-5, four measures characterizing the nonlinear elastic response of each sample are found. Additionally, each sample is tested with nonlinear resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy (NRUS) and a fth measure of nonlinear elastic response is found. The ve measures of the nonlinear elastic response of the samples (approximately 3 x 6 x 20 x 5 numbers as each measurement is repeated 3 times) are subjected to careful analysis using model independentmore » statistical methods, principal component analysis and fuzzy clustering. This analysis reveals di erences among the samples and di erences among the nonlinear measures. Four of the nonlinear measures are sensing much the same physical mechanism in the samples. The fth is seeing something di erent. This is the case for all samples. Although the same physical mechanisms (two) are operating in all samples there are distinctive features in the way the physical mechanisms present themselves from sample to sample. This suggests classi cation of the samples into two groups. The numbers in this study and the classi cation of the measures/samples constitute an empirical characterization of rock nonlinear elastic properties that can serve as a valuable testing ground for physically based theories that relate rock nonlinear elastic properties to microscopic elastic features.« less

  6. Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Small Silicon Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Wang , N. Herron, W. Mahler and A. Suna, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 6, 808 (1989). 6. Y. Q. Li, C. C. Sung, R. Inguva and C. M. Bowden, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 6, 814...J. Tersoff, Phys. Rev. B 37, 6991 (1988); R. Biswas, C. Z. Wang , C. T. Chan, K. M. Ho and C. M. Souk- oulis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 1491 (1989); A. D...IL 60208 Irvine, CA 92717 Professor Frank DiSalvo Professor Roald Hoffmann Department of Chemistry Department of Chemistry Cornell University Cornell

  7. Spatial Frequency Clustering in Nonlinear Dust-Density Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, K. O.; Arp, O.; Piel, A.

    2010-06-11

    Self-excited density waves were studied in a strongly coupled dusty plasma of a radio-frequency discharge under microgravity conditions. The spatiotemporal evolution of the complicated three-dimensional wave field was investigated and analyzed for two different situations. The reconstructed instantaneous phase information of the wave field revealed a partial synchronization within multiple distinct domains. The boundaries of these regions coincide with the locations of topological defects.

  8. Nonlinear onset of calcium wave propagation in cardiac cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous calcium (Ca) waves in cardiac myocytes are known to underlie a wide range of cardiac arrhythmias. However, it is not understood which physiological parameters determine the onset of waves. In this study, we explore the relationship between Ca signaling between ion channels and the nucleation of Ca waves. In particular, we apply a master equation approach to analyze the stochastic interaction between neighboring clusters of ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels. Using this analysis, we show that signaling between clusters can be described as a barrier hopping process with exponential sensitivity to system parameters. A consequence of this feature is that the probability that Ca release at a cluster induces release at a neighboring cluster exhibits a sigmoid dependence on the Ca content in the cell. This nonlinearity originates from the regulation of RyR opening due to more than one Ca ion binding site, in conjunction with Ca mediated cooperativity between RyR channels in clusters. We apply a spatially distributed stochastic model of Ca cycling to analyze the physiological consequences of this nonlinearity, and show that it explains the sharp onset of Ca wave nucleation in cardiac cells. Furthermore, we show that this sharp onset can serve as a mechanism for Ca alternans under physiologically relevant conditions. Thus our findings identify the nonlinear features of Ca signaling which potentially underlie the onset of Ca waves and Ca alternans in cardiac cells.

  9. Fractal dimension of critical clusters in the Φ44 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, K.; Lang, C. B.

    1991-06-01

    We study the d=4 O(4) symmetric nonlinear sigma model at the pseudocritical points for 84-284 lattices. The Fortuin-Kasteleyn-Coniglio-Klein clusters are shown to have fractal dimension df~=3-in accordance with the conjectured scaling relation involving the odd critical exponent δ. For the one cluster algorithm introduced recently by Wolff the dynamical critical exponent z comes out to be compatible with zero in this model.

  10. Nonlinear cochlear mechanics.

    PubMed

    Zweig, George

    2016-05-01

    An earlier paper characterizing the linear mechanical response of the organ of Corti [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 138, 1102-1121 (2015)] is extended to the nonlinear domain. Assuming the existence of nonlinear oscillators nonlocally coupled through the pressure they help create, the oscillator equations are derived and examined when the stimuli are modulated tones and clicks. The nonlinearities are constrained by the requirements of oscillator stability and the invariance of zero crossings in the click response to changes in click amplitude. The nonlinear oscillator equations for tones are solved in terms of the fluid pressure that drives them, and its time derivative, presumably a proxy for forces created by outer hair cells. The pressure equation is reduced to quadrature, the integrand depending on the oscillators' responses. The resulting nonlocally coupled nonlinear equations for the pressure, and oscillator amplitudes and phases, are solved numerically in terms of the fluid pressure at the stapes. Methods for determining the nonlinear damping directly from measurements are described. Once the oscillators have been characterized from their tone and click responses, the mechanical response of the cochlea to natural sounds may be computed numerically. Signal processing inspired by cochlear mechanics opens up a new area of nonlocal nonlinear time-frequency analysis.

  11. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  12. Turbulent Reconnection Rates from Cluster Observations in the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendel, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    The role of turbulence in producing fast reconnection rates is an important unresolved question. Scant in situ analyses exist. We apply multiple spacecraft techniques to a case of nonlinear turbulent reconnection in the magnetosheath to test various theoretical results for turbulent reconnection rates. To date, in situ estimates of the contribution of turbulence to reconnection rates have been calculated from an effective electric field derived through linear wave theory. However, estimates of reconnection rates based on fully nonlinear turbulence theories and simulations exist that are amenable to multiple spacecraft analyses. Here we present the linear and nonlinear theories and apply some of the nonlinear rates to Cluster observations of reconnecting, turbulent current sheets in the magnetosheath. We compare the results to the net reconnection rate found from the inflow speed. Ultimately, we intend to test and compare linear and nonlinear estimates of the turbulent contribution to reconnection rates and to measure the relative contributions of turbulence and the Hall effect.

  13. Turbulent Reconnection Rates from Cluster Observations in the Magneto sheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendel, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    The role of turbulence in producing fast reconnection rates is an important unresolved question. Scant in situ analyses exist. We apply multiple spacecraft techniques to a case of nonlinear turbulent reconnection in the magnetosheath to test various theoretical results for turbulent reconnection rates. To date, in situ estimates of the contribution of turbulence to reconnection rates have been calculated from an effective electric field derived through linear wave theory. However, estimates of reconnection rates based on fully nonlinear turbulence theories and simulations exist that are amenable to multiple spacecraft analyses. Here we present the linear and nonlinear theories and apply some of the nonlinear rates to Cluster observations of reconnecting, turbulent current sheets in the magnetos heath. We compare the results to the net reconnection rate found from the inflow speed. Ultimately, we intend to test and compare linear and nonlinear estimates of the turbulent contribution to reconnection rates and to measure the relative contributions of turbulence and the Hall effect.

  14. Metamaterials with conformational nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Lapine, Mikhail; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Powell, David A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2011-01-01

    Within a decade of fruitful development, metamaterials became a prominent area of research, bridging theoretical and applied electrodynamics, electrical engineering and material science. Being man-made structures, metamaterials offer a particularly useful playground to develop interdisciplinary concepts. Here we demonstrate a novel principle in metamaterial assembly which integrates electromagnetic, mechanical, and thermal responses within their elements. Through these mechanisms, the conformation of the meta-molecules changes, providing a dual mechanism for nonlinearity and offering nonlinear chirality. Our proposal opens a wide road towards further developments of nonlinear metamaterials and photonic structures, adding extra flexibility to their design and control. PMID:22355655

  15. Nonlinear ordinary difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Future space vehicles will be relatively large and flexible, and active control will be necessary to maintain geometrical configuration. While the stresses and strains in these space vehicles are not expected to be excessively large, their cumulative effects will cause significant geometrical nonlinearities to appear in the equations of motion, in addition to the nonlinearities caused by material properties. Since the only effective tool for the analysis of such large complex structures is the digital computer, it will be necessary to gain a better understanding of the nonlinear ordinary difference equations which result from the time discretization of the semidiscrete equations of motion for such structures.

  16. Nonlinear optomechanical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Claudio; Boyd, Robert

    2014-03-01

    A transparent material exhibits ultrafast optical nonlinearity and is subject to optical pressure if irradiated by a laser beam. However, the effect of nonlinearity on optical pressure is often overlooked, even if a nonlinear optical pressure may be potentially employed in many applications, such as optical manipulation, biophysics, cavity optomechanics, quantum optics, and optical tractors, and is relevant in fundamental problems such as the Abraham-Minkoswky dilemma or the Casimir effect. Here, we show that an ultrafast nonlinear polarization gives indeed a contribution to the optical pressure that also is negative in certain spectral ranges; the theoretical analysis is confirmed by first-principles simulations. An order-of-magnitude estimate shows that the effect can be observable by measuring the deflection of a membrane made by graphene.

  17. Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear structural analysis techniques for engine structures and components are addressed. The finite element method and boundary element method are discussed in terms of stress and structural analyses of shells, plates, and laminates.

  18. Nonlinear Dynamics in Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of many cardiac arrhythmias, as well as the nature of transitions between different heart rhythms, have long been considered evidence of nonlinear phenomena playing a direct role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. In most types of cardiac disease, the pathology develops slowly and gradually, often over many years. In contrast, arrhythmias often occur suddenly. In nonlinear systems, sudden changes in qualitative dynamics can, counter-intuitively, result from a gradual change in a system parameter –this is known as a bifurcation. Here, we review how nonlinearities in cardiac electrophysiology influence normal and abnormal rhythms and how bifurcations change the dynamics. In particular, we focus on the many recent developments in computational modeling at the cellular level focused on intracellular calcium dynamics. We discuss two areas where recent experimental and modeling work have suggested the importance of nonlinearities in calcium dynamics: repolarization alternans and pacemaker cell automaticity. PMID:22524390

  19. Clustering instability of focused swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Nadal, Francois

    2016-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of active matter is its rich nonlinear dynamics and instabilities. Recent numerical simulations of phototactic algae showed that a thin jet of swimmers, obtained from hydrodynamic focusing inside a Poiseuille flow, was unstable to longitudinal perturbations with swimmers dynamically clustering (Jibuti L. et al., Phys. Rev. E, 90, (2014) 063019). As a simple starting point to understand these instabilities, we consider in this paper an initially homogeneous one-dimensional line of aligned swimmers moving along the same direction, and characterise its instability using both a continuum framework and a discrete approach. In both cases, we show that hydrodynamic interactions between the swimmers lead to instabilities in density for which we compute the growth rate analytically. Lines of pusher-type swimmers are predicted to remain stable while lines of pullers (such as flagellated algae) are predicted to always be unstable.

