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Sample records for laser-induced retinal lesions

  1. Hedgehog Signaling Components Are Expressed in Choroidal Neovascularization in Laser-induced Retinal Lesion.

    PubMed

    Nochioka, Katsunori; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Morita, Shoko; Ogata, Nahoko; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-04-28

    Choroidal neovascularization is one of the major pathological changes in age-related macular degeneration, which causes devastating blindness in the elderly population. The molecular mechanism of choroidal neovascularization has been under extensive investigation, but is still an open question. We focused on sonic hedgehog signaling, which is implicated in angiogenesis in various organs. Laser-induced injuries to the mouse retina were made to cause choroidal neovascularization. We examined gene expression of sonic hedgehog, its receptors (patched1, smoothened, cell adhesion molecule down-regulated by oncogenes (Cdon) and biregional Cdon-binding protein (Boc)) and downstream transcription factors (Gli1-3) using real-time RT-PCR. At seven days after injury, mRNAs for Patched1 and Gli1 were upregulated in response to injury, but displayed no upregulation in control retinas. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Patched1 and Gli1 proteins were localized to CD31-positive endothelial cells that cluster between the wounded retina and the pigment epithelium layer. Treatment with the hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine did not significantly decrease the size of the neovascularization areas, but the hedgehog agonist purmorphamine made the areas significantly larger than those in untreated retina. These results suggest that the hedgehog-signaling cascade may be a therapeutic target for age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27239075

  2. Hedgehog Signaling Components Are Expressed in Choroidal Neovascularization in Laser-induced Retinal Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nochioka, Katsunori; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Morita, Shoko; Ogata, Nahoko; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization is one of the major pathological changes in age-related macular degeneration, which causes devastating blindness in the elderly population. The molecular mechanism of choroidal neovascularization has been under extensive investigation, but is still an open question. We focused on sonic hedgehog signaling, which is implicated in angiogenesis in various organs. Laser-induced injuries to the mouse retina were made to cause choroidal neovascularization. We examined gene expression of sonic hedgehog, its receptors (patched1, smoothened, cell adhesion molecule down-regulated by oncogenes (Cdon) and biregional Cdon-binding protein (Boc)) and downstream transcription factors (Gli1-3) using real-time RT-PCR. At seven days after injury, mRNAs for Patched1 and Gli1 were upregulated in response to injury, but displayed no upregulation in control retinas. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Patched1 and Gli1 proteins were localized to CD31-positive endothelial cells that cluster between the wounded retina and the pigment epithelium layer. Treatment with the hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine did not significantly decrease the size of the neovascularization areas, but the hedgehog agonist purmorphamine made the areas significantly larger than those in untreated retina. These results suggest that the hedgehog-signaling cascade may be a therapeutic target for age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27239075

  3. Neuroprotective therapy for argon-laser-induced retinal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai; Solberg, Yoram; Turetz, Yosef

    1999-06-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment of the central retina is often complicated by an immediate side effect of visual impairment, caused by the unavoidable laser-induced destruction of the normal tissue lying adjacent to the lesion and not affected directly by the laser beam. Furthermore, accidental laser injuries are at present untreatable. A neuroprotective therapy for salvaging the normal tissue might enhance the benefit obtained from treatment and allow safe perifoveal photocoagulation. We have developed a rat model for studying the efficacy of putative neuroprotective compounds in ameliorating laser-induced retinal damage. Four compounds were evaluated: the corticosteroid methylprednisolone, the glutamate-receptor blocker MK-801, the anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, and the calcim-overload antagonist flunarizine. The study was carried out in two steps: in the first, the histopathological development of retinal laser injuries was studied. Argon laser lesions were inflicted in the retinas of 18 pigmented rats. The animals were sacrificed after 3, 20 or 60 days and their retinal lesions were evaluated under the light microscope. The laser injury mainly involved the outer layers of the retina, where it destroyed significant numbers of photoreceptor cells. Over time, evidence of two major histopathological processes was observed: traction of adjacent nomral retinal cells into the central area of the lesion forming an internal retinal bulging, and a retinal pigmented epithelial proliferative reaction associated with subretinal neovascularization and invations of the retinal lesion site by phagocytes. The neuroprotective effects of each of the four compounds were verified in a second step of the study. For each drug tested, 12 rats were irradiated wtih argon laser inflictions: six of them received the tested agent while the other six were treated with the corresponding vehicle. Twenty days after laser expsoure, the rats were sacrificed and their lesions were

  4. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  5. The neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on laser-induced retinal damage in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnevskia-Dai, Victoria; Belokopytov, Mark; Dubinsky, Galina; Nachum, Gal; Avni, Isaac; Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai

    2005-04-01

    Retinal damage induced by mechanical trauma, ischemia or laser photocoagulation increases considerably by secondary degeneration processes. The spread of damage may be ameliorated by neuroprotection that is aimed at reducing the extent of the secondary degeneration and promote healing processes. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment consists of inspiration of oxygen at higher than one absolute atmospheric pressure. Improved neural function was observed in patients with acute brain trauma or ischemia treated with HBO. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on laser induced retinal damage in a rat model. Standard argon laser lesions were created in 25 pigmented rats divided into three groups: Ten rats were treated immediately after the irradiation with HBO three times during the first 24 hr followed by 12 consecutive daily treatments. Five rats received a shorter treatment regimen of 10 consecutive HBO treatments. The control group (10 rats) underwent the laser damage with no additional treatment. The retinal lesions were evaluated 20 days after the injury. All outcome measures were improved by the longer HBO treatment (P<0.01). The shorter HBO treatment was less effective, showing an increase only in nuclei density at the central area of lesion (P< 0.01). Hyperbaric oxygen seems to exert a neuroprotective effect on laser-induced retinal damage in a rat model. In the range of HBO exposures studied, longer exposure provides more neuroprotection. These results encourage further evaluation of the potential therapeutic use of hyperbaric oxygen in diseases and injuries of the retina.

  6. Therapeutic effect of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 on low-level laser induced retinal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, W.-H.; Wu, J.; Chen, P.; Dou, J.-T.; Pan, C.-Y.; Mu, Y.-M.; Lu, J.-M.

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this article was to explore the mechanism of injury in rat retina after constant low-level helium-neon (He-Ne) laser exposure and therapeutic effects of MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, on laser-induced retinal injury. He-Ne laser lesions were created in the central retina of adult Wistar Kyoto rats and were followed immediately by intraperitoneal injection of MK-801 (2 mg/kg) or saline, macroscopical and microscopical lesion were observed by funduscope and light microscope. Ultrastructural changes of the degenerating cells were examined by electron microscopy. Photoreceptor apoptosis was evaluated by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL). mRNA levels were measured by in situ hybridization and NMDA receptor expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Laser induced damage was histologically quantified by image-analysis morphometry. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded at different time point after the cessation of exposure to constant irradiation. There was no visible bleeding, exudation or necrosis under funduscope. TUNEL and electron microscopy showed photoreceptor apoptosis after irradiation. MK-801-treated animals had significantly fewer TUNEL-positive cells in the photoreceptors than saline-treated animals after exposure to laser. In situ hybridization (ISH) showed that the NMDAR mRNA level of MK-801-treated rats decreased in the inner plexiform layer 6 h after the cessation of exposure to constant irradiation when compared with that of saline-treated rats. So did Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Electroretinogram showed that b-wave amplitudes of MK-801-treated group were higher than that of saline-treated group after laser exposure. These findings suggest that Low level laser may cause the retinal pathological changes under given conditions. High expression of NMDAR is one of the possible mechanisms causing experimental retinal laser injury of rats. MK-801 exhibits the therapeutic effect due to promote the

  7. VEGF receptor blockade markedly reduces retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration into laser-induced CNV.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hu; Parlier, Rachel; Shen, Ji-Kui; Lutty, Gerard A; Vinores, Stanley A

    2013-01-01

    Although blocking VEGF has a positive effect in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the effect of blocking its receptors remains unclear. This was an investigation of the effect of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) 1 and/or 2 blockade on retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration in laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a model of wet AMD. CNV lesions were isolated by laser capture microdissection at 3, 7, and 14 days after laser and analyzed by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining for mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Neutralizing antibodies for VEGFR1 or R2 and the microglia inhibitor minocycline were injected intraperitoneally (IP). Anti-CD11b, CD45 and Iba1 antibodies were used to confirm the cell identity of retinal microglia/macrophage, in the RPE/choroidal flat mounts or retinal cross sections. CD11b(+), CD45(+) or Iba1(+) cells were counted. mRNA of VEGFR1 and its three ligands, PlGF, VEGF-A (VEGF) and VEGF-B, were expressed at all stages, but VEGFR2 were detected only in the late stage. PlGF and VEGF proteins were expressed at 3 and 7 days after laser. Anti-VEGFR1 (MF1) delivered IP 3 days after laser inhibited infiltration of leukocyte populations, largely retinal microglia/macrophage to CNV, while anti-VEGFR2 (DC101) had no effect. At 14 days after laser, both MF1 and DC101 antibodies markedly inhibited retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration into CNV. Therefore, VEGFR1 and R2 play differential roles in the pathogenesis of CNV: VEGFR1 plays a dominant role at 3 days after laser; but both receptors play pivotal roles at 14 days after laser. In vivo imaging demonstrated accumulation of GFP-expressing microglia into CNV in both CX3CR1(gfp/gfp) and CX3CR1(gfp/+) mice. Minocycline treatment caused a significant increase in lectin(+) cells in the sub-retinal space anterior to CNV and a decrease in dextran-perfused neovessels compared to controls. Targeting the chemoattractant molecules that regulate trafficking of retinal microglia

  8. Laser-induced retinal damage threshold measurements with wavefront correction.

    PubMed

    Lund, Brian J; Lund, David J; Esdall, Peter R

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive optics (AO) system was incorporated into a laser retinal exposure setup in order to correct for refractive error and higher-order aberrations of the nonhuman primate (NHP) eye during an in vivo retinal ED(50) measurement. Using this system, the ED(50) for a 100-ms, 532-nm small spot size exposure was measured to be 1.05 mJ total intraocular energy (TIE), a reduction of 22% from the value measured without aberration correction. The ED(50) for a 3.5-ns, 532-nm exposure was measured to be 0.51 microJ TIE, the lowest ED(50) reported for a ns-duration exposure. This is a reduction of 37% from the value measured without aberration correction and is a factor of only 2.6 higher than the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) for a 3.5-ns, visible wavelength small spot size exposure. The trend of in vitro measurements using retinal explants suggests that the in vivo ED(50) for small spot-size exposures could potentially be one order of magnitude smaller than the previously reported in vivo ED(50). Distortion of the incident laser beam by ocular aberrations cannot fully explain the discrepancy between the in vivo measurements with no aberration correction and the in vitro results.

  9. Retinal hemorrhagic lesions from femtosecond visible laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Cindy D.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Roach, William P.

    1994-08-01

    We present our clinical evaluation of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic 90 fs single pulses in rabbits and primates. The rabbit and primate eye present unique in vivo models for evaluation of retinal and choroidal laser induced hemorrhages with distinct differences in their retinal anatomy. We found two different hemorrhagic events to occur in the posterior pole with delivery of 90 fs pulses. First, in the Dutch Belted rabbit, we found large amounts of energy per pulse (from 20 to 60 times ED50) were required for formation of subretinal hemorrhages. Second, in the Rhesus monkey, we found significant numbers of small intraretinal hemorrhages from relatively low energy 90 fs pulses. Both the Dutch Belted rabbit and the Rhesus monkey failed to consistently show subretinal hemorrhagic lesions form very high pulse energies. Our findings suggest more energy absorption at the level of the retinal circulation than the choroidal circulation with our pulse parameters. The effects of the laser on the retinal circulation may be due to the use of a wavelength of 580 nm. At this wavelength the oxyhemoglobin to melanin absorption ratio is nearly at its peak (approximately 0.40), perhaps allowing improved absorption in the retinal vasculature. One precaution with this finding, however, are the distinct differences between primate and non-primate ocular systems. Further studies are required to resolve the differences in damage at the level of the RPE and choroid between rabbits and primates.

  10. N-acetylcysteine and acute retinal laser lesions in the colubrid snake eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, William R., III; Rentmeister-Bryant, Heike K.; Barsalou, Norman; Beer, Jeremy; Zwick, Harry

    2004-07-01

    This study examined the role of oxidative stress and the effect of a single dose treatment with N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) on the temporal development of acute laser-induced retinal injury. We used the snake eye/Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) model, an in vivo, non-invasive ocular imaging technique, which has the ability to image cellular retinal detail and allows for studying morphological changes of retinal injury over time. For this study 12 corn-snakes (Elaphe g. guttata) received 5 laser exposures per eye, followed by either a single dose of the antioxidant NAC (150mg/kg, IP in sterile saline) or placebo. Laser exposures were made with a Nd: VO4 DPSS, 532nm laser, coaxially aligned to the SLO. Shuttered pulses were 20msec x 50 mW; 1mJ each. Retinal images were taken using a Rodenstock cSLO and were digitally recorded at 1, 6, 24-hrs, and at 3-wks post-exposure. Lesions were assessed by two raters blind to the conditions of the study yielding measures of damaged area and counts of missing or damaged photoreceptors. Treated eyes showed a significant beneficial effect overall, and these results suggest that oxidative stress plays a role in laser-induced retinal injury. The use of NAC or a similar antioxidant shows promise as a therapeutic tool.

  11. Investigation of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, 1 Apr 91-31 Mar 92

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, R.D.; Lam, K.W.

    1992-04-22

    Laser-induced, photooxidative damage in ocular tissue was studied with a quantitative assay using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate oxidized and reduced ascorbic acid in exposed tissue components. We demonstrated that ascorbic acid, incubated with whole, bovine retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, was oxidized when the reaction mixture was exposed to the output of an argon-ion continuous wave laser The amount of ascorbic acid oxidized was proportional to the irradiance of the sample, and the reaction was wavelength-dependent, with short-wavelength visible light more effective than long-wavelengths in driving the, reaction. The photosensitizing activity was associated with the RPE melanin pigment granules, and was not lost after disrupting or heating the RPE cells. Because melanin was known to form free radicals when illuminated, we hypothesized that ascorbic acid detoxified the light-activated melanin free radicals while being itself oxidized in process. If the supply of reduced ascorbic acid were exhausted, however, the activated melanin could have been the source of tissue-damaging radicals. This model was consistent with a photochemical damage mechanism involving light-activated melanin.

  12. Ex-plant retinal laser induced threshold studies in the millisecond time regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmeister, Karl; Husinsky, Johannes; Seiser, Bernhard; Edthofer, Florian; Tuschl, Helga; Lund, David J.

    2006-02-01

    Excised bovine retinas were used as model for threshold determination of laser induced thermal damage in the pulse regime of 1 ms to 655 ms for a range of laser spot size diameters. The thresholds as determined by fluorescence viability staining compare very well with the prediction of thermal damage models. Both models compare well with published and new Rhesus monkey threshold data. A distinctive dependence of the threshold on laser spot size diameter for different pulse duration was found which indicates that current (ICNIRP, ANSI and IEC) laser exposure limits for large spots can be increased in this pulse duration regime. A time dependent α max is proposed which only for the case of long exposure durations has the current value of 100 mrad, but decreases to smaller angles for short exposure durations, effectively increasing the permissible exposure level. An explanation based on intra-retinal scattering is offered for the unexpected spot size dependence for spot diameters less than about 80 µm. The time dependence and nature of damage is discussed for pulse durations shorter than 1 ms where bubble induced damage seems to lead to a threshold a factor of 10 lower than the thermally induced threshold, resulting in the need to lower the MPE values for this condition. Possible changes of the MPE values are offered and discussed.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of benign and malignant cutaneous lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina G.; Troyanova, P. P.; Stoyanova, V. P.; Avramov, Lachezar A.

    2005-04-01

    The goals of this work were investigation of pigmented skin lesions by the method of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectra were obtained from malignant and benign skin lesions after excitation with nitrogen laser at 337 nm, namely: benign nevi, dysplastic nevi, malignant melanoma (MM), keratopapilloma, base-cell papilloma and base-cell carcinoma, as well as from healthy skin areas near to the lesion that were used posteriori to reveal changes between healthy and lesion skin spectra. Initially lesions were classified by ABCD-dermatscopic method. All suspicious lesions were excised and were investigated histologically. Spectrum of healthy skin consists of one main maximum at 470-500 nm spectral region and secondary maxima at in the regions round 400 and 440 nm. In the cases of nevi and melanoma significant decrease of fluorescence intensity, which correlated with the type of pigment lesion was observed. This reduction of the signal is related to the accumulation of melanin in the lesions that re-absorb strongly the fluorescence from native skin fluorophores in whole visible spectral region. In cases of papilloma and base-cell carcinoma an intensity decrease was also observed, related to accumulation of pigments in these cutaneous lesions. An relative increase of the fluorescence peak at 440 nm were registered in the case of base-cell carcinoma, and appearance of green fluorescence, related to increase of keratin content in benign papilloma lesions were detected. The results, obtained in this investigation of the different pigment lesions could be used for better comprehension of the skin optical properties. The fluorescence spectroscopy of the human skin are very prominent for early diagnosis and differentiation of cutaneous diseases and gives a wide range of possibilities related to real-time determination of existing pathological condition.

  14. Investigating the recovery period of rat brain tissue after electrolytic and 980-nm laser induced lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkulak, Ozguncem; Tabakoglu, H. Ozgur; Aksoy, Ayla; Canbeyli, Resit; Bilgin, Nes'e.; Kurtkaya, Ozlem; Sav, Aydin; Gulsoy, Murat

    2003-10-01

    The effects of 980-nm diode laser and electrolytic lesions in Wistar rat brain tissue were observed by immunohistochemical staining for CD68 marker and Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E). Bilateral lesions; laser lesions (2W/2sec) in the right hemispheres, and electrolytic lesions (1.5mA/20sec) in the left hemispheres were done through in vivo stereotaxic neurosurgical procedure. Subjects were classified into three groups due to the recovery period. Subjects in Group I, II, and III were sacrificed after 0, 2 and 7 days of recovery period respectively. After saline perfusion their brains were dislocated, and paraffin embedded sections were taken. One section for H&E and one for CD68 were cut consecutively in 3μm thickness by examining the lesion in every 30-μm thickness. CD68 was found more efficient marker than H&E in observing the after-effects of both types of lesions. The total damage of laser was smaller than that of electrosurgical unit. The shape of the ablated area in laser induced lesions was more spherical than that of electrosurgical unit. The number of macrophages increased as the recovery period increased for all subjects. Group III showed the highest number of macrophages in three, and the number of macrophages around electrolytic lesion is nearly 1.5 times higher than that of laser lesion. The remarkable ablating ability, the damage zone created and the healing of nearby tissue clearly showed that the 980-nm diode laser is an effective and useful alternative to electrosurgical unit in neurosurgery.

  15. Stereotactic laser induced thermotherapy (LITT): a novel treatment for brain lesions regrowing after radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Torres-Reveron, Juan; Tomasiewicz, Hilarie C; Shetty, Anil; Amankulor, Nduka M; Chiang, Veronica L

    2013-07-01

    Since the inception of radiosurgery, the management of brain metastases has become a common problem for neurosurgeons. Although the use of stereotactic radiosurgery and/or whole brain radiation therapy serves to control the majority of disease burden, patients who survive longer than 6-8 months sometimes face the problem of symptomatic radiographically regrowing lesions with few treatment options. Here we investigate the feasibility of use of MRI-guided stereotactic laser induced thermotherapy (LITT) as a novel treatment option for these lesions. Six patients who had previously undergone gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases were selected. All patients had an initial favorable response to radiosurgery but subsequently developed regrowth of at least one lesion associated with recurrent edema and progressive neurological symptoms requiring ongoing steroids for symptom control. All lesions were evaluated for craniotomy, but were deemed unresectable due to deep location or patient's comorbidities. Stereotactic biopsies were performed prior to the thermotherapy procedure in all cases. LITT was performed using the Visualase system and follow-up MRI imaging was used to determine treatment response. In all six patients biopsy results were negative for tumor and consistent with adverse radiation effects also known as radiation necrosis. Patients tolerated the procedure well and were discharged from the hospital within 48 h of the procedure. In 4/6 cases there was durable improvement of neurological symptoms until death. In all cases steroids were weaned off within 2 months. One patient died from systemic causes related to his cancer a month after the procedure. One patient had regrowth of the lesion 3 months after the procedure and required re-initiation of steroids and standard craniotomy for surgical resection. There were no complications directly related to the thermocoagulation procedure. Stereotactic laser induced thermotherapy is a feasible

  16. Laser-induced retinal nerve fiber layer injury in the nonhuman primate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwick, Harry; Belkin, Michael; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Lund, David J.; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Scales, David K.

    1996-04-01

    We have evaluated the acute effects of Argon laser injury to the retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) in the non-human primate. Single Argon laser exposures of 150 millijoules were employed to induce retinal NFL injury. Retinal NFL injury is not acute; unlike its parallel in retinal disease it has two components that emanate from the acute retinal injury site. The ascending component is more visible, primarily because it is ascending toward the disk, representing ganglion cell axons cut off from their nutrient base, the ganglion cell body; the descending component may require up to 3 weeks to develop. Its characterization depends on the distribution of retinal NFL and the slower degeneration of the ganglion cell bodies. Fluorescein angiography suggest a retinal capillary loss that occurs in the capillary bed of the retinal NFL defect. It may reflect a reduced capillary vascular requirement of the NFL as well as a possible reduction of activity in the axonal transport mechanisms in the ascending NFL defect.

  17. Evaluation of retinal laser lesion healing by perimetric electroretinography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Elmar T.

    1996-04-01

    Eight Cynomolgus fasciculata who had graded laser lesions placed in one eye 6 years previously were evaluated by a stimulation and electrophysiologic recording technique to produce maps of retinal function. All animal testing was performed under IACUC approved protocols. The single q-switched pulses from a neodymium-YAG laser produced lesions of 4 types: no visible change, minimal visible lesions, `white dot' lesions (localized circumscribed retinal blanching) and `red dot' lesions (contained retinal hemorrhage) in the eye at the time of placement. Single exposures had been made in four locations: 5 degrees superior, inferior and temporal to the fovea, and one foveally. The multifocal (perimetric) electroretinogram was recorded from specialized contact lenses through hospital grade amplifiers. Initial analyses gave field maps that demonstrated apparent relative loss of function in some lesion sites. However, these losses were variable and occasionally patchy (i.e. disconnected areas of low signal). Repeated examinations of the same retinal areas showed high variability, even with 15 minute acquisition times and no apparent gaze drift. Apparent losses did not appear to correlate with visible retinal changes at the lesion site. Further research is needed to determine the biological substrate for this variability in response topography.

  18. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, September 1981-August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis

    1982-09-01

    This research led to new insights in the fundamental mechanisms involved in laser induced retinal damage and some of the fundamental work on these mechanisms lead to new and exciting avenues in the development of rapidly adjustable molecular light filters with important new possibilities for pulsed-laser eye protection. This report summarizes the significant progress of the past year: (1) Development and Fundamental Mechanism of a Rapidly Adjustable Molecular Filter for Pulsed Laser Eye Protection - this research direction resulted from our investigations on cones of the red-eared swamp turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans. (2) The Optical Density of Turtle Oil Droplet Solutions - it is important both from a practical and fundamental point of view to determine the optical density of turtle oil-droplet suspensions. In view of the high optical densities in this system, tunable-laser resonance Raman spectroscopy, which is the only technique that has been able to provide high-resolution data, is the only technique that is potentially able to obtain the information. (3) Laser-Induced Molecular Alterations in Turtle Retina. (4) Light Driven Enzymatic Reactions in Photoreceptors. (5) Molecular Cytology of Rod Outer Segments.

  19. Elemental analysis of tissue pellets for the differentiation of epidermal lesion and normal skin by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Youngmin; Han, Jung Hyun; Shin, Sungho; Kim, Yong-Chul; Jeong, Sungho

    2016-01-01

    By laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of epidermal lesion and dermis tissue pellets of hairless mouse, it is shown that Ca intensity in the epidermal lesion is higher than that in dermis, whereas Na and K intensities have an opposite tendency. It is demonstrated that epidermal lesion and normal dermis can be differentiated with high selectivity either by univariate or multivariate analysis of LIBS spectra with an intensity ratio difference by factor of 8 or classification accuracy over 0.995, respectively. PMID:27231610

  20. Automated placement of retinal laser lesions in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Jerath, Maya R.; Lewis, R. Stephen, II; Dillard, Bryan C.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1995-03-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Biomedical Engineering Laser Laboratory investigating the medical applications of lasers have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The overall goal of the ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Researchers at the USAF Academy's Department of Electrical Engineering and the Optical Radiation Division of Armstrong Laboratory have also become involved with this research due to similar related interests. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Work is ongoing to build a prototype system to simultaneously control lesion depth and placement. Following the dual-use concept, this system is being adapted for clinical use as a retinal treatment system as well as a research tool for military laser-tissue interaction studies. Specifically, the system is being adapted for use with an ultra-short pulse laser system at Armstrong Laboratory and Frank J. Seiler Research Laboratory to study the effects of ultra-short laser pulses on the human retina. The instrumentation aspects of the prototype subsystems were presented at SPIE Conference 1877 in January 1993. Since then our efforts have concentrated on combining the lesion depth control subsystem and the lesion placement subsystem into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both parameters. We have designated this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. We have also investigated methods to improve system response time. Use of high speed nonstandard frame rate CCD cameras and high speed frame

  1. Laser-induced autofluorescence properties of base-cell lesions: analysis and algorithms for diagnosis and differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2006-09-01

    The goals of this work were investigation of base-cell skin lesions by the method of laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectra were obtained from benign base-cell papilloma and malignant base-cell carcinoma, as well as from healthy skin areas near to the lesions that were used posteriori to reveal changes between healthy and lesion skin spectra. Preliminarily lesions were classified by dermatoscopic method (MoleMax II, DERMA Instruments). All suspicious lesions were excised and were investigated histologically. The experimental set-up consists of a nitrogen laser (337 nm, 14 μJ, 10 Hz), lenses, filters, optical fibers, and a microspectrometer (PC2000, "Ocean Optics"). A computer controls this system. Spectrum of healthy skin consists of one main maximum at 470-500 nm spectral region and secondary maxima at in the regions around 400 and 440 nm. In cases of papilloma and base-cell carcinoma an intensity decrease was observed, related to accumulation of pigments in these cutaneous lesions. An relative increase of the fluorescence peak at 440 nm were registered in the case of base-cell carcinoma, related to metabolism activity increase, and appearance of green fluorescence, related to increase of keratin content in benign papilloma lesions were detected. The results, obtained were used to develop multispectral diagnostic algorithm of these base-cell lesions. An sensitivity of 89,4% and 91,0% and specificity of 99,6% and 97,4% for differentiation between normal skin and papilloma and carcinoma respectively were obtained. The capability of the human skin fluorescence spectroscopy for early diagnosis and differentiation of cutaneous lesions is shown.

  2. Evaluation of vernier acuity near healed retinal laser lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Elmar T.

    1997-05-01

    Seven Cynomolgus fasciculata who had graded laser lesions placed in own eye 6 years previously were evaluated for their vernier acuity by electrophysiologic recording techniques. In these experiments, 95 percent contrast vernier acuity targets were presented at high luminance levels to anesthetized primates. Visual evoked potentials were recorded by conventional means form scalp electrodes through hospital grade amplifiers. All animal testing was performed under IACUC approved protocols. The single q-switched pulses form a neodymium-YAG laser had produced lesions of 4 types: no visible change, minimal visible lesions, 'white dot' lesions and 'red dot' lesions in the eye at the time of placement. Single exposures had been made in four locations: 5 degrees superior, inferior and temporal to the fovea, and one foveally. Vernier recording proved somewhat successful in smaller animals with less than contained retinal hemorrhage lesions in the fovea. Initial analyses demonstrated a significant decrease of the pattern response signal/noise in the experimental eye overall, and an apparent relative loss of vernier signal in some lesioned eyes. Animals with the more severe lesions have somewhat degraded small patten responses and no recordable vernier response. Apparent lesser losses produced less effect.

  3. Monitoring the healing process of laser-induced microvascular lesions using optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-02-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) possesses optical resolution and reveals endogenous optical absorption contrast, promising to be a valuable tool for in vivo microvascular imaging. In laser dermatology, OR-PAM can provide fruitful structural and functional information about the targeted microvascular lesions, such as their threedimensional (3D) morphology, precise location inside the tissue, and blood oxygenation within single vessels, which will facilitate accurate diagnosis and proper treatment. More importantly, the advantages of noninvasiveness and measurement consistency also permit OR-PAM to monitor the healing process of the laser-surgical wound noninvasively. In this work, we employed OR-PAM to monitor the healing process of microvascular lesions induced by nanosecond-pulsed laser. Our results indicate that OR-PAM could be a very useful tool in laser dermatology and laser microsurgery.

  4. Histopathology of ultrashort-laser-pulse retinal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Cynthia A.; Narayan, Drew G.; Osborne, Catherine; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Stein, Cindy D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Roach, William P.; Noojin, Gary D.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1996-05-01

    Recent studies of retinal damage due to ultrashort laser pulses have shown interesting behavior. Laser induced retinal damage for ultrashort (i.e. less than 1 ns) laser pulses is produced at lower energies than in the nanosecond to microsecond laser pulse regime and the energy required for hemorrhagic lesions is much greater times greater for the nanosecond regime. We investigated the tissue effects exhibited in histopathology of retinal tissues exposed to ultrashort laser pulses.

  5. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, February-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis

    1981-09-01

    Laser-spectroscopy experiments have focused on cones in the red-eared swamp turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans. Choice of this system was based on the desire to correlate molecular data with the extensive data being collected on this system by Dr. Zwick in his studies on laser hazards at LAIR. Thus, a detailed collaborative effort was initiated on this system during the past year. The experiments resulted in important information that opens new avenues to explore fundamental molecular mechanisms of retinal damage with laser irradiation. Results of these experiments are summarized in the following sections: I. Elucidation of the role of oil droplets in the absorption of light by the turtle retina; II. A Selective Probe of Membrane Potentials in Turtle Cone Cells; III. Angstrom Resolution Light Microscopy of Photoreceptor Cells; IV. Identification and Selective Staining of Other Important Molecular Components of Photoreceptor Cells.

  6. Non-invasive detection of laser-induced retinal injury through the vitreous using dynamic light scattering (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Naiman, Melissa; Bouhenni, Rachida; Dunmire, Jeffery; Liu, Ying; Rafiq, Qundeel; Edward, Deepak; Gothard, David

    2016-03-01

    Laser radiation entering the eye has the potential of damaging the retina. As an inflammatory response, the proteins can rush to the lesion site created by laser exposure. We explore the hypothesis if these proteins can be detected non-invasively. In this preliminary study, we developed a new brief-case size dynamic light scattering instrument to detect these proteins in-vivo in the rabbit vitreous. The results were validated with bio-chemical analysis.

  7. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan; Li, Jie; Sun, Ye; Fu, Zhongjie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Evans, Lucy; Tian, Katherine; Saba, Nicholas; Fredrick, Thomas; Morss, Peyton; Chen, Jing; Smith, Lois E H

    2015-01-01

    The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model.

  8. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Fu, Zhongjie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Evans, Lucy; Tian, Katherine; Saba, Nicholas; Fredrick, Thomas; Morss, Peyton; Chen, Jing; Smith, Lois E. H.

    2015-01-01

    The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model. PMID:26161975

  9. Significance of retinal laser lesion location and subretinal hemorrhage in bridging choroidal neovascular complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuschereba, Steven T.; Clarkson, Donna R.; Valo, Lynn M.; Brown, Jeremiah, Jr.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2003-06-01

    Purpose: To determine funduscopic criteria that will help predict when bridging choroidal neovascular (CNV) complexes will develop after laser retinal trauma and to define early preventive treatment targets. Methods: Ten rhesus monkeys were used and retinal lesions were produced by Nd:YAG exposures (20ns, 1-2mJ, 1064nm, min. spot size) simulating human accidental laser trauma to the central fundus. Funduscopy and fluorescein/ICG angiography were conducted at day 1, 4, and 14, and at 2 and 4 months, and animals terminated for histologic evaluation. Predisposition for bridging fibrovascular complexes was evaluated for single lesions, two small lesions showing coalescing hemorrhages, and multiple lesions involved with large field subretinal and vitreous hemorrhages. Results: Elevated CNVs were present in all single lesions with confined subretinal hemorrhages. All lesion sets that showed initial and small coalescing subretinal hemorrhages formed bridging CNV scars. No bridging CNVs occurred in lesion sets involving a vitreous hemorrhage adjacent to a confined, but small subretinal hemorrhage. In large field subretinal hemorrhages involving multiple laser lesions, complex CNV formation occurred. Extensive secondary photoreceptor losses occurred in confined hemorrhage and CNV zones. Conclusion: Trauma presenting with evidence of coalescing and confined subretinal hemorrhages between two adjacent lesions has a high chance of forming choroidal neovascular bridge complexes between the involved lesions. CNV formation may be related to the long residence time, break down products, and clearance processes of extravasated blood. Removal of trapped blood and curtailing angiogenesis and cellular proliferation may be helpful treatment strategies.

  10. Topographic reorganization in area 18 of adult cats following circumscribed monocular retinal lesions in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Young, J M; Waleszczyk, W J; Burke, W; Calford, M B; Dreher, B

    2002-06-01

    Circumscribed laser lesions were made in the nasal retinae of one eye in adolescent cats. Ten to sixteen months later, about 80 % of single neurones recorded in the lesion projection zone (LPZ) of contralateral area 18 (parastriate cortex, area V2) were binocular but when stimulated via the lesioned eye had ectopic discharge fields (displaced to normal retina in the vicinity of the lesion). Although the clear majority of binocular cells recorded from the LPZ responded with higher peak discharge rates to stimuli presented via the non-lesioned eye, the orientation and direction selectivities as well as preferred and upper cut-off velocities for stimuli presented through either eye were very similar. Furthermore, the sizes of the ectopic discharge fields of binocular cells recorded from the LPZ were not significantly different from those of their counterparts plotted via the non-lesioned eye. Thus, monocular retinal lesions performed in adolescent cats induce topographic reorganization in the LPZ of area 18. Although a similar reorganization occurs in area 17 (striate cortex, area V1) of cats in which monocular retinal lesions were made either in adulthood or adolescence, in view of the very different velocity response profiles of ectopic discharge fields in areas 17 and those in area 18, it appears that ectopic discharge fields in area 17 are largely independent of excitatory feedback input from area 18.

  11. Temperature-Controlled Retinal Photocoagulation Reliably Generates Uniform Subvisible, Mild, or Moderate Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Koinzer, Stefan; Baade, Alexander; Schlott, Kerstin; Hesse, Carola; Caliebe, Amke; Roider, Johann; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Conventional retinal photocoagulation produces irregular lesions and does not allow reliable control of ophthalmoscopically invisible lesions. We applied automatically controlled retinal photocoagulation, which allows to apply uniform lesions without titration, and aimed at five different predictable lesion intensities in a study on rabbit eyes. Methods A conventional 532-nm photocoagulation laser was used in combination with a pulsed probe laser. They facilitated real-time fundus temperature measurements and automatic exposure time control for different predefined time/temperature dependent characteristics (TTC). We applied 225 control lesions (exposure time 200 ms) and 794 TTC lesions (5 intensities, exposure times 7–800 ms) in six rabbit eyes with variable laser power (20–66.4 mW). Starting after 2 hours, we examined fundus color and optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images over 3 months and classified lesion morphologies according to a seven-stage OCT classifier. Results Visibility rates in funduscopy (OCT) after 2 hours were 17% (68%) for TTC intensity group 1, 38% (90%) for TTC group 2 and greater than 94% (>98%) for all consecutive groups. TTC groups 1 through 4 correlated to increasing morphological lesion intensities and increasing median funduscopic and OCT diameters. Group 5 lesions were as large as, but more intense than group 4 lesions. Conclusions Automatic, temperature controlled photocoagulation allows to apply predictable subvisible, mild, or moderate lesions without manual power titration. Translational Relevance The technique will facilitate standardized, automatically controlled low and early treatment of diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS) intensity photocoagulation independently of the treating physician, the treated eye and lesion location. PMID:26473086

  12. Spatial and temporal vision of macaques after central retinal lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Merigan, W.H.; Pasternak, T.; Zehl, D.

    1981-07-01

    Spatial contrast and temporal modulation sensitivity of two macaque monkeys were measured at three luminance levels before and after binocular laser coagulation of the fovea. The radius of the lesions ranged from 1.6 to 2.2 degree from the center of the fovea. After placement of the lesions, the visibility of high spatial frequencies was greatly reduced, although sensitivity at middle and low spatial frequencies was unaffected. No loss of spatial resolution was found at the lowest luminance tested. When temporal modulation sensitivity was tested with 4 deg targets, foveal lesions had no effect at any temporal frequency or luminance. However, with a 0.57 degree target, sensitivity to lower temporal frequencies was impaired. Thus visual loss after destruction of the fovea is limited to high luminance, small targets, and the resolution of fine detail.

  13. Cortical reorganization after long-term adaptation to retinal lesions in humans.

    PubMed

    Chung, Susana T L

    2013-11-13

    Single-unit recordings demonstrated that the adult mammalian visual cortex is capable of reorganizing after induced retinal lesions. In humans, whether the adult cortex is capable of reorganizing has only been studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging, with equivocal results. Here, we exploited the phenomenon of visual crowding, a major limitation on object recognition, to show that, in humans with long-standing retinal (macular) lesions that afflict the fovea and thus use their peripheral vision exclusively, the signature properties of crowding are distinctly different from those of the normal periphery. Crowding refers to the inability to recognize objects when the object spacing is smaller than the critical spacing. Critical spacing depends only on the retinal location of the object, scales linearly with its distance from the fovea, and is approximately two times larger in the radial than the tangential direction with respect to the fovea, thus demonstrating the signature radial-tangential anisotropy of the crowding zone. Using retinal imaging combined with behavioral measurements, we mapped out the crowding zone at the precise peripheral retinal locations adopted by individuals with macular lesions as the new visual reference loci. At these loci, the critical spacings are substantially smaller along the radial direction than expected based on the normal periphery, resulting in a lower scaling of critical spacing with the eccentricity of the peripheral locus and a loss in the signature radial-tangential anisotropy of the crowding zone. These results imply a fundamental difference in the substrate of cortical processing in object recognition following long-term adaptation to macular lesions.

  14. Retinal spot size with wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Eilert, Brent; Druessel, Jeffrey J.; Payne, Dale J.; Phillips, Shana L.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1997-06-01

    We have made an indirect in-vivo determination of spot size focusing in the rhesus monkey model. Measurement of the laser induced breakdown threshold both in-vitro and in-vivo allow correlation and assignment of a spot size after focusing through the living eye. We discuss and analyze the results and show how trends in minimum visible lesion data should be assessed in light of chromatic aberration. National laser safety standards are based on minimal visual lesion (MVL) threshold studies in different animal models. The energy required for a retinal lesion depends upon may parameters including wavelength and retinal spot size. We attempt to explain trends in reported MVL threshold studies using a model of the eye which allows calculation of changes in retinal spot size due to chromatic aberration.

  15. Histopathology of ultrashort pulsed laser retinal damage: changing retinal pathology with variation in spot size for near-infrared laser lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Cynthia A.; Winter, Katrina P.; Norton McCall, Michelle L.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1999-06-01

    We wish to identify the change in extent of retinal tissue injury due to varying the spot size at the retina of ultrashort laser pulses. We compared the effects of delivery of near infrared (1060 nm) single laser pulses to an 800 micron diameter retinal spot to previously reported laser retinal effects. We examined macular lesions 24 hours after delivery of near-infrared (1060 nm wavelength) ultrashort laser to 804 micron spot-size, using fundus examination, fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms. Using light microscopy, we examined sections of these lesions obtained 24 hours after laser delivery. The degree of retinal damage was compared to our data published previously by using a modified version of our previous grading scale. The 150 fs near infrared, large spot laser lesions were remarkable in their clinical and pathological appearance. The lesions, rather than centering on a single focal spot of pallor as typically seen in pulsed laser lesions of the retina, demonstrated a spotted pattern of multiple focal lesions across the area of laser delivery. There was also choroidal damage in several eyes but the Bruch's membrane remained intact. Although there was choroidal damage in the 150 fs near infrared wavelength small spot laser lesions there was not significant thermal spread. The small spot ultrashort visible wavelength showed no significant thermal spread and no choroidal damage. Larger spot-size demonstrated a broader area of damage than that of the smaller spot-size and different choroidal effect when compared to smaller sized lesions.

  16. Minimum visible retinal lesions from pico- and femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, William P.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Stein, Cindy D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1994-08-01

    Threshold measurements for Minimum Visible Lesions (MVL) at the retina are reported for femtosecond (fs) and picosecond (ps) laser pulses in Rhesus monkey eyes using visible wavelengths. The 50% probability for damage (ED50) dosages are calculated for 1 hour and 24 hour post-exposures at the 95% confidence level. The ED50 values are found to decrease with pulsewidth down to 600 fs. At 90 fs the ED50 dosages were noted to increase slightly when compared with the 3 ps and 600 fs values. Fluorescein angiography (FA) was accomplished at both 1 hour and 24 hour post-exposure and did not demonstrate lower threshold for damage, which has been the case for MVL's created with longer pulse durations (>= nanoseconds). At the 90 fs pulse duration, MVLs were not observed below 0.1 (mu) J. At energies greater than 0.1 (mu) J, both MVL and the absence of MVL's were observed up to 1.4 (mu) J. Above 1.4 (mu) J all energies delivered showed MVL development. Out of 138 data points taken at 90 fs, 94 were between 0.1 and 14 (mu) J, and the observed lesions are distributed with approximately 50% probability throughout this energy rate.

  17. Points of interest and visual dictionaries for automatic retinal lesion detection.

    PubMed

    Rocha, A; Carvalho, T; Jelinek, H F; Goldenstein, S; Wainer, J

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we present an algorithm to detect the presence of diabetic retinopathy (DR)-related lesions from fundus images based on a common analytical approach that is capable of identifying both red and bright lesions without requiring specific pre- or postprocessing. Our solution constructs a visual word dictionary representing points of interest (PoIs) located within regions marked by specialists that contain lesions associated with DR and classifies the fundus images based on the presence or absence of these PoIs as normal or DR-related pathology. The novelty of our approach is in locating DR lesions in the optic fundus images using visual words that combines feature information contained within the images in a framework easily extendible to different types of retinal lesions or pathologies and builds a specific projection space for each class of interest (e.g., white lesions such as exudates or normal regions) instead of a common dictionary for all classes. The visual words dictionary was applied to classifying bright and red lesions with classical cross validation and cross dataset validation to indicate the robustness of this approach. We obtained an area under the curve (AUC) of 95.3% for white lesion detection and an AUC of 93.3% for red lesion detection using fivefold cross validation and our own data consisting of 687 images of normal retinae, 245 images with bright lesions, 191 with red lesions, and 109 with signs of both bright and red lesions. For cross dataset analysis, the visual dictionary also achieves compelling results using our images as the training set and the RetiDB and Messidor images as test sets. In this case, the image classification resulted in an AUC of 88.1% when classifying the RetiDB dataset and in an AUC of 89.3% when classifying the Messidor dataset, both cases for bright lesion detection. The results indicate the potential for training with different acquisition images under different setup conditions with a high accuracy of

  18. Association of reduced Connexin 43 expression with retinal vascular lesions in human diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tien, Thomas; Muto, Tetsuya; Zhang, Joyce; Sohn, Elliott H; Mullins, Robert F; Roy, Sayon

    2016-05-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) downregulation promotes apoptosis in retinal vascular cells of diabetic animal models; however, its relevance to human diabetic retinopathy has not been established. In this study, we investigated whether diabetes alters Cx43 expression and promotes retinal vascular lesions in human retinas. Diabetic human eyes (aged 64-94 years) and non-diabetic human eyes (aged 61-90 years) were analyzed in this study. Retinal protein samples and retinal capillary networks were assessed for Cx43 level by Western blot (WB) analysis and immunostaining. In parallel, retinal capillary networks were stained with hematoxylin and periodic acid Schiff to determine the extent of pericyte loss (PL) and acellular capillaries (AC) in these retinas. Cx43 protein expression was significantly reduced in the diabetic retinas compared to non-diabetic retinas as indicated by WB analysis (81 ± 11% of control). Additionally, a significant decrease in the number of Cx43 plaques per unit length of vessel was observed in the diabetic retinas compared to those of non-diabetic retinas (62 ± 10% of control; p < 0.005). Importantly, a strong inverse relationship was noted between Cx43 expression and the relative number of AC (r = -0.89; p < 0.0005), and between Cx43 expression and number of pericyte loss (r = -0.88; p < 0.0005). Overall, these results show that Cx43 expression is reduced in the human diabetic retinas and Cx43 reduction is associated with increased vascular cell death. These findings suggest that diabetes decreases retinal Cx43 expression and that the development of PL and AC is associated with reduced Cx43 expression in human diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26738943

  19. Hierarchical detection of red lesions in retinal images by multiscale correlation filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bob; Wu, Xiangqian; You, Jane; Li, Qin; Karray, Fakhri

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents an approach to the computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of diabetic retinopathy (DR) -- a common and severe complication of long-term diabetes which damages the retina and cause blindness. Since red lesions are regarded as the first signs of DR, there has been extensive research on effective detection and localization of these abnormalities in retinal images. In contrast to existing algorithms, a new approach based on Multiscale Correlation Filtering (MSCF) and dynamic thresholding is developed. This consists of two levels, Red Lesion Candidate Detection (coarse level) and True Red Lesion Detection (fine level). The approach was evaluated using data from Retinopathy On-line Challenge (ROC) competition website and we conclude our method to be effective and efficient.

  20. Recovery from retinal lesions: molecular plasticity mechanisms in visual cortex far beyond the deprived zone.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Van den Bergh, Gert; Thorrez, Lieven; Heylen, Kevin; Eysel, Ulf T; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2011-12-01

    In cats with central retinal lesions, deprivation of the lesion projection zone (LPZ) in primary visual cortex (area 17) induces remapping of the cortical topography. Recovery of visually driven cortical activity in the LPZ involves distinct changes in protein expression. Recent observations, about molecular activity changes throughout area 17, challenge the view that its remote nondeprived parts would not be involved in this recovery process. We here investigated the dynamics of the protein expression pattern of remote nondeprived area 17 triggered by central retinal lesions to explore to what extent far peripheral area 17 would contribute to the topographic map reorganization inside the visual cortex. Using functional proteomics, we identified 40 proteins specifically differentially expressed between far peripheral area 17 of control and experimental animals 14 days to 8 months postlesion. Our results demonstrate that far peripheral area 17 is implicated in the functional adaptation to the visual deprivation, involving a meshwork of interacting proteins, operating in diverse pathways. In particular, endocytosis/exocytosis processes appeared to be essential via their intimate correlation with long-term potentiation and neurite outgrowth mechanisms. PMID:21571696

  1. Retinal image analysis to detect and quantify lesions associated with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C I; Hornero, R; López, M I; Poza, J

    2004-01-01

    An automatic method to detect hard exudates, a lesion associated with diabetic retinopathy, is proposed. The algorithm found on their color, using a statistical classification, and their sharp edges, applying an edge detector, to localize them. A sensitivity of 79.62% with a mean number of 3 false positives per image is obtained in a database of 20 retinal image with variable color, brightness and quality. In that way, we evaluate the robustness of the method in order to make adequate to a clinical environment. Further efforts will be done to improve its performance.

  2. Retinal image analysis to detect and quantify lesions associated with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C I; Hornero, R; López, M I; Poza, J

    2004-01-01

    An automatic method to detect hard exudates, a lesion associated with diabetic retinopathy, is proposed. The algorithm found on their color, using a statistical classification, and their sharp edges, applying an edge detector, to localize them. A sensitivity of 79.62% with a mean number of 3 false positives per image is obtained in a database of 20 retinal image with variable color, brightness and quality. In that way, we evaluate the robustness of the method in order to make adequate to a clinical environment. Further efforts will be done to improve its performance. PMID:17272012

  3. Bright Retinal Lesions Detection using Colour Fundus Images Containing Reflective Features

    SciTech Connect

    Giancardo, Luca; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Chaum, Edward; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Li, Yaquin

    2009-01-01

    In the last years the research community has developed many techniques to detect and diagnose diabetic retinopathy with retinal fundus images. This is a necessary step for the implementation of a large scale screening effort in rural areas where ophthalmologists are not available. In the United States of America, the incidence of diabetes is worryingly increasing among the young population. Retina fundus images of patients younger than 20 years old present a high amount of reflection due to the Nerve Fibre Layer (NFL), the younger the patient the more these reflections are visible. To our knowledge we are not aware of algorithms able to explicitly deal with this type of reflection artefact. This paper presents a technique to detect bright lesions also in patients with a high degree of reflective NFL. First, the candidate bright lesions are detected using image equalization and relatively simple histogram analysis. Then, a classifier is trained using texture descriptor (Multi-scale Local Binary Patterns) and other features in order to remove the false positives in the lesion detection. Finally, the area of the lesions is used to diagnose diabetic retinopathy. Our database consists of 33 images from a telemedicine network currently developed. When determining moderate to high diabetic retinopathy using the bright lesions detected the algorithm achieves a sensitivity of 100% at a specificity of 100% using hold-one-out testing.

  4. Red lesion detection using background estimation and lesions characteristics in diabetic retinal image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongbo; Peng, Yinghui; Yi, Yao; Shang, Xingyu

    2013-10-01

    Detection of red lesions [hemorrhages (HRs) and microaneurysms (MAs)] is crucial for the diagnosis of early diabetic retinopathy. A method based on background estimation and adapted to specific characteristics of HRs and MAs is proposed. Candidate red lesions are located by background estimation and Mahalanobis distance measure and then some adaptive postprocessing techniques, which include vessel detection, nonvessel exclusion based on shape analysis, and noise points exclusion by double-ring filter (only used for MAs detection), are conducted to remove nonlesion pixels. The method is evaluated on our collected image dataset, and experimental results show that it is better than or approximate to other previous approaches. It is effective to reduce the false-positive and false-negative results that arise from incomplete and inaccurate vessel structure.

  5. Deficiency in the metabolite receptor SUCNR1 (GPR91) leads to outer retinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lapalme, Eric; Leboeuf, Dominique; Carbadillo, Jose; Rubic, Tina; Picard, Emilie; Mawambo, Gaelle; Tetreault, Nicolas; Joyal, Jean-Sebastien; Chemtob, Sylvain; Sennlaub, Florian; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Guimond, Martin; Sapieha, Przemyslaw

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prominent cause of blindness in the Western world. To date, its molecular pathogenesis as well as the sequence of events leading to retinal degeneration remain largely ill-defined. While the invasion of choroidal neovasculature in the retina is the primary mechanism that precipitates loss of sight, an earlier dry form may accompany it. Here we provide the first evidence for the protective role of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE)-resident metabolite receptor, succinate receptor 1 (SUCNR1; G-Protein coupled Receptor-91 (GPR91), in preventing dry AMD-like lesions of the outer retina. Genetic analysis of 925 patients with geographic atrophy and 1199 AMD-free peers revealed an increased risk of developing geographic atrophy associated with intronic variants in the SUCNR1 gene. In mice, outer retinal expression of SUCNR1 is observed in the RPE as well as microglial cells and decreases progressively with age. Accordingly, Sucnr1−/− mice show signs of premature sub-retinal dystrophy with accumulation of oxidized-LDL, abnormal thickening of Bruch's membrane and a buildup of subretinal microglia. The accumulation of microglia in Sucnr1-deficient mice is likely triggered by the inefficient clearance of oxidized lipids by the RPE as bone marrow transfer of wild-type microglia into Sucnr1−/− mice did not salvage the patho-phenotype and systemic lipolysis was equivalent between wild-type and control mice. Our findings suggest that deficiency in SUCNR1 is a possible contributing factor to the pathogenesis of dry AMD and thus broaden our understanding of this clinically unmet need. PMID:23833031

  6. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, 1 May 1985-30 April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.

