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Sample records for laser-induced spark dplis

  1. Evaluation and Characterization Study of Dual Pulse Laser-Induced Spark (DPLIS) For Rocket Engine Ignition System Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Early, Jim; Osborne, Robin

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the progress of technology development of a laser ignition system at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Initial hot-fire tests in a small-scale rocket chamber at MSFC have demonstrated the DPLIS concept having two main advantages over existing laser ignition concepts. First, the DPLIS can be potentially optimized its laser pulse format to maximize the initial plasma volume, the plasma lifetime, as well as the flame kernel growth rate. Characterization studies of the laser pulse format are now underway with experiments of igniting gaseous hydrogen/air in a Hencken burner. Once ignition is achieved, the flame is open to the atmosphere. This open environment allows easy access for diagnostics of the ignition phenomenon. The quick turn-around time of conducting experiments on this burner make it more amenable for conducting a large number of experiments for statistical analysis of the sensitivity of the test parameters. The results from these experiments will help optimize the laser format for future testing in an H2/O2 subscale rocket chamber.

  2. Evaluation and Characterization Study of Dual Pulse Laser-Induced Spark (DPLIS) for Rocket Engine Ignition System Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Robin; Wehrmeyer, Joseph; Trinh, Huu; Early, James

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the progress of technology development of a laser ignition system at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Laser ignition has been used at MSFC in recent test series to successfully ignite RP1/GOX propellants in a subscale rocket chamber, and other past studies by NASA GRC have demonstrated the use of laser ignition for rocket engines. Despite the progress made in the study of this ignition method, the logistics of depositing laser sparks inside a rocket chamber have prohibited its use. However, recent advances in laser designs, the use of fiber optics, and studies of multi-pulse laser formats3 have renewed the interest of rocket designers in this state-of the-art technology which offers the potential elimination of torch igniter systems and their associated mechanical parts, as well as toxic hypergolic ignition systems. In support of this interest to develop an alternative ignition system that meets the risk-reduction demands of Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT), characterization studies of a dual pulse laser format for laser-induced spark ignition are underway at MSFC. Results obtained at MSFC indicate that a dual pulse format can produce plasmas that absorb the laser energy as efficiently as a single pulse format, yet provide a longer plasma lifetime. In an experiments with lean H2/air propellants, the dual pulse laser format, containing the same total energy of a single laser pulse, produced a spark that was superior in its ability to provide sustained ignition of fuel-lean H2/air propellants. The results from these experiments are being used to optimize a dual pulse laser format for future subscale rocket chamber tests. Besides the ignition enhancement, the dual pulse technique provides a practical way to distribute and deliver laser light to the combustion chamber, an important consideration given the limitation of peak power that can be delivered through optical fibers. With this knowledge, scientists and engineers at Los

  3. Laser induced spark ignition of methane-oxygen mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santavicca, D. A.; Ho, C.; Reilly, B. J.; Lee, T.-W.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an experimental study of laser induced spark ignition of methane-oxygen mixtures are presented. The experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure and 296 K under laminar pre-mixed and turbulent-incompletely mixed conditions. A pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser was used as the ignition source. Laser sparks with energies of 10 mJ and 40 mJ were used, as well as a conventional electrode spark with an effective energy of 6 mJ. Measurements were made of the flame kernel radius as a function of time using pulsed laser shadowgraphy. The initial size of the spark ignited flame kernel was found to correlate reasonably well with breakdown energy as predicted by the Taylor spherical blast wave model. The subsequent growth rate of the flame kernel was found to increase with time from a value less than to a value greater than the adiabatic, unstretched laminar growth rate. This behavior was attributed to the combined effects of flame stretch and an apparent wrinkling of the flame surface due to the extremely rapid acceleration of the flame. The very large laminar flame speed of methane-oxygen mixtures appears to be the dominant factor affecting the growth rate of spark ignited flame kernels, with the mode of ignition having a small effect. The effect of incomplete fuel-oxidizer mixing was found to have a significant effect on the growth rate, one which was greater than could simply be accounted for by the effect of local variations in the equivalence ratio on the local flame speed.

  4. Wavefront measurements of a laser-induced breakdown spark in still air.

    PubMed

    Rennie, R Mark; Goorskey, David; Whiteley, Matthew R; Jumper, Eric J

    2012-05-01

    Experimental measurements of the wavefronts of the light from a laser-induced breakdown (LIB) spark in non-moving air are presented and compared to spark dimensional data acquired from photographic measurements of the spark. The data show that the variation in the spark emitted wavefront between ignitions can be directly related to the motion of the spark volumetric centroid. The dominant modal components of the emitted wavefront variations are presented, as well as quantitative results for the magnitude of the wavefront variations. The results are relevant to the use of LIB as a light source for the measurement of optical aberrations such as those caused by compressible (i.e., "aero-optic") flows around an aircraft in flight, and data are shown indicating that LIB could be successfully used to measure the aberrating effect of compressible shear layers and boundary layers at typical cruise Mach numbers. PMID:22614405

  5. Laser-induced spark ignition fundamental and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Tran X.

    2006-05-01

    Laser ignition has become an active research topic in recent years because it has the potential to replace the conventional electric spark plugs in engines that are required to operate under much higher compression ratios, faster compression rates, and much leaner fuel-to-air ratios than gas engines today. It is anticipated that the igniter in these engines will face with pressures as high as 50 MPa and temperatures as high as 4000 K. Using the conventional ignition system, the required voltage and energy must be greatly increased (voltages in excess of 40 kV) to reliably ignite the air and fuel mixture under these conditions. Increasing the voltage and energy does not always improve ignitability but it does create greater reliability problem. The objective of this paper is to review past work to identify some fundamental issues underlying the physics of the laser spark ignition process and research needs in order to bring the laser ignition concept into the realm of reality.

  6. Laser-induced spark ignition fundamental and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.

    2006-05-01

    Laser ignition has become an active research topic in recent years because it has the potential to replace the conventional electric spark plugs in engines that are required to operate under much higher compression ratios, faster compression rates, and much leaner fuel-to-air ratios than gas engines today. It is anticipated that the igniter in these engines will face with pressures as high as 50MPa and temperatures as high as 4000 K. Using the conventional ignition system, the required voltage and energy must be greatly increased (voltages in excess of 40 kV) to reliably ignite the air and fuel mixture under these conditions. Increasing the voltage and energy does not always improve ignitability but it does create greater reliability problem. The objective of this paper is to review past work to identify some fundamental issues underlying the physics of the laser spark ignition process and research needs in order to bring the laser ignition concept into the realm of reality.

  7. An experimental and numerical study of laser-induced spark in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Tran X.

    2005-02-01

    The present work studied the expansion of a laser-induced spark in air. The experiments were carried out using the beam deflection technique. Numerical analysis used a simple one-dimensional spherical model and the governing equations were integrated numerically using the MacCormack predictor-corrector scheme. The present results indicated that the shock radius R is proportional to shock arrival time t0.4 and the shock pressure is proportional to R-3 as functionally described by the blast wave theory. For the range of the spark energies from 15 to 50 mJ, the shock front reached a distance of about 2 mm within a few microseconds or less. During this period the shock-wave energy loss was from about 51% to 70%, the radiation energy losses accounted for were from 22% to 34%, and the energy of the remaining hot gas, was about 7-8% of the absorbed energy.

  8. High-speed laser-induced fluorescence and spark plug absorption sensor diagnostics for mixing and combustion studies in engines

    SciTech Connect

    Cundy, Michael; Schucht, Torsten; Thiele, Olaf; Sick, Volker

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneous high-speed in-cylinder measurements of laser-induced fluorescence of biacetyl as a fuel tracer and mid-infrared broadband absorption of fuel and combustion products (water and carbon dioxide) using a spark plug probe are compared in an optical engine. The study addresses uncertainties and the applicability of absorption measurements at a location slightly offset to the spark plug when information about mixing at the spark plug is desired. Absorbance profiles reflect important engine operation events, such as valve opening and closing, mixing, combustion, and outgassing from crevices.

  9. Production of organic compounds in plasmas - A comparison among electric sparks, laser-induced plasmas, and UV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scattergood, T. W.; McKay, C. P.; Borucki, W. J.; Giver, L. P.; van Ghyseghem, H.; Parris, J. E.; Miller, S. L.

    1989-10-01

    In order to ascertain the features of organic compound-production in planetary atmospheres under the effects of plasmas and shocks, various mixtures of N2, CH4, and H2 modeling the atmosphere of Titan were subjected to discrete sparks, laser-induced plasmas, and UV radiation. The experimental results obtained suggest that UV photolysis from the plasma is an important organic compound synthesis process, as confirmed by the photolysis of gas samples that were exposed to the light but not to the shock waves emitted by the sparks. The thermodynamic equilibrium theory is therefore incomplete in the absence of photolysis.

  10. Production of organic compounds in plasmas - A comparison among electric sparks, laser-induced plasmas, and UV light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Borucki, William J.; Giver, Lawrence P.; Van Ghyseghem, Hilde

    1989-01-01

    In order to ascertain the features of organic compound-production in planetary atmospheres under the effects of plasmas and shocks, various mixtures of N2, CH4, and H2 modeling the atmosphere of Titan were subjected to discrete sparks, laser-induced plasmas, and UV radiation. The experimental results obtained suggest that UV photolysis from the plasma is an important organic compound synthesis process, as confirmed by the photolysis of gas samples that were exposed to the light but not to the shock waves emitted by the sparks. The thermodynamic equilibrium theory is therefore incomplete in the absence of photolysis.

  11. Dissociation dynamics of CH3I in electric spark induced breakdown revealed by time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Wei-long; Song, Yun-fei; Duo, Li-ping; Liu, Yu-qiang; Yang, Yan-qiang

    2015-02-01

    The electric discharge spark dissociation of gas CH3I is found to be similar to its femtosecond laser photodissociation. The almost identical spectra of the two processes show that their initial ionization conditions are very similar. The initial ionization followed by molecular fragmentation is proposed as the dissociation mechanism, in which the characteristic emissions of I+, CH3, CH2, CH, H, and I2 are identified as the dissociation products. The emission band of 505 nm I2 is clearly observed in the time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The dynamic curve indicates that I2∗ molecules are formed after the delay time of ∼4.7 ns. The formation of I2∗ molecule results from the bimolecular collision of the highly excited iodine atom I∗(4P) and CH3I molecule. This dynamical information can help understand the process of electric discharge spark dissociation of CH3I.

  12. Production of organic compounds in plasmas: a comparison among electric sparks, laser-induced plasmas, and UV light.

    PubMed

    Scattergood, T W; McKay, C P; Borucki, W J; Giver, L P; Van Ghyseghem, H; Parris, J E; Miller, S L

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry in planetary atmospheres that is induced by processes associated with high-temperature plasmas is of broad interest because such processes may explain many of the chemical species observed. There are at least two important phenomena that are known to generate plasmas (and shocks) in planetary atmospheres: lightning and meteor impacts. For both phenomena, rapid heating of atmospheric gases leads to formation of a high-temperature plasma which emits radiation and produces shock waves that propagate through the surrounding atmosphere. These processes initiate chemical reactions that can transform simple gases into more complex compounds. In order to study the production of organic compounds in plasmas (shocks), various mixtures of N2, CH4, and H2, modeling the atmosphere of Titan, were exposed to discrete sparks, laser-induced plasmas (LIP), an ultraviolet radiation. The yields of HCN and several simple hydrocarbons were measured by gas chromatography and compared to those calculated from a simple quenched thermodynamic equilibrium model. The agreement between experiment and theory was fair for HCN and C2H2. However, the agreement for C2H6 and the other hydrocarbons was poor, indicating that a more comprehensive theory is needed. Our experiments suggest that photolysis by ultraviolet light from the plasma is an important process in the synthesis. This was confirmed by the photolysis of gas samples exposed to the light but not to the shock waves emitted by the sparks. Hence, the results of these experiments demonstrate that the thermodynamic equilibrium theory does not adequately model lightning and meteor impacts and that photolysis must be included. Finally, the similarity in yields between the spark and the LIP experiments suggest that LIP provide valid and clean simulations of lightning and meteor impacts and that photolysis must be included. Finally, the similarity in yields between the spark and the LIP experiments suggests that LIP provide valid

  13. Investigating the dynamics of laser induced sparks in atmospheric helium using Rayleigh and Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nedanovska, E.; Nersisyan, G.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Riley, D.; Graham, W. G.; Morgan, T. J.; Hüwel, L.; Murakami, T.

    2015-01-07

    We have used optical Rayleigh and Thomson scattering to investigate the expansion dynamics of laser induced plasma in atmospheric helium and to map its electron parameters both in time and space. The plasma is created using 9 ns duration, 140 mJ pulses from a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm, focused with a 10 cm focal length lens, and probed with 7 ns, 80 mJ, and 532 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses. Between 0.4 μs and 22.5 μs after breakdown, the electron density decreases from 3.3 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} to 9 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −3}, while the temperature drops from 3.2 eV to 0.1 eV. Spatially resolved Thomson scattering data recorded up to 17.5 μs reveal that during this time the laser induced plasma expands at a rate given by R ∼ t{sup 0.4} consistent with a non-radiative spherical blast wave. This data also indicate the development of a toroidal structure in the lateral profile of both electron temperature and density. Rayleigh scattering data show that the gas density decreases in the center of the expanding plasma with a central scattering peak reemerging after about 12 μs. We have utilized a zero dimensional kinetic global model to identify the dominant particle species versus delay time and this indicates that metastable helium and the He{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ion play an important role.

  14. Investigating the dynamics of laser induced sparks in atmospheric helium using Rayleigh and Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedanovska, E.; Nersisyan, G.; Morgan, T. J.; Hüwel, L.; Murakami, T.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Riley, D.; Graham, W. G.

    2015-01-01

    We have used optical Rayleigh and Thomson scattering to investigate the expansion dynamics of laser induced plasma in atmospheric helium and to map its electron parameters both in time and space. The plasma is created using 9 ns duration, 140 mJ pulses from a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm, focused with a 10 cm focal length lens, and probed with 7 ns, 80 mJ, and 532 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses. Between 0.4 μs and 22.5 μs after breakdown, the electron density decreases from 3.3 × 1017 cm-3 to 9 × 1013 cm-3, while the temperature drops from 3.2 eV to 0.1 eV. Spatially resolved Thomson scattering data recorded up to 17.5 μs reveal that during this time the laser induced plasma expands at a rate given by R ˜ t0.4 consistent with a non-radiative spherical blast wave. This data also indicate the development of a toroidal structure in the lateral profile of both electron temperature and density. Rayleigh scattering data show that the gas density decreases in the center of the expanding plasma with a central scattering peak reemerging after about 12 μs. We have utilized a zero dimensional kinetic global model to identify the dominant particle species versus delay time and this indicates that metastable helium and the He2+ molecular ion play an important role.

  15. Production of organic compounds in plasmas: A comparison among electric sparks, laser-induced plasmas and UV light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T. W.; Mckay, C. P.; Borucki, W. J.; Giver, L. P.; Vanghyseghem, H.; Parris, J. E.; Miller, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    In order to study the production of organic compounds in plasmas (and shocks), various mixtures of N2, CH4, and H2, modeling the atmosphere of Titan, were exposed to discrete sparks, laser-induced plasmas (LIP) and ultraviolet light. The yields of HCN and simple hydrocarbons were measured and compared to those calculated from a simple quenched thermodynamic equilibrium model. The agreement between experiment and theory was fair for HCN and C2H2. However, the yields of C2H6 and other hydrocarbons were much higher than those predicted by the model. Our experiments suggest that photolysis by ultraviolet light from the plasma is an important process in the synthesis. This was confirmed by the photolysis of gas samples exposed to the light, but not to the plasma or shock waves. The results of these experiments demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known efficient synthesis of organic compounds in plasmas, the yields of saturated species, e.g., ethane, may be higher than predicted by theory and that LIP provide a convenient and clean way of simulating planetary lightning and impact plasmas in the laboratory.

  16. In-cylinder crank-angle-resolved imaging of fuel concentration in a firing spark-ignition engine using planar laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Berckmueller, M.; Tait, N.P.; Lockett, R.D.; Greenhalgh, D.A.; Ishii, Kiyoshi; Urata, Yasuhiro; Umiyama, Hidezo; Yoshida, Kazuo

    1994-12-31

    The authors present a quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) method for imaging the in-cylinder fuel concentration in a spark-ignition engine. The method is based on fluorescence from a carbonyl compound added to the iso-octane and excited by an excimer laser at 308 nm. The method has been applied to the study of charge stratification in a lean burn engine equipped with a four-valve pent-roof cylinder head. In this engine, stratification is achieved by fuel injection through an inlet valve, the paths of rich fuel pockets from induction through compression to the point of ignition is shown by a series of crank-angle-resolved air-to-fuel ratio (AFR) images.