  20. Electron clusters in inert gases.

    PubMed

    Nazin, S; Shikin, V

    2008-10-17

    This Letter addresses the counterintuitive behavior of electrons injected into dense cryogenic media with negative scattering length L. Instead of strongly reduced mobility at all but the lowest densities due to the polaronic effect involving the formation of density enhancement clusters (expected in the theory with a simple gas-electron interaction successfully applied earlier to electrons in helium where L>0) which should substantially decrease the electron mobility, an opposite picture is observed: with increasing |L| (the trend taking place for inert gases with the growth of atomic number) and the gas density, the electrons remain practically free. An explanation of this behavior is provided based on consistent accounting for the nonlinearity of the electron interaction with the gaseous medium in the gas atom number density.

  1. Adaptive and Nonlinear Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-29

    in [22], we also applied the concept of zero dynamics to the problem of exact linearization of a nonlinear control system by dynamic feedback. Exact ...nonlinear systems, although it was well-known that the conditions for exact linearization are very stringent and consequently do not apply to a broad...29th IEEE Conference n Decision and Control, Invited Paper delivered by Dr. Gilliam. Exact Linearization of Zero Dynamics, 29th IEEE Conference on

  2. Perturbed nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    For perturbed nonlinear systems, a norm, other than the supremum norm, is introduced on some spaces of continuous functions. This makes possible the study of new types of behavior. A study is presented on a perturbed nonlinear differential equation defined on a half line, and the existence of a family of solutions with special boundedness properties is established. The ideas developed are applied to the study of integral manifolds, and examples are given.

  3. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sandor

    Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard ΛCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant (Λ) and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM), structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging. Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang, hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics. The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions: the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulence are developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thus our review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clusters is to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses. New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopes will come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities, we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  4. Robust Nonlinear Neural Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qianli; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Most interesting natural sensory stimuli are encoded in the brain in a form that can only be decoded nonlinearly. But despite being a core function of the brain, nonlinear population codes are rarely studied and poorly understood. Interestingly, the few existing models of nonlinear codes are inconsistent with known architectural features of the brain. In particular, these codes have information content that scales with the size of the cortical population, even if that violates the data processing inequality by exceeding the amount of information entering the sensory system. Here we provide a valid theory of nonlinear population codes by generalizing recent work on information-limiting correlations in linear population codes. Although these generalized, nonlinear information-limiting correlations bound the performance of any decoder, they also make decoding more robust to suboptimal computation, allowing many suboptimal decoders to achieve nearly the same efficiency as an optimal decoder. Although these correlations are extremely difficult to measure directly, particularly for nonlinear codes, we provide a simple, practical test by which one can use choice-related activity in small populations of neurons to determine whether decoding is suboptimal or optimal and limited by correlated noise. We conclude by describing an example computation in the vestibular system where this theory applies. QY and XP was supported by a grant from the McNair foundation.

  5. Nonlinear systems in medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Many achievements in medicine have come from applying linear theory to problems. Most current methods of data analysis use linear models, which are based on proportionality between two variables and/or relationships described by linear differential equations. However, nonlinear behavior commonly occurs within human systems due to their complex dynamic nature; this cannot be described adequately by linear models. Nonlinear thinking has grown among physiologists and physicians over the past century, and non-linear system theories are beginning to be applied to assist in interpreting, explaining, and predicting biological phenomena. Chaos theory describes elements manifesting behavior that is extremely sensitive to initial conditions, does not repeat itself and yet is deterministic. Complexity theory goes one step beyond chaos and is attempting to explain complex behavior that emerges within dynamic nonlinear systems. Nonlinear modeling still has not been able to explain all of the complexity present in human systems, and further models still need to be refined and developed. However, nonlinear modeling is helping to explain some system behaviors that linear systems cannot and thus will augment our understanding of the nature of complex dynamic systems within the human body in health and in disease states. PMID:14580107

  6. Pescara benchmarks: nonlinear identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandino, E.; Garibaldi, L.; Marchesiello, S.

    2011-07-01

    Recent nonlinear methods are suitable for identifying large systems with lumped nonlinearities, but in practice most structural nonlinearities are distributed and an ideal nonlinear identification method should cater for them as well. In order to extend the current NSI method to be applied also on realistic large engineering structures, a modal counterpart of the method is proposed in this paper. The modal NSI technique is applied on one of the reinforced concrete beams that have been tested in Pescara, under the project titled "Monitoring and diagnostics of railway bridges by means of the analysis of the dynamic response due to train crossing", financed by Italian Ministry of Research. The beam showed a softening nonlinear behaviour, so that the nonlinearity concerning the first mode is characterized and its force contribution is quantified. Moreover, estimates for the modal parameters are obtained and the model is validated by comparing the measured and the reconstructed output. The identified estimates are also used to accurately predict the behaviour of the same beam, when subject to different initial conditions.

  7. Gold-bismuth clusters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana

    2014-08-07

    Metal clusters have interesting characteristics, such as the relationship between properties and size of the cluster. This is not always apparent, so theoretical studies can provide relevant information. In this report, optimized structures and electron donor-acceptor properties of AunBim clusters are reported (n + m = 2-7, 20). Density functional theory calculations were performed to obtain optimized structures. The ground states of gold clusters formed with up to seven atoms are planar. The presence of Bi modifies the structure, and the clusters become 3-D. Several optimized geometries have at least one Bi atom bonded to gold or bismuth atoms and form structures similar to NH3. This fragment is also present in clusters with 20 atoms, where the formation of Au3Bi stabilizes the structures. Bismuth clusters are better electron donors and worse electron acceptors than gold clusters. Mixed clusters fall in between these two extremes. The presence of Bi atoms in gold clusters modifies the electron donor-acceptor properties of the clusters, but there is no correlation between the number of Bi atoms present in the cluster and the capacity for donating electrons. The effect of planarity in Au19Bi clusters is the same as that in Au20 clusters. The properties of pure gold clusters are certainly interesting, but clusters formed by Bi and Au are more important because the introduction of different atoms modifies the geometry, the stability, and consequently the physical and chemical properties. Apparently, the presence of Bi may increase the reactivity of gold clusters, but further studies are necessary to corroborate this hypothesis.

  8. Final report for the NSF/DOE partnership in basic plasma science grant DE-FG02-06ER54906 'Laser-driven collisionless shocks in the Large Plasma Device'

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, Christoph; Gekelman, W.; Winske, D.; Larsen, D.

    2012-12-14

    We have performed several thousand high-energy laser shots in the LAPD to investigate the dynamics of an exploding laser-produced plasma in a large ambient magneto-plasma. Debris-ions expanding at super-Alfvenic velocity (up to MA=1.5) expel the ambient magnetic field, creating a large (> 20 cm) diamagnetic cavity. We observed field compressions of up to B/B{sub 0} = 1.5 at the edge of the bubble, consistent with the MHD jump conditions, as well as localized electron heating at the edge of the bubble. Two-dimensional hybrid simulations reproduce these measurements well and show that the majority of the ambient ions are energized by the magnetic piston to super-Alfvenic speeds and swept outside the bubble volume. Nonlinear shear-Alfven waves ({delta}B/B{sub 0} > 25%) are radiated from the cavity with a coupling efficiency of 70% from magnetic energy in the bubble to the wave. While the data is consistent with a weak magneto-sonic shock, the experiments were severely limited by the low ambient plasma densities (10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}). 2D hybrid simulations indicate that future experiments with the new LAPD plasma source and densities in excess of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} will drive full-blown collisionless shocks with MA>10 over several c/wpi and shocked Larmor radii. In a separate experiment at the LANL Trident laser facility we have performed a proof-of-principle experiment at higher densities to demonstrate key elements of collisionless shocks in laser-produced magnetized plasmas with important implications to NIF. Simultaneously we have upgraded the UCLA glass-laser system by adding two large amplitude disk amplifiers from the NOVA laser and boost the on-target energy from 30 J to up to 1 kJ, making this one of the world’s largest university-scale laser systems. We now have the infrastructure in place to perform novel and unique high-impact experiments on collision-less shocks at the LAPD.

  9. Multigrid techniques for nonlinear eigenvalue probems: Solutions of a nonlinear Schroedinger eigenvalue problem in 2D and 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costiner, Sorin; Taasan, Shlomo

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents multigrid (MG) techniques for nonlinear eigenvalue problems (EP) and emphasizes an MG algorithm for a nonlinear Schrodinger EP. The algorithm overcomes the mentioned difficulties combining the following techniques: an MG projection coupled with backrotations for separation of solutions and treatment of difficulties related to clusters of close and equal eigenvalues; MG subspace continuation techniques for treatment of the nonlinearity; an MG simultaneous treatment of the eigenvectors at the same time with the nonlinearity and with the global constraints. The simultaneous MG techniques reduce the large number of self consistent iterations to only a few or one MG simultaneous iteration and keep the solutions in a right neighborhood where the algorithm converges fast.