    1986-12-31

    Progress on the fundamental effects of femtosecond laser pulses with retinal pigments, new insights into the detailed interactions of light with photoreceptor cells, and tremendous advances in new forms of super-resolution microscopy are discussed. The common Nd:YAG laser pumping a dye laser is used.

  7. Protective effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on retinal injury induced by argon laser photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Zhang, C. P.; San, Q.; Wang, C. Z.; Yang, Z. F.; Kang, H. X.; Qian, H. W.

    2010-12-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment is often complicated by a side effect of visual impairment, which is caused by the unavoidable laser-induced retinal destruction. At present no specific is found to cure this retinopathy. The aim of this study was to observe the neuroprotective effect of bFGF on laser-induced retinal injury. Chinchilla rabbits were divided into three groups and argon laser lesions were created in the retinas. Then bFGF or dexamethasone, a widely used ophthalmic preparation, or saline was given severally by retrobulbar injection. The retinal lesions were evaluated histologically and morphometrically, and visual function was examined by ERG. The results showed that bFGF administration better preserved morphology of retinal photoreceptors and significantly diminished the area of the lesions. Furthermore, bFGF promoted the restoration of the ERG b-wave amplitude. In rabbits treated with dexamethasone, however, the lesions showed almost no ameliorative changes. This is the first study to investigate the potential role of bFGF as a remedial agent in laser photocoagulation treatment. These findings suggest that bFGF has significant neuroprotective properties in the retina and this type of neuroprotection may be of clinical significance in reducing iatrogenic laser-induced retinal injuries in humans.

  8. Lesions of the mitral valve as a cause of central retinal artery occlusion: presentation and discussion of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ayati, Maryam; Gori, Tommaso; Münzel, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We present two cases of mitral valve lesions that manifested with unilateral blindness caused by central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO): Case 1. A 68-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic for sudden blindness. Retinal artery angiogram showed CRAO. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) documented a mass attached to the ventricular side of the posterior mitral leaflet, which at pathology was identified as a blood cyst. Case 2. A 67-year-old man was admitted for a sudden unilateral painless loss of vision. Retinal angiogram documented CRAO, and TEE showed a highly mobile, spherical, lesion on the atrial side of anterior mitral leaflet. In this case, the pathological finding was a degenerated calcified thrombosis. We report on two cases of very rare abnormalities of the mitral valve presenting with a very rare embolic complication, i.e., CRAO. Like for cryptogenic stroke, transesophageal echocardiography plays a central role in the diagnosis of cardiogenic embolic sources. PMID:20070361

  9. Visible-lesion threshold dependency on retinal spot size for ultrashort laser pulses in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Payne, Dale J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    1998-05-01

    Single pulses in the near-infrared (1060 nanometers) were used to measure retinal spot size dependence of minimum visible lesion (MVL) thresholds in rhesus monkey eyes at a pulsewidth of 150 femtoseconds. We report the MVL thresholds determined at 1 hour and 24 hours post exposure which were obtained with 2 different lenses placed in front of the eye to vary the retinal spot size. Also we report the fluorescein angiography thresholds (FAVL) for the above measurements. These new data points will be added to the databank for Retinal Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) as a function of spot size for this pulsewidth and a comparison will be made with previous spot size dependency studies. Our measurements show that the retinal ED50 threshold fluence decreases for increasing retinal spot sizes. The fluence at the MVL threshold decreased by a factor of 3 for an increase in retinal image diameter by a factor of 4.5 times from the smallest to largest spot size.

  10. Choroidal abnormalities and masquerade syndromes confounding the diagnosis of laser-induced eye injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Henry D.; Zwick, Harry; Brown, Jeremiah, Jr.; Dicks, Ronald; Cheramie, Rachel; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2005-04-01

    The diagnosis of a laser-induced eye injury occurring in occupational or military environments is often complicated by confounding symptoms, the possibility of pre-existing pathology, and/or a lack of visual deficits that can be clearly associated with a specific incident. Two recent cases are described that illustrate the importance of a thorough differential diagnosis when coexisting retinal pathologies are present with potentially different (e.g. laser or disease) etiologies. Indocyanine green angiography (ICG) and ocular coherence tomography (OCT) used in combination with standard ophthalmic imaging can provide helpful insights as to the etiology of these lesions. Vascular choroidal abnormalities such as hemangiomas or occult histoplasmosis infection can produce findings that can mimic the leakage that may be evident from neovascular membranes associated with laser injury. Further evaluation with OCT and conventional fluorescein angiography (FA) is helpful to look for the classic signature of retinal disruption and retinal pigment layer changes that are often present in association with laser injury. Furthermore, a careful situational assessment of a potential laser exposure is important to confirm the diagnosis of laser-induced eye injury.

  11. Aberrant retinal projections to midbrain targets mediate spared visual orienting function in hamsters with neonatal lesions of superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Carman, L S; Schneider, G E

    1992-01-01

    Rodents, cats, and most nonmammalian vertebrates with bilateral tectal deafferentation or ablation in adulthood are extremely deficient at orienting to visual stimuli; yet animals with neonatal lesions of superficial layers of the superior colliculus (SC) show partial sparing of this response, particularly for targets in the central visual field. In this study, we sought to determine whether these spared orienting abilities are mediated by aberrant retinal projections to the remaining intermediate layers of the SC, or whether visual cortex (VC) mechanisms or alternative behavioral strategies are responsible. Neonatal golden hamsters received either bilateral heat lesions of the SC (rlSC), or a heat lesion of the right SC and enucleation of the right eye (rSCrE). This latter procedure causes axons from the left eye to recross the tectal midline and terminate in the "wrong" (left) SC (Schneider 1973). As adults, both groups of hamsters were extremely deficient in visually guided approach to stationary targets, although rlSC-lesioned hamsters showed some sparing for central field targets and rSCrE-lesioned hamsters often made wrong-direction turns for targets in the left peripheral field. We then subjected both groups of neonatally lesioned hamsters to bilateral aspiration lesions of the VC. Retesting showed no change in visual orienting behavior as a result of the cortical lesions. Labeling of the optic tract with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) revealed abundant aberrant retinal projections to remaining intermediate layers of the SC and thalamic nucleus lateralis posterior (LP), as well as supernormal innervation of pretectal nuclei, the dorsal terminal nucleus of the accessory optic tract, and the ventral nucleus of the lateral geniculate body (LGv). We conclude that the spared visual orienting capabilities of hamsters with rlSC and rSCrE lesions are mediated by the aberrant midbrain projections, and that cortical mechanisms are not involved in spared visual orienting

  12. In vivo laser-induced breakdown in the rabbit eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Roach, William P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for femtosecond laser pulsewidths have been made for retinal minimum visible lesions (MVLs) in Dutch Belted rabbit and rhesus monkey eyes. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water have been measured and reported using an artificial eye. We have recorded on video the first LIB causing bubble formation in any eye in vivo using albino rabbit eyes (New Zealand white) with 120- femtosecond (fs) pulses and pulse energies as low as 5 microjoules ((mu) J). These bubbles were clearly formed anterior to the retina within the vitreous humor and, with 60 (mu) J of energy, they lasted for several seconds before disappearing and leaving no apparent damage to the retina. We believe this to be true LIB because of the lack of pigmentation or melanin granules within the albino rabbit eye (thus no absorptive elements) and because of the extremely high peak powers within the 5-(mu) J, 120-fs laser pulse. These high peak powers produce self-focusing of the pulse within the vitreous. The bubble formation at the breakdown site acts as a limiting mechanism for energy transmission and may explain why high-energy femotsecond pulses at energies up to 100 (mu) J sometimes do not cause severe damage in the pigmented rabbit eye. This fact may also explain why it is so difficult to produce hemorrhagic lesions in either the rabbit or primate eye with 100-fs laser pulses.

  13. Detection of retinal lesions in diabetic retinopathy: comparative evaluation of 7-field digital color photography versus red-free photography.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Pradeep; Sharma, Reetika; Vashist, Nagender; Vohra, Rajpal; Garg, Satpal

    2015-10-01

    Red-free light allows better detection of vascular lesions as this wavelength is absorbed by hemoglobin; however, the current gold standard for the detection and grading of diabetic retinopathy remains 7-field color fundus photography. The goal of this study was to compare the ability of 7-field fundus photography using red-free light to detect retinopathy lesions with corresponding images captured using standard 7-field color photography. Non-stereoscopic standard 7-field 30° digital color fundus photography and 7-field 30° digital red-free fundus photography were performed in 200 eyes of 103 patients with various grades of diabetic retinopathy ranging from mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The color images (n = 1,400) were studied with corresponding red-free images (n = 1,400) by one retina consultant (PV) and two senior residents training in retina. The various retinal lesions [microaneurysms, hemorrhages, hard exudates, soft exudates, intra-retinal microvascular anomalies (IRMA), neovascularization of the retina elsewhere (NVE), and neovascularization of the disc (NVD)] detected by all three observers in each of the photographs were noted followed by determination of agreement scores using κ values (range 0-1). Kappa coefficient was categorized as poor (≤0), slight (0.01-0.20), fair (0.2 -0.40), moderate (0.41-0.60), substantial (0.61-0.80), and almost perfect (0.81-1). The number of lesions detected by red-free images alone was higher for all observers and all abnormalities except hard exudates. Detection of IRMA was especially higher for all observers with red-free images. Between image pairs, there was substantial agreement for detection of hard exudates (average κ = 0.62, range 0.60-0.65) and moderate agreement for detection of hemorrhages (average κ = 0.52, range 0.45-0.58), soft exudates (average κ = 0.51, range 0.42-0.61), NVE (average κ = 0.47, range 0.39-0.53), and NVD

  14. Retinal lesions induce fast intrinsic cortical plasticity in adult mouse visual system.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Katrien; Vreysen, Samme; Laramée, Marie-Eve; Cuyvers, Annemie; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Van Brussel, Leen; Eysel, Ulf T; Nys, Julie; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-09-01

    Neuronal activity plays an important role in the development and structural-functional maintenance of the brain as well as in its life-long plastic response to changes in sensory stimulation. We characterized the impact of unilateral 15° laser lesions in the temporal lower visual field of the retina, on visually driven neuronal activity in the afferent visual pathway of adult mice using in situ hybridization for the activity reporter gene zif268. In the first days post-lesion, we detected a discrete zone of reduced zif268 expression in the contralateral hemisphere, spanning the border between the monocular segment of the primary visual cortex (V1) with extrastriate visual area V2M. We could not detect a clear lesion projection zone (LPZ) in areas lateral to V1 whereas medial to V2M, agranular and granular retrosplenial cortex showed decreased zif268 levels over their full extent. All affected areas displayed a return to normal zif268 levels, and this was faster in higher order visual areas than in V1. The lesion did, however, induce a permanent LPZ in the retinorecipient layers of the superior colliculus. We identified a retinotopy-based intrinsic capacity of adult mouse visual cortex to recover from restricted vision loss, with recovery speed reflecting the areal cortical magnification factor. Our observations predict incomplete visual field representations for areas lateral to V1 vs. lack of retinotopic organization for areas medial to V2M. The validation of this mouse model paves the way for future interrogations of cortical region- and cell-type-specific contributions to functional recovery, up to microcircuit level. PMID:26663520

  15. IKK2 Inhibition Attenuates Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huayi; Lu, Qingxian; Gaddipati, Subhash; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Wang, Wei; Pasparakis, Manolis; Kaplan, Henry J.; Li, Qiutang

    2014-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is aberrant angiogenesis associated with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Inflammation has been suggested as a risk factor for AMD. The IKK2/NF-κB pathway plays a key role in the inflammatory response through regulation of the transcription of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and angiogenic factors. We investigated the functional role of IKK2 in development of the laser-induced CNV using either Ikk2 conditional knockout mice or an IKK2 inhibitor. The retinal neuronal tissue and RPE deletion of IKK2 was generated by breeding Ikk2−/flox mice with Nestin-Cre mice. Deletion of Ikk2 in the retina caused no obvious defect in retinal development or function, but resulted in a significant reduction in laser-induced CNV. In addition, intravitreal or retrobulbar injection of an IKK2 specific chemical inhibitor, TPCA-1, also showed similar inhibition of CNV. Furthermore, in vitro inhibition of IKK2 in ARPE-19 cells significantly reduced heat shock-induced expression of NFKBIA, IL1B, CCL2, VEGFA, PDGFA, HIF1A, and MMP-2, suggesting that IKK2 may regulate multiple molecular pathways involved in laser-induced CNV. The in vivo laser-induced expression of VEGFA, and HIF1A in RPE and choroidal tissue was also blocked by TPCA-1 treatment. Thus, IKK2/NF-κB signaling appears responsible for production of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors in laser-induced CNV, suggesting that this intracellular pathway may serve as an important therapeutic target for aberrant angiogenesis in exudative AMD. PMID:24489934

  16. Functional and behavioral metrics for evaluating laser retinal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Martinsen, Gary L.; Garza, Thomas; Grado, Andres; Morin, Juan; Brown, Araceli; Stolarski, David; Cain, Clarence

    2006-02-01

    The use of lasers by both the military and civilian community is rapidly expanding. Thus, the potential for and severity of laser eye injury and retinal damage is increasing. Sensitive and accurate methods to evaluate and follow laser retinal damage are needed. The multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) has the potential to meet these criteria. In this study, the mfERG was used to evaluate changes to retinal function following laser exposure. Landolt C contrast acuity was also measured in the six behaviorally trained Rhesus monkeys. The monkeys then received Nd:YAG laser lesions (1064 nm, 9 ns pulse width) in each eye. One eye received a single foveal lesion of approximately 0.13 mJ total intraocular exposure (TIE) and the other received six parafoveal lesions which varied in TIE from 0.13 to 4 mJ. mfERGs and behavioral data were collected both pre- and post-exposure. mfERGs were recorded using stimuli that contained 103, 241, and 509 hexagons. Landolt C contrast acuity was measured with five sizes of Landolt C (0.33 to 11.15 cycles/degree) of varying contrast. mfERG response densities were sensitive to the functional retinal changes caused by the laser insult. In general, larger lesions showed greater mfERG abnormalities than smaller laser lesions. Deficits in contrast acuity were found to be more severe in the eyes with foveal injuries. Although the mfERG and contrast acuity assess different areas of the visual system, both are sensitive to laser-induced retinal damage and may be complementary tests for laser eye injury triage.

  17. Laser-induced macular holes demonstrate impaired choroidal perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeremiah, Jr.; Allen, Ronald D.; Zwick, Harry; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2003-06-01

    Choroidal perfusion was evaluated following the creation of a laser induced macular hole in a nonhuman primate model. Two Rhesus monkeys underwent macular exposures delivered by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The lesions were evaluated with fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography . Each lesion produced vitreous hemorrhage and progressed to a full thickness macular hole. ICG angiography revealed no perfusion of the choriocapillaris beneath the lesion centers. Histopathologic evaluation showed replacement of the choriocapillaris with fibroblasts and connective tissue. Nd:YAG, laser-induced macular holes result in long term impairment of choroidal perfusion at the base of the hole due to choroidal scarring and obliteration of the choriocapillaris.

  18. IKK2 Inhibition Using TPCA-1-Loaded PLGA Microparticles Attenuates Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization and Macrophage Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Gaddipati, Subhash; Lu, Qingxian; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Miller, M. Clarke; Lu, Qingjun; Trent, John O.; Kaplan, Henry J.; Li, Qiutang

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of NF-κB by genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of IKK2 significantly reduces laser-induced choroid neovascularization (CNV). To achieve a sustained and controlled intraocular release of a selective and potent IKK2 inhibitor, 2-[(aminocarbonyl)amino]-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-thiophenecarboxamide (TPCA-1) (MW: 279.29), we developed a biodegradable poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) polymer-delivery system to further investigate the anti-neovascularization effects of IKK2 inhibition and in vivo biosafety using laser-induced CNV mouse model. The solvent-evaporation method produced spherical TPCA-1-loaded PLGA microparticles characterized with a mean diameter of 2.4 ¼m and loading efficiency of 80%. Retrobulbar administration of the TPCA-1-loaded PLGA microparticles maintained a sustained drug level in the retina during the study period. No detectable TPCA-1 level was observed in the untreated contralateral eye. The anti-CNV effect of retrobulbarly administrated TPCA-1-loaded PLGA microparticles was assessed by retinal fluorescein leakage and isolectin staining methods, showing significantly reduced CNV development on day 7 after laser injury. Macrophage infiltration into the laser lesion was attenuated as assayed by choroid/RPE flat-mount staining with anti-F4/80 antibody. Consistently, laser induced expressions of Vegfa and Ccl2 were inhibited by the TPCA-1-loaded PLGA treatment. This TPCA-1 delivery system did not cause any noticeable cellular or functional toxicity to the treated eyes as evaluated by histology and optokinetic reflex (OKR) tests; and no systemic toxicity was observed. We conclude that retrobulbar injection of the small-molecule IKK2 inhibitor TPCA-1, delivered by biodegradable PLGA microparticles, can achieve a sustained and controllable drug release into choroid/retina and attenuate laser-induced CNV development without causing apparent systemic toxicity. Our results suggest a potential clinical application of TPCA-1 delivered

  19. Intravenous transferrin, RGD peptide and dual-targeted nanoparticles enhance anti-VEGF intraceptor gene delivery to laser-induced CNV

    PubMed Central

    Singh, SR; Grossniklaus, HE; Kang, SJ; Edelhauser, HF; Ambati, BK; Kompella, UB

    2010-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) leads to loss of vision in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in adult population over 50 years old. In this study, we developed intravenously administered, nanoparticulate, targeted nonviral retinal gene delivery systems for the management of CNV. CNV was induced in Brown Norway rats using a 532 nm laser. We engineered transferrin, arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) peptide or dual-functionalized poly-(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles to target delivery of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) intraceptor plasmid to CNV lesions. Anti-VEGF intraceptor is the only intracellularly acting VEGF inhibitory modality. The results of the study show that nanoparticles allow targeted delivery to the neovascular eye but not the control eye on intravenous administration. Functionalizing the nanoparticle surface with transferrin, a linear RGD peptide or both increased the retinal delivery of nanoparticles and subsequently the intraceptor gene expression in retinal vascular endothelial cells, photoreceptor outer segments and retinal pigment epithelial cells when compared to nonfunctionalized nanoparticles. Most significantly, the CNV areas were significantly smaller in rats treated with functionalized nanoparticles as compared to the ones treated with vehicle or nonfunctionalized nanoparticles. Thus, surface-functionalized nanoparticles allow targeted gene delivery to the neovascular eye on intravenous administration and inhibit the progression of laser-induced CNV in a rodent model. PMID:19194480

  20. Segmentation and quantification of retinal lesions in age-related macular degeneration using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Sattmann, Harald; Schütze, Christopher; Schlanitz, Ferdinand; Ahlers, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2010-11-01

    We present polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for quantitative assessment of retinal pathologies in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). On the basis of the polarization scrambling characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium, novel segmentation algorithms were developed that allow one to segment pathologic features such as drusen and atrophic zones in dry AMD as well as to determine their dimensions. Results from measurements in the eyes of AMD patients prove the ability of PS-OCT for quantitative imaging based on the retinal features polarizing properties. Repeatability measurements were performed in retinas diagnosed with drusen and geographic atrophy in order to evaluate the performance of the described methods. PS-OCT appears as a promising imaging modality for three-dimensional retinal imaging and ranging with additional contrast based on the structures' tissue-inherent polarization properties.

  1. Retinal holes.

    PubMed

    Foos, R Y

    1978-09-01

    Holes of the peripheral retina, defined as full-thickness breaks of trophic origin with no associated flap or free operculum, were found in 136 (2.4%) eyes from 2,800 autopsied subjects. Primary retinal holes (those with no indication of a proximal causative lesion and with no lattice degeneration in either eye) occurred in only eight of the 5,600 eyes studied; all were unilateral, single, less than 0.25 disk diameter in size, within the basal zone, and in eyes from elderly subjects. Secondary holes were found in 128 (2.3%) of eyes and of these, lattice degeneration was the most common cause (103). Other lesions complicated by hole formation included zonular traction tufts (10), chorioretinitis (9), meridional folds (3), and pavingstone degeneration (2). Retinal holes in surgically aphakic eyes did not differ qualitatively or quantitatively from those in age-matched phakic eyes.

  2. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of ...

  3. Melissa officinalis Extract Inhibits Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Jin Young; Song, Hyun Beom; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the effect of Melissa officinalis extract on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in a rat model. The mechanism by which M. officinalis extract acted was also investigated. Methods Experimental CNV was induced by laser photocoagulation in Brown Norway rats. An active fraction of the Melissa leaf extract was orally administered (50 or 100 mg/kg/day) beginning 3 days before laser photocoagulation and ending 14 days after laser photocoagulation. Optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography were performed in vivo to evaluate the thickness and leakage of CNV. Choroidal flat mount and histological analysis were conducted to observe the CNV in vitro. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 expression were measured in retinal and choroidal-scleral lysates 7 days after laser injury. Moreover, the effect of M. officinalis extract on tertiary-butylhydroperoxide (t-BH)-induced VEGF secretion and mRNA levels of VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were evaluated in human retinal epithelial cells (ARPE-19) as well as in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results The CNV thickness in M. officinalis-treated rats was significantly lower than in vehicle-treated rats by histological analysis. The CNV thickness was 33.93±7.64 µm in the high-dose group (P<0.001), 44.09±12.01 µm in the low-dose group (P = 0.016), and 51.00±12.37 µm in the control group. The proportion of CNV lesions with clinically significant fluorescein leakage was 9.2% in rats treated with high-dose M. officinalis, which was significantly lower than in control rats (53.4%, P<0.001). The levels of VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were significantly lower in the high-dose group than in the control group. Meanwhile, M. officinalis extract suppressed t-BH-induced transcription of VEGF and MMP-9 in ARPE-19 cells and HUVECs. Conclusions Systemic administration of M. officinalis extract suppressed laser-induced CNV

  4. Retinal Inhibition of CCR3 Induces Retinal Cell Death in a Murine Model of Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Gambhir, Deeksha; Becker, Silke; Kunz, Eric; Liu, Angelina Jingtong; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of chemokine C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3) signaling has been considered as treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, CCR3 is expressed in neural retina from aged human donor eyes. Therefore, broad CCR3 inhibition may be harmful to the retina. We assessed the effects of CCR3 inhibition on retina and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) that develop into choroidal neovascularization (CNV). In adult murine eyes, CCR3 colocalized with glutamine-synthetase labeled Műller cells. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, CCR3 immunolocalized not only to lectin-stained cells in CNV lesions but also to the retina. Compared to non-lasered controls, CCR3 mRNA was significantly increased in laser-treated retina. An intravitreal injection of a CCR3 inhibitor (CCR3i) significantly reduced CNV compared to DMSO or PBS controls. Both CCR3i and a neutralizing antibody to CCR3 increased TUNEL+ retinal cells overlying CNV, compared to controls. There was no difference in cleaved caspase-3 in laser-induced CNV lesions or in overlying retina between CCR3i- or control-treated eyes. Following CCR3i, apoptotic inducible factor (AIF) was significantly increased and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2 decreased in the retina; there were no differences in retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In cultured human Műller cells exposed to eotaxin (CCL11) and VEGF, CCR3i significantly increased TUNEL+ cells and AIF but decreased BCL2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, without affecting caspase-3 activity or VEGF. CCR3i significantly decreased AIF in RPE/choroids and immunostaining of phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (p-VEGFR2) in CNV with a trend toward reduced VEGF. In cultured CECs treated with CCL11 and/or VEGF, CCR3i decreased p-VEGFR2 and increased BCL2 without increasing TUNEL+ cells and AIF. These findings suggest that inhibition of retinal CCR3 causes retinal cell death and that targeted inhibition of CCR3 in CECs may be a safer if CCR3 inhibition

  5. Retinal Ganglion Cell Atrophy in Homonymous Hemianopia due to Acquired Occipital Lesions Observed Using Cirrus High-Definition-OCT

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tsutomu; Miki, Atsushi; Goto, Katsutoshi; Araki, Syunsuke; Takizawa, Go; Ieki, Yoshiaki; Kiryu, Junichi; Tabuchi, Akio; Iguchi, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Kazumi; Yagita, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a reduction in macular ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer (GCL+IPL) thickness and circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) thickness using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in patients with homonymous hemianopia due to posterior cerebral artery (PCA) stroke. Methods. Seven patients with PCA stroke were examined using Cirrus high-definition-OCT. The GCL+IPL thicknesses were divided into the hemianopic and unaffected sides. The relationship between the time after stroke and the GCL+IPL thicknesses in the hemianopic side was evaluated. Results. The average thicknesses of the GCL+IPL were 64.6 and 82.0 μm on the hemianopic and unaffected sides, respectively, and the measurement was significantly thinner on the former side (p = 0.018). A regression analysis revealed a negative linear relationship (R2 = 0.574, p = 0.049) between the time after stoke and the GCL+IPL thicknesses on the hemianopic side. The supratemporal and inferotemporal cpRNFL thicknesses in the eyes ipsilateral to the stroke showed a significant reduction. Conclusion. Our findings confirmed our previous observations that the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells can occur after PCA stroke. GCL+IPL thinning was demonstrated in the hemiretinae corresponding to the affected hemifields. Also, it is suggested that the retinal changes observed are progressive. PMID:27274865

  6. Retinal Ganglion Cell Atrophy in Homonymous Hemianopia due to Acquired Occipital Lesions Observed Using Cirrus High-Definition-OCT.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tsutomu; Miki, Atsushi; Goto, Katsutoshi; Araki, Syunsuke; Takizawa, Go; Ieki, Yoshiaki; Kiryu, Junichi; Tabuchi, Akio; Iguchi, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Kazumi; Yagita, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a reduction in macular ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer (GCL+IPL) thickness and circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) thickness using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in patients with homonymous hemianopia due to posterior cerebral artery (PCA) stroke. Methods. Seven patients with PCA stroke were examined using Cirrus high-definition-OCT. The GCL+IPL thicknesses were divided into the hemianopic and unaffected sides. The relationship between the time after stroke and the GCL+IPL thicknesses in the hemianopic side was evaluated. Results. The average thicknesses of the GCL+IPL were 64.6 and 82.0 μm on the hemianopic and unaffected sides, respectively, and the measurement was significantly thinner on the former side (p = 0.018). A regression analysis revealed a negative linear relationship (R (2) = 0.574, p = 0.049) between the time after stoke and the GCL+IPL thicknesses on the hemianopic side. The supratemporal and inferotemporal cpRNFL thicknesses in the eyes ipsilateral to the stroke showed a significant reduction. Conclusion. Our findings confirmed our previous observations that the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells can occur after PCA stroke. GCL+IPL thinning was demonstrated in the hemiretinae corresponding to the affected hemifields. Also, it is suggested that the retinal changes observed are progressive. PMID:27274865

  7. Laser Induced Blue Luminescence Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haiyong; Duan, Yanmin; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Yaoju; Yang, Fugui

    2011-09-01

    Laser induced strange blue luminescence in several Raman crystals has been investigated. The blue luminescence at about 473 nm has the characteristic of no orientation and only produced in the crystal where the fundament laser oscillated. The experimental results show that the blue luminescence must result from the fundamental laser around 1.0 µm rather than Stokes-shifting. The spectrum detected is similar for different crystals. This blue luminescence is obviously strange and inconsistent with traditional luminescence theories, which maybe a brand-new luminescence theory.

  8. Heat shock protein expression as guidance for the therapeutic window of retinal laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Huie, Philip; Dalal, Roopa; Lee, Seungjun; Tan, Gavin; Lee, Daeyoung; Lavinksy, Daniel; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Unlike conventional photocoagulation, non-damaging retinal laser therapy (NRT) limits laser-induced heating to stay below the retinal damage threshold and therefore requires careful dosimetry. Without the adverse effects associated with photocoagulation, NRT can be applied to critical areas of the retina and repeatedly to manage chronic disorders. Although the clinical benefits of NRT have been demonstrated, the mechanism of therapeutic effect and width of the therapeutic window below damage threshold are not well understood. Here, we measure activation of heat shock response via laser-induced hyperthermia as one indication of cellular response. A 577 nm laser is used with the Endpoint Management (EpM) user interface, a titration algorithm, to set experimental pulse energies relative to a barely visible titration lesion. Live/dead staining and histology show that the retinal damage threshold in rabbits is at 40% of titration energy on EpM scale. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was detected by whole-mount immunohistochemistry after different levels of laser treatment. We show HSP70 expression in the RPE beginning at 25% of titration energy indicating that there is a window for NRT between 25% and 40% with activation of the heat shock protein expression in response to hyperthermia. HSP70 expression is also seen at the perimeter of damaging lesions, as expected based on a computational model of laser heating. Expression area for each pulse energy setting varied between laser spots due to pigmentation changes, indicating the relatively narrow window of non-damaging activation and highlighting the importance of proper titration.

  9. In vitro model that approximates retinal damage threshold trends.

    PubMed

    Denton, Michael L; Foltz, Michael S; Schuster, Kurt J; Noojin, Gary D; Estlack, Larry E; Thomas, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Without effective in vitro damage models, advances in our understanding of the physics and biology of laser-tissue interaction would be hampered due to cost and ethical limitations placed on the use of nonhuman primates. We extend our characterization of laser-induced cell death in an existing in vitro retinal model to include damage thresholds at 514 and 413 nm. The new data, when combined with data previously reported for 532 and 458 nm exposures, provide a sufficiently broad range of wavelengths and exposure durations (0.1 to 100 s) to make comparisons with minimum visible lesion (in vivo) data in the literature. Based on similarities between in vivo and in vitro action spectra and temporal action profiles, the cell culture model is found to respond to laser irradiation in a fundamentally similar fashion as the retina of the rhesus animal model. We further show that this response depends on the amount of intracellular melanin pigmentation.

  10. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids. PMID:27511757

  11. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids.

  12. Foveal photoreceptor explanation of short-term visual acuity recovery associated with laser-induced foveal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langus, Amir; Zwick, Harry; Stuck, Bruce E.; Belkin, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Both human laser accident cases and non-human primate behavioral studies demonstrate the possibility of full visual acuity recovery following foveal laser injury. Current explanations of such recovery require suppositions of complex retinal reorganization dynamics or neural reorganization at higher order visual brain systems. However, recent investigation based on data of retinal photoreceptor and ganglion cell topography and connectivity, suggest that the amount of static inherent plasticity, already exists at the retinal level, may also explain visual acuity recovery in the presence of laser-induced foveal damage. Modeling the off-axis visual acuity while utilizing this data, produces a more gradual fall-off in visual acuity, and supports the notion that visual acuity recovery may reside in the topographical organization of the cones. Moreover, considering the filling-in phenomena, which can conceal the presence of retinal damage from being recognized, together with eye movements, could nullify scotoma, as long as the retinal damage is not too extensive.

  13. Laser-induced caesium-137 decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Simakin, A. V.; Shafeev, G. A.

    2014-08-01

    Experimental data are presented on the laser-induced beta decay of caesium-137. We demonstrate that the exposure of a gold target to a copper vapour laser beam (wavelengths of 510.6 and 578.2 nm, pulse duration of 15 ns) for 2 h in an aqueous solution of a caesium-137 salt reduces the caesium-137 activity by 70%, as assessed from the gamma activity of the daughter nucleus 137mBa, and discuss potential applications of laser-induced caesium-137 decay in radioactive waste disposal.

  14. Mestastable State Population in Laser Induced Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, V. H. S.; Kyriakides, C.; Ward, W. K.

    2006-01-01

    Laser induced plasma has been used as a source of neutrals and ions in the study of astrophysical plasmas. The purity of state of this source is essential in the determination of collision parameters such as the charge transfer rate coefficients between ions and neutrals. We will show that the temperature of the laser induced plasma is a rapidly decreasing function of time. The temperature is initially high but cools off rapidly through collisions with the expanding plasma electrons as the plasma recombines and streams into the vacuum. This rapid expansion of the plasma, similar to a supersonic jet, drastically lowers the internal energy of the neutrals and ions.

  15. Laser-induced caesium-137 decay

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Simakin, A V; Shafeev, G A

    2014-08-31

    Experimental data are presented on the laser-induced beta decay of caesium-137. We demonstrate that the exposure of a gold target to a copper vapour laser beam (wavelengths of 510.6 and 578.2 nm, pulse duration of 15 ns) for 2 h in an aqueous solution of a caesium-137 salt reduces the caesium-137 activity by 70%, as assessed from the gamma activity of the daughter nucleus {sup 137m}Ba, and discuss potential applications of laser-induced caesium-137 decay in radioactive waste disposal. (letters)

  16. Real-time control of lesion size based on reflectance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerath, Maya R.; Kaisig, Danielle; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1992-08-01

    Laser-induced lesion size is controlled in real time based on a two dimensional reflectance image recorded by a CCD array during lesion formation. A feedback system using components of the reflectance image achieves uniform lesions by compensating for light absorption variability in biological media. Lesions are formed in a phantom using an argon laser to simulate retinal photocoagulation. The tissue model consists of an absorptive high temperature black paint layer and an egg white protein layer. Reflectance images are acquired as the lesion forms at a standard frame rate using a 512 X 512 CCD camera attached to an ITI 151 series image processor and a Sun 3/260 computer. A shutter controlled by the computer is closed when certain preset conditions are met in the images. Results show a low variance in the sizes of the lesions (diameter or depth) produced under different irradiation conditions and the ability to produce lesions of a predefined size under varying illumination conditions. Real time control from reflectance images based on certain parameters is demonstrated as a feasible method of controlling lesion size.

  17. Laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Ell, C; Wondrazek, F; Frank, F; Hochberger, J; Lux, G; Demling, L

    1986-05-01

    With the aid of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with energy transmission via a flexible glass fiber, it proves possible under laboratory conditions, to destroy gallstones reliably and reproducibly. Lithotripsy is effected mechanically via a laser-induced local shockwave.

  18. Neuronal growth cones respond to laser-induced axonal damage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Shi, Linda Z.; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Miotke, Jill; Meyer, Ronald L.; Berns, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well known that damage to neurons results in release of substances that inhibit axonal growth, release of chemical signals from damaged axons that attract axon growth cones has not been observed. In this study, a 532 nm 12 ns laser was focused to a diffraction-limited spot to produce site-specific damage to single goldfish axons in vitro. The axons underwent a localized decrease in thickness (‘thinning’) within seconds. Analysis by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy indicated that there was no gross rupture of the cell membrane. Mitochondrial transport along the axonal cytoskeleton immediately stopped at the damage site, but recovered over several minutes. Within seconds of damage nearby growth cones extended filopodia towards the injury and were often observed to contact the damaged site. Turning of the growth cone towards the injured axon also was observed. Repair of the laser-induced damage was evidenced by recovery of the axon thickness as well as restoration of mitochondrial movement. We describe a new process of growth cone response to damaged axons. This has been possible through the interface of optics (laser subcellular surgery), fluorescence and electron microscopy, and a goldfish retinal ganglion cell culture model. PMID:21831892

  19. [Laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy--in vitro trial and animal experiment studies].

    PubMed

    Wenk, H; Benecke, W; Thomas, S; Barreton, G; Lange, V; Möller, K O; Schildberg, F W

    1988-01-01

    Laser induced shock wave lithotripsy is a new procedure to destroy gallstones. Stones of up to 500 mg are destroyed within 5 min. Severe reactions of the soft tissue cannot be observed in animal studies. No perforations, stenoses or thermic lesions after wound healing were observed. The development of an optomechanical transducer replacing the optical lens system at the end of the transmission guide allows its handling in flexible endoscopes. Clinical use is therefore possible from the technical aspect.

  20. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  1. Interaction of Laser Induced Micro-shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leela, Ch.; Bagchi, Suman; Tewari, Surya P.; Kiran, P. Prem

    Laser induced Shock Waves (LISWs) characterized by several optical methods provide Equation of State (EOS) for a variety of materials used in high-energy density physics experiments at Mbar pressures [1, 2]. Other applications include laser spark ignition for fuel-air mixtures, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation engines, laser shock peening [3], surface cleaning [4] and biological applications (SW lithotripsy) [5] to name a few.

  2. Multifocal electroretinogram (MFERG) evaluation of laser-induced secondary damage in the non-human primate (NHP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwick, Harry; Stuck, Bruce E.; Akers, A.; Edsall, Peter; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Lund, David J.

    2005-04-01

    Laser induced retinal damage may involve primary injury to the central retina and secondary damage, including intraretinal scar formation (IRSF) retinal traction (RT) and retinal nerve fiber layer injury (RNFL). We have evaluated these laser induced retinal pathologies with MFERG in non-human primates (NHPs) with a Veris (4.9) MFERG system 103 Hexagons, centered on the macula with non-scaled arrays and in one NHP with a 2-frame/M-step sequence to assess long term exposure effects within the RNFL. Chemical restraint was achieved using Ketamine stability HCL (10 mg/kg IM) and Propofol (0.5 mg-1.2/Kg/min via syringe pump). Peribulbar eye blocks were performed using 2% lidocain or a mixture of 2% Lidocain/Marcain (monitored ocular motility was less than 40 microns in retinal space). Primary and secondary damage effects were induced with either q-switched single pulse Neodymium (1064 nm, 1.0 mJ) or Argon CW (10 to 1000 msec, 10-150 mW). MFERG demonstrated capability to detect primary and secondary induced retinal damage in both 1st and 2nd order kernels. Primary and secondary damage in the central retina was often suppressed in amplitude and with longer latencies relative to the MFERG norm. Preliminary investigations in one NHP with Primary and secondary RNFL damage at 9 to 14 months showed recovery with non-scaled array one frame / M-step sequence but demonstrated significant abnormalities for a two frame/ M-step sequence. Utilization of advanced Veris recording parameters involving spatial and temporal manipulation of the stimulus parameters can improve detection of functional deficits induced by focal laser retinal injury.

  3. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Andria; Lawhead, Carlos; Ujj, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a very practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition of materials. Recent technical developments resulted in equipment used on the MARS Rover by NASA. It is capable of measuring the emission spectra of laser induced plasma created by energetic laser pulses focused on the sample (rocks, metals, etc.). We have develop a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy setup and investigated the necessary experimental and methodological challenges needed to make such material identification measurements. 355 and 532 nm laser pulses with 5 ns temporal duration was used to generate micro-plasma from which compositions can be determined based on known elemental and molecular emission intensities and wavelengths. The performance of LIBS depends on several parameters including laser wavelength, pulse energy, pulse duration, time interval of observation, geometrical configuration of collecting optics, and the properties of ambient medium. Spectra recorded from alloys (e.g. US penny coin) and pure metals will be presented. Special thanks for the financial support of the Office of Undergraduate Research of UWF.

  4. Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Spalton, D J; Bird, A C; Cleary, P E

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with retinitis pigmentosa and retinal leakage were investigated. Oedema was present in dominant and X-linked inherited disease and is likely to be present in recessive disease as well. We suggest that this might be a general response seen in many types of tapeto-retinal degeneration to actively degenerating photoreceptors or pigment epithelium. Images PMID:638111

  5. Differentiation of cutaneous melanoma from surrounding skin using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jung Hyun; Moon, Youngmin; Lee, Jong Jin; Choi, Sujeong; Kim, Yong-Chul; Jeong, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has the potential to be used as a surgical tool for simultaneous tissue ablation and elemental analysis of the ablated tissue. LIBS may be used to distinguish melanoma lesions from the surrounding dermis based on the quantitative difference of elements within melanoma lesions. Here, we measured the elements in homogenized pellets and real tissues from excised skin samples of melanoma-implanted mice. In addition, statistical analysis of LIBS spectra using principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis was performed. Our results showed that this method had high detection sensitivity, highlighting the potential of this tool in clinical applications. PMID:26819817

  6. Hyperspectral laser-induced autofluorescence imaging of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is a disease characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals leading to the penetration of bacteria into the dentine and pulp. Early detection of enamel demineralization resulting in increased enamel porosity, commonly known as white spots, is a difficult diagnostic task. Laser induced autofluorescence was shown to be a useful method for early detection of demineralization. The existing studies involved either a single point spectroscopic measurements or imaging at a single spectral band. In the case of spectroscopic measurements, very little or no spatial information is acquired and the measured autofluorescence signal strongly depends on the position and orientation of the probe. On the other hand, single-band spectral imaging can be substantially affected by local spectral artefacts. Such effects can significantly interfere with automated methods for detection of early caries lesions. In contrast, hyperspectral imaging effectively combines the spatial information of imaging methods with the spectral information of spectroscopic methods providing excellent basis for development of robust and reliable algorithms for automated classification and analysis of hard dental tissues. In this paper, we employ 405 nm laser excitation of natural caries lesions. The fluorescence signal is acquired by a state-of-the-art hyperspectral imaging system consisting of a high-resolution acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and a highly sensitive Scientific CMOS camera in the spectral range from 550 nm to 800 nm. The results are compared to the contrast obtained by near-infrared hyperspectral imaging technique employed in the existing studies on early detection of dental caries.

  7. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  8. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Jun-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical detection technique based on atomic emission spectroscopy to measure the elemental composition. LIBS has been extensively studied and developed due to the non-contact, fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and multi-elemental detection features. The development and applications of LIBS technique in Asia are summarized and discussed in this review paper. The researchers in Asia work on different aspects of the LIBS study in fundamentals, data processing and modeling, applications and instrumentations. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further development of LIBS technique in Asia are also evaluated to promote LIBS research and its applications.

  10. Laser-induced desorption from sapphire surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, A.V.; Schildbach, M.A.

    1992-03-01

    Laser-induced desorption of energetic ({approximately}7eV) aluminum ions was observed from clean and water-covered sapphire (1102) surfaces using time-of-flight mass spectrometry with laser wavelengths of 1064, 355, and 266 nm. In sharp contrast, O{sup +} (H{sup +} and OH{sup +}) ions were observed in electron-induced desorption measurements with 300 eV electrons from the bare (water- covered) (1102) surface. Sapphire surfaces were characterized with low energy electron diffraction, reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy. 8 refs.

  11. Kinetic Approach for Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Banaz; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2008-10-22

    Non-equilibrium distribution functions of electron gas and phonon gas excited with ultrashort intense laser pulses are calculated for laser-induced plasmas occurring in solids. The excitation during femtosecond irradiation and the subsequent thermalization of the free electrons, as well as the dynamics of phonons are described by kinetic equations. The microscopic collision processes, such as absorption by inverse bremsstrahlung, electron-electron collisions, and electron-phonon interactions are considered by complete Boltzmann collision integrals. We apply our kinetic approach for gold by taking s-band electron into account and compare it with the case of excitation of d-band electrons.

  12. Laser Induced Chemical Liquid Phase Deposition (LCLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Nanai, Laszlo; Balint, Agneta M.

    2012-08-17

    Laser induced chemical deposition (LCLD) of metals onto different substrates attracts growing attention during the last decade. Deposition of metals onto the surface of dielectrics and semiconductors with help of laser beam allows the creation of conducting metal of very complex architecture even in 3D. In the processes examined the deposition occurs from solutions containing metal ions and reducing agents. The deposition happens in the region of surface irradiated by laser beam (micro reactors). Physics -chemical reactions driven by laser beam will be discussed for different metal-substrate systems. The electrical, optical, mechanical properties of created interfaces will be demonstrated also including some practical-industrial applications.

  13. Automatic temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Ptaszynski, Lars; Bever, Marco; Baade, Alex; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    Laser coagulation is a treatment method for many retinal diseases. Due to variations in fundus pigmentation and light scattering inside the eye globe, different lesion strengths are often achieved. The aim of this work is to realize an automatic feedback algorithm to generate desired lesion strengths by controlling the retinal temperature increase with the irradiation time. Optoacoustics afford non-invasive retinal temperature monitoring during laser treatment. A 75 ns/523 nm Q-switched Nd:YLF laser was used to excite the temperature-dependent pressure amplitudes, which were detected at the cornea by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser served for photocoagulation. The ED50 temperatures, for which the probability of ophthalmoscopically visible lesions after one hour in vivo in rabbits was 50%, varied from 63°C for 20 ms to 49°C for 400 ms. Arrhenius parameters were extracted as ΔE=273 J mol-1 and A=3.1044 s-1. Control algorithms for mild and strong lesions were developed, which led to average lesion diameters of 162+/-34 μm and 189+/-34 μm, respectively. It could be demonstrated that the sizes of the automatically controlled lesions were widely independent of the treatment laser power and the retinal pigmentation.

  14. Retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is the most common form of retinal detachment, where a retinal "break" allows the ingress of fluid from the vitreous cavity to the subretinal space, resulting in retinal separation. It occurs in about 1 in 10,000 people a year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent progression from retinal breaks or lattice degeneration to retinal detachment? What are the effects of different surgical interventions in people with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment? What are the effects of interventions to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy occurring as a complication of retinal detachment or previous treatment for retinal detachment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 21 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, cryotherapy, daunorubicin, fluorouracil plus low molecular weight heparin, laser photocoagulation, pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling, short-acting or long-acting gas tamponade, silicone oil tamponade, and vitrectomy. PMID:21406128

  15. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  16. Laser-induced spreading arrest of Mytilus gill cilia

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Using a "slit camera" recording technique, we have examined the effects of local laser irradiation of cilia of the gill epithelium of Mytilus edulis. The laser produces a lesion which interrupts epithelial integrity. In artificial sea water that contains high K+ or is effectively Ca++ free, metachronism of the lateral cilia continues to either side of the lesion with only minor perturbations in frequency synchronization and wave velocity, such as would be expected if metachronal wave coordination is mechanical. However, in normal sea water and other appropriate ionic conditions (i.e., where Ca++ concentration is elevated), in addition to local damage, the laser induces distinct arrest responses of the lateral cilia. Arrest is not mechanically coordinated, since cilia stop in sequence depending on stroke position as well as distance from the lesion. The velocity of arrest under standard conditions is about 3 mm/s, several orders of magnitude faster than spreading velocities associated with diffusion of materials from the injured region. Two responses can be distinguished on the basis of the kinetics of recovery of the arrested regions. These are (a) a nondecremental response that resembles spontaneous ciliary stoppage in the gills, and (b) a decremental response, where arrest nearer the stimulus point is much longer lasting. The slower recovery is often periodic, with a step size approximating lateral cell length. Arrest responses with altered kinetics also occur in laterofrontal cilia. The responses of Mytilus lateral cilia resemble the spreading ciliary arrest seen in Elliptio and arrest induced by electrical and other stimuli, and the decremental response may depend upon electrotonic spread of potential change produced at the stimulus site. If this were coupled to transient changes in Ca++ permeability of the cell membrane, a local rise in Ca++ concentration might inhibit ciliary beat at a sensitive point in the stroke cycle to produce the observed arrest. PMID

  17. Laser-induced spreading arrest of Mytilus gill cilia.

    PubMed

    Motokawa, T; Satir, P

    1975-08-01

    Using a "slit camera" recording technique, we have examined the effects of local laser irradiation of cilia of the gill epithelium of Mytilus edulis. The laser produces a lesion which interrupts epithelial integrity. In artificial sea water that contains high K+ or is effectively Ca++ free, metachronism of the lateral cilia continues to either side of the lesion with only minor perturbations in frequency synchronization and wave velocity, such as would be expected if metachronal wave coordination is mechanical. However, in normal sea water and other appropriate ionic conditions (i.e., where Ca++ concentration is elevated), in addition to local damage, the laser induces distinct arrest responses of the lateral cilia. Arrest is not mechanically coordinated, since cilia stop in sequence depending on stroke position as well as distance from the lesion. The velocity of arrest under standard conditions is about 3 mm/s, several orders of magnitude faster than spreading velocities associated with diffusion of materials from the injured region. Two responses can be distinguished on the basis of the kinetics of recovery of the arrested regions. These are (a) a nondecremental response that resembles spontaneous ciliary stoppage in the gills, and (b) a decremental response, where arrest nearer the stimulus point is much longer lasting. The slower recovery is often periodic, with a step size approximating lateral cell length. Arrest responses with altered kinetics also occur in laterofrontal cilia. The responses of Mytilus lateral cilia resemble the spreading ciliary arrest seen in Elliptio and arrest induced by electrical and other stimuli, and the decremental response may depend upon electrotonic spread of potential change produced at the stimulus site. If this were coupled to transient changes in Ca++ permeability of the cell membrane, a local rise in Ca++ concentration might inhibit ciliary beat at a sensitive point in the stroke cycle to produce the observed arrest.

  18. Automated retinal layer segmentation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luisi, Jonathan; Briley, David; Boretsky, Adam; Motamedi, Massoud

    2014-05-01

    Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a valuable diagnostic tool in both clinical and research settings. The depth-resolved intensity profiles generated by light backscattered from discrete layers of the retina provide a non-invasive method of investigating progressive diseases and injury within the eye. This study demonstrates the application of steerable convolution filters capable of automatically separating gradient orientations to identify edges and delineate tissue boundaries. The edge maps were recombined to measure thickness of individual retinal layers. This technique was successfully applied to longitudinally monitor changes in retinal morphology in a mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and human data from age-related macular degeneration patients. The steerable filters allow for direct segmentation of noisy images, while novel recombination of weaker segmentations allow for denoising post-segmentation. The segmentation before denoising strategy allows the rapid detection of thin retinal layers even under suboptimal imaging conditions.

  19. Retinal cartography.

    PubMed

    Mosier, M A

    1982-10-01

    This paper analyses retinal cartography in terms of its reflection of anatomic data and its relation to several forms of geographic methods of map-making. It shows that the distances between anatomic landmarks of the eye are reasonably similar to the relative distances on the retinal drawing chart currently used. Two forms of geographic cartography--azimuth equidistant and orthographic--are described and compared with retinal cartography. The retinal drawing chart currently used most closely approximates an azimuth equidistant projection, which suffers from circumferential distortion, a fact that retinal surgeons must keep in mind. It is therefore recommended that the chart be modified to have equally spaced concentric circles and clearer identification of the ora serrata; the present accurate marking of anatomic landmarks, such as the equator and the posterior border of the ciliary body, should be preserved.

  20. Laser-Induced Spallation of Microsphere Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Morgan; Stossel, Melicent; Khanolkar, Amey; Wang, Junlan; Boechler, Nicholas

    2016-08-01

    The detachment of a semiordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres adhered to an aluminum-coated glass substrate is studied using a laser-induced spallation technique. The microsphere-substrate adhesion force is estimated from substrate surface displacement measurements obtained using optical interferometry, and a rigid-body model that accounts for the inertia of the microspheres. The estimated adhesion force is compared with estimates obtained using an adhesive contact model together with interferometric measurements of the out-of-plane microsphere contact resonance, and with estimated work of adhesion values for the polystyrene-aluminum interface. Scanning electron microscope images of detached monolayer regions reveal a unique morphology, namely, partially detached monolayer flakes composed of single hexagonal close packed crystalline domains. This work contributes to the fields of microsphere adhesion and contact dynamics, and demonstrates a unique monolayer delamination morphology. PMID:27409715

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Yuan, Ting-Bi; Hou, Zong-Yu; Zhou, Wei-Dong; Lu, Ji-Dong; Ding, Hong-Bin; Zeng, Xiao-Yan

    2014-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been regarded as a future superstar for chemical analysis for years due to its unique features such as little or no sample preparation, remote sensing, and fast and multi-element analysis. Chinese LIBS community is one of the most dynamically developing communities in the World. The aim of the work is to inspect what have been done in China for LIBS development and, based on the understanding of the overall status, to identify the challenges and opportunities for the future development. In this paper, the scientific contributions from Chinese LIBS community are reviewed for the following four aspects: fundamentals, instrumentation, data processing and modeling, and applications; and the driving force of LIBS development in China is analyzed, the critical issues for successful LIBS application are discussed, and in our opinion, the potential direction to improve the technology and to realize large scale commercialization in China is proposed.

  2. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  3. Laser-Induced Incandescence: Detection Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental LII (laser-induced incandescence) measurements were performed in a laminar gasjet flame to test the sensitivity of different LII signal collection strategies to particle size. To prevent introducing a particle size dependent bias in the LII signal, signal integration beginning with the excitation laser pulse is necessary . Signal integration times extending to 25 or 100 nsec after the laser pulse do not produce significant differences in radial profiles of the LII signal due to particle size effects with longer signal integration times revealing a decreased sensitivity to smaller primary particles. Long wavelength detection reduces the sensitivity of the LII signal to primary particle size. Excitation of LII using 1064 nm light is recommended to avoid creating photochemical interferences thus allowing LII signal collection to occur during the excitation pulse without spectral interferences.