  17. Direct solid analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hardmetal precursors by laser-induced argon spark ablation with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Holá, Markéta; Kanický, Viktor; Mermet, Jean-Michel; Otruba, Vítezslav

    2003-12-01

    The potential of the laser-induced argon spark atomizer (LINA-Spark atomizer) coupled with ICP-AES as a convenient device for direct analysis of WC/Co powdered precursors of sintered hardmetals was studied. The samples were presented for the ablation as pressed pellets prepared by mixing with powdered silver binder containing GeO2 as internal standard. The pellets were ablated with the aid of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) focused 16 mm behind the target surface with a resulting estimated power density of 5 GW cm(-2). Laser ablation ICP-AES signals were studied as a function of ablation time, and the duration of time prior to measurement (pre-ablation time) which was necessary to obtain reliable results was about 40 s. Linear calibration plots were obtained up to 10% (m/m) Ti, 9% Ta and 3.5% Nb both without internal standardization and by using germanium as an added internal standard or tungsten as a contained internal standard. The relative uncertainty at the centroid of the calibration line was in the range from +/- 6% to +/- 11% for Nb, Ta and Ti both with and without internal standardisation by Ge. A higher spread of points about the regression was observed for cobalt for which the relative uncertainty at the centroid was in the range from +/- 9% to +/- 14%. Repeatability of results was improved by the use of both Ge and W internal standards. The lowest determinable quantities calculated for calibration plots were 0.060% Co, 0.010% Nb, 0.16% Ta and 0.030% Ti with internal standardization by Ge. The LA-ICP-AES analyses of real samples led to good agreement with the results obtained by solution-based ICP determination with a relative bias not exceeding 10%. The elimination of the dissolution procedure of powdered tungsten (Nb, Ta, Ti) carbide is the principal advantage of the developed LA-ICP-AES method.

  18. On the study of threshold intensity dependence on the gain and loss processes in laser induced spark ignition of molecular hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, M. M. Aboulfotouh, A. M.; Gamal, Y. E. E.

    2015-03-30

    In the present work, a numerical analysis is performed to investigate the comparative contribution of the mechanisms responsible for electron gain and losses in laser spark ignition and plasma formation of H{sub 2}. The analysis considered H{sub 2} over pressure range 150 -3000 torr irradiated by a Nd:YAG laser radiation at wavelengths 1064 and 532 nm with pulse length 5.5 ns. The study based on a modified electron cascade model by one of the authors which solves numerically the time dependent Boltzmann equation as well as a set of rate equations that describe the rate of change of the excited states population. The model includes most of the physical processes that might take place during the interaction. Computations of The threshold intensity are performed for the combined and separate contribution of each of the gain and loss processes. Reasonable agreement with the measured values over the tested pressure range is obtained only for the case of the combined contribution. Basing on the calculation of the electron energy distribution function, the determined relations of the time evolution of the electrons density for selected values of the tested gas pressure region revealed that photo-ionization of the excited states could determine the time of electron generation and hence spark ignition. Collisional ionization contributes to this phenomenon only at the high pressure regime. Loss processes due to electron diffusion, vibrational excitation are found to have significant effect over examined pressure values for the two applied laser wavelengths.

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with multi-kHz fibre laser for mobile metal analysis tasks — A comparison of different analysis methods and with a mobile spark-discharge optical emission spectroscopy apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharun, Michael; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Noll, Reinhard

    2013-09-01

    The identification and separation of different alloys are a permanent task of crucial importance in the metal recycling industry. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers important advantages in comparison to the state-of-the-art techniques for this application. For LIBS measurement no additional sample preparation is necessary. The overall analysis time is much smaller than for the state-of-the-art techniques. The LIBS setup presented in this study enables mobile operation with a handheld probe for the analysis of metallic materials. Excitation source is a fibre laser with a repetition rate of 30 kHz and a pulse energy of 1.33 mJ. The compact optical setup allows measurements at almost every point of a sample within 5 ms. The generated plasma light is analysed using a Multi-CCD spectrometer. The broad spectral coverage and high resolution provide an outstanding amount of spectroscopic information thereby enabling a variety of calibration approaches. Using a set of Al-based and a set of Fe-based samples the analytical performance of uni- and multivariate calibrations is evaluated. The same sample sets are analysed with a commercial state-of-the-art spark-discharge optical emission spectrometer allowing an assessment of the achieved results. Even though the possible analytical correctness of the fibre laser based LIBS measurements is found to similar or even better than that of the conventional technique, advantages of the multivariate data evaluation have not yet been realised in the investigations. However, due to the in situ sample preparation and short measurement times, fibre-laser based LIBS offers superior features.

  20. Interaction of Laser Induced Micro-shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leela, Ch.; Bagchi, Suman; Tewari, Surya P.; Kiran, P. Prem

    Laser induced Shock Waves (LISWs) characterized by several optical methods provide Equation of State (EOS) for a variety of materials used in high-energy density physics experiments at Mbar pressures [1, 2]. Other applications include laser spark ignition for fuel-air mixtures, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation engines, laser shock peening [3], surface cleaning [4] and biological applications (SW lithotripsy) [5] to name a few.

  1. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  2. Predictive spark timing method

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, D.L.; Chang, M.F.; Sultan, M.C.

    1990-01-09

    This patent describes a method of determining spark time in a spark timing system of an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders and a spark period for each cylinder in which a spark occurs. It comprises: generating at least one crankshaft position reference pulse for each spark firing event, the reference pulse nearest the next spark being set to occur within a same cylinder event as the next spark; measuring at least two reference periods between recent reference pulses; calculating the spark timing synchronously with crankshaft position by performing the calculation upon receipt of the reference pulse nearest the next spark; predicting the engine speed for the next spark period from at least two reference periods including the most recent reference period; and based on the predicted speed, calculating a spark time measured from the the reference pulse nearest the next spark.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Dependence of Interspark Interactions in Femtosecond-Nanosecond Dual-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaffidi, Jon; Pearman, William; Lawrence, Marion; Chance Carter, J.; Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Angel, S. Michael

    2004-09-01

    A femtosecond air spark has recently been combined with a nanosecond ablative pulse in order to map the spatial and temporal interactions of the two plasmas in femtosecond-nanosecond orthogonal preablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Good spatial and temporal correlation was found for reduced atomic emission from atmospheric species (nitrogen and oxygen) and increased atomic emission from ablated species (copper and aluminum) in the femtosecond-nanosecond plasma, suggesting a potential role for atmospheric pressure or nitrogen/oxygen concentration reduction following air spark formation in generating atomic emission enhancements in dual-pulse LIBS.

  4. Chemical consequences of laser-induced breakdown in molecular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babánková, Dagmar; Civiš, Svatopluk; Juha, Libor

    This article gives an account of chemical reactions initiated by laser-induced dielectric breakdown (LIDB) in homogeneous molecular gases. The systematic part of the article describes the laser-plasma-chemical behavior of simple inorganic gases and their mixtures, metal carbonyls and organometallics, and organic molecular gases. Research on LIDB-initiated chemical reactions producing well-defined fine solid particles has been triggered again recently by the advent of nanotechnologies. Laser ignition of fuel mixtures is also a well researched branch of laser-plasma chemistry because of strong commercial and military interests. However, the strongest current impulses for studying laser-spark chemistry come from planetary sciences, where laser sparks have been used as a laboratory model of high-energy-density phenomena (e.g., impact of extraterrestrial bodies, lightning) in planetary atmospheres. A single pulse from a high-power laser system was used to develop an improved method for investigating this phenomenon. The particular processes responsible for the chemical action of a laser spark are identified and described in detail by the end of the article.

  5. Laser spark distribution and ignition system

    DOEpatents

    Woodruff, Steven; McIntyre, Dustin L.

    2008-09-02

    A laser spark distribution and ignition system that reduces the high power optical requirements for use in a laser ignition and distribution system allowing for the use of optical fibers for delivering the low peak energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. An optical distributor distributes and delivers optical pumping energy from an optical pumping source to multiple combustion chambers incorporating laser oscillators or laser amplifiers for inducing a laser spark within a combustion chamber. The optical distributor preferably includes a single rotating mirror or lens which deflects the optical pumping energy from the axis of rotation and into a plurality of distinct optical fibers each connected to a respective laser media or amplifier coupled to an associated combustion chamber. The laser spark generators preferably produce a high peak power laser spark, from a single low power pulse. The laser spark distribution and ignition system has application in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

  6. Laser Induced Blue Luminescence Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haiyong; Duan, Yanmin; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Yaoju; Yang, Fugui

    2011-09-01

    Laser induced strange blue luminescence in several Raman crystals has been investigated. The blue luminescence at about 473 nm has the characteristic of no orientation and only produced in the crystal where the fundament laser oscillated. The experimental results show that the blue luminescence must result from the fundamental laser around 1.0 µm rather than Stokes-shifting. The spectrum detected is similar for different crystals. This blue luminescence is obviously strange and inconsistent with traditional luminescence theories, which maybe a brand-new luminescence theory.

  7. Picosecond laser-induced water condensation in a cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Du, Shengzhe; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-01

    We investigated water condensation in a laboratory cloud chamber induced by picosecond (ps) laser pulses at ~350 ps (800 nm/1-1000 Hz) with a maximum peak power of ~25 MW. The peak power was much lower than the critical power for self-focusing in air (~3-10 GW depending on the pulse duration). Sparks, airflow and snow formation were observed under different laser energies or repetition rates. It was found that weaker ps laser pulses can also induce water condensation by exploding and breaking down ice crystals and/or water droplets into tiny particles although there was no formation of laser filament. These tiny particles would grow until precipitation in a super-saturation zone due to laser-induced airflow in a cold region with a large temperature gradient.

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy expands into industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Reinhard; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Brunk, Markus; Connemann, Sven; Meinhardt, Christoph; Scharun, Michael; Sturm, Volker; Makowe, Joachim; Gehlen, Christoph

    This paper presents R&D activities in the field of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for industrial applications and shows novel LIBS systems running in routine operation for inline process control tasks. Starting with a comparison of the typical characteristics of LIBS with XRF and spark-discharge optical emission spectrometry, the principal structure of LIBS machines embedded for inline process monitoring will be presented. A systematic requirement analysis for LIBS systems following Ishikawa's scheme was worked out. Stability issues are studied for laser sources and Paschen-Runge spectrometers as key components for industrial LIBS systems. Examples of industrial applications range from handheld LIBS systems using a fiber laser source, via a set of LIBS machines for inline process control tasks, such as scrap analysis, coal analysis, liquid slag analysis and finally monitoring of drill dust.

  9. Picosecond laser-induced water condensation in a cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Du, Shengzhe; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-01

    We investigated water condensation in a laboratory cloud chamber induced by picosecond (ps) laser pulses at ~350 ps (800 nm/1-1000 Hz) with a maximum peak power of ~25 MW. The peak power was much lower than the critical power for self-focusing in air (~3-10 GW depending on the pulse duration). Sparks, airflow and snow formation were observed under different laser energies or repetition rates. It was found that weaker ps laser pulses can also induce water condensation by exploding and breaking down ice crystals and/or water droplets into tiny particles although there was no formation of laser filament. These tiny particles would grow until precipitation in a super-saturation zone due to laser-induced airflow in a cold region with a large temperature gradient. PMID:27607654

  10. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence of formaldehyde in combustion using third harmonic Nd:YAG laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Christian; Nygren, Jenny; Bai, Xiao; Li, Zhongshan; Bladh, Henrik; Axelsson, Boman; Denbratt, Ingemar; Koopmans, Lucien; Bengtsson, Per-Erik; Aldén, Marcus

    2003-12-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is an important intermediate species in combustion processes and it can through laser-induced fluorescence measurements be used for instantaneous flame front detection. The present study has focussed on the use of the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as excitation wavelength for formaldehyde, and different dimethyl ether (C2H6O) flames were used as sources of formaldehyde in the experiments. The investigations included studies of the overlap between the laser profile and the absorption lines of formaldehyde, saturation effects and the potential occurrence of laser-induced photochemistry. The technique was applied for detection of formaldehyde in an internal combustion engine operated both as a spark ignition engine and as a homogenous charge compression ignition engine.

  12. Laser-induced caesium-137 decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Simakin, A. V.; Shafeev, G. A.

    2014-08-01

    Experimental data are presented on the laser-induced beta decay of caesium-137. We demonstrate that the exposure of a gold target to a copper vapour laser beam (wavelengths of 510.6 and 578.2 nm, pulse duration of 15 ns) for 2 h in an aqueous solution of a caesium-137 salt reduces the caesium-137 activity by 70%, as assessed from the gamma activity of the daughter nucleus 137mBa, and discuss potential applications of laser-induced caesium-137 decay in radioactive waste disposal.

  13. Mestastable State Population in Laser Induced Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, V. H. S.; Kyriakides, C.; Ward, W. K.

    2006-01-01

    Laser induced plasma has been used as a source of neutrals and ions in the study of astrophysical plasmas. The purity of state of this source is essential in the determination of collision parameters such as the charge transfer rate coefficients between ions and neutrals. We will show that the temperature of the laser induced plasma is a rapidly decreasing function of time. The temperature is initially high but cools off rapidly through collisions with the expanding plasma electrons as the plasma recombines and streams into the vacuum. This rapid expansion of the plasma, similar to a supersonic jet, drastically lowers the internal energy of the neutrals and ions.

  14. Laser-induced caesium-137 decay

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Simakin, A V; Shafeev, G A

    2014-08-31

    Experimental data are presented on the laser-induced beta decay of caesium-137. We demonstrate that the exposure of a gold target to a copper vapour laser beam (wavelengths of 510.6 and 578.2 nm, pulse duration of 15 ns) for 2 h in an aqueous solution of a caesium-137 salt reduces the caesium-137 activity by 70%, as assessed from the gamma activity of the daughter nucleus {sup 137m}Ba, and discuss potential applications of laser-induced caesium-137 decay in radioactive waste disposal. (letters)

  15. The sparking voltage of spark plugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsbee, F B

    1925-01-01

    This report has been prepared in order to collect and correlate into convenient and useful form the available data on this subject. The importance of the subject lies in the fact that it forms the common meeting ground for studies of the performance of spark generators and spark plugs on the one hand and of the internal combustion engines on the other hand. While much of the data presented was obtained from various earlier publications, numerous places were found where necessary data were lacking, and these have been provided by experiments in gasoline engines at the Bureau of Standards.

  16. Laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Ell, C; Wondrazek, F; Frank, F; Hochberger, J; Lux, G; Demling, L

    1986-05-01

    With the aid of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with energy transmission via a flexible glass fiber, it proves possible under laboratory conditions, to destroy gallstones reliably and reproducibly. Lithotripsy is effected mechanically via a laser-induced local shockwave.

  17. Nitrogen spark denoxer

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Henry K.; Novick, Vincent J.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.

    1997-01-01

    A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

  18. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  19. SparkJet Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  20. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Andria; Lawhead, Carlos; Ujj, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a very practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition of materials. Recent technical developments resulted in equipment used on the MARS Rover by NASA. It is capable of measuring the emission spectra of laser induced plasma created by energetic laser pulses focused on the sample (rocks, metals, etc.). We have develop a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy setup and investigated the necessary experimental and methodological challenges needed to make such material identification measurements. 355 and 532 nm laser pulses with 5 ns temporal duration was used to generate micro-plasma from which compositions can be determined based on known elemental and molecular emission intensities and wavelengths. The performance of LIBS depends on several parameters including laser wavelength, pulse energy, pulse duration, time interval of observation, geometrical configuration of collecting optics, and the properties of ambient medium. Spectra recorded from alloys (e.g. US penny coin) and pure metals will be presented. Special thanks for the financial support of the Office of Undergraduate Research of UWF.

  1. Laser Induced Aluminum Surface Breakdown Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Sijun; Wang, Ten-See (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Laser powered propulsion systems involve complex fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer processes. Based on an unstructured grid, pressure-based computational aerothermodynamics; platform, several sub-models describing such underlying physics as laser ray tracing and focusing, thermal non-equilibrium, plasma radiation and air spark ignition have been developed. This proposed work shall extend the numerical platform and existing sub-models to include the aluminum wall surface Inverse Bremsstrahlung (IB) effect from which surface ablation and free-electron generation can be initiated without relying on the air spark ignition sub-model. The following tasks will be performed to accomplish the research objectives.

  2. Laser Induced Aluminum Surface Breakdown Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Sijun; Wnag, Ten-See (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser powered propulsion systems involve complex fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer processes. Based on an unstructured grid., pressure-based computational aerothermodynamics, platform, several sub-nio"'dels describing such underlying physics as laser ray tracing and focusing, thermal non-equilibrium, plasma radiation and air spark ignition have been developed. This proposed work shall extend the numerical platform and existing sub-models to include the aluminum wall surface Inverse Bremsstrahlung (113) effect from which surface ablation and free-electron generation can be initiated without relying on the air spark ignition sub-model. The following tasks will be performed to accomplish the research objectives.

  3. Measurement of elemental concentration of aerosols using spark emission spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Diwakar, Prasoon K.

    2015-01-01

    A coaxial microelectrode system has been used to collect and analyse the elemental composition of aerosol particles in near real-time using spark emission spectroscopy. The technique involves focused electrostatic deposition of charged aerosol particles onto the flat tip of a microelectrode, followed by introduction of spark discharge. A pulsed spark discharge was generated across the electrodes with input energy ranging from 50 to 300 mJ per pulse, resulting in the formation of controlled pulsed plasma. The particulate matter on the cathode tip is ablated and atomized by the spark plasma, resulting in atomic emissions which are subsequently recorded using a broadband optical spectrometer for element identification and quantification. The plasma characteristics were found to be very consistent and reproducible even after several thousands of spark discharges using the same electrode system. The spark plasma was characterized by measuring the excitation temperature (~7000 to 10 000 K), electron density (~1016 cm−3), and evolution of spectral responses as a function of time. The system was calibrated using particles containing Pb, Si, Na and Cr. Absolute mass detection limits in the range 11 pg to 1.75 ng were obtained. Repeatability of spectral measurements varied from 2 to 15%. The technique offers key advantages over similar microplasma-based techniques such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, as: (i) it does not require any laser beam optics and eliminates any need for beam alignment, (ii) pulse energy from dc power supply in SIBS system can be much higher compared to that from laser source of the same physical size, and (iii) it is quite conducive to compact, field-portable instrumentation. PMID:26491209

  4. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  5. Mars Spark Source Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; Weiland, Karen J.; VanderWal, Randall L.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware has been developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma that will allow their identification and quantification. Trace metal measurements are vital for the assessment of the potential toxicity of the Martian environment for human exploration. The current method of X-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations only of major species. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. This paper describes the Mars Spark Source Prototype hardware, the results of the characterization tests, and future plans for hardware development.