  10. Nuclear Clusters in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Kahl, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  11. Matlab Cluster Ensemble Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Sapio, Vincent De; Kegelmeyer, Philip

    2009-04-27

    This is a Matlab toolbox for investigating the application of cluster ensembles to data classification, with the objective of improving the accuracy and/or speed of clustering. The toolbox divides the cluster ensemble problem into four areas, providing functionality for each. These include, (1) synthetic data generation, (2) clustering to generate individual data partitions and similarity matrices, (3) consensus function generation and final clustering to generate ensemble data partitioning, and (4) implementation of accuracy metrics. With regard to data generation, Gaussian data of arbitrary dimension can be generated. The kcenters algorithm can then be used to generate individual data partitions by either, (a) subsampling the data and clustering each subsample, or by (b) randomly initializing the algorithm and generating a clustering for each initialization. In either case an overall similarity matrix can be computed using a consensus function operating on the individual similarity matrices. A final clustering can be performed and performance metrics are provided for evaluation purposes.

  12. [Pathophysiology of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Donnet, Anne

    2015-11-01

    The aetiology of cluster headache is partially unknown. Three areas are involved in the pathogenesis of cluster headache: the trigeminal nociceptive pathways, the autonomic system and the hypothalamus. The cluster headache attack involves activation of the trigeminal autonomic reflex. A dysfunction located in posterior hypothalamic gray matter is probably pivotal in the process. There is a probable association between smoke exposure, a possible genetic predisposition and the development of cluster headache.

  13. Clustering algorithm studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2001-07-01

    An object-oriented framework for undertaking clustering algorithm studies has been developed. We present here the definitions for the abstract Cells and Clusters as well as the interface for the algorithm. We intend to use this framework to investigate the interplay between various clustering algorithms and the resulting jet reconstruction efficiency and energy resolutions to assist in the design of the calorimeter detector.

  14. From trans-[(eta5-C5Me5)2Mo2S2(mu-S)2] to [(eta5-C5Me5)2Mo2(mu3-S)4(CuMeCN)2]2+ to [(eta5-C5Me5)2Mo2(mu3-S)4Cu2]-based polymeric and dimeric clusters: syntheses, structures and enhanced third-order non-linear optical performances.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Jun-Yi; Song, Ying-Lin; Li, Ni-Ya; Li, Hong-Xi; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Lang, Jian-Ping

    2009-04-14

    Reactions of trans-[(eta5-C5Me5)2Mo2S2(mu-S)2] (1) with 2 equiv. of [Cu(MeCN)4]X (X = PF6-, ClO4-) produced two acetonitrile-coordinated cubane-like cationic clusters [(eta5-C5Me5)2Mo2(mu3-S)4Cu2(MeCN)2]X2 (X = PF6- (2), ClO4- (3)). Treatment of 2 or 3 with 4,4'-bipyridine (4,4'-bipy) or trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene) (bpee) afforded two polymeric clusters {[(eta5-C5Me5)2Mo2(mu3-S)4Cu2(L)]X2}n (4: L = 4,4'-bipy, X = PF6-; 5: L = bpee, X = ClO4-), while analogous reactions of 2 or 3 with 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (bpea), 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphine)ethane (dppe), or 1,4-bis-(diphenylphosphine)butane) (dppb) formed three dimeric clusters [(eta5-C5Me5)2Mo2(mu3-S)4Cu2(L)]2X4 (6: L = bpea; X = PF6-; 7: L = dppe, X = ClO4-; 8: L = dppb, X = ClO4-). Clusters 2-8 consist of a cubane-like [(eta5-C5Me5)2Mo2(mu3-S)4Cu2] core with each Cu being coordinated by one labile MeCN molecule (2, 3) or by bridging dipyridyl or diphosphino ligands (4-8). 4 or 5 has a 1D zigzag chain structure while 6-8 contain cyclic dimeric structures. The third-order non-linear optical (NLO) properties of 2-8 in MeCN were investigated by Z-scan technique at 532 nm. These compounds showed strong third-order NLO absorption effects and self-defocusing properties, and their NLO performances were remarkably enhanced relative to those of 1.

  15. Algebraic Nonlinear Collective Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troupe, J.; Rosensteel, G.

    1998-11-01

    Finite-dimensional Lie algebras of vector fields determine geometrical collective models in quantum and classical physics. Every set of vector fields on Euclidean space that generates the Lie algebra sl(3, R) and contains the angular momentum algebra so(3) is determined. The subset of divergence-free sl(3, R) vector fields is proven to be indexed by a real numberΛ. TheΛ=0 solution is the linear representation that corresponds to the Riemann ellipsoidal model. The nonlinear group action on Euclidean space transforms a certain family of deformed droplets among themselves. For positiveΛ, the droplets have a neck that becomes more pronounced asΛincreases; for negativeΛ, the droplets contain a spherical bubble of radius |Λ|1/3. The nonlinear vector field algebra is extended to the nonlinear general collective motion algebra gcm(3) which includes the inertia tensor. The quantum algebraic models of nonlinear nuclear collective motion are given by irreducible unitary representations of the nonlinear gcm(3) Lie algebra. These representations model fissioning isotopes (Λ>0) and bubble and two-fluid nuclei (Λ<0).

  16. Reproductive pair correlations and the clustering of organisms.

    PubMed

    Young, W R; Roberts, A J; Stuhne, G

    2001-07-19

    Clustering of organisms can be a consequence of social behaviour, or of the response of individuals to chemical and physical cues. Environmental variability can also cause clustering: for example, marine turbulence transports plankton and produces chlorophyll concentration patterns in the upper ocean. Even in a homogeneous environment, nonlinear interactions between species can result in spontaneous pattern formation. Here we show that a population of independent, random-walking organisms ('brownian bugs'), reproducing by binary division and dying at constant rates, spontaneously aggregates. Using an individual-based model, we show that clusters form out of spatially homogeneous initial conditions without environmental variability, predator-prey interactions, kinesis or taxis. The clustering mechanism is reproductively driven-birth must always be adjacent to a living organism. This clustering can overwhelm diffusion and create non-poissonian correlations between pairs (parent and offspring) or organisms, leading to the emergence of patterns.

  17. Reproductive pair correlations and the clustering of organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, W. R.; Roberts, A. J.; Stuhne, G.

    2001-07-01

    Clustering of organisms can be a consequence of social behaviour, or of the response of individuals to chemical and physical cues. Environmental variability can also cause clustering: for example, marine turbulence transports plankton and produces chlorophyll concentration patterns in the upper ocean. Even in a homogeneous environment, nonlinear interactions between species can result in spontaneous pattern formation. Here we show that a population of independent, random-walking organisms (`brownian bugs'), reproducing by binary division and dying at constant rates, spontaneously aggregates. Using an individual-based model, we show that clusters form out of spatially homogeneous initial conditions without environmental variability, predator-prey interactions, kinesis or taxis. The clustering mechanism is reproductively driven-birth must always be adjacent to a living organism. This clustering can overwhelm diffusion and create non-poissonian correlations between pairs (parent and offspring) or organisms, leading to the emergence of patterns.

  18. A new clustering strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-xin; Tang, Jia-fu; Wang, Guang-xing

    2007-04-01

    On the basis of the analysis of clustering algorithm that had been proposed for MANET, a novel clustering strategy was proposed in this paper. With the trust defined by statistical hypothesis in probability theory and the cluster head selected by node trust and node mobility, this strategy can realize the function of the malicious nodes detection which was neglected by other clustering algorithms and overcome the deficiency of being incapable of implementing the relative mobility metric of corresponding nodes in the MOBIC algorithm caused by the fact that the receiving power of two consecutive HELLO packet cannot be measured. It's an effective solution to cluster MANET securely.

  19. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  20. Unconventional methods for clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Cluster analysis or clustering is a task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a cluster) are more similar (in some sense or another) to each other than to those in other groups (clusters). It is the main task of exploratory data mining and a common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine learning, pattern recognition, image analysis, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. The topic of this paper is one of the modern methods of clustering namely SOM (Self Organising Map). The paper describes the theory needed to understand the principle of clustering and descriptions of algorithm used with clustering in our experiments.

  1. Nonlinear Waves in Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leble, Sergei B.

    S.B. Leble's book deals with nonlinear waves and their propagation in metallic and dielectric waveguides and media with stratification. The underlying nonlinear evolution equations (NEEs) are derived giving also their solutions for specific situations. The reader will find new elements to the traditional approach. Various dispersion and relaxation laws for different guides are considered as well as the explicit form of projection operators, NEEs, quasi-solitons and of Darboux transforms. Special points relate to: 1. the development of a universal asymptotic method of deriving NEEs for guide propagation; 2. applications to the cases of stratified liquids, gases, solids and plasmas with various nonlinearities and dispersion laws; 3. connections between the basic problem and soliton- like solutions of the corresponding NEEs; 4. discussion of details of simple solutions in higher- order nonsingular perturbation theory.

  2. Nonlinear optomechanics with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Airlia; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Wang, Ke; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    To date, studies of cavity optomechanics have been limited to exploiting the linear interactions between the light and mechanics. However, investigations of quantum signal transduction, quantum enhanced metrology and manybody physics with optomechanics each require strong, nonlinear interactions. Graphene nanomembranes are an exciting prospect for realizing such studies due to their inherently nonlinear nature and low mass. We fabricate large graphene nanomembranes and study their mechanical and optical properties. By using dark ground imaging techniques, we correlate their eigenmode shapes with the measured dissipation. We study their hysteretic response present even at low driving amplitudes, and their nonlinear dissipation. Finally, we discuss ongoing efforts to use these resonators for studies of quantum optomechanics and force sensing. This work is supported by the DARPA QuASAR program through a Grant from the ARO.

  3. Nonlinear optical Galton board

    SciTech Connect

    Navarrete-Benlloch, C.; Perez, A.; Roldan, Eugenio

    2007-06-15

    We generalize the concept of optical Galton board (OGB), first proposed by Bouwmeester et al. [Phys. Rev. A 61, 013410 (2000)], by introducing the possibility of nonlinear self-phase modulation on the wave function during the walker evolution. If the original Galton board illustrates classical diffusion, the OGB, which can be understood as a grid of Landau-Zener crossings, illustrates the influence of interference on diffusion, and is closely connected with the quantum walk. Our nonlinear generalization of the OGB shows new phenomena, the most striking of which is the formation of nondispersive pulses in the field distribution (solitonlike structures). These exhibit a variety of dynamical behaviors, including ballistic motion, dynamical localization, nonelastic collisions, and chaotic behavior, in the sense that the dynamics is very sensitive to the nonlinearity strength.