  4. Laser-induced autofluorescence of caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Hibst, Raimund; Flemming, Gabriela; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    1993-07-01

    The laser induced autofluorescence from carious regions of human teeth was studied using a krypton ion laser at 407 nm as an excitation source, a fiberoptical detection system combined with a polychromator and an optical multichannel analyzer. In addition, time-resolved and time-gated fluorescence measurements in the nanosecond range were carried out. It was found that carious regions contain different fluorophores which emit in the red spectral range. The emission spectra with maxima around 590 nm, 625 nm and 635 nm are typical for metalloporphyrins, copro- and protoporphyrin. During excitation the fluorescence was bleached. Non-carious regions showed a broad fluorescence band with a maximum in the short-wavelength spectral region with shorter fluorescence decay times than the carious regions. Therefore, caries can be detected by spectral analysis of the autofluorescence as well as by determination of the fluorescence decay times or by time-gated imaging.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection.

    PubMed

    Hybl, John D; Tysk, Shane M; Berry, Shaun R; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors. However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  8. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  9. Retinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision Diabetic eye disease Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is ... children. Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula Macular hole - ...

  10. The progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Holland, G N

    1994-01-01

    The progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome is a recently described clinical variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is caused by varicellazoster virus infection of the retina. Its course and clinical features distinguish it from the acute retinal necrosis syndrome and CMV retinopathy. Early disease is characterized by multifocal deep retinal opacification. Lesions rapidly coalesce and progress to total retinal necrosis over a short period of time. Despite aggressive therapy with intravenous antivirial drugs, prognosis is poor; disease progression and/or recurrence is common, and the majority of patients develop no light perception vision. Total retinal detachments are common. Prophylaxis against retinal detachment using laser retinopexy has not been useful in most cases. PORN syndrome is an uncommon, but devastating complication of AIDS.

  11. The progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Holland, G N

    1994-01-01

    The progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome is a recently described clinical variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is caused by varicellazoster virus infection of the retina. Its course and clinical features distinguish it from the acute retinal necrosis syndrome and CMV retinopathy. Early disease is characterized by multifocal deep retinal opacification. Lesions rapidly coalesce and progress to total retinal necrosis over a short period of time. Despite aggressive therapy with intravenous antivirial drugs, prognosis is poor; disease progression and/or recurrence is common, and the majority of patients develop no light perception vision. Total retinal detachments are common. Prophylaxis against retinal detachment using laser retinopexy has not been useful in most cases. PORN syndrome is an uncommon, but devastating complication of AIDS. PMID:7852023

  12. Cyclic intensive light exposure induces retinal lesions similar to age-related macular degeneration in APPswe/PS1 bigenic mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intensive light exposure and beta-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates have been known as a risk factor for macular degeneration and an important component in the pathologic drusen structure involved in this disorder, respectively. However, it is unknown whether Aβ deposition mediates or exacerbates light exposure-induced pathogenesis of macular degeneration. Several studies including the one from us already showed accumulation of Aβ deposits in the retina in Alzheimer's transgenic mice. Using histopathological analysis combined with electroretinographic functional assessment, we investigated the effects of cyclic intensive light exposure (CILE) on the architecture of retina and related function in the APPswe/PS1bigenic mouse. Results Histopathological analysis has found significant loss of outer nuclear layer/photoreceptor outer segment and outer plexiform layer along with abnormal hypo- and hyper-pigmentation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), remarkable choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and exaggerated neuroinflammatory responses in the outer retina of APPswe/PS1 bigenic mice following cyclic intensive light exposure (CILE), whereas controls remained little change contrasted with age-matched non-transgenic littermates. CILE-induced degenerative changes in RPE are further confirmed by transmission electron microcopy and manifest as formation of basal laminar deposits, irregular thickening of Bruch's membrane (BrM), deposition of outer collagenous layer (OCL) in the subretinal space, and vacuolation in the RPE. Immunofluorescence microscopy reveals drusenoid Aβ deposits in RPE as well as neovessels attached which are associated with disruption of RPE integrity and provoked neuroinflammatory response as indicated by markedly increased retinal infiltration of microglia. Moreover, both immunohistochemistry and Western blots detect an induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in RPE, which corroborates increased CNV in the outer retina in the

  13. Diagnostics of pigmented skin tumors based on laser-induced autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borisova, E; Avramov, L; Troyanova, P; Pavlova, P

    2008-06-30

    Results of investigation of cutaneous benign and malignant pigmented lesions by laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy (LIAFS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) are presented. The autofluorescence of human skin was excited by a 337-nm nitrogen laser. A broadband halogen lamp (400-900 nm) was used for diffuse reflectance measurements. A microspectrometer detected in vivo the fluorescence and reflectance signals from human skin. The main spectral features of benign (dermal nevi, compound nevi, dysplastic nevi) and malignant (melanoma) lesions are discussed. The combined usage of the fluorescence and reflectance spectral methods to determine the type of the lesion, which increases the total diagnostic accuracy, is compared with the usage of LIAFS or DRS only. We also applied colorimetric transformation of the reflectance spectra detected and received additional evaluation criteria for determination of type of the lesion under study. Spectra from healthy skin areas near the lesion were detected and changes between healthy and lesion skin spectra were revealed. The influence of the main skin pigments on the detected spectra is discussed and evaluation of possibilities for differentiation between malignant and benign lesions is performed based on their spectral properties. This research shows that the non-invasive and high-sensitive in vivo detection by means of appropriate light sources and detectors should be possible, related to the real-time determination of existing pathological conditions. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  14. Laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2011-11-01

    Recent streams of laser studies on crystallization and crystal growth are summarized and reviewed. Femtosecond multiphoton excitation of solutions leads to their ablation at the focal point, inducing local bubble formation, shockwave propagation, and convection flow. This phenomenon, called "laser micro tsunami" makes it possible to trigger crystallization of molecules and proteins from their supersaturated solutions. Femtosecond laser ablation of a urea crystal in solution triggers the additional growth of a single daughter crystal. Intense continuous wave (CW) near infrared laser irradiation at the air/solution interface of heavy-water amino acid solutions results in trapping of the clusters and evolves to crystallization. A single crystal is always prepared in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, and the crystal polymorph of glycine depends on laser power, polarization, and solution concentration. Upon irradiation at the glass/solution interface, a millimeter-sized droplet is formed, and a single crystal is formed by shifting the irradiation position to the surface. Directional and selective crystal growth is also possible with laser trapping. Finally, characteristics of laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth are summarized.

  15. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Cobalt Monoboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, H. F.; Ng, Y. W.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectrum of cobalt monoboride (CoB) in the visible region between 465 and 560 nm has been observed. CoB molecule was produced by the reaction of laser ablated cobalt atom and diborane (B_2H_6) seeded in argon. Over twenty five vibronic bands have been recorded, and both Co10B and Co11B isotopic species have been observed and analyzed. Preliminary analysis of the rotational lines showed that the observed vibronic bands belong to two categories namely: the Ω' = 2 - Ω'' = 2 and the Ω' = 3 - Ω'' = 3 transitions, which indicated the ground state of CoB is consistent with an assignment of a ^3Δ_i state predicted from ab initio calculations. Unresolved hyperfine structure arising from the Co nucleus (I = 7/2) causes a broadening of spectral lines. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the spectrum of the CoB molecule. Financial support from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU 701008P) is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Volume of a laser-induced microjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Sennosuke; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Noguchi, Yuto; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Needle-free injection systems are of great importance for medical treatments. In spite of their great potential, these systems are not commonly used. One of the common problems is strong pain caused by diffusion shape of the jet. To solve this problem, the usage of a high-speed highly-focused microjet as needle-free injection system is expected. It is thus crucial to control important indicators such as ejected volume of the jet for its safe application. We conduct experiments to reveal which parameter influences mostly the ejected volume. In the experiments, we use a glass tube of an inner diameter of 500 micro-meter, which is filled with the liquid. One end is connected to a syringe and the other end is opened. Radiating the pulse laser instantaneously vapors the liquid, followed by the generation of a shockwave. We find that the maximum volume of a laser-induced bubble is approximately proportional to the ejected volume. It is also found that the occurrence of cavitation does not affect the ejected volume while it changes the jet velocity.

  17. Laser-induced lipolysis on adipose cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efrain; Gutierrez, O.; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, J.; Isaza, Carolina; Ramirez, Hugo; Rebolledo, Aldo F.; Criollo, Willian; Ortiz, C.

    2004-10-01

    Recently, a new liposuction technique, using a low-level laser (LLL) device and Ultrawet solution prior to the procedure, demonstrated the movement of fat from the inside to the outside of the adipocyte (Neira et al., 2002). To determine the mechanisms involved, we have performed Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy studies; Light transmittance measurements on adipocyte dilutions; and a study of laser light propagation in adipose tissue. This studies show: 1. Cellular membrane alterations. 2. LLL is capable to reach the deep adipose tissue layer, and 3. The tumescence solution enhances the light propagation by clearing the tissue. MRI studies demonstrated the appearance of fat on laser treated abdominal tissue. Besides, adipocytes were cultivated and irradiated to observe the effects on isolated cells. These last studies show: 1. 635 nm-laser alone is capable of mobilizing cholesterol from the cell membrane; this action is enhanced by the presence of adrenaline and lidocaine. 2. Intracellular fat is released from adipocytes by co joint action of adrenaline, aminophyline and 635 nm-laser. Results are consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides the modification of the cellular membranes.

  18. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  19. Laser Induced Fluorescence of the Iodine Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargus, William

    2014-10-01

    Iodine (I2) has been considered as a potential electrostatic spacecraft thruster propellant for approximately 2 decades, but has only recently been demonstrated. Energy conversion efficiency appears to be on par with xenon without thruster modification. Intriguingly, performance appears to exceed xenon at high acceleration potentials. As part of a continuing program for the development of non-intrusive plasma diagnostics for advanced plasma spacecraft propulsion, we have identified the I II 5d5D4 o state as metastable, and therefore containing a reservoir of excited state ions suitable for laser probing. The 5d5D4 o - 6p5P3 transition at 695.878 nm is convenient for diode laser excitation with the 5s5S2 o - 6p5P3 transition at 516.12 nm as an ideal candidate for non-resonant fluorescence collection. We have constructed a Penning type iodine microwave discharge lamp optimized for I II production for table-top measurements. This work demonstrates I II laser-induced fluorescence in a representative iodine discharge and will validate our previous theoretical work based on the limited available historical I II spectral data.

  20. Anions in laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, S. V.; Gornushkin, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    The equation of state for plasmas containing negative atomic and molecular ions (anions) is modeled. The model is based on the assumption that all ionization processes and chemical reactions are at local thermal equilibrium and the Coulomb interaction in the plasma is described by the Debye-Hückel theory. In particular, the equation of state is obtained for plasmas containing the elements Ca, Cl, C, Si, N, and Ar. The equilibrium reaction constants are calculated using the latest experimental and ab initio data of spectroscopic constants for the molecules CaCl_2, CaCl, Cl_2, N_2, C_2, Si_2, CN, SiN, SiC, and their positive and negative ions. The model is applied to laser-induced plasmas (LIPs) by including the equation of state into a fluid dynamic numerical model based on the Navier-Stokes equations describing an expansion of LIP plumes into an ambient gas as a reactive viscous flow with radiative losses. In particular, the formation of anions Cl-, C-, Si-, {{Cl}}2^{ - }, {{Si}}2^{ - }, {{C}}2^{ - }, CN-, SiC-, and SiN- in LIPs is investigated in detail.

  1. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  2. Improved Imaging With Laser-Induced Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Engmin J.

    1993-01-01

    System tests specimen of material nondestructively by laser-induced eddy-current imaging improved by changing method of processing of eddy-current signal. Changes in impedance of eddy-current coil measured in absolute instead of relative units.

  3. Classical cutoffs for laser-induced nonsequential double ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D.B.; Becker, W.

    2003-12-01

    Classical cutoffs for the momenta of electrons ejected in laser-induced nonsequential double ionization are derived for the recollision-impact-ionization scenario. Such simple cutoff laws can aid in the interpretation of the observed electron spectra.

  4. Laser-induced shockwave propagation from ablation in a cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Xianzhong; Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Wen, S.-B.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-02-06

    The propagation of laser-induced shockwaves from ablation inside of cavities was determined from time-resolved shadowgraph images. The temperature and electron number density of the laser-induced plasma was determined from spectroscopic measurements. These properties were compared to those for laser ablation on the flat surface under the same energy and background gas condition. A theoretical model was proposed to determine the amount of energy and vaporized mass stored in the vapor plume based on these measurements.

  5. Laser-induced gas-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. J.

    Chemical reactions in homogeneous systems activated by laser radiation have been extensively investigated for more than a decade. The applications of lasers to promote gas-surface interactions have just been realized in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to examine the fundamental processes involved in laser-induced gas-surface chemical interactions. Specifically, the photon-enhanced adsorption, adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-solid reactions, product formation and desorption processes are discussed in detail. The dynamic processes involved in photoexcitation of the electronic and vibrational states, the energy transfer and relaxation in competition with chemical interactions are considered. These include both single and multiple photon adsorption, and fundamental and overtone transitions in the excitation process, and inter- and intra-molecular energy transfer, and coupling with phonons, electron-hole pairs and surface plasmons in the energy relaxation process. Many current experimental and theoretical studies on the subject are reviewed and discussed with the goal of clarifying the relative importance of the surface interaction steps and relating the resulting concepts to the experimentally observed phenomena. Among the many gas-solid systems that have been investigated, there has been more extensive use of CO adsorbed on metals, and SF 6 and XeF 2 interactions with silicon as examples to illustrate the many facets of the electronically and vibrationally activated surface processes. Results on IR laser stimulated desorption of C 5H 5N and C 5D 5N molecules from various solid surfaces are also presented. It is clearly shown that rapid intermolecular energy exchange and molecule to surface energy transfer can have important effects on photodesorption cross sections and isotope selectivities. It is concluded that utilization of lasers in gas-surface studies not only can provide fundamental insight into the mechanism and dynamics involved in heterogeneous

  6. Digital imaging-based retinal photocoagulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Oberg, Erik D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1997-05-01

    Researchers at the USAF Academy and the University of Texas are developing a computer-assisted retinal photocoagulation system for the treatment of retinal disorders (i.e. diabetic retinopathy, retinal tears). Currently, ophthalmologists manually place therapeutic retinal lesions, an acquired technique that is tiring for both the patient and physician. The computer-assisted system under development can rapidly and safely place multiple therapeutic lesions at desired locations on the retina in a matter of seconds. Separate prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth during irradiation and lesion placement to compensate for retinal movement. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Two different design approaches are being pursued to combine the capabilities of both subsystems: a digital imaging-based system and a hybrid analog-digital system. This paper will focus on progress with the digital imaging-based prototype system. A separate paper on the hybrid analog-digital system, `Hybrid Retinal Photocoagulation System', is also presented in this session.

  7. Temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Baade, Alexander; Birngruber, Reginald; Roider, Johann; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Retinal photocoagulation lacks objective dosage in clinical use, thus the commonly applied lesions are too deep and strong, associated with pain reception and the risk of visual field defects and induction of choroidal neovascularisations. Optoacoustics allows real-time non-invasive temperature measurement in the fundus during photocoagulation by applying short probe laser pulses additionally to the treatment radiation, which excite the emission of ultrasonic waves. Due to the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen parameter, the amplitudes of the ultrasonic waves can be used to derive the temperature of the absorbing tissue. By measuring the temperatures in real-time and automatically controlling the irradiation by feedback to the treatment laser, the strength of the lesions can be defined. Different characteristic functions for the time and temperature dependent lesion sizes were used as rating curves for the treatment laser, stopping the irradiation automatically after a desired lesion size is achieved. The automatically produced lesion sizes are widely independent of the adjusted treatment laser power and individual absorption. This study was performed on anaesthetized rabbits and is a step towards a clinical trial with automatically controlled photocoagulation.

  8. Laser-induced thermal acoustic velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan

    2000-11-01

    Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA) is a non- intrusive, remote, four-wave mixing laser diagnostic technique for measurements of the speed of sound and of the thermal diffusivity in gases. If the gas composition is known, then its temperature and density can be inferred. Beam misalignments and bulk fluid velocities can influence the time history and intensity of LITA signals. A closed-form analytic expression for LITA signals incorporating these effects is derived. The magnitude of beam misalignment and the flow velocity can be inferred from the signal shape using a least-squares fit of this model to the experimental data. High-speed velocimetry using homodyne detection is demonstrated with NO2-seeded air in a supersonic blow-down nozzle. The measured speed of sound deviates less than 2% from the theoretical value assuming isentropic quasi-1D flow. Boundary layer effects degrade the velocity measurements to errors of 20%. Heterodyne detection is used for low-speed velocimetry up to Mach number M = 0.1. The uncertainty of the velocity measurements was ~0.2 m/s. The sound speed measurements were repeatable to 0.5%. The agreement between theory and experiments is very good. A one-hidden-layer feed-forward neural network is trained using back-propagation learning and a steepest descent learning rule to extract the speed of sound and flow velocity from a heterodyne LITA signal. The effect of the network size on the performance is demonstrated. The accuracy is determined with a second set of LITA signals that were not used during the training phase. The accuracy is found to be better than that of a conventional frequency decomposition technique while being computationally as efficient. This data analysis method is robust with respect to noise, numerically stable, and fast enough for real-time data analysis. The accuracy and uncertainty of non-resonant LITA measurements is investigated. The error in measurements of the speed of sound and of the thermal diffusivity

  9. Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul; Jones, Tom; Connell, John; Belvin, Keith; Watson, Kent

    2004-01-01

    surface of the target. The improved method is denoted laser-induced-fluorescence photogrammetry.

  10. Laser induced incandescence and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy based sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eseller, Kemal Efe

    In this doctoral dissertation, two laser-based sensors were evaluated for different applications. Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) is a technique which can provide non-intrusive quantitative measurement of soot and it provides a unique diagnostic tool to characterize engine performance. Since LII is linearly proportional to the soot volume fraction, it can provide in situ, real time measurement of soot volume fraction with high temporal and spatial resolution. LII has the capability to characterize soot formation during combustion. The soot volume fraction from both flames and a soot generator was investigated with LII. The effects of experimental parameters, such as laser fluence, gate delay, gate width and various laser beam focusing, on LII signal was studied. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), a diagnostic tool for in situ elemental analysis, has been evaluated for on-line, simultaneous, multi-species impurity monitoring in hydrogen. LIBS spectra with different impurity levels of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen were recorded and the intensity of the spectral lines of Ar, O, N, and H observed were used to form calibration plots for impurities in hydrogen measurements. An ungated detection method for LIBS has been developed and applied to equivalence ratio measurements of CH4/air and biofuel/air. LIBS has also been used to quantitatively analyze the composition of a slurry sample. The quenching effect of water in slurry samples causes low LIBS signal quality with poor sensitivity. Univariate and multivariate calibration was performed on LIBS spectra of dried slurry samples for elemental analysis of Mg, Si and Fe. Calibration results show that the dried slurry samples give good correlation between spectral intensity and elemental concentration.

  11. Thrombospondin-2 Expression During Retinal Vascular Development and Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Ping; Palenski, Tammy L.; Wang, Shoujian; Gurel, Zafer; Hankenson, Kurt D.; Sorenson, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine thrombospondin-2 (TSP2) expression and its impact on postnatal retinal vascular development and retinal neovascularization. Methods: The TSP2-deficient (TSP2−/−) mice and a line of TSP2 reporter mice were used to assess the expression of TSP2 during postnatal retinal vascular development and neovascularization. The postnatal retinal vascularization was evaluated using immunostaining of wholemount retinas prepared at different postnatal days by collagen IV staining and/or TSP2 promoter driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. The organization of astrocytes was evaluated by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) staining. Retinal vascular densities were determined using trypsin digestion preparation of wholemount retinas at 3- and 6-weeks of age. Retinal neovascularization was assessed during the oxygen-induced ischemic retinopathy (OIR). Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) was assessed using laser-induced CNV. Results: Using the TSP2-GFP reporter mice, we observed significant expression of TSP2 mRNA in retinas of postnatal day 5 (P5) mice, which increased by P7 and remained high up to P42. Similar results were observed in retinal wholemount preparations, and western blotting for GFP with the highest level of GFP was observed at P21. In contrast to high level of mRNA at P42, the GFP fluorescence or protein level was dramatically downregulated. The primary retinal vasculature developed at a faster rate in TSP2−/− mice compared with TSP2+/+ mice up to P5. However, the developing retinal vasculature in TSP2+/+ mice caught up with that of TSP2−/− mice after P7. No significant differences in retinal vascular density were observed at 3- or 6-weeks of age. TSP2−/− mice also exhibited a similar sensitivity to the hyperoxia-mediated vessel obliteration and similar level of neovascularization during OIR as TSP2+/+ mice. Lack of TSP2 expression minimally affected laser-induced CNV compared with TSP2+/+ mice. Conclusions

  12. [Intravitreal ganciclovir in cytomegalovirus retinitis in AIDS].

    PubMed

    Olea, J L; Salvat, M; Mateos, J M; Vila, J; Villalonga, C; Riera, M

    1996-04-01

    A retrospective study was made of 26 patients with AIDS who initially presented with retinitis as the only clinical manifestation of cytomegalovirus infection (39 eyes). Sixty-five induction or re-induction therapeutic courses were administered with intravitreal ganciclovir. The efficiency rate of therapy was 93.8%. Thirty-eight maintenance therapeutic courses (200 micrograms/week) were evaluated. The non-compliance rate was 23%. Bilateral retinitis occurred in 44.4% of cases. The systemic administration of therapy had to be substituted for the intravitreal administration in 32% of patients during the clinical course of their conditions. The mean survival rate was 9.5 months. Both retinal detachment and vitreal hemorrhage occurred in 5% of patients. When retinitis is the first clinical manifestation of cytomegalovirus infection, therapy with intravitreal ganciclovir is efficacious to inactivate lesions. Although bilateral retinitis and extraocular dissemination are common, the mean survival rate is high.

  13. Crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in Si

    DOE PAGES

    Verburg, P. C.; Smillie, L. A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Haberl, B.; Bradby, J. E.; Williams, J. S.; Huis in ’t Veld, A. J.

    2015-06-04

    Laser-induced subsurface modification of dielectric materials is a well-known technology. Applications include the production of optical components and selective etching. In addition to dielectric materials, the subsurface modification technology can be applied to silicon, by employing near to mid-infrared radiation. An application of subsurface modifications in silicon is laser-induced subsurface separation, which is a method to separate wafers into individual dies. Other applications for which proofs of concept exist are the formation of waveguides and resistivity tuning. However, limited knowledge is available about the crystal structure of subsurface modifications in silicon. In this paper, we investigate the geometry and crystalmore » structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in monocrystalline silicon wafers. Finally, in addition to the generation of lattice defects, we found that transformations to amorphous silicon and Si-iii/Si-xii occur as a result of the laser irradiation.« less

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence of space-exposed polyurethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Ralph H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this work was to utilize laser-induced fluorescence technique to characterize several samples of space-exposed polyurethane. These samples were flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), which was in a shuttle-like orbit for nearly 6 years. Because of our present work to develop laser-induced-fluorescence inspection techniques for polymers, space-exposed samples and controls were lent to us for evaluation. These samples had been attached to the outer surface of LDEF; therefore, they were subjected to thermal cycling, solar ultraviolet radiation, vacuum, and atomic oxygen. It is well documented that atomic oxygen and ultraviolet exposure have detrimental effects on many polymers. This was a unique opportunity to make measurements on material that had been naturally degraded by an unusual environment. During our past work, data have come from artificially degraded samples and generally have demonstrated a correlation between laser-induced fluorescence and tensile strength or elasticity.

  15. Crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Verburg, P. C.; Smillie, L. A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Haberl, B.; Bradby, J. E.; Williams, J. S.; Huis in ’t Veld, A. J.

    2015-06-04

    Laser-induced subsurface modification of dielectric materials is a well-known technology. Applications include the production of optical components and selective etching. In addition to dielectric materials, the subsurface modification technology can be applied to silicon, by employing near to mid-infrared radiation. An application of subsurface modifications in silicon is laser-induced subsurface separation, which is a method to separate wafers into individual dies. Other applications for which proofs of concept exist are the formation of waveguides and resistivity tuning. However, limited knowledge is available about the crystal structure of subsurface modifications in silicon. In this paper, we investigate the geometry and crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in monocrystalline silicon wafers. Finally, in addition to the generation of lattice defects, we found that transformations to amorphous silicon and Si-iii/Si-xii occur as a result of the laser irradiation.

  16. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  17. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  18. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  19. Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Mar. 01, 2016 How does a detached or torn retina affect your vision? If a retinal tear is occurring, you may ...

  20. Integrated computer-aided retinal photocoagulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Oberg, Erik D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1996-05-01

    Successful retinal tracking subsystem testing results in vivo on rhesus monkeys using an argon continuous wave laser and an ultra-short pulse laser are presented. Progress on developing an integrated robotic retinal laser surgery system is also presented. Several interesting areas of study have developed: (1) 'doughnut' shaped lesions that occur under certain combinations of laser power, spot size, and irradiation time complicating measurements of central lesion reflectance, (2) the optimal retinal field of view to achieve simultaneous tracking and lesion parameter control, and (3) a fully digital versus a hybrid analog/digital tracker using confocal reflectometry integrated system implementation. These areas are investigated in detail in this paper. The hybrid system warrants a separate presentation and appears in another paper at this conference.

  1. Minimally invasive non-thermal laser technology using laser-induced optical breakdown for skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Habbema, Louis; Verhagen, Rieko; Van Hal, Robbert; Liu, Yan; Varghese, Babu

    2012-02-01

    We describe a novel, minimally invasive laser technology for skin rejuvenation by creating isolated microscopic lesions within tissue below the epidermis using laser induced optical breakdown. Using an in-house built prototype device, tightly focused near-infrared laser pulses are used to create optical breakdown in the dermis while leaving the epidermis intact, resulting in lesions due to cavitation and plasma explosion. This stimulates a healing response and consequently skin remodelling, resulting in skin rejuvenation effects. Analysis of ex-vivo and in-vivo treated human skin samples successfully demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of the microscopic lesion creation inside the dermis. Treatments led to mild side effects that can be controlled by small optimizations of the optical skin contact and treatment depth within the skin. The histological results from a limited panel test performed on five test volunteers show evidence of microscopic lesion creation and new collagen formation at the sites of the optical breakdown. This potentially introduces a safe, breakthrough treatment procedure for skin rejuvenation without damaging the epidermis with no or little social down-time and with efficacy comparable to conventional fractional ablative techniques.

  2. New therapeutic modalities of retinal laser injury. Final report, 1 Mar 89-1 Mar 92

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, T.T.; Tso, M.O.

    1992-03-31

    Efficacies of three different regimens of high dose of methylprednisolone (MP) treatment on laser-induced non-hemorrhage retinal injury and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) in sub-retinal hemorrhage laser injury were evaluated in a sub-human primate model and a rat model respectively. Clinical, histopathological, and morphometric criteria were employed for evaluating the efficacy of MP. High dose and prolonged treatment (4 days) was the most effective regimen while high dose for 8 hours showed limited effect in non-hemorrhagic retinal injury. Intravitreal t-PA showed no apparent beneficial effect in sub-retinal hemorrhage after laser injury. Hence, patients with laser retinal injury may benefit from high dose MP treatment for an appropriate period of time.

  3. Infrared Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. LIBS is a relatively simple technique and has been successfully employed in applications such as environmental monitoring, materials analysis, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, and homeland security. Most LIBS applications are limited to emission features in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region arising from atoms and simple molecular fragments. In the present work, we report on the observation of mid- infrared emission lines from alkali metal halides due to laser-induced breakdown processes. The studied alkali metal halides included LiCl, NaCl, NaBr, KCl, KBr, KF, RbCl, and RbBr. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 16 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on the target. The LIBS infrared emission from alkali halides showed intense and narrow bands located in the region from 2-8 μm. The observed emission features were assigned to atomic transitions between higher-lying Rydberg states of neutral alkali atoms. More detailed results of the performed IR LIBS studies on alkali metal halides will be discussed at the conference.

  4. Using Laser-Induced Incandescence To Measure Soot in Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.; Sankar, Subramanian V.

    2005-01-01

    An instrumentation system exploits laser-induced incandescence (LII) to measure the concentration of soot particles in an exhaust stream from an engine, furnace, or industrial process that burns hydrocarbon fuel. In comparison with LII soot-concentration-measuring systems, this system is more complex and more capable.

  5. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  6. Laser-induced copper deposition with weak reducing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemirovsky, V. A.; Fateev, S. A.; Logunov, L. S.; Tumkin, I. I.; Safonov, S. V.; Khairullina, E. M.

    2013-11-01

    The study showed that organic alcohols with 1,2,3,5,6 hydroxyl groups can be used as reducing agents for laser-induced copper deposition from solutions (LCLD).Multiatomic alcohols, sorbitol, xylitol, and glycerol, are shown to be effective reducing agents for performing LCLD at glass-ceramic surfaces. High-conductivity copper tracks with good topology were synthesized.

  7. Impairing autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium leads to inflammasome activation and enhanced macrophage-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Copland, David A.; Theodoropoulou, Sofia; Chiu, Hsi An Amy; Barba, Miriam Durazo; Mak, Ka Wang; Mack, Matthias; Nicholson, Lindsay B.; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related decreases in autophagy contribute to the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We have now studied the interaction between autophagy impaired in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the responses of macrophages. We find that dying RPE cells can activate the macrophage inflammasome and promote angiogenesis. In vitro, inhibiting rotenone-induced autophagy in RPE cells elicits caspase-3 mediated cell death. Co-culture of damaged RPE with macrophages leads to the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and nitrite oxide. Exogenous IL-6 protects the dysfunctional RPE but IL-1β causes enhanced cell death. Furthermore, IL-1β toxicity is more pronounced in dysfunctional RPE cells showing reduced IRAK3 gene expression. Co-culture of macrophages with damaged RPE also elicits elevated levels of pro-angiogenic proteins that promote ex vivo choroidal vessel sprouting. In vivo, impaired autophagy in the eye promotes photoreceptor and RPE degeneration and recruitment of inflammasome-activated macrophages. The degenerative tissue environment drives an enhanced pro-angiogenic response, demonstrated by increased size of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions. The contribution of macrophages was confirmed by depletion of CCR2+ monocytes, which attenuates CNV in the presence of RPE degeneration. Our results suggest that the interplay between perturbed RPE homeostasis and activated macrophages influences key features of AMD development. PMID:26847702

  8. Laser induced autofluorescence for diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakaki, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Merlemis, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Sianoudis, I. A.; Batsi, O.; Christofidou, E.; Stratigos, A. J.; Katsambas, A. D.; Antoniou, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Non melanoma skin cancer is one of the most frequent malignant tumors among humans. A non-invasive technique, with high sensitivity and high specificity, would be the most suitable method for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or other malignancies diagnostics, instead of the well established biopsy and histopathology examination. In the last decades, a non-invasive, spectroscopic diagnostic method was introduced, the laser induced fluorescence (LIF), which could generate an image contrast between different states of skin tissue. The noninvasiveness consists in that this biophotonic method do not require tissue sample excision, what is necessary in histopathology characterization and biochemical analysis of the skin tissue samples, which is worldwide used as an evaluation gold standard. The object of this study is to establish the possibilities of a relatively portable system for laser induced skin autofluorescence to differentiate malignant from nonmalignant skin lesions. Unstained human skin samples, excised from humans undergoing biopsy examination, were irradiated with a Nd:YAG-3ω laser (λ=355 nm, 6 ns), used as an excitation source for the autofluorescence measurements. A portable fiber-based spectrometer was used to record fluorescence spectra of the sites of interest. The ex vivo results, obtained with this spectroscopic technique, were correlated with the histopathology results. After the analysis of the fluorescence spectra of almost 60 skin tissue areas, we developed an algorithm to distinguish different types of malignant lesions, including inflammatory areas. Optimization of the data analysis and potential use of LIF spectroscopy with 355 nm Nd:YAG laser excitation of tissue autofluorescence for clinical applications are discussed.

  9. Laser-induced dental caries and plaque diagnosis on patients by sensitive autofluorescence spectroscopy and time-gated video imaging: preliminary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    1994-09-01

    The laser-induced in vivo autofluorescence of human teeth was investigated by means of time- resolved/time-gated fluorescence techniques. The aim of these studies was non-contact caries and plaque detection. Carious lesions and dental plaque fluoresce in the red spectral region. This autofluorescence seems to be based on porphyrin-producing bacteria. We report on preliminary studies on patients using a novel method of autofluorescence imaging. A special device was constructed for time-gated video imaging. Nanosecond laser pulses for fluorescence excitation were provided by a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Autofluorescence was detected in an appropriate nanosecond time window using a video camera with a time-gated image intensifier (minimal time gate: 5 ns). Laser-induced autofluorescence based on porphyrin-producing bacteria seems to be an appropriate tool for detecting dental lesions and for creating `caries-images' and `dental plaque' images.

  10. A mechanical model of retinal detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Siegel, Michael

    2012-08-01

    We present a model of the mechanical and fluid forces associated with exudative retinal detachments where the retinal photoreceptor cells separate, typically from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By computing the total fluid volume flow arising from transretinal, vascular and RPE pump currents, we determine the conditions under which the subretinal fluid pressure exceeds the maximum yield stress holding the retina and RPE together, giving rise to an irreversible, extended retinal delamination. We also investigate localized, blister-like retinal detachments by balancing mechanical tension in the retina with both the retina-RPE adhesion energy and the hydraulic pressure jump across the retina. For detachments induced by traction forces, we find a critical radius beyond which the blister is unstable to growth. Growth of a detached blister can also be driven by inflamed lesions in which the tissue has a higher choroidal hydraulic conductivity, has insufficient RPE pump activity, or has defective adhesion bonds. We determine the parameter regimes in which the blister either becomes unstable to growth, remains stable and finite-sized, or shrinks, allowing possible healing. The corresponding stable blister radius and shape are calculated. Our analysis provides a quantitative description of the physical mechanisms involved in exudative retinal detachments and can help guide the development of retinal reattachment protocols or preventative procedures.

  11. In vivo visualizing the dynamics of bone marrow stem cells in mouse retina and choroidal-retinal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heuy-Ching H.; Zwick, Harry; Edsall, Peter R.; Cheramie, Rachel D.; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce

    2007-02-01

    It has recently been shown that bone marrow cells can differentiate into various lineage cells including neural cells in vitro and in vivo. Therefore it is an attractive therapeutic intervention to apply autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells that may offer neuroprotection to laser-induced retinal injuries. The purpose of this study is to develop a method with which to visualize bone marrow stem cells dynamics in mouse retinal circulation. We have used a physiological method, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), to track the highly enriched stem/progenitor cells circulating in the retina. Stem cells were enriched by immunomagnetic depletion of cells committed to the T- and B lymphocytic, myeloid and erythorid lineages. CellTracker TM Green-labeled stem cells were injected into the tail veins of mice with laser-induced focal retinal injuries. Bone marrow stem cells labeled with CellTracker TM Green were visible in the retinal circulation for as long as 1 hour and 30 minutes. These studies suggest that stem cell-enriched bone marrow cells may have the ability to mobilize into laser-induced retinal injuries and possibly further proliferate, differentiate and functionally integrate into the retina.

  12. Tubedown regulation of retinal endothelial permeability signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Nhu; Gendron, Robert L.; Grozinger, Kindra; Whelan, Maria A.; Hicks, Emily Anne; Tennakoon, Bimal; Gardiner, Danielle; Good, William V.; Paradis, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tubedown (Tbdn; Naa15), a subunit of the N-terminal acetyltransferase NatA, complexes with the c-Src substrate Cortactin and supports adult retinal homeostasis through regulation of vascular permeability. Here we investigate the role of Tbdn expression on signaling components of retinal endothelial permeability to understand how Tbdn regulates the vasculature and supports retinal homeostasis. Tbdn knockdown-induced hyperpermeability to Albumin in retinal endothelial cells was associated with an increase in the levels of activation of the Src family kinases (SFK) c-Src, Fyn and Lyn and phospho-Cortactin (Tyr421). The knockdown of Cortactin expression reduced Tbdn knockdown-induced permeability to Albumin and the levels of activated SFK. Inhibition of SFK in retinal endothelial cells decreased Tbdn knockdown-induced permeability to Albumin and phospho-Cortactin (Tyr421) levels. Retinal lesions of endothelial-specific Tbdn knockdown mice, with tissue thickening, fibrovascular growth, and hyperpermeable vessels displayed an increase in the levels of activated c-Src. Moreover, the retinal lesions of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) associated with a loss of Tbdn expression and hyperpermeability to Albumin displayed increased levels of activated SFK in retinal blood vessels. Taken together, these results implicate Tbdn as an important regulator of retinal endothelial permeability and homeostasis by modulating a signaling pathway involving c-Src and Cortactin. PMID:26142315

  13. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  14. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, E.A.

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  15. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenou, M.; Sa'ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-05-01

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10-100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  16. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Hadi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  17. Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy have been carried out in four different hydrocarbon gas mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) to investigate the effect of gas species on the laser induced breakdown kinetics and resulting the plasma emission. For this purpose, each mixture that consists of different species has the same atom composition. It is found that the temporal emission spectra and the decay rates of atomic line-intensities are almost identical for the breakdowns in the four different mixtures. This finding may indicate that the breakdown plasmas of these mixtures reach a similar thermodynamic and physiochemical state after its formation, resulting in a similar trend of quenching of excited species.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Edwards, Donna H.; Buckley, Paul F., III; DeCosta, Joseph F.; Haggitt, Rodger C.

    1996-04-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether laser-induced fluorescence could detect high grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus. Four-hundred-ten nm laser light was used to induce autofluorescence of Barrett's mucosa in 36 patients during routine endoscopy. The spectra were analyzed using the Differential Normalized Fluorescence (DNF) Index technique to differentiate high grade dysplasia from either low grade or non-dysplastic mucosa. Each spectrum was classified as either premalignant or benign using two different DNF indices. Analyzing the fluorescence spectra from all patients using one DNF Index, 96% of non- dysplastic Barrett's samples classified as benign tissue. All low grade dysplasia samples classified as benign. Ninety percent of high grade dysplasia samples classified as premalignant. Twenty-eight percent of mixed low grade/focal high grade dysplasia samples classified as premalignant. In summary, high grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus patients can be detected by endoscopic laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy using differential normalized fluorescence technique.

  19. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Zenou, M.; Sa'ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  20. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  1. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  2. Coherent microwave radiation from a laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.

    2012-12-24

    We propose a method for generation of coherent monochromatic microwave/terahertz radiation from a laser-induced plasma. It is shown that small-scale plasma, located in the interaction region of two co-propagating plane-polarized laser beams, can be a source of the dipole radiation at a frequency equal to the difference between the frequencies of the lasers. This radiation is coherent and appears as a result of the so-called optical mixing in plasma.

  3. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy:. AN Application on Multilayered Archeological Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponterio, R.; Trusso, S.; Vasi, C.; Aragona, S.; Mavilia, L.

    2004-10-01

    In this work we show an example of application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in combination with another laser-based technique: Raman micro-spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and glaze on pottery found archaeological excavations in Amendolea castle site (south of Italy in Calabrian peninsula); the objects belong to medieval period. The spectral data indicates the qualitative elemental composition of the examined materials and, in addition, give us useful information on the stratigraphy of the paint layers.

  4. Post-acceleration of laser-induced ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Delle Side, D.

    2015-04-01

    A complete review of the essential and recent developments in the field of post-acceleration of laser-induced ion beams is presented. After a brief introduction to the physics of low-intensity nanosecond laser-matter interaction, the details of ions extraction and acceleration are critically analyzed and the key parameters to obtain good-quality ion beams are illustrated. A description of the most common ion beam diagnosis system is given, together with the associated analytical techniques.

  5. Laser-induced transient grating setup with continuously tunable period

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Flick, A.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Khanolkar, A.; Abi Ghanem, M.; Boechler, N.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2015-12-15

    We present a modification of the laser-induced transient grating setup enabling continuous tuning of the transient grating period. The fine control of the period is accomplished by varying the angle of the diffraction grating used to split excitation and probe beams. The setup has been tested by measuring dispersion of bulk and surface acoustic waves in both transmission and reflection geometries. The presented modification is fully compatible with optical heterodyne detection and can be easily implemented in any transient grating setup.

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for specimen analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Akshaya; Yu-Yueh, Fang; Burgess, Shane C.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-08-15

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus, a system and a method for detecting the presence or absence of trace elements in a biological sample using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy. The trace elements are used to develop a signature profile which is analyzed directly or compared with the known profile of a standard. In one aspect of the invention, the apparatus, system and method are used to detect malignant cancer cells in vivo.

  7. Hydrogen leak detection using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ball, A J; Hohreiter, V; Hahn, D W

    2005-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is investigated as a technique for real-time monitoring of hydrogen gas. Two methodologies were examined: The use of a 100 mJ laser pulse to create a laser-induced breakdown directly in a sample gas stream, and the use of a 55 mJ laser pulse to create a laser-induced plasma on a solid substrate surface, with the expanding plasma sampling the gas stream. Various metals were analyzed as candidate substrate surfaces, including aluminum, copper, molybdenum, stainless steel, titanium, and tungsten. Stainless steel was selected, and a detailed analysis of hydrogen detection in binary mixtures of nitrogen and hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was performed. Both the gaseous plasma and the plasma initiated on the stainless steel surface generated comparable hydrogen emission signals, using the 656.28 Halpha emission line, and exhibited excellent signal linearity. The limit of detection is about 20 ppm (mass) as determined for both methodologies, with the solid-initiated plasma yielding a slightly better value. Overall, LIBS is concluded to be a viable candidate for hydrogen sensing, offering a combination of high sensitivity with a technique that is well suited to implementation in field environments.

  8. Combined branch retinal vein and artery occlusion in toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Aggio, Fabio Bom; Novelli, Fernando José de; Rosa, Evandro Luis; Nobrega, Mário Junqueira

    2016-01-01

    A 22-year-old man complained of low visual acuity and pain in his left eye for five days. His ophthalmological examination revealed 2+ anterior chamber reaction and a white, poorly defined retinal lesion at the proximal portion of the inferotemporal vascular arcade. There were retinal hemorrhages in the inferotemporal region extending to the retinal periphery. In addition, venous dilation, increased tortuosity, and ischemic retinal whitening along the inferotemporal vascular arcade were also observed. A proper systemic work-up was performed, and the patient was diagnosed with ocular toxoplasmosis. He was treated with an anti-toxoplasma medication, and his condition slowly improved. Inferior macular inner and middle retinal atrophy could be observed on optical coherence tomography as a sequela of ischemic injury. To our knowledge, this is the first report of combined retinal branch vein and artery occlusion in toxoplasmosis resulting in a striking and unusual macular appearance. PMID:27463632

  9. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  10. Two-dimensional Temperature Measurement in Laser-induced Breakdown (LIB) using Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence (PLIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Ling; Parigger, Christian; Plemmons, David H.; Lewis, J. W. L.

    1996-05-01

    Two-dimensional temperature maps of the spatial profile of NH have been obtained following laser-induced breakdown of NH_3. A focused Nd:YAG laser of nominally 30 mJ and 6 ns pulsewidth was used to obtain laser breakdown of atmospheric pressure, flowing gaseous NH_3. The recombination NH A-X far-ultraviolet spectra was studied over the temporal region of 1 - 100 μs following breakdown. Spontaneous emission and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) spectra were observed using a two dimensional image-intensifier filter combination. The PLIF excitation spetra were achieved using an excimer-pumped dye laser, and temperature were obtained using Boltzmann plots. The results show the spatial profiles of the remnant plasma kernel and the effect of gas-dynamic expansion.

  11. Variation of retinal ED50 with exposure duration for near-IR sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, David J.; Fuller, Daniel R.; Hoxie, Stephen W.; Edsall, P. R.

    1997-05-01

    A body of data relates the ED50 for laser-induced retinal damage to exposure duration for visible-wavelength laser exposure and for 1064 nm laser exposure. The database, extending from sub-nanosecond exposures to kilosecond exposures, can for the most part, be fit to models based on thermal interactions, thermal-mechanical mechanisms, and photochemical processes. Exceptions to this fit occur between 1 and 100 microseconds where the damage mechanism transitions from exclusively thermal to thermal-mechanical. Disagreement exists as to whether this anomalous dip of ED50 is real or is an artifact of the data. We determined the laser-induced retinal ED50 in Rhesus monkey eyes for several exposure durations from 12 nanoseconds to 1000 milliseconds at 755 nm using a dye laser, an alexandrite laser, and a Ti:Sapphire laser. These data do not show a dip in ED50 in the microsecond time period.

  12. Automated retinal robotic laser system instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Jerath, Maya R.; Lewis, R. Stephen, II; Dillard, Bryan C.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1995-05-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Biomedical Engineering Laser Laboratory investigating the medical applications of lasers have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The ultimate goal of this ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Researchers at the USAF Academy's Department of Electrical Engineering have also become involved with this research due to similar interests. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Work is ongoing to build a prototype system to simultaneously control lesion depth and placement. The instrumentation aspects of the prototype subsystems were presented at SPIE Conference 1877 in January 1993. Since then our efforts have concentrated on combining the lesion depth control subsystem and the lesion placement subsystem into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both parameters. We have designed this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. An initial CALOSOS prototype design is provided. We have also investigated methods to improve system response time. The use of high speed non-standard frame rate CCD cameras and high speed local bus frame grabbers hosted on personal computers are being investigated. A review of system testing in vivo to date is provided in SPIE Conference proceedings 2374-49 (Novel Applications of Lasers and Pulsed Power, Dual-Use Applications of Lasers: Medical session).

  13. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    acuity improvement during the first 7 days differs significantly (p<0.001) among the 4 types of CRAO; among them, in eyes with initial visual acuity of counting finger or worse, visual acuity improved, remained stable or deteriorated in nonarteritic CRAO in 22%, 66% and 12% respectively; in nonarteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing in 67%, 33% and none respectively; and in transient nonarteritic CRAO in 82%, 18% and none respectively. Arteritic CRAO shows no change. Recent studies have shown that administration of local intra-arterial thrombolytic agent not only has no beneficial effect but also can be harmful. Prevalent multiple misconceptions on CRAO are discussed. Branch retinal artery occlusion Pathogeneses, clinical features and management of various types of BRAO are discussed at length. The natural history of visual acuity outcome shows a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better in 89% of permanent BRAO cases, 100% of transient BRAO and 100% of nonarteritic CLRAO alone. Cotton wools spots These are common, non-specific acute focal retinal ischemic lesions, seen in many retinopathies. Their pathogenesis and clinical features are discussed in detail. Amaurosis fugax Its pathogenesis, clinical features and management are described. PMID:21620994

  14. A simple dental caries detection system using full spectrum of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha-Cabral, Renata Maciel; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Maldonado, Edison Puig; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-06-01

    Objectives: to develop an apparatus for the detection of early caries lesions in enamel using the full extent of the tooth fluorescence spectrum, through the integration of a laser diode, fiber optics, filters and one portable spectrometer connected to a computer, all commercially available; to evaluate the developed device in clinical and laboratory tests, and compare its performance with commercial equipment. Methods: clinical examinations were performed in patients with indication for exodontics of premolars. After examinations, the patients underwent surgery and the teeth were stored individually. The optical measurements were repeated approximately two months after extraction, on the same sites previously examined, then histological analysis was carried out. Results: the spectral detector has presented high specificity and moderate sensitivity when applied to differentiate between healthy and damaged tissues, with no significant differences from the performance of the commercial equipment. The developed device is able to detect initial damages in enamel, with depth of approximately 300 μm. Conclusions: we successfully demonstrated the development of a simple and portable system based in laser-induced fluorescence for caries detection, assembled from common commercial parts. As the spectral detector acquires a complete recording of the spectrum from each tissue, it is possible to use it for monitoring developments of caries lesions.

  15. In-vivo laser-induced bubbles in the primate eye with femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Roach, William P.

    1996-05-01

    Threshold measurements for laser-induced breakdown (LIB) and bubble generation for femtosecond laser pulsewidths have been made in vivo for rhesus monkey eyes. These LIB thresholds are compared with model-predicted thresholds for water and minimum visible lesion thresholds in Dutch Belted rabbit and rhesus monkey eyes. LIB thresholds in biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water have been measured and reported using an artificial eye. We have recorded on video the first LIB causing bubble formation in any eye in vivo using albino rabbit eyes, pigmented rabbit eyes, and rhesus monkey eyes. External optics were used to focus the image within the vitreous and the bubbles generated were clearly formed anterior to the retina within the vitreous humor. The length of time that the bubbles are visible depends on the pulse energy delivered and may last for several seconds. However, for pulse energies near thresholds, the bubbles have a very short lifetime and may be seen on the video for only one frame. The plasma formation at the breakdown site acts as a limiting mechanism for energy transmission and may explain why high-energy femtosecond pulses at energies up to 100 microjoules sometimes do not cause severe damage to the retina. This fact may also explain why it is so difficult to product hemmorrhagic lesions in either the rabbit or primate eye with 100-femtosecond laser pulses.

  16. A freely available semi-automated method for quantifying retinal ganglion cells in entire retinal flatmounts.

    PubMed

    Geeraerts, E; Dekeyster, E; Gaublomme, D; Salinas-Navarro, M; De Groef, L; Moons, L

    2016-06-01

    Glaucomatous optic neuropathies are characterized by progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the neurons that connect the eye to the brain. Quantification of these RGCs is a cornerstone in experimental optic neuropathy research and commonly performed via manually quantifying parts of the retina. However, this is a time-consuming process subject to inter- and intra-observer variability. Here we present a freely available ImageJ script to semi-automatically quantify RGCs in entire retinal flatmounts after immunostaining for the RGC-specific transcription factor Brn3a. The blob-like signal of Brn3a-immunopositive RGCs is enhanced via eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix and the resulting local maxima are counted as RGCs. After the user has outlined the retinal flatmount area, the total RGC number and retinal area are reported and an isodensity map, showing the RGC density distribution across the retina, is created. The semi-automated quantification shows a very strong correlation (Pearson's r ≥ 0.99) with manual counts for both widefield and confocal images, thereby validating the data generated via the developed script. Moreover, application of this method in established glaucomatous optic neuropathy models such as N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced excitotoxicity, optic nerve crush and laser-induced ocular hypertension revealed RGC loss conform with literature. Compared to manual counting, the described automated quantification method is faster and shows user-independent consistency. Furthermore, as the script detects the RGC number in entire retinal flatmounts, the method allows detection of regional differences in RGC density. As such, it can help advance research investigating the degenerative mechanisms of glaucomatous optic neuropathies and the effectiveness of new neuroprotective treatments. Because the script is flexible and easy to optimize due to a low number of critical parameters, it can potentially be applied in combination with other tissues or

  17. Interventions for asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for preventing retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration are visible lesions that are risk factors for later retinal detachment. Retinal detachments occur when fluid in the vitreous cavity passes through tears or holes in the retina and separates the retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. Creation of an adhesion surrounding retinal breaks and lattice degeneration, with laser photocoagulation or cryotherapy, has been recommended as an effective means of preventing retinal detachment. This therapy is of value in the management of retinal tears associated with the symptoms of flashes and floaters and persistent vitreous traction upon the retina in the region of the retinal break, because such symptomatic retinal tears are associated with a high rate of progression to retinal detachment. Retinal tears and holes unassociated with acute symptoms and lattice degeneration are significantly less likely to be the sites of retinal breaks that are responsible for later retinal detachment. Nevertheless, treatment of these lesions frequently is recommended, in spite of the fact that the effectiveness of this therapy is unproven. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of techniques used to treat asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for the prevention of retinal detachment. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 2), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to February 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2014), PubMed (January 1948 to February 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in

  18. Q-Switched Alexandrite Laser-induced Chrysiasis

    PubMed Central

    Victor Ross, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chyriasis is an uncommon side effect that occurs in patients who are receiving prolonged treatment with either intravenous or intramuscular gold as a distinctive blue-gray pigmentation of light-exposed skin. Laser-induced chrysiasis is a rarely described phenomenon in individuals who have received systemic gold and are subsequently treated with a Q-switched laser. Purpose: To describe the characteristics of patients with laser-induced chrysiasis. Methods: The authors describe a 60-year-old woman who developed chrysiasis at Q-switched alexandrite laser treatment sites. They also reviewed the medical literature using PubMed, searching the terms chrysiasis, gold, and laser-induced. Patient reports and previous reviews of these subjects were critically assessed and the salient features are presented. Results: Including the authors’ patient, laser-induced chrysiasis has been described in five Caucasian arthritis patients (4 women and 1 man); most of the patients had received more than 8g of systemic gold therapy during a period of 3 to 13 years. Gold therapy was still occurring or had been discontinued as long as 26 years prior to laser treatment. All of the patients immediately developed blue macules at the Q-switched laser treatment site. Resolution of the dyschromia occurred in a 70-year-old woman after two treatment sessions with a long-pulsed ruby laser and the authors’ patient after a sequential series of laser sessions using a long-pulsed alexandrite laser, followed by a nonablative fractional laser and an ablative carbon dioxide laser. Conclusion: Laser-induced chrysiasis has been observed following treatment with Q-switched lasers in patients who are receiving or have previously been treated with systemic gold. It can occur decades after treatment with gold has been discontinued. Therefore, inquiry regarding a prior history of treatment with gold—particularly in older patients with arthritis—should be considered prior to treatment with a Q

  19. Retinal manifestations of ophthalmic artery hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ong, Terrence J; Paine, Mark; O'Day, Justin

    2002-08-01

    Ophthalmic artery hypoperfusion is a relatively uncommon clinical entity. This study illustrates the posterior segment findings of ophthalmic artery hypoperfusion in a series of nine patients. Colour photographs and relevant fluorescein angiograms highlighting the findings are shown. The retinal manifestations of ophthalmic artery hypoperfusion in this series of patients include midperipheral haemorrhages, dilated retinal veins, optic disk collaterals, optic disk neo-vascularization, cotton wool spots, grey intraretinal lesions, fundus pallor, optic disk swelling and choroidal infarcts. Recognition of the ophthalmic changes in this condition may lead to detection of carotid artery disease, the surgical and medical treatment of which has important bearing on patient management.