  6. Spark gap electrode erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krompholz, H.; Kristiansen, M.

    1984-12-01

    The results of a one-year contract on electrode erosion phenomena are summarized. The arc voltage drop in a spark gap was measured for various electrode, gas, and pressure combinations. A previously developed model of self breakdown voltage distribution was extended. A jet model for electrode erosion was proposed and an experimental arrangement for testing the model was constructed. The effects of inhomogeneities and impurities in the electrodes were investigated. Some of the work described here is scheduled for completion in 1985 under a current grant (AFOSR 84-0032). The areas of investigation described here include: (1) Self breakdown voltage distributions; (2) Electrode erosion; (3) Spark gap voltage recovery.

  7. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  8. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Jun-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical detection technique based on atomic emission spectroscopy to measure the elemental composition. LIBS has been extensively studied and developed due to the non-contact, fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and multi-elemental detection features. The development and applications of LIBS technique in Asia are summarized and discussed in this review paper. The researchers in Asia work on different aspects of the LIBS study in fundamentals, data processing and modeling, applications and instrumentations. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further development of LIBS technique in Asia are also evaluated to promote LIBS research and its applications.

  10. Laser-induced desorption from sapphire surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, A.V.; Schildbach, M.A.

    1992-03-01

    Laser-induced desorption of energetic ({approximately}7eV) aluminum ions was observed from clean and water-covered sapphire (1102) surfaces using time-of-flight mass spectrometry with laser wavelengths of 1064, 355, and 266 nm. In sharp contrast, O{sup +} (H{sup +} and OH{sup +}) ions were observed in electron-induced desorption measurements with 300 eV electrons from the bare (water- covered) (1102) surface. Sapphire surfaces were characterized with low energy electron diffraction, reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy. 8 refs.

  11. Kinetic Approach for Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Banaz; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2008-10-22

    Non-equilibrium distribution functions of electron gas and phonon gas excited with ultrashort intense laser pulses are calculated for laser-induced plasmas occurring in solids. The excitation during femtosecond irradiation and the subsequent thermalization of the free electrons, as well as the dynamics of phonons are described by kinetic equations. The microscopic collision processes, such as absorption by inverse bremsstrahlung, electron-electron collisions, and electron-phonon interactions are considered by complete Boltzmann collision integrals. We apply our kinetic approach for gold by taking s-band electron into account and compare it with the case of excitation of d-band electrons.

  12. Laser Induced Chemical Liquid Phase Deposition (LCLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Nanai, Laszlo; Balint, Agneta M.

    2012-08-17

    Laser induced chemical deposition (LCLD) of metals onto different substrates attracts growing attention during the last decade. Deposition of metals onto the surface of dielectrics and semiconductors with help of laser beam allows the creation of conducting metal of very complex architecture even in 3D. In the processes examined the deposition occurs from solutions containing metal ions and reducing agents. The deposition happens in the region of surface irradiated by laser beam (micro reactors). Physics -chemical reactions driven by laser beam will be discussed for different metal-substrate systems. The electrical, optical, mechanical properties of created interfaces will be demonstrated also including some practical-industrial applications.

  13. Fostering the Curiosity Spark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Sherry R.

    2010-01-01

    Many of the children in the early grades who marveled at the plethora of beautiful resources just did not seem that interested by the time they reached upper elementary school. While some children sustained their spark of curiosity, others did not. The force that keeps children (or people of any age) excited about anything is called "intrinsic…

  14. Characterization of alumina-based ceramic nanocomposites by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Kaleem; Al-Eshaikh, Mohammad A.; Kadachi, Ahmed N.

    2015-06-01

    Alumina-based hybrids containing different concentrations of carbon nanostructure and SiC nanoparticles were consolidated by the spark plasma sintering in order to obtain fully dense bulk ceramic nanocomposites. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was employed to determine relationship between plasma temperature and surface hardness of the composites. The characteristic parameters of plasma generated by irradiation of laser Nd:YAG ( λ = 1064 nm) on different bulk nanocomposites were determined at different delay times and energies by assuming the LTE condition for optically thin plasma. The plasma temperatures were estimated through intensity of selected aluminum emission lines using the Boltzmann plot method. The electron density was determined using the Stark broadening of selected aluminum and silicon emission lines. The samples were mechanically characterized by the Vickers hardness test. It has been observed that the plasma temperature increases with the increase in hardness and shows a perfect linear relationship. The results suggest that calibration curve between hardness and the plasma temperature can be employed as an alternate method to estimate the hardness of nanocomposite with varying concentrations of nanostructures just by measuring the plasma temperature with better reproducibility and accuracy. Therefore, laser-induced break down spectroscopy (LIBS) offers potential applications in nuclear industry.

  15. Laser-Induced Spallation of Microsphere Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Morgan; Stossel, Melicent; Khanolkar, Amey; Wang, Junlan; Boechler, Nicholas

    2016-08-01

    The detachment of a semiordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres adhered to an aluminum-coated glass substrate is studied using a laser-induced spallation technique. The microsphere-substrate adhesion force is estimated from substrate surface displacement measurements obtained using optical interferometry, and a rigid-body model that accounts for the inertia of the microspheres. The estimated adhesion force is compared with estimates obtained using an adhesive contact model together with interferometric measurements of the out-of-plane microsphere contact resonance, and with estimated work of adhesion values for the polystyrene-aluminum interface. Scanning electron microscope images of detached monolayer regions reveal a unique morphology, namely, partially detached monolayer flakes composed of single hexagonal close packed crystalline domains. This work contributes to the fields of microsphere adhesion and contact dynamics, and demonstrates a unique monolayer delamination morphology. PMID:27409715

  16. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Yuan, Ting-Bi; Hou, Zong-Yu; Zhou, Wei-Dong; Lu, Ji-Dong; Ding, Hong-Bin; Zeng, Xiao-Yan

    2014-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been regarded as a future superstar for chemical analysis for years due to its unique features such as little or no sample preparation, remote sensing, and fast and multi-element analysis. Chinese LIBS community is one of the most dynamically developing communities in the World. The aim of the work is to inspect what have been done in China for LIBS development and, based on the understanding of the overall status, to identify the challenges and opportunities for the future development. In this paper, the scientific contributions from Chinese LIBS community are reviewed for the following four aspects: fundamentals, instrumentation, data processing and modeling, and applications; and the driving force of LIBS development in China is analyzed, the critical issues for successful LIBS application are discussed, and in our opinion, the potential direction to improve the technology and to realize large scale commercialization in China is proposed.

  17. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  18. Laser-Induced Incandescence: Detection Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental LII (laser-induced incandescence) measurements were performed in a laminar gasjet flame to test the sensitivity of different LII signal collection strategies to particle size. To prevent introducing a particle size dependent bias in the LII signal, signal integration beginning with the excitation laser pulse is necessary . Signal integration times extending to 25 or 100 nsec after the laser pulse do not produce significant differences in radial profiles of the LII signal due to particle size effects with longer signal integration times revealing a decreased sensitivity to smaller primary particles. Long wavelength detection reduces the sensitivity of the LII signal to primary particle size. Excitation of LII using 1064 nm light is recommended to avoid creating photochemical interferences thus allowing LII signal collection to occur during the excitation pulse without spectral interferences.

  19. Laser-induced autofluorescence of caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Hibst, Raimund; Flemming, Gabriela; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    1993-07-01

    The laser induced autofluorescence from carious regions of human teeth was studied using a krypton ion laser at 407 nm as an excitation source, a fiberoptical detection system combined with a polychromator and an optical multichannel analyzer. In addition, time-resolved and time-gated fluorescence measurements in the nanosecond range were carried out. It was found that carious regions contain different fluorophores which emit in the red spectral range. The emission spectra with maxima around 590 nm, 625 nm and 635 nm are typical for metalloporphyrins, copro- and protoporphyrin. During excitation the fluorescence was bleached. Non-carious regions showed a broad fluorescence band with a maximum in the short-wavelength spectral region with shorter fluorescence decay times than the carious regions. Therefore, caries can be detected by spectral analysis of the autofluorescence as well as by determination of the fluorescence decay times or by time-gated imaging.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection.

    PubMed

    Hybl, John D; Tysk, Shane M; Berry, Shaun R; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors. However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  3. Appearance of toroidal structure in dissipating laser-generated sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, D.; Hüwel, L.

    2000-03-01

    We have investigated the temporal and spatial evolution of laser-induced plasmas in pure nitrogen. A 1064 nm, 20 ns pulse from a neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser with pulse energies ranging from 175 to 500 mJ is tightly focused to produce a spark at various, near-atmospheric pressures. Spatially resolved Rayleigh scattered light from a time-delayed, 355 nm Nd:YAG laser pulse traversing the spark at right angles is collected with an image intensifier gated, linear diode array. At a delay time of 30 μs, the laser plasma remnant appears as a nearly spherically symmetric region with a center temperature of about 4500 K. After around 100 μs, the hot gas starts to change into a toroidal shape expanding radially at an average speed of a few meters per second. The final torus size increases with decreasing pressure and increasing laser power. This general behavior of the plasma afterglow can be reconciled with a numerical model, where in the aftermath of the spark shock wave a pair of vortices is produced which in turn moves the residual hot gas into the observed toroidal geometry.

  4. Movable fiber probe for gas-phase laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Cosmin E; Puzinauskas, Paulius V; Olcmen, Semih

    2008-11-01

    A movable probe that fiber couples both the beam delivery and the signal collection functions of gas-phase laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements was evaluated. The adjustable probe was used to investigate the effect of delivery fiber curvature on plasma characteristics and the associated effect on LIBS spectra and to further identify issues remaining to facilitate fully fiber-coupled gas-phase LIBS measurements. LIBS data were collected from lean methane-air mixtures of various equivalence ratios and spectroscopically analyzed to establish the ability to determine relative fuel-air ratio. Measurements with straight delivery fiber were compared to those with the fiber curved at specific radii. Decreasing fiber radius of curvature decreased fiber transmission efficiency and reduced the spark formation probability by almost a factor of 2. For constant fiber input energy, this decreased transmission increased the percentage of failed spark formations and influenced the LIBS elemental ratio calculations. However, minimal difference was found between LIBS measurements with straight or curved fiber as long as the output energy and a constant laser beam spot diameter were maintained on the exit beam focusing lens. A significant reduction in data scatter and improved linearity were achieved by using the Balmer series H(alpha) and H(beta) hydrogen emission line ratio as a data selection criterion. Observed linear variation of H/N elemental ratio with equivalence ratio confirmed the possibility of a flexible, light-contained, fully fiber-coupled probe for remote gas-phase LIBS analysis.

  5. Movable fiber probe for gas-phase laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Puzinauskas, Paulius V.; Olcmen, Semih

    2008-11-01

    A movable probe that fiber couples both the beam delivery and the signal collection functions of gas-phase laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements was evaluated. The adjustable probe was used to investigate the effect of delivery fiber curvature on plasma characteristics and the associated effect on LIBS spectra and to further identify issues remaining to facilitate fully fiber-coupled gas-phase LIBS measurements. LIBS data were collected from lean methane-air mixtures of various equivalence ratios and spectroscopically analyzed to establish the ability to determine relative fuel-air ratio. Measurements with straight delivery fiber were compared to those with the fiber curved at specific radii. Decreasing fiber radius of curvature decreased fiber transmission efficiency and reduced the spark formation probability by almost a factor of 2. For constant fiber input energy, this decreased transmission increased the percentage of failed spark formations and influenced the LIBS elemental ratio calculations. However, minimal difference was found between LIBS measurements with straight or curved fiber as long as the output energy and a constant laser beam spot diameter were maintained on the exit beam focusing lens. A significant reduction in data scatter and improved linearity were achieved by using the Balmer series H{alpha} and H{beta} hydrogen emission line ratio as a data selection criterion. Observed linear variation of H/N elemental ratio with equivalence ratio confirmed the possibility of a flexible, light-contained, fully fiber-coupled probe for remote gas-phase LIBS analysis.

  6. Signal enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using fast square-pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, H.; Robledo-Martinez, A.

    2016-10-01

    A fast, high voltage square-shaped electrical pulse initiated by laser ablation was investigated as a means to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser Induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The electrical pulse is generated by the discharge of a charged coaxial cable into a matching impedance. The pulse duration and the stored charge are determined by the length of the cable. The ablation plasma was produced by hitting an aluminum target with a nanosecond 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam under variable fluence 1.8-900 J cm- 2. An enhancement of up to one order of magnitude on the emission signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the spark discharge assisted laser ablation. Besides, this increment is larger for ionized species than for neutrals. LIBS signal is also increased with the discharge voltage with a tendency to saturate for high laser fluences. Electron density and temperature evolutions were determined from time delays of 100 ns after laser ablation plasma onset. Results suggest that the spark discharge mainly re-excites the laser produced plume.

  7. Flame Speed and Spark Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, D W; Silsbee, F B

    1925-01-01

    This report describes a series of experiments undertaken to determine whether or not the electrical characteristics of the igniting spark have any effect on the rapidity of flame spread in the explosive gas mixtures which it ignites. The results show very clearly that no such effect exists. The flame velocity in carbon-monoxide oxygen, acetylene oxygen, and gasoline-air mixtures was found to be unaffected by changes in spark intensity from sparks which were barely able to ignite the mixture up to intense condenser discharge sparks having fifty time this energy. (author)

  8. Laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2011-11-01

    Recent streams of laser studies on crystallization and crystal growth are summarized and reviewed. Femtosecond multiphoton excitation of solutions leads to their ablation at the focal point, inducing local bubble formation, shockwave propagation, and convection flow. This phenomenon, called "laser micro tsunami" makes it possible to trigger crystallization of molecules and proteins from their supersaturated solutions. Femtosecond laser ablation of a urea crystal in solution triggers the additional growth of a single daughter crystal. Intense continuous wave (CW) near infrared laser irradiation at the air/solution interface of heavy-water amino acid solutions results in trapping of the clusters and evolves to crystallization. A single crystal is always prepared in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, and the crystal polymorph of glycine depends on laser power, polarization, and solution concentration. Upon irradiation at the glass/solution interface, a millimeter-sized droplet is formed, and a single crystal is formed by shifting the irradiation position to the surface. Directional and selective crystal growth is also possible with laser trapping. Finally, characteristics of laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth are summarized.

  9. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Cobalt Monoboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, H. F.; Ng, Y. W.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectrum of cobalt monoboride (CoB) in the visible region between 465 and 560 nm has been observed. CoB molecule was produced by the reaction of laser ablated cobalt atom and diborane (B_2H_6) seeded in argon. Over twenty five vibronic bands have been recorded, and both Co10B and Co11B isotopic species have been observed and analyzed. Preliminary analysis of the rotational lines showed that the observed vibronic bands belong to two categories namely: the Ω' = 2 - Ω'' = 2 and the Ω' = 3 - Ω'' = 3 transitions, which indicated the ground state of CoB is consistent with an assignment of a ^3Δ_i state predicted from ab initio calculations. Unresolved hyperfine structure arising from the Co nucleus (I = 7/2) causes a broadening of spectral lines. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the spectrum of the CoB molecule. Financial support from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU 701008P) is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Volume of a laser-induced microjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Sennosuke; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Noguchi, Yuto; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Needle-free injection systems are of great importance for medical treatments. In spite of their great potential, these systems are not commonly used. One of the common problems is strong pain caused by diffusion shape of the jet. To solve this problem, the usage of a high-speed highly-focused microjet as needle-free injection system is expected. It is thus crucial to control important indicators such as ejected volume of the jet for its safe application. We conduct experiments to reveal which parameter influences mostly the ejected volume. In the experiments, we use a glass tube of an inner diameter of 500 micro-meter, which is filled with the liquid. One end is connected to a syringe and the other end is opened. Radiating the pulse laser instantaneously vapors the liquid, followed by the generation of a shockwave. We find that the maximum volume of a laser-induced bubble is approximately proportional to the ejected volume. It is also found that the occurrence of cavitation does not affect the ejected volume while it changes the jet velocity.

  11. Laser-induced lipolysis on adipose cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efrain; Gutierrez, O.; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, J.; Isaza, Carolina; Ramirez, Hugo; Rebolledo, Aldo F.; Criollo, Willian; Ortiz, C.

    2004-10-01

    Recently, a new liposuction technique, using a low-level laser (LLL) device and Ultrawet solution prior to the procedure, demonstrated the movement of fat from the inside to the outside of the adipocyte (Neira et al., 2002). To determine the mechanisms involved, we have performed Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy studies; Light transmittance measurements on adipocyte dilutions; and a study of laser light propagation in adipose tissue. This studies show: 1. Cellular membrane alterations. 2. LLL is capable to reach the deep adipose tissue layer, and 3. The tumescence solution enhances the light propagation by clearing the tissue. MRI studies demonstrated the appearance of fat on laser treated abdominal tissue. Besides, adipocytes were cultivated and irradiated to observe the effects on isolated cells. These last studies show: 1. 635 nm-laser alone is capable of mobilizing cholesterol from the cell membrane; this action is enhanced by the presence of adrenaline and lidocaine. 2. Intracellular fat is released from adipocytes by co joint action of adrenaline, aminophyline and 635 nm-laser. Results are consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides the modification of the cellular membranes.