  4. Discrete Integrable Systems and Poisson Algebras From Cluster Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordy, Allan P.; Hone, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We consider nonlinear recurrences generated from cluster mutations applied to quivers that have the property of being cluster mutation-periodic with period 1. Such quivers were completely classified by Fordy and Marsh, who characterised them in terms of the skew-symmetric matrix that defines the quiver. The associated nonlinear recurrences are equivalent to birational maps, and we explain how these maps can be endowed with an invariant Poisson bracket and/or presymplectic structure. Upon applying the algebraic entropy test, we are led to a series of conjectures which imply that the entropy of the cluster maps can be determined from their tropical analogues, which leads to a sharp classification result. Only four special families of these maps should have zero entropy. These families are examined in detail, with many explicit examples given, and we show how they lead to discrete dynamics that is integrable in the Liouville-Arnold sense.

  5. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Betancourt, O.; Garabedian, P.

    1981-01-01

    The computer code developed by Bauer et al. (1978) for the study of the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of a plasma in toroidal geometry is extended so that the growth rates of instabilities may be estimated more accurately. The original code, which is based on the variational principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics, is upgraded by the introduction of a nonlinear formula for the growth rate of an unstable mode which acts as a quantitative measure of instability that is important in estimating numerical errors. The revised code has been applied to the determination of the nonlinear saturation, ballooning modes and beta limits for tokamaks, stellarators and torsatrons.

  6. Nonlinear Fault Diagnosis,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Systems, New York, Marcel Dekker, (to appear). 3. Desoer , C.A. and S.E. Kuh, Basic Circuit Theory, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1969, pp. 423-425. 130 NONLINEAR...DIAGNOSIS A 7*ssior For 1 MU3 CRA&T IY’IC TAB Ju-st i.cat IC- P.U A: CONTENTS Fault Diagnosis in Electronic Circuits , R. Saeks and R.-w. Liu...Vincentelli and R. Saeks .............. 61 Multitest Diagnosibility of Nonlinear Circuits and Systems, A. Sangiovanni-Vincentelli and R. Saeks

  7. Nonlinear Wave Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-07

    honeycomb lattices, M.J. Ablowitz and Y. Zhu, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 87 (2013) 19591979 11. Nonlinear Temporal-Spatial Surface Plasmon Polaritons , M. J. Ablowitz...temporal-spatial surface plasmon polaritons . Op- tics Communications, 330:49–55, 2014. 37 [39] M.C. Rechtsman, Y. Plotnik, J.M. Zeuner, , D. Song, Z...honeycomb lattices, M.J. Ablowitz and Y. Zhu, SIAM J. Appl. Math., Vol. 87 (2013) 1959-1979 11. Nonlinear Temporal-Spatial Surface Plasmon Polaritons

  8. Problems of nonlinear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoliuk, E. I.; Shalashilin, V. I.

    A method of continuing the solution is discussed with respect to a parameter for a certain class of nonlinear problems in solid mechanics. Modifications of the method are developed in order to implement a unified continuation process at regular and limit points in the set of solutions, with extensions to nonlinear boundary value problems. Algorithms are developed for solving large deflection problems of elastic arches and large axisymmetric deflection problems for shells of revolution. In particular, the algorithms are used for the analysis of large deflections of circular arches and toroidal shells. Examples of natural vibration and stability problems for parallelograms and trapezoidal membranes and panels are given.

  9. Solitons in nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Maimistov, Andrei I

    2010-11-13

    The classic examples of optical phenomena resulting in the appearance of solitons are self-focusing, self-induced transparency, and parametric three-wave interaction. To date, the list of the fields of nonlinear optics and models where solitons play an important role has significantly expanded. Now long-lived or stable solitary waves are called solitons, including, for example, dissipative, gap, parametric, and topological solitons. This review considers nonlinear optics models giving rise to the appearance of solitons in a narrow sense: solitary waves corresponding to the solutions of completely integrable systems of equations basic for the models being discussed. (review)

  10. Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Ellwood

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

  11. Nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging.

    PubMed

    Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A

    2004-03-26

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) processes are "coherent," but the phase of the anti-Stokes radiation is lost by most incoherent spectroscopic CARS measurements. We propose a Raman microscopy imaging method called nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging, which measures Raman spectra by obtaining the temporal anti-Stokes signal through nonlinear interferometry. With a more complete knowledge of the anti-Stokes signal, we show through simulations that a high-resolution Raman spectrum can be obtained of a molecule in a single pulse using broad band radiation. This could be useful for identifying the three-dimensional spatial distribution of molecular species in tissue.

  12. Perturbed nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, T. G.

    1972-01-01

    The existence of a solution defined for all t and possessing a type of boundedness property is established for the perturbed nonlinear system y = f(t,y) + F(t,y). The unperturbed system x = f(t,x) has a dichotomy in which some solutions exist and are well behaved as t increases to infinity, and some solution exists and are well behaved as t decreases to minus infinity. A similar study is made for a perturbed nonlinear differential equation defined on a half line, R+, and the existence of a family of solutions with special boundedness properties is established. The ideas are applied to integral manifolds.

  13. Fuzzy Subspace Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgelt, Christian

    In clustering we often face the situation that only a subset of the available attributes is relevant for forming clusters, even though this may not be known beforehand. In such cases it is desirable to have a clustering algorithm that automatically weights attributes or even selects a proper subset. In this paper I study such an approach for fuzzy clustering, which is based on the idea to transfer an alternative to the fuzzifier (Klawonn and Höppner, What is fuzzy about fuzzy clustering? Understanding and improving the concept of the fuzzifier, In: Proc. 5th Int. Symp. on Intelligent Data Analysis, 254-264, Springer, Berlin, 2003) to attribute weighting fuzzy clustering (Keller and Klawonn, Int J Uncertain Fuzziness Knowl Based Syst 8:735-746, 2000). In addition, by reformulating Gustafson-Kessel fuzzy clustering, a scheme for weighting and selecting principal axes can be obtained. While in Borgelt (Feature weighting and feature selection in fuzzy clustering, In: Proc. 17th IEEE Int. Conf. on Fuzzy Systems, IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ, 2008) I already presented such an approach for a global selection of attributes and principal axes, this paper extends it to a cluster-specific selection, thus arriving at a fuzzy subspace clustering algorithm (Parsons, Haque, and Liu, 2004).

  14. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  15. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  16. Nonlinear optical inves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Arfan, A.; Allahham, A.

    2017-03-01

    Z-scan technique was used to investigate the nonlinear optical properties of Quinine and 1-(carboxymethyl)-6-methoxy-4-(3-(3-vinylpiperidin-4-yl) propanoyl) quinolin-1-ium chloride (Quinotoxine) salts. The two salts were characterized using UV-visible, FTIR and NMR measurements. The characterization spectra confirm the expected molecular structure of the prepared "Quinotoxine " salt. The z-scan measurements were performed with a CW Diode laser at 635 nm wavelength and 26 mW power. The nonlinear absorption coefficient (β), nonlinear refractive index (n2), the ground-state absorption cross sections (σg), the excited-state absorption cross sections (σex) and thermo-optic coefficient of the samples were determined. Our results reveal that the σex is higher than the σg indicating that the reverse saturable absorption (RSA) is the dominating mechanism for the observed absorption nonlinearities. The results suggest that this material should be considered as a promising candidate for future optical devices applications.

  17. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  18. Nonlinear plasmonic nanorulers.

    PubMed

    Butet, Jérémy; Martin, Olivier J F

    2014-05-27

    The evaluation of distances as small as few nanometers using optical waves is a very challenging task that can pave the way for the development of new applications in biotechnology and nanotechnology. In this article, we propose a new measurement method based on the control of the nonlinear optical response of plasmonic nanostructures by means of Fano resonances. It is shown that Fano resonances resulting from the coupling between a bright mode and a dark mode at the fundamental wavelength enable unprecedented and direct manipulation of the nonlinear electromagnetic sources at the nanoscale. In the case of second harmonic generation from gold nanodolmens, the different nonlinear sources distributions induced by the different coupling regimes are clearly revealed in the far-field distribution. Hence, the configuration of the nanostructure can be accurately determined in 3-dimensions by recording the wave scattered at the second harmonic wavelength. Indeed, the conformation of the different elements building the system is encoded in the nonlinear far-field distribution, making second harmonic generation a promising tool for reading 3-dimension plasmonic nanorulers. Furthemore, it is shown that 3-dimension plasmonic nanorulers can be implemented with simpler geometries than in the linear regime while providing complete information on the structure conformation, including the top nanobar position and orientation.

  19. Generalized Nonlinear Yule Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansky, Petr; Polito, Federico; Sacerdote, Laura

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of considering models related to random graphs growth exhibiting persistent memory, we propose a fractional nonlinear modification of the classical Yule model often studied in the context of macroevolution. Here the model is analyzed and interpreted in the framework of the development of networks such as the World Wide Web. Nonlinearity is introduced by replacing the linear birth process governing the growth of the in-links of each specific webpage with a fractional nonlinear birth process with completely general birth rates. Among the main results we derive the explicit distribution of the number of in-links of a webpage chosen uniformly at random recognizing the contribution to the asymptotics and the finite time correction. The mean value of the latter distribution is also calculated explicitly in the most general case. Furthermore, in order to show the usefulness of our results, we particularize them in the case of specific birth rates giving rise to a saturating behaviour, a property that is often observed in nature. The further specialization to the non-fractional case allows us to extend the Yule model accounting for a nonlinear growth.