  20. Remote sensing of phytoplankton using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Babichenko, S.; Poryvkina, L.; Arikese, V. ); Kaitala, S. ); Kuosa, H. )

    1993-06-01

    The results of remote laser sensing of brackish-water phytoplankton on board a research vessel are presented. Field data of laser-induced fluorescence of phytoplankton obtained during the several cruises in the mouth of tile Gulf of Finland are compared with the results of standard chlorophyll a analysis of water samples and phytoplankton species determination by microscopy. The approach of fluorescence excitation by tunable laser radiation is applied to study the spatial distribution of a natural phytoplankton community. The remote analysis of the pigment composition of a phytoplankton community using the method of selective pigment excitation is described. The possibility of elaborating methods of quantitative laser remote biomonitoring is discussed.

  1. Expansion of radiative cooling of the laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Chunyi; Greif, Ralph; Russo,Richard

    2006-05-05

    To study the expansion and cooling process of the laser induced plasma generated by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation, experiments have been conducted which measure the position of the external shockwaves and the temperature of the vapor plumes. The positions of external shockwaves were determined by a femtosecond laser time-resolved imaging system. Vapor plume temperature was determined from spectroscopic measurements of the plasma emission lines. A model which considers the mass, momentum, and energy conservation of the region affected by the laser energy was developed. It shows good agreement to the experimental data.

  2. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  3. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS): specific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtica, M. S.; Savovic, J.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Kuzmanovic, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Ciganovic, J.; Zivkovic, S.

    2015-12-01

    A short overview of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with emphasis on the new trends is presented. Nowadays, due to unique features of this technique, LIBS has found applications in a great variety of fields. Achievements in the application of LIBS in nuclear area, for hazardous materials detection and in geology were considered. Also, some results recently obtained at VINCA Institute, with LIBS system based on transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, are presented. Future investigations of LIBS will be oriented toward further improvement of the analytical performance of this technique, as well as on finding new application fields.

  4. Laser induced fluorescence of biochemical for UV LIDAR application.

    PubMed

    Gupta, L; Sharma, R C; Razdan, A K; Maini, A K

    2014-05-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the ultraviolet regime has been used for the detection of biochemical through a fiber coupled CCD detector from a distance of 2 m. The effect of concentration and laser excitation energy on the fluorescence spectra of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been investigated. The signature fluorescence peak of NADH was centred about 460 nm. At lower concentration Raman peak centred at 405 nm was also observed. The origin of this peak has been discussed. Detection limit with the proposed set up is found to be 1 ppm.

  5. Laser-induced stress transients: aqueous pores of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flotte, Thomas J.; Lee, Shun; Zhang, Hong; McAuliffe, Daniel J., Sr.; Taitelbaum, Jeremy; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    1996-05-01

    Lasers can be used to enhance the delivery of a number of molecules. The model that best fits our data is for the formation of aqueous pores. These pores are present for up to 80 seconds. Our experiments have shown that laser-induced stress transients can be utilized as a vector for intracellular delivery of molecules that may or may not normally cross the cell membrane. These two conditions have been tested with Photofrin and DNA. This technology may have applications in cell and molecular biology, cancer therapy, gene therapy, and others.

  6. Laser-induced breakdown in large transparent water droplets.

    PubMed

    Chang, R K; Eickmans, J H; Hsieh, W F; Wood, C F; Zhang, J Z; Zheng, J B

    1988-06-15

    Recent experiments on the laser-induced breakdown (LIB) of large transparent liquid droplets are reviewed. A physical model of LIB processes is presented with the aim of integrating the following recent results: (1) the internal and near-field distributions for large transparent spheres; (2) the location of LIB initiation based on spatially resolved plasma emission spectroscopic techniques; (3) spatially resolved but time-averaged density of the plasma plumes and temperature of the atomic species within the plasma; (4) the plasma front propagation velocities inside and outside the droplet; and (5) the fate of the remaining superheated droplet and the expelled material.

  7. Interaction between jets during laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Patrascioiu, A.; Florian, C.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.; Hennig, G.; Delaporte, P.

    2014-07-07

    Simultaneous two-beam laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) was carried out for various inter-beam separations, analyzing both the resulting printing outcomes and the corresponding liquid transfer dynamics. In a first experiment, droplets of an aqueous solution were printed onto a substrate at different inter-beam distances, which proved that a significant departure from the single-beam LIFT dynamics takes places at specific separations. In the second experiment, time-resolved imaging analysis revealed the existence of significant jet-jet interactions at those separations; such interactions proceed through a dynamics that results in remarkable jet deflection for which a possible onset mechanism is proposed.

  8. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  9. Search for Laser-Induced Formation of Antihydrogen Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amoretti, M.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Ejsing, A. M.; Hangst, J. S.; Madsen, N.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L. V.; Mitchard, D.

    2006-11-24

    Antihydrogen can be synthesized by mixing antiprotons and positrons in a Penning trap environment. Here an experiment to stimulate the formation of antihydrogen in the n=11 quantum state by the introduction of light from a CO{sub 2} continuous wave laser is described. An overall upper limit of 0.8% with 90% C.L. on the laser-induced enhancement of the recombination has been found. This result strongly suggests that radiative recombination contributes negligibly to the antihydrogen formed in the experimental conditions used by the ATHENA Collaboration.

  10. Search for laser-induced formation of antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Ejsing, A M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Lodi Rizzini, E; Macrì, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Posada, L G C; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Telle, H H; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2006-11-24

    Antihydrogen can be synthesized by mixing antiprotons and positrons in a Penning trap environment. Here an experiment to stimulate the formation of antihydrogen in the n = 11 quantum state by the introduction of light from a CO2 continuous wave laser is described. An overall upper limit of 0.8% with 90% C.L. on the laser-induced enhancement of the recombination has been found. This result strongly suggests that radiative recombination contributes negligibly to the antihydrogen formed in the experimental conditions used by the ATHENA Collaboration.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the secondary cataract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, N. A.; Larionov, P. M.; Rozhin, I. A.; Druzhinin, I. B.; Chernykh, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    Excitation-emission matrices of laser-induced fluorescence of lens capsule epithelium, the lens nucleus, and the lens capsule are investigated. A solid-state laser in combination with an optical parametric generator tunable in the range from 210 to 350 nm was used for excitation of fluorescence. The spectra of fluorescence of all three types of tissues exhibit typical features that are specific to them and drastically differ from one another. This effect can be used for intrasurgical control of presence of residual lens capsule epithelium cells in the capsular bag after surgical treatment of a cataract.

  12. Laser-induced backward transfer of nanoimprinted polymer elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinaeugle, Matthias; Heath, Daniel J.; Mills, Benjamin; Grant-Jacob, James A.; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Eason, Robert W.

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced backward transfer of transparent photopolymers is demonstrated in the solid state, assisted by a digital micromirror spatial light modulator for producing shaped deposits. Through use of an absorbing silicon carrier substrate, we have been able to successfully transfer solid-phase material, with lateral dimensions as small as ~6 µm. In addition, a carrier of silicon incorporating a photonic waveguide relief structure enables the transfer of imprinted deposits that have been accomplished with surface features exactly complementing those present on the substrate, with an observed minimum feature size of 140 nm.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence of biochemical for UV LIDAR application.

    PubMed

    Gupta, L; Sharma, R C; Razdan, A K; Maini, A K

    2014-05-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the ultraviolet regime has been used for the detection of biochemical through a fiber coupled CCD detector from a distance of 2 m. The effect of concentration and laser excitation energy on the fluorescence spectra of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been investigated. The signature fluorescence peak of NADH was centred about 460 nm. At lower concentration Raman peak centred at 405 nm was also observed. The origin of this peak has been discussed. Detection limit with the proposed set up is found to be 1 ppm. PMID:24337816

  14. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in paintings and sculptures research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzyński, A.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Marczak, J.

    2007-07-01

    Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for investigation of chemical constitution and stratigraphy of artworks, and metallic objects with multilayer structures is described in the paper. Physical phenomena accompanying LIBS investigations, especially temporal evolution and spectral lines broadening are described. Operational characteristics of experimental equipment are shown. Results obtained with use of two different echelle spectrometers are compared. Pigments used in oil paintings are analyzed and analysis results are presented. Experimental results of measurements of various objects like paintings, sculptures and artifacts are shown. Works on dating of investigated paintings are described.

  15. Laser-induced shock waves effects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.; Shafer, B.P.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the effects of pressure pulses on materials is presented with an orientation toward laser-induced shock wave effects in biological tissue. The behavior is first discussed for small amplitudes, namely sound waves, since many important features in this region are also applicable at large amplitudes. The generation of pressure pulses by lasers is discussed along with amplitudes. The origin and characteristic properties of shock waves are discussed along with the different types of effects they can produce. The hydrodynamic code techniques required for shock wave calculations are discussed along with the necessary empirical data base and methods for generating that data base. 7 refs., 15 figs.

  16. High time resolution laser induced fluorescence in pulsed argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Biloiu, Ioana A.; Sun Xuan; Scime, Earl E.

    2006-10-15

    A submillisecond time resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method for obtaining the temporal evolution of the ion velocity distribution function in pulsed argon plasma is presented. A basic LIF system that employs a continuous laser wave pumping and lock-in aided detection of the subsequent fluorescence radiation is modified by addition of a high frequency acousto-optic modulator to provide measurements of the ion flow velocity and ion temperature in a helicon generated pulsed argon plasma with temporal resolutions as high as 30 {mu}s.

  17. Laser-Induced Underwater Plasma And Its Spectroscopic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lazic, Violeta

    2008-09-23

    Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for analysis of immersed solid and soft materials, and for liquid impurities are described. A method for improving the LIBS signal underwater and for obtaining quantitative analyses in presence of strong shot-to-shot variations of the plasma properties is proposed. Dynamic of the gas bubble formed by the laser pulse is also discussed, together with its importance in Double-Pulse (DP) laser excitation. Results of the studies relative to an application of multi-pulse sequence and its effects on the plasma and gas bubble formation are also presented.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of combustion chemistry intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) can measure the trace (often free radical) species encountered as intermediates in combustion chemistry; OH, CS, NH, NS, and NCO are typical of the species detected in flames by LIF. Attention is given to illustrative experiments designed to accumulate a quantitative data base for LIF detection in low pressure flow systems and flames, as well as to flame measurements conducted with a view to the detection of new chemical intermediaries that may deepen insight into the chemistry of combustion.

  19. Laser-induced micro-jetting from armored droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, J. O.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2015-07-01

    We present findings from an experimental study of laser-induced cavitation within a liquid drop coated with a granular material, commonly referred to as "armored droplets" or "liquid marbles." The cavitation event follows the formation of plasma after a nanosecond laser pulse. Using ultra-high-speed imaging up to 320,610 fps, we investigate the extremely rapid dynamics following the cavitation, which manifests itself in the form of a plethora of micro-jets emanating simultaneously from the spaces between particles on the surface of the drop. These fine jets break up into droplets with a relatively narrow diameter range, on the order of 10 μm.

  20. Progress in fieldable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2012-06-01

    In recent years there has been great progress in the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technology field. Significant advances have been made both in fundamental and applied research as well as in data processing/chemometrics. Improvements in components, most notably lasers/optics and spectrometers are enabling the development of new devices that are suitable for field use. These new commercial devices recently released to the marketplace, as well as ones currently under development, are bringing the potential of LIBS for CBRNE threat analysis into real-world applications.

  1. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Dr. Karel; Hrdlicka, A; Malina, R; Hartl, M; Kizek, R; Adam, V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  2. Transscleral contact retinal photocoagulation with an 810-nm semiconductor diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, T.; Fuller, T.; Vukich, J.A.; Lam, T.T.; Joondeph, B.C.; Ticho, B.; Blair, N.P.; Edward, D.P. )

    1990-07-01

    Since the 810-nm wavelength has marked transmissibility through the sclera and absorption by melanin, it would be ideal for transscleral photocoagulation. We performed experiments to determine if consistent transscleral chorioretinal lesions could be produced in Dutch belted pigmented rabbits using the 810-nm laser, and if this modality caused less blood-retinal barrier disruption than retinal cryopexy of clinically equivalent treatment areas. The laser applications produced whitish to grayish-white retinal lesions when the surgeon, under direct visualization, used low powers and long durations (5 to 10 seconds), and controlled the treatment duration. Histopathologic evaluation of a lesion demonstrated an intact sclera overlying the chorioretinal lesion. Vitreous protein concentration, which was measured to assess blood-retinal barrier disruption, was significantly less in eyes treated with transscleral photocoagulation than in eyes treated with cryopexy of clinically equivalent treatment areas. We conclude that transscleral 810-nm laser treatment may be a viable clinical alternative to retinal cryopexy.

  3. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high.

  4. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Say, Emil Anthony T

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high. PMID:27625880

  5. Comparison of light-induced and laser-induced fluorescence methods for the detection and quantification of enamel demineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masatoshi; Analoui, Mostafa; Schemehorn, Bruce R.; Stookey, George K.

    1999-05-01

    The Quantitative Laser-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) technique has been sued for diagnosis of early caries in permanent teeth (PT). The objective of this study was to determine the caries quantification ability of QLF in deciduous teeth (DT). Sixty sound teeth, thirty DT and thirty PT, were used. All teeth were cleaned to remove debris and equally divided into three groups. Lesions were created in small windows (0.8x2.0 mm2) on buccal or labial surface for 48, 72, and 96 hr. Lesion images were made with a 488 nm argon laser (QLF I) and then with a 370 +/- 80 nm violet-blue light (QLF II). Both images were analyzed to determine the mean percent change in fluorescence radiance (ΔF). A center section from the lesions was taken for analysis with microradiography. The lesion depth and loss of mineral content were determined. The correlations between ΔF and lesion depth as well as ΔZ in DT were 0.76 and 0.84 with QLF I, 0.81 and 0.88 with QLF II, respectively. It can be concluded the ability of QLF to quantify white-spots in DT is better than in PT.

  6. Neuroprotectin D1 Attenuates Laser-induced Choroidal Neovascularization in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Kristopher G.; Zhou, Yongdong; Ertel, Monica K.; Knott, Eric J.; Regan, Cornelius E.; Elison, Jasmine R.; Gordon, William C.; Gjorstrup, Per

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1), a stereospecific derivative of docosahexaenoic acid, on choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in a laser-induced mouse model. Specifically, this was assessed by clinically grading laser-induced lesions, measuring leakage area, and volumetrically quantifying vascular endothelial cell proliferation. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were treated with vehicle control or NPD1, and choroidal neovascularization was induced by laser rupture of Bruch's membrane; treatment was administered throughout the first week of recovery. One and two weeks after CNV induction, fundus fluorescein angiography was performed. Angiograms were clinically graded to assess leakage severity, while leakage area was measured by image analysis of angiograms. Proliferation of vascular endothelial cells was evaluated volumetrically by three-dimensional laser confocal immunofluorescent microscopy of cytoskeletal, nuclear, and endothelial cell markers. Results At seven days after CNV induction, NPD1-treated mice had 60% fewer clinically relevant lesions than controls, dropping to 80% fewer by 14 days. NPD1 mice exhibited 25% smaller leakage area than controls at 7 days and 44% smaller area at 14 days. Volumetric immunofluorescence revealed 46% less vascular endothelial cell volume in 7-day NPD1-treated mice than in 7-day controls, and by 14 days NPD1 treatment was 68% lower than controls. Furthermore, comparison of 7- and 14-day volumes of NPD1-treated mice revealed a 50% reduction at 14 days. Conclusions NPD1 significantly inhibits choroidal neovascularization. There are at least two possible mechanisms that could explain the neuroprotective action of NPD1. Ultimately, nuclear factor-κB could be inhibited with a reduction in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) to reduce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and/or activation of the resolution phase of the inflammatory response/survival pathways could be upregulated. Moreover, NPD1 continues to be

  7. Dynamical behavior of laser-induced nanoparticles during remote processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Tobias; Dickmann, Klaus; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Laser remote processing is used in a wide field of industrial applications. Among other things, it is characterized by flexible beam guidance in combination with high processing velocities. But in most cases process gas support in the interaction zone is omitted. Consequently, interaction mechanism between the vapor plume and the incident laser radiation can dynamically affect the process stability. Referring to remote welding with high brilliant laser sources having a wavelength around 1 μm, the interaction between the incident laser radiation and formed particles plays an important role. The presented work shows results of the investigation of the laser-induced particle formation during the laser welding of stainless steel with a 2 kW fiber laser under remote conditions. It is therefore concentrated on the dynamical behavior of the laser-induced particle formation and the dependence of the particle formation on the laser beam power. TEM images of formed particles were analyzed. In addition, the radiation of a LED was directed through the vapor plume. On the one hand, the dynamic of the attenuation was considered. On the other hand, the Rayleigh approximation was used in order to evaluate the detected signals.

  8. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffin, V. L.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from 1 Sep. 1989 to 28 Feb. 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe in supercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  9. Laser-induced nuclear magnetic resonance splitting in hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ikäläinen, Suvi; Lantto, Perttu; Manninen, Pekka; Vaara, Juha

    2008-09-28

    Irradiation of matter with circularly polarized light (CPL) shifts all nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lines. The phenomenon arises from the second-order interaction of the electron cloud with the optical field, combined with the orbital hyperfine interaction. The shift occurs in opposite directions for right and left CPL, and rapid switching between them will split the resonance lines into two. We present ab initio and density functional theory predictions of laser-induced NMR splittings for hydrocarbon systems with different sizes: ethene, benzene, coronene, fullerene, and circumcoronene. Due to the computationally challenging nature of the effect, traditional basis sets could not be used for the larger systems. A novel method for generating basis sets, mathematical completeness optimization, was employed. As expected, the magnitude of the spectral splitting increases with the laser beam frequency and polarizability of the system. Massive amplification of the effect is also observed close to the optical excitation energies. A much larger laser-induced splitting is found for the largest of the present molecules than for the previously investigated noble gas atoms or small molecules. The laser intensity required for experimental detection of the effect is discussed.

  10. Laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voumard, Pierre; Zenobi, Renato

    1995-10-01

    A complete study on the energy partitioning upon laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces was undertaken. The measurements include characterization of the aniline-quartz adsorption system using temperature-programmed desorption, the extrapolation of quasiequilibrium desorption temperatures to the regime of laser heating rates on the order of 109-1010 K/s by computational means, measurement of the kinetic energy distributions of desorbing aniline using a pump-probe method, and the determination of internal energies with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. The measurements are compared to calculations of the surface temperature rise and the resulting desorption rates, based on a finite-difference mathematical description of pulsed laser heating. While the surface temperature of laser-heated silica reaches about 600-700 K at the time of desorption, the translational temperature of laser-desorbed aniline was measured to be Tkin=420±60 K, Tvib was 360±60 K, and Trot was 350±100 K. These results are discussed using different models for laser-induced thermal desorption from surfaces.

  11. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  12. Nanorod Surface Plasmon Enhancement of Laser-Induced Ultrafast Demagnetization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haitian; Hajisalem, Ghazal; Steeves, Geoffrey M; Gordon, Reuven; Choi, Byoung C

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser-induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films were measured using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser in a pump-probe magneto-optic Kerr effect setup. The effect of plasmon resonance on the transient magnetization was investigated by drop-coating the ferromagnetic films with dimensionally-tuned gold nanorods supporting longitudinal surface plasmon resonance near the central wavelength of the pump laser. With ~4% nanorod areal coverage, we observe a >50% increase in demagnetization signal in nanorod-coated samples at pump fluences on the order of 0.1 mJ/cm(2) due to surface plasmon-mediated localized electric-field enhancement, an effect which becomes more significant at higher laser fluences. We were able to qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations using finite-difference time-domain simulations and mean-field theory. This dramatic enhancement of ultrafast laser-induced demagnetization points to possible applications of nanorod-coated thin films in heat-assisted magnetic recording. PMID:26515296

  13. Analytical application of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikechi, Noureddine; Markushin, Yuri

    2015-05-01

    We report on significant advantages provided by femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for analytical applications in fields as diverse as protein characterization and material science. We compare the results of a femto- and nanosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of dual-elemental pellets in terms of the shot-to-shot variations of the neutral/ionic emission line intensities. This study is complemented by a numerical model based on two-dimensional random close packing of disks in an enclosed geometry. In addition, we show that LIBS can be used to obtain quantitative identification of the hydrogen composition of bio-macromolecules in a heavy water solution. Finally, we show that simultaneous multi-elemental particle assay analysis combined with LIBS can significantly improve macromolecule detectability up to near single molecule per particle efficiency. Research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (0630388), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NX09AU90A). Our gratitude to Dr. D. Connolly, Fox Chase Cancer Center.

  14. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 7th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1976-06-01

    The Seventh ERDA-ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, on 29-31 July 1975. These Symposia are held as part of the activities in ASTM Subcommittee II on Lasers and Laser Materials, which is charged with the responsibilities of formulating standards and test procedures for laser materials, components, and devices. The Chairman of Subcommittee II is Haynes Lee, of Owens-Illinois, Inc. Co-chairmen for the Damage Symposia are Arthur Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory and Alexander J. Glass of Law-rence Livermore Laboratory. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard forty-five papers on topics relating fabrication procedures to laser induced damage in optical materials; on metal mirrors; in ir window materials; the multipulse, wavelength, and pulse length dependence of damage thresholds; damage in dielectric films and at exposed surfaces; as well as theoretical discussions on avalanche ionization and multiphoton processes of importance at shorter wavelengths. Of particular importance were the scaling relations developed from several parametric studies relating fundamental properties (refractive index, surface roughness etc.) to the damage threshold. This year many of the extrinsic influences tending to reduce a materials damage resistance were isolated such that measures of their egregious nature could be quantified. Much still needs to be accomplished to improve processing and fabrication procedures to allow a measurable approach to a materials intrinsic strength to be demonstrated.

  15. Microwave assisted laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljanen, Jan; Sun, Zhiwei; Alwahabi, Zeyad T.

    2016-04-01

    Signal enhancements in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using external microwave power are demonstrated in ambient air. Pulsed microwave at 2.45 GHz and of 1 millisecond duration was delivered via a simple near field applicator (NFA), with which an external electric field is generated and coupled into laser induced plasma. The external microwave power can significantly increase the signal lifetime from a few microseconds to hundreds of microseconds, resulting in a great enhancement on LIBS signals with the use of a long integration time. The dependence of signal enhancement on laser energy and microwave power is experimentally assessed. With the assistance of microwave source, a significant enhancement of ~ 100 was achieved at relatively low laser energy that is only slightly above the ablation threshold. A limit of detection (LOD) of 8.1 ppm was estimated for copper detection in Cu/Al2O3 solid samples. This LOD corresponds to a 93-fold improvement compared with conventional single-pulse LIBS. Additionally, in the microwave assisted LIBS, the self-reversal effect was greatly reduced, which is beneficial in measuring elements of high concentration. Temporal measurements have been performed and the results revealed the evolution of the emission process in microwave-enhanced LIBS. The optimal position of the NFA related to the ablation point has also been investigated.

  16. Nanorod Surface Plasmon Enhancement of Laser-Induced Ultrafast Demagnetization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haitian; Hajisalem, Ghazal; Steeves, Geoffrey M.; Gordon, Reuven; Choi, Byoung C.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser-induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films were measured using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser in a pump-probe magneto-optic Kerr effect setup. The effect of plasmon resonance on the transient magnetization was investigated by drop-coating the ferromagnetic films with dimensionally-tuned gold nanorods supporting longitudinal surface plasmon resonance near the central wavelength of the pump laser. With ~4% nanorod areal coverage, we observe a >50% increase in demagnetization signal in nanorod-coated samples at pump fluences on the order of 0.1 mJ/cm2 due to surface plasmon-mediated localized electric-field enhancement, an effect which becomes more significant at higher laser fluences. We were able to qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations using finite-difference time-domain simulations and mean-field theory. This dramatic enhancement of ultrafast laser-induced demagnetization points to possible applications of nanorod-coated thin films in heat-assisted magnetic recording. PMID:26515296

  17. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  18. A model for traumatic brain injury using laser induced shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selfridge, A.; Preece, D.; Gomez, V.; Shi, L. Z.; Berns, M. W.

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a major treatment challenge in both civilian and military medicine; on the cellular level, its mechanisms are poorly understood. As a method to study the dysfunctional repair mechanisms following injury, laser induced shock waves (LIS) are a useful way to create highly precise, well characterized mechanical forces. We present a simple model for TBI using laser induced shock waves as a model for damage. Our objective is to develop an understanding of the processes responsible for neuronal death, the ways in which we can manipulate these processes to improve cell survival and repair, and the importance of these processes at different levels of biological organization. The physics of shock wave creation has been modeled and can be used to calculate forces acting on individual neurons. By ensuring that the impulse is in the same regime as that occurring in practical TBI, the LIS model can ensure that in vitro conditions and damage are similar to those experienced in TBI. This model will allow for the study of the biochemical response of neurons to mechanical stresses, and can be combined with microfluidic systems for cell growth in order to better isolate areas of damage.

  19. Laser-induced nucleation of carbon dioxide bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ward, Martin R; Jamieson, William J; Leckey, Claire A; Alexander, Andrew J

    2015-04-14

    A detailed experimental study of laser-induced nucleation (LIN) of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubbles is presented. Water and aqueous sucrose solutions supersaturated with CO2 were exposed to single nanosecond pulses (5 ns, 532 nm, 2.4-14.5 MW cm(-2)) and femtosecond pulses (110 fs, 800 nm, 0.028-11 GW cm(-2)) of laser light. No bubbles were observed with the femtosecond pulses, even at high peak power densities (11 GW cm(-2)). For the nanosecond pulses, the number of bubbles produced per pulse showed a quadratic dependence on laser power, with a distinct power threshold below which no bubbles were observed. The number of bubbles observed increases linearly with sucrose concentration. It was found that filtering of solutions reduces the number of bubbles significantly. Although the femtosecond pulses have higher peak power densities than the nanosecond pulses, they have lower energy densities per pulse. A simple model for LIN of CO2 is presented, based on heating of nanoparticles to produce vapor bubbles that must expand to reach a critical bubble radius to continue growth. The results suggest that non-photochemical laser-induced nucleation of crystals could also be caused by heating of nanoparticles.

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  1. [Identification of invoice based on laser-induced photoluminescence spectrum].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Yang, Yong; Tian, Yong-hong

    2011-12-01

    The rapid identification of invoice authenticity was studied based on laser-induced photoluminescence spectrum. First, the spectral curves of eighty invoice samples were obtained by laser-induced photoluminescence detection system, and genetic algorithm (GA) was applied to fit and separate overlapped spectral region between 566 and 669 nm by three Gaussian peaks. Spectral feature parameters extracted by GA were employed as the inputs of BP neural networks, and then an identification model was built. One hundred and four data were converted to 13 Gaussian parameters, and for authentic and false invoices the coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.99789 and 0.99683 and the relative standard deviations (RSD) were 0.017052 and 0.022362, respectively. It was showed that Gaussian fitting algorithm could not only simplify the parameters of models, but also improve the explanation of analysis models. Through comparison analysis of the results, it was found that the model, whose thirteen feature parameters and two evaluated parameters were all applied as BP inputs, was the best, and the corrected identification rates of sixty calibration samples and twenty validation samples were both 100%. So the identification method studied in the present research played a good role in the classification and identification, and offered a new approach to the rapid identification of invoice authenticity. PMID:22295788

  2. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 6th ASTM Symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1975-03-01

    The Sixth ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado on 22-23 May 1974. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard thirty-one papers on topics relating to laser induced damage in crystalline and nonlinear optical materials, at dielectric surfaces, and in thin film coatings as well as discussions of damage problems in the ir region due both to cw and pulsed irradiation. In addition, several reports on the theoretical analysis of laser-materials interaction relative to the damage progress were given, along with tabulations of fundamental materials properties of importance in evaluation of optical material response to high-power laser radiation. Attention was given to high-power laser system design considerations that relate to improved system performance and reliability when various damage mechanisms are operable in such systems. A workshop on the machining of optics was held, and nine papers on various facets of the topic were presented dealing with machining procedures, surface characterization of machined elements, coating of machined components, and the polishing and damage resistance of polished, coated, and bare metal reflectors. PMID:20134954

  3. Evaluation of laser-induced thin-layer removal by using shadowgraphy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabasović, M. S.; Šević, D.; Lukač, N.; Jezeršek, M.; Možina, J.; Gregorčič, P.

    2016-03-01

    Shadow photography and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are studied as methods for monitoring the selective removal of thin (i.e., under 100 μm) layers by laser ablation. We used a laser pulse of 5 ns and 16 mJ at 1064 nm to ablate an 18-μm-thin copper layer from the fiberglass substrate. On the basis of shadowgraphs of the laser-induced shock waves, we measured the optodynamic energy-conversion efficiency, defined as the ratio between the mechanical energy of the shock wave and the excitation-pulse energy. Our results show that this efficiency is significantly higher for the laser pulse-copper interaction than for the interaction between the excitation pulse and the substrate. LIBS was simultaneously employed in our experimental setup. The optical emission from the plasma plume was collected by using a spectrograph and recorded with a streak camera. We show that advancing of laser ablation through the copper layer and reaching of the substrate can be estimated by tracking the spectral region between 370 and 500 nm. Therefore, the presented results confirm that LIBS method enables an on-line monitoring needed for selective removal of thin layers by laser.

  4. Detection of trace phosphorus in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Wang, H.; Xie, Z. Q.; Gao, Y.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2009-05-01

    Monitoring of light-element concentration in steel is very important for quality assurance in the steel industry. In this work, detection in open air of trace phosphorus (P) in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) combined with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been investigated. An optical parametric oscillator wavelength-tunable laser was used to resonantly excite the P atoms within plasma plumes generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. A set of steel samples with P concentrations from 3.9 to 720 parts in 10{sup 6}(ppm) were analyzed using LIBS-LIF at wavelengths of 253.40 and 253.56 nm for resonant excitation of P atoms and fluorescence lines at wavelengths of 213.55 and 213.62 nm. The calibration curves were measured to determine the limit of detection for P in steel, which is estimated to be around 0.7 ppm. The results demonstrate the potential of LIBS-LIF to meet the requirements for on-line analyses in open air in the steel industry.

  5. Determination of phosphorus in steel by the combined technique of laser induced breakdown spectrometry with laser induced fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Naoya; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-09-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) combined with laser induced fluorescence spectrometry (LIFS) has been applied for detection of trace-level phosphorus in steel. The plasma induced by irradiation of Nd:YAG laser pulse for ablation was illuminated by the 3rd harmonic of Ti:Sapphire laser tuned to one of the resonant lines for phosphorus in the wavelength region of 253-256 nm. An excitation line for phosphorus was selected to give the highest signal-to-noise ratio. Fluorescence signals, P213.62 and P214.91 nm, were observed with high selectivity at the contents as low as several tens µg g - 1 . Fluorescence intensities were in a good linear correlation with the contents. Fluorescence intensity ratio of a collisionally assisted line (213.62 nm) to a direct transition line (214.91 nm) was discussed in terms of the analytical conditions and experimental results were compared with a calculation based on rate equations. Since the fluorescence signal light in the wavelength range longer than 200 nm can be transmitted relatively easily, even through fiber optics of moderate length, LIBS/LIFS would be a versatile technique in on-site applications for the monitoring of phosphorus contents in steel.

  6. Detection of trace phosphorus in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Shen, X K; Wang, H; Xie, Z Q; Gao, Y; Ling, H; Lu, Y F

    2009-05-01

    Monitoring of light-element concentration in steel is very important for quality assurance in the steel industry. In this work, detection in open air of trace phosphorus (P) in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) combined with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been investigated. An optical parametric oscillator wavelength-tunable laser was used to resonantly excite the P atoms within plasma plumes generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. A set of steel samples with P concentrations from 3.9 to 720 parts in 10(6) (ppm) were analyzed using LIBS-LIF at wavelengths of 253.40 and 253.56 nm for resonant excitation of P atoms and fluorescence lines at wavelengths of 213.55 and 213.62 nm. The calibration curves were measured to determine the limit of detection for P in steel, which is estimated to be around 0.7 ppm. The results demonstrate the potential of LIBS-LIF to meet the requirements for on-line analyses in open air in the steel industry. PMID:19412215

  7. Hybrid retinal tracking and coagulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Cameron H. G.; Oberg, Erik D.; Barrett, Steven F.

    1998-06-01

    Laser photocoagulation is used extensively by ophthalmologists to treat retinal disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal breaks and tears. Currently, the procedure is performed manually and suffers from several drawbacks: it often requires many clinical visits, it is very tedious for both patient and physician, the laser pointing accuracy and safety margin are limited by a combination of the physician's manual dexterity and the patient's ability to hold their eye still, and there is a wide variability in retinal tissue absorption parameters. A computer-assisted hybrid system is under development that will rapidly and safely place multiple therapeutic lesions at desired locations on the retina in a matter of seconds. In the past, one of the main obstacles to such a system has been the ability to track the retina and compensate for any movement with sufficient speed during photocoagulation. Two different tracking modalities (digital image-based tracking and analog confocal tracking) were designed and tested in vivo on pigmented rabbits. These two systems are being seamlessly combined into a hybrid system which provides real-time, motion stabilized lesion placement for typical irradiation times (100 ms). This paper will detail the operation of the hybrid system and efforts toward controlling the depth of coagulation on the retinal surface.

  8. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  9. Dynamics of retinal photocoagulation and rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Brown, Jefferson; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    In laser retinal photocoagulation, short (<20 ms) pulses have been found to reduce thermal damage to the inner retina, decrease treatment time, and minimize pain. However, the safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of power for producing a rupture to that of mild coagulation) decreases with shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of retinal heating and maximize the therapeutic window, a computational model of millisecond retinal photocoagulation and rupture was developed. Optical attenuation of 532-nm laser light in ocular tissues was measured, including retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) pigmentation and cell-size variability. Threshold powers for vaporization and RPE damage were measured with pulse durations ranging from 1 to 200 ms. A finite element model of retinal heating inferred that vaporization (rupture) takes place at 180-190°C. RPE damage was accurately described by the Arrhenius model with activation energy of 340 kJ/mol. Computed photocoagulation lesion width increased logarithmically with pulse duration, in agreement with histological findings. The model will allow for the optimization of beam parameters to increase the width of the therapeutic window for short exposures.

  10. Exosomes derived from MSCs ameliorate retinal laser injury partially by inhibition of MCP-1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bo; Shao, Hui; Su, Chang; Jiang, Yuanfeng; Chen, Xiteng; Bai, Lingling; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qiutang; Zhang, Xiaomin; Li, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Although accumulated evidence supports the notion that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) act in a paracrine manner, the mechanisms are still not fully understood. Recently, MSC-derived exosomes (MSC-Exos), a type of microvesicle released from MSCs, were thought to carry functional proteins and RNAs to recipient cells and play therapeutic roles. In the present study, we intravitreally injected MSCs derived from either mouse adipose tissue or human umbilical cord, and their exosomes to observe and compare their functions in a mouse model of laser-induced retinal injury. We found that both MSCs and their exosomes reduced damage, inhibited apoptosis, and suppressed inflammatory responses to obtain better visual function to nearly the same extent in vivo. Obvious down-regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in the retina was found after MSC-Exos injection. In vitro, MSC-Exos also down-regulated MCP-1 mRNA expression in primarily cultured retinal cells after thermal injury. It was further demonstrated that intravitreal injection of an MCP-1-neutralizing antibody promoted the recovery of retinal laser injury, whereas the therapeutic effect of exosomes was abolished when MSC-Exos and MCP-1 were administrated simultaneously. Collectively, these results suggest that MSC-Exos ameliorate laser-induced retinal injury partially through down-regulation of MCP-1. PMID:27686625

  11. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies. PMID:27020758

  12. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  13. Laser-induced plasma generation and evolution in a transient spray.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Tsuboi, Kazuya; Tomita, Eiji

    2014-01-13

    The behaviors of laser-induced plasma and fuel spray were investigated by visualizing images with an ultra-high-speed camera. Time-series images of laser-induced plasma in a transient spray were visualized using a high-speed color camera. The effects of a shockwave generated from the laser-induced plasma on the evaporated spray behavior were investigated. The interaction between a single droplet and the laser-induced plasma was investigated using a single droplet levitated by an ultrasonic levitator. Two main conclusions were drawn from these experiments: (1) the fuel droplets in the spray were dispersed by the shockwave generated from the laser-induced plasma; and (2) the plasma position may have shifted due to breakdown of the droplet surface and the lens effect of droplets.

  14. Retinal hemorrhages in newborn.

    PubMed

    Govind, A; Kumari, S; Lath, N K

    1989-02-01

    Two hundred and fifty eight newborn babies were studied for the presence of retinal hemorrhages between 1-3 days of birth. The overall incidence of retinal hemorrhages was found to be 18.9%. It was observed that the incidence of retinal hemorrhages was higher in unassisted vaginal deliveries than in assisted births. Also, a two fold higher incidence was noted in term infants as compared to preterm babies. No association was seen with birth asphyxia.

  15. Laser-induced thermal bubbles for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Jian, Aoqun; Zhang, Xuming; Wang, Yu; Li, Zhaohui; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2011-04-01

    We present a unique bubble generation technique in microfluidic chips using continuous-wave laser-induced heat and demonstrate its application by creating micro-valves and micro-pumps. In this work, efficient generation of thermal bubbles of controllable sizes has been achieved using different geometries of chromium pads immersed in various types of fluid. Effective blocking of microfluidic channels (cross-section 500 × 40 μm(2)) and direct pumping of fluid at a flow rate of 7.2-28.8 μl h(-1) with selectable direction have also been demonstrated. A particular advantage of this technique is that it allows the generation of bubbles at almost any location in the microchannel and thus enables microfluidic control at any point of interest. It can be readily integrated into lab-on-a-chip systems to improve functionality.

  16. Laser-induced microbubble poration of localized single cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qihui; Hu, Wenqi; Ohta, Aaron T

    2014-05-01

    Laser-induced microbubbles were used to porate the cell membranes of localized single NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Microsecond laser pulses were focused on an optically absorbent substrate, creating a vapour microbubble that oscillated in size at the laser focal point in a fluidic chamber. The shear stress accompanying the bubble size oscillation was able to porate nearby cells. Cell poration was demonstrated with the delivery of FITC-dextran dye with various molecular weights. Under optimal poration conditions, the cell poration efficiency was up to 95.2 ± 4.8%, while maintaining 97.6 ± 2.4% cell viability. The poration system is able to target a single cell without disturbing surrounding cells. PMID:24632785

  17. Evaluating Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekry, O.; El-Batanouny, M. H.; El-Begawy, M. B.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), is an excellent tool for trace elemental analysis, was exploited for a detecting concentrations of calcium and magnesium in malignant tissues before and after PDT. Calcium and magnesium concentrations are known tobe high in malignancy. Tissues were injected with methylene blue photosensitizer with concentrations 0.5%, 1% and 2%. Two different light sources were used with two different energy densities/each light sources. The results showed a decrease in tissue elements content after PDT application for both calcium and magnesium compared to before PDT application as shown in the tissue spectral lines' intensities which has been reflected in. Type of light source showed no effect on tissue elements content which showed slight differences among the different energy densities. It has been shown that LIBS technique can be adopted method to monitor tumor photodynamic therapy applications.

  18. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneve, L.; Diamanti, A.; Grimaldi, F.; Palleschi, G.; Spizzichino, V.; Valentini, F.

    2010-08-01

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  19. Trigonometric pulse envelopes for laser-induced quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, I.; Lasser, C.

    2009-12-01

    We relate powers of trigonometric functions to Gaussians by proving that properly truncated cosn functions converge to a Gaussian as n tends to infinity. For an application, we analyse the laser-induced population transfer |X1Σ+rang → |A1Πxrang in a two-level model system of aluminium monochloride (AlCl) with fixed nuclei. We apply linearly x-polarized ultraviolet laser pulses with a trigonometric envelope function, whose square has full width at half-maximum of 2.5 fs and 5.0 fs. Studying population dynamics and optimized laser parameters, we find that the optimal field amplitude for trigonometric pulses with n = 20 and n = 1000 has a relative difference of 1%, which is below experimental resolution.

  20. Laser-induced stress transients: applications for molecular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flotte, Thomas J.; Lee, Shun; Zhang, Hong; McAuliffe, Daniel J.; Douki, Tina; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    1995-05-01

    Lasers can be used to enhance the delivery of a number of molecules. Other investigators have demonstrated local release of molecules from liposomes following laser irradiation, microbeam disruption of the cell membrane to increase cell transport, microbeam ablation of the zona pellucida surrounding the ovum to increase the chances of fertilization, and increased transcutaneous transport following ablation of the stratum corneum. Our experiments have shown that laser-induced stress transients can be utilized as a vector for intracellular delivery of molecules that may or may not normally cross the cell membrane. These two conditions have been tested with Photofrin and DNA. This technology may have applications in cell and molecular biology, cancer therapy, gene therapy, and others.

  1. Laser-induced modification of transparent crystals and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakova, N M; Stoian, Razvan; Rosenfeld, A

    2010-12-29

    We analyse the processes taking place in transparent crystals and glasses irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses in the regimes typical of various applications in optoelectronics and photonics. We consider some phenomena, which have been previously described by the authors within the different model representations: charging of the dielectric surface due to electron photoemission resulting in a Coulomb explosion; crater shaping by using an adaptive control of the laser pulse shape; optimisation of the waveguide writing in materials strongly resistant to laser-induced compaction under ordinary irradiation conditions. The developed models and analysis of the processes relying on these models include the elements of the solid-state physics, plasma physics, thermodynamics, theory of elasticity and plasticity. Some important experimental observations which require explanations and adequate description are summarised. (photonics and nanotechnology)

  2. Laser induced fluorescence applied to turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The saturated fluorescence method makes use of the great simplifications which occur when under conditions of intense radiation the excitation process becomes saturated. A description is presented of the saturated fluorescence method, taking into account rate equations and saturation, radiative transfer, the two-level system, a multilevel system, and measurements under saturation conditions. The detectability limits of the method are investigated. Fluorescence trapping is found to place an upper limit on the number density of the fluorescing species that can be measured without signal loss. Turbulence places time and spatial constraints on the measurements, but otherwise poses no difficulties. Saturated laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy appears to be a most promising method for measuring species concentrations in flames.

  3. Laser-induced photo-thermal magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, David A.; Lin, Yuting; Luk, Alex; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2012-08-01

    Due to the strong scattering nature of biological tissue, optical imaging beyond the diffusion limit suffers from low spatial resolution. In this letter, we present an imaging technique, laser-induced photo-thermal magnetic imaging (PMI), which uses laser illumination to induce temperature increase in a medium and magnetic resonance imaging to map the spatially varying temperature, which is proportional to absorbed energy. This technique can provide high-resolution images of optical absorption and can potentially be used for small animal as well as breast cancer and lymph node imaging. First, we describe the theory of PMI, including the modeling of light propagation and heat transfer in tissue. We also present experimental data with corresponding predictions from theoretical models, which show excellent agreement.

  4. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  5. Picosecond laser-induced water condensation in a cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Du, Shengzhe; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-01

    We investigated water condensation in a laboratory cloud chamber induced by picosecond (ps) laser pulses at ~350 ps (800 nm/1-1000 Hz) with a maximum peak power of ~25 MW. The peak power was much lower than the critical power for self-focusing in air (~3-10 GW depending on the pulse duration). Sparks, airflow and snow formation were observed under different laser energies or repetition rates. It was found that weaker ps laser pulses can also induce water condensation by exploding and breaking down ice crystals and/or water droplets into tiny particles although there was no formation of laser filament. These tiny particles would grow until precipitation in a super-saturation zone due to laser-induced airflow in a cold region with a large temperature gradient.

  6. Laser-induced vibration of a thin soap film.

    PubMed

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-09-21

    We report on the vibration of a thin soap film based on the optical radiation pressure force. The modulated low power laser induces a counter gravity flow in a vertical free-standing draining film. The thickness of the soap film is then higher in the upper region than in the lower region of the film. Moreover, the lifetime of the film is dramatically increased by a factor of 2. Since the laser beam only acts mechanically on the film interfaces, such a film can be employed in an optofluidic diaphragm pump, the interfaces behaving like a vibrating membrane and the liquid in-between being the fluid to be pumped. Such a pump could then be used in delicate micro-equipment, in chips where temperature variations are detrimental and even in biological systems. PMID:25017934

  7. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for elemental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Loree, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, or LIBS, is a laser-based form of atomic emission spectroscopy that can be used for the in-situ elemental analysis of coal gasifier product streams. At this point, LIBS has been deployed in three gasifier field tests, and C, H, O, N, Na, K, S, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Pb, Se, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Li, and Mn were qualitatively detected in the various product streams. In laboratory experiments on quantitative detection, a detection limit of 4 ppB was demonstrated for sodium. The long-range goal of this program is add the trace elements As, B, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn to the detection list, and to develop the capability of quantitative detection in real time for the trace elements. 4 figures.

  8. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  9. Terahertz generation in multiple laser-induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-K.; Kim, Jae Hun; Yang, C.-E.; Yin, Stuart Shizhuo; Hui Rongqing; Ruffin, Paul

    2008-12-08

    An investigation of the terahertz wave generation in multiple laser-induced air plasmas is presented. First, it is demonstrated that the intensity of the terahertz wave increases as the number of air plasmas increases. Second, the physical mechanism of this enhancement effect of the terahertz generation is studied by quantitatively measuring the intensity of the generated terahertz wave as a function of phase difference between adjacent air plasmas. It is found out that the superposition is the main mechanism to cause this enhancement. Thus, the results obtained in this paper not only provide a technique to generate stronger terahertz wave but also enable a better understanding of the mechanism of the terahertz generation in air plasma.

  10. Laser-induced jet formation in liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, Frederik; Arnold, Craig

    2014-11-01

    The absorption of a focused laser pulse in a liquid film generates a cavitation bubble on which a narrow jet can form. This is the basis of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a versatile printing technique that offers an alternative to inkjet printing. We study the influence of the fluid properties and laser pulse energy on jet formation using numerical simulations and time-resolved imaging. At low energies, surface tension causes the jet to retract without transferring a drop, and at high energies, the bubble breaks up into a splashing spray. We explore the parameter space of Weber number, Ohnesorge number, and ratio of film thickness to maximum bubble radius, revealing regions where uniform drops are transferred.

  11. Hydroxylapatite nanoparticles obtained by fiber laser-induced fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; Comesaña, R.; Pou, J.

    2009-03-01

    This work presents the results of laser-induced fragmentation of hydroxylapatite microparticles in water dissolution. Calcined fish bones in form of powder, which were previously milled to achieve microsized particles, were used as precursor material. Two different laser sources were employed to reduce the size of the suspended particles: a pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a Ytterbium doped fiber laser working in continuous wave mode. The morphology as well as the composition of the obtained particles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HRTEM). The results show that nanometric particles of hydroxylapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate as small as 10 nm diameter can be obtained.

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cip, Ondrej; Buchta, Zdenek; Lesundak, Adam; Randula, Antonin; Mikel, Bretislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverkova, Lenka

    2014-03-01

    The recent effort leads to reliable imaging techniques which can help to a surgeon during operations. The fluorescence spectroscopy was selected as very useful online in vivo imaging method to organics and biological materials analysis. The presented work scopes to a laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to detect tissue local necrosis in small intestine surgery. In first experiments, we tested tissue auto-fluorescence technique but a signal-to-noise ratio didn't express significant results. Then we applied a contrast dye - IndoCyanine Green (ICG) which absorbs and emits wavelengths in the near IR. We arranged the pilot experimental setup based on highly coherent extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) used for stimulating of some critical areas of the small intestine tissue with injected ICG dye. We demonstrated the distribution of the ICG exciter with the first file of shots of small intestine tissue of a rabbit that was captured by high sensitivity fluorescent cam.

  13. Elemental Analysis of Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Mohammed Ashraf; Dastageer, Mohamed A.

    The chemical and elemental composition of soil is very complex as it contains many constituents like minerals, organic matters, living organisms, fossils, air and water. Considering the diversity of soil contents, quality and usability, a systematic scientific study on the elemental and chemical composition of soil is very important. In order to study the chemical composition of soil, Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied recently. The important features of LIBS system and its applications for the measurement of nutrients in green house soil, on-line monitoring of remediation process of chromium polluted soil, determination of trace elements in volcanic erupted soil samples collected from ancient cenozoic lava eruption sites and detection of toxic metals in Gulf war oil spill contaminated soil using LIBS are described in this chapter.

  14. Combined Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography and Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Utzinger, Urs

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are promising modalities for tissue characterization in human patients and animal models. OCT detects coherently backscattered light, whereas LIF detects fluorescence emission of endogenous biochemicals, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), collagen, and fluorescent proteins, or exogenous substances such as cyanine dyes. Given the complementary mechanisms of contrast for OCT and LIF, the combination of the two modalities could potentially provide more sensitive and specific detection of disease than either modality alone. Sample probes for both OCT and LIF can be implemented using small diameter optical fibers, suggesting a particular synergy for endoscopic applications. In this chapter, the mechanisms of contrast and diagnostic capability for both OCT and LIF are briefly examined. Evidence of complementary capability is described. Example published combined OCT-LIF systems are reviewed, one successful commercial instrument is discussed, and example applications are provided.

  15. Microfabrication of Fresnel zone plates by laser induced solid ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa R. M.; Thomas, John; Santhosh, Chidangil; Ramachandran, Hema; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    A novel and simple single-step method of inscribing optical elements on metal-coated transparent substrates is demonstrated. Laser induced solid ablation (LISA) demands very low laser energies (nJ), as can be amply provided by a femtosecond laser oscillator. Here, LISA is used to write Fresnel zone plates on indium and tungsten coated glass. With up to 100 zones, remarkable agreement is obtained between measured and expected values of the focal length. LISA has enabled attainment of focal spot sizes that are 38% smaller than what would be obtained using conventional lenses of the same numerical aperture. The simplicity with which a high degree of automation can readily be achieved using LISA makes this cost-effective method amenable to a wide variety of applications related to microfabrication of optical elements.