  12. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  13. Laser Induced Fluorescence of the Iodine Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargus, William

    2014-10-01

    Iodine (I2) has been considered as a potential electrostatic spacecraft thruster propellant for approximately 2 decades, but has only recently been demonstrated. Energy conversion efficiency appears to be on par with xenon without thruster modification. Intriguingly, performance appears to exceed xenon at high acceleration potentials. As part of a continuing program for the development of non-intrusive plasma diagnostics for advanced plasma spacecraft propulsion, we have identified the I II 5d5D4 o state as metastable, and therefore containing a reservoir of excited state ions suitable for laser probing. The 5d5D4 o - 6p5P3 transition at 695.878 nm is convenient for diode laser excitation with the 5s5S2 o - 6p5P3 transition at 516.12 nm as an ideal candidate for non-resonant fluorescence collection. We have constructed a Penning type iodine microwave discharge lamp optimized for I II production for table-top measurements. This work demonstrates I II laser-induced fluorescence in a representative iodine discharge and will validate our previous theoretical work based on the limited available historical I II spectral data.

  14. Anions in laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, S. V.; Gornushkin, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    The equation of state for plasmas containing negative atomic and molecular ions (anions) is modeled. The model is based on the assumption that all ionization processes and chemical reactions are at local thermal equilibrium and the Coulomb interaction in the plasma is described by the Debye-Hückel theory. In particular, the equation of state is obtained for plasmas containing the elements Ca, Cl, C, Si, N, and Ar. The equilibrium reaction constants are calculated using the latest experimental and ab initio data of spectroscopic constants for the molecules CaCl_2, CaCl, Cl_2, N_2, C_2, Si_2, CN, SiN, SiC, and their positive and negative ions. The model is applied to laser-induced plasmas (LIPs) by including the equation of state into a fluid dynamic numerical model based on the Navier-Stokes equations describing an expansion of LIP plumes into an ambient gas as a reactive viscous flow with radiative losses. In particular, the formation of anions Cl-, C-, Si-, {{Cl}}2^{ - }, {{Si}}2^{ - }, {{C}}2^{ - }, CN-, SiC-, and SiN- in LIPs is investigated in detail.

  15. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  16. Improved Imaging With Laser-Induced Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Engmin J.

    1993-01-01

    System tests specimen of material nondestructively by laser-induced eddy-current imaging improved by changing method of processing of eddy-current signal. Changes in impedance of eddy-current coil measured in absolute instead of relative units.

  17. Classical cutoffs for laser-induced nonsequential double ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D.B.; Becker, W.

    2003-12-01

    Classical cutoffs for the momenta of electrons ejected in laser-induced nonsequential double ionization are derived for the recollision-impact-ionization scenario. Such simple cutoff laws can aid in the interpretation of the observed electron spectra.

  18. Laser-induced shockwave propagation from ablation in a cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Xianzhong; Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Wen, S.-B.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-02-06

    The propagation of laser-induced shockwaves from ablation inside of cavities was determined from time-resolved shadowgraph images. The temperature and electron number density of the laser-induced plasma was determined from spectroscopic measurements. These properties were compared to those for laser ablation on the flat surface under the same energy and background gas condition. A theoretical model was proposed to determine the amount of energy and vaporized mass stored in the vapor plume based on these measurements.

  19. Development of microwave-enhanced spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Yuji; Moon, Ahsa; Kaneko, Masashi

    2010-05-01

    We propose microwave-enhanced spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy with the same measurement and analysis processes as in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, but with a different plasma generation mechanism. The size and lifetime of the plasma generated can contribute to increased measurement accuracy and expand its applicability to industrial measurement, such as an exhaust gas analyzer for automobile engine development and its regulation, which has been hard to operate by laser at an engineering evaluation site. The use of microwaves in this application helps lower the cost, reduce the system size, and increase the ease of operation to make it commercially viable. A microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz was used to enhance the volume and lifetime of the plasma at atmospheric condition even at elevated pressure.

  20. Laser-induced gas-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. J.

    Chemical reactions in homogeneous systems activated by laser radiation have been extensively investigated for more than a decade. The applications of lasers to promote gas-surface interactions have just been realized in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to examine the fundamental processes involved in laser-induced gas-surface chemical interactions. Specifically, the photon-enhanced adsorption, adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-solid reactions, product formation and desorption processes are discussed in detail. The dynamic processes involved in photoexcitation of the electronic and vibrational states, the energy transfer and relaxation in competition with chemical interactions are considered. These include both single and multiple photon adsorption, and fundamental and overtone transitions in the excitation process, and inter- and intra-molecular energy transfer, and coupling with phonons, electron-hole pairs and surface plasmons in the energy relaxation process. Many current experimental and theoretical studies on the subject are reviewed and discussed with the goal of clarifying the relative importance of the surface interaction steps and relating the resulting concepts to the experimentally observed phenomena. Among the many gas-solid systems that have been investigated, there has been more extensive use of CO adsorbed on metals, and SF 6 and XeF 2 interactions with silicon as examples to illustrate the many facets of the electronically and vibrationally activated surface processes. Results on IR laser stimulated desorption of C 5H 5N and C 5D 5N molecules from various solid surfaces are also presented. It is clearly shown that rapid intermolecular energy exchange and molecule to surface energy transfer can have important effects on photodesorption cross sections and isotope selectivities. It is concluded that utilization of lasers in gas-surface studies not only can provide fundamental insight into the mechanism and dynamics involved in heterogeneous

  1. Laser-induced thermal acoustic velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan

    2000-11-01

    Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA) is a non- intrusive, remote, four-wave mixing laser diagnostic technique for measurements of the speed of sound and of the thermal diffusivity in gases. If the gas composition is known, then its temperature and density can be inferred. Beam misalignments and bulk fluid velocities can influence the time history and intensity of LITA signals. A closed-form analytic expression for LITA signals incorporating these effects is derived. The magnitude of beam misalignment and the flow velocity can be inferred from the signal shape using a least-squares fit of this model to the experimental data. High-speed velocimetry using homodyne detection is demonstrated with NO2-seeded air in a supersonic blow-down nozzle. The measured speed of sound deviates less than 2% from the theoretical value assuming isentropic quasi-1D flow. Boundary layer effects degrade the velocity measurements to errors of 20%. Heterodyne detection is used for low-speed velocimetry up to Mach number M = 0.1. The uncertainty of the velocity measurements was ~0.2 m/s. The sound speed measurements were repeatable to 0.5%. The agreement between theory and experiments is very good. A one-hidden-layer feed-forward neural network is trained using back-propagation learning and a steepest descent learning rule to extract the speed of sound and flow velocity from a heterodyne LITA signal. The effect of the network size on the performance is demonstrated. The accuracy is determined with a second set of LITA signals that were not used during the training phase. The accuracy is found to be better than that of a conventional frequency decomposition technique while being computationally as efficient. This data analysis method is robust with respect to noise, numerically stable, and fast enough for real-time data analysis. The accuracy and uncertainty of non-resonant LITA measurements is investigated. The error in measurements of the speed of sound and of the thermal diffusivity

  2. Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul; Jones, Tom; Connell, John; Belvin, Keith; Watson, Kent

    2004-01-01

    surface of the target. The improved method is denoted laser-induced-fluorescence photogrammetry.

  3. Laser induced incandescence and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy based sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eseller, Kemal Efe

    In this doctoral dissertation, two laser-based sensors were evaluated for different applications. Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) is a technique which can provide non-intrusive quantitative measurement of soot and it provides a unique diagnostic tool to characterize engine performance. Since LII is linearly proportional to the soot volume fraction, it can provide in situ, real time measurement of soot volume fraction with high temporal and spatial resolution. LII has the capability to characterize soot formation during combustion. The soot volume fraction from both flames and a soot generator was investigated with LII. The effects of experimental parameters, such as laser fluence, gate delay, gate width and various laser beam focusing, on LII signal was studied. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), a diagnostic tool for in situ elemental analysis, has been evaluated for on-line, simultaneous, multi-species impurity monitoring in hydrogen. LIBS spectra with different impurity levels of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen were recorded and the intensity of the spectral lines of Ar, O, N, and H observed were used to form calibration plots for impurities in hydrogen measurements. An ungated detection method for LIBS has been developed and applied to equivalence ratio measurements of CH4/air and biofuel/air. LIBS has also been used to quantitatively analyze the composition of a slurry sample. The quenching effect of water in slurry samples causes low LIBS signal quality with poor sensitivity. Univariate and multivariate calibration was performed on LIBS spectra of dried slurry samples for elemental analysis of Mg, Si and Fe. Calibration results show that the dried slurry samples give good correlation between spectral intensity and elemental concentration.

  4. Spark Plug Defects and Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsbee, F B; Loeb, L B; Sawyer, L G; Fonseca, E L; Dickinson, H C; Agnew, P G

    1920-01-01

    The successful operation of the spark plug depends to a large extent on the gas tightness of the plug. Part 1 of this report describes the method used for measuring the gas tightness of aviation spark plugs. Part 2 describes the methods used in testing the electrical conductivity of the insulation material when hot. Part 3 describes the testing of the cold dielectric strength of the insulation material, the resistance to mechanical shock, and the final engine test.

  5. Crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in Si

    DOE PAGES

    Verburg, P. C.; Smillie, L. A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Haberl, B.; Bradby, J. E.; Williams, J. S.; Huis in ’t Veld, A. J.

    2015-06-04

    Laser-induced subsurface modification of dielectric materials is a well-known technology. Applications include the production of optical components and selective etching. In addition to dielectric materials, the subsurface modification technology can be applied to silicon, by employing near to mid-infrared radiation. An application of subsurface modifications in silicon is laser-induced subsurface separation, which is a method to separate wafers into individual dies. Other applications for which proofs of concept exist are the formation of waveguides and resistivity tuning. However, limited knowledge is available about the crystal structure of subsurface modifications in silicon. In this paper, we investigate the geometry and crystalmore » structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in monocrystalline silicon wafers. Finally, in addition to the generation of lattice defects, we found that transformations to amorphous silicon and Si-iii/Si-xii occur as a result of the laser irradiation.« less

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence of space-exposed polyurethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Ralph H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this work was to utilize laser-induced fluorescence technique to characterize several samples of space-exposed polyurethane. These samples were flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), which was in a shuttle-like orbit for nearly 6 years. Because of our present work to develop laser-induced-fluorescence inspection techniques for polymers, space-exposed samples and controls were lent to us for evaluation. These samples had been attached to the outer surface of LDEF; therefore, they were subjected to thermal cycling, solar ultraviolet radiation, vacuum, and atomic oxygen. It is well documented that atomic oxygen and ultraviolet exposure have detrimental effects on many polymers. This was a unique opportunity to make measurements on material that had been naturally degraded by an unusual environment. During our past work, data have come from artificially degraded samples and generally have demonstrated a correlation between laser-induced fluorescence and tensile strength or elasticity.

  7. Crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Verburg, P. C.; Smillie, L. A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Haberl, B.; Bradby, J. E.; Williams, J. S.; Huis in ’t Veld, A. J.

    2015-06-04

    Laser-induced subsurface modification of dielectric materials is a well-known technology. Applications include the production of optical components and selective etching. In addition to dielectric materials, the subsurface modification technology can be applied to silicon, by employing near to mid-infrared radiation. An application of subsurface modifications in silicon is laser-induced subsurface separation, which is a method to separate wafers into individual dies. Other applications for which proofs of concept exist are the formation of waveguides and resistivity tuning. However, limited knowledge is available about the crystal structure of subsurface modifications in silicon. In this paper, we investigate the geometry and crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in monocrystalline silicon wafers. Finally, in addition to the generation of lattice defects, we found that transformations to amorphous silicon and Si-iii/Si-xii occur as a result of the laser irradiation.

  8. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  9. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  10. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  11. Large laser sparks for laboratory simulation of high-energy-density events in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babankova, Dagmar; Juha, Libor; Civias, Svatopluk; Bittner, Michal; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Ryc, Leszek; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skala, Jiri; Ullschmied, Jiri

    2005-09-01

    Single ≤1 kJ pulses from a high-power laser are focused into molecular gases to create large laser sparks. This provides a unique way to mimic the chemical effects of high-energy-density events in planetary atmospheres (cometary impact, lightning) matching the natural energy-density, its spatio-temporal evolution and plasma-volume scaling of such events in a fully-controlled laboratory environment. Some chemical reactions initiated by laser-induced dielectric breakdown (LIDB) in both pure molecular gases and mixtures related to the chemical evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere were studied. Most of the experiments were carried out in a static gas cell. However, an initial series of experiments was also performed with a gas-puff target placed within a vacuum interaction chamber. Under these dynamic conditions the hot core of a laser spark can be directly investigated.

  12. Time-resolved imaging of flame kernels: Laser spark ignition of H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Spiglanin, T.A.; Mcilroy, A.; Fournier, E.W.; Cohen, R.B.; Syage, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The shape and structure of developing flame kernels in laser-induced spark ignited hydrogen/air mixtures is investigated as a function of gas composition and time. Using planar laser-induce fluorescence (PLIF) to measure the spatial distribution of OH radicals produced inside the reacting zone, the authors have recorded the evolution of the nascent flame kernel in a series of images following the laser-induced spark. This series provides the rate of flame growth, the evolution of the flame shape, and the intensity of the PLIF signal as a function of time for both igniting flames and nonignition events. The reaction zones grow quickly at early times, but slowly decrease in propagation rate as the energy density within the flame kernel decreases. A distinct anisotropy is observed in the expanding spark and flame kernel. At short times (t<100 {micro}s), as toroidal shape is observed similar to that seen previously for electrode-spark ignitions and for laser ignitions in methane/air. There is also a tendency for the flame to grow back toward the ignition laser. Successful ignitions appear virtually identical to failed ignitions during the first 100 {micro}s. Significant differences, notably in intensity, appear between 100 and 500 {micro}s following the spark. These observations imply that early flame kernel growth is dominated by gas motion induced by the short-duration spark. The ultimate fate of an ignition lies with the chemistry of the reactions which determines whether the gas undergoes a transition from hot plasma to propagating flame.

  13. Rapid analysis of liquid formulations containing sodium chloride using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    St-Onge, Louis; Kwong, Elizabeth; Sabsabi, Mohamad; Vadas, Elizabeth B

    2004-10-29

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the possibilities offered by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the direct and rapid analysis of pharmaceutical liquid formulations. Sodium chloride in solution was chosen as a model compound. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) was used to produce a gaseous plasma from the liquid sample. The ensuing plasma emission was spectrally analysed, and the intensity of an atomic line from sodium was used to quantitate the sodium chloride. Using surface analysis of a flowing solution, the precision (%R.S.D.) of a measurement lasting 50 s (average of 50 laser shots at 1 shot/s) was approximately 0.5% for isotonic solutions. On a non-flowing solution, a 50 s measurement had an R.S.D. of 1.8%. Direct analysis in closed (transparent) bottles was possible but more complex, requiring the superimposition of two sequential laser sparks. Using a surface procedure, common commercial isotonic products (including injectable, bacteriostatic injectable, and nasal solutions) were analysed. Their sodium content (corresponding to 0.9% sodium chloride) was accurately determined in all cases, demonstrating the capabilities of LIBS for the rapid analysis of liquid pharmaceutical products.

  14. Infrared Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. LIBS is a relatively simple technique and has been successfully employed in applications such as environmental monitoring, materials analysis, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, and homeland security. Most LIBS applications are limited to emission features in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region arising from atoms and simple molecular fragments. In the present work, we report on the observation of mid- infrared emission lines from alkali metal halides due to laser-induced breakdown processes. The studied alkali metal halides included LiCl, NaCl, NaBr, KCl, KBr, KF, RbCl, and RbBr. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 16 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on the target. The LIBS infrared emission from alkali halides showed intense and narrow bands located in the region from 2-8 μm. The observed emission features were assigned to atomic transitions between higher-lying Rydberg states of neutral alkali atoms. More detailed results of the performed IR LIBS studies on alkali metal halides will be discussed at the conference.

  15. Using Laser-Induced Incandescence To Measure Soot in Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.; Sankar, Subramanian V.

    2005-01-01

    An instrumentation system exploits laser-induced incandescence (LII) to measure the concentration of soot particles in an exhaust stream from an engine, furnace, or industrial process that burns hydrocarbon fuel. In comparison with LII soot-concentration-measuring systems, this system is more complex and more capable.

  16. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  17. Laser-induced copper deposition with weak reducing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemirovsky, V. A.; Fateev, S. A.; Logunov, L. S.; Tumkin, I. I.; Safonov, S. V.; Khairullina, E. M.

    2013-11-01

    The study showed that organic alcohols with 1,2,3,5,6 hydroxyl groups can be used as reducing agents for laser-induced copper deposition from solutions (LCLD).Multiatomic alcohols, sorbitol, xylitol, and glycerol, are shown to be effective reducing agents for performing LCLD at glass-ceramic surfaces. High-conductivity copper tracks with good topology were synthesized.

  18. Efficiency of SparkJet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golbabaei-Asl, M.; Knight, D.; Wilkinson, S.