  20. Nonlinear Theory and Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The main points of recent theoretical and computational studies on boundary-layer transition and turbulence are to be highlighted. The work is based on high Reynolds numbers and attention is drawn to nonlinear interactions, breakdowns and scales. The research focuses in particular on truly nonlinear theories, i.e. those for which the mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original state. There appear to be three such theories dealing with unsteady nonlinear pressure-displacement interactions (I), with vortex/wave interactions (II), and with Euler-scale flows (III). Specific recent findings noted for these three, and in quantitative agreement with experiments, are the following. Nonlinear finite-time break-ups occur in I, leading to sublayer eruption and vortex formation; here the theory agrees with experiments (Nishioka) regarding the first spike. II gives rise to finite-distance blowup of displacement thickness, then interaction and break-up as above; this theory agrees with experiments (Klebanoff, Nishioka) on the formation of three-dimensional streets. III leads to the prediction of turbulent boundary-layer micro-scale, displacement-and stress-sublayer-thicknesses.

  1. Nonlinear Image Denoising Methodologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    53 5.3 A Multiscale Approach to Scale-Space Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 5.4...etc. In this thesis, Our approach to denoising is first based on a controlled nonlinear stochastic random walk to achieve a scale space analysis ( as in... stochastic treatment or interpretation of the diffusion. In addition, unless a specific stopping time is known to be adequate, the resulting evolution

  2. A Novel Information-Theoretic Approach for Variable Clustering and Predictive Modeling Using Dirichlet Process Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Yang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In the era of big data, there are increasing interests on clustering variables for the minimization of data redundancy and the maximization of variable relevancy. Existing clustering methods, however, depend on nontrivial assumptions about the data structure. Note that nonlinear interdependence among variables poses significant challenges on the traditional framework of predictive modeling. In the present work, we reformulate the problem of variable clustering from an information theoretic perspective that does not require the assumption of data structure for the identification of nonlinear interdependence among variables. Specifically, we propose the use of mutual information to characterize and measure nonlinear correlation structures among variables. Further, we develop Dirichlet process (DP) models to cluster variables based on the mutual-information measures among variables. Finally, orthonormalized variables in each cluster are integrated with group elastic-net model to improve the performance of predictive modeling. Both simulation and real-world case studies showed that the proposed methodology not only effectively reveals the nonlinear interdependence structures among variables but also outperforms traditional variable clustering algorithms such as hierarchical clustering. PMID:27966581

  3. A Novel Information-Theoretic Approach for Variable Clustering and Predictive Modeling Using Dirichlet Process Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Yang, Hui

    2016-12-14

    In the era of big data, there are increasing interests on clustering variables for the minimization of data redundancy and the maximization of variable relevancy. Existing clustering methods, however, depend on nontrivial assumptions about the data structure. Note that nonlinear interdependence among variables poses significant challenges on the traditional framework of predictive modeling. In the present work, we reformulate the problem of variable clustering from an information theoretic perspective that does not require the assumption of data structure for the identification of nonlinear interdependence among variables. Specifically, we propose the use of mutual information to characterize and measure nonlinear correlation structures among variables. Further, we develop Dirichlet process (DP) models to cluster variables based on the mutual-information measures among variables. Finally, orthonormalized variables in each cluster are integrated with group elastic-net model to improve the performance of predictive modeling. Both simulation and real-world case studies showed that the proposed methodology not only effectively reveals the nonlinear interdependence structures among variables but also outperforms traditional variable clustering algorithms such as hierarchical clustering.

  4. A Novel Information-Theoretic Approach for Variable Clustering and Predictive Modeling Using Dirichlet Process Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Yang, Hui

    2016-12-01

    In the era of big data, there are increasing interests on clustering variables for the minimization of data redundancy and the maximization of variable relevancy. Existing clustering methods, however, depend on nontrivial assumptions about the data structure. Note that nonlinear interdependence among variables poses significant challenges on the traditional framework of predictive modeling. In the present work, we reformulate the problem of variable clustering from an information theoretic perspective that does not require the assumption of data structure for the identification of nonlinear interdependence among variables. Specifically, we propose the use of mutual information to characterize and measure nonlinear correlation structures among variables. Further, we develop Dirichlet process (DP) models to cluster variables based on the mutual-information measures among variables. Finally, orthonormalized variables in each cluster are integrated with group elastic-net model to improve the performance of predictive modeling. Both simulation and real-world case studies showed that the proposed methodology not only effectively reveals the nonlinear interdependence structures among variables but also outperforms traditional variable clustering algorithms such as hierarchical clustering.

  5. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  6. Nonlinear dynamics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of nonlinear dynamics experiments is to improve the understanding of single particle effects that increase the particle amplitude and lead to loss. Particle motion in storage rings is nearly conservative and for transverse dynamics the Hamiltonian in action angle variables (I{sub x},I{sub y},{phi}{sub x},{phi}{sub y}) near an isolated resonance k{nu}{sub x} + l{nu}{sub y} {approx} p is H = I{sub x}{nu}{sub x0} + I{sub y}{nu}{sub y0} + g(I{sub x}, I{sub y}) + h(I{sub x}, I{sub y})cos(k{phi}{sub x} + l{phi}{sub y} - p{theta}), (1) where k, l, p are integers, {theta} = 2{pi}s/L is the azimuth, and s and L are the path length and circumference respectively. The amplitude dependent tunes are given by {nu}{sub x,y}(I{sub x},I{sub y}) = {nu}{sub x0,y0} + {partial_derivative}g(I{sub x},I{sub y})/{partial_derivative}I{sub x,y} (2) and h(I{sub x},I{sub y}) is the resonance driving term (RDT). If the motion is governed by multiple resonances, h(I{sub x},I{sub y}) has to be replace by a series of terms. The particle motion is completely determined by the terms g and h, which can be calculated from higher order multipoles (Sec. ??), or obtained from simulations. Deviations from pure Hamiltonian motion occur due to synchrotron radiation damping (Sec. ??) in lepton or very high energy hadron rings, parameter variations, and diffusion processes such as residual gas and intrabeam scattering. The time scale of the non-Hamiltonian process determines the applicability of the Hamiltonian analysis. Transverse nonlinearities are introduced through sextupoles or higher order multipoles and magnetic field errors in dipoles and quadrupoles. Sextupoles can already drive all resonances. The beam-beam interaction and space charge also introduce nonlinear fields. Intentionally introduced nonlinearities are used to extract beam on a resonance or through capture in stable islands. Localization and minimization of nonlinearities in a ring is a general strategy to decrease emittance growth

  7. Dynamic evolution of nearby galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernacka, M.; Flin, P.

    2011-06-01

    A study of the evolution of 377 rich ACO clusters with redshift z<0.2 is presented. The data concerning galaxies in the investigated clusters were obtained using FOCAS packages applied to Digital Sky Survey I. The 377 galaxy clusters constitute a statistically uniform sample to which visual galaxy/star reclassifications were applied. Cluster shape within 2.0 h-1 Mpc from the adopted cluster centre (the mean and the median of all galaxy coordinates, the position of the brightest and of the third brightest galaxy in the cluster) was determined through its ellipticity calculated using two methods: the covariance ellipse method (hereafter CEM) and the method based on Minkowski functionals (hereafter MFM). We investigated ellipticity dependence on the radius of circular annuli, in which ellipticity was calculated. This was realized by varying the radius from 0.5 to 2 Mpc in steps of 0.25 Mpc. By performing Monte Carlo simulations, we generated clusters to which the two ellipticity methods were applied. We found that the covariance ellipse method works better than the method based on Minkowski functionals. We also found that ellipticity distributions are different for different methods used. Using the ellipticity-redshift relation, we investigated the possibility of cluster evolution in the low-redshift Universe. The correlation of cluster ellipticities with redshifts is undoubtly an indicator of structural evolution. Using the t-Student statistics, we found a statistically significant correlation between ellipticity and redshift at the significance level of α = 0.95. In one of the two shape determination methods we found that ellipticity grew with redshift, while the other method gave opposite results. Monte Carlo simulations showed that only ellipticities calculated at the distance of 1.5 Mpc from cluster centre in the Minkowski functional method are robust enough to be taken into account, but for that radius we did not find any relation between e and z. Since CEM

  8. Dielectric Nonlinear Transmission Line (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dielectric Nonlinear Transmission Line (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...14. ABSTRACT A parallel plate nonlinear transmission line (NLTL) was constructed. Periodic loading of nonlinear dielectric slabs provides the...846-9101 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Dielectric Nonlinear Transmission Line David M. French, Brad W. Hoff

  9. Chemistry Within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    DME )nCH3OCH 2 +). We speculate that this is due to the fragments being consumed by an ion-molecule reaction within the cluster. One likely candidate is...the ion-molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME , within the bulk cluster to form a trimethyloxonlum cation intermediate. This...the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to the same products, should involve the same mechanism found to

  10. Chemistry Within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    and ( DME ).CH 3OCH2+). We speculate that this is due to the fragments being consumed by an ion-molecule reaction within the cluster. A likely candidate...is the ion-molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME within the bulk cluster, to form a trimethyloxonium cation intermediate...a trimethyloxonium intermediate as the common intermediate for the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to

  11. Cluster State Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    nearest neighbor cluster state has been shown to be a universal resource for MBQC thus we can say our quantum computer is universal. We note that...CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTATION FEBRUARY 2014 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED STINFO COPY AIR FORCE...TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTATION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62788F 6

  12. Chemical Reactions in Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-04

    NH 3)n, n _> 4, clusters has been attributed to the (solvated) naphtholate anion.3a A single picosecond decay measurement has been reported which...vibrational energy in the cluster Sl state. The data are summarized in Table I. A model to explain these decay results can be constructed based on a proton...11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Chemical Reactions in Clusters 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Elliot R. Bernstein 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED

  13. Target current density effects in al-cluster ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, N.; Rajasekar, P.; Chakraborty, P.; Dey, S. D.