  16. Laser-induced damage thresholds of starched PMMA waveplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melninkaitis, A.; Mikšys, D.; Maciulevičius, M.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Šlekys, G.; Samoylov, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is a versatile polymeric material that is well suited for fabrication of many commercial optical components: lenses, fibers, windows, phase waveplates and others. Our focus is achromatic zero-order waveplates made of anisotropic PMMA which can be used to modify the state of polarization of electromagnetic radiation. Such waveplates have a broad range of application in devices where polarized radiation is used. For example, when tunable lasers are used or when spectropolarimetric measurements are performed, one needs an achromatic waveplate providing a specific retardation in a wide wavelength range. Herewith anisotropic properties of PMMA subjected to one-axis stretching are analyzed and the technology for manufacturing such achromatic and super-achromatic, one-axis-stretched PMMA waveplates is described. This technology excludes any mechanical processing of waveplate component surfaces. Technical characteristics of achromatic and super-achromatic waveplates manufactured of PMMA including results of laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) measurements are discussed below.

  17. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy expands into industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Reinhard; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Brunk, Markus; Connemann, Sven; Meinhardt, Christoph; Scharun, Michael; Sturm, Volker; Makowe, Joachim; Gehlen, Christoph

    This paper presents R&D activities in the field of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for industrial applications and shows novel LIBS systems running in routine operation for inline process control tasks. Starting with a comparison of the typical characteristics of LIBS with XRF and spark-discharge optical emission spectrometry, the principal structure of LIBS machines embedded for inline process monitoring will be presented. A systematic requirement analysis for LIBS systems following Ishikawa's scheme was worked out. Stability issues are studied for laser sources and Paschen-Runge spectrometers as key components for industrial LIBS systems. Examples of industrial applications range from handheld LIBS systems using a fiber laser source, via a set of LIBS machines for inline process control tasks, such as scrap analysis, coal analysis, liquid slag analysis and finally monitoring of drill dust.

  18. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  19. Picosecond laser-induced water condensation in a cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Du, Shengzhe; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-01

    We investigated water condensation in a laboratory cloud chamber induced by picosecond (ps) laser pulses at ~350 ps (800 nm/1-1000 Hz) with a maximum peak power of ~25 MW. The peak power was much lower than the critical power for self-focusing in air (~3-10 GW depending on the pulse duration). Sparks, airflow and snow formation were observed under different laser energies or repetition rates. It was found that weaker ps laser pulses can also induce water condensation by exploding and breaking down ice crystals and/or water droplets into tiny particles although there was no formation of laser filament. These tiny particles would grow until precipitation in a super-saturation zone due to laser-induced airflow in a cold region with a large temperature gradient. PMID:27607654

  20. Microfabrication of polystyrene microbead arrays by laser induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla-Papavlu, Alexandra; Dinca, Valentina; Paraico, Iurie; Moldovan, Antoniu; Shaw-Stewart, James; Schneider, Christof W.; Kovacs, Eugenia; Lippert, Thomas; Dinescu, Maria

    2010-08-01

    In this study we describe a simple method to fabricate microarrays of polystyrene microbeads (PS-μbeads) on Thermanox coverslip surfaces using laser induced forward transfer (LIFT). A triazene polymer layer which acts as a dynamic release layer and propels the closely packed microspheres on the receiving substrate was used for this approach. The deposited features were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Ultrasonication was used to test the adherence of the transferred beads. In addition, the laser ejection of the PS-μbead pixels was investigated by time resolved shadowgraphy. It was found that stable PS-μbeads micropatterns without any specific immobilization process could be realized by LIFT. These results highlight the increasing role of LIFT in the development of biomaterials, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  1. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek K; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K; Thakur, Surya N; Rai, Pradeep K; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  2. Laser-induced vibration of a thin soap film.

    PubMed

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-09-21

    We report on the vibration of a thin soap film based on the optical radiation pressure force. The modulated low power laser induces a counter gravity flow in a vertical free-standing draining film. The thickness of the soap film is then higher in the upper region than in the lower region of the film. Moreover, the lifetime of the film is dramatically increased by a factor of 2. Since the laser beam only acts mechanically on the film interfaces, such a film can be employed in an optofluidic diaphragm pump, the interfaces behaving like a vibrating membrane and the liquid in-between being the fluid to be pumped. Such a pump could then be used in delicate micro-equipment, in chips where temperature variations are detrimental and even in biological systems.

  3. Application of the method of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateeva, Natalia L.; Matvienko, Gennadii G.

    2004-02-01

    Great attention is now paid to ecology of the environment, in whic plants are of great importance. However the present methods of biophysical analysis of plant states are very labor-intensive and require a lot of time. The structure of protein-pigment complexes is known to break in different dissolvents that results in the shift of maxima of chlorophyll absorption and fluorescence bands. That is why development of methods for remote diagnostics of plants is of great scientific and practical interest. They would make it possible to determine species and state of plants rather quickly and accurately. We have developed a setup and methods for optical diagnostics of the physiological state of plants to investigate the dynamics of the fastest part of fluorescence of plants in vivo. The method of laser-induced fluorescence makes it possible to observe the level of vegetative development of living plants, as well as their state under the impact of some stress factors.

  4. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the discrimination of Candida strains.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, S; Ugena, L; Tornero-Lopéz, J; Martín, H; Molina, M; Camacho, J J; Cáceres, J O

    2016-08-01

    The present study reports the evaluation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Neural Networks (NN) for the discrimination of different strains of various species of Candida. This genus of yeast was selected due to its medical relevance as it is commonly found in cases of fungal infection in humans. Twenty one strains belonging to seven species of Candida were included in the study. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) was employed as a complementary technique to provide information about elemental composition of Candida cells. The use of LIBS spectra in combination with optimized NN models provided reliable discrimination among the distinct Candida strains with a high spectral correlation index for the samples analyzed, without any false positive or false negative. Therefore, this study indicates that LIBS-NN based methodology has the potential to be used as fast fungal identification or even diagnostic method.

  5. Elemental analysis of urinary calculi by laser induced plasma spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao; Ahmad, S Rafi; Mayo, Mike; Iqbal, Syed

    2005-12-01

    Laser induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) has been applied to analyse and identify elemental constituents of urinary calculi. Measurements on seven different urinary stone samples were conducted and the concentrations of some key elemental species were estimated. The elements detected with the present system were: Calcium, Magnesium, Sodium, Samarium, Potassium and Lead. Absolute concentrations of the species were derived from pre-calibration of the system for each element. Their concentrations were found to be widely different in different samples. It was observed that the samples containing a significant amount of lead have large proportion of calcium. It has been established that LIPS would allow real time clinic measurements of elemental contents and the concentrations in the biomaterials without sample preparation. The technique has the potential for routine clinic applications in urological disorder diagnosis.

  6. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vivek K.; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K.; Thakur, Surya N.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  7. Pulsed UV laser induced desorption of ions from aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David Paul; Helvajian, Henry

    2000-04-01

    A study of pulsed UV laser induced desorption (LID) has been performed on an Al(111) sample. The positive ion desorption was investigated at low laser fluence, in a regime in which the ion yield exhibits a highly non-linear dependence on the laser fluence. The peak of the kinetic energy distribution of the desorbed ions has been measured to be about 15 eV. This result is consistent with the conjecture that the ion departing the metal surface can acquire a kinetic energy kick from a process associated with plasmon annihilation. The Al + ion kinetic energy peak is asymmetric and about 3 eV full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). This experiment indicates that plasmon excitation can play a significant role in laser stimulated desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET).

  8. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xianqian Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang; Zhong, Fachun

    2015-02-16

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  9. OH Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence from Microgravity Droplet Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael; Wegge, Jason; Kang, Kyung-Tae

    1997-01-01

    Droplet combustion under microgravity conditions has been extensively studied, but laser diagnostics have just begun to be employed in microgravity droplet experiments. This is due in part to the level of difficulty associated with laser system size, power and economic availability. Hydroxyl radical (OH) is an important product of combustion, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has proved to be an adequate and sensitive tool to measure OH. In this study, a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser and a doubled dye laser, compact and reliable enough to perform OH PLIF experiments aboard a parabolic flight-path aircraft, has been developed and successfully demonstrated in a methanol droplet flame experiment. Application to microgravity conditions is planned aboard parabolic flight-path aircraft.

  10. Radioactive contamination screening with laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sheely, R.; Di Benedetto, J.

    1994-06-01

    The ability to induce, detect and discriminate fluorescence of uranium oxides makes available new capabilities for screening the surface of large complex facilities for uranium. This paper will present the results of field tests evaluate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) as a contamination screening tool and report on the progress to produce a field portable instrument for uranium surveys on exposed surfaces. The principal effect is to illuminate the surface of an object or an area with a remotely-located light source, and to evaluate the re-radiated emission energy. A gated intensified CCD camera was used with ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation to discriminate the phosphorescent (persistent) green uranium emission from the prompt background fluorescence which results from excitation of plants, concrete, soils, and other background materials.

  11. Laser induced fluorescence as a diagnostic tool integrated into a scanning fiber endoscope for mouse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher M.; Maggio-Price, Lillian; Seibel, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) technology has shown promise as a minimally invasive optical imaging tool. To date, it is capable of capturing full-color 500-line images, at 15 Hz frame rate in vivo, as a 1.6 mm diameter endoscope. The SFE uses a singlemode optical fiber actuated at mechanical resonance to scan a light spot over tissue while backscattered or fluorescent light at each pixel is detected in time series using several multimode optical fibers. We are extending the capability of the SFE from a RGB reflectance imaging device to a diagnostic tool by imaging laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in tissue, allowing for correlation of endogenous fluorescence to tissue state. Design of the SFE for diagnostic imaging is guided by a comparison of single point spectra acquired from an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) model to tissue histology evaluated by a pathologist. LIF spectra were acquired by illuminating tissue with a 405 nm light source and detecting intrinsic fluorescence with a multimode optical fiber. The IBD model used in this study was mdr1a-/- mice, where IBD was modulated by infection with Helicobacter bilis. IBD lesions in the mouse model ranged from mild to marked hyperplasia and dysplasia, from the distal colon to the cecum. A principle components analysis (PCA) was conducted on single point spectra of control and IBD tissue. PCA allowed for differentiation between healthy and dysplastic tissue, indicating that emission wavelengths from 620 - 650 nm were best able to differentiate diseased tissue and inflammation from normal healthy tissue.

  12. Biological effects of laser-induced stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, A.; Lee, S.; McAuliffe, D.

    1995-12-31

    Laser-induced stress waves can be generated by one of the following mechanisms: Optical breakdown, ablation or rapid heating of an absorbing medium. These three modes of laser interaction with matter allow the investigation of cellular and tissue responses to stress waves with different characteristics and under different conditions. The most widely studied phenomena are those of the collateral damage seen in photodisruption in the eye and in 193 run ablation of cornea and skin. On the other hand, the therapeutic application of laser-induced stress waves has been limited to the disruption of noncellular material such as renal stones, atheromatous plaque and vitreous strands. The effects of stress waves to cells and tissues can be quite disparate. Stress waves can fracture tissue, damage cells, and increase the permeability of the plasma membrane. The viability of cell cultures exposed to stress waves increases with the peak stress and the number of pulses applied. The rise time of the stress wave also influences the degree of cell injury. In fact, cell viability, as measured by thymidine incorporation, correlates better with the stress gradient than peak stress. Recent studies have also established that stress waves induce a transient increase of the permeability of the plasma membrane in vitro. In addition, if the stress gradient is below the damage threshhold, the cells remain viable. Thus, stress waves can be useful as a means of drug delivery, increasing the intracellular drug concentration and allowing the use of drugs which are impermeable to the cell membrane. The present studies show that it is important to create controllable stress waves. The wavelength tunability and the micropulse structure of the free electron laser is ideal for generating stress waves with independently adjustable parameters, such as rise time, duration and peak stress.

  13. Discriminating crude oil grades using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hussein, A.; Marzouk, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of crude oil using laser-based analytical techniques such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has become of great interest to various specialists in different fields such as geology, petro-chemistry and environmental science. In this work, a detailed study is presented wherein the implementation of an efficient and simple LIBS technique to identify the elemental constituents of crude oil and to distinguish between different grades of petroleum crude oil is discussed. Laser-induced plasma (LIP) technique has been used in this work for direct measurements of atomic, ionic and molecular species in dry crude oil samples with API gravities ranging between 18 and 36. The technique was implemented using the first harmonic of a pulsed Nd-YAG laser source. Atomic and molecular emission bands were observed, consisting of characteristic spectral lines of atoms and diatomic molecular bands, namely from C, H, Si, Na, Ca, Mg, AL, Fe, Ti, Mo, C2 and CN. The intensities of high-resolution spectral lines for some atoms and molecules of elements such as Ca, Na, Fe, Mo, C2 and CN were evaluated at different wavelengths along the obtained spectra. The molecular bands and the elemental spectral lines were used to assess the possibility of adopting the LIBS technique in differentiating between crude oil samples with different American Petroleum Institute (API) gravity values. The results indicate the presence of a distinct correlation between the API gravity values of the various oil samples and the spectral line intensities of the elements and some molecular radical constituents. In addition, the possibility of identifying the API gravity values of unknown oil samples is also indicated.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence of the CH2CFO radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furubayashi, Masashi; Bridier, Isabelle; Inomata, Satoshi; Washida, Nobuaki; Yamashita, Koichi

    1997-04-01

    A new laser-induced fluorescence spectrum has been observed in the region of 307-335 nm. Since this spectrum is observed when reacting oxygen atoms with CH2CHF, or CH2CF2, or CH2CFCl and also by photolysis of CH3CFO, the fluorescing molecule is the CH2CFO (fluoroformyl methyl) radical. From an analysis of the laser-induced single vibronic level fluorescence, some of the vibrational frequencies can be assigned for the ground electronic state ν3=1724 cm-1 (C-O stretch), ν5=1211 cm-1 (C-F stretch), ν6=906 cm-1 (CH2 rock), ν7=847 cm-1 (C-C stretch), ν8=584 cm-1 (FCO bend), and ν9=416 cm-1 (CCO bend), for the excited state ν3=1790, ν5=1253, ν6=911, ν7=874, ν8=537, and ν9=421 cm-1. Ab initio calculations on the CH2CFO radical give a planar geometry with vibrational frequencies that are consistent with the observed fundamental frequencies. The vibrational frequencies show that the structure of the ground state is closer to fluoroformyl methyl (ṡCH2CFO) rather than a vinoxy-type (CH2=CFOṡ) radical. The collision-free radiative lifetimes of the excited state are 49-81 ns depending on excitation energy and vibrational modes. Strong predissociation is observed above v=1, especially in the ν3' mode.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence of the CD2CFO radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Furubayashi, Masashi; Imamura, Takashi; Washida, Nobuaki; Yamaguchi, Makoto

    1999-10-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence spectrum of the B˜ 2A″→X˜2A″ transition of the CD2CFO radical has been observed in the region 316-335 nm. The radical was produced by 193 nm photolysis or by fluorine atom reaction with acetyl-d3 fluoride. The spectrum of CD2CFO was similar to that of CH2CFO reported previously except for small isotope shifts in the range 7-343 cm-1. The isotope shifts support the assignment of these spectra to fluorinated vinoxy radicals, and rule out the alternate assignment to FCO proposed by others. The X˜→B˜ electronic transition energy (T0) for CD2CFO was measured to be 29 867 cm-1, which is only 7 cm-1 lower than that for CH2CFO. From an analysis of the laser-induced single vibronic level fluorescence, some of the vibrational frequencies can be assigned for the ground electronic state; ν3(CO str.)=1735; ν4(CD2 sciss.)=1043; ν5 (CF str.)=1248; ν6(CD2 rock.)=774; ν7(CC str.)=863; ν8(CCF bend)=597; and ν9(CCO bend)=370 cm-1. For the B˜ 2A″ state, ν3=1772; ν4=1073; ν5=1241; ν6=783; ν7=827; ν8=530; and ν9=370 cm-1. These assignments are supported by ab initio calculations. Among these fundamental frequencies, the ν4 and ν6 modes showed the largest isotope shifts, although isotope effects were observed in all the above vibrational fundamentals. The radiative lifetimes of the excited CD2CFO and the quantum yield of formation of the CH2CFO radical from photolysis of CH3CFO at 193 nm are also reported.

  16. Experimental Studies of Laser-Induced Breakdown in Transparent Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W

    2003-09-23

    The mechanisms by which transparent dielectrics damage when exposed to high power laser radiation has been of scientific and technological interest since the invention of the laser. In this work, a set of three experiments are presented which provide insight into the damage initiation mechanisms and the processes involved in laser-induced damage. Using an OPO (optical parametric oscillator) laser, we have measured the damage thresholds of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) from the near ultraviolet into the visible. Distinct steps, whose width is of order K{sub b}T, are observed in the damage threshold at photon energies associated with the number of photons (3{yields}2 or 4{yields}3) needed to promote a ground state electron across the energy gap. The wavelength dependence of the damage threshold suggests that a primary mechanism for damage initiation in DKDP is a multi-photon process in which the order is reduced through excited defect state absorption. In-situ fluorescence microscopy, in conjunction with theoretical calculations by Liu et al., has been used to establish that hydrogen displacement defects are potentially responsible for the reduction in the multi-photon cross-section. During the damage process, the material absorbs energy from the laser pulse and produces an ionized region that gives rise to broadband emission. By performing a time-resolved investigation of this emission, we demonstrate both that it is blackbody in nature, and we provide the first direct measurement of the localized temperature during and following laser damage initiation for various optical materials. For excitation using nanosecond laser pulses, the plasma, when confined in the bulk, is in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. These results allow for a detailed characterization of temperature, pressure, and electron densities occurring during laser-induced damage.

  17. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2} to the 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2}-5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  18. [Morphologic aspects of therapy-resistant cytomegalovirus retinitis].

    PubMed

    Meyer, P; Bernauer, W; Daicker, B; Zimmerli, W; Rüttimann, S

    1992-05-01

    Intravenous ganciclovir treatment was performed in eight male AIDS patients with primary unilateral CMV-retinitis. Three patients developed slowly progressive CMV-retinitis in the fellow eye despite adequate dose of ganciclovir. These different CMV-manifestations are shown in a sequence of fundus pictures. Three types of CMV-lesions were observed in connection with this study. Untreated central lesions showed the aspect of crumbled cheese and ketchup. Untreated lesions in the peripherie were yellowish-white, granular, "dry" and showed in most cases no haemorrhages. Lesions appearing during treatment showed initially "dry" white opaque subretinal areas, turning later on to the typical aspect of untreated lesions. The progression could not be stopped by highdose ganciclovir i.v. and thus bilateral blindness resulted after 12 to 22 months. The level of CD4-lymphocytes in the blood was diminished in all patients, but much more in patients with progressive disease. PMID:1319528

  19. Formation of carbon nanotubes: In situ optical analysis using laser-induced incandescence and laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Trétout, B.; Cochon, J.-L.; Foutel-Richard, A.; Loiseau, A.; Krüger, V.; Tsurikov, M.; Scott, C. D.

    2010-04-01

    Gas-phase production of carbon nanotubes in presence of a metal catalyst with a continuous wave CO2 laser is investigated by combining coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and laser-induced incandescence (LII). These in situ techniques provide a unique investigation of the different transformation processes of the primarily carbon and metal vapors issued from the vaporization of the target by the laser and the temperature at which these processes occur. Continuous-wave laser provides with stable continuous vaporization conditions very well suited for such in situ investigations. Temperature profiles inside the reactor are known from CARS measurements and flow calculations. Carbon soot, density, and size of carbon aggregates are determined by LII measurements. LIF measurements are used to study the gas phases, namely, C2 and C3 radicals which are the very first steps of carbon recombination, and metal catalysts gas phase. Spectral investigations allow us to discriminate the signal from each species by selecting the correct pair of excitation/detection wavelengths. Spatial distributions of the different species are measured as a function of target composition and temperature. The comparison of LIF and LII signals allow us to correlate the spatial evolution of gas and soot in the scope of the different steps of the nanotube growth already proposed in the literature and to identify the impact of the chemical nature of the catalyst on carbon condensation and nanotube nucleation. Our study presents the first direct evidence of the nanotube onset and that the nucleation proceeds from a dissolution-segregation process from metal particles as assumed in the well-known vapor-liquid-solid model. Comparison of different catalysts reveals that this process is strongly favored when Ni is present.

  20. Bone Marrow Transplantation Transfers Age-Related Susceptibility to Neovascular Remodeling in Murine Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G.; Malek, Goldis; Mettu, Priyatham S.; Caicedo, Alejandro; Saloupis, Peter; Gach, Sarah; Dunnon, Askia K.; Hu, Peng; Spiga, Maria-Grazia; Cousins, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Neovascular remodeling (NVR), the progression of small capillaries into large-caliber arterioles with perivascular fibrosis, represents a major therapeutic challenge in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Neovascular remodeling occurs after laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in aged but not young mice. Additionally, bone marrow–derived cells, including macrophages, endothelial precursor cells, and mesenchymal precursor cells, contribute to CNV severity. In this study, we investigated the impact of aged bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on the degree of fibrosis, size, and vascular morphology of CNV lesions in a mouse model of laser-induced CNV. Methods. Young (2 months) and old (16 months) mice were transplanted with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled bone marrow isolated from either young or old donors. Laser CNV was induced 1 month following transplant, and eyes were analyzed via choroidal flat mounts and immunohistochemistry 1 month postlaser. The identity of cells infiltrating CNV lesions was determined using specific markers for the labeled transplanted cells (GFP+), macrophages (F4/80+), perivascular mesenchymal-derived cells (smooth muscle actin, SMA+), and endothelial cells (CD31+). Results. Bone marrow transplantation from aged mice transferred susceptibility to NVR into young recipients. Inversely, transplantation of young marrow into old mice prevented NVR, preserving small size and minimal fibrosis. Mice with NVR demonstrated a greater relative contribution of marrow-derived SMA+ perivascular mesenchymal cells as compared to other cells. Conclusions. Our findings indicate that the status of bone marrow is an important determining factor of neovascular severity. Furthermore, we find that perivascular mesenchymal cells, rather than endothelial cells, derived from aged bone marrow may contribute to increased CNV severity in this murine model of experimental neovascularization. PMID:24135751

  1. Laser-induced damage in biological tissue: Role of complex and dynamic optical properties of the medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Elharith M.

    Since its invention in the early 1960's, the laser has been used as a tool for surgical, therapeutic, and diagnostic purposes. To achieve maximum effectiveness with the greatest margin of safety it is important to understand the mechanisms of light propagation through tissue and how that light affects living cells. Lasers with novel output characteristics for medical and military applications are too often implemented prior to proper evaluation with respect to tissue optical properties and human safety. Therefore, advances in computational models that describe light propagation and the cellular responses to laser exposure, without the use of animal models, are of considerable interest. Here, a physics-based laser-tissue interaction model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal temperature and pressure rise during laser exposure to biological tissues. Our new model also takes into account the dynamic nature of tissue optical properties and their impact on the induced temperature and pressure profiles. The laser-induced retinal damage is attributed to the formation of microbubbles formed around melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the damage mechanism is assumed to be photo-thermal. Selective absorption by melanin creates these bubbles that expand and collapse around melanosomes, destroying cell membranes and killing cells. The Finite Element (FE) approach taken provides suitable ground for modeling localized pigment absorption which leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution within pigmented cells following laser pulse exposure. These hot-spots are sources for localized thermo-elastic stresses which lead to rapid localized expansions that manifest themselves as microbubbles and lead to microcavitations. Model predictions for the interaction of lasers at wavelengths of 193, 694, 532, 590, 1314, 1540, 2000, and 2940 nm with biological tissues were generated and comparisons were made with available experimental data for the retina

  2. Modern retinal laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Igor; Luttrull, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal lasers are a standard source of light to produce retinal tissue photocoagulation to treat retinovascular disease. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were large randomized clinical trials that have shown beneficial effect of retinal laser photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy and have dictated the standard of care for decades. However, current treatment protocols undergo modifications. Types of lasers used in treatment of retinal diseases include argon, diode, dye and multicolor lasers, micropulse lasers and lasers for photodynamic therapy. Delivery systems include contact lens slit-lamp laser delivery, indirect ophthalmocope based laser photocoagulation and camera based navigated retinal photocoagulation with retinal eye-tracking. Selective targeted photocoagulation could be a future alternative to panretinal photocoagulation. PMID:25892934

  3. Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barefield Il, James E; Clegg, Samuel M; Le, Loan A; Lopez, Leon N

    2010-01-01

    In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements

  4. In Vitro Effect of Laser-Induced Hydrodynamics on Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Elagin, V V; Pavlikov, A I; Yusupov, V I; Shirmanova, M V; Zagaynova, E V; Bagratashvili, V N

    2015-11-01

    We studied the effect of laser-induced hydrodynamic on viability of Colo-26 murine colon carcinoma cells in vitro. Laser-induced hydrodynamics was generated by a laser (λ=1.56 μ, power 3 W, 5 min exposure); to this end, the fiber end was submersed into a buffer above the cell monolayer. It was found that laser-induced hydrodynamics destructed the monolayer at standoff distances of between the working end of the laser fiber to cell monolayer of 1 and 5 mm and triggers apoptotic and necrotic death in remaining cells at a distance of 4 mm from the emitter.

  5. Accidental human laser retinal injuries from military laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuck, Bruce E.; Zwick, Harry; Molchany, Jerome W.; Lund, David J.; Gagliano, Donald A.

    1996-04-01

    The time course of the ophthalmoscopic and functional consequences of eight human laser accident cases from military laser systems is described. All patients reported subjective vision loss with ophthalmoscopic evidence of retinal alteration ranging from vitreous hemorrhage to retinal burn. Five of the cases involved single or multiple exposures to Q-switched neodymium radiation at close range whereas the other three incidents occur over large ranges. Most exposures were within 5 degrees of the foveola, yet none directly in the foveola. High contrast visual activity improved with time except in the cases with progressive retinal fibrosis between lesion sites or retinal hole formation encroaching the fovea. In one patient the visual acuity recovered from 20/60 at one week to 20/25 in four months with minimal central visual field loss. Most cases showed suppression of high and low spatial frequency contrast sensitivity. Visual field measurements were enlarged relative to ophthalmoscopic lesion size observations. Deep retinal scar formation and retinal traction were evident in two of the three cases with vitreous hemorrhage. In one patient, nerve fiber layer damage to the papillo-macular bundle was clearly evident. Visual performance measured with a pursuit tracking task revealed significant performance loss relative to normal tracking observers even in cases where acuity returned to near normal levels. These functional and performance deficits may reflect secondary effects of parafoveal laser injury.

  6. Measurements of retinal temperature increase during photodynamic therapy for choroidal neovascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongxia; Yang, Zaifu; Gu, Ying; Li, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Youquan; Zhang, Luyong; Qiu, Haixia

    2010-11-01

    To study the risk of retinal thermal injury from 532 nm laser during photodynamic therapy (PDT) for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) by measuring the retinal temperature increase of rabbit eyes. A microthermocouple technique was developed to measure retinal temperature increase during PDT in pigmented and non-pigmented rabbit eyes. The 532 nm laser exposures were performed with 100-s duration, 2-mm spot size, and retinal irradiance ranging from 400 to 1600 mW/cm2. A K-type microthermocouple was inserted through the sclerotomy and advanced until the tip reached the retina at the posterior pole. The thermocouple was connected a computer that recorded and analyzed retinal temperature data. The results showed that the retinal temperature increase during laser exposure was proportional to retinal irradiance with a particular spot diameter, exposure duration, wavelength, and fundus pigmentation. And the measured retinal temperature increases in pigmented rabbits were a little higher than those in albino rabbits under the same radiant condition. Retinal threshold irradiance required for visible lesions at laser wavelength of 532 nm with 2.0-mm spot size and 100-s duration was 1657 mW/cm2 in albino and 1003 mW/cm2 in pigmented rabbits, respectively, corresponding to retinal temperature increase of about 8 °C and 6 °C. The measured temperatures in albino and pigmented rabbit eyes were both lower than the model predictions, especially in pigmented rabbits. Therefore, further parameter modifying should be performed to obtain accuracy prediction of retinal temperature.

  7. Visualization of plasma turbulence with laser-induced fluorescence (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, Fred M.; Trintchouk, Fedor

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence is a key factor limiting the performance of fusion devices. Plasma edge turbulence determines the boundary values of the plasma density and temperature, which in turn determine the internal gradients and controls global plasma transport. In recent years, significant progress has been made in modeling turbulence behavior in plasmas and its effect on transport. Progress has also been made in diagnostics for turbulence measurement; however, there is still a large gap in our understanding of it. An approach to improve this situation is to experimentally visualize the turbulence, that is, a high resolution 2-D image of the plasma density. Visualization of turbulence can improve the connection to theory and help validate theoretical models. One method that has been successfully developed to visualize turbulence in gases and fluids is planar laser-induced fluorescence. We have recently applied this technique to visualize turbulence and structures in a plasma. This was accomplished using an Alexandrite laser that is tunable between 700 and 800 nm, and from 350 to 400 nm with second harmonic generation. The fluorescence light from an argon ion transition has been imaged onto an intensified charged coupled device camera that is gated in synchronization with the laser. Images from the plasma show a rotating structure at 30 kHz in addition to small scale turbulence.

  8. Laser-induced incandescence measurements of particles in aeroengine exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, John D.

    1999-09-01

    Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) has been demonstrated as a non-intrusive technique for measurement of particle concentration in the exhausts of aero-engines on sea level test beds as part of a European Union collaborative program (AEROJET) aimed at replacing gas sampling rakes behind development engines with non-intrusive instrumentation. Currently emissions of CO, NOx, unburned hydrocarbon, and smoke from aero-engines must be shown to be less than internationally specified limits. Measurements are made on development engines on sea level test beds by applying a number of standard analytical methods to extracted exhaust gas samples. The hardware required for exhaust gas sampling is heavy and complex and is expensive to build and install. As a result, only the minimum number of emissions tests are conducted during an engine development program, and emissions data is only available to combustion engineers late in the program. Hence, there is a need for more versatile and less costly non-intrusive measurement techniques. Molecular species can be measured using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, while LII is a promising smoke measuring technique. The development of an LII system specifically designed for exhaust applications is described.

  9. [The Progress in Remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting-ting; Wan, Xiong; Shu, Rong; Liu, Peng-xi

    2015-07-01

    As a kind of spectroscopic technique, the remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (Remote LIBS) can measure elemental compositions of remote targets by using high-power lasers and focusing approaches. In this paper, three remote detection approaches (open path LIBS, fiber optic LIBS and compact probe fiber optic LIBS) and their system architectures are summarized and analyzed. Conventional open path LIBS, with high requirement of specifications of lasers, optical systems, spectrographs and detectors, has always been a research focus in remote testing field. Fiber optic LIBS has the advantages of simplification of optical focusing system and high collection efficiency of the plasma light. This paper reviews the progress in new techniques of LIBS, for instance Filament-LIBS techniques and LIBS combines with other spectral detection techniques, and emphatically analyzes their characteristics and advantages. These new techniques have greatly broadened the detection range of LIBS, enhanced material recognition ability of LIBS, and made a great contribution to expanding applications of remote LIBS. Latest development of applications of remote LIBS in fields of deep space exploration, hazardous material detection, pollution testing, metallurgical industries and heritage restoration is introduced in detail. With the development of laser techniques, spectral detection and calibration techniques, the detection range of remote LIBS has been expended, their application fields has been extended, and the detection precision and accuracy have been improved. PMID:26717768

  10. Laser-induced incandescence applied to dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on the laser heating of nanoparticles (diameters ≤slant 1 μm) confined in a reactive plasma by short (150 ps) and intense (˜ 63 mJ) UV (355 nm) laser pulses (laser-induced incandescence, LII). Important parameters such as the particle temperature and radius follow from analysis of the emission spectrum of the heated nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are not ideal black bodies, which is taken into account by calculating their emissivity using a light-scattering theory relevant to our conditions (Mie theory). Three sets of refractive index data from the literature serve as model input. The obtained radii range between 100 and 165 nm, depending on the choice of refractive index data set. By fitting the temperature decay of the particles to a heat exchange model, the product of their mass density and specific heat is determined as (1.3+/- 0.5) J K-1 cm-3, which is considerably smaller than the value for bulk graphite at the temperature our particles attain (3000 K): 4.8 J K-1 cm-3. The particle sizes obtained in situ with LII are compared with ex situ scanning electron microscopy analysis of collected particles. Quantitative assessment of the LII measurements is hampered by transport of particles in the plasma volume and the fact that LII probes locally, whereas the samples with collected particles have a more global character.

  11. Construction of a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Joseph; Palmer, Andria; Amos, James; Dynka, Tom; Ujj, Lazlo

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical and atomic composition of materials. The third harmonic output of a Nd:YAG Q-switched laser generating 5ns pulses with 10Hz repetition rate was used to ablate the sample and create a micro-plasma. The emission of the radiating plasma was focused into an optical fiber with 0.22 numerical aperture. The spectra was measured with an Ocean Optics micro spectrometer. A synchronized shutter was used to select single laser pulses. In order to reach the breakdown threshold of the sample using the available energy of the laser pulses (<5 mJ) a beam expander and a parabolic mirror was used for tight focusing. The optical and technical details including the characterization of the system will be presented. LIBS spectra taken from a variety of metal and organic samples show appropriate selectivity for quantitative and qualitative analysis for materials. UWF NIH MARC U-STAR 1T34GM110517-01, UWF Office of Undergraduate Research.

  12. The motional stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is the worldwide standard technique for internal magnetic field pitch angle measurements in magnetized plasmas. Traditionally, it is based on using polarimetry to measure the polarization direction of light emitted from a hydrogenic species in a neutral beam. As the beam passes through the magnetized plasma at a high velocity, in its rest frame it perceives a Lorentz electric field. This field causes the H-alpha emission to be split and polarized. A new technique under development adds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for an MSE measurement that will enable radially resolved magnetic field magnitude as well as pitch angle measurements in even low-field (<1 T) experiments. An MSE-LIF system will be installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It will enable reconstructions of the plasma pressure, q-profile and current as well as, in conjunction with the existing MSE system, measurements of radial electric fields.

  13. Analysis of human nails by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to analyze human fingernails using nanosecond laser pulses. Measurements on 45 nail samples are carried out and 14 key species are identified. The elements detected with the present system are: Al, C, Ca, Fe, H, K, Mg, N, Na, O, Si, Sr, Ti as well as CN molecule. Sixty three emission lines have been identified in the spectrum that are dominated by calcium lines. A discriminant function analysis is used to discriminate among different genders and age groups. This analysis demonstrates efficient discrimination among these groups. The mean concentration of each element is compared between different groups. Correlation between concentrations of elements in fingernails is calculated. A strong correlation is found between sodium and potassium while calcium and magnesium levels are inversely correlated. A case report on high levels of sodium and potassium in patients with hyperthyroidism is presented. It is shown that LIBS could be a promising technique for the analysis of nails and therefore identification of health problems.

  14. Development and applications of laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderwal, Randy L.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Zhou, Zhiquang; Choi, Mun Y.

    1995-01-01

    Several NASA-funded investigations focus on soot processes and radiative influences of soot in diffusion flames given their simplicity, practical significance, and potential for theoretical modeling. Among the physical parameters characterizing soot, soot volume fraction, f(sub v), a function of particle size and number density, is often of chief practical interest in these investigations, as this is the geometrical property that directly impacts radiative characteristics and the temperature field of the flame and is basic to understanding soot growth and oxidation processes. Diffusion flames, however, present a number of challenges to the determination of f(sub v) via traditional extinction measurements. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) possesses several advantages compared to line-of-sight extinction techniques for determination of f(sub v). Since LII is not a line-of-sight technique, similar to fluorescence, it possesses geometric versatility allowing spatially resolved measurements of f(sub v) in real time in nonaxisymmetric systems without using deconvolution techniques. The spatial resolution of LII is determined by the detector and imaging magnification used. Neither absorption by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) nor scattering contributes to the signal. Temporal capabilities are limited only by the laser pulse and camera gate duration, with measurements having been demonstrated with 10 ns resolution. Because of these advantages, LII should be applicable to a variety of combustion processes involving both homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. Our work has focussed on characterization of the technique as well as exploration of its capabilities and is briefly described.

  15. Resonance fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Koch, Sandra; Garen, Walter; Neu, Walter; Reuter, Rainer

    2006-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in liquids using a double-pulse Q-switched Nd:YAG laser system has provided reliable results that give trace detection limits in water. Resonant laser excitation has been added to enhance detection sensitivity. A primary laser pulse (at 532 nm), transmitted via an optical fiber, induces a cavitation bubble and shockwave at a target immersed in a 10 mg l(-1)-100 mg l(-1) indium (In) water suspension. The low-pressure rear of the shockwave induces bubble expansion and a resulting reduction in cavity pressure as it extends away from the target. Shortly before the maximum diameter is expected, a secondary laser pulse (also at 532 nm) is fed into the bubble in order to reduce quenching processes. The plasma field generated is then resonantly excited by a fiber-guided dye laser beam to increase detection selectivity. The resulting resonance fluorescence emission is optically detected and processed by an intensified optical multichannel analyzer system.

  16. Kalman filtered MR temperature imaging for laser induced thermal therapies.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, D; Yung, J; Hazle, J D; Weinberg, J S; Stafford, R J

    2012-04-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3-D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comparing predictions in these regions to the original measurements. Performance was quantitatively evaluated in terms of a dimensionless L(2) (RMS) norm of the temperature error weighted by acquisition uncertainty. During periods of no data corruption, observed error histories demonstrate that the Kalman algorithm does not alter the high quality temperature measurement provided by MR thermal imaging. The KF-MRTI implementation considered is seen to predict the bioheat transfer with RMS error < 4 for a short period of time, ∆t < 10 s, until the data corruption subsides. In its present form, the KF-MRTI method currently fails to compensate for consecutive for consecutive time periods of data loss ∆t > 10 sec.

  17. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF.

  18. Enhancing the analytical performance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, D.A.; Chinni, R.C.; Pichahchy, A.E.; Thornquist, H.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work is to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is a method of elemental analysis in which powerful laser pulses are focused on a sample to form a microplasma. LIBS is perhaps the most versatile elemental analysis method, applicable to a variety of different real-world analysis problems. Therefore, it is important to enhance the capabilities of the method as much as possible. Accomplishments include: (1) demonstration of signal enhancements of 5--30 times from soils and metals using a double pulse method; (2) development of a model of the observed enhancement obtained using double pulses; (3) demonstration that the analytical performance achievable using low laser-pulse energies (10 and 25 mJ) can match that achievable using an energy of 100 mJ; and (4) demonstration that time-gated detection is not necessary with LIBS.

  19. Dust Removal on Mars Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Anderson, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Dust coatings on the surface of Mars complicate and, if sufficiently thick, mask the spectral characteristics and compositional determination of underlying material from in situ and remote sensing instrumentation. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) portion of the Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instrument, aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, will be the first active remote sensing technique deployed on Mars able to remove dust. ChemCam utilizes a 5 ns pulsed 1067 nm high-powered laser focused to less than 400 m diameter on targets at distances up to 7 m [1,2]. With multiple laser pulses, dust and weathering coatings can be remotely analyzed and potentially removed using this technique [2,3]. A typical LIBS measurement during MSL surface operations is planned to consist of 50 laser pulses at 14 mJ, with the first 5 to 10 pulses used to analyze as well as remove any surface coating. Additionally, ChemCam's Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) is capable of resolving 200 m details at a distance of 2 m, or 1 mm at 10 m [1,4]. In this study, we report on initial laboratory experiments conducted to characterize the removal of dust coatings using similar LIBS parameters as ChemCam under Mars-like conditions. These experiments serve to better understand the removal of surface dust using LIBS and to facilitate the analysis of ChemCam LIBS spectral data and RMI images.

  20. Kalman Filtered MR Temperature Imaging for Laser Induced Thermal Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, D.; Yung, J.; Hazle, J. D.; Weinberg, J. S.; Stafford, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comparing predictions in these regions to the original measurements. Performance was quantitatively evaluated in terms of a dimensionless L2 (RMS) norm of the temperature error weighted by acquisition uncertainty. During periods of no data corruption, observed error histories demonstrate that the Kalman algorithm does not alter the high quality temperature measurement provided by MR thermal imaging. The KF-MRTI implementation considered is seen to predict the bioheat transfer with RMS error < 4 for a short period of time, Δt < 10sec, until the data corruption subsides. In its present form, the KF-MRTI method currently fails to compensate for consecutive for consecutive time periods of data loss Δt > 10sec. PMID:22203706

  1. Laser-induced-plasma-assisted ablation for glass microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Minghui; Sugioka, Koji; Wu, Ding J.; Wong, L. L.; Lu, Yongfeng; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Chong, Tow Chong

    2001-10-01

    Glass is a hard transparent material with many applications in Photonics and advanced display industries. It is a high challenge to achieve crack-free glass microfabrication due to its special material characteristics. Laser-induced-plasma- assisted ablation is applied in this study to get the high quality glass microfabrication. In this processing, the laser beam goes through the glass substrate first and then irradiates on a solid target behind. For laser fluence above ablation threshold for the target, the generated plasma flies forward at a high speed. At a small target-to-substrate distance, there are strong interactions among laser light, target plasma and glass materials at the rear side of the substrate. Light absorption characteristic at the glass substrate is modified since the plasma may soften and dope into the glass in the interaction area. To have a better understanding of this processing, signal diagnostics are carried out to study the dynamic interaction. It is found that glass microfabrication is closely related to laser fluence, target-to-substrate distance, laser spot size and laser beam scanning speed. With proper control of the processing parameters, glass surface marking patterning and cutting can be achieved. With different materials as the targets, color marking of glass substrate can be obtained.

  2. Laser-induced coloration of magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrovsky, A. L.; Naumova, I. I.

    1992-12-01

    The nonlinear absorption in LiNbO3:Mg crystals exposed to pulsed green laser radiation was studied. A brown track in LiNbO3:Mg was observed at room temperature. A dose of green light about 2 J/cm2 was necessary to reach the maximum coloration, the corresponding absorption being proportional to the square of optical power density. This absorption adds to the two-photon absorption thus increasing the total nonlinear absorption approximately by a factor of eight. The coloration can be bleached by heating (the relaxation time constant being less than a second at 100 degree(s)C) and by exposure to the visible light with small peak power density. The nonlinear absorption limits the efficiency of second harmonic generation (SHG) at room temperature. A 40 to 50% efficiency rise accompanying the temperature increase was caused by the decay of coloration. The two-photon pumping of electron traps is a plausible trigger mechanism for laser-induced coloration.

  3. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (< ~2.5 °C) in temperature at the surface of the skin, examined by both thermal camera and the Monte Carlo simulation, indicate that laser does not evoke heat-induced nociceptive sensation. In the human EEG study, brain responses to both mechanical and laser stimulation are consistent, along with subjective reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli. PMID:26047142

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with spatial heterodyne spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gornushkin, Igor B; Smith, Ben W; Panne, Ulrich; Omenetto, Nicoló

    2014-01-01

    A spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) is tested for the first time in combination with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The spectrometer is a modified version of the Michelson interferometer in which mirrors are replaced by diffraction gratings. The SHS contains no moving parts and the gratings are fixed at equal distances from the beam splitter. The main advantage is high throughput, about 200 times higher than that of dispersive spectrometers used in LIBS. This makes LIBS-SHS a promising technique for low-light standoff applications. The output signal of the SHS is an interferogram that is Fourier-transformed to retrieve the original plasma spectrum. In this proof-of-principle study, we investigate the potential of LIBS-SHS for material classification and quantitative analysis. Brass standards with broadly varying concentrations of Cu and Zn were tested. Classification via principal component analysis (PCA) shows distinct groupings of materials according to their origin. The quantification via partial least squares regression (PLS) shows good precision (relative standard deviation < 10%) and accuracy (within ± 5% of nominal concentrations). It is possible that LIBS-SHS can be developed into a portable, inexpensive, rugged instrument for field applications. PMID:25226262

  5. Oxide nanoparticles synthesis via laser-induced plasma in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Taku; Weihs, Hansel; Honda, Mitsuhiro; Kulinich, Sergei; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2014-10-01

    Laser ablation in fluids has recently attracted a lot of attention as one of synthetic techniques to prepare new attractive nanomaterials, with the ability to control both product chemistry and morphology in many systems. In this study, we generated laser-induced plasma in H2O - ethanol mixtures, while ablating metal targets to produce oxide nanoparticles and to study the effect of the medium on their properties. The ablated targets used in this study were Zn or Sn plates. A nanosecond Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength of 532 nm (10 Hz, 20--30 mJ/pulse) was applied to irradiate the targets. The liquid media were maintained at 0.1 to 30 MPa to study the effect of pressure. We found that the H2O/ethanol ratio (at atmospheric pressure) can control the properties of the produced ZnO nanoparticles, such as defects and oxidation degree. The properties were examined by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopies, and so on. More details will be presented at the symposium.

  6. Laser-induced backside wet cleaning technique for glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Tsu-Shien; Tsai, Chwan-Huei

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the laser-induced backside wet cleaning techniques for glass substrates. Two kinds of laser cleaning techniques are proposed in this study. The first involves applying an Nd:YAG laser to the backside of the substrate which is submerged in water. A metal plate is placed below the glass substrate. Most of the laser energy will be absorbed by the metal plate. The metal then vaporizes the water and generates a turbulent bubble flow. The bubble flow removes the alumina particles from the surface of the glass substrate. The second involves using a CO2 laser to generate turbulent bubble flow to remove the particles. Both methods were successfully demonstrated for the removal of submicron particles of 0.5 μm in size. The phenomena of bubble generation and diffusion are presented in the paper. Because the laser is applied to the backside of the substrate, the damage due to the laser heat can be significantly reduced. The quality and efficient of the backside processing is better than those of the front side processing. The proposed techniques have great potential to provide an improved solution for glass cleaning.

  7. Laser-Induced Incandescence Measurements in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    A low-gravity environment offers advantages to investigations concerned with soot growth or flame radiation by eliminating of buoyancy-induced convection. Basic to each type of study is knowledge of spatially resolved soot volume fraction, (f(sub v). Laser-induced incandescence (LII) has emerged as a diagnostic for soot volume fraction determination because it possesses high temporal and spatial resolution, geometric versatility and high sensitivity. Implementation and system characterization of LII in a drop tower that provides 2.2 sec of low-gravity (micro)g) at the NASA Lewis Research Center are described here. Validation of LII for soot volume fraction determination in (micro)g is performed by comparison between soot volume fraction measurements obtained by light extinction [20] and LII in low-gravity for a 50/50 mixture (by volume) of 0 acetylene/nitrogen issuing into quiescent air. Quantitative soot volume fraction measurements within other laminar flames of ethane and propane and a turbulent diffusion flame in (micro)g via LII are also demonstrated. An analysis of LII images of a turbulent acetylene diffusion flame in 1-g and (micro)g is presented.

  8. Measuring turbulent fluid dispersion using laser induced phosphorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, Dennis; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; Kunnen, Rudie; Clercx, Herman; van Heijst, Gertjan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid dispersion due to turbulence is an important subject in both natural and engineering processes, from cloud formation to turbulent mixing and liquid spray combustion. The combination of small scales and often high velocities results in few experimental techniques that can follow the course of events. We introduce a novel technique, which measures the dispersion of ``tagged'' fluid particles by means of laser-induced phosphorescence, using a solution containing a europium-based molecular complex with a relatively long phosphorescence half-life. This technique is used to measure transport processes in both the dispersion of droplets in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the dispersion of fluid of near-nozzle spray breakup processes. By tagging a small amount of droplets/fluid via laser excitation, the tagged droplets can be tracked in a Lagrangian way. The absolute dispersion of the droplets can be measured in a variety of turbulent flows. Using this technique it is shows that droplets around St =τp /τη ~ 1 (Stokes number) disperse faster than true fluid tracers in homogeneous isotropic turbulence, as well as differences between longitudinal and radial dispersion in turbulent sprays. This work is part of the research programme of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  9. Ultraviolet Laser-induced ignition of RDX single crystal.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhonghua; Zhang, Chuanchao; Liu, Wei; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Ming; Wang, Xuming; Zhou, Guorui; Tan, Bisheng; Yang, Zongwei; Li, Zhijie; Li, Li; Yan, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zu, Xiaotao

    2016-01-01

    The RDX single crystals are ignited by ultraviolet laser (355 nm, 6.4 ns) pulses. The laser-induced damage morphology consisted of two distinct regions: a core region of layered fracture and a peripheral region of stripped material surrounding the core. As laser fluence increases, the area of the whole crack region increases all the way, while both the area and depth of the core region increase firstly, and then stay stable over the laser fluence of 12 J/cm(2). The experimental details indicate the dynamics during laser ignition process. Plasma fireball of high temperature and pressure occurs firstly, followed by the micro-explosions on the (210) surface, and finally shock waves propagate through the materials to further strip materials outside and yield in-depth cracks in larger surrounding region. The plasma fireball evolves from isotropic to anisotropic under higher laser fluence resulting in the damage expansion only in lateral direction while maintaining the fixed depth. The primary insights into the interaction dynamics between laser and energetic materials can help developing the superior laser ignition technique. PMID:26847854

  10. Chemical consequences of laser-induced breakdown in molecular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babánková, Dagmar; Civiš, Svatopluk; Juha, Libor

    This article gives an account of chemical reactions initiated by laser-induced dielectric breakdown (LIDB) in homogeneous molecular gases. The systematic part of the article describes the laser-plasma-chemical behavior of simple inorganic gases and their mixtures, metal carbonyls and organometallics, and organic molecular gases. Research on LIDB-initiated chemical reactions producing well-defined fine solid particles has been triggered again recently by the advent of nanotechnologies. Laser ignition of fuel mixtures is also a well researched branch of laser-plasma chemistry because of strong commercial and military interests. However, the strongest current impulses for studying laser-spark chemistry come from planetary sciences, where laser sparks have been used as a laboratory model of high-energy-density phenomena (e.g., impact of extraterrestrial bodies, lightning) in planetary atmospheres. A single pulse from a high-power laser system was used to develop an improved method for investigating this phenomenon. The particular processes responsible for the chemical action of a laser spark are identified and described in detail by the end of the article.

  11. Evaluation of immunoglobulins in bovine colostrum using laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Z; Abdel Ghany, Sh; Harith, M A

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to exploit laser induced fluorescence (LIF) as a spectrochemical analytical technique for evaluation of immunoglobulin (IgG) in bovine colostrum. Colostrum samples were collected from different American Holstein cows at different times after calving. Four samples were gathered from each cow; the first three samples were obtained from the first three milkings (colostrum) and the fourth sample (milk) was obtained a week after calving. It has been demonstrated that LIF can be used as a simple, fast, sensitive and less costly spectrochemical analytical technique for qualitative estimation of IgG in colostrum. LIF results have been confirmed via the quantitative evaluation of IgG in the same samples adopting the single radial immunodiffusion conventional technique and a very good agreement has been obtained. Through LIF it was possible to evaluate bovine colostrum after different milking times and to differentiate qualitatively between colostrum from different animals which may reflect their general health status. A fluorescence linear calibration curve for IgG concentrations from 0 up to 120 g L(-1) has been obtained. In addition, it is feasible to adopt this technique for in situ measurements, i.e. in dairy cattle farms as a simple and fast method for evaluation of IgG in bovine colostrum instead of using lengthy and complicated conventional techniques in laboratories. PMID:25127559

  12. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, Uğur; Çakır, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique.