    2013-01-01

    The thermal efficiency of a SparkJet is evaluated by measuring the impulse response of a pendulum subject to a single spark discharge. The SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. A laser displacement sensor is used to measure the displacement of the pendulum upon discharge. The pendulum motion is a function of the fraction of the discharge energy that is channeled into the heating of the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). A theoretical perfect gas model is used to estimate the portion of the energy from the heated gas that results in equivalent pendulum displacement as in the experiment. The earlier results from multiple runs for different capacitances of C = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40(micro)F demonstrate that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.1 In the current paper, results from additional run cases have been included and confirm the previous results

  19. Are Crab nanoshots Schwinger sparks?

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbins, Albert; Yoo, Hojin

    2015-05-21

    The highest brightness temperature ever observed are from "nanoshots" from the Crab pulsar which we argue could be the signature of bursts of vacuum e± pair production. If so this would be the first time the astronomical Schwinger effect has been observed. These "Schwinger sparks" would be an intermittent but extremely powerful, ~103 L, 10 PeV e± accelerator in the heart of the Crab. These nanosecond duration sparks are generated in a volume less than 1 m3 and the existence of such sparks has implications for the small scale structure of the magnetic field of young pulsars such as the Crab. As a result, this mechanism may also play a role in producing other enigmatic bright short radio transients such as fast radio bursts.

  20. IKK2 Inhibition Attenuates Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huayi; Lu, Qingxian; Gaddipati, Subhash; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Wang, Wei; Pasparakis, Manolis; Kaplan, Henry J.; Li, Qiutang

    2014-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is aberrant angiogenesis associated with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Inflammation has been suggested as a risk factor for AMD. The IKK2/NF-κB pathway plays a key role in the inflammatory response through regulation of the transcription of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and angiogenic factors. We investigated the functional role of IKK2 in development of the laser-induced CNV using either Ikk2 conditional knockout mice or an IKK2 inhibitor. The retinal neuronal tissue and RPE deletion of IKK2 was generated by breeding Ikk2−/flox mice with Nestin-Cre mice. Deletion of Ikk2 in the retina caused no obvious defect in retinal development or function, but resulted in a significant reduction in laser-induced CNV. In addition, intravitreal or retrobulbar injection of an IKK2 specific chemical inhibitor, TPCA-1, also showed similar inhibition of CNV. Furthermore, in vitro inhibition of IKK2 in ARPE-19 cells significantly reduced heat shock-induced expression of NFKBIA, IL1B, CCL2, VEGFA, PDGFA, HIF1A, and MMP-2, suggesting that IKK2 may regulate multiple molecular pathways involved in laser-induced CNV. The in vivo laser-induced expression of VEGFA, and HIF1A in RPE and choroidal tissue was also blocked by TPCA-1 treatment. Thus, IKK2/NF-κB signaling appears responsible for production of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors in laser-induced CNV, suggesting that this intracellular pathway may serve as an important therapeutic target for aberrant angiogenesis in exudative AMD. PMID:24489934

  1. Bright Sparks of Our Future!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riordan, Naoimh

    2016-04-01

    My name is Naoimh Riordan and I am the Vice Principal of Rockboro Primary School in Cork City, South of Ireland. I am a full time class primary teacher and I teach 4th class, my students are aged between 9-10 years. My passion for education has developed over the years and grown towards STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects. I believe these subjects are the way forward for our future. My passion and beliefs are driven by the unique after school programme that I have developed. It is titled "Sparks" coming from the term Bright Sparks. "Sparks" is an after school programme with a difference where the STEM subjects are concentrated on through lessons such as Science, Veterinary Science Computer Animation /Coding, Eco engineering, Robotics, Magical Maths, Chess and Creative Writing. All these subjects are taught through activity based learning and are one-hour long each week for a ten-week term. "Sparks" is fully inclusive and non-selective which gives all students of any level of ability an opportunity to engage into these subjects. "Sparks" is open to all primary students in County Cork. The "Sparks" after school programme is taught by tutors from the different Universities and Colleges in Cork City. It works very well because the tutor brings their knowledge, skills and specialised equipment from their respective universities and in turn the tutor gains invaluable teaching practise, can trial a pilot programme in a chosen STEM subject and gain an insight into what works in the physical classroom.

  2. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  3. Fiber delivery and diagnostics of laser spark ignition for natural gas engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Sachin

    2008-10-01

    Laser ignition via fiber optic delivery is challenging because of the need to deliver pulsed laser beam with relatively high energy and sufficient beam quality to refocus the light to the intensity required for creating spark. This dissertation presents work undertaken towards the development of a multiplexed fiber delivered laser ignition system for advanced lean-burn natural gas engines. It also describes the use of laser ignition system to perform in-cylinder optical diagnostics in gas engines. Key elements of the dissertation includes: (i) time resolved emission spectroscopy (TRES) of laser sparks in air to investigate the dependence of spark temperatures and electron number densities on ambient gas pressures, (ii) optical characterization of hollow core fibers, step-index silica fibers, photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) and fiber lasers, (iii) development and on-engine demonstration of a multiplexer to deliver the laser beam from a single laser source to two engine cylinders via optical fibers, and (iv) demonstration of simultaneous use of laser sparks for ignition and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to measure in-cylinder equivalence ratios in a Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine. For TRES of laser sparks, the ambient gas pressure is varied from 0.85 bar to 48.3 bar (high pressures to simulate elevated motored in-cylinder pressures at time of ignition in advanced gas engines). At later stages (˜1mus) of spark evolution, spark temperatures become comparable at all pressures. Electron number densities increase initially with increasing ambient gas pressure but become comparable at pressures greater than ˜20 bar. The effects of launch conditions and bending for 2-m long hollow core fibers are studied and an optimum launch f/# of ˜55 is shown to form spark in atmospheric pressure air. Spark formation using the output of a pulsed fiber laser is shown and delivery of 0.55 mJ nanosecond pulses through PCFs is achieved. Successful multiplexed laser

  4. Spark gap with low breakdown voltage jitter

    DOEpatents

    Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.

    1996-04-23

    Novel spark gap devices and electrodes are disclosed. The novel spark gap devices and electrodes are suitable for use in a variety of spark gap device applications. The shape of the electrodes gives rise to local field enhancements and reduces breakdown voltage jitter. Breakdown voltage jitter of approximately 5% has been measured in spark gaps according the invention. Novel electrode geometries and materials are disclosed. 13 figs.

  5. Spark gap with low breakdown voltage jitter

    DOEpatents

    Rohwein, Gerald J.; Roose, Lars D.

    1996-01-01

    Novel spark gap devices and electrodes are disclosed. The novel spark gap devices and electrodes are suitable for use in a variety of spark gap device applications. The shape of the electrodes gives rise to local field enhancements and reduces breakdown voltage jitter. Breakdown voltage jitter of approximately 5% has been measured in spark gaps according the invention. Novel electrode geometries and materials are disclosed.

  6. Spark ignition of turbulent nonpremixed bluff-body flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.F.; Marchione, T.; Mastorakos, E.; Balachandran, R.

    2007-10-15

    Spark ignition of turbulent nonpremixed bluff-body flames with radial fuel injection for different fuel and air bulk velocities and swirl conditions has been investigated in terms of stability and ignitability limits and ignition probability (P{sub ign}, defined as the probability of igniting the whole flame from a localized 2-mm spark). The velocity field and the mixture fraction distributions have been measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone, respectively. Successful and failed ignition events have been visualized by high-speed and OH PLIF imaging. The results show that the stability limits are much wider than the ignitability limits, but with swirl, they become closer. The mixture fraction distribution shows high sensitivity to any change in the fuel and air velocities, with the mixture inside the central recirculation zone (CRZ) tending to be relatively well-mixed and rich. Visualization of different spark realizations shows that successful ignition events manage to initiate a flame at the separation corner of the bluff body and that the direction of initial flame propagation depends more on the ignition location than on the flow conditions due to the convection of the flame kernel by the mean flow. With successful spark events inside the CRZ the flame expands in all directions, up to a certain point, when it starts forming the shape of the stable flame. The highest P{sub ign} was close to the CRZ boundaries with low P{sub ign} or no ignition inside CRZ when the mixture there was rich. Under conditions where the CRZ is not close to the rich flammability limit, P{sub ign} is substantial. Downstream of the CRZ, P{sub ign} is uniform but low due to the adverse velocity. The probability of just initiating a kernel is higher than P{sub ign}, especially, in the area above the CRZ. With swirl, the highest P{sub ign} is at the burner exit, with no ignition inside the CRZ because the mixture is too lean. The data

  7. Effect of temperature and CO2 concentration on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of alkali fume.

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, Alejandro; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Blevins, Linda Gail; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Walsh, Peter W.

    2004-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used in the evaluation of aerosol concentration in the exhaust of an oxygen/natural-gas glass furnace. Experiments showed that for a delay time of 10 {micro}s and a gate width of 50 {micro}s, the presence of CO{sub 2} and changes in gas temperature affect the intensity of both continuum emission and the Na D lines. The intensity increased for the neutral Ca and Mg lines in the presence of 21% CO{sub 2} when compared to 100% N{sub 2}, whereas the intensity of the Mg and Ca ionic lines decreased. An increase in temperature from 300 to 730 K produced an increase in both continuum emission and Na signal. These laboratory measurements were consistent with measurements in the glass furnace exhaust. Time-resolved analysis of the spark radiation suggested that differences in continuum radiation resulting from changes in bath composition are only apparent at long delay times. The changes in the intensity of ionic and neutral lines in the presence of CO{sub 2} are believed to result from higher free electron number density caused by lower ionization energies of species formed during the spark decay process in the presence of CO{sub 2}. For the high Na concentration observed in the glass furnace exhaust, self-absorption of the spark radiation occurred. Power law regression was used to fit laboratory Na LIBS calibration data for sodium loadings, gas temperatures, and a CO{sub 2} content representative of the furnace exhaust. Improvement of the LIBS measurement in this environment may be possible by evaluation of Na lines with weaker emission and through the use of shorter gate delay times.

  8. NOx Production in Laser -Induced Plasma as a Function of Dissipated Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.; Cooray, V.

    2003-12-01

    Lightning has been identified as a potentially important natural source of nitrogen oxides (NOx =NO+NO2) and thus several laboratory experiments have been conducted to measure the NOx production as a function of energy dissipated in sparks and laser plasma discharges. Chameides et al. [1977] measured NOx production in air subjected to a centimetre long spark by chemiluminescenc and derived a yield of (6±1) × 1016 molecule J-1. The sparks were generated by a 35 kV electrostatic generator, yielding an energy of 36 mJ per spark. Levine et al. [1981] measured NOx production in air using chemiluminescent technique from several centimetre long sparks having a discharge energy of 12 kJ, which is more than a five order of magnitude energy increase compared to the energy produced in Chemeides experiment and derived a yield of (5±2) ×1016 molecule J-1. Hill et al. [1988] investigated also the production of NO in atmospheric coronas using a specially designed plasma reactor operated at a pressure of 0.1 MPa and a temperature of 300 K and found a yield of NO to be (1.4±0.7)×1016 molecule J-1. Wang et al. [1998] employed sparks with lightning like peak currents of up to 30kA, a spark of 4 cm long at atmospheric pressure and found that the production was about (15-40×1016) molecule J-1. Navarro-Gonzalez et al. [2001] simulated lightning in the laboratory by a laser-induced plasma generated by a pulsed Nd.YAG laser at 1064 nm and found a yield of NO to be 1.5±0.5×1017 molecule J-1. Rehbein et al. [2001] measured NOx from a 0.5-2.0 cm long sparks in the energy range of 0.5-2.5 J by chemiluminescenc and derived a yield of (2.97±0.2)×1016 molecule J-1. An experiment on the production of NOx from a DC corona discharge maintained by applying a high voltage to the central wire of a coaxial metal cylinder, has also been conducted by Rehbein et al. For the estimated energy dissipated in the discharge of about 0.4 mJ it has been found that the NOx yield was slightly higher for

  9. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  10. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, E.A.

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  11. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenou, M.; Sa'ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-05-01

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10-100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  12. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Hadi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  13. Laser-induced macular holes demonstrate impaired choroidal perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeremiah, Jr.; Allen, Ronald D.; Zwick, Harry; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2003-06-01

    Choroidal perfusion was evaluated following the creation of a laser induced macular hole in a nonhuman primate model. Two Rhesus monkeys underwent macular exposures delivered by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The lesions were evaluated with fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography . Each lesion produced vitreous hemorrhage and progressed to a full thickness macular hole. ICG angiography revealed no perfusion of the choriocapillaris beneath the lesion centers. Histopathologic evaluation showed replacement of the choriocapillaris with fibroblasts and connective tissue. Nd:YAG, laser-induced macular holes result in long term impairment of choroidal perfusion at the base of the hole due to choroidal scarring and obliteration of the choriocapillaris.

  14. Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy have been carried out in four different hydrocarbon gas mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) to investigate the effect of gas species on the laser induced breakdown kinetics and resulting the plasma emission. For this purpose, each mixture that consists of different species has the same atom composition. It is found that the temporal emission spectra and the decay rates of atomic line-intensities are almost identical for the breakdowns in the four different mixtures. This finding may indicate that the breakdown plasmas of these mixtures reach a similar thermodynamic and physiochemical state after its formation, resulting in a similar trend of quenching of excited species.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Edwards, Donna H.; Buckley, Paul F., III; DeCosta, Joseph F.; Haggitt, Rodger C.

    1996-04-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether laser-induced fluorescence could detect high grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus. Four-hundred-ten nm laser light was used to induce autofluorescence of Barrett's mucosa in 36 patients during routine endoscopy. The spectra were analyzed using the Differential Normalized Fluorescence (DNF) Index technique to differentiate high grade dysplasia from either low grade or non-dysplastic mucosa. Each spectrum was classified as either premalignant or benign using two different DNF indices. Analyzing the fluorescence spectra from all patients using one DNF Index, 96% of non- dysplastic Barrett's samples classified as benign tissue. All low grade dysplasia samples classified as benign. Ninety percent of high grade dysplasia samples classified as premalignant. Twenty-eight percent of mixed low grade/focal high grade dysplasia samples classified as premalignant. In summary, high grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus patients can be detected by endoscopic laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy using differential normalized fluorescence technique.

  16. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Zenou, M.; Sa'ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  17. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  18. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  19. Coherent microwave radiation from a laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.

    2012-12-24

    We propose a method for generation of coherent monochromatic microwave/terahertz radiation from a laser-induced plasma. It is shown that small-scale plasma, located in the interaction region of two co-propagating plane-polarized laser beams, can be a source of the dipole radiation at a frequency equal to the difference between the frequencies of the lasers. This radiation is coherent and appears as a result of the so-called optical mixing in plasma.

  20. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy:. AN Application on Multilayered Archeological Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponterio, R.; Trusso, S.; Vasi, C.; Aragona, S.; Mavilia, L.

    2004-10-01

    In this work we show an example of application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in combination with another laser-based technique: Raman micro-spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and glaze on pottery found archaeological excavations in Amendolea castle site (south of Italy in Calabrian peninsula); the objects belong to medieval period. The spectral data indicates the qualitative elemental composition of the examined materials and, in addition, give us useful information on the stratigraphy of the paint layers.

  1. Post-acceleration of laser-induced ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Delle Side, D.

    2015-04-01

    A complete review of the essential and recent developments in the field of post-acceleration of laser-induced ion beams is presented. After a brief introduction to the physics of low-intensity nanosecond laser-matter interaction, the details of ions extraction and acceleration are critically analyzed and the key parameters to obtain good-quality ion beams are illustrated. A description of the most common ion beam diagnosis system is given, together with the associated analytical techniques.

  2. Laser-induced transient grating setup with continuously tunable period

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Flick, A.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Khanolkar, A.; Abi Ghanem, M.; Boechler, N.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2015-12-15

    We present a modification of the laser-induced transient grating setup enabling continuous tuning of the transient grating period. The fine control of the period is accomplished by varying the angle of the diffraction grating used to split excitation and probe beams. The setup has been tested by measuring dispersion of bulk and surface acoustic waves in both transmission and reflection geometries. The presented modification is fully compatible with optical heterodyne detection and can be easily implemented in any transient grating setup.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for specimen analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Akshaya; Yu-Yueh, Fang; Burgess, Shane C.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-08-15

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus, a system and a method for detecting the presence or absence of trace elements in a biological sample using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy. The trace elements are used to develop a signature profile which is analyzed directly or compared with the known profile of a standard. In one aspect of the invention, the apparatus, system and method are used to detect malignant cancer cells in vivo.

  4. Fiber coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan

    2008-08-12

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, the spark delivery system including a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. In addition, the laser delivery assembly includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. In accordance with embodiments of the present invention, the assembly may be used to create a spark in a combustion engine. In accordance with other embodiments of the present invention, a method of using the spark delivery system is provided. In addition, a method of choosing an appropriate fiber for creating a spark using a laser beam is also presented.

  5. Hydrogen leak detection using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ball, A J; Hohreiter, V; Hahn, D W

    2005-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is investigated as a technique for real-time monitoring of hydrogen gas. Two methodologies were examined: The use of a 100 mJ laser pulse to create a laser-induced breakdown directly in a sample gas stream, and the use of a 55 mJ laser pulse to create a laser-induced plasma on a solid substrate surface, with the expanding plasma sampling the gas stream. Various metals were analyzed as candidate substrate surfaces, including aluminum, copper, molybdenum, stainless steel, titanium, and tungsten. Stainless steel was selected, and a detailed analysis of hydrogen detection in binary mixtures of nitrogen and hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was performed. Both the gaseous plasma and the plasma initiated on the stainless steel surface generated comparable hydrogen emission signals, using the 656.28 Halpha emission line, and exhibited excellent signal linearity. The limit of detection is about 20 ppm (mass) as determined for both methodologies, with the solid-initiated plasma yielding a slightly better value. Overall, LIBS is concluded to be a viable candidate for hydrogen sensing, offering a combination of high sensitivity with a technique that is well suited to implementation in field environments.