    1994-04-01

    Target current density effects in secondary emission of positively-charged sputtered clusters from an ion-bombarded polycrystalline aluminium surface have been investigated for various primary Cd+ ion energies. For each cluster type, at medium target current densities (Jp : 0?350 ?A/cm2), apart from the presence of the expected linear term in the I+ s α Jp curves, there is a square law term, depicting that some fraction of the pre-emitted neutral clusters gets ionized in vacuum above the target surface. Thus, a sum of these two terms constitutes the total cluster ion current which shows a non-linear dependence on the target current density. At higher target current densities (350 ?A cm?2?1.05 mA cm?2), in addition to the parabolic effect, a higher order non-linearity comes into play and the net cluster ion current I + s , measured as a function of target current density within the Ip range concerned, can be expressed in terms of our previously proposed semi-empirical formula I+ s = C.Ip + D.I2 p + F.In p , which was earlier found to be applicable in case of single and double charged secondary monomers. A higher power (n > 2) dependence has been observed here for the first time in case of cluster ion emission, suggesting chemical enhancement of secondary clusters. Our present observations seem to support ?direct emission model? even for small metal clusters?a proposition which is in apparent contradiction to the current notion in this field, i.e. vacuum recombination of individual atoms in small cluster formation.

  14. Star Clusters within FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  15. Melting of nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, I.L.; Jellinek, J.

    1991-12-31

    The meltinglike phenomenon in Ni{sub n}, n = 19,20,55, clusters is studied using microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction between the atoms in the clusters is modelled by a size-dependent Gupta-like potential that incorporates many-body effects. The clusters display the ``usual`` stages in their meltinglike transition, which characterize also Lennard-Jones (e.g., noble gas) and ionic clusters. In addition, Ni{sub 20} passes through a so-called premelting stage found earlier also for Ni{sub 14}. 11 ref., 3 figs.

  16. Melting of nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, I.L. . Inst. de Fisica); Jellinek, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The meltinglike phenomenon in Ni{sub n}, n = 19,20,55, clusters is studied using microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction between the atoms in the clusters is modelled by a size-dependent Gupta-like potential that incorporates many-body effects. The clusters display the usual'' stages in their meltinglike transition, which characterize also Lennard-Jones (e.g., noble gas) and ionic clusters. In addition, Ni{sub 20} passes through a so-called premelting stage found earlier also for Ni{sub 14}. 11 ref., 3 figs.

  17. Mini-clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinellato, J. A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Bellandifilho, J.; Lattes, C. M. G.; Menon, M. J.; Navia, C. E.; Pamilaju, A.; Sawayanagi, K.; Shibuya, E. H.; Turtelli, A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of mini-clusters observed in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber no.19 are summarized. The study was made on 54 single core shower upper and 91 shower clusters of E(gamma) 10 TeV from 30 families which are visible energy greater than 80 TeV and penetrate through both upper and lower detectors of the two-story chamber. The association of hadrons in mini-cluster is made clear from their penetrative nature and microscopic observation of shower continuation in lower chamber. Small P sub t (gamma) of hadrons in mini-clusters remained in puzzle.

  18. Compactons in Nonlinear Schroedinger Lattices with Strong Nonlinearity Management

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Salerno, M.

    2010-09-10

    The existence of compactons in the discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation in the presence of fast periodic time modulations of the nonlinearity is demonstrated. In the averaged discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation, the resulting effective interwell tunneling depends on the modulation parameters and on the field amplitude. This introduces nonlinear dispersion in the system and can lead to a prototypical realization of single- or multisite stable discrete compactons in nonlinear optical waveguide and Bose-Einstein condensate arrays. These structures can dynamically arise out of Gaussian or compactly supported initial data.

  19. The structure of deposited metal clusters generated by laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, P.; Brandstättner, M.; Ding, A.

    1991-09-01

    Metal clusters have been produced using a laser evaporation source. A Nd-YAG laser beam focused onto a solid silver rod was used to evaporate the material, which was then cooled to form clusters with the help of a pulsed high pressure He beam. TOF mass spectra of these clusters reveal a strong occurrence of small and medium sized clusters ( n<100). Clusters were also deposited onto grid supported thin layers of carbon-films which were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Very high resolution pictures of these grids were used to analyze the size distribution and the structure of the deposited clusters. The diffraction pattern caused by crystalline structure of the clusters reveals 3-and 5-fold symmetries as well as fcc bulk structure. This can be explained in terms of icosahedron and cuboctahedron type clusters deposited on the surface of the carbon layer. There is strong evidence that part of these cluster geometries had already been formed before the depostion process. The non-linear dependence of the cluster size and the cluster density on the generating conditions is discussed. Therefore the samples were observed in HREM in the stable DEEKO 100 microscope of the Fritz-Haber-Institut operating at 100 KV with the spherical aberration c S =0.5 mm. The quality of the pictures was improved by using the conditions of minimum phase contrast hollow cone illumination. This procedure led to a minimum of phase contrast artefacts. Among the well-crystallized particles were a great amount of five- and three-fold symmetries, icosahedra and cuboctahedra respectively. The largest clusters with five- and three-fold symmetries have been found with diameters of 7 nm; the smallest particles displaying the same undistorted symmetries were of about 2 mm. Even smaller ones with strong distortions could be observed although their classification is difficult. The quality of the images was improved by applying Fourier filtering techniques.

  20. Program for Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    November 1970. 2. R. E. Jones and W. L. Salus , "Survey and Development of Finite Elements for Nonlineer Structural Analysis", Volume II, "Nonlinear Shell...1970. 2. R. E. Jones and W. L. Salus , "Survey and Development of Finite Elements for Nonlinear Structural Analysis," Volume II, "Nonlinear Shell

  1. Cubication of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L.; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Immaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear…

  2. Clustering versus non-clustering phase synchronizations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2014-03-15

    Clustering phase synchronization (CPS) is a common scenario to the global phase synchronization of coupled dynamical systems. In this work, a novel scenario, the non-clustering phase synchronization (NPS), is reported. It is found that coupled systems do not transit to the global synchronization until a certain sufficiently large coupling is attained, and there is no clustering prior to the global synchronization. To reveal the relationship between CPS and NPS, we further analyze the noise effect on coupled phase oscillators and find that the coupled oscillator system can change from CPS to NPS with the increase of noise intensity or system disorder. These findings are expected to shed light on the mechanism of various intriguing self-organized behaviors in coupled systems.

  3. Abundances for globular cluster giants. I. Homogeneous metallicities for 24 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretta, E.; Gratton, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    We have obtained high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio CCD echelle spectra of 10 bright red giants in 3 globular clusters (47 Tuc, NGC 6752 and NGC 6397) roughly spanning the whole range of metallicities of the galactic globular cluster system. The analysis of this newly acquired material reveals no significant evidence of star-to-star variation of the [Fe/H] ratio in these three clusters. Moreover, a large set of high quality literature data (equivalent widths from high dispersion CCD spectra) was re-analyzed in an homogeneous and self-consistent way to integrate our observations and derive new metal abundances for more than 160 bright red giants in 24 globular clusters (i.e. about 16% of the known population of galactic globulars). This set was then used to define a new metallicity scale for globular clusters which is the result of high quality, direct spectroscopic data, of new and updated model atmospheres from the grid of \\cite[Kurucz (1992)]{\\ref41}, and of a careful fine abundance analysis; this last, in turn, is based on a common set of both atomic and atmospheric parameters for all the stars examined. Given the very high degree of internal homogeneity, our new scale supersedes the offsets and discrepancies existing in previous attempts to obtain a metallicity scale. The internal uncertainty in [Fe/H] is very small: 0.06 dex (24 clusters) on average, and can be interpreted also as the mean precision of the c luster ranking. Compared to our system, metallicities on the widely used Zinn and West's scale are about 0.10 dex higher for [Fe/H]>-1, 0.23 dex lower for -1<[Fe/H]<-1.9 and 0.11 dex too high for [Fe/H]<-1.9. The non-linearity of the Zinn and West's scale is significant even at 3 sigma level. A quadratic transformation is given to correct older values to the new scale in the range of our calibrating clusters (-2.24 <= [Fe/H]ZW <= -0.51). A minor disagreement is found at low metallicities between the metallicity scale based on field and cluster

  4. Nonlinear electrostatic drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Avadhesh C.; Srivastava, Krishna M.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis of electrostatic drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is performed. It is shown that the analysis leads to the propagation of the weakly nonlinear dispersive waves, and the nonlinear behavior is governed by the nonlinear Burger's equation.

  5. A nonparametric clustering technique which estimates the number of clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    In applications of cluster analysis, one usually needs to determine the number of clusters, K, and the assignment of observations to each cluster. A clustering technique based on recursive application of a multivariate test of bimodality which automatically estimates both K and the cluster assignments is presented.

  6. Bayesian Cosmic Web Reconstruction: BARCODE for Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, E. G. Patrick; van de Weygaert, Rien; Kitaura, Francisco; Cautun, Marius

    2016-10-01

    We describe the Bayesian \\barcode\\ formalism that has been designed towards the reconstruction of the Cosmic Web in a given volume on the basis of the sampled galaxy cluster distribution. Based on the realization that the massive compact clusters are responsible for the major share of the large scale tidal force field shaping the anisotropic and in particular filamentary features in the Cosmic Web. Given the nonlinearity of the constraints imposed by the cluster configurations, we resort to a state-of-the-art constrained reconstruction technique to find a proper statistically sampled realization of the original initial density and velocity field in the same cosmic region. Ultimately, the subsequent gravitational evolution of these initial conditions towards the implied Cosmic Web configuration can be followed on the basis of a proper analytical model or an N-body computer simulation. The BARCODE formalism includes an implicit treatment for redshift space distortions. This enables a direct reconstruction on the basis of observational data, without the need for a correction of redshift space artifacts. In this contribution we provide a general overview of the the Cosmic Web connection with clusters and a description of the Bayesian BARCODE formalism. We conclude with a presentation of its successful workings with respect to test runs based on a simulated large scale matter distribution, in physical space as well as in redshift space.