  13. Optofluidic tunable lenses using laser-induced thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingming; Jian, Aoqun; Li, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xuming

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a new design of optofluidic tunable lens using a laser-induced thermal gradient. It makes use of two straight chromium strips at the bottom of the microfluidic chamber to absorb the continuous pump laser to heat up the moving benzyl alcohol solution, creating a 2D refractive index gradient in the entrance part between the two hot strips. This design can be regarded as a cascade of a series of refractive lenses, and is distinctively different from the reported liquid lenses that mimic the refractive lens design and the 1D gradient index lens design. CFD simulation shows that a stable thermal lens can be built up within 200 ms. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the continuous tuning of focal length from initially infinite to the minimum 1.3 mm, as well as the off-axis focusing by offsetting the pump laser spot. Data analyses show the empirical dependences of the focal length on the pump laser intensity and the flow velocity. Compared with previous studies, this tunable lens design enjoys many merits, such as fast tuning speed, aberration-free focusing, remote control, and enabling the use of homogeneous fluids for easy integration with other optofluidic systems. PMID:26584422

  14. Laser-induced acoustic emissions in experimental dental composites.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Lin, C T; Keh, E S; Pan, L C; Huang, H M; Shih, Y H; Cheng, H C

    2000-07-01

    A laser thermoacoustic technique was innovated to evaluate laser-induced acoustic emissions (AEs) in experimental dental composites aged with 75% ethanol solution. Experimental composite systems of 75/25 BisGMA/TEGDMA resin filled with 0, 12.6, 30.0, and 56.5 vol% of 8-microm silanized and unsilanized BaSiO6 were analyzed. The sample size was 4.65 mm (diameter) x 0.5 mm (thick). Aging effects of immersing in 75% ethanol for up to 14 h on AEs were then evaluated. A continuous-wave CO2 laser was used to heat the samples. Acoustic emissions were collected as a function of filler fraction, laser power, silanization, and immersion time. Onset of burst-pattern acoustic signals characteristic of fracturing occurred at different laser powers for different tested groups. Acoustic emissions generally increased with laser power, in which lower laser powers produced low-amplitude (45-50 dB) signals; the amplitude distribution (50-85 dB) became more extensive as laser powers increased. After immersion, the lower laser powers could produce the same phenomenon. The higher the filler fraction, the fewer AEs generated. A large percentage AE reduction due to silanization was noted as a function of filler fraction. Unsilanized specimens showed more thermal damages than did silanized ones.

  15. Characteristics of laser-induced luminescence in poly(paraphenylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Changqin; Lu, Shaozhe; Su, Xi A.; Liu, Xing J.

    1992-02-01

    Under laser inducement, we have observed steady state photoluminescence from poly(paraphenylene) and transient photoliininescence from PPP in nanosecond time regime for the first time. PPP samples studied were produced using the Kovacic method. The experimental results indicate that the lininescence spectra are well-resolved. The peaks are rather sharp and located at 4340Å(100K), 4332Å(50K), 4318Å(8.5K) (transient state) and 4309Å, 4575Å (steady state). The luminescence spectra have been discussed by using the lattice relaxation process. The lifetime of the luminescence of PPP was measured. The decay curve of PPP is found to have a double exponential form with a lifetime of 7.47 ns and 5.13 ns. The decay kinetics was interpreted by the interchain recombination of photoexcited polaron pairs. The decay kinetics of photoinduced absorption between a few nanoseconds and a few microseconds is mainly due to the interchain recombination of the photoexcited polaron pairs and exhibits the radiative luminescence after relaxation.

  16. Fast analysis of wood preservers using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhl, A.; Loebe, K.; Kreuchwig, L.

    2001-06-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the investigation of wood preservers in timber and in furniture. Both experiments in laboratory and practical applications in recycling facilities and on a building site prove the new possibilities for the fast detection of harmful agents in wood. A commercial system was developed for mobile laser-plasma-analysis as well as for industrial use in sorting plants. The universal measuring principle in combination with an Echelle optics permits real simultaneous multi-element-analysis in the range of 200-780 nm with a resolution of a few picometers. It enables the user to detect main and trace elements in wood within a few seconds, nearly independent of the matrix, knowing that different kinds of wood show an equal elemental composition. Sample preparation is not required. The quantitative analysis of inorganic wood preservers (containing, e.g. Cu, Cr, B, As, Pb, Hg) has been performed exactly using carbon as reference element. It can be shown that the detection limits for heavy metals in wood are in the ppm-range. Additional information is given concerning the quantitative analysis. Statistical data, e.g. the standard deviation (S.D.), were determined and calibration curves were used for each particular element. A comparison between ICP-AES and LIBS is given using depth profile correction factors regarding the different penetration depths with respect to the different volumes in wood analyzed by both analytical methods.

  17. Elemental analysis of cotton by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, Emily R.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the elemental characterization of unprocessed cotton. This research is important in forensic and fraud detection applications to establish an elemental fingerprint of U.S. cotton by region, which can be used to determine the source of the cotton. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a LIBS method for the elemental analysis of cotton. The experimental setup consists of a Nd:YAG laser that operates at the fundamental wavelength as the LIBS excitation source and an echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The relative concentrations of elements Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, and Sr from both nutrients and environmental contributions were determined by LIBS. Principal component analysis was used to visualize the differences between cotton samples based on the elemental composition by region in the U.S. Linear discriminant analysis of the LIBS data resulted in the correct classification of >97% of the cotton samples by U.S. region and >81% correct classification by state of origin.

  18. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy application in joint European torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerok, A.; L'Hermite, D.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Lacour, J.-L.; Cheymol, G.; Kempenaars, M.; Bekris, N.; Grisolia, C.

    2016-09-01

    The results on the first successful application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for remote in situ diagnostics of plasma facing components (a deposited layer on a divertor tile) in Joint European Torus (JET) are presented. The studies were performed with an available JET EDGE LIDAR laser system. For in-depth analysis of deposited layers on JET divertor tiles, a number of laser shots were applied onto the same divertor place without laser beam displacement. The spectral lines of D, CII and impurity elements (CrI, BeII, …) were identified in a wide spectral range (400-670 nm). With the increase in a number of laser shots applied onto the same divertor place, we observed consecutive changes in spectral line intensities of deuterium, carbon, and impurities with the appearance of spectral lines of tungsten substrate (WI). In-depth analysis of deposited layers on JET divertor tiles was made on the basis of the spectral line behaviour in reference to the applied laser shots. The possibility of surface cartography with laser beam displacement on the tile surface was demonstrated as well. Based on the results obtained, we may conclude that LIBS method is applicable for in situ remote analysis of deposited layers of JET plasma facing components.

  19. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Filipescu, M.; Vizireanu, S.; Vogt, L.; Antohe, S.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2016-06-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO2 nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500-700 mJ/cm2 it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO2 pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  20. Laser-induced Forward Transfer of Ag Nanopaste

    PubMed Central

    Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been much development of non-lithographic methods1-3 for printing metallic inks or other functional materials. Many of these processes such as inkjet3 and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT)4 have become increasingly popular as interest in printable electronics and maskless patterning has grown. These additive manufacturing processes are inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and well suited for rapid prototyping, when compared to more traditional semiconductor processing techniques. While most direct-write processes are confined to two-dimensional structures and cannot handle materials with high viscosity (particularly inkjet), LIFT can transcend both constraints if performed properly. Congruent transfer of three dimensional pixels (called voxels), also referred to as laser decal transfer (LDT)5-9, has recently been demonstrated with the LIFT technique using highly viscous Ag nanopastes to fabricate freestanding interconnects, complex voxel shapes, and high-aspect-ratio structures. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple yet versatile process for fabricating a variety of micro- and macroscale Ag structures. Structures include simple shapes for patterning electrical contacts, bridging and cantilever structures, high-aspect-ratio structures, and single-shot, large area transfers using a commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) chip. PMID:27077645

  1. Drift mechanism of laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgovsky, L.

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum is possible due to the ejection of electrons from the beam as a consequence of the transverse drift orthogonal to the propagation direction. The transverse drift is derived from the general solution of the equations of motion of the electrons in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave with arbitrary polarization. It is shown that the energy gain is proportional to the square of the field strength additionally modulated by the function of the injection and ejection phases. In particular, for a linearly polarized beam this function is reduced to the squared difference between the cosines of these phases. The finite laser pulse duration restricts the range of the field strength suitable for direct electron acceleration in vacuum within certain limits. It is demonstrated that the high efficiency of energy transfer from the laser wave into the kinetic energy of the accelerated electrons demands phase matching between the electron quiver phase at the exit point and the phase of the energy transfer.

  2. Laser-induced Forward Transfer of Ag Nanopaste.

    PubMed

    Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been much development of non-lithographic methods(1-3) for printing metallic inks or other functional materials. Many of these processes such as inkjet(3) and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT)(4) have become increasingly popular as interest in printable electronics and maskless patterning has grown. These additive manufacturing processes are inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and well suited for rapid prototyping, when compared to more traditional semiconductor processing techniques. While most direct-write processes are confined to two-dimensional structures and cannot handle materials with high viscosity (particularly inkjet), LIFT can transcend both constraints if performed properly. Congruent transfer of three dimensional pixels (called voxels), also referred to as laser decal transfer (LDT)(5-9), has recently been demonstrated with the LIFT technique using highly viscous Ag nanopastes to fabricate freestanding interconnects, complex voxel shapes, and high-aspect-ratio structures. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple yet versatile process for fabricating a variety of micro- and macroscale Ag structures. Structures include simple shapes for patterning electrical contacts, bridging and cantilever structures, high-aspect-ratio structures, and single-shot, large area transfers using a commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) chip. PMID:27077645

  3. Femtosecond laser induced nanostructuring for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaoudi, H.; Das, S. K.; Lange, J.; Heinrich, F.; Schrader, S.; Frohme, M.; Grunwald, R.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of periodical nanostructures with femtosecond laser pulses was used to create highly efficient substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). We report about the structuring of silver and copper substrates and their application to the SERS of DNA (herring sperm) and protein molecules (egg albumen). The maximum enhancement factors were found on Ag substrates processed with the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a 1-kHz Ti:sapphire laser and structure periods near the SHG wavelength. In the case of copper, however, the highest enhancement was obtained with long-period ripples induced with at fundamental wavelength. This is explained by an additional significant influence of nanoparticles on the surface. Nanostructured areas in the range of 1.25 mm2 were obtained in 10 s. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fast Fourier Transform and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the role of the chemical modification of the metal structures is addressed. Thin oxide layers resulting from working in atmosphere which improve the biocompatibility were indicated by vibration spectra. It is expected that the detailed study of the mechanisms of laser-induced nanostructure formation will stimulate further applications of functionalized surfaces like photocatalysis, selective chemistry and nano-biology.

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for polymer identification.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Sylvain; Boudinet, Marjorie; Pelascini, Frédéric; Surma, Fabrice; Detalle, Vincent; Holl, Yves

    2011-07-01

    This study aims at differentiating several organic materials, particularly polymers, by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The goal is to apply this technique to the fields of polymer recycling and cultural heritage conservation. We worked with some usual polymers families: polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyoxymethylene, (POM), poly(vinyl chloride), polytetrafluoroethylene, polyoxyethylene (POE), and polyamide for the aliphatic ones, and poly(butylene terephthalate), acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polystyrene, and polycarbonate for the aromatic ones. The fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) in ambient air at atmospheric pressure was used. A careful analysis of the C(2) Swan system (0,0) band in polymers containing no C-C (POM), few C-C (POE), or aromatic C-C linkages led us to the conclusion that the C(2) signal might be native, i.e., the result of direct ablation from the sample. With use of these results, aliphatic and aromatic polymers could be differentiated. Further data treatments, such as properly chosen line ratios, principal component analysis, and partial least squares regression, were evaluated. It was shown that many polymers could be separated, including PE and PP, despite their similar chemical structures.

  5. Seedless Laser Velocimetry Using Heterodyne Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A need exists for a seedless equivalent of laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) for use in low-turbulence or supersonic flows or elsewhere where seeding is undesirable or impractical. A compact laser velocimeter using heterodyne non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) to measure a single component of velocity is described. Neither molecular (e.g. NO2) nor particulate seed is added to the flow. In non-resonant LITA two beams split from a short-pulse pump laser are crossed; interference produces two counterpropagating sound waves by electrostriction. A CW probe laser incident on the sound waves at the proper angle is directed towards a detector. Measurement of the beating between the Doppler-shifted light and a highly attenuated portion of the probe beam allows determination of one component of flow velocity, speed of sound, and temperature. The sound waves essentially take the place of the particulate seed used in LDV. The velocimeter was used to study the flow behind a rearward-facing step in NASA Langley Research Center's Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel. Comparison is made with pitot-static probe data in the freestream over the range 0 m/s - 55 m/s. Comparison with LDV is made in the recirculation region behind the step and in a well-developed boundary layer in front of the step. Good agreement is found in all cases.

  6. Study of Bacterial Samples Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W, A. Farooq; M, Atif; W, Tawfik; M, S. Alsalhi; Z, A. Alahmed; M, Sarfraz; J, P. Singh

    2014-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to investigate two different types of bacteria, Escherichia coli (B1) and Micrococcus luteus (B2) deposited on glass slides using Spectrolaser 7000. LIBS spectra were analyzed using spectrolaser software. LIBS spectrum of glass substrate was compared with bacteria spectra. Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, S, Cl, Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, C, H and CN-band appeared in bacterial samples in air. Two carbon lines at 193.02 nm, 247.88 nm and one hydrogen line at 656.28 nm with intensity ratios of 1.9, 1.83 and 1.53 appeared in bacterial samples B1 and B2 respectively. Carbon and hydrogen are the important components of the bio-samples like bacteria and other cancer cells. Investigation on LIBS spectra of the samples in He and Ar atmospheres is also presented. Ni lines appeared only in B2 sample in Ar atmosphere. From the present experimental results we are able to show that LIBS technique has a potential in the identification and discrimination of different types of bacteria.

  7. Laser-induced differential fluorescence for cancer diagnosis without biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.; Buckley III, P.

    1997-01-01

    An optical diagnostic procedure based on laser-induced fluorescence was developed for direct {ital in vivo} cancer diagnosis without requiring biopsy. The methodology was applied in a clinical study involving over 100 patients in order to differentiate normal tissue from malignant tumors of the esophagus. Endogenous fluorescence of normal and malignant tissues was measured directly with the use of a fiber-optic probe inserted through an endoscope. The measurements were performed {ital in vivo} during routine endoscopy. Detection of the fluorescence signal from the tissue was performed with the use of laser excitation. This report describes the differential normalized fluorescence (DNF) procedure using the amplified spectral differences between the normalized fluorescence of malignant tissue and normal mucosa. The results of this DNF approach were compared with histopathology results of the biopsy samples and indicated excellent agreement in the classification of normal tissue and malignant tumors for the samples investigated. Data related to various grades of Barrett{close_quote}s esophagus are discussed. The DNF procedure could lead to the development of a rapid and cost-effective technique for cancer diagnosis. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  8. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (< ~2.5 °C) in temperature at the surface of the skin, examined by both thermal camera and the Monte Carlo simulation, indicate that laser does not evoke heat-induced nociceptive sensation. In the human EEG study, brain responses to both mechanical and laser stimulation are consistent, along with subjective reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli. PMID:26047142

  9. Laser-Induced Shocks in Strongly Coupled Aluminum Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, T.; Benage, J.; Evans, S.; Glocer, A.; Kyrala, G.; Montoya, R.; Munson, C.; Roberts, J.; Skidmore, B.; Taylor, A.; Wood, B.; Workman, J.; Wysocki, F.

    2001-10-01

    Inverse bremsstrahlung is a dominant absorption mechanism at high densities and low temperatures, such as in strongly coupled plasmas. We electrically produce a 0.1 g/cm^3, 1 eV SCP target which is struck by a 2-3 J, 0.8 ns frequency-doubled Nd:Yag laser pulse. Under these conditions, the laser pulse couples into the plasma where the electron plasma frequency equals the laser frequency. For a wavelength of 532 nm, this happens at a critical density of ne = 4x10^21 cm-3. The rapid deposition of energy heats and compresses the plasma to shock conditions. The surface temperature of the plasma is measured using four filtered PMTs with the assumption of blackbody emission with constant emissivity. Pre-shocked and shocked density measurements are simultaneously made using a laser-produced Ti K-shell (4.75 keV) x-ray shadowgraph. We present the experiment design and results of a laser-induced shock in a strongly coupled plasma.

  10. Laser-induced porous graphene films from commercial polymers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian; Peng, Zhiwei; Liu, Yuanyue; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Ye, Ruquan; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Yakobson, Boris I.; Tour, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis and patterning of carbon nanomaterials cost effectively is a challenge in electronic and energy storage devices. Here report a one-step, scalable approach for producing and patterning porous graphene films with 3-dimensional networks from commercial polymer films using a CO2 infrared laser. The sp3-carbon atoms are photothermally converted to sp2-carbon atoms by pulsed laser irradiation. The resulting laser-induced graphene (LIG) exhibits high electrical conductivity. The LIG can be readily patterned to interdigitated electrodes for in-plane microsupercapacitors with specific capacitances of >4 mF·cm−2 and power densities of ~9 mW·cm−2. Theoretical calculations partially suggest that enhanced capacitance may result from LIG’s unusual ultra-polycrystalline lattice of pentagon-heptagon structures. Combined with the advantage of one-step processing of LIG in air from commercial polymer sheets, which would allow the employment of a roll-to-roll manufacturing process, this technique provides a rapid route to polymer-written electronic and energy storage devices. PMID:25493446

  11. Laser induced focusing for over-dense plasma beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Peter; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Mulser, Peter

    2015-09-15

    The capability of ion acceleration with high power, pulsed lasers has become an active field of research in the past years. In this context, the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) mechanism has been the topic of numerous theoretical and experimental publications. Within that mechanism, a high power, pulsed laser beam hits a thin film target. In contrast to the target normal sheath acceleration, the entire film target is accelerated as a bulk by the radiation pressure of the laser. Simulations predict heavy ion beams with kinetic energy up to GeV, as well as solid body densities. However, there are several effects which limit the efficiency of the RPA: On the one hand, the Rayleigh-Taylor-instability limits the predicted density. On the other hand, conventional accelerator elements, such as magnetic focusing devices are too bulky to be installed right after the target. Therefore, we present a new beam transport method, suitable for RPA-like/over-dense plasma beams: laser induced focusing.

  12. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, Uğur; Çakır, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique. PMID:25794738

  13. Laser-induced breakdown plasma-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2010-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is dependent on the interaction between the initiating Laser sequence, the sampled material and the intermediate plasma states. Pulse shaping and timing have been empirically demonstrated to have significant impact on the signal available for active/passive detection and identification. The transient nature of empirical LIBS work makes data collection for optimization an expensive process. Guidance from effective computer simulation represents an alternative. This computational method for CBRNE sensing applications models the Laser, material and plasma interaction for the purpose of performance prediction and enhancement. This paper emphasizes the aspects of light, plasma, and material interaction relevant to portable sensor development for LIBS. The modeling structure emphasizes energy balances and empirical fit descriptions with limited detailed-balance and finite element approaches where required. Dusty plasma from partially decomposed material sample interaction with pulse dynamics is considered. This heuristic is used to reduce run times and computer loads. Computer simulations and some data for validation are presented. A new University of Memphis HPC/super-computer (~15 TFLOPS) is used to enhance simulation. Results coordinated with related effort at Arkansas State University. Implications for ongoing empirical work are presented with special attention paid to the application of compressive sensing for signal processing, feature extraction, and classification.

  14. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krueger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2012-07-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on two different silica polymorphs (single-crystalline synthetic quartz and commercial fused silica glass) upon irradiation in air with multiple linearly polarized single- and double-fs-laser pulse sequences ({tau} = 150 fs pulse duration, {lambda} = 800 nm center wavelength, temporal pulse separation {Delta}t < 40 ps) is studied experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct types of fs-LIPSS [so-called low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSS (HSFL)] with different spatial periods and orientations were identified. Their appearance was characterized with respect to the experimental parameters peak laser fluence and number of laser pulses per spot. Additionally, the 'dynamics' of the LIPSS formation was addressed in complementary double-fs-pulse experiments with varying delays, revealing a characteristic change of the LSFL periods. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a Sipe-Drude model considering the carrier dependence of the optical properties of fs-laser excited silica. This new approach provides an explanation of the LSFL orientation parallel to the laser beam polarisation in silica - as opposed to the behaviour of most other materials.

  15. Laser-induced porous graphene films from commercial polymers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Peng, Zhiwei; Liu, Yuanyue; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Ye, Ruquan; Samuel, Errol L G; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Yakobson, Boris I; Tour, James M

    2014-01-01

    The cost effective synthesis and patterning of carbon nanomaterials is a challenge in electronic and energy storage devices. Here we report a one-step, scalable approach for producing and patterning porous graphene films with three-dimensional networks from commercial polymer films using a CO2 infrared laser. The sp(3)-carbon atoms are photothermally converted to sp(2)-carbon atoms by pulsed laser irradiation. The resulting laser-induced graphene (LIG) exhibits high electrical conductivity. The LIG can be readily patterned to interdigitated electrodes for in-plane microsupercapacitors with specific capacitances of >4 mF cm(-2) and power densities of ~9 mW cm(-2). Theoretical calculations partially suggest that enhanced capacitance may result from LIG's unusual ultra-polycrystalline lattice of pentagon-heptagon structures. Combined with the advantage of one-step processing of LIG in air from commercial polymer sheets, which would allow the employment of a roll-to-roll manufacturing process, this technique provides a rapid route to polymer-written electronic and energy storage devices. PMID:25493446

  16. Ultraviolet Laser-induced ignition of RDX single crystal

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhonghua; Zhang, Chuanchao; Liu, Wei; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Ming; Wang, Xuming; Zhou, Guorui; Tan, Bisheng; Yang, Zongwei; Li, Zhijie; Li, Li; Yan, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zu, Xiaotao

    2016-01-01

    The RDX single crystals are ignited by ultraviolet laser (355 nm, 6.4 ns) pulses. The laser-induced damage morphology consisted of two distinct regions: a core region of layered fracture and a peripheral region of stripped material surrounding the core. As laser fluence increases, the area of the whole crack region increases all the way, while both the area and depth of the core region increase firstly, and then stay stable over the laser fluence of 12 J/cm2. The experimental details indicate the dynamics during laser ignition process. Plasma fireball of high temperature and pressure occurs firstly, followed by the micro-explosions on the (210) surface, and finally shock waves propagate through the materials to further strip materials outside and yield in-depth cracks in larger surrounding region. The plasma fireball evolves from isotropic to anisotropic under higher laser fluence resulting in the damage expansion only in lateral direction while maintaining the fixed depth. The primary insights into the interaction dynamics between laser and energetic materials can help developing the superior laser ignition technique. PMID:26847854

  17. Production of biomolecule microarrays through laser induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Pradas, Juan Marcos; Serra, Pere; Colina, Monica; Morenza, Jose-Luis

    2004-10-01

    Biomolecule microarrays are a kind of biosensors that consist in patterns of different biological molecules immobilized on a solid substrate and capable to bind specifically to their complementary targets. In particular, DNA and protein microarrays have been revealed to be very efficient devices for genen and protein identification, what has converted them in powerful tools for many applications, like clinical diagnose, drug discovery analysis, genomics and proteomics. The production of these devices requires the manipulation of tiny amounts of a liquid solution containing biomolecules without damaging them. In this work laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) has been used for spotting a biomolecule in order to check the viability of this technique for the production of microarrays. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (355 nm wavelength) has been used to transfer droplets of a biomolecule containing solution onto a solid slide. Optical microscopy of the transferred material has been carried out to investigate the morphological characteristics of the droplets obtained under different irradiation conditions. Afterwards, a DNA microarray has been spotted. The viability of the transference has been tested by checking the biological activity of the biomolecule in front of its specific complementary target. This has revealed that, indeed, the LIFT technique is adequate for the production of DNA microarrays.

  18. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-06-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (< ~2.5 °C) in temperature at the surface of the skin, examined by both thermal camera and the Monte Carlo simulation, indicate that laser does not evoke heat-induced nociceptive sensation. In the human EEG study, brain responses to both mechanical and laser stimulation are consistent, along with subjective reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli.

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in industrial and security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; Liu Chunyi; Plumer, John R.; Russo, Richard E.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers rapid, localized chemical analysis of solid or liquid materials with high spatial resolution in lateral and depth profiling, without the need for sample preparation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares algorithms were applied to identify a variety of complex organic and inorganic samples. This work illustrates how LIBS analyzers can answer a multitude of real-world needs for rapid analysis, such as determination of lead in paint and children's toys, analysis of electronic and solder materials, quality control of fiberglass panels, discrimination of coffee beans from different vendors, and identification of generic versus brand-name drugs. Lateral and depth profiling was performed on children's toys and paint layers. Traditional one-element calibration or multivariate chemometric procedures were applied for elemental quantification, from single laser shot determination of metal traces at {approx}10 {mu}g/g to determination of halogens at 90 {mu}g/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation. The effectiveness of LIBS for security applications was demonstrated in the field by testing the 50-m standoff LIBS rasterizing detector.

  20. Laser induced mechanisms controlling the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeming; Vitrant, Guy; Lefkir, Yaya; Bakhti, Said; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-21

    This paper describes a model to simulate changes in the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in TiO2 films upon continuous wave light excitation. Interrelated laser induced physical and chemical processes initiated directly by photon absorption or by plasmon induced thermal heating are considered. Namely the model takes into account the NP coalescence, Ostwald ripening, the reduction of silver ions and the oxidation of metallic NPs, competitive mechanisms that can lead to counter-intuitive behaviors depending on the exposure conditions. Theoretical predictions are compared successfully to the experimental results deduced from a thorough analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) pictures of Ag:TiO2 films processed with a scanning visible laser beam at different speeds. Ag:TiO2 systems are considered for many applications in solar energy conversion, photocatalysis or secured data printing. Numerical investigations of such a system provide a better understanding of light induced growth and shrinking processes and open up prospects for designing more efficient photocatalytic devices based on metal NP doped TiO2 or for improving the size homogeneity in self-organized metallic NP patterns, for instance. PMID:27539293

  1. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of congruent voxels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Beniam, Iyoel; Breckenfeld, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offers unique advantages and capabilities for the rapid prototyping of electronic, optical and sensor elements. The use of LIFT for printing high viscosity metallic nano-inks and nano-pastes can be optimized for the transfer of voxels congruent with the shape of the laser pulse, forming thin film-like structures non-lithographically. These processes are capable of printing patterns with excellent lateral resolution and thickness uniformity typically found in 3-dimensional stacked assemblies, MEMS-like structures and free-standing interconnects. However, in order to achieve congruent voxel transfer with LIFT, the particle size and viscosity of the ink or paste suspensions must be adjusted to minimize variations due to wetting and drying effects. When LIFT is carried out with high-viscosity nano-suspensions, the printed voxel size and shape become controllable parameters, allowing the printing of thin-film like structures whose shape is determined by the spatial distribution of the laser pulse. The result is a new level of parallelization beyond current serial direct-write processes whereby the geometry of each printed voxel can be optimized according to the pattern design. This work shows how LIFT of congruent voxels can be applied to the fabrication of 2D and 3D microstructures by adjusting the viscosity of the nano-suspension and laser transfer parameters.

  2. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy enhanced by a micro torch.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Huang, X; Li, S; Lu, Yao; Chen, K; Jiang, L; Silvain, J F; Lu, Y F

    2015-06-01

    A commercial butane micron troch was used to enhance plasma optical emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Fast imaging and spectroscopic analyses were used to observe plasma evolution in the atmospheric pressure for LIBS without and with using a micro torch. Optical emission intensities and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) as functions of delay time were studied. Enhanced optical emission and SNRs were obtained by using a micro torch. The effects of laser pulse energy on the emission intensities and SNRs were studied. The same spectral intensity could be obtained using micro torch with much lower laser pulse energy. The investigation of SNR evolution with delay time at different laser pulse energies showed that the SNR enhancement factor is higher for plasmas generated by lower laser pulse energies than those generated by higher laser energies. The calibration curves of emission line intensities with elemental concentrations showed that detection sensitivities of Mn I 404.136 nm and V I 437.923 nm were improved by around 3 times. The limits of detection for both Mn I 404.136 nm and V I 437.923 nm are reduced from 425 and 42 ppm to 139 and 20 ppm, respectively, after using the micro torch. The LIBS system with micro torch was demonstrated to be cost-effective, compact, and capable of sensitivity improvement, especially for LIBS system operating with low laser pulse energy. PMID:26072861

  3. The stochastic nature of growth of laser-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, C. W.; Cross, David A.; Liao, Zhi M.; Norton, Mary A.; Negres, Raluca A.

    2015-07-01

    Laser fluence and operational tempo of ICF systems operating in the UV are typically limited by the growth of laser- induced damage on their final optics (primarily silica optics). In the early 2000 time frame, studies of laser damage growth with relevant large area beams revealed that for some laser conditions damage sites located on the exit surface of a fused silica optic grew following an exponential growth rule: D(n) = D0 exp (n α(φ)), where D is final site diameter, D0 is the initial diameter of the site, φ is the laser fluence, α(φ) is the growth coefficient, and n is the number of exposures. In general α is a linear function of φ, with a threshold of φTH. In recent years, it has been found that that growth behavior is actually considerably more complex. For example, it was found that α is not a constant for a given fluence but follows a probability distribution with a mean equal to α(φ). This is complicated by observations that these distributions are actually functions of the pulse shape, damage site size, and initial morphology of damage initiation. In addition, there is not a fixed fluence threshold for damage sites growth, which is better described by a probability of growth which depends on site size, morphology and laser fluence. Here will review these findings and discuss implications for the operation of large laser systems.

  4. Analysis of human nails by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to analyze human fingernails using nanosecond laser pulses. Measurements on 45 nail samples are carried out and 14 key species are identified. The elements detected with the present system are: Al, C, Ca, Fe, H, K, Mg, N, Na, O, Si, Sr, Ti as well as CN molecule. Sixty three emission lines have been identified in the spectrum that are dominated by calcium lines. A discriminant function analysis is used to discriminate among different genders and age groups. This analysis demonstrates efficient discrimination among these groups. The mean concentration of each element is compared between different groups. Correlation between concentrations of elements in fingernails is calculated. A strong correlation is found between sodium and potassium while calcium and magnesium levels are inversely correlated. A case report on high levels of sodium and potassium in patients with hyperthyroidism is presented. It is shown that LIBS could be a promising technique for the analysis of nails and therefore identification of health problems.

  5. Restoration of Retinal Structure and Function after Selective Photocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Huie, Philip; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Leung, Loh-Shan S.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Beier, Corinne; Marc, Robert E.; Palanker, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    CNS neurons change their connectivity to accommodate a changing environment, form memories, or respond to injury. Plasticity in the adult mammalian retina after injury or disease was thought to be limited to restructuring resulting in abnormal retinal anatomy and function. Here we report that neurons in the mammalian retina change their connectivity and restore normal retinal anatomy and function after injury. Patches of photoreceptors in the rabbit retina were destroyed by selective laser photocoagulation, leaving retinal inner neurons (bipolar, amacrine, horizontal, ganglion cells) intact. Photoreceptors located outside of the damaged zone migrated to make new functional connections with deafferented bipolar cells located inside the lesion. The new connections restored ON and OFF responses in deafferented ganglion cells. This finding extends the previously perceived limits of restorative plasticity in the adult retina and allows for new approaches to retinal laser therapy free of current detrimental side effects such as scotomata and scarring. PMID:23595739

  6. Restoration of retinal structure and function after selective photocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Sher, Alexander; Jones, Bryan W; Huie, Philip; Paulus, Yannis M; Lavinsky, Daniel; Leung, Loh-Shan S; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Beier, Corinne; Marc, Robert E; Palanker, Daniel

    2013-04-17

    CNS neurons change their connectivity to accommodate a changing environment, form memories, or respond to injury. Plasticity in the adult mammalian retina after injury or disease was thought to be limited to restructuring resulting in abnormal retinal anatomy and function. Here we report that neurons in the mammalian retina change their connectivity and restore normal retinal anatomy and function after injury. Patches of photoreceptors in the rabbit retina were destroyed by selective laser photocoagulation, leaving retinal inner neurons (bipolar, amacrine, horizontal, ganglion cells) intact. Photoreceptors located outside of the damaged zone migrated to make new functional connections with deafferented bipolar cells located inside the lesion. The new connections restored ON and OFF responses in deafferented ganglion cells. This finding extends the previously perceived limits of restorative plasticity in the adult retina and allows for new approaches to retinal laser therapy free of current detrimental side effects such as scotomata and scarring.

  7. Retinal Proliferation Response in the Buphthalmic Zebrafish, bugeye

    PubMed Central

    Sherpa, Tshering; Hunter, Samuel S.; Frey, Ruth A.; Robison, Barrie D.; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    The zebrafish retina regenerates in response to acute retinal lesions, replacing damaged neurons with new neurons. In this study we test the hypothesis that chronic stress to inner retinal neurons also triggers a retinal regeneration response in the bugeye zebrafish. Mutations in the lrp2 gene in zebrafish are associated with a progressive eye phenotype (bugeye) that models several risk factors for human glaucoma including buphthalmos (enlarged eyes), elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), and upregulation of genes related to retinal ganglion cell pathology. The retinas of adult bugeye zebrafish showed high rates of ongoing proliferation which resulted in the production of a small number of new retinal neurons, particularly photoreceptors. A marker of mechanical cell stress, Hsp27, was strongly expressed in inner retinal neurons and glia of bugeye retinas. The more enlarged eyes of individual bugeye zebrafish showed disrupted retinal lamination, and a persistent reduced density of neurons in the ganglion cell layer (GCL), although total numbers of GCL neurons were higher than in control eyes. Despite the presence of a proliferative response to damage, the adult bugeye zebrafish remained behaviorally blind. These findings suggest the existence of an unsuccessful regenerative response to a persistent pathological condition in the bugeye zebrafish. PMID:21723280

  8. Penta(cyclopentadienyl)-[eta]5-cyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl: Structure and laser-induced conversion to fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, Mark P.; Cammack, J. Kevin; Goebel, Matthias; Wasser, Ian M.; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.; Drewello, Thomas

    1998-08-28

    The title compound [Cp5CpMn(CO)3], 1, has been characterized by X-ray crystallography and shown by laser-induced desorption/ionization (LDI) to undergo coalescence to fullerene C60 and other carbon clusters.

  9. APPLICATIONS OF CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION TO GROUND WATER MIGRATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been applied to the determination of groundwater migration based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and traditional spectrofluorimetry. The detection limits of injected dye-fluorescent whitening agent (tinopal) in the low parts per tr...

  10. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION OF FLUORESCEIN AS A GROUNDWATER MIGRATION TRACER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been applied to the determination of the groundwater migration tracer dye fluorescein based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and compared to determinations obtained with traditional spectrofluorimetry. Detection limits of injected d...

  11. Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Improving the Detection of Molecular Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koral, Can; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Mao, Xianglei; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas is important for improving sensitivity and limits of detection in molecular sensing and molecular isotope analysis. In this work we introduce the use of Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown (NELIBS) for the enhancement of molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas, and study the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed enhancement. The use of Ag nanoparticles leads to an order of magnitude enhancement for AlO (B2Σ+ → Χ+ Σ+) system emission from an Al-based alloy. We demonstrate that the mechanism responsible for the enhancement of molecular bands differs from that of atomic emission, and can be traced down to the increased number of atomic species in NELIBS which lead to AlO molecular formation. These findings showcase the potential of NELIBS as a simple and viable technology for enhancing molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas.

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  13. Laser-based diagnostics for coal gasification instrumentation. [Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.J.; Loree, T.R.; Hartford, A. Jr.; Tiee, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this program the investigators have investigated the suitability of a number of optical diagnostic techniques for nonintrusive real-time measurements of species concentrations and temperatures of coal gasification streams. They have identified and evaluated several promising techniques including coherent Raman spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and laser-induced fluorescence. They emphasize that these are complementary, rather than competing, diagnostic technologies, as each can provide a different class of data for gasifier operation. The results of their gasifier field tests and supporting laboratory work on these diagnostic techniques have been summarized and recommendations for continued work on optical diagnostics for coal gasification streams are presented. 12 references, 17 figures.

  14. Retinal and optic nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2003-11-01

    A variety of disease processes can affect the retina and/or the optic nerve, including vascular or ischemic disease, inflammatory or infectious disease, and degenerative disease. These disease processes may selectively damage certain parts of the retina or optic nerve, and the specific areas that are damaged may have implications for the design of potential therapeutic visual prosthetic devices. Outer retinal diseases include age-related macular degeneration, pathologic myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Although the retinal photoreceptors may be lost, the inner retina is relatively well-preserved in these diseases and may be a target for retinal prosthetic devices. Inner retinal diseases include retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal venous occlusive disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Other retinal diseases such as ocular infections (retinitis, endophthalmitis) may affect all retinal layers. Because the inner retinal cells, including the retinal ganglion cells, may be destroyed in these diseases (inner retinal or whole retinal), prosthetic devices that stimulate the inner retina may not be effective. Common optic nerve diseases include glaucoma, optic neuritis, and ischemic optic neuropathy. Because the ganglion cell nerve fibers themselves are damaged, visual prosthetics for these diseases will need to target more distal portions of the visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. Clearly, a sound understanding of retinal and optic nerve disease pathophysiology is critical for designing and choosing the optimal visual prosthetic device.

  15. Laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Brelet, Yohann; Forestier, Benjamin; Houard, Aurelien; Yu, Linwei; Deng, Yongkai; Jiang, Hongbing

    2013-06-24

    We report on the formation of laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica irradiated with multiple femtosecond laser pulses. This surface morphology emerges after the disappearance of the conventional laser induced periodic surface structures, under successive laser pulse irradiation. It is independent of the laser polarization and universally observed for different focusing geometries. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the damage crater and the incident laser pulse.

  16. Retinal risks of high-dose ornithine supplements: a review.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, Seiji; Kodama, Tatsuo; Ohira, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We reviewed the literature on ornithine supplementation and related topics. Nutritionists and physicians have reported that ornithine supplementation is useful. Paediatricians and biochemists have reported that ornithine is supplemented for NH(3) detoxification in the hyperornithinaemia-hyperammonaemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome. In contrast, ophthalmic researchers have reported retinotoxicity associated with high-dose ornithine. In vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that high concentrations of ornithine or its metabolites are toxic to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Long-term (exceeding a few years) and high concentrations (exceeding 600 μmol/l) of ornithine in the blood induce retinal toxicity in gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina (GA). Intermittent high levels of ornithine do not lead to retinal lesions. Constant blood ornithine levels between 250 and 600 μmol/l do not induce retinal lesions or cause a very slowly progressive retinal degeneration. Blood ornithine levels below 250 μmol/l do not produce retinal alteration. We concluded that short-term, low-dose or transient high-dose ornithine intake is safe for the retina; its nutritional usefulness and effect on NH(3) detoxification are supported by many researchers, but the effect may be limited; and long-term, high-dose ornithine intake may be risky for the retina. Patients with GA should avoid taking ornithine; amino acid supplementation should be administered carefully for patients with the HHH syndrome, relatives of patients with GA (heterozygotes) and subjects with RPE lesions; and blood ornithine levels and retinal conditions should be evaluated in individuals taking long-term, high-dose ornithine. PMID:21767450

  17. Investigation of the early stages in laser-induced ignition by Schlieren photography and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Maximilian; Charareh, S; Winter, F; Iskra, K; Rüdisser, D; Neger, T; Kopecek, H; Wintner, E

    2004-09-20

    Laser ignition has been discussed widely as a potentially superior ignition source for technical appliances such as internal combustion engines. Ignition strongly affects overall combustion, and its early stages in particular have strong implications on subsequent pollutant formation, flame quenching, and extinction. Our research here is devoted to the experimental investigation of the early stages of laser-induced ignition of CH4/air mixtures up to high pressures. Tests were performed in a 0.9-l combustion cell with initial pressures of up to 25 bar with stoichiometric to fuel-lean mixtures using a 5-ns 50-mJ 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser. Laserinduced fluorescence (LIF) was used to obtain two dimensionally resolved images of the OH radical distribution after the ignition event. These images were used to produce an animation of laser ignition and early flame kernel development. Schlieren photography was used to investigate the laserinduced shock wave, hot core gas, and developing flame ball. We extend existing knowledge to high-pressure regimes relevant for internal combustion engines.

  18. Investigation of the early stages in laser-induced ignition by Schlieren photography and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, Maximilian; Charareh, S.; Winter, F.; Iskra, K. F.; Rüdisser, D.; Neger, T.; Kopecek, H.; Wintner, E.

    2004-09-01

    Laser ignition has been discussed widely as a potentially superior ignition source for technical appliances such as internal combustion engines. Ignition strongly affects overall combustion, and its early stages in particular have strong implications on subsequent pollutant formation, flame quenching, and extinction. Our research here is devoted to the experimental investigation of the early stages of laser-induced ignition of CH4/air mixtures up to high pressures. Tests were performed in a 0.9-l combustion cell with initial pressures of up to 25 bar with stoichiometric to fuel-lean mixtures using a 5-ns 50-mJ 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser. Laserinduced fluorescence (LIF) was used to obtain two dimensionally resolved images of the OH radical distribution after the ignition event. These images were used to produce an animation of laser ignition and early flame kernel development. Schlieren photography was used to investigate the laserinduced shock wave, hot core gas, and developing flame ball. We extend existing knowledge to high-pressure regimes relevant for internal combustion engines.

  19. Histological aspects of retinal damage following exposure to pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation in rabbits: indication for mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, T.; Peri, D.; Turetz, J.; Fishbine, E.; Sahar, R.; Egoz, I.; Sapiens, N.; Brandeis, R.

    2007-02-01

    The severity and characteristics of retinal injury following laser radiation derived from laser and tissue related factors. We have previously shown that retinal damage following Nd:YAG Q-switched laser radiation in rabbits was related to physical parameters, i.e. energy levels and number of pulses. Yet, an extremely large variability in the severity of the damage was found under similar exposure paradigms, even within the same retina. This emphasizes the role of the biological variables in the pathological mechanism of laser-induced retinal damage. The aim of the present study was to further study histological parameters of the injury in relation to retinal site and to elucidate their role in the initiation and characteristics of the damage, following various energy levels (10-50 μJ) and number of pulses (1-4). Pigmented rabbits were exposed to Nd:YAG laser radiation (532nm, pulse duration: 20ns). Exposures were conducted in retina tissue, adjacent to the optic nerve, with a total of 20 exposures per retina. Animals were sacrificed 15 min or 24 hours post exposure, eyes enucleated and processed for paraffin embedding. 4μm thick serial sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, were examined under light microscopy. Two major types of retinal damage were observed: focal edema confined to the pigmented epithelium and the photoreceptor cells, and hemorrhages, associated with destruction of retinal tissue. While focal edema associated with slight elevation of the photoreceptor layer seems to depend on the pigmented epithelium, hemorrhages were related also to the choroid vasculature at the site of radiation. It is suggested that a thermo-mechanical mechanism is involved in laser induced retinal hemorrhages at energies above 10-30μJ (2-1 pulses, respectively).

  20. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of punctate outer retinal toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, Brandon J.

    2014-01-01

    Punctate outer retinal toxoplasmosis is a recognized phenotype of this common ocular parasite. We present a case presenting with poor visual acuity, but with prompt treatment regaining excellent vision by the final time point. Imaging demonstrates progression of an active lesion adjacent to an inactive retinal scar with color photography, fluorescein angiography, and Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT). SD-OCT imaging of the chorioretinal scar demonstrated alternating hypertrophy and atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium along with a discrete break in Bruch’s membrane. At baseline, the active lesion demonstrated a large collection of inflammatory subretinal fluid adjacent to an area of active retinitis. Over time, the subretinal material was found to resolve, there was restoration of the foveal anatomy, and the area of retinitis progressed into a chorioretinal scar. PMID:24843310

  1. Laser-induced transepidermal elimination of dermal content by fractional photothermolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantash, Basil M.; Bedi, Vikramaditya P.; Sudireddy, Vasanthi; Struck, Steven K.; Herron, G. Scott; Chan, Kin Foong

    2006-07-01

    The wound healing process in skin is studied in human subjects treated with fractional photothermolysis. In-vivo histological evaluation of vacuoles formed over microthermal zones (MTZs) and their content is undertaken. A 30-W, 1550-nm single-mode fiber laser system delivers an array of 60 µm or 140 µm 1/e2 incidence microbeam spot size at variable pulse energy and density. Treatments span from 6 to 20 mJ with skin excisions performed 1-day post-treatment. Staining with hematoxylin and eosin demonstrates an intact stratum corneum with vacuolar formation within the epidermis. The re-epithelialization process with repopulation of melanocytes and keratinocytes at the basal layer is apparent by 1-day post-treatment. The dermal-epidermal (DE) junction is weakened and separated just above zones of dermal coagulation. Complete loss of dermal cell viability is noted within the confines of the MTZs 1-day post-treatment, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase. All cells falling outside the irradiation field remain viable. Content within the epidermal vacuoles stain positively with Gomori trichrome, suggesting a dermal origin. However, the positive staining could be due to loss of specificity after thermal alteration. Nevertheless, this dermal extrusion hypothesis is supported by very specific positive staining with an antihuman elastin antibody. Fractional photothermolysis creates microthermal lesions that allow transport and extrusion of dermal content through a compromised DE junction. Some dermal material is incorporated into the microepidermal necrotic debris and shuttled up the epidermis to eventually be exfoliated through the stratum corneum. This is the first report of a nonablative laser-induced transport mechanism by which dermal content can be predictably extruded biologically through the epidermis. Thus, treatment with the 1550-nm fiber laser may provide the first therapeutic option for clinical indications, including pigmentary disorders such as medically

  2. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschter, Rolf

    1994-12-01

    Urinary outflow obstruction by prostatic enlargement is usually treated by resection or, recently, less invasively by thermal `ablation' of tissue through the urethra. With the latter technique, the amount of tissue that can be removed is limited by the limited penetration depth of suitable radiation sources, e.g. lasers, or conduction of heat. Interstitial thermotherapy was expected to overcome this problem. Our initial in vitro and animal studies with different light guides for interstitial application of Nd:YAG laser radiation showed small carbonized lesions with bare fibers, but large homogeneous coagulation zones with special `ITT' (interstitial thermotherapy) fibers. Further studies using these applicators resulted in a technique to be apt for clinical routine in the treatment of symptomatic prostatic enlargement. The tip of the light guide was repeatedly inserted into the prostate either transurethrally through a cystoscope under direct vision or percutaneously from the perineum under transrectal ultrasound guidance. The number of fiber placements depended on the size and configuration of the gland. Irradiation was performed either for 10 min with 5 or 7 W or in the advanced `turbo'- mode for 5 or 3 min per fiber placement using automatically stepwise reduced power (20 W for 30 s, 15 W for 30 s, 10 W for 30 s, and 7 W for 210 or 90 s). By optical feedback control the laser was switched off automatically in the case of carbonization to avoid fiber damage. From July 15, 1991 to October 1, 1993 239 patients with BPH and 14 patients with advanced prostate cancer, suffering from severe urinary outflow obstruction, were treated by laser induced interstitial thermotherapy. The results and complications of treatment are reported.

  3. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Focal Laser-Induced Interstitial Thermal Therapy in a Canine Prostate Model

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, R. Jason; Shetty, Anil; Elliott, Andrew M.; Klumpp, Sherry A.; McNichols, Roger J.; Gowda, Ashok; Hazle, John D.; Ward, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a newly FDA-cleared closed-loop, magnetic resonance (MR)-guided laser-induced interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) system for targeted ablation of prostate tissue in order to assess targeting ability, lesion generation and feasibility. Materials and Methods Mongrel dogs with (n = 2) and without (n = 5) canine transmissible venereal tumors in the prostate were imaged with a 1.5-T MR imaging scanner. Real-time 3D MR imaging was used to accurately position water-cooled 980-nm laser applicators to pre-determined targets within the canine prostates. Destruction of targeted tissue was guided with MR temperature imaging in real time for precise control of thermal ablation. MR predictions of thermal damage were correlated with findings from post-treatment images and compared to histopathology. Results Template-based targeting using MR guidance allowed the laser applicator to be placed within a mean of 1.1 mm (SD = 0.7 mm) of the target location. The mean width and length of the ablation zone by MR were 13.7 mm (SD = 1.3 mm) and 19.0 mm (SD = 4.2 mm) using single and compound exposures. The thermal damage predicted by MR correlated with the thermal damage determined by post-treatment imaging with a slope near unity and excellent correlation (R2 = 0.94). Conclusions This LITT system provided rapid and localized heating of tissue with minimal collateral thermal spread or injury. Combined with real-time monitoring and template-based planning, MR-guided LITT is an attractive modality for prostate cancer focal therapy. PMID:20727549

  4. Laser-induced transepidermal elimination of dermal content by fractional photothermolysis.

    PubMed

    Hantash, Basil M; Bedi, Vikramaditya P; Sudireddy, Vasanthi; Struck, Steven K; Herron, G Scott; Chan, Kin Foong

    2006-01-01

    The wound healing process in skin is studied in human subjects treated with fractional photothermolysis. In-vivo histological evaluation of vacuoles formed over microthermal zones (MTZs) and their content is undertaken. A 30-W, 1550-nm single-mode fiber laser system delivers an array of 60 microm or 140 microm 1e2 incidence microbeam spot size at variable pulse energy and density. Treatments span from 6 to 20 mJ with skin excisions performed 1-day post-treatment. Staining with hematoxylin and eosin demonstrates an intact stratum corneum with vacuolar formation within the epidermis. The re-epithelialization process with repopulation of melanocytes and keratinocytes at the basal layer is apparent by 1-day post-treatment. The dermal-epidermal (DE) junction is weakened and separated just above zones of dermal coagulation. Complete loss of dermal cell viability is noted within the confines of the MTZs 1-day post-treatment, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase. All cells falling outside the irradiation field remain viable. Content within the epidermal vacuoles stain positively with Gomori trichrome, suggesting a dermal origin. However, the positive staining could be due to loss of specificity after thermal alteration. Nevertheless, this dermal extrusion hypothesis is supported by very specific positive staining with an antihuman elastin antibody. Fractional photothermolysis creates microthermal lesions that allow transport and extrusion of dermal content through a compromised DE junction. Some dermal material is incorporated into the microepidermal necrotic debris and shuttled up the epidermis to eventually be exfoliated through the stratum corneum. This is the first report of a nonablative laser-induced transport mechanism by which dermal content can be predictably extruded biologically through the epidermis. Thus, treatment with the 1550-nm fiber laser may provide the first therapeutic option for clinical indications, including pigmentary disorders such as medically

  5. Retinal vein occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... most often caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) and the formation of a blood clot. Blockage ... arteries that have been thickened or hardened by atherosclerosis cross over and place pressure on a retinal ...

  6. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 17. Duker JS. Retinal arterial ... M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:chap 6.18. Reiss GR, Sipperley ...

  7. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  8. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively. PMID:464014

  9. Detection of uranium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chinni, Rosemarie C; Cremers, David A; Radziemski, Leon J; Bostian, Melissa; Navarro-Northrup, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this work is a detailed study of uranium detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for application to activities associated with environmental surveillance and detecting weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The study was used to assist development of LIBS instruments for standoff detection of bulk radiological and nuclear materials and these materials distributed as contaminants on surfaces. Uranium spectra were analyzed under a variety of different conditions at room pressure, reduced pressures, and in an argon atmosphere. All spectra displayed a high apparent background due to the high density of uranium lines. Time decay curves of selected uranium lines were monitored and compared to other elements in an attempt to maximize detection capabilities for each species in the complicated uranium spectrum. A survey of the LIBS uranium spectra was conducted and relative emission line strengths were determined over the range of 260 to 800 nm. These spectra provide a guide for selection of the strongest LIBS analytical lines for uranium detection in different spectral regions. A detection limit for uranium in soil of 0.26% w/w was obtained at close range and 0.5% w/w was achieved at a distance of 30 m. Surface detection limits were substrate dependent and ranged from 13 to 150 microg/cm2. Double-pulse experiments (both collinear and orthogonal arrangements) were shown to enhance the uranium signal in some cases. Based on the results of this work, a short critique is given of the applicability of LIBS for the detection of uranium residues on surfaces for environmental monitoring and WMD surveillance. PMID:19891832

  10. Laser induced heat source distribution in bio-tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Fan, Shifu; Zhao, Youquan

    2006-09-01

    During numerical simulation of laser and tissue thermal interaction, the light fluence rate distribution should be formularized and constituted to the source term in the heat transfer equation. Usually the solution of light irradiative transport equation is given in extreme conditions such as full absorption (Lambert-Beer Law), full scattering (Lubelka-Munk theory), most scattering (Diffusion Approximation) et al. But in specific conditions, these solutions will induce different errors. The usually used Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) is more universal and exact but has difficulty to deal with dynamic parameter and fast simulation. Its area partition pattern has limits when applying FEM (finite element method) to solve the bio-heat transfer partial differential coefficient equation. Laser heat source plots of above methods showed much difference with MCS. In order to solve this problem, through analyzing different optical actions such as reflection, scattering and absorption on the laser induced heat generation in bio-tissue, a new attempt was made out which combined the modified beam broaden model and the diffusion approximation model. First the scattering coefficient was replaced by reduced scattering coefficient in the beam broaden model, which is more reasonable when scattering was treated as anisotropic scattering. Secondly the attenuation coefficient was replaced by effective attenuation coefficient in scattering dominating turbid bio-tissue. The computation results of the modified method were compared with Monte Carlo simulation and showed the model provided reasonable predictions of heat source term distribution than past methods. Such a research is useful for explaining the physical characteristics of heat source in the heat transfer equation, establishing effective photo-thermal model, and providing theory contrast for related laser medicine experiments.