  6. Two-dimensional Temperature Measurement in Laser-induced Breakdown (LIB) using Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence (PLIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Ling; Parigger, Christian; Plemmons, David H.; Lewis, J. W. L.

    1996-05-01

    Two-dimensional temperature maps of the spatial profile of NH have been obtained following laser-induced breakdown of NH_3. A focused Nd:YAG laser of nominally 30 mJ and 6 ns pulsewidth was used to obtain laser breakdown of atmospheric pressure, flowing gaseous NH_3. The recombination NH A-X far-ultraviolet spectra was studied over the temporal region of 1 - 100 μs following breakdown. Spontaneous emission and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) spectra were observed using a two dimensional image-intensifier filter combination. The PLIF excitation spetra were achieved using an excimer-pumped dye laser, and temperature were obtained using Boltzmann plots. The results show the spatial profiles of the remnant plasma kernel and the effect of gas-dynamic expansion.

  7. Mars Spark Source Prototype Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; VanderWal, Randall L.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware was developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample, and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma to identify and quantify them. Trace metal measurements are vital in assessing whether or not the Martian environment will be toxic to human explorers. The current method of x-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations of major species only. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The new instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but it would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field initiated the development of the MSSP as part of Glenn's Director's Discretionary Fund project for the Spark Analysis Detection of Trace Metal Species in Martian Dusts and Soils. The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a compact, sensitive optical instrument for the detection of trace hazardous metals in Martian dusts and soils.

  8. Lifecycle of laser-produced air sparks

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S. Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the lifecycle of laser-generated air sparks or plasmas using multiple plasma diagnostic tools. The sparks were generated by focusing the fundamental radiation from an Nd:YAG laser in air, and studies included early and late time spark dynamics, decoupling of the shock wave from the plasma core, emission from the spark kernel, cold gas excitation by UV radiation, shock waves produced by the air spark, and the spark's final decay and turbulence formation. The shadowgraphic and self-emission images showed similar spark morphology at earlier and late times of its lifecycle; however, significant differences are seen in the midlife images. Spectroscopic studies in the visible region showed intense blackbody-type radiation at early times followed by clearly resolved ionic, atomic, and molecular emission. The detected spectrum at late times clearly contained emission from both CN and N{sub 2}{sup +}. Additional spectral features have been identified at late times due to emission from O and N atoms, indicating some degree of molecular dissociation and excitation. Detailed spatially and temporally resolved emission analysis provides insight about various physical mechanisms leading to molecular and atomic emission by air sparks, including spark plasma excitation, heating of cold air by UV radiation emitted by the spark, and shock-heating.

  9. Multi-point laser spark generation for internal combustion engines using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Elliott; Kuang, Zheng; Cheng, Hua; Page, Vincent; Shenton, Tom; Dearden, Geoff

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on a technique demonstrating for the first time successful multi-point laser-induced spark generation, which is variable in three dimensions and derived from a single laser beam. Previous work on laser ignition of internal combustion engines found that simultaneously igniting in more than one location resulted in more stable and faster combustion - a key potential advantage over conventional spark ignition. However, previous approaches could only generate secondary foci at fixed locations. The work reported here is an experimental technique for multi-point laser ignition, in which several sparks with arbitrary spatial location in three dimensions are created by variable diffraction of a pulsed single laser beam source and transmission through an optical plug. The diffractive multi-beam arrays and patterns are generated using a spatial light modulator on which computer generated holograms are displayed. A gratings and lenses algorithm is used to accurately modulate the phase of the input laser beam and create multi-beam output. The underpinning theory, experimental arrangement and results obtained are presented and discussed.

  10. Q-Switched Alexandrite Laser-induced Chrysiasis

    PubMed Central

    Victor Ross, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chyriasis is an uncommon side effect that occurs in patients who are receiving prolonged treatment with either intravenous or intramuscular gold as a distinctive blue-gray pigmentation of light-exposed skin. Laser-induced chrysiasis is a rarely described phenomenon in individuals who have received systemic gold and are subsequently treated with a Q-switched laser. Purpose: To describe the characteristics of patients with laser-induced chrysiasis. Methods: The authors describe a 60-year-old woman who developed chrysiasis at Q-switched alexandrite laser treatment sites. They also reviewed the medical literature using PubMed, searching the terms chrysiasis, gold, and laser-induced. Patient reports and previous reviews of these subjects were critically assessed and the salient features are presented. Results: Including the authors’ patient, laser-induced chrysiasis has been described in five Caucasian arthritis patients (4 women and 1 man); most of the patients had received more than 8g of systemic gold therapy during a period of 3 to 13 years. Gold therapy was still occurring or had been discontinued as long as 26 years prior to laser treatment. All of the patients immediately developed blue macules at the Q-switched laser treatment site. Resolution of the dyschromia occurred in a 70-year-old woman after two treatment sessions with a long-pulsed ruby laser and the authors’ patient after a sequential series of laser sessions using a long-pulsed alexandrite laser, followed by a nonablative fractional laser and an ablative carbon dioxide laser. Conclusion: Laser-induced chrysiasis has been observed following treatment with Q-switched lasers in patients who are receiving or have previously been treated with systemic gold. It can occur decades after treatment with gold has been discontinued. Therefore, inquiry regarding a prior history of treatment with gold—particularly in older patients with arthritis—should be considered prior to treatment with a Q

  11. Remote sensing of phytoplankton using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Babichenko, S.; Poryvkina, L.; Arikese, V. ); Kaitala, S. ); Kuosa, H. )

    1993-06-01

    The results of remote laser sensing of brackish-water phytoplankton on board a research vessel are presented. Field data of laser-induced fluorescence of phytoplankton obtained during the several cruises in the mouth of tile Gulf of Finland are compared with the results of standard chlorophyll a analysis of water samples and phytoplankton species determination by microscopy. The approach of fluorescence excitation by tunable laser radiation is applied to study the spatial distribution of a natural phytoplankton community. The remote analysis of the pigment composition of a phytoplankton community using the method of selective pigment excitation is described. The possibility of elaborating methods of quantitative laser remote biomonitoring is discussed.

  12. Expansion of radiative cooling of the laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Chunyi; Greif, Ralph; Russo,Richard

    2006-05-05

    To study the expansion and cooling process of the laser induced plasma generated by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation, experiments have been conducted which measure the position of the external shockwaves and the temperature of the vapor plumes. The positions of external shockwaves were determined by a femtosecond laser time-resolved imaging system. Vapor plume temperature was determined from spectroscopic measurements of the plasma emission lines. A model which considers the mass, momentum, and energy conservation of the region affected by the laser energy was developed. It shows good agreement to the experimental data.

  13. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  14. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS): specific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtica, M. S.; Savovic, J.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Kuzmanovic, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Ciganovic, J.; Zivkovic, S.

    2015-12-01

    A short overview of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with emphasis on the new trends is presented. Nowadays, due to unique features of this technique, LIBS has found applications in a great variety of fields. Achievements in the application of LIBS in nuclear area, for hazardous materials detection and in geology were considered. Also, some results recently obtained at VINCA Institute, with LIBS system based on transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, are presented. Future investigations of LIBS will be oriented toward further improvement of the analytical performance of this technique, as well as on finding new application fields.

  15. Laser induced fluorescence of biochemical for UV LIDAR application.

    PubMed

    Gupta, L; Sharma, R C; Razdan, A K; Maini, A K

    2014-05-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the ultraviolet regime has been used for the detection of biochemical through a fiber coupled CCD detector from a distance of 2 m. The effect of concentration and laser excitation energy on the fluorescence spectra of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been investigated. The signature fluorescence peak of NADH was centred about 460 nm. At lower concentration Raman peak centred at 405 nm was also observed. The origin of this peak has been discussed. Detection limit with the proposed set up is found to be 1 ppm.

  16. Laser-induced stress transients: aqueous pores of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flotte, Thomas J.; Lee, Shun; Zhang, Hong; McAuliffe, Daniel J., Sr.; Taitelbaum, Jeremy; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    1996-05-01

    Lasers can be used to enhance the delivery of a number of molecules. The model that best fits our data is for the formation of aqueous pores. These pores are present for up to 80 seconds. Our experiments have shown that laser-induced stress transients can be utilized as a vector for intracellular delivery of molecules that may or may not normally cross the cell membrane. These two conditions have been tested with Photofrin and DNA. This technology may have applications in cell and molecular biology, cancer therapy, gene therapy, and others.

  17. Laser-induced breakdown in large transparent water droplets.

    PubMed

    Chang, R K; Eickmans, J H; Hsieh, W F; Wood, C F; Zhang, J Z; Zheng, J B

    1988-06-15

    Recent experiments on the laser-induced breakdown (LIB) of large transparent liquid droplets are reviewed. A physical model of LIB processes is presented with the aim of integrating the following recent results: (1) the internal and near-field distributions for large transparent spheres; (2) the location of LIB initiation based on spatially resolved plasma emission spectroscopic techniques; (3) spatially resolved but time-averaged density of the plasma plumes and temperature of the atomic species within the plasma; (4) the plasma front propagation velocities inside and outside the droplet; and (5) the fate of the remaining superheated droplet and the expelled material.

  18. Interaction between jets during laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Patrascioiu, A.; Florian, C.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.; Hennig, G.; Delaporte, P.

    2014-07-07

    Simultaneous two-beam laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) was carried out for various inter-beam separations, analyzing both the resulting printing outcomes and the corresponding liquid transfer dynamics. In a first experiment, droplets of an aqueous solution were printed onto a substrate at different inter-beam distances, which proved that a significant departure from the single-beam LIFT dynamics takes places at specific separations. In the second experiment, time-resolved imaging analysis revealed the existence of significant jet-jet interactions at those separations; such interactions proceed through a dynamics that results in remarkable jet deflection for which a possible onset mechanism is proposed.

  19. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  20. Search for Laser-Induced Formation of Antihydrogen Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amoretti, M.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Ejsing, A. M.; Hangst, J. S.; Madsen, N.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L. V.; Mitchard, D.

    2006-11-24

    Antihydrogen can be synthesized by mixing antiprotons and positrons in a Penning trap environment. Here an experiment to stimulate the formation of antihydrogen in the n=11 quantum state by the introduction of light from a CO{sub 2} continuous wave laser is described. An overall upper limit of 0.8% with 90% C.L. on the laser-induced enhancement of the recombination has been found. This result strongly suggests that radiative recombination contributes negligibly to the antihydrogen formed in the experimental conditions used by the ATHENA Collaboration.

  1. Search for laser-induced formation of antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Ejsing, A M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Lodi Rizzini, E; Macrì, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Posada, L G C; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Telle, H H; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2006-11-24

    Antihydrogen can be synthesized by mixing antiprotons and positrons in a Penning trap environment. Here an experiment to stimulate the formation of antihydrogen in the n = 11 quantum state by the introduction of light from a CO2 continuous wave laser is described. An overall upper limit of 0.8% with 90% C.L. on the laser-induced enhancement of the recombination has been found. This result strongly suggests that radiative recombination contributes negligibly to the antihydrogen formed in the experimental conditions used by the ATHENA Collaboration.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the secondary cataract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, N. A.; Larionov, P. M.; Rozhin, I. A.; Druzhinin, I. B.; Chernykh, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    Excitation-emission matrices of laser-induced fluorescence of lens capsule epithelium, the lens nucleus, and the lens capsule are investigated. A solid-state laser in combination with an optical parametric generator tunable in the range from 210 to 350 nm was used for excitation of fluorescence. The spectra of fluorescence of all three types of tissues exhibit typical features that are specific to them and drastically differ from one another. This effect can be used for intrasurgical control of presence of residual lens capsule epithelium cells in the capsular bag after surgical treatment of a cataract.

  3. Laser-induced backward transfer of nanoimprinted polymer elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinaeugle, Matthias; Heath, Daniel J.; Mills, Benjamin; Grant-Jacob, James A.; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Eason, Robert W.

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced backward transfer of transparent photopolymers is demonstrated in the solid state, assisted by a digital micromirror spatial light modulator for producing shaped deposits. Through use of an absorbing silicon carrier substrate, we have been able to successfully transfer solid-phase material, with lateral dimensions as small as ~6 µm. In addition, a carrier of silicon incorporating a photonic waveguide relief structure enables the transfer of imprinted deposits that have been accomplished with surface features exactly complementing those present on the substrate, with an observed minimum feature size of 140 nm.

  4. Laser induced fluorescence of biochemical for UV LIDAR application.

    PubMed

    Gupta, L; Sharma, R C; Razdan, A K; Maini, A K

    2014-05-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the ultraviolet regime has been used for the detection of biochemical through a fiber coupled CCD detector from a distance of 2 m. The effect of concentration and laser excitation energy on the fluorescence spectra of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been investigated. The signature fluorescence peak of NADH was centred about 460 nm. At lower concentration Raman peak centred at 405 nm was also observed. The origin of this peak has been discussed. Detection limit with the proposed set up is found to be 1 ppm. PMID:24337816

  5. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in paintings and sculptures research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzyński, A.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Marczak, J.

    2007-07-01

    Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for investigation of chemical constitution and stratigraphy of artworks, and metallic objects with multilayer structures is described in the paper. Physical phenomena accompanying LIBS investigations, especially temporal evolution and spectral lines broadening are described. Operational characteristics of experimental equipment are shown. Results obtained with use of two different echelle spectrometers are compared. Pigments used in oil paintings are analyzed and analysis results are presented. Experimental results of measurements of various objects like paintings, sculptures and artifacts are shown. Works on dating of investigated paintings are described.

  6. Laser-induced shock waves effects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.; Shafer, B.P.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the effects of pressure pulses on materials is presented with an orientation toward laser-induced shock wave effects in biological tissue. The behavior is first discussed for small amplitudes, namely sound waves, since many important features in this region are also applicable at large amplitudes. The generation of pressure pulses by lasers is discussed along with amplitudes. The origin and characteristic properties of shock waves are discussed along with the different types of effects they can produce. The hydrodynamic code techniques required for shock wave calculations are discussed along with the necessary empirical data base and methods for generating that data base. 7 refs., 15 figs.

  7. High time resolution laser induced fluorescence in pulsed argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Biloiu, Ioana A.; Sun Xuan; Scime, Earl E.

    2006-10-15

    A submillisecond time resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method for obtaining the temporal evolution of the ion velocity distribution function in pulsed argon plasma is presented. A basic LIF system that employs a continuous laser wave pumping and lock-in aided detection of the subsequent fluorescence radiation is modified by addition of a high frequency acousto-optic modulator to provide measurements of the ion flow velocity and ion temperature in a helicon generated pulsed argon plasma with temporal resolutions as high as 30 {mu}s.

  8. Laser-Induced Underwater Plasma And Its Spectroscopic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lazic, Violeta

    2008-09-23

    Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for analysis of immersed solid and soft materials, and for liquid impurities are described. A method for improving the LIBS signal underwater and for obtaining quantitative analyses in presence of strong shot-to-shot variations of the plasma properties is proposed. Dynamic of the gas bubble formed by the laser pulse is also discussed, together with its importance in Double-Pulse (DP) laser excitation. Results of the studies relative to an application of multi-pulse sequence and its effects on the plasma and gas bubble formation are also presented.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of combustion chemistry intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) can measure the trace (often free radical) species encountered as intermediates in combustion chemistry; OH, CS, NH, NS, and NCO are typical of the species detected in flames by LIF. Attention is given to illustrative experiments designed to accumulate a quantitative data base for LIF detection in low pressure flow systems and flames, as well as to flame measurements conducted with a view to the detection of new chemical intermediaries that may deepen insight into the chemistry of combustion.

  10. Laser-induced micro-jetting from armored droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, J. O.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2015-07-01

    We present findings from an experimental study of laser-induced cavitation within a liquid drop coated with a granular material, commonly referred to as "armored droplets" or "liquid marbles." The cavitation event follows the formation of plasma after a nanosecond laser pulse. Using ultra-high-speed imaging up to 320,610 fps, we investigate the extremely rapid dynamics following the cavitation, which manifests itself in the form of a plethora of micro-jets emanating simultaneously from the spaces between particles on the surface of the drop. These fine jets break up into droplets with a relatively narrow diameter range, on the order of 10 μm.

  11. Progress in fieldable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2012-06-01

    In recent years there has been great progress in the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technology field. Significant advances have been made both in fundamental and applied research as well as in data processing/chemometrics. Improvements in components, most notably lasers/optics and spectrometers are enabling the development of new devices that are suitable for field use. These new commercial devices recently released to the marketplace, as well as ones currently under development, are bringing the potential of LIBS for CBRNE threat analysis into real-world applications.

  12. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Dr. Karel; Hrdlicka, A; Malina, R; Hartl, M; Kizek, R; Adam, V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  13. Storytelling through animation: Oxford Sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, D. M.; Cook, A.