  7. A general non-linear multilevel structural equation mixture model

    PubMed Central

    Kelava, Augustin; Brandt, Holger

    2014-01-01

    In the past 2 decades latent variable modeling has become a standard tool in the social sciences. In the same time period, traditional linear structural equation models have been extended to include non-linear interaction and quadratic effects (e.g., Klein and Moosbrugger, 2000), and multilevel modeling (Rabe-Hesketh et al., 2004). We present a general non-linear multilevel structural equation mixture model (GNM-SEMM) that combines recent semiparametric non-linear structural equation models (Kelava and Nagengast, 2012; Kelava et al., 2014) with multilevel structural equation mixture models (Muthén and Asparouhov, 2009) for clustered and non-normally distributed data. The proposed approach allows for semiparametric relationships at the within and at the between levels. We present examples from the educational science to illustrate different submodels from the general framework. PMID:25101022

  8. On characterizing protein spatial clusters with correlation approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shivanandan, Arun; Unnikrishnan, Jayakrishnan; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Spatial aggregation of proteins might have functional importance, e.g., in signaling, and nano-imaging can be used to study them. Such studies require accurate characterization of clusters based on noisy data. A set of spatial correlation approaches free of underlying cluster processes and input parameters have been widely used for this purpose. They include the radius of maximal aggregation ra obtained from Ripley’s L(r) − r function as an estimator of cluster size, and the estimation of various cluster parameters based on an exponential model of the Pair Correlation Function(PCF). While convenient, the accuracy of these methods is not clear: e.g., does it depend on how the molecules are distributed within the clusters, or on cluster parameters? We analyze these methods for a variety of cluster models. We find that ra relates to true cluster size by a factor that is nonlinearly dependent on parameters and that can be arbitrarily large. For the PCF method, for the models analyzed, we obtain linear relationships between the estimators and true parameters, and the estimators were found to be within ±100% of true parameters, depending on the model. Our results, based on an extendable general framework, point to the need for caution in applying these methods. PMID:27507257

  9. Parametric myocardial perfusion PET imaging using physiological clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nikolaos A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel framework of robust kinetic parameter estimation applied to absolute ow quanti cation in dynamic PET imaging. Kinetic parameter estimation is formulated as a nonlinear least squares with spatial constraints problem (NLLS-SC) where the spatial constraints are computed from a physiologically driven clustering of dynamic images, and used to reduce noise contamination. An ideal clustering of dynamic images depends on the underlying physiology of functional regions, and in turn, physiological processes are quanti ed by kinetic parameter estimation. Physiologically driven clustering of dynamic images is performed using a clustering algorithm (e.g. K-means, Spectral Clustering etc) with Kinetic modeling in an iterative handshaking fashion. This gives a map of labels where each functionally homogenous cluster is represented by mean kinetics (cluster centroid). Parametric images are acquired by solving the NLLS-SC problem for each voxel which penalizes spatial variations from its mean kinetics. This substantially reduces noise in the estimation process for each voxel by utilizing kinetic information from physiologically similar voxels (cluster members). Resolution degradation is also substantially minimized as no spatial smoothing between heterogeneous functional regions is performed. The proposed framework is shown to improve the quantitative accuracy of Myocardial Perfusion (MP) PET imaging, and in turn, has the long-term potential to enhance capabilities of MP PET in the detection, staging and management of coronary artery disease.

  10. Clusters, deformation, and dilation: Diagnostics for material accumulation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntley, Helga S.; Lipphardt, B. L.; Jacobs, Gregg; Kirwan, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    Clusters of material at the ocean surface have been frequently observed. Such accumulations of material play an important role in a variety of applications, from biology to pollution mitigation. Identifying where clusters will form can aid in locating, for example, hotspots of biological activity or regions of high pollutant concentration. Here cluster strength is introduced as a new metric for defining clusters when all particle positions are known. To diagnose regions likely to contain clusters without the need to integrate millions of particle trajectories, we propose to use dilation, which quantifies area changes of Lagrangian patches. Material deformation is decomposed into dilation and area-preserving stretch processes to refine previous approaches based on finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) by splitting the FTLE into fundamental kinematic properties. The concepts are developed theoretically and illustrated in the context of a state-of-the-art data-assimilating predictive ocean model of the Gulf of Mexico. Regions of dilation less than one are shown to be much more likely (6 times more likely in the given example) to be visited by particles than those of dilation greater than one. While the relationship is nonlinear, dilation and cluster strength exhibit a fairly good correlation. In contrast, both stretch and Eulerian divergence are found to be uncorrelated with cluster strength. Thus, dilation maps can be used as guides for identifying cluster locations, while saving some of the computational cost of trajectory integrations.

  11. Optothermal nonlinearity of silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Gentilini, Silvia; Fleming, Adam; Samuels, Michiel C.; Di Falco, Andrea; Conti, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    We report on the characterization of silica aerogel thermal optical nonlinearity, obtained by z-scan technique. The results show that typical silica aerogels have nonlinear optical coefficient similar to that of glass (≃10-12 m2/W), with negligible optical nonlinear absorption. The nonlinear coefficient can be increased to values in the range of 10-10 m2/W by embedding an absorbing dye in the aerogel. This value is one order of magnitude higher than that observed in the pure dye and in typical highly nonlinear materials like liquid crystals.

  12. Nonlinear computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapira, Asia; Juwiler, Irit; Arie, Ady

    2011-08-01

    We propose a novel technique for arbitrary wavefront shaping in quadratic nonlinear crystals by introducing the concept of computer-generated holograms (CGHs) into the nonlinear optical regime. We demonstrate the method experimentally showing a conversion of a fundamental Gaussian beam pump light into the first three Hermite--Gaussian beams at the second harmonic in a stoichiometric lithium tantalate nonlinear crystal, and we characterize its efficiency dependence on the fundamental power and the crystal temperature. Nonlinear CGHs open new possibilities in the fields of nonlinear beam shaping, mode conversion, and beam steering.

  13. Nonlinear metamaterials for holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Euclides; Bitton, Ora; Prior, Yehiam

    2016-08-01

    A hologram is an optical element storing phase and possibly amplitude information enabling the reconstruction of a three-dimensional image of an object by illumination and scattering of a coherent beam of light, and the image is generated at the same wavelength as the input laser beam. In recent years, it was shown that information can be stored in nanometric antennas giving rise to ultrathin components. Here we demonstrate nonlinear multilayer metamaterial holograms. A background free image is formed at a new frequency--the third harmonic of the illuminating beam. Using e-beam lithography of multilayer plasmonic nanoantennas, we fabricate polarization-sensitive nonlinear elements such as blazed gratings, lenses and other computer-generated holograms. These holograms are analysed and prospects for future device applications are discussed.

  14. Nonlinear metamaterials for holography

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Euclides; Bitton, Ora

    2016-01-01

    A hologram is an optical element storing phase and possibly amplitude information enabling the reconstruction of a three-dimensional image of an object by illumination and scattering of a coherent beam of light, and the image is generated at the same wavelength as the input laser beam. In recent years, it was shown that information can be stored in nanometric antennas giving rise to ultrathin components. Here we demonstrate nonlinear multilayer metamaterial holograms. A background free image is formed at a new frequency—the third harmonic of the illuminating beam. Using e-beam lithography of multilayer plasmonic nanoantennas, we fabricate polarization-sensitive nonlinear elements such as blazed gratings, lenses and other computer-generated holograms. These holograms are analysed and prospects for future device applications are discussed. PMID:27545581

  15. Nonlinear Magnetic Beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, A.; Breizman, B.

    2000-10-01

    The ion response to the rf-field in the magnetic beach problem can be essentially nonlinear. This paper presents a self-consistent theory of the rf-wave propagation and ion motion through the ion cyclotron resonance. An important ingredient of the problem is the ion flow along the magnetic field. The flow velocity limits the time the ions spend at the resonance, which in turn limits the ion energy gain. A feature that makes the problem nonlinear is that the flow accelerates under the effect of the grad B force and rf-pressure. This acceleration can produce a steep decrease in the plasma density at the resonance, resulting in partial reflection of the incident wave. *Work supported by VASIMR project at NASA and by U.S. DOE Contract DE-FG03-96ER-54346.

  16. Nonlinear Photonics 2014: introduction.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, N; Kartashov, Yaroslav

    2015-01-12

    International Conference "Nonlinear Photonics-2014" took place in Barcelona, Spain on July 27-31, 2014. It was a part of the "Advanced Photonics Congress" which is becoming a traditional notable event in the world of photonics. The current focus issue of Optics Express contains contributions from the participants of the Conference and the Congress. The articles in this focus issue by no means represent the total number of the congress contributions (around 400). However, it demonstrates wide range of topics covered at the event. The next conference of this series is to be held in 2016 in Australia, which is the home of many researchers working in the field of photonics in general and nonlinear photonics in particular.

  17. Augmented nonlinear differentiator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xingling; Liu, Jun; Yang, Wei; Tang, Jun; Li, Jie

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a sigmoid function based augmented nonlinear differentiator (AND) for calculating the noise-less time derivative from a noisy measurement. The prominent advantages of the present differentiation technique are: (i) compared to the existing tracking differentiators, better noise suppression ability can be achieved without appreciable delay; (ii) the enhanced noise-filtering mechanism not only can be applied to the designed differentiator, but also can be extended for improving noise-tolerance capability of the available differentiators. In addition, the convergence property and robustness performance against noises are investigated via singular perturbation theory and describing function method, respectively. Also, comparison with several classical differentiators is given to illustrate the superiority of AND in noise suppression. Finally, applications on autopilot design and displacement following for nonlinear mass spring mechanical system are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed AND technique.

  18. Nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  19. Nonlinear terahertz superconducting plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingbo; Zhang, Caihong; Liang, Lanju; Jin, Biaobing; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Wang, Huabing; Chen, Jian; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Wu, Peiheng

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear terahertz (THz) transmission through subwavelength hole array in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) film is experimentally investigated using intense THz pulses. The good agreement between the measurement and numerical simulations indicates that the field strength dependent transmission mainly arises from the nonlinear properties of the superconducting film. Under weak THz pulses, the transmission peak can be tuned over a frequency range of 145 GHz which is attributed to the high kinetic inductance of 50 nm-thick NbN film. Utilizing the THz pump-THz probe spectroscopy, we study the dynamic process of transmission spectra and demonstrate that the transition time of such superconducting plasmonic device is within 5 ps.