  11. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  12. Analysis of slags using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghapi, Hervé K.; Ayyalasomayajula, Krishna K.; Yueh, Fang Y.; Singh, Jagdish P.; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Jain, Jinesh C.; Nakano, Jinichiro

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the analysis of gasification slags was investigated by comparing LIBS results to the results of an ICP-OES analyzer. A small amount of slag sample was placed on a piece of double sided adhesive tape attached to a glass microscope slide and analyzed for Al, Ca, Fe, Si, and V which are major elements found in slags. The partial least squares regression (PLS-R) and univariate simple linear regression (SLR) calibration methods indicated that apart from V (accuracy up to + 20%) the accuracy of analysis varies within 0.35-6.5% for SLR and 0.06-10% for PLS-R. A paired-sample t-test within the 95% confidence level yielded p-values greater than 0.05, meaning no appreciable statistical difference was observed between the univariate SLR with internal standardization and the multivariate PLS-R for most of the analytes. From the results obtained in this work, LIBS response varies depending on the element and the technique used for quantitative analysis. Simultaneous use of the univariate calibration curves with internal standard (intensity ratio) and PLS regression in multi-elemental analysis can help reduce the matrix effect of slags associated to their high variation in concentration. Overall, these results demonstrate the capability of LIBS as an alternative technique for analyzing gasification slags. Estimated limits of detection for Al, Ca, Fe, Si and V were 0.167, 0.78, 0.171, 0.243 and 0.01 wt.%, respectively.

  13. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  14. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained

  15. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectrum Characteristics of Paddy under Nitrogen Stress].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei; Du, Lin; Zhu, Bo; Ma, Ying-ying; Sun, Jia

    2016-02-01

    Order to guide fertilizing andreduce waste of resources as well as enviro nmental pollution, especially eutrophication, which are caused by excessive fertilization, a system of laser-induced fluorescence(LIF) was built. The system aimed to investigate the correlation between nitrogen(N) content of paddy leaf and the fluorescence intensity. We measuredNcontent and SPAD of paddy leaf (the samples came from the second upper leaves of paddy in tillering stage and the study area was located in Jianghan plain of China) by utilizing the Plant Nutrient (Tester TYS-3N). The fluorescence spectrum was also obtained by using the systembuilt based on theLIFtechnology. Fluorescence spectra of leaf with different N-content were collected and then a fluorescence spectra database wasestablished. It is analyzed that the relationship between the parameters of fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅ is the ratio of fluorescence intensity of 740 nm. dividing that of 685 nm) and the N level of paddy. It is found that the effect of different N-content on the fluorescence spectrum characteristics is significant. The experiment demonstrated the positive correlation between fluorescence parameters and paddy leaf N-content. Results showed a positive linear correlation between the ratio of peak fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅) and N-content The correlation coefficient (r) reached 0.871 8 and the root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.076 82. The experiment demonstrated that LIF spectroscopy detection technology has the advantages of rapidand non-destructive measurement, and it also has the potential to measure plant content of nutrient elements. It will provide a more accurate remote sensing method to rapidly detect the crop nitrogen levels.

  16. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Maes, N. C. J.; Lamberts, T.; Sweep, A. M.; van de Water, W.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Dam, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (˜1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation.

  17. A handheld laser-induced fluorescence detector for multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-Xia; Li, Han-Yang; Fang, Pan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Fang, Qun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a compact handheld laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector based on a 450 nm laser diode and quasi-confocal optical configuration with a total size of 9.1 × 6.2 × 4.1 cm(3). Since there are few reports on the use of 450 nm laser diode in LIF detection, especially in miniaturized LIF detector, we systematically investigated various optical arrangements suitable for the requirements of 450 nm laser diode and system miniaturization, including focusing lens, filter combination, and pinhole, as well as Raman effect of water at 450 nm excitation wavelength. As the result, the handheld LIF detector integrates the light source (450 nm laser diode), optical circuit module (including a 450 nm band-pass filter, a dichroic mirror, a collimating lens, a 525 nm band-pass filter, and a 1.0mm aperture), optical detector (miniaturized photomultiplier tube), as well as electronic module (including signal recording, processing and displaying units). This detector is capable of working independently with a cost of ca. $2000 for the whole instrument. The detection limit of the instrument for sodium fluorescein solution is 0.42 nM (S/N=3). The broad applicability of the present system was demonstrated in capillary electrophoresis separation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled amino acids and in flow cytometry of tumor cells as an on-line LIF detector, as well as in droplet array chip analysis as a LIF scanner. We expect such a compact LIF detector could be applied in flow analysis systems as an on-line detector, and in field analysis and biosensor analysis as a portable universal LIF detector. PMID:26838391

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence in diagnosis of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakaki, Eleni A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan; Serafetinides, Alexandros A.

    2003-09-01

    laser induces better discrimination in deep caries diagnosis.

  19. Characterisation of estuarine intertidal macroalgae by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameiro, Carla; Utkin, Andrei B.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2015-12-01

    The article reports the application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for the assessment of macroalgae communities of estuarine intertidal areas. The method was applied for the characterisation of fifteen intertidal macroalgae species of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, and adjacent coastal area. Three bands characterised the LIF spectra of red macroalgae with emission maxima in the ranges 577-583 nm, 621-642 nm and 705-731 nm. Green and brown macroalgae showed one emission maximum in the red region (687-690 nm) and/or one in the far-red region (726-732 nm). Characteristics of LIF emission spectra were determined by differences in the main fluorescing pigments: phycoerythrin, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a (Chl a). In the green and brown macroalgae groups, the relative significance of the two emission maxima seems to be related to the thickness of the photosynthetic layer. In thick macroalgae, like Codium tomentosum or Fucus vesiculosus, the contribution of the far-red emission fluorescence peak was more significant, most probably due to re-absorption of the emitted red Chl a fluorescence within the dense photosynthetic layer. Similarly, an increase in the number of layers of the thin-blade green macroalgae Ulva rigida caused a shift to longer wavelengths of the red emission maximum and the development of a fluorescence peak at the far-red region. Water loss from Ulva's algal tissue also led to a decrease in the red/far-red Chl fluorescence ratio (F685/F735), indicating an increase in the density of chloroplasts in the shrinking macroalgal tissue during low tide exposure.

  20. Laser induced spark ignition of methane-oxygen mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santavicca, D. A.; Ho, C.; Reilly, B. J.; Lee, T.-W.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an experimental study of laser induced spark ignition of methane-oxygen mixtures are presented. The experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure and 296 K under laminar pre-mixed and turbulent-incompletely mixed conditions. A pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser was used as the ignition source. Laser sparks with energies of 10 mJ and 40 mJ were used, as well as a conventional electrode spark with an effective energy of 6 mJ. Measurements were made of the flame kernel radius as a function of time using pulsed laser shadowgraphy. The initial size of the spark ignited flame kernel was found to correlate reasonably well with breakdown energy as predicted by the Taylor spherical blast wave model. The subsequent growth rate of the flame kernel was found to increase with time from a value less than to a value greater than the adiabatic, unstretched laminar growth rate. This behavior was attributed to the combined effects of flame stretch and an apparent wrinkling of the flame surface due to the extremely rapid acceleration of the flame. The very large laminar flame speed of methane-oxygen mixtures appears to be the dominant factor affecting the growth rate of spark ignited flame kernels, with the mode of ignition having a small effect. The effect of incomplete fuel-oxidizer mixing was found to have a significant effect on the growth rate, one which was greater than could simply be accounted for by the effect of local variations in the equivalence ratio on the local flame speed.

  1. Standoff laser-induced thermal emission of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galán-Freyle, Nataly Y.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Figueroa-Navedo, Amanda; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    A laser mediated methodology for remote thermal excitation of analytes followed by standoff IR detection is proposed. The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of using laser induced thermal emission (LITE) from vibrationally excited explosives residues deposited on surfaces to detect explosives remotely. Telescope based FT-IR spectral measurements were carried out to examine substrates containing trace amounts of threat compounds used in explosive devices. The highly energetic materials (HEM) used were PETN, TATP, RDX, TNT, DNT and ammonium nitrate with concentrations from 5 to 200 μg/cm2. Target substrates of various thicknesses were remotely heated using a high power CO2 laser, and their mid-infrared (MIR) thermally stimulated emission spectra were recorded. The telescope was configured from reflective optical elements in order to minimize emission losses in the MIR frequencies and to provide optimum overall performance. Spectral replicas were acquired at a distance of 4 m with an FT-IR interferometer at 4 cm- 1 resolution and 10 scans. Laser power was varied from 4-36 W at radiation exposure times of 10, 20, 30 and 60 s. CO2 laser powers were adjusted to improve the detection and identification of the HEM samples. The advantages of increasing the thermal emission were easily observed in the results. Signal intensities were proportional to the thickness of the coated surface (a function of the surface concentration), as well as the laser power and laser exposure time. For samples of RDX and PETN, varying the power and time of induction of the laser, the calculated low limit of detections were 2 and 1 μg/cm2, respectively.

  2. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy based deminers' probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, James P.; Walker, Mark; Hamadani, Siavosh; Bloomhardt, Natalie; Eagan, Justin

    2009-05-01

    We report on a prototype Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Deminers' Probe used to identify underground objects. We have built a prototype, and are in the process of developing a more advanced LIBS based Deminer' s Probe used to prod objects underground, and then sense them by creating a micro-plasma plume of the surface material and analyzing the spectrum of the emitted light to identify the object. It is expected that the Deminer will be able to eliminate many false positives, which consume most of the Deminers' time. SARA Fiber-Optics coupled LIBS system consists in a probe that can be inserted into the ground to provide a path for both the laser beam to the target, and for the micro-plasma plume fluorescence from the target to a spectrometer or spectrometers for analysis. The probe is closely modeled after the conventional Deminers' probe, resembling a saber. We have demonstrated that this simple system is capable of producing remarkably different spectra from different materials. Our next steps are to add a number of features to the Deminers' Probe. These include: a new optical configuration to increase the irradiance and fluence created by the pulsed laser at the target, a multiple channel fluorescence reception system that can increase the amount of light delivered to the spectrometers, a fluidic system to clear the detritus away from the probe tip, and a complete operational/control and readout system for the Deminer to use. Mine-lane tests are planned to be performed in the later part of 2009, or shortly thereafter.

  3. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  4. Detection of uranium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chinni, Rosemarie C; Cremers, David A; Radziemski, Leon J; Bostian, Melissa; Navarro-Northrup, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this work is a detailed study of uranium detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for application to activities associated with environmental surveillance and detecting weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The study was used to assist development of LIBS instruments for standoff detection of bulk radiological and nuclear materials and these materials distributed as contaminants on surfaces. Uranium spectra were analyzed under a variety of different conditions at room pressure, reduced pressures, and in an argon atmosphere. All spectra displayed a high apparent background due to the high density of uranium lines. Time decay curves of selected uranium lines were monitored and compared to other elements in an attempt to maximize detection capabilities for each species in the complicated uranium spectrum. A survey of the LIBS uranium spectra was conducted and relative emission line strengths were determined over the range of 260 to 800 nm. These spectra provide a guide for selection of the strongest LIBS analytical lines for uranium detection in different spectral regions. A detection limit for uranium in soil of 0.26% w/w was obtained at close range and 0.5% w/w was achieved at a distance of 30 m. Surface detection limits were substrate dependent and ranged from 13 to 150 microg/cm2. Double-pulse experiments (both collinear and orthogonal arrangements) were shown to enhance the uranium signal in some cases. Based on the results of this work, a short critique is given of the applicability of LIBS for the detection of uranium residues on surfaces for environmental monitoring and WMD surveillance.

  5. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capoen, Bruno; Chahadih, Abdallah; El Hamzaoui, Hicham; Cristini, Odile; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  6. Diamond detectors with laser induced surface graphite electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komlenok, M.; Bolshakov, A.; Ralchenko, V.; Konov, V.; Conte, G.; Girolami, M.; Oliva, P.; Salvatori, S.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the response of metal-less CVD polycrystalline-diamond pixel sensors under β-particles irradiation. A 21×21 array of 0.18×0.18 mm2 pixels was realized on one side of a 10.0×10.0×0.5 mm3 polycrystalline diamond substrate by means of laser induced surface graphitization. With the same technique, a large graphite contact, used for detector biasing, was fabricated on the opposite side. A coincidence detecting method was used with two other reference polycrystalline diamond detectors for triggering, instead of commonly used scintillators, positioned in the front and on the back of the sensor-array with respect to the impinging particles trajectory. The collected charge distribution at each pixel was analyzed as a function of the applied bias. No change in the pulse height distribution was recorded by inverting the bias voltage polarity, denoting contacts ohmicity and symmetry. A fairly good pixel response uniformity was obtained: the collected charge most probable value saturates for all the pixels at an electric field strength of about ±0.6 V/μm. Under saturation condition, the average collected charge was equal to =1.64±0.02 fC, implying a charge collection distance of about 285 μm. A similar result, within 2%, was also obtained for 400 MeV electrons at beam test facility at INFN Frascati National Laboratory. Experimental results highlighted that more than 84% of impinging particles involved only one pixel, with no significant observed cross-talk effects.

  7. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy under Polar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, J. L.; Hark, R.; Bol'shakov, A.; Plumer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade our research team has evaluated the use of commercial-off-the-shelf laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for chemical analysis of snow and ice samples under polar conditions. One avenue of research explored LIBS suitability as a detector of paleo-climate proxy indicators (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) in ice as it relates to atmospheric circulation. LIBS results revealed detection of peaks for C and N, consistent with the presence of organic material, as well as major ions (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) and trace metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ti). The detection of Ca, K, Mg, and Na confirmed that LIBS has sufficient sensitivity to be used as a tool for characterization of paleo-climate proxy indicators in ice-core samples. Techniques were developed for direct analysis of ice as well as indirect measurements of ice via melting and filtering. Pitfalls and issues of direct ice analysis using several cooling techniques to maintain ice integrity will be discussed. In addition, a new technique, laser ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS) was applied to detection of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in ice as isotopic analysis of ice is the main tool in paleoclimatology and glaciology studies. Our results demonstrated that spectra of hydroxyl isotopologues 16OH, 18OH, and 16OD can be recorded with a compact spectrograph to determine hydrogen and oxygen isotopes simultaneously. Quantitative isotopic calibration for ice analysis can be accomplished using multivariate chemometric regression as previously realized for water vapor. Analysis with LIBS and LAMIS required no special sample preparation and was about ten times faster than analysis using ICP-MS. Combination of the two techniques in one portable instrument for in-field analysis appears possible and would eliminate the logistical and cost issues associated with ice core management.

  8. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectrum Characteristics of Paddy under Nitrogen Stress].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei; Du, Lin; Zhu, Bo; Ma, Ying-ying; Sun, Jia

    2016-02-01

    Order to guide fertilizing andreduce waste of resources as well as enviro nmental pollution, especially eutrophication, which are caused by excessive fertilization, a system of laser-induced fluorescence(LIF) was built. The system aimed to investigate the correlation between nitrogen(N) content of paddy leaf and the fluorescence intensity. We measuredNcontent and SPAD of paddy leaf (the samples came from the second upper leaves of paddy in tillering stage and the study area was located in Jianghan plain of China) by utilizing the Plant Nutrient (Tester TYS-3N). The fluorescence spectrum was also obtained by using the systembuilt based on theLIFtechnology. Fluorescence spectra of leaf with different N-content were collected and then a fluorescence spectra database wasestablished. It is analyzed that the relationship between the parameters of fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅ is the ratio of fluorescence intensity of 740 nm. dividing that of 685 nm) and the N level of paddy. It is found that the effect of different N-content on the fluorescence spectrum characteristics is significant. The experiment demonstrated the positive correlation between fluorescence parameters and paddy leaf N-content. Results showed a positive linear correlation between the ratio of peak fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅) and N-content The correlation coefficient (r) reached 0.871 8 and the root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.076 82. The experiment demonstrated that LIF spectroscopy detection technology has the advantages of rapidand non-destructive measurement, and it also has the potential to measure plant content of nutrient elements. It will provide a more accurate remote sensing method to rapidly detect the crop nitrogen levels. PMID:27209764

  9. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, D D; Maes, N C J; Lamberts, T; Sweep, A M; van de Water, W; Kunnen, R P J; Clercx, H J H; van Heijst, G J F; Dam, N J

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (∼1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation. PMID:27036779

  10. Laser Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for the ASTRAL Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert; Kamar, Ola; Munoz, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    A Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic is presented in this poster. The ion temperature measurements are made in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source using a diode laser based LIF diagnostic. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and any gas can be used for the discharge. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. A number of diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device (Langmuir Probe, Spectrometer, LIF system). The LIF diagnostic makes use of a diode laser with the following characteristics: 1.5 MHz bandwidth, Littrow external cavity, mode-hop free tuning range up to 16 GHz, total power output of about 15 mW. The wavelength is measured by a precision wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevents wavelength drift. For Ar plasma, a new LIF scheme has been developed. The laser tuned at 686.354 nm, is used to pump the 3d^4F5/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p^4D5/2 state. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p^4D5/2 and the 4s^4P3/2 terms (442.6 nm) is monitored by a PMT.

  11. Laser-induced selective copper plating of polypropylene surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratautas, K.; Gedvilas, M.; Stankevičiene, I.; JagminienÄ--, A.; Norkus, E.; Li Pira, N.; Sinopoli, S.; Emanuele, U.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2016-03-01

    Laser writing for selective plating of electro-conductive lines for electronics has several significant advantages, compared to conventional printed circuit board technology. Firstly, this method is faster and cheaper at the prototyping stage. Secondly, material consumption is reduced, because it works selectively. However, the biggest merit of this method is potentiality to produce moulded interconnect device, enabling to create electronics on complex 3D surfaces, thus saving space, materials and cost of production. There are two basic techniques of laser writing for selective plating on plastics: the laser-induced selective activation (LISA) and laser direct structuring (LDS). In the LISA method, pure plastics without any dopant (filler) can be used. In the LDS method, special fillers are mixed in the polymer matrix. These fillers are activated during laser writing process, and, in the next processing step, the laser modified area can be selectively plated with metals. In this work, both methods of the laser writing for the selective plating of polymers were investigated and compared. For LDS approach, new material: polypropylene with carbon-based additives was tested using picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses. Different laser processing parameters (laser pulse energy, scanning speed, the number of scans, pulse durations, wavelength and overlapping of scanned lines) were applied in order to find out the optimal regime of activation. Areal selectivity tests showed a high plating resolution. The narrowest width of a copper-plated line was less than 23 μm. Finally, our material was applied to the prototype of the electronic circuit board on a 2D surface.

  12. Liquid Jet Formation in Laser-Induced Forward Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, C. Frederik

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-write technique capable of printing precise patterns of a wide variety of materials. In this process, a laser pulse is focused through a transparent support and absorbed in a thin donor film, propelling material onto an adjacent acceptor substrate. For fluid materials, this transfer occurs through the formation of a narrow liquid jet, which eventually pinches off due to surface tension. This thesis examines in detail the fluid mechanics of the jet formation process occurring in LIFT. The main focus is on a variant of LIFT known as blister-actuated LIFT (BA-LIFT), in which the laser pulse is absorbed in an ink-coated polymer layer, rapidly deforming it locally into a blister to induce liquid jet formation. The early-time response of a fluid layer to a deforming boundary is analyzed with a domain perturbation method and potential-flow simulations, revealing scalings for energy and momentum transfer to the fluid and providing physical insight on how and why a jet forms in BA-LIFT. The remaining chapters explore more complex applications and modifications of LIFT. One is the possibility of high-repetition rate printing and limits on time delay and separation between pulses imposed by a tilting effect found for adjacent jets. Another examines a focusing effect achieved by perturbing the interface with ring-shaped disturbances. The third contains an experimental study of LIFT using a silver paste as the donor material instead of a Newtonian liquid. The transfer mechanism is significantly different, although with repeated pulses at one location, a focusing effect is again observed. All three of these chapters investigate how perturbations to the interface can strongly influence the jet formation process.

  13. Infrared laser induced plasma diagnostics of silver target

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmat, L. Nadeem, Ali; Ahmed, I.

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, the optical emission spectra of silver (Ag) plasma have been recorded and analyzed using the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. The emission line intensities and plasma parameters were investigated as a function of lens to sample distance, laser irradiance, and distance from the target surface. The electron number density (n{sub e}) and electron temperature (T{sub e}) were determined using the Stark broadened line profile and Boltzmann plot method, respectively. A gradual increase in the spectral line intensities and the plasma parameters, n{sub e} from 2.89 × 10{sup 17} to 3.92 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} and T{sub e} from 4662 to 8967 K, was observed as the laser irradiance was increased 2.29 × 10{sup 10}–1.06 × 10{sup 11} W cm{sup −2}. The spatial variations in n{sub e} and T{sub e} were investigated from 0 to 5.25 mm from the target surface, yielding the electron number density from 4.78 × 10{sup 17} to 1.72 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} and electron temperature as 9869–3789 K. In addition, the emission intensities and the plasma parameters of silver were investigated by varying the ambient pressure from 0.36 to 1000 mbars.

  14. Computational model of retinal photocoagulation and rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    In patterned scanning laser photocoagulation, shorter duration (< 20 ms) pulses help reduce thermal damage beyond the photoreceptor layer, decrease treatment time and minimize pain. However, safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of rupture threshold power to that of light coagulation) decreases for shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of thermal damage in the retina, and maximize the therapeutic window, we developed a computational model of retinal photocoagulation and rupture. Model parameters were adjusted to match measured thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Computed lesion width agreed with histological measurements in a wide range of pulse durations and power. Application of ring-shaped beam profile was predicted to double the therapeutic window width for exposures in the range of 1 - 10 ms.

  15. Experimental study of the spectral characteristics of laser-induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhaoxiang; Wu Jinquan; Sun Fenglou; Gong Shunsheng

    2010-05-01

    The characteristics of laser-induced air, N2, and O2 plasma spectra are investigated spectroscopically. The study concentrates mainly on the temporal behavior of laser-induced plasma after breakdown. We used delayed spectra and spectra evolution for this study. Except for the general one-beam laser-induced breakdown experiment, a second laser beam was added to further probe the behavior of plasma during its decay. We report the experimental results of spectra composition, spectra time evolution, and spectra affected by a second laser beam. We determined that all the laser-induced air plasma spectra are from a continuous spectrum and some line spectra superposed on the continuous spectrum. The stronger short wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by bremsstrahlung radiation of electrons in the plasma, and the weaker long wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by electron and ion recombination. Line spectra originate from excited molecules, atoms, and their first-order ions, but no line spectra form higher-order ions. The results show that the temporal behavior of some spectra is a decay-rise-redecay pattern. With the two laser beam experiment we found that all the spectra intensities are enhanced by the second laser beam, but the response of various spectra to the delay of the second laser beam is quite different, in particular, the intensity increments of some spectra increase with the delay of the second laser beam. Some microscopic processes of laser-induced plasma obtained from the experimental results are discussed. These results are useful for a better understanding of some laser-induced air plasma related applications, such as laser-guided lightning and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  16. Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopic imaging resolution of secondary retinal effects induced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwick, Harry; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce E.; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Elliot, Rowe; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Belkin, M.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    1996-02-01

    We have evaluated secondary laser induced retinal effects in non-human primates with a Rodenstock confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. A small eye animal model, the Garter snake, was employed to evaluate confocal numerical aperture effects in imaging laser retinal damage in small eyes vs. large eyes. Results demonstrate that the confocal image resolution in the Rhesus monkey eye is sufficient to differentiate deep retinal scar formation from retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) damage and to estimate the depth of the NFL damage. The best comparison with histological depth was obtained for the snake retina, yielding a ratio close to 1:1 compared to 2:1 for the Rhesus. Resolution in the Garter snake allows imaging the photoreceptor matrix and therefore, evaluation of the interrelationship between the primary damage site (posterior retina), the photoreceptor matrix, and secondary sites in the anterior retina such as the NFL and the epiretinal vascular system. Alterations in both the retinal NFL and epiretinal blood flow rate were observed within several minutes post Argon laser exposure. Unique aspects of the snake eye such as high tissue transparency and inherently high contrast cellular structures, contribute to the confocal image quality. Such factors may be nearly comparable in primate eyes suggesting that depth of resolution can be improved by smaller confocal apertures and more sensitive signal processing techniques.

  17. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  18. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in Geochemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis is being applied to an increasing number of geochemical problems, including mineral and rock analysis on the Mars rover Curiosity, elemental concentrations in ore minerals, identification of ore minerals, provenance determination of gems and other conflict minerals, geochemical mapping, correlation of rock units, and sample screening. LIBS is a laser ablation technique in which the photons emitted from electron transitions in the cooling plasma are diffracted and recorded as a spectrum. LIBS has several characteristics that set it apart from traditional, lab-based techniques. First, LIBS is relatively simple and requires no sample preparation, resulting in analysis that is portable, in situ, real-time, rapid, and inexpensive (in terms of equipment purchase, maintenance, and operating personnel). Second, each LIBS spectrum contains an enormous amount of information about the material. Most elements emit photons in the typical LIBS spectral range (200-1000 nm). Spectral interferences for which corrections are necessary in traditional techniques are additional, useful information in the LIBS spectrum, and recent work has demonstrated that some isotopic ratios can be measured with LIBS data. Thus, LIBS spectra are detailed chemical fingerprints of materials and the use of multivariate analysis can resolve issues that have been untouchable using traditional techniques. A good example is determination of country of origin for rubies and sapphires. Concentrations of key trace elements, as analyzed by LA-ICP-MS, have been used with marginal success to demonstrate that different deposits yield rubies or sapphires with unique, identifiable compositions. However, the fields for each deposit overlap in the 2- or 3-component diagrams commonly used. In contrast, it is possible to determine country of origin with greater than 90% accuracy using LIBS data, in which the intensities of 13,700 wavelengths are used as variables in

  19. Laser-induced breakdown emission in hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Carter, Campbell; Do, Hyungrok

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved emission measurements of laser-induced breakdown plasmas have been carried out to investigate the effect that gas species might have on the kinetics, particularly in excited states, and the resulting plasma properties. For this purpose, fuel-oxygen (O2)-carbon dioxide (CO2) mixtures with either helium (He) or nitrogen (N2) balance are prepared while maintaining their atomic compositions. The fuels tested in this study are methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), propane (C3H8), and butane (C4H10). The breakdown is produced in the mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/He, C2H4/O2/He, C3H8/CO2/O2/He and C4H10/CO2/O2/He or CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) at room conditions using the second harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (with pulse duration of 10 ns). The temporal evolution of plasma temperature is deduced from the ratio of two oxygen lines (777 nm and 823 nm) through Boltzmann analysis, while the evolution of electron number density is estimated based on Stark broadening of the Balmer-alpha (H α ) line at 656 nm and the measured plasma temperature. From the results, the temporal evolution of emission spectra and decay rates of atomic line-intensities are found to be almost identical between the breakdown plasma in the different mixtures given balancing gases. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of plasma temperature and electron number density are also found to be independent of the species compositions. Therefore, this behavior—of the breakdown emissions and plasma properties in the different mixtures with identical atomic composition—may be because the breakdown gases reach similar thermodynamic and physiochemical states immediately after the breakdown.

  20. Modeling of Laser Induced Damage in NIF UV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2001-02-21

    Controlling damage to nominally transparent optical elements such as lenses, windows and frequency conversion crystals on high power lasers is a continuing technical problem. Scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms of laser energy absorption, material heating and vaporization and resultant mechanical damage is especially important for UV lasers with large apertures such as NIF. This LDRD project was a single year effort, in coordination with associated experimental projects, to initiate theoretical descriptions of several of the relevant processes. In understanding laser damage, we distinguish between damage initiation and the growth of existent damage upon subsequent laser irradiation. In general, the effect of damage could be ameliorated by either preventing its initiation or by mitigating its growth. The distinction comes about because initiation is generally due to extrinsic factors such as contaminants, which provide a means of local laser energy absorption. Thus, initiation tends to be local and stochastic in nature. On the other hand, the initial damaging event appears to modify the surrounding material in such a way that multiple pulse damage grows more or less regularly. More exactly, three ingredients are necessary for visible laser induced damage. These are adequate laser energy, a mechanism of laser energy absorption and mechanical weakness. For damage growth, the material surrounding a damage site is already mechanically weakened by cracks and probably chemically modified as well. The mechanical damage can also lead to electric field intensification due to interference effects, thus increasing the available laser energy density. In this project, we successfully accounted for the pulselength dependence of damage threshold in bulk DKDP crystals with the hypothesis of small absorbers with a distribution of sizes. We theoretically investigated expected scaling of damage initiation craters both to baseline detailed numerical simulations

  1. Improvement of retinal blood vessel detection using morphological component analysis.

    PubMed

    Imani, Elaheh; Javidi, Malihe; Pourreza, Hamid-Reza

    2015-03-01

    Detection and quantitative measurement of variations in the retinal blood vessels can help diagnose several diseases including diabetic retinopathy. Intrinsic characteristics of abnormal retinal images make blood vessel detection difficult. The major problem with traditional vessel segmentation algorithms is producing false positive vessels in the presence of diabetic retinopathy lesions. To overcome this problem, a novel scheme for extracting retinal blood vessels based on morphological component analysis (MCA) algorithm is presented in this paper. MCA was developed based on sparse representation of signals. This algorithm assumes that each signal is a linear combination of several morphologically distinct components. In the proposed method, the MCA algorithm with appropriate transforms is adopted to separate vessels and lesions from each other. Afterwards, the Morlet Wavelet Transform is applied to enhance the retinal vessels. The final vessel map is obtained by adaptive thresholding. The performance of the proposed method is measured on the publicly available DRIVE and STARE datasets and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. An accuracy of 0.9523 and 0.9590 has been respectively achieved on the DRIVE and STARE datasets, which are not only greater than most methods, but are also superior to the second human observer's performance. The results show that the proposed method can achieve improved detection in abnormal retinal images and decrease false positive vessels in pathological regions compared to other methods. Also, the robustness of the method in the presence of noise is shown via experimental result.

  2. Patterned retinal coagulation with a scanning laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Jain, ATul; Paulus, Yannis; Andersen, Dan; Blumenkranz, Mark S.

    2007-02-01

    Pan-retinal photocoagulation in patients with diabetic retinopathy typically involves application of more than 1000 laser spots; often resulting in physician fatigue and patient discomfort. We present a semi-automated patterned scanning laser photocoagulator that rapidly applies predetermined patterns of lesions; thus, greatly improving the comfort, efficiency and precision of the treatment. Patterns selected from a graphical user interface are displayed on the retina with an aiming beam, and treatment can be initiated and interrupted by depressing a foot pedal. To deliver a significant number of burns during the eye's fixation time, each pulse should be considerably shorter than conventional 100ms pulse duration. We measured coagulation thresholds and studied clinical and histological outcomes of the application of laser pulses in the range of 1-200ms in pigmented rabbits. Laser power required for producing ophthalmoscopically visible lesions with a laser spot of 132μm decreased from 360 to 37mW with pulse durations increasing from 1 to 100ms. In the range of 10-100ms clinically and histologically equivalent light burns could be produced. The safe therapeutic range of coagulation (ratio of the laser power required to produce a rupture to that for a light burn) decreased with decreasing pulse duration: from 3.8 at 100ms, to 3.0 at 20ms, to 2.5 at 10ms, and to 1.1 at 1ms. Histology demonstrated increased confinement of the thermal damage with shorter pulses, with coagulation zone limited to the photoreceptor layer at pulses shorter than 10ms. Durations of 10-20ms appear to be a good compromise between the speed and safety of retinal coagulation. Rapid application of multiple lesions greatly improves the speed, precision, and reduces pain in retinal photocoagulation.

  3. In vivo analysis of the time and spatial activation pattern of microglia in the retina following laser-induced choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Garcia, Sergio; Reichhart, Nadine; Hernandez-Matas, Carlos; Zabulis, Xenophon; Kociok, Norbert; Brockmann, Claudia; Joussen, Antonia M; Strauss, Olaf

    2015-10-01

    Microglia play a major role in retinal neovascularization and degeneration and are thus potential targets for therapeutic intervention. In vivo assessment of microglia behavior in disease models can provide important information to understand patho-mechanisms and develop therapeutic strategies. Although scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) permits the monitoring of microglia in transgenic mice with microglia-specific GFP expression, there are fundamental limitations in reliable identification and quantification of activated cells. Therefore, we aimed to improve the SLO-based analysis of microglia using enhanced image processing with subsequent testing in laser-induced neovascularization (CNV). CNV was induced by argon laser in MacGreen mice. Microglia was visualized in vivo by SLO in the fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF) mode and verified ex vivo using retinal preparations. Three image processing algorithms based on different analysis of sequences of images were tested. The amount of recorded frames was limiting the effectiveness of the different algorithms. Best results from short recordings were obtained with a pixel averaging algorithm, further used to quantify spatial and temporal distribution of activated microglia in CNV. Morphologically, different microglia populations were detected in the inner and outer retinal layers. In CNV, the peak of microglia activation occurred in the inner layer at day 4 after laser, lacking an acute reaction. Besides, the spatial distribution of the activation changed by the time over the inner retina. No significant time and spatial changes were observed in the outer layer. An increase in laser power did not increase number of activated microglia. The SLO, in conjunction with enhanced image processing, is suitable for in vivo quantification of microglia activation. This surprisingly revealed that laser damage at the outer retina led to more reactive microglia in the inner retina, shedding light upon a new perspective to approach

  4. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, September 1983-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.

    1984-09-01

    Advances made in the work for the Ocular Hazards Program at the Letterman Army Institute of Research (LAIR) are described. The research has seen the first application of femtosecond lasers to the visual system; it is giving new insights into how these ultimate laser sources interact with biological tissue in general and with the visual system in particular. The authors have discovered that simple anions can activate visual photoreceptors in the dark; among these anionic activators is the dental agent fluoride. Research has continued into identifying selectively and spatially the image of various elements in photoreceptors and adjacent tissue. The authors were able to extend our preparation procedures to view the elemental composition of such components as melanin granules. The sensitive and selective spatial images should play important roles in extending understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage. The staining procedures developed can be applied to study laser-damaged retina. Data were obtained demonstrating rapid mechanical motions in vertebrate photoreceptors. Such rapid mechanical motions which parallel electrophysiological responses in the cell may lie at the very basis of photoreceptor function. Laser-damage mechanisms should now be reevaluated in terms of this new data. The effect of laser light on these newly discovered mechanical motions will surely lead to new and improved understanding of low-level laser ocular hazards.

  5. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, September 1982-August 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis

    1983-09-01

    This research led to major discoveries in two general areas. First, it was shown that there are a series of anionic activators of visual cells. These anionic activators turn on, in the dark, the enzymatic processes usually stimulated by light. Among these anionic activators is fluoride, the important additive in dental care. It is possible that the discovery of anionic activators will allow modulation of visual sensitivity and excitation. A second major advance was the development of a staining method that allows the direct observation with light microscopy of actin filaments in rod outer segments. This discovery will now allow viewing these important actin filaments in live cells under physiologically relevant experimental conditions. It will also allow for the development of new methods to probe pathological and damaged conditions in visual photoreceptor cells. The above discoveries are described in two separate sections, the first entitled Anionic Activators of Photoreceptor Cells in the Dark, and the second entitled Visualization of Actin in Photoreceptor Cells by Light Microscopy.

  6. Characterization of a Spontaneous Retinal Neovascular Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Eiichi; Sweigard, Harry; Husain, Deeba; Olivares, Ana M.; Chang, Bo; Smith, Kaylee E.; Birsner, Amy E.; D’Amato, Robert J.; Michaud, Norman A.; Han, Yinan; Vavvas, Demetrios G.; Miller, Joan W.; Haider, Neena B.; Connor, Kip M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vision loss due to vascular disease of the retina is a leading cause of blindness in the world. Retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) is a subgroup of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), whereby abnormal blood vessels develop in the retina leading to debilitating vision loss and eventual blindness. The novel mouse strain, neoretinal vascularization 2 (NRV2), shows spontaneous fundus changes associated with abnormal neovascularization. The purpose of this study is to characterize the induction of pathologic angiogenesis in this mouse model. Methods The NRV2 mice were examined from postnatal day 12 (p12) to 3 months. The phenotypic changes within the retina were evaluated by fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis. The pathological neovascularization was imaged by confocal microscopy and reconstructed using three-dimensional image analysis software. Results We found that NRV2 mice develop multifocal retinal depigmentation in the posterior fundus. Depigmented lesions developed vascular leakage observed by fluorescein angiography. The spontaneous angiogenesis arose from the retinal vascular plexus at postnatal day (p)15 and extended toward retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By three months of age, histological analysis revealed encapsulation of the neovascular lesion by the RPE in the photoreceptor cell layer and subretinal space. Conclusions The NRV2 mouse strain develops early neovascular lesions within the retina, which grow downward towards the RPE beginning at p15. This retinal neovascularization model mimics early stages of human retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) and will likely be a useful in elucidating targeted therapeutics for patients with ocular neovascular disease. PMID:25188381

  7. Reconstruction of laser-induced cavitation bubble dynamics based on a Fresnel propagation approach.

    PubMed

    Devia-Cruz, Luis Felipe; Camacho-López, Santiago; Cortés, Víctor Ruiz; Ramos-Muñiz, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2015-12-10

    A single laser-induced cavitation bubble in transparent liquids has been studied through a variety of experimental techniques. High-speed video with varying frame rate up to 20×10(7)   fps is the most suitable to study nonsymmetric bubbles. However, it is still expensive for most researchers and more affordable (lower) frame rates are not enough to completely reproduce bubble dynamics. This paper focuses on combining the spatial transmittance modulation (STM) technique, a single shot cavitation bubble and a very simple and inexpensive experimental technique, based on Fresnel approximation propagation theory, to reproduce a laser-induced cavitation spatial dynamics. Our results show that the proposed methodology reproduces a laser-induced cavitation event much more accurately than 75,000 fps video recording. In conclusion, we propose a novel methodology to reproduce laser-induced cavitation events that combine the STM technique with Fresnel propagation approximation theory that properly reproduces a laser-induced cavitation event including a very precise identification of the first, second, and third collapses of the cavitation bubble. PMID:26836867

  8. Time-Resolved Aluminum Monoxide Emission Measurements in Laser-Induced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, David; Parigger, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced plasmas are useful for diagnostic applications in a wide variety of fields. One application is the creation of laser-induced plasmas on the surface of an aluminum sample to simulate an aluminized flame. In this study, aluminum monoxide emissions are measured to characterize the temperature along the laser-induced plasma as a function of time delay following laser-induced optical breakdown. The breakdown event is achieved by focusing 1064 nanometer laser radiation from an Nd:YAG laser onto the surface of an aluminum sample. Light from the plasma is dispersed with the use of a Czerny-Turner spectrograph, and time resolved emission spectra are recorded with an intensified, gated detector. Temperatures are inferred from the diatomic molecular emissions by fitting the experimentally collected to theoretically calculated spectra using a Nelder-Mead algorithm. For computation of synthetic spectra we utilize accurate line strengths for selected AlO molecular bands. Atomic emissions from aluminum are also investigated in our study of laser-induced plasma.

  9. Retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium forms early in development and subsequently remains dormant, undergoing minimal proliferation throughout normal life. Retinal pigment epithelium proliferation, however, can be activated in disease states or by removing retinal pigment epithelial cells into culture. We review the conditions that control retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in culture, in animal models and in human disease and interpret retinal pigment epithelium proliferation in context of the recently discovered retinal pigment epithelium stem cell that is responsible for most in vitro retinal pigment epithelial proliferation. Retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated wound repair that occurs in selected macular diseases is contrasted with retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated fibroblastic scar formation that underlies proliferative vitreoretinopathy. We discuss the role of retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in age-related macular degeneration which is reparative in some cases and destructive in others. Macular retinal pigment epithelium wound repair and regression of choroidal neovascularization are more pronounced in younger than older patients. We discuss the possibility that the limited retinal pigment epithelial proliferation and latent wound repair in older age-related macular degeneration patients can be stimulated to promote disease regression in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26041390

  10. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  11. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  12. Finite element model of thermal processes in retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Short duration (< 20 ms) pulses are desirable in patterned scanning laser photocoagulation to confine thermal damage to the photoreceptor layer, decrease overall treatment time and reduce pain. However, short exposures have a smaller therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of rupture threshold power to that of light coagulation). We have constructed a finite-element computational model of retinal photocoagulation to predict spatial damage and improve the therapeutic window. Model parameters were inferred from experimentally measured absorption characteristics of ocular tissues, as well as the thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Calculated lesion diameters showed good agreement with histological measurements over a wide range of pulse durations and powers.

  13. Differential expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases accompanies the reorganisation of the retina upon laser lesion.

    PubMed

    Besser, Manuela; Horvat-Bröcker, Andrea; Eysel, Ulf T; Faissner, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    The regulation of protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in virtually all aspects of eukaryotic development. Beginning with the regulation of the cell cycle to cellular proliferation and differentiation, the delicate balance between the phosphorylating activity of kinases and the dephosphorylation by phosphatases controls the outcome of many signal transduction cascades. The generation of cellular diversity occurs in an environment that is structured by the extracellular matrix (ECM) which forms a surrounding niche for stem and progenitor cells. Cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions elicit specific signaling pathways that control cellular behavior. In pathological situations such as neural degenerating diseases, gene expression patterns and finally the composition of the ECM change dramatically. This leads to changes of cell behavior and finally results in the failure of regeneration and functional restoration in the adult central nervous system. In order to study the roles of tyrosine phosphatases and ECM in this context, we analyzed the effects of laser-induced retinal injury on the regulation of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTP) RPTPBr7, Phogrin and RPTPbeta/zeta. The latter occurs in several isoforms, including the soluble released chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan phosphacan that is expressed in the developing retina. The receptor variants RPTPbeta/zeta(long) and RPTPbeta/zeta(short) may serve as receptors of tenascin-proteins and serve as modulators of cell intrinsic signaling in response to the ECM. Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis, we show here a time-dependent pattern of gene expression of these molecules following laser lesions of the retina.

  14. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Beach, James

    2014-01-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry. PMID:25237591

  15. Laser-induced THz magnetization precession for a tetragonal Heusler-like nearly compensated ferrimagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, S.; Sugihara, A.; Iihama, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Suzuki, K. Z.; Miyazaki, T.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-induced magnetization precessional dynamics was investigated in epitaxial films of Mn3Ge, which is a tetragonal Heusler-like nearly compensated ferrimagnet. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) mode was observed, the precession frequency for which exceeded 0.5 THz and originated from the large magnetic anisotropy field of approximately 200 kOe for this ferrimagnet. The effective damping constant was approximately 0.03. The corresponding effective Landau-Lifshitz constant is approximately 60 Mrad/s and is comparable with those of the similar Mn-Ga materials. The physical mechanisms for the Gilbert damping and for the laser-induced excitation of the FMR mode were also discussed in terms of the spin-orbit-induced damping and the laser-induced ultrafast modulation of the magnetic anisotropy, respectively.

  16. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water based on graphite conch method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlong; Liu, Jianguo; Zhao, Nanjing; Shi, Huan; Liu, Lituo; Ma, Mingjun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Wenqing

    2012-10-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission characteristics of trace heavy metal lead in water is studied based on graphite conch method, with a 1064nm wavelength Nd: YAG laser as excitation source, the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector are used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. The delay time 900ns and gate time 1600ns are determined in the experiment. The calibration curve of Pb is plotted based on the different concentration measurement results, and a limit of detection of 0.0138mg / L is obtained for Pb in water. Graphite conch method effectively overcomes the current problems on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water. The detection limits and stability are improved. The reference data is provided for further study on the fast measurement of trace heavy metals in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique.

  17. Laser-induced plasmas in ambient air for incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruth, Albert A; Dixneuf, Sophie; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-03-01

    The emission from a laser-induced plasma in ambient air, generated by a high power femtosecond laser, was utilized as pulsed incoherent broadband light source in the center of a quasi-confocal high finesse cavity. The time dependent spectra of the light leaking from the cavity was compared with those of the laser-induced plasma emission without the cavity. It was found that the light emission was sustained by the cavity despite the initially large optical losses of the laser-induced plasma in the cavity. The light sustained by the cavity was used to measure part of the S(1) ← S(0) absorption spectrum of gaseous azulene at its vapour pressure at room temperature in ambient air as well as the strongly forbidden γ-band in molecular oxygen: b(1)Σ(g)(+)(ν'=2)←X(3)Σ(g)(-)(ν''=0). PMID:25836833

  18. Simulation and characterization of laser induced deformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yajun

    2006-04-01

    Laser induced deformation processes include laser forming (LF) and laser shock processing. LF is a recently developed and highly flexible thermal forming technique, and laser shock processing is an innovative mechanical process in which shock waves up to 10GPa are generated by a confined laser ablation process. The generated high pressure imparts beneficial residual stress into the surface layer of metal parts as well as shapes thin metal parts. In laser forming, it has been known that microstructural evolution has an important effect on the deformation process, and that the typical thermal cycles in laser forming are much steeper than those in other thermal mechanical processes like welding and hot rolling. In this study, microstructural evolution in laser forming has been investigated, and a thermal-microstructural-mechanical model is developed to predict microstructural changes (phase transformations and recrystallization) and their effects on flow behavior and deformation. Grain structure and phase transformation in heat affected zone (HAZ) is experimentally characterized, and measurement of bending curvature also helps to validate the proposed model. Based on the similar methodology, two different materials have been studied: AISI 1010 low carbon steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. In the case of Ti-6A1-4V alloy, the initial phase ratio of Ti-alpha and Ti-beta need to be measured by X-ray diffraction. In laser shock processing, under shock loading solid material behavior is fluidlike and shock-solid interactions play a key role in determining the induced residual stress distributions and the final deformed shape. In this work shock-solid interactions under high pressure and thus high strain rate in laser shock processing are studied and simulated based on conservation's law, equation of state and elastoplasticity of material. A series of carefully controlled experiments, including spatially resolved residual stress measurement by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and

  19. Central serous choroidopathy with bullous retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, I; Uyama, M

    1978-05-16

    We report here a new type of secondary retinal detachment that has never been clearly defined. The characteristic features of the disease are: (1) prevalence in middle-aged males, (2) bilateral involvement, (3) frequent existence of prodromal lesions that over long periods resemble central serous retinopathy, (4) in the evolution stage, appearance of multiple yellowish white exudative flecks of one-half to one disc in diameter at or near the posterior pole of the fundus, (5) fluorescein studies revealing pronounced leakage of dye from the choroid into the subretinal space at the sites of exudates, (6) retinal detachment of various degrees with shifting subretinal fluid and without tears, (7) no evidence of intraocular inflammation, (8) no filling abnormalities seen in the choroidal fluorescence, (9) no response to medical therapy, including steroids and antibiotics, (10) photocoagulation to leakage sites leading to rapid resolution of retinal detachment; otherwise, spontaneous healing of detachment occurring within about 7-9 months, leaving fibroblastic macular scars and marked visual loss, and (11) no evidence of systemic findings that may be of etiologic significance. From this characteristic clinical picture, the idea of a new clinical entity must be considered. Our findings in 35 eyes from 18 Japanese patients are discussed.

  20. [Laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect in laser resonance ionization process of lead atom].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Shun; Li, Ying; Dai, Lin; Zheng, Rong-Er

    2008-07-01

    Isotope ratio measurements have been increasingly used in geochemistry, geochronology, cosmos chemistry and environmental science. Precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements are an important task in many applications such as the determination of isotope variations in geological and cosmic samples. Due to its high sensitivity, high ionization efficiency and high element selectivity, laser resonance ionization spectroscopy has nowadays become one of the key techniques, including isotope ratio measurements and trace amount analyses. Because of the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure, there is laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect in the process of laser resonance ionization. The different isotope ionization efficiency can affect precise and accurate measurement of isotope ratios. In the present paper, the dependences of the laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect on some of the laser parameters were studied by theoretical methods. Based on the numerical simulation of the population rate equations, laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect of lead isotopes was studied, by calculating laser resonance ionization transition "6s2 6p23 P0-6s2 6p7 s3 P1(0) --> ionization". The population rate equations was approximated considering some factors which affect the probability of laser resonance transition such as spectral lines width of laser and atom, isotope shifts and hyperfine structure. According to the approximated population rate equations, "1+1" laser resonant ionization process was employed to calculate the ionization probability of lead isotopes by means of computer simulation. The dependences of laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect on the laser parameters, such as laser central wavelength, bandwidth and intensity were investigated. The calculated results show that the laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect of lead isotopes could be almost eliminated by operating at optimized wavelength and could be lessened by using wide band laser

  1. Remote imaging laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy using nanosecond pulses from a mobile lidar system.

    PubMed

    Grönlund, Rasmus; Lundqvist, Mats; Svanberg, Sune

    2006-08-01

    A mobile lidar system was used in remote imaging laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments. Also, computer-controlled remote ablation of a chosen area was demonstrated, relevant to cleaning of cultural heritage items. Nanosecond frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser pulses at 355 nm were employed in experiments with a stand-off distance of 60 meters using pulse energies of up to 170 mJ. By coaxial transmission and common folding of the transmission and reception optical paths using a large computer-controlled mirror, full elemental imaging capability was achieved on composite targets. Different spectral identification algorithms were compared in producing thematic data based on plasma or fluorescence light. PMID:16925920

  2. Luminosity and contrast normalization in color retinal images based on standard reference image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S. Varnousfaderani, Ehsan; Yousefi, Siamak; Belghith, Akram; Goldbaum, Michael H.

    2016-03-01

    Color retinal images are used manually or automatically for diagnosis and monitoring progression of a retinal diseases. Color retinal images have large luminosity and contrast variability within and across images due to the large natural variations in retinal pigmentation and complex imaging setups. The quality of retinal images may affect the performance of automatic screening tools therefore different normalization methods are developed to uniform data before applying any further analysis or processing. In this paper we propose a new reliable method to remove non-uniform illumination in retinal images and improve their contrast based on contrast of the reference image. The non-uniform illumination is removed by normalizing luminance image using local mean and standard deviation. Then the contrast is enhanced by shifting histograms of uniform illuminated retinal image toward histograms of the reference image to have similar histogram peaks. This process improve the contrast without changing inter correlation of pixels in different color channels. In compliance with the way humans perceive color, the uniform color space of LUV is used for normalization. The proposed method is widely tested on large dataset of retinal images with present of different pathologies such as Exudate, Lesion, Hemorrhages and Cotton-Wool and in different illumination conditions and imaging setups. Results shows that proposed method successfully equalize illumination and enhances contrast of retinal images without adding any extra artifacts.