    2013-12-01

    Oxford Sparks is a portal that launched in 2012, with the aim of bringing together resources that have been created across the University of Oxford and elsewhere for the purpose of wider engagement with science. To bring attention to this site, Oxford Sparks developed a set of high-quality short animations, each designed to tell a story relating to a current area of science. These animations have been launched on YouTube, and will shortly be available on iTunesU, and have covered broad areas of science from subduction zones (';Underwater Volcano Disaster'), through the early history of the solar system (';Rogue Planet') to the workings of the Large Hadron Collider (';A quick look around the LHC'). The animations have each been developed in close collaboration with researchers, created by a team with experience of education, engagement and outreach. The two minute scripts are intended to be both widely accessible and viewable as ';stand alone' stories. To this end, the scripts are humorous; while the animations are delightfully quirky, and created by professional animator with a degree-level science background. The animations are also intended to be used as ';lesson starters' in school, and educational activities graded for different age groups are being developed in parallel with the animations. They have been used, successfully, on pre-university summer schools, and in university classes. We are gathering both quantitative (analytics) and qualitative (school teacher and student focus group) feedback to monitor the success of the project, and to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. In the first year since launch, Oxford Sparks animations were viewed over 80,000 times on YouTube, in part due to the surge of interest in the Large Hadron Collider animation after the discovery of the Higgs Boson.

  14. Cosmic sparks from superconducting strings.

    PubMed

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-01

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents approximately 10{5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{-1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model. PMID:18851517

  15. Cosmic Sparks from Superconducting Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-03

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents {approx}10{sup 5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{sup -1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model.

  16. Dynamical behavior of laser-induced nanoparticles during remote processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Tobias; Dickmann, Klaus; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Laser remote processing is used in a wide field of industrial applications. Among other things, it is characterized by flexible beam guidance in combination with high processing velocities. But in most cases process gas support in the interaction zone is omitted. Consequently, interaction mechanism between the vapor plume and the incident laser radiation can dynamically affect the process stability. Referring to remote welding with high brilliant laser sources having a wavelength around 1 μm, the interaction between the incident laser radiation and formed particles plays an important role. The presented work shows results of the investigation of the laser-induced particle formation during the laser welding of stainless steel with a 2 kW fiber laser under remote conditions. It is therefore concentrated on the dynamical behavior of the laser-induced particle formation and the dependence of the particle formation on the laser beam power. TEM images of formed particles were analyzed. In addition, the radiation of a LED was directed through the vapor plume. On the one hand, the dynamic of the attenuation was considered. On the other hand, the Rayleigh approximation was used in order to evaluate the detected signals.

  17. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffin, V. L.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from 1 Sep. 1989 to 28 Feb. 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe in supercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  18. Laser-induced nuclear magnetic resonance splitting in hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ikäläinen, Suvi; Lantto, Perttu; Manninen, Pekka; Vaara, Juha

    2008-09-28

    Irradiation of matter with circularly polarized light (CPL) shifts all nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lines. The phenomenon arises from the second-order interaction of the electron cloud with the optical field, combined with the orbital hyperfine interaction. The shift occurs in opposite directions for right and left CPL, and rapid switching between them will split the resonance lines into two. We present ab initio and density functional theory predictions of laser-induced NMR splittings for hydrocarbon systems with different sizes: ethene, benzene, coronene, fullerene, and circumcoronene. Due to the computationally challenging nature of the effect, traditional basis sets could not be used for the larger systems. A novel method for generating basis sets, mathematical completeness optimization, was employed. As expected, the magnitude of the spectral splitting increases with the laser beam frequency and polarizability of the system. Massive amplification of the effect is also observed close to the optical excitation energies. A much larger laser-induced splitting is found for the largest of the present molecules than for the previously investigated noble gas atoms or small molecules. The laser intensity required for experimental detection of the effect is discussed.

  19. Laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voumard, Pierre; Zenobi, Renato

    1995-10-01

    A complete study on the energy partitioning upon laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces was undertaken. The measurements include characterization of the aniline-quartz adsorption system using temperature-programmed desorption, the extrapolation of quasiequilibrium desorption temperatures to the regime of laser heating rates on the order of 109-1010 K/s by computational means, measurement of the kinetic energy distributions of desorbing aniline using a pump-probe method, and the determination of internal energies with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. The measurements are compared to calculations of the surface temperature rise and the resulting desorption rates, based on a finite-difference mathematical description of pulsed laser heating. While the surface temperature of laser-heated silica reaches about 600-700 K at the time of desorption, the translational temperature of laser-desorbed aniline was measured to be Tkin=420±60 K, Tvib was 360±60 K, and Trot was 350±100 K. These results are discussed using different models for laser-induced thermal desorption from surfaces.

  20. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  1. Nanorod Surface Plasmon Enhancement of Laser-Induced Ultrafast Demagnetization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haitian; Hajisalem, Ghazal; Steeves, Geoffrey M; Gordon, Reuven; Choi, Byoung C

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser-induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films were measured using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser in a pump-probe magneto-optic Kerr effect setup. The effect of plasmon resonance on the transient magnetization was investigated by drop-coating the ferromagnetic films with dimensionally-tuned gold nanorods supporting longitudinal surface plasmon resonance near the central wavelength of the pump laser. With ~4% nanorod areal coverage, we observe a >50% increase in demagnetization signal in nanorod-coated samples at pump fluences on the order of 0.1 mJ/cm(2) due to surface plasmon-mediated localized electric-field enhancement, an effect which becomes more significant at higher laser fluences. We were able to qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations using finite-difference time-domain simulations and mean-field theory. This dramatic enhancement of ultrafast laser-induced demagnetization points to possible applications of nanorod-coated thin films in heat-assisted magnetic recording. PMID:26515296

  2. Analytical application of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikechi, Noureddine; Markushin, Yuri

    2015-05-01

    We report on significant advantages provided by femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for analytical applications in fields as diverse as protein characterization and material science. We compare the results of a femto- and nanosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of dual-elemental pellets in terms of the shot-to-shot variations of the neutral/ionic emission line intensities. This study is complemented by a numerical model based on two-dimensional random close packing of disks in an enclosed geometry. In addition, we show that LIBS can be used to obtain quantitative identification of the hydrogen composition of bio-macromolecules in a heavy water solution. Finally, we show that simultaneous multi-elemental particle assay analysis combined with LIBS can significantly improve macromolecule detectability up to near single molecule per particle efficiency. Research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (0630388), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NX09AU90A). Our gratitude to Dr. D. Connolly, Fox Chase Cancer Center.

  3. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 7th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1976-06-01

    The Seventh ERDA-ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, on 29-31 July 1975. These Symposia are held as part of the activities in ASTM Subcommittee II on Lasers and Laser Materials, which is charged with the responsibilities of formulating standards and test procedures for laser materials, components, and devices. The Chairman of Subcommittee II is Haynes Lee, of Owens-Illinois, Inc. Co-chairmen for the Damage Symposia are Arthur Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory and Alexander J. Glass of Law-rence Livermore Laboratory. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard forty-five papers on topics relating fabrication procedures to laser induced damage in optical materials; on metal mirrors; in ir window materials; the multipulse, wavelength, and pulse length dependence of damage thresholds; damage in dielectric films and at exposed surfaces; as well as theoretical discussions on avalanche ionization and multiphoton processes of importance at shorter wavelengths. Of particular importance were the scaling relations developed from several parametric studies relating fundamental properties (refractive index, surface roughness etc.) to the damage threshold. This year many of the extrinsic influences tending to reduce a materials damage resistance were isolated such that measures of their egregious nature could be quantified. Much still needs to be accomplished to improve processing and fabrication procedures to allow a measurable approach to a materials intrinsic strength to be demonstrated.

  4. Microwave assisted laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljanen, Jan; Sun, Zhiwei; Alwahabi, Zeyad T.

    2016-04-01

    Signal enhancements in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using external microwave power are demonstrated in ambient air. Pulsed microwave at 2.45 GHz and of 1 millisecond duration was delivered via a simple near field applicator (NFA), with which an external electric field is generated and coupled into laser induced plasma. The external microwave power can significantly increase the signal lifetime from a few microseconds to hundreds of microseconds, resulting in a great enhancement on LIBS signals with the use of a long integration time. The dependence of signal enhancement on laser energy and microwave power is experimentally assessed. With the assistance of microwave source, a significant enhancement of ~ 100 was achieved at relatively low laser energy that is only slightly above the ablation threshold. A limit of detection (LOD) of 8.1 ppm was estimated for copper detection in Cu/Al2O3 solid samples. This LOD corresponds to a 93-fold improvement compared with conventional single-pulse LIBS. Additionally, in the microwave assisted LIBS, the self-reversal effect was greatly reduced, which is beneficial in measuring elements of high concentration. Temporal measurements have been performed and the results revealed the evolution of the emission process in microwave-enhanced LIBS. The optimal position of the NFA related to the ablation point has also been investigated.

  5. Nanorod Surface Plasmon Enhancement of Laser-Induced Ultrafast Demagnetization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haitian; Hajisalem, Ghazal; Steeves, Geoffrey M.; Gordon, Reuven; Choi, Byoung C.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser-induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films were measured using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser in a pump-probe magneto-optic Kerr effect setup. The effect of plasmon resonance on the transient magnetization was investigated by drop-coating the ferromagnetic films with dimensionally-tuned gold nanorods supporting longitudinal surface plasmon resonance near the central wavelength of the pump laser. With ~4% nanorod areal coverage, we observe a >50% increase in demagnetization signal in nanorod-coated samples at pump fluences on the order of 0.1 mJ/cm2 due to surface plasmon-mediated localized electric-field enhancement, an effect which becomes more significant at higher laser fluences. We were able to qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations using finite-difference time-domain simulations and mean-field theory. This dramatic enhancement of ultrafast laser-induced demagnetization points to possible applications of nanorod-coated thin films in heat-assisted magnetic recording. PMID:26515296

  6. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  7. A model for traumatic brain injury using laser induced shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selfridge, A.; Preece, D.; Gomez, V.; Shi, L. Z.; Berns, M. W.

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a major treatment challenge in both civilian and military medicine; on the cellular level, its mechanisms are poorly understood. As a method to study the dysfunctional repair mechanisms following injury, laser induced shock waves (LIS) are a useful way to create highly precise, well characterized mechanical forces. We present a simple model for TBI using laser induced shock waves as a model for damage. Our objective is to develop an understanding of the processes responsible for neuronal death, the ways in which we can manipulate these processes to improve cell survival and repair, and the importance of these processes at different levels of biological organization. The physics of shock wave creation has been modeled and can be used to calculate forces acting on individual neurons. By ensuring that the impulse is in the same regime as that occurring in practical TBI, the LIS model can ensure that in vitro conditions and damage are similar to those experienced in TBI. This model will allow for the study of the biochemical response of neurons to mechanical stresses, and can be combined with microfluidic systems for cell growth in order to better isolate areas of damage.

  8. Laser-induced nucleation of carbon dioxide bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ward, Martin R; Jamieson, William J; Leckey, Claire A; Alexander, Andrew J

    2015-04-14

    A detailed experimental study of laser-induced nucleation (LIN) of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubbles is presented. Water and aqueous sucrose solutions supersaturated with CO2 were exposed to single nanosecond pulses (5 ns, 532 nm, 2.4-14.5 MW cm(-2)) and femtosecond pulses (110 fs, 800 nm, 0.028-11 GW cm(-2)) of laser light. No bubbles were observed with the femtosecond pulses, even at high peak power densities (11 GW cm(-2)). For the nanosecond pulses, the number of bubbles produced per pulse showed a quadratic dependence on laser power, with a distinct power threshold below which no bubbles were observed. The number of bubbles observed increases linearly with sucrose concentration. It was found that filtering of solutions reduces the number of bubbles significantly. Although the femtosecond pulses have higher peak power densities than the nanosecond pulses, they have lower energy densities per pulse. A simple model for LIN of CO2 is presented, based on heating of nanoparticles to produce vapor bubbles that must expand to reach a critical bubble radius to continue growth. The results suggest that non-photochemical laser-induced nucleation of crystals could also be caused by heating of nanoparticles.

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  10. [Identification of invoice based on laser-induced photoluminescence spectrum].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Yang, Yong; Tian, Yong-hong

    2011-12-01

    The rapid identification of invoice authenticity was studied based on laser-induced photoluminescence spectrum. First, the spectral curves of eighty invoice samples were obtained by laser-induced photoluminescence detection system, and genetic algorithm (GA) was applied to fit and separate overlapped spectral region between 566 and 669 nm by three Gaussian peaks. Spectral feature parameters extracted by GA were employed as the inputs of BP neural networks, and then an identification model was built. One hundred and four data were converted to 13 Gaussian parameters, and for authentic and false invoices the coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.99789 and 0.99683 and the relative standard deviations (RSD) were 0.017052 and 0.022362, respectively. It was showed that Gaussian fitting algorithm could not only simplify the parameters of models, but also improve the explanation of analysis models. Through comparison analysis of the results, it was found that the model, whose thirteen feature parameters and two evaluated parameters were all applied as BP inputs, was the best, and the corrected identification rates of sixty calibration samples and twenty validation samples were both 100%. So the identification method studied in the present research played a good role in the classification and identification, and offered a new approach to the rapid identification of invoice authenticity. PMID:22295788

  11. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 6th ASTM Symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1975-03-01

    The Sixth ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado on 22-23 May 1974. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard thirty-one papers on topics relating to laser induced damage in crystalline and nonlinear optical materials, at dielectric surfaces, and in thin film coatings as well as discussions of damage problems in the ir region due both to cw and pulsed irradiation. In addition, several reports on the theoretical analysis of laser-materials interaction relative to the damage progress were given, along with tabulations of fundamental materials properties of importance in evaluation of optical material response to high-power laser radiation. Attention was given to high-power laser system design considerations that relate to improved system performance and reliability when various damage mechanisms are operable in such systems. A workshop on the machining of optics was held, and nine papers on various facets of the topic were presented dealing with machining procedures, surface characterization of machined elements, coating of machined components, and the polishing and damage resistance of polished, coated, and bare metal reflectors. PMID:20134954

  12. Sparking Interest in Nature--Family Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlee, Donna J.; Cormons, Grace D.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes SPARK (Shore People Advancing Readiness for Knowledge), a nature-based program designed to advance literacy and environmental knowledge in a rural Virginia county that has long been combating generational poverty and low literacy. SPARK engages children between the ages of 3 and 7 and their families in nature learning. The…

  13. Sparks: Senior Perspectives Awareness Research Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, Juanita; Bernick, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Describes SPARKS (Senior Perspectives Awareness Research Knowledge Seminars), a Virginia Beach (Virginia) program in which selected high school seniors meet to research, discuss, and debate topics. Students design the seminar and select the topics. Teachers organize, monitor, and evaluate. Examples of SPARKS activities, seminar topics, and field…

  14. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches.

  15. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  16. Evaluation of laser-induced thin-layer removal by using shadowgraphy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabasović, M. S.; Šević, D.; Lukač, N.; Jezeršek, M.; Možina, J.; Gregorčič, P.

    2016-03-01

    Shadow photography and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are studied as methods for monitoring the selective removal of thin (i.e., under 100 μm) layers by laser ablation. We used a laser pulse of 5 ns and 16 mJ at 1064 nm to ablate an 18-μm-thin copper layer from the fiberglass substrate. On the basis of shadowgraphs of the laser-induced shock waves, we measured the optodynamic energy-conversion efficiency, defined as the ratio between the mechanical energy of the shock wave and the excitation-pulse energy. Our results show that this efficiency is significantly higher for the laser pulse-copper interaction than for the interaction between the excitation pulse and the substrate. LIBS was simultaneously employed in our experimental setup. The optical emission from the plasma plume was collected by using a spectrograph and recorded with a streak camera. We show that advancing of laser ablation through the copper layer and reaching of the substrate can be estimated by tracking the spectral region between 370 and 500 nm. Therefore, the presented results confirm that LIBS method enables an on-line monitoring needed for selective removal of thin layers by laser.

  17. Detection of trace phosphorus in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Wang, H.; Xie, Z. Q.; Gao, Y.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2009-05-01

    Monitoring of light-element concentration in steel is very important for quality assurance in the steel industry. In this work, detection in open air of trace phosphorus (P) in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) combined with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been investigated. An optical parametric oscillator wavelength-tunable laser was used to resonantly excite the P atoms within plasma plumes generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. A set of steel samples with P concentrations from 3.9 to 720 parts in 10{sup 6}(ppm) were analyzed using LIBS-LIF at wavelengths of 253.40 and 253.56 nm for resonant excitation of P atoms and fluorescence lines at wavelengths of 213.55 and 213.62 nm. The calibration curves were measured to determine the limit of detection for P in steel, which is estimated to be around 0.7 ppm. The results demonstrate the potential of LIBS-LIF to meet the requirements for on-line analyses in open air in the steel industry.

  18. Determination of phosphorus in steel by the combined technique of laser induced breakdown spectrometry with laser induced fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Naoya; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-09-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) combined with laser induced fluorescence spectrometry (LIFS) has been applied for detection of trace-level phosphorus in steel. The plasma induced by irradiation of Nd:YAG laser pulse for ablation was illuminated by the 3rd harmonic of Ti:Sapphire laser tuned to one of the resonant lines for phosphorus in the wavelength region of 253-256 nm. An excitation line for phosphorus was selected to give the highest signal-to-noise ratio. Fluorescence signals, P213.62 and P214.91 nm, were observed with high selectivity at the contents as low as several tens µg g - 1 . Fluorescence intensities were in a good linear correlation with the contents. Fluorescence intensity ratio of a collisionally assisted line (213.62 nm) to a direct transition line (214.91 nm) was discussed in terms of the analytical conditions and experimental results were compared with a calculation based on rate equations. Since the fluorescence signal light in the wavelength range longer than 200 nm can be transmitted relatively easily, even through fiber optics of moderate length, LIBS/LIFS would be a versatile technique in on-site applications for the monitoring of phosphorus contents in steel.

  19. Detection of trace phosphorus in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Shen, X K; Wang, H; Xie, Z Q; Gao, Y; Ling, H; Lu, Y F

    2009-05-01

    Monitoring of light-element concentration in steel is very important for quality assurance in the steel industry. In this work, detection in open air of trace phosphorus (P) in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) combined with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been investigated. An optical parametric oscillator wavelength-tunable laser was used to resonantly excite the P atoms within plasma plumes generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. A set of steel samples with P concentrations from 3.9 to 720 parts in 10(6) (ppm) were analyzed using LIBS-LIF at wavelengths of 253.40 and 253.56 nm for resonant excitation of P atoms and fluorescence lines at wavelengths of 213.55 and 213.62 nm. The calibration curves were measured to determine the limit of detection for P in steel, which is estimated to be around 0.7 ppm. The results demonstrate the potential of LIBS-LIF to meet the requirements for on-line analyses in open air in the steel industry. PMID:19412215

  20. Neuroprotective therapy for argon-laser-induced retinal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai; Solberg, Yoram; Turetz, Yosef

    1999-06-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment of the central retina is often complicated by an immediate side effect of visual impairment, caused by the unavoidable laser-induced destruction of the normal tissue lying adjacent to the lesion and not affected directly by the laser beam. Furthermore, accidental laser injuries are at present untreatable. A neuroprotective therapy for salvaging the normal tissue might enhance the benefit obtained from treatment and allow safe perifoveal photocoagulation. We have developed a rat model for studying the efficacy of putative neuroprotective compounds in ameliorating laser-induced retinal damage. Four compounds were evaluated: the corticosteroid methylprednisolone, the glutamate-receptor blocker MK-801, the anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, and the calcim-overload antagonist flunarizine. The study was carried out in two steps: in the first, the histopathological development of retinal laser injuries was studied. Argon laser lesions were inflicted in the retinas of 18 pigmented rats. The animals were sacrificed after 3, 20 or 60 days and their retinal lesions were evaluated under the light microscope. The laser injury mainly involved the outer layers of the retina, where it destroyed significant numbers of photoreceptor cells. Over time, evidence of two major histopathological processes was observed: traction of adjacent nomral retinal cells into the central area of the lesion forming an internal retinal bulging, and a retinal pigmented epithelial proliferative reaction associated with subretinal neovascularization and invations of the retinal lesion site by phagocytes. The neuroprotective effects of each of the four compounds were verified in a second step of the study. For each drug tested, 12 rats were irradiated wtih argon laser inflictions: six of them received the tested agent while the other six were treated with the corresponding vehicle. Twenty days after laser expsoure, the rats were sacrificed and their lesions were

  1. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  2. Laser-induced plasma generation and evolution in a transient spray.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Tsuboi, Kazuya; Tomita, Eiji

    2014-01-13

    The behaviors of laser-induced plasma and fuel spray were investigated by visualizing images with an ultra-high-speed camera. Time-series images of laser-induced plasma in a transient spray were visualized using a high-speed color camera. The effects of a shockwave generated from the laser-induced plasma on the evaporated spray behavior were investigated. The interaction between a single droplet and the laser-induced plasma was investigated using a single droplet levitated by an ultrasonic levitator. Two main conclusions were drawn from these experiments: (1) the fuel droplets in the spray were dispersed by the shockwave generated from the laser-induced plasma; and (2) the plasma position may have shifted due to breakdown of the droplet surface and the lens effect of droplets.

  3. Microwave scattering from laser spark in air

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Jordan; Zhang Zhili; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2012-09-15

    In this paper, microwave Mie scattering from a laser-induced plasma in atmospheric air is computed. It shows that the scattered microwave transitions from coherent Rayleigh scattering to Mie scattering based on the relative transparency of the laser-induced plasma at the microwave frequency. The microwave penetration in the plasma alters from total transparency to partial shielding due to the sharp increase of the electron number density within the avalanche ionization phase. The transition from Rayleigh scattering to Mie scattering is verified by both the temporal evolution of the scattered microwave and the homogeneity of polar scattering plots.

  4. Laser-induced thermal bubbles for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Jian, Aoqun; Zhang, Xuming; Wang, Yu; Li, Zhaohui; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2011-04-01

    We present a unique bubble generation technique in microfluidic chips using continuous-wave laser-induced heat and demonstrate its application by creating micro-valves and micro-pumps. In this work, efficient generation of thermal bubbles of controllable sizes has been achieved using different geometries of chromium pads immersed in various types of fluid. Effective blocking of microfluidic channels (cross-section 500 × 40 μm(2)) and direct pumping of fluid at a flow rate of 7.2-28.8 μl h(-1) with selectable direction have also been demonstrated. A particular advantage of this technique is that it allows the generation of bubbles at almost any location in the microchannel and thus enables microfluidic control at any point of interest. It can be readily integrated into lab-on-a-chip systems to improve functionality.

  5. Laser-induced microbubble poration of localized single cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qihui; Hu, Wenqi; Ohta, Aaron T

    2014-05-01

    Laser-induced microbubbles were used to porate the cell membranes of localized single NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Microsecond laser pulses were focused on an optically absorbent substrate, creating a vapour microbubble that oscillated in size at the laser focal point in a fluidic chamber. The shear stress accompanying the bubble size oscillation was able to porate nearby cells. Cell poration was demonstrated with the delivery of FITC-dextran dye with various molecular weights. Under optimal poration conditions, the cell poration efficiency was up to 95.2 ± 4.8%, while maintaining 97.6 ± 2.4% cell viability. The poration system is able to target a single cell without disturbing surrounding cells. PMID:24632785

  6. Evaluating Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekry, O.; El-Batanouny, M. H.; El-Begawy, M. B.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), is an excellent tool for trace elemental analysis, was exploited for a detecting concentrations of calcium and magnesium in malignant tissues before and after PDT. Calcium and magnesium concentrations are known tobe high in malignancy. Tissues were injected with methylene blue photosensitizer with concentrations 0.5%, 1% and 2%. Two different light sources were used with two different energy densities/each light sources. The results showed a decrease in tissue elements content after PDT application for both calcium and magnesium compared to before PDT application as shown in the tissue spectral lines' intensities which has been reflected in. Type of light source showed no effect on tissue elements content which showed slight differences among the different energy densities. It has been shown that LIBS technique can be adopted method to monitor tumor photodynamic therapy applications.

  7. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneve, L.; Diamanti, A.; Grimaldi, F.; Palleschi, G.; Spizzichino, V.; Valentini, F.

    2010-08-01

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  8. Trigonometric pulse envelopes for laser-induced quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, I.; Lasser, C.

    2009-12-01

    We relate powers of trigonometric functions to Gaussians by proving that properly truncated cosn functions converge to a Gaussian as n tends to infinity. For an application, we analyse the laser-induced population transfer |X1Σ+rang → |A1Πxrang in a two-level model system of aluminium monochloride (AlCl) with fixed nuclei. We apply linearly x-polarized ultraviolet laser pulses with a trigonometric envelope function, whose square has full width at half-maximum of 2.5 fs and 5.0 fs. Studying population dynamics and optimized laser parameters, we find that the optimal field amplitude for trigonometric pulses with n = 20 and n = 1000 has a relative difference of 1%, which is below experimental resolution.

  9. Laser-induced stress transients: applications for molecular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flotte, Thomas J.; Lee, Shun; Zhang, Hong; McAuliffe, Daniel J.; Douki, Tina; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    1995-05-01

    Lasers can be used to enhance the delivery of a number of molecules. Other investigators have demonstrated local release of molecules from liposomes following laser irradiation, microbeam disruption of the cell membrane to increase cell transport, microbeam ablation of the zona pellucida surrounding the ovum to increase the chances of fertilization, and increased transcutaneous transport following ablation of the stratum corneum. Our experiments have shown that laser-induced stress transients can be utilized as a vector for intracellular delivery of molecules that may or may not normally cross the cell membrane. These two conditions have been tested with Photofrin and DNA. This technology may have applications in cell and molecular biology, cancer therapy, gene therapy, and others.

  10. Laser-induced modification of transparent crystals and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakova, N M; Stoian, Razvan; Rosenfeld, A

    2010-12-29

    We analyse the processes taking place in transparent crystals and glasses irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses in the regimes typical of various applications in optoelectronics and photonics. We consider some phenomena, which have been previously described by the authors within the different model representations: charging of the dielectric surface due to electron photoemission resulting in a Coulomb explosion; crater shaping by using an adaptive control of the laser pulse shape; optimisation of the waveguide writing in materials strongly resistant to laser-induced compaction under ordinary irradiation conditions. The developed models and analysis of the processes relying on these models include the elements of the solid-state physics, plasma physics, thermodynamics, theory of elasticity and plasticity. Some important experimental observations which require explanations and adequate description are summarised. (photonics and nanotechnology)

  11. Laser induced fluorescence applied to turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The saturated fluorescence method makes use of the great simplifications which occur when under conditions of intense radiation the excitation process becomes saturated. A description is presented of the saturated fluorescence method, taking into account rate equations and saturation, radiative transfer, the two-level system, a multilevel system, and measurements under saturation conditions. The detectability limits of the method are investigated. Fluorescence trapping is found to place an upper limit on the number density of the fluorescing species that can be measured without signal loss. Turbulence places time and spatial constraints on the measurements, but otherwise poses no difficulties. Saturated laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy appears to be a most promising method for measuring species concentrations in flames.

  12. Laser-induced photo-thermal magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, David A.; Lin, Yuting; Luk, Alex; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2012-08-01

    Due to the strong scattering nature of biological tissue, optical imaging beyond the diffusion limit suffers from low spatial resolution. In this letter, we present an imaging technique, laser-induced photo-thermal magnetic imaging (PMI), which uses laser illumination to induce temperature increase in a medium and magnetic resonance imaging to map the spatially varying temperature, which is proportional to absorbed energy. This technique can provide high-resolution images of optical absorption and can potentially be used for small animal as well as breast cancer and lymph node imaging. First, we describe the theory of PMI, including the modeling of light propagation and heat transfer in tissue. We also present experimental data with corresponding predictions from theoretical models, which show excellent agreement.

  13. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  14. Laser-induced vibration of a thin soap film.

    PubMed

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-09-21

    We report on the vibration of a thin soap film based on the optical radiation pressure force. The modulated low power laser induces a counter gravity flow in a vertical free-standing draining film. The thickness of the soap film is then higher in the upper region than in the lower region of the film. Moreover, the lifetime of the film is dramatically increased by a factor of 2. Since the laser beam only acts mechanically on the film interfaces, such a film can be employed in an optofluidic diaphragm pump, the interfaces behaving like a vibrating membrane and the liquid in-between being the fluid to be pumped. Such a pump could then be used in delicate micro-equipment, in chips where temperature variations are detrimental and even in biological systems. PMID:25017934

  15. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for elemental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Loree, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, or LIBS, is a laser-based form of atomic emission spectroscopy that can be used for the in-situ elemental analysis of coal gasifier product streams. At this point, LIBS has been deployed in three gasifier field tests, and C, H, O, N, Na, K, S, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Pb, Se, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Li, and Mn were qualitatively detected in the various product streams. In laboratory experiments on quantitative detection, a detection limit of 4 ppB was demonstrated for sodium. The long-range goal of this program is add the trace elements As, B, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn to the detection list, and to develop the capability of quantitative detection in real time for the trace elements. 4 figures.

  16. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  17. Terahertz generation in multiple laser-induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-K.; Kim, Jae Hun; Yang, C.-E.; Yin, Stuart Shizhuo; Hui Rongqing; Ruffin, Paul

    2008-12-08

    An investigation of the terahertz wave generation in multiple laser-induced air plasmas is presented. First, it is demonstrated that the intensity of the terahertz wave increases as the number of air plasmas increases. Second, the physical mechanism of this enhancement effect of the terahertz generation is studied by quantitatively measuring the intensity of the generated terahertz wave as a function of phase difference between adjacent air plasmas. It is found out that the superposition is the main mechanism to cause this enhancement. Thus, the results obtained in this paper not only provide a technique to generate stronger terahertz wave but also enable a better understanding of the mechanism of the terahertz generation in air plasma.

  18. Laser-induced jet formation in liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, Frederik; Arnold, Craig

    2014-11-01

    The absorption of a focused laser pulse in a liquid film generates a cavitation bubble on which a narrow jet can form. This is the basis of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a versatile printing technique that offers an alternative to inkjet printing. We study the influence of the fluid properties and laser pulse energy on jet formation using numerical simulations and time-resolved imaging. At low energies, surface tension causes the jet to retract without transferring a drop, and at high energies, the bubble breaks up into a splashing spray. We explore the parameter space of Weber number, Ohnesorge number, and ratio of film thickness to maximum bubble radius, revealing regions where uniform drops are transferred.

  19. Hydroxylapatite nanoparticles obtained by fiber laser-induced fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; Comesaña, R.; Pou, J.

    2009-03-01

    This work presents the results of laser-induced fragmentation of hydroxylapatite microparticles in water dissolution. Calcined fish bones in form of powder, which were previously milled to achieve microsized particles, were used as precursor material. Two different laser sources were employed to reduce the size of the suspended particles: a pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a Ytterbium doped fiber laser working in continuous wave mode. The morphology as well as the composition of the obtained particles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HRTEM). The results show that nanometric particles of hydroxylapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate as small as 10 nm diameter can be obtained.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cip, Ondrej; Buchta, Zdenek; Lesundak, Adam; Randula, Antonin; Mikel, Bretislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverkova, Lenka

    2014-03-01

    The recent effort leads to reliable imaging techniques which can help to a surgeon during operations. The fluorescence spectroscopy was selected as very useful online in vivo imaging method to organics and biological materials analysis. The presented work scopes to a laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to detect tissue local necrosis in small intestine surgery. In first experiments, we tested tissue auto-fluorescence technique but a signal-to-noise ratio didn't express significant results. Then we applied a contrast dye - IndoCyanine Green (ICG) which absorbs and emits wavelengths in the near IR. We arranged the pilot experimental setup based on highly coherent extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) used for stimulating of some critical areas of the small intestine tissue with injected ICG dye. We demonstrated the distribution of the ICG exciter with the first file of shots of small intestine tissue of a rabbit that was captured by high sensitivity fluorescent cam.

  1. Elemental Analysis of Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Mohammed Ashraf; Dastageer, Mohamed A.

    The chemical and elemental composition of soil is very complex as it contains many constituents like minerals, organic matters, living organisms, fossils, air and water. Considering the diversity of soil contents, quality and usability, a systematic scientific study on the elemental and chemical composition of soil is very important. In order to study the chemical composition of soil, Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied recently. The important features of LIBS system and its applications for the measurement of nutrients in green house soil, on-line monitoring of remediation process of chromium polluted soil, determination of trace elements in volcanic erupted soil samples collected from ancient cenozoic lava eruption sites and detection of toxic metals in Gulf war oil spill contaminated soil using LIBS are described in this chapter.

  2. Combined Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography and Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Utzinger, Urs

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are promising modalities for tissue characterization in human patients and animal models. OCT detects coherently backscattered light, whereas LIF detects fluorescence emission of endogenous biochemicals, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), collagen, and fluorescent proteins, or exogenous substances such as cyanine dyes. Given the complementary mechanisms of contrast for OCT and LIF, the combination of the two modalities could potentially provide more sensitive and specific detection of disease than either modality alone. Sample probes for both OCT and LIF can be implemented using small diameter optical fibers, suggesting a particular synergy for endoscopic applications. In this chapter, the mechanisms of contrast and diagnostic capability for both OCT and LIF are briefly examined. Evidence of complementary capability is described. Example published combined OCT-LIF systems are reviewed, one successful commercial instrument is discussed, and example applications are provided.

  3. Microfabrication of Fresnel zone plates by laser induced solid ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa R. M.; Thomas, John; Santhosh, Chidangil; Ramachandran, Hema; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    A novel and simple single-step method of inscribing optical elements on metal-coated transparent substrates is demonstrated. Laser induced solid ablation (LISA) demands very low laser energies (nJ), as can be amply provided by a femtosecond laser oscillator. Here, LISA is used to write Fresnel zone plates on indium and tungsten coated glass. With up to 100 zones, remarkable agreement is obtained between measured and expected values of the focal length. LISA has enabled attainment of focal spot sizes that are 38% smaller than what would be obtained using conventional lenses of the same numerical aperture. The simplicity with which a high degree of automation can readily be achieved using LISA makes this cost-effective method amenable to a wide variety of applications related to microfabrication of optical elements.

  4. Laser-induced damage thresholds of starched PMMA waveplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melninkaitis, A.; Mikšys, D.; Maciulevičius, M.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Šlekys, G.; Samoylov, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is a versatile polymeric material that is well suited for fabrication of many commercial optical components: lenses, fibers, windows, phase waveplates and others. Our focus is achromatic zero-order waveplates made of anisotropic PMMA which can be used to modify the state of polarization of electromagnetic radiation. Such waveplates have a broad range of application in devices where polarized radiation is used. For example, when tunable lasers are used or when spectropolarimetric measurements are performed, one needs an achromatic waveplate providing a specific retardation in a wide wavelength range. Herewith anisotropic properties of PMMA subjected to one-axis stretching are analyzed and the technology for manufacturing such achromatic and super-achromatic, one-axis-stretched PMMA waveplates is described. This technology excludes any mechanical processing of waveplate component surfaces. Technical characteristics of achromatic and super-achromatic waveplates manufactured of PMMA including results of laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) measurements are discussed below.

  5. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  6. Microfabrication of polystyrene microbead