  20. Research in nonlinear structural and solid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, H. G., Jr. (Compiler); Noor, A. K. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis of building structures and numerical solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and Newton's method are discussed. Other topics include: nonlinear interaction problems; solution procedures for nonlinear problems; crash dynamics and advanced nonlinear applications; material characterization, contact problems, and inelastic response; and formulation aspects and special software for nonlinear analysis.

  1. Nonlinear Guided Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-19

    experiments," contributed paper, topical meeting on Integrated Photonics , Hilton Head (1990). 20. S. Trillo, S. Wabnitz, B. Diano, and E. M. Wright...34Picosecond pulse switching in semiconductor active nonlinear directional couplers," contributed paper, topical meeting on Integrated Photonics , Hilton...meeting on Integrated Photonics , Hilton Head (1990). 22. E. M. Wright, "Amplifier and laser switches," invited paper, workshop on Semiconductor Laser

  2. Nonlinear Neural Network Oscillator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A nonlinear oscillator (10) includes a neural network (12) having at least one output (12a) for outputting a one dimensional vector. The neural ... neural network and the input of the input layer for modifying a magnitude and/or a polarity of the one dimensional output vector prior to the sample of...first or a second direction. Connection weights of the neural network are trained on a deterministic sequence of data from a chaotic source or may be a

  3. Mathematical Nonlinear Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-11

    34Evolution of Bloch electrons with Applied Electromagnetic Fields: the Semiclassical Equations ", European Jour- nal of Applied Mathematics (1996...establishment (with Jalal Shatah) of the existence of homoclinic orbits with complex spa- tial structure for perturbed NLS equations . This existence...a very small amount of diffraction. (v) McLaughlin (with T. Ueda) have in progress a study of precursors for model nonlinear wave equations . This

  4. Mathematical Nonlinear Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-03

    August, 1991. Thesis - "Applications of the Inverse Spectral Transform to a Korteweg - DeVries Equation with a Kuramoto-Sivashinsky-Type Perturbation... equations , the mathematical theory of nematic optics involves strong coupling between the electromagnetic and nematic director (molecular orientation... equations for the electric field E coupled to a nonlinear parabolic equation for the director n, a field of unit vectors which describes the local molecular

  5. Surface nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R.; Chen, C.K.; de Castro, A.R.B.

    1980-01-01

    Surface electromagnetic waves are waves propagating along the interface of two media. Their existence was predicted by Sommerfield in 1909. In recent years, interesting applications have been found in the study of overlayers and molecular adsorption on surfaces, in probing of phase transitions, and in measurements of refractive indices. In the laboratory, the nonlinear interaction of surface electromagnetic waves were studied. The preliminary results of this recent venture in this area are presented.

  6. Nonlinear Wave Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-09

    of parameters. Hence one expects that the solutions of the two equations , PES and NLS, are comparable. In Fig. 3 we plot the two solutions for...power saturated term, in the PES equation ) have stable soliton solutions or mode-locking evolution. In general the solitons are found to be unstable...literature. Generally speaking, the above lattice equations omitting nonlinear terms have solutions propagating along z direction, i.e., ψ(r, z) = e−iµzϕ(r

  7. Nonlinear Wave Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-30

    Equation * Discrete IST and numerical simulations * Long time asymptotic solutions of nonlinear evolution equations * Painlevf equations . Focussing...larger class of solutions io KdV than does the Gel’fand-’Levitan equation . Specifically we have shown by direct calculation that if 0(k;x,t) solves oV...Investigation of the full generality of the solutions of KdV via this new formulation. (b) Developnent of similar types - integral equations for

  8. Nonlinear Wave Propagation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-23

    generalized wave equation (GWE) when (z) 0 (1-Z2)/2: - X(z). (1.5) The compatibility condition required for the existence of solutions to these B~icklund...Phys. tion of a class of nonlocal nonlinear evolution equations , A 15 (1982) 781. INS *47, Clarkson University (1985), to be published in J. Math... semilinear form. The above approach will fail if there exist linearizable quasilinear equations which can not be mapped to a semilinear from. It is shown in

  9. Cognitive Nonlinear Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Devices and Method for Detecting Emplacement of Improvised Explosive Devices, U. S. Patent 7,680,599, Mar. 16, 2010. 11. Steele, D.; Rotondo, F.; Houck...Patent 7,987,068, Jul. 26, 2011. 9 14. Keller, W. Active Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Electronic Signature Detection , U. S. Patent...operate without interfering with each other. The CNR uses a narrowband, nonlinear radar target detection methodology. This methodology has the advantage

  10. Photoionization of molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, R. P.; Calo, J. M.

    1981-12-01

    An experimental apparatus consisting of a novel multiple expansion cluster source coupled with a molecular beam system and photoionization mass spectrometer has been designed and constructed. This apparatus has been thoroughly tested and preliminary measurements of the growth kinetics of water clusters and the photoionization cross section of the water dimer have been carried out.

  11. Probability and Cancer Clusters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton-Keene, Rachael; Lenard, Christoper T.; Mills, Terry M.

    2009-01-01

    Recently there have been several news items about possible cancer clusters in the Australian media. The term "cancer cluster" is used when an unusually large number of people in one geographic area, often a workplace, are diagnosed with cancer in a short space of time. In this paper the authors explore this important health issue using…

  12. Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 34' x 34' on the sky, of the Coma cluster, aka Abell 1656. This is a particularly rich cluster of individual galaxies (over 1000 members), most prominently the two giant ellipticals, NGC 4874 (right) and NGC 4889 (left). The remaining members are mostly smaller ellipticals, but spiral galaxies are also evident in the 2MASS image. The cluster is seen toward the constellation Coma Berenices, but is actually at a distance of about 100 Mpc (330 million light years, or a redshift of 0.023) from us. At this distance, the cluster is in what is known as the 'Hubble flow,' or the overall expansion of the Universe. As such, astronomers can measure the Hubble Constant, or the universal expansion rate, based on the distance to this cluster. Large, rich clusters, such as Coma, allow astronomers to measure the 'missing mass,' i.e., the matter in the cluster that we cannot see, since it gravitationally influences the motions of the member galaxies within the cluster. The near-infrared maps the overall luminous mass content of the member galaxies, since the light at these wavelengths is dominated by the more numerous older stellar populations. Galaxies, as seen by 2MASS, look fairly smooth and homogeneous, as can be seen from the Hubble 'tuning fork' diagram of near-infrared galaxy morphology. Image mosaic by S. Van Dyk (IPAC).

  13. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  14. Cluster Guide. Accounting Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaverton School District 48, OR.

    Based on a recent task inventory of key occupations in the accounting cluster taken in the Portland, Oregon, area, this curriculum guide is intended to assist administrators and teachers in the design and implementation of high school accounting cluster programs. The guide is divided into four major sections: program organization and…

  15. Marketing Occupations. Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This cluster guide, which is designed to show teachers what specific knowledge and skills qualify high school students for entry-level employment (or postsecondary training) in marketing occupations, is organized into three sections: (1) cluster organization and implementation, (2) instructional emphasis areas, and (3) assessment. The first…

  16. Ultrametric Hierarchical Clustering Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Glenn W.

    1979-01-01

    Johnson has shown that the single linkage and complete linkage hierarchical clustering algorithms induce a metric on the data known as the ultrametric. Johnson's proof is extended to four other common clustering algorithms. Two additional methods also produce hierarchical structures which can violate the ultrametric inequality. (Author/CTM)

  17. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI.

  18. Targeting Clusters, Achieving Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Stuart; Jacobs, Jim; Liston, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that groups, or clusters, of industries form partnerships with community colleges in order to positively impact economic development. Asserts that a cluster-oriented community college system requires innovation, specialized resources and expertise, knowledge of trends, and links to industry. Offers suggestions for developing such a…

  19. Multiple frame cluster tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadaleta, Sabino; Klusman, Mike; Poore, Aubrey; Slocumb, Benjamin J.

    2002-08-01

    Tracking large number of closely spaced objects is a challenging problem for any tracking system. In missile defense systems, countermeasures in the form of debris, chaff, spent fuel, and balloons can overwhelm tracking systems that track only individual objects. Thus, tracking these groups or clusters of objects followed by transitions to individual object tracking (if and when individual objects separate from the groups) is a necessary capability for a robust and real-time tracking system. The objectives of this paper are to describe the group tracking problem in the context of multiple frame target tracking and to formulate a general assignment problem for the multiple frame cluster/group tracking problem. The proposed approach forms multiple clustering hypotheses on each frame of data and base individual frame clustering decisions on the information from multiple frames of data in much the same way that MFA or MHT work for individual object tracking. The formulation of the assignment problem for resolved object tracking and candidate clustering methods for use in multiple frame cluster tracking are briefly reviewed. Then, three different formulations are presented for the combination of multiple clustering hypotheses on each frame of data and the multiple frame assignments of clusters between frames.

  20. Brightest Cluster Galaxy Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisman, Luke; Haarsma, D. B.; Sebald, D. A.; ACCEPT Team

    2011-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) play an important role in several fields of astronomical research. The literature includes many different methods and criteria for identifying the BCG in the cluster, such as choosing the brightest galaxy, the galaxy nearest the X-ray peak, or the galaxy with the most extended profile. Here we examine a sample of 75 clusters from the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), measuring masked magnitudes and profiles for BCG candidates in each cluster. We first identified galaxies by hand; in 15% of clusters at least one team member selected a different galaxy than the others.We also applied 6 other identification methods to the ACCEPT sample; in 30% of clusters at least one of these methods selected a different galaxy than the other methods. We then developed an algorithm that weighs brightness, profile, and proximity to the X-ray peak and centroid. This algorithm incorporates the advantages of by-hand identification (weighing multiple properties) and automated selection (repeatable and consistent). The BCG population chosen by the algorithm is more uniform in its properties than populations selected by other methods, particularly in the relation between absolute magnitude (a proxy for galaxy mass) and average gas temperature (a proxy for cluster mass). This work supported by a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and a Sid Jansma Summer Research Fellowship.