  3. The Role of Fundus Autofluorescence in Late-Onset Retinitis Pigmentosa (LORP) Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tamara J.; Hwang, John C.; Chen, Royce W. S.; Lima, Luiz H.; Wang, Nan-Kai; Tosi, Joaquin; Freund, K. Bailey; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the utility and characteristics of fundus autofluorescence in late-onset retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Observational case series. Patients diagnosed with late-onset retinitis pigmentosa were identified retrospectively in an institutional setting. Twelve eyes of six patients were identified and medical records were reviewed. Results All patients presented with slowly progressive peripheral field loss and initial clinical examination revealed only subtle retinal changes. There was a notable lack of intraretinal pigment migration in all patients. Five out of six patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain to rule out intracranial processes and all were referred from another ophthalmologist for further evaluation. Fundus autofluorescence was ultimately employed in all patients and revealed more extensive retinal pathology than initially appreciated on clinical examination. Fundus autofluorescence directed the workup toward a retinal etiology in all cases and led to the eventual diagnosis of late-onset retinitis pigmentosa through electroretinogram testing. Conclusion Fundus autofluorescence may be a more sensitive marker for retinal pathology than stereo fundus biomicroscopy alone in late-onset retinitis pigmentosa. Early use of fundus autofluorescence imaging in the evaluation of patients with subtle retinal lesions and complaints of peripheral field loss may be an effective strategy for timely and cost-efficient diagnosis. PMID:23899229

  4. Femtosecond laser-induced breakdown in distilled water for fabricating the helical microchannels array.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Qu, Shiliang

    2011-11-01

    We have fabricated complex helical microchannel arrays with uniform diameter in silica glass using femtosecond laser-induced breakdown in distilled water. The generated high-speed jet and shockwave cause cavitation damage in silica glass. Distilled water injected into microchannels through a rubber hose is used for effectively ejecting the debris. The low concentration of debris in the ablated area ensure continuously femtosecond laser-induced breakdown. The distribution, coil number, coil diameter and pitch of the helical microchannel arrays can be controlled.

  5. Laser-induced synthesis and decay of Tritium under exposure of solid targets in heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Timashev, S. F.; Shafeev, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    The processes of laser-assisted synthesis of Tritium nuclei and their laser-induced decay in cold plasma in the vicinity of solid targets (Au, Ti, Se, etc.) immersed into heavy water are experimentally realized at peak laser intensity of 1010-1013 W/cm2. Initial stages of Tritium synthesis and their laser-induced beta-decay are interpreted on the basis of non-elastic interaction of plasma electrons having kinetic energy of 5-10 eV with nuclei of Deuterium and Tritium, respectively.

  6. (Study of flow properties of wet solids using laser induced photo chemical anemometry)

    SciTech Connect

    Falco, B.

    1992-04-09

    A new diagnostic measurement technique is being developed that will enable the investigation of the dynamics of flowing wet solids. The technique involves the use of Laser Induced Photochemical Anemometry (LIPA), enhanced to enable two photochemical species to be excited. It uses laser induced photochromic and photo luminescent molecules to separately tag the two phases for times long enough for them to distort the tagging. Recording the distortions of the tagging caused by the movement of each phase enables us to obtain local characterization of flow properties of both phases of the wet solids at many positions simultaneously across a pipe.

  7. Non-gated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water by position-selective detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Zheng, Ronger

    2015-09-14

    Temporal and spatial evolutions of the laser-induced plasma in bulk water are investigated using fast imaging and emission spectroscopic techniques. By tightly focusing a single-pulse nanosecond Nd: YAG laser beam into the bulk water, we generate a strongly expanded plasma with high reproducibility. Such a strong expanding plasma enables us to obtain well-resolved spectral lines by means of position-selective detection; hence, the time-gated detector becomes abdicable. The present results suggest not only a possible non-gated approach for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy but also give an insight into the plasma generation and expansion in bulk water.

  8. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Nanofibers and Laser-Induced Incandescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Kathy (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randy L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; Berger, Gordon M.; Patel, Premal D.

    2004-01-01

    Laser induced incandescence applied to a heterogeneous, multi-element reacting flows is characterized by a) temporally resolved emission spectra, time-resolved emission at selected detection wavelengths and fluence dependence. Laser fluences above 0.6 Joules per square centimeter at 1064 nm initiate laser-induced vaporization, yielding a lower incandescence intensity, as found through fluence dependence measurements. Spectrally derived temperatures show that values of excitation laser fluence beyond this value lead to a super-heated plasma, well above the vaporization of temperature of carbon. The temporal evolution of the emission signal at these fluences is consistent with plasma dissipation processes, not incandescence from solid-like structures.

  9. Modification of the photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Takashi; Buica, Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    We theoretically investigate how the photoelectron angular distribution is altered by the introduction of a dressing laser. The physical mechanism underlying this alteration is the so-called laser-induced continuum structure; namely, a strong dressing laser induces quantum mechanical interference, the degree of which is different for different ionization channels. Therefore the branching ratio into different ionization channels changes as a function of laser detuning, and accordingly the photoelectron angular distribution is altered. After a general argument, we present specific theoretical results for the K atom, which indeed exhibit significant modification of the photoelectron angular distribution.

  10. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Anmin; Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  11. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  12. Degenerative retinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G. Anderson, R.E. LaVail, M.M. . Dept. of Anatomy)

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among three sections. Some of the paper titles are: Molecular Genetics of Gyrate Atrophy; Molecular Site of Expression and Genetic Interaction of the rd and the rds Loci in the Retina of the Mouse; and Studies on Abnormal Cyclic GMP Metabolism in Animal Models of Retinal Degeneration: Genetic Relationships and Cellular Compartmentalization.

  13. Generating Recombinant Antibodies against Putative Biomarkers of Retinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kierny, Michael R.; Cunningham, Thomas D.; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Edward, Deepak P.; Kay, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Candidate biomarkers, indicative of disease or injury, are beginning to overwhelm the process of validation through immunological means. Recombinant antibodies developed through phage-display offer an alternative means of generating monoclonal antibodies faster than traditional immunization of animals. Peptide segments of putative biomarkers of laser induced injury in the rabbit, discovered through mass spectrometry, were used as targets for a selection against a library of phage-displayed human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies. Highly specific antibodies were isolated to four of these unique peptide sequences. One antibody against the retinal protein, Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Protein Beta 5 (GBB5), had a dissociation constant ~300 nM and recognized the full-length endogenous protein in retinal homogenates of three different animal species by western blot. Alanine scanning of the peptide target identified three charged and one hydrophobic amino acid as the critical binding residues for two different scFvs. To enhance the utility of the reagent, one scFv was dimerized through a Fragment-crystallizable hinge region (i.e., Fc) and expressed in HEK-293 cells. This dimeric reagent yielded a 25-fold lower detection limit in western blots. PMID:25902199

  14. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Measurements of laser-induced shock waves in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werdiger, M.; Arad, B.; Moshe, E.; Eliezer, S.

    1995-02-01

    A simple optical method for measurements of high-irradiance (3×1013 W cm-2) laser-induced shock waves is described. The shock wave velocity (~13 km s-1) was measured with an error not exceeding 5%. The laser-induced one-to-two-dimensional (1D-to-2D) shock wave transition was studied.

  15. A case of atypical progressive outer retinal necrosis after highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Se Joon; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chung, Hum

    2004-06-01

    This is a report of an atypical case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) and the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the clinical course of viral retinitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. A 22-year-old male patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presented with unilaterally reduced visual acuity and a dense cataract. After cataract extraction, retinal lesions involving the peripheral and macular areas were found with perivascular sparing and the mud-cracked, characteristic appearance of PORN. He was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and was given combined antiviral treatment. With concurrent HAART, the retinal lesions regressed, with the regression being accelerated by further treatment with intravenous acyclovir and ganciclovir. This case suggests that HAART may change the clinical course of PORN in AIDS patients by improving host immunity. PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute unilateral cataract in AIDS patients. PMID:15255240

  16. A case of atypical progressive outer retinal necrosis after highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Se Joon; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chung, Hum

    2004-06-01

    This is a report of an atypical case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) and the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the clinical course of viral retinitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. A 22-year-old male patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presented with unilaterally reduced visual acuity and a dense cataract. After cataract extraction, retinal lesions involving the peripheral and macular areas were found with perivascular sparing and the mud-cracked, characteristic appearance of PORN. He was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and was given combined antiviral treatment. With concurrent HAART, the retinal lesions regressed, with the regression being accelerated by further treatment with intravenous acyclovir and ganciclovir. This case suggests that HAART may change the clinical course of PORN in AIDS patients by improving host immunity. PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute unilateral cataract in AIDS patients.

  17. An acoustic based, laser induced breakdown method for determining the sizes and concentrations of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyun; Kim, Ji-Woong; Son, Ji-A; Choi, Joong-Gill

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic, laser induced breakdown (LIBD) method has been developed for determining the sizes and concentrations of nano-sized colloids. The size distributions from a mixture of aquatic nanoparticles are determined by measuring amplitudes of plasma shockwave that are fitted to multi-curve Gaussian distributions displayed in separate peaks with positions corresponding to particle sizes and areas being proportional to concentrations.

  18. Recognition of edible oil by using BP neural network and laser induced fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Tao-tao; Chen, Si-ying; Zhang, Yin-chao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He; Zhang, Hong-yan; Liu, Xiao-hua; Wang, Yuan; Bu, Zhi-chao

    2013-09-01

    In order to accomplish recognition of the different edible oil we set up a laser induced fluorescence spectrum system in the laboratory based on Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, and then collect the fluorescence spectrum of different edible oil by using that system. Based on this, we set up a fluorescence spectrum database of different cooking oil. It is clear that there are three main peak position of different edible oil from fluorescence spectrum chart. Although the peak positions of all cooking oil were almost the same, the relative intensity of different edible oils was totally different. So it could easily accomplish that oil recognition could take advantage of the difference of relative intensity. Feature invariants were extracted from the spectrum data, which were chosen from the fluorescence spectrum database randomly, before distinguishing different cooking oil. Then back propagation (BP) neural network was established and trained by the chosen data from the spectrum database. On that basis real experiment data was identified by BP neural network. It was found that the overall recognition rate could reach as high as 83.2%. Experiments showed that the laser induced fluorescence spectrum of different cooking oil was very different from each other, which could be used to accomplish the oil recognition. Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, combined BP neural network,was fast, high sensitivity, non-contact, and high recognition rate. It could become a new technique to accomplish the edible oil recognition and quality detection.

  19. [Study of enhancement effect of laser-induced crater on plasma radiation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Qing-Lin; Su, Hong-Xin; Li, Guang

    2009-02-01

    Single pulses exported from high-energy neodymium glass laser were used to act on the same position of soil sample surface repeatedly, and the plasma emission spectra generated from sequential laser pulse action were collected by spectral recording system. The experimental results show that the laser-induced soil plasma radiation was enhanced continuously under the confinement effect of the crater walls, and the line intensities and signal-to-background ratios both had different improvements along with increasing the number of acting pulses. The photographs of the plasma image and crater appearance were taken to study the plasma shape, laser-induced crater appearance, and the mass of the ablated sample. The internal mechanism behind that laser-induced crater enhanced plasma radiation was researched. Under the sequential laser pulse action, the forming plasma as a result enlarges gradually first, leading to distortion at the trail of plasma plume, and then, its volume diminishes slowly. And also, the color of the plasma changes from buff to white gradually, which implies that the temperature increases constantly. The laser-induced crater had a regular shape, that is, the diameter increased from its bottom to top gradually, thus forming a taper. The mass of the laser-ablated substance descends along with increasing the amount of action pulse. Atomization degree of vaporized substance was improved in virtue of the crater confinement effect, Fresnel absorption produced from the crater walls reflection, and the inverse bremsstrahlung, and the plasma radiation intensity was enhanced as a result.

  20. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edwards; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1991-04-09

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  1. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1996-02-20

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  2. Laser-Induced Damage Threshold and Certification Procedures for Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This document provides instructions for performing laser-induced-damage-threshold tests and pass-fail certification tests on optical materials used in pulsed-laser systems. The optical materials to which these procedures apply include coated and uncoated optical substrates, laser crystals, Q-switches, polarizers, and other optical components employed in pulsed-laser systems.

  3. Use of laser-induced ionization to detect soot inception in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzello, Samuel L.; Lee, Eui Ju; Mulholland, George W.

    2005-08-01

    Experimental measurements of laser-induced ionization were performed for ethene-air premixed flames operated near the soot inception point. Soot was ionized with a pulsed laser operated at 532 nm. The ionization signal was collected with a tungsten electrode located in the postflame region. Ionization signals were collected by use of both single-electrode and dual-electrode configurations. Earlier laser-induced- ionization studies focused on the use of a single biased electrode to generate the electric field, with the burner head serving as the path to ground. In many practical combustion systems, a path to ground is not readily available. To apply the laser-induced- ionization diagnostic to these geometries, a dual-electrode geometry must be employed. The influence of electrode configuration, flame equivalence ratio, and flame height on ionization signal detection was determined. The efficacy of the laser-induced-ionization diagnostic in detecting soot inception in the postflame region of a premixed flame by use of a dual-electrode configuration was investigated. Of the dual-electrode configurations tested, the dual-electrode geometry oriented parallel to the laser beam was observed to be most sensitive for detecting the soot inception point in a premixed flame.

  4. Prospects for single-molecule detection in liquids by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Dovichi, N.J.

    1983-01-01

    A laser-induced fluoresence determination of aqueous solutions of rhodamine 6G resulted in a detection limit of 18 attograms, or 22,000 molecules, of rhodamine 6G. These results allow the projection to single-molecule detection with reasonable improvements in the experimental apparatus.

  5. Use of laser-induced ionization to detect soot inception in premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Manzello, Samuel L.; Lee, Eui Ju; Mulholland, George W

    2005-08-20

    Experimental measurements of laser-induced ionization were performed for ethene-air premixed flames operated near the soot inception point. Soot was ionized with a pulsed laser operated at 532 nm. The ionization signal was collected with a tungsten electrode located in the postflame region. Ionization signals were collected by use of both single-electrode and dual-electrode configurations. Earlier laser-induced- ionization studies focused on the use of a single biased electrode to generate the electric field, with the burner head serving as the path to ground. In many practical combustion systems, a path to ground is not readily available. To apply the laser-induced- ionization diagnostic to these geometries, a dual-electrode geometry must be employed. The influence of electrode configuration, flame equivalence ratio, and flame height on ionization signal detection was determined. The efficacy of the laser-induced-ionization diagnostic in detecting soot inception in the postflame region of a premixed flame by use of a dual-electrode configuration was investigated. Of the dual-electrode configurations tested, the dual-electrode geometry oriented parallel to the laser beam was observed to be most sensitive for detecting the soot inception point in a premixed flame.

  6. [The Spectral Analysis of Laser-Induced Plasma in Laser Welding with Various Protecting Conditions].

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao; Yang, Li-jun; Liu, Tong; Jiao, Jiao; Wang, Hui-chao

    2016-01-01

    The shielding gas plays an important role in the laser welding process and the variation of the protecting conditions has an obvious effect on the welding quality. This paper studied the influence of the change of protecting conditions on the parameters of laser-induced plasma such as electron temperature and electron density during the laser welding process by designing some experiments of reducing the shielding gas flow rate step by step and simulating the adverse conditions possibly occurring in the actual Nd : YAG laser welding process. The laser-induced plasma was detected by a fiber spectrometer to get the spectral data. So the electron temperature of laser-induced plasma was calculated by using the method of relative spectral intensity and the electron density by the Stark Broadening. The results indicated that the variation of protecting conditions had an important effect on the electron temperature and the electron density in the laser welding. When the protecting conditions were changed, the average electron temperature and the average electron density of the laser-induced plasma would change, so did their fluctuation range. When the weld was in a good protecting condition, the electron temperature, the electron density and their fluctuation were all low. Otherwise, the values would be high. These characteristics would have contribution to monitoring the process of laser welding. PMID:27228732

  7. Colorizing pure copper surface by ultrafast laser-induced near-subwavelength ripples.

    PubMed

    Ou, Zhigui; Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate that the colorizing effect of angle dependence can be efficiently and conveniently achieved on the rippled surface of pure copper processed by the femtosecond laser with an out-of-focus method, which greatly improves the machining speed. Such a laser-induced colorization can occur in a wide range of laser fluence, which determines the coverage and morphological characteristics of laser-induced ripples and thus can finely tune the colorizing effect. By inspecting the colors and corresponding spectra of treated areas at different angles, the relationship between the diffracted light central wavelength and the laser-induced near-subwavelength grating is analyzed quantitatively based on the fundamental grating equation with the experimental grating parameters. The spectrum analysis indicates that for the laser fluence increasing in a suitable range, the more clarity and regularity of formed ripples should bring out a more prominent grating effect, which becomes further matching of the grating equation in a larger inspecting angle for the elimination of the influence of the diffused reflection light. In short, the study confirms that the colorizing phenomenon mainly ascribes to the grating diffraction effect of the laser-induced periodic surface ripples, which would help to enable the flexible control of the colorizing effect induced by laser processing on pure copper.

  8. Study of mid IR fiber transmission and mode patterns under laser induced stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.; Chong, Yat C.; Zhou, Hongyi

    1990-01-01

    Mid IR fiber transmission and exit radiation mode patterns at various incident CO2 laser power levels appear to be effective diagnostic tools for monitoring laser induced stimulated Brillouin scattering in various mid IR fibers. Such processes are deemed to be essential mechanisms for fiber-optic amplifiers and switches as potential replacements of current repeaters and bistable devices.

  9. Optimization study of the femtosecond laser-induced forward-transfer process with thin aluminum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudipta; Sabbah, A. J.; Yarbrough, J. M.; Allen, C. G.; Winters, Beau; Durfee, Charles G.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2007-07-01

    The parameters for an effective laser-induced forward-transfer (LIFT) process of aluminum thin films using a femtosecond laser are studied. Deposited feature size as a function of laser fluence, donor film thickness, quality of focus, and the pulse duration are varied, providing a metric of the most desirable conditions for femtosecond LIFT with thin aluminum films.

  10. Laser-induced blood serum fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy for cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Wang, Qiuyu; Lin, Junxiu

    1999-09-01

    Laser induced auto-fluorescence and Raman spectra of serum from cancerous and normal people are measured and analyzed. The content of (beta) -carotene in the serum from normal man is higher than that from the cancerous one, this result agrees with other reports.

  11. Sorbitol as an efficient reducing agent for laser-induced copper deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemirovsky, V. A.; Logunov, L. S.; Safonov, S. V.; Tumkin, I. I.; Tver'yanovich, Yu. S.; Menchikov, L. G.

    2012-10-01

    We have pioneered in revealing the fact that sorbitol may be used as an efficient reducing agent in the process of laser-induced copper deposition from solutions; in this case, it is possible to obtain copper lines much higher quality than by using conventional formalin.

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source.

  13. Effects of thermo-plasmonics on laser-induced backside wet etching of silicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, M. Yu; Yusupov, V. I.; Minaev, N. V.; Timashev, P. S.; Golant, K. M.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2016-10-01

    The thermo-plasmonic effect (heat deposition via absorption of laser light by metal nanoparticles) is applied to substantially enhance the effectiveness and controllability of the microstructure formation by laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE). Experiments were carried out with silicate glass plates using a pulsed 527 nm wavelength laser and an aqueous solution of AgNO3 as a precursor of the Ag nanoparticles. Mechanisms of such thermo-plasmonic LIBWE (TP-LIBWE) versions are considered. They involve: laser-induced photo-thermal reducing of silver (Ag) and self-assembling of Ag nanoparticles in water and the water/glass interface; fast laser-induced overheating of a water and glass surface through the thermo-plasmonic effect; formation of highly reactive supercritical water that causes glass etching and crater formation; generation of steam-gas bubbles in a liquid. It is significant that the emergence of the Marangoni convection results in bubble retention in the focal point at the interface and the accumulation of nanoparticles on the surface of the laser-induced crater, as this facilitates the movement of the bubbles with captured Ag particles from the fluid volume in the crater region, and accelerates the formation of the area of strong ‘surface absorption’ of laser energy. All these mechanisms provide a highly efficient and reproducible process for laser microstructure formation on the surface of glass using a novel TP-LIBWE technique.

  14. Laser-induced micro-plasmas in air for incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, Albert; Dixneuf, Sophie; Orphal, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) is an experimentally straightforward absorption method where the intensity of light transmitted by an optically stable (high finesse) cavity is measured. The technique is realized using broadband incoherent sources of radiation and therefore the amount of light transmitted by a cavity consisting of high reflectance mirrors (typically R > 99.9%) can be low. In order to find an alternative to having an incoherent light source outside the cavity, an experiment was devised, where a laser-induced plasma in ambient air was generated inside a quasi-confocal cavity by a high-power femtosecond laser. The emission from the laser-induced plasma was utilized as pulsed broadband light source. The time-dependent spectra of the light leaking from the cavity were compared with those of the laser-induced plasma emission without the cavity. It was found that the light emission was sustained by the cavity despite the initially large optical losses caused by the laser-induced plasma in the cavity. The light sustained by the cavity was used to measure part of the S1 ← S0 absorption spectrum of gaseous azulene at its vapour pressure at room temperature in ambient air, as well as the strongly forbidden γ-band in molecular oxygen (b1Σ(2,0) ← X3Σ(0,0)).

  15. Laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin: Optical method of elimination of hypoxia (oxygen deficiency in biotissue)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimov, M. M.; Thanh, Nguyen Cong

    2011-08-01

    We consider the effect of laser-induced in vivo photodissociation of blood oxyhemoglobin on gas exchange in biological tissues. An optical method of laser-induced oxygenation of biotissues is developed and proposed. We show that, in the region of the action of the laser radiation, the degree of oxygenation of a tissue increases. We experimentally confirm that the phenomenon of laser-induced in vivo photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin opens up a new possibility of controlling the local concentration of free molecular oxygen in tissues, eliminating tissue hypoxia, and stimulating aerobic metabolism of cells. We show that the efficiency of the proposed method of laser-induced oxygenation of biotissues proves to be comparable with the efficiency of the hyperbaric oxygenation, but has the advantage of the locality of the action. The proposed optical method of local oxygenation of biotissues will make it possible to eliminate the problem of hypoxia in cancerous tumor tissue and to considerably increase the efficiency of photodynamic, radiation, and chemotherapy in modern oncology.

  16. Adjunctive use of systematic retinal thickness map analysis to monitor disease activity in punctate inner choroidopathy.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, Savitha; Keane, Pearse A; Denniston, Alastair K

    2016-12-01

    A challenge in the management of 'white dot syndromes' is the lack of sensitive objective measures of disease activity. Retinal thickness maps from spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) inform treatment decisions in other retinal conditions such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic maculopathy. In this report, we demonstrate their value in providing quantitative monitoring of a patient with punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC). Retinal thickness maps referenced against a baseline scan reliably detected focal areas of increased macular volume in active PIC lesions during symptomatic episodes, highlighting these as 'hot spots' that could be quantified, providing an objective basis for treatment decisions.

  17. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  18. The Retinal Homeobox (Rx) gene is necessary for retinal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-De Luna, Reyna I.; Kelly, Lisa E.; El-Hodiri, Heithem M.

    2011-01-01

    The Retinal Homeobox (Rx) gene is essential for vertebrate eye development. Rx function is required for the specification and maintenance of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Loss of Rx function leads to a lack of eye development in a variety of species. Here we show that Rx function is also necessary during retinal regeneration. We performed a thorough characterization of retinal regeneration after partial retinal resection in pre-metamorphic X. laevis. We show that after injury the wound is repopulated with retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) that express Rx and other RPC marker genes. We used an shRNA-based approach to specifically silence Rx expression in vivo in tadpoles. We found that loss of Rx function results in impaired retinal regeneration, including defects in the cells that repopulate the wound and the RPE at the wound site. We show that the regeneration defects can be rescued by provision of exogenous Rx. These results demonstrate for the first time that Rx, in addition to being essential during retinal development, also functions during retinal regeneration. PMID:21334323

  19. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  20. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  1. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  2. Laser-induced autofluorescence of oral cavity hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E. G.; Uzunov, Tz. T.; Avramov, L. A.

    2007-03-01

    In current study oral cavity hard tissues autofluorescence was investigated to obtain more complete picture of their optical properties. As an excitation source nitrogen laser with parameters - 337,1 nm, 14 μJ, 10 Hz (ILGI-503, Russia) was used. In vitro spectra from enamel, dentine, cartilage, spongiosa and cortical part of the periodontal bones were registered using a fiber-optic microspectrometer (PC2000, "Ocean Optics" Inc., USA). Gingival fluorescence was also obtained for comparison of its spectral properties with that of hard oral tissues. Samples are characterized with significant differences of fluorescence properties one to another. It is clearly observed signal from different collagen types and collagen-cross links with maxima at 385, 430 and 480-490 nm. In dentine are observed only two maxima at 440 and 480 nm, related also to collagen structures. In samples of gingival and spongiosa were observed traces of hemoglobin - by its re-absorption at 545 and 575 nm, which distort the fluorescence spectra detected from these anatomic sites. Results, obtained in this study are foreseen to be used for development of algorithms for diagnosis and differentiation of teeth lesions and other problems of oral cavity hard tissues as periodontitis and gingivitis.

  3. The peripheral retinal 'map'.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The condition of the periphery of the retinal field of the human eye is of considerable significance, it is suggested, to those participating in various sporting activities. Its boundaries shrink and expand depending upon the physiological conditions imposed both upon the eye and upon the organism as a whole. Consequently its message to the brain may be impaired under stress with resulting danger owing to delayed response. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:1148574

  4. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  5. Vessel Segmentation in Retinal Images Using Multi-scale Line Operator and K-Means Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Saffarzadeh, Vahid Mohammadi; Osareh, Alireza; Shadgar, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Detecting blood vessels is a vital task in retinal image analysis. The task is more challenging with the presence of bright and dark lesions in retinal images. Here, a method is proposed to detect vessels in both normal and abnormal retinal fundus images based on their linear features. First, the negative impact of bright lesions is reduced by using K-means segmentation in a perceptive space. Then, a multi-scale line operator is utilized to detect vessels while ignoring some of the dark lesions, which have intensity structures different from the line-shaped vessels in the retina. The proposed algorithm is tested on two publicly available STARE and DRIVE databases. The performance of the method is measured by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and the segmentation accuracy. The proposed method achieves 0.9483 and 0.9387 localization accuracy against STARE and DRIVE respectively. PMID:24761376

  6. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barot, Megha; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Mitra, Ashim K

    2011-12-01

    The mitochondrion is a vital intracellular organelle for retinal cell function and survival. There is growing confirmation to support an association between mitochondrial dysfunction and a number of retinal degenerations. Investigations have also unveiled mitochondrial genomic instability as one of the contributing factors for age-related retinal pathophysiology. This review highlights the role of mitochondrial dysfunction originating from oxidative stress in the etiology of retinal diseases including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Moreover, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage associated with AMD due to susceptibility of mtDNA to oxidative damage and failure of mtDNA repair pathways is also highlighted in this review. The susceptibility of neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) mitochondria to oxidative damage with ageing appears to be a major factor in retinal degeneration. It thus appears that the mitochondrion is a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of retinal cells. In addition, failure of mtDNA repair pathways can also specifically contribute towards pathogenesis of AMD. This review will further summarize the prospective role of mitochondria targeting therapeutic agents for the treatment of retinal disease. Mitochondria based drug targeting to diminish oxidative stress or promote repair of mtDNA damage may offer potential alternatives for the treatment of various retinal degenerative diseases.

  8. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed.

  9. Using optical coherence tomography to elucidate the impact of fixation on retinal laser pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Michelle; Harkrider, Curtis J.; Deramo, Vincent; Bailey, Sarah F.; Winter, Katrina P.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Stolarski, David J.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2001-07-01

    Purpose: The direct comparison of in-vivo OCT images with fixed tissues sections assumes the fixation of tissue has no effect on the size and configuration of final pathology images such as light micrographs. Fixation artifact has been a concern in numerous studies of the pathology of retinal laser lesions. We tested this hypothesis. Methods: The Humphrey OCT model 2000 with a custom mirror and lens assembly was used to scan tissue phantoms and both fresh and fixed ex-vivum tissue samples. The optical configuration was determined by optimization of the contrast and signal strength on tissue phantoms. Fresh porcine retinas were scanned using this optimal configuration, then fixed using either glutaraldehyde or formalin. OCT images were taken of the tissue at various stages during the fixation process. Additionally, we examined fixed retinal tissue containing retinal laser lesions as a part of our study of ultrashort-pulsed laser effects on the macacca mulatta retina. Histologic sections were prepared and evaluated. Results: In this presentation, we describe our optical setup and image optimization process and assess the effects of glutaraldehyde and formalin processing on OCT image quality. The OCT images of glutaraldehyde-fixed laser lesions are compared with similar images of laser lesions in-vivo. Fixation artifacts appeared on OCT at 2 to 24 hours. Opacification of the lumen of large vessels was seen at two hours with both glutaraldehyde and formalin, while fixation induced retinal detachment appeared at 24 hours. Overall, there was a grater delineation of the laser lesions by OCT at 24 hours when compared to at 1 or 2 hours of fixation. Conclusions: Fixations induced changes in OCT scans of retinal tissue are present as early as 2 hours after immersion in fixative. Although both glutaraldehyde and formalin fixation preserve much of the tissue structure, these method of fixation have s significant effect on OCT imaging of both normal retinal tissue and laser

  10. Intraocular retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, M S

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: An electronic implant that can bypass the damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulate the remaining retinal neurons to restore useful vision has been proposed. A number of key questions remain to make this approach feasible. The goal of this thesis is to address the following 2 specific null hypotheses: (1) Stimulus parameters make no difference in the electrically elicited retinal responses. (2) Just as we have millions of photoreceptors, so it will take a device that can generate millions of pixels/light points to create useful vision. METHODS: For electrophysiologic experiments, 2 different setups were used. In the first setup, charge-balanced pulses were delivered to the retinal surface via electrodes inserted through an open sky approach in normal or blind retinal degenerate (rd) mice. In the second setup, the rabbit retina was removed under red light conditions from an enucleated eye and then maintained in a chamber while being superfused with oxygenated, heated Ames media. In both setups, stimulating electrodes and recording electrodes were positioned on the retinal surface to evaluate the effect of varying stimulation parameters on the orthodromic retinal responses (i.e., recording electrode placed between stimulating electrodes and optic nerve head). For psychophysical experiments, visual images were divided into pixels of light that could be projected in a pattern on the retina in up to 8 sighted volunteers. Subjects were asked to perform various tasks ranging from reading and face recognition to various activities of daily living. RESULTS: Electrophysiologic experiments: In a normal mouse, a single cycle of a 1-kHz sine wave was significantly more efficient than a 1-kHz square wave (P < .05), but no such difference was noted in either of the 8- or 16-week-old rd mouse groups (8-week-old, P = .426; 16-week-old, P = .078). Charge threshold was significantly higher in 16-week-old rd mouse versus both 8-week-old rd and normal mouse for every

  11. Shielding properties of laser-induced breakdown in water for pulse durations from 5 ns to 125 fs.

    PubMed

    Hammer, D X; Jansen, E D; Frenz, M; Noojin, G D; Thomas, R J; Noack, J; Vogel, A; Rockwell, B A; Welch, A J

    1997-08-01

    The shielding effectiveness of laser-induced breakdown from focused, visible laser pulses from 5 ns to 125 fs is determined from measurements of transmission of energy through the focal volume. The shielding efficiency decreases as a function of pulse duration from 5 ns to 300 fs and increases from 300 fs to 125 fs. The results are compared with past studies at similar pulse durations. The results of the measurements support laser-induced breakdown models and may lead to an optimization of laser-induced breakdown in ophthalmic surgery by reduction of collateral effects. PMID:18259389

  12. Congenital simple hamartoma of the retinal pigment epithelium: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thorell, Mariana Rossi; Kniggendorf, Vinicius Ferreira; Arana, Luis Augusto; Grandinetti, Alexandre Achille

    2014-04-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented for a routine ophthalmological examination without visual symptoms and had a unilateral black retinal lesion that was detected by clinical examination. Fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography findings were compatible with a congenital simple hamartoma of the retinal pigment epithelium. It is very important to detect this tumor and differentiate it from other pigmented fundus lesions that can compromise visual function or result in systemic conditions such as those caused by malignant tumors. PMID:25076477

  13. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  14. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  15. Nanosecond laser-induced ablation and laser-induced shockwave structuring of polymer foils down to sub-μm patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.; Engisch, L.

    2015-03-01

    Micro- and nanostructures exhibit a growing commercial interest where a fast, cost-effective, and large-area production is attainable. Laser methods have a great potential for the easy fabrication of surface structures into flexible polymer foils like polyimide (PI). In this study two different concepts for the structuring of polymer foils using a KrF excimer laser were tested and compared: the laser-induced ablation and the laser-induced shock wave structuring. The direct front side laser irradiation of these polymers allows the fabrication of different surface structures. For example: The low laser fluence treatment of PI results in nano-sized cone structures where the cone density can be controlled by the laser parameters. This allows inter alia the laser fabrication of microscopic QR code and high-resolution grey-tone images. Furthermore, the laser treatment of the front side of the polymer foil allows the rear side structuring due to a laserinduced shock wave. The resultant surface structures were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as white light interferometry (WLI).

  16. Retinal Regeneration is Facilitated by the Presence of Surviving Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sherpa, Tshering; Lankford, Tyler; McGinn, Tim E.; Hunter, Samuel S.; Frey, Ruth A.; Sun, Chi; Ryan, Mariel; Robison, Barrie D.; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fish regenerate their retinas after damage, in contrast to mammals. In zebrafish subjected to an extensive ouabain-induced lesion that destroys all neurons and spares Müller glia, functional recovery and restoration of normal optic nerve head (ONH) diameter take place at 100 days post-injury. Subsequently, regenerated retinas overproduce cells in the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer, and the ONH becomes enlarged. Here we test the hypothesis that a selective injury, which spares photoreceptors and Müller glia, results in faster functional recovery and fewer long-term histological abnormalities. Following this selective retinal damage, recovery of visual function required 60 days, consistent with this hypothesis. In contrast to extensively damaged retinas, selectively damaged retinas showed fewer histological errors and did not overproduce neurons. Extensively damaged retinas had RGC axons that were delayed in pathfinding to the ONH, and showed misrouted axons within the ONH, suggesting that delayed functional recovery following an extensive lesion is related to defects in RGC axons exiting the eye and/or reaching their central targets. The atoh7, fgf8a, shha, and netrin-1 genes were differentially expressed, and the distribution of Hh protein was disrupted following extensive damage as compared with selective damage. Confirming a role for Shh signaling in supporting rapid regeneration, shhat4+/− zebrafish showed delayed functional recovery following selective damage. We suggest that surviving retinal neurons provide structural/molecular information to regenerating neurons, and that this patterning mechanism regulates factors such as Shh. These factors in turn control neuronal number, retinal lamination, and RGC axon pathfinding during retinal regeneration. PMID:24488694

  17. Experimental investigation on dynamic characteristics and strengthening mechanism of laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; He, H; Tong, Y Q; Ren, Y P; Yuan, S Q; Liu, R; Zuo, C Y; Wu, K; Sui, S; Wang, D S

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic features of nanosecond laser-induced cavitation bubbles near the light alloy boundary were investigated with the high-speed photography. The shock-waves and the dynamic characteristics of the cavitation bubbles generated by the laser were detected using the hydrophone. The dynamic features and strengthening mechanism of cavitation bubbles were studied. The strengthening mechanisms of cavitation bubble were discussed when the relative distance parameter γ was within the range of 0.5-2.5. It showed that the strengthening mechanisms caused by liquid jet or shock-waves depended on γ much. The research results provided a new strengthening method based on laser-induced cavitation shotless peening (CSP).

  18. The effect of multiple wavelengths on Laser-induced damage in DKDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Auerbach, J M

    2005-07-11

    Laser-induced damage is a key factor that constrains how optical materials are used in high-power laser systems. In this work the size and density of bulk laser-induced damage sites formed during frequency tripling in a DKDP crystal are studied. The characteristics of the damage sites formed during tripling, where 1053-nm, 526-nm, and 351-nm light is simultaneously present, are compared to damage sites formed by 351-nm light alone. The fluence of each wavelength is calculated as a function of depth with a full 4D(x,y,z,t) frequency conversion code and compared to measured damage density and size distributions. The density of damage is found be predominantly governed by 351-nm light with some lesser, though non-negligible contribution from 526-nm light. The morphology of the damage sites, however, is seen to be relatively insensitive to wavelength and depend only on total fluence of all wavelengths present.

  19. Experimental investigation on dynamic characteristics and strengthening mechanism of laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; He, H; Tong, Y Q; Ren, Y P; Yuan, S Q; Liu, R; Zuo, C Y; Wu, K; Sui, S; Wang, D S

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic features of nanosecond laser-induced cavitation bubbles near the light alloy boundary were investigated with the high-speed photography. The shock-waves and the dynamic characteristics of the cavitation bubbles generated by the laser were detected using the hydrophone. The dynamic features and strengthening mechanism of cavitation bubbles were studied. The strengthening mechanisms of cavitation bubble were discussed when the relative distance parameter γ was within the range of 0.5-2.5. It showed that the strengthening mechanisms caused by liquid jet or shock-waves depended on γ much. The research results provided a new strengthening method based on laser-induced cavitation shotless peening (CSP). PMID:27150764

  20. Solution-based adaptive parallel patterning by laser-induced local plasmonic surface defunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bongchul; Kim, Jongsu; Yang, Minyang

    2012-12-17

    Adaptive mass fabrication method based on laser-induced plasmonic local surface defunctionalization was suggested to realize solution-based high resolution self-patterning on transparent substrate in parallel. After non-patterned functional monolayer was locally deactivated by laser-induced metallic plasma species, various micro/nano metal structures could be simultaneously fabricated by the parallel self-selective deposition of metal nanoparticles on a specific region. This method makes the eco-friendly and cost-effective production of high resolution pattern possible. Moreover, it can respond to design change actively due to the broad controllable range and easy change of key patterning specifications such as a resolution (subwavelength~100 μm), thickness (100 nm~6 μm), type (dot and line), and shape.

  1. Laser-induced shock wave plasma spectrometry using a small chamber designed for in situ analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Hendrik; Jie Lie, Tjung; Kagawa, Kiichiro; On Tjia, May

    2000-07-01

    Direct spectrochemical analyses on large bulk samples such as metal plates have been performed by using a small vacuum chamber, which was attached directly to the sample surface through an o-ring. This technique allowed the in situ generation of laser plasma and hence overcome to a good extent the inconvenient and sometime clumsy sample preparation procedure required in Laser-Induced Shock Wave Plasma Spectrometry. Additionally, the presence of the o-ring near the target surface effectively shielded off the surrounding area from the undesirable continuum emission from the primary plasma, and thereby enhanced the detection sensitivity of this technique. Using zinc plate and Pb glass as samples, it was further demonstrated in this experiment that even the time-integrated spectra, obtained by employing an OMA system, still exhibited a lower background than those obtained by ordinary time-resolved Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

  2. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  3. Fraunhofer-type absorption lines in double-pulse laser-induced plasma.

    PubMed

    Nagli, Lev; Gaft, Michael; Gornushkin, Igor

    2012-03-01

    We studied the confocal double-pulse laser-induced plasma in the very beginning of its life. It was found that the second laser pulse fired 0.7 to 5 µs after the first pulse produces plasma which, during the first 0 to 20 ns, resembles solar configuration. There is a very hot and compact plasma core that radiates a broad continuum spectrum and a much larger and cooler outer shell. The light from the hot core passes through the cold outer shell and is partly absorbed by atoms and ions that are in ground (or close to ground) states. This produces absorption lines that are similar to Fraunhofer lines observed in the sun spectrum. The possibility to use these absorption lines for new direct and calibration free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analytical applications, both in laboratory and industrial conditions, is proved.

  4. Investigation of laser induced breakdown in liquid nitromethane using nanosecond shadowgraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wencan; Zheng, Xianxu; Yu, Guoyang; Zhao, Jun; Zeng, Yangyang; Liu, Cangli

    2016-09-01

    A nanosecond time-resolved shadowgraphy is performed to observe a laser-induced breakdown in nitromethane. The digital delays are introduced between a pump beam and an illumination light to achieve a measuring range from 40 ns to 100 ms, which enable us to study the shock wave propagation, bubble dynamics, and other process of the laser-induced breakdown. Compared with distilled water, there are two obvious differences observed in nitromethane: (1) the production of a non-evaporative gas at the final stage, and (2) an absence of the secondary shock wave after the first collapse of the bubble. We also calculated the bubble energy in nitromethane and distilled water under a different incident energy. The results indicate that the bubble energy in nitromethane is more than twice as large as that in water. It is suggested that chemical reactions contribute to the releasing of energy.

  5. Preliminary Design of Laser - induced Breakd own Spectroscopy for Proto - MPEX

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Guinevere C; Biewer, T.M.; Martin, Madhavi Z; Martin, Rodger Carl

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique for measuring surface matter composition. LIBS is performed by focusing laser radiation onto a target surface, ablating the surface, forming a plasma, and analyzing the light produced. LIBS surface analysis is a possible diagnostic for characterizing plasma-facing materials in ITER. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has enabled the initial installation of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic on the prototype Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), which strives to mimic the conditions found at the surface of the ITER divertor. This paper will discuss the LIBS implementation on Proto-MPEX, preliminary design of the fiber optic LIBS collection probe, and the expected results.

  6. Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer series in laboratory air.

    PubMed

    Swafford, Lauren D; Parigger, Christian G

    2014-01-01

    Stark-broadened emission profiles for the hydrogen alpha and beta Balmer series lines in plasma are measured to characterize electron density and temperature. Plasma is generated using a typical laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) arrangement that employs a focused Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd : YAG) laser, operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The temporal evolution of the hydrogen Balmer series lines is explored using LIBS. Spectra from the plasma are measured following laser-induced optical breakdown in laboratory air. The electron density is primarily inferred from the Stark-broadened experimental data collected at various time delays. Due to the presence of nitrogen and oxygen in air, the hydrogen alpha and beta lines become clearly discernible from background radiation for time delays of 0.4 and 1.4 μs, respectively.

  7. [A multivariate nonlinear model for quantitative analysis in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing-Long; Fu, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jing-Ge; Ni, Zhi-Bo; He, Wen-Gan; Xu, Jun; Rao Rui-zhong; Dong, Rui-Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Most quantitative models used in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are based on the hypothesis that laser-induced plasma approaches the state of local thermal equilibrium (LTE). However, the local equilibrium is possible only at a specific time segment during the evolution. As the populations of each energy level does not follow Boltzmann distribution in non-LTE condition, those quantitative models using single spectral line would be inaccurate. A multivariate nonlinear model, in which the LTE is not required, was proposed in this article to reduce the signal fluctuation and improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis. This multivariate nonlinear model was compared with the internal calibration model which is based on the LTE condition. The content of Mn in steel samples was determined by using the two models, respectively. A minor error and a minor relative standard deviation (RSD) were observed in multivariate nonlinear model. This result demonstrates that multivariate nonlinear model can improve measurement accuracy and repeatability.

  8. On two optomechanical effects of laser-induced electrostriction in dielectric liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Bejtullahu, Rasim; Obayashi, Shigeru

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents electrostriction from the phenomenological perspective, and gives details on two mechanical effects arising from laser-matter interaction. Electrostriction is the tendency of materials to compress in the presence of a varying electric field. In this paper, the investigated materials are polar and nonpolar dielectric liquids. It is stressed that the dominant factor is the time evolution of the laser pulse, which causes tensile stresses and acoustic waves. The study is supported by experimental realization of electrostriction, which can be detected only at favorable conditions (observed in water, but not in castor oil). This study will shed light in developing measurement techniques (e.g., laser-induced grating spectroscopy) and in explaining the onset of cavities and laser-induced liquid breakdown.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence of formaldehyde in combustion using third harmonic Nd:YAG laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Christian; Nygren, Jenny; Bai, Xiao; Li, Zhongshan; Bladh, Henrik; Axelsson, Boman; Denbratt, Ingemar; Koopmans, Lucien; Bengtsson, Per-Erik; Aldén, Marcus

    2003-12-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is an important intermediate species in combustion processes and it can through laser-induced fluorescence measurements be used for instantaneous flame front detection. The present study has focussed on the use of the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as excitation wavelength for formaldehyde, and different dimethyl ether (C2H6O) flames were used as sources of formaldehyde in the experiments. The investigations included studies of the overlap between the laser profile and the absorption lines of formaldehyde, saturation effects and the potential occurrence of laser-induced photochemistry. The technique was applied for detection of formaldehyde in an internal combustion engine operated both as a spark ignition engine and as a homogenous charge compression ignition engine.

  10. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of environmental samples by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorov, N. B.; Popov, A. M.; Zaytsev, S. M.; Labutin, T. A.

    2015-10-01

    The key achievements in the determination of trace amounts of components in environmental samples (soils, ores, natural waters, etc.) by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry are considered. Unique capabilities of this method make it suitable for rapid analysis of metals and alloys, glasses, polymers, objects of cultural heritage, archaeological and various environmental samples. The key advantages of the method that account for its high efficiency are demonstrated, in particular, a small amount of analyzed material, the absence of sample preparation, the possibility of local and remote analysis of either one or several elements. The use of chemometrics in laser-induced breakdown spectrometry for qualitative sample classification is described in detail. Various approaches to improving the figures of merit of quantitative analysis of environmental samples are discussed. The achieved limits of detection for most elements in geochemical samples are critically evaluated. The bibliography includes 302 references.

  11. Note: A novel technique for analysis of aqueous solutions by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rusak, D. A.; Bell, Z. T.; Anthony, T. P.

    2015-11-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates typically consist of gold or silver nanoparticles deposited on a non-conductive substrate. In Raman spectroscopy, the nanoparticles produce an enhancement of the electromagnetic field which, in turn, leads to greater electronic excitation of molecules in the local environment. Here, we show that these same surfaces can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio obtained in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aqueous solutions. In this case, the SERS substrates not only lower breakdown thresholds and lead to more efficient plasma initiation but also provide an appropriately wettable surface for the deposition of the liquid. We refer to this technique as surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  12. Short pulse, high power microwave radiation source with a laser-induced sheet plasma mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated the short pulse, high power microwave radiation source using an ultraviolet laser-induced sheet plasma mirror in a gas-filled x-band rectangular waveguide from the conventional microwave sources and components. A laser-induced sheet plasma with an overdense plasma acts as a plasma mirror. The long pulse propagating in the gas-filled waveguide was sliced by the sheet plasma mirror at two different points along the waveguide. We observed about twice the power of the pulse by adding the two sliced microwave pulses produced by this scheme. A maximum peak power of 200 kW with a pulse duration of 10 ns (full width at half maximum) from the long microwave pulse source with a pulse duration of 0.8 mus was observed.

  13. Influence of external magnetic field on laser-induced gold nanoparticles fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, A. A.; Rakov, I. I.; Simakin, A. V.; Kuzmin, P. G.; Shafeev, G. A.; Mikhailova, G. N.; Antonova, L. Kh.; Troitskii, A. V.; Kuzmin, G. P.

    2016-08-01

    Laser-assisted fragmentation is an efficient method of the nanoparticles size and morphology control. However, its exact mechanisms are still under consideration. One of the remaining problems is the plasma formation, inevitably occurring upon the high intensity laser irradiation. In this Letter, the role of the laser-induced plasma is studied via introduction of high-intensity external magnetic field (up to 7.5 T). Its presence is found to cause the plasma emission to start earlier regarding to a laser pulse, also increasing the plume luminosity. Under these conditions, the acceleration of nanoparticles fragmentation down to a few nanometers is observed. Laser-induced plasma interaction with magnetic field and consequent energy transfer from plasma to nanoparticles are discussed.

  14. Mechanisms of two-color laser-induced field-free molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Spanner, Michael; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul

    2012-09-14

    Two mechanisms of two-color (ω+2ω) laser-induced field-free molecular orientation, based on the hyperpolarizability and ionization depletion, are explored and compared. The CO molecule is used as a computational example. While the hyperpolarizability mechanism generates small amounts of orientation at intensities below the ionization threshold, ionization depletion quickly becomes the dominant mechanism as soon as ionizing intensities are reached. Only the ionization mechanism leads to substantial orientation (e.g., on the order of ≳0.1). For intensities typical of laser-induced molecular alignment and orientation experiments, the two mechanisms lead to robust, characteristic timings of the field-free orientation wave-packet revivals relative to the alignment revivals and the revival time. The revival timings can be used to detect the active orientation mechanism experimentally.

  15. Application of laser-induced autofluorescence spectra detection in human colorectal cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Chia, Teck-Chee; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Diong, Cheong Hoong; Tang, Choong Leong; Choen, Francis S.; Krishnan, S. M.

    2003-10-01

    We investigated 48 normal patients and 25 diseased patients using our laser-induced autofluorescence spectra detection system during their regular colonoscopy. The colon and rectum mucosa autofluorescence were excited by 405 nm continue wavelength laser. We observed that cancer or diseased colorectal mucosa, their autofluorescence spectra are significantly different from normal area. The autofluorescence spectra intensity at about 500 nm was been used for our intensity ratio characteristics intensity for our diagnostic algorithm. The intensity ratios of RI-680/I-500 and RI-630/I-500 were performed to identify the detection area. From experimental result we concluded that both intensity ratios of RI-680/I-500 and RI-630/I-500 as guidelines can detect cancerous and polyps disease completely. Our investigation provided some useful insight for laser induced autofluorescence spectra as a diagnosis technique for clinical application.

  16. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy system for remote measurement of salt in a narrow gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Shuzo; Fujii, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    We performed remotely measured, with a 5-m optical path, the chlorine concentration of a sea salt attached to stainless steel (SS) located at the side wall of a narrow gap (width ~ 50 mm) by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in two configurations. One uses mirrors for transmitting laser pulses in air, while the other uses multimode fiber. A compact optical device was developed to access the surface of SS for focusing laser pulses and collecting laser-induced plasma. With the configuration in which laser pulses pass through the fiber, the chlorine spectrum could be detected by fiber-coupled LIBS. In addition, with the configuration in which laser pulses pass through air, chlorine concentrations from 0 to 100 mg/m2 could be evaluated quantitatively by using the calibration data of chlorine emission intensity. These results show that the proposed system enables the measurement of chlorine at the surface of SS remotely, instantly, and quantitatively.

  17. Effect of laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin on biomedical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimov, Mustafo M.; Asimov, Rustam M.; Mirshahi, M.; Gisbrecht, Alexander

    2001-04-01

    In the present report we draw attention to the phenomenon of laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin in cutaneous blood vessels as an important factor in biostimulating and therapeutic action of low energy laser radiation. Calculations of absorption efficiency of laser radiation both by oxyhemoglobin and carbon monoxide hemoglobin were carried out by a computer simulation using Kubelka-Munk model of tissue. It has been shown that the absorption of the oxyhemoglobin in the visible region corresponding to the Q-band of absorption spectra possesses a relatively high selectivity. The obtained results are discussed in terms of developing new methods for wound healing, as well as for carbon monoacid poisoning. Some aspects of the laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin complexes are discussed in view of its practical use for developing new diagnostic methods. An attractive way to use this phenomenon is monitoring of local concentrations of oxygen by laser light irradiation.

  18. Absolute tracer dye concentration using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The use of simultaneous airborne-laser-induced dye fluorescence and water Raman backscatter to measure the absolute concentration of an ocean-dispersed tracer dye is discussed. Theoretical considerations of the calculation of dye concentration by the numerical comparison of airborne laser-induced fluorescence spectra with laboratory spectra for known dye concentrations using the 3400/cm OH-stretch water Raman scatter as a calibration signal are presented which show that minimum errors are obtained and no data concerning water mass transmission properties are required when the laser wavelength is chosen to yield a Raman signal near the dye emission band. Results of field experiments conducted with an airborne conical scan lidar over a site in New York Bight into which rhodamine dye had been injected in a study of oil spill dispersion are then indicated which resulted in a contour map of dye concentrations, with a minimum detectable dye concentration of approximately 2 ppb by weight.

  19. Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence on an oscillatory xenon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-11-15

    A novel approach to time-synchronizing laser-induced fluorescence measurements to an oscillating current in a 60 Hz xenon discharge lamp using a continuous wave laser is presented. A sample-hold circuit is implemented to separate out signals at different phases along a current cycle, and is followed by a lock-in amplifier to pull out the resulting time-synchronized fluorescence trace from the large background signal. The time evolution of lower state population is derived from the changes in intensity of the fluorescence excitation line shape resulting from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 6s{sup Prime }[1/2]{sub 1}{sup 0}-6p{sup Prime }[3/2]{sub 2} xenon atomic transition at {lambda}= 834.68 nm. Results show that the lower state population oscillates at twice the frequency of the discharge current, 120 Hz.

  20. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-05-26

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency reflection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multilayer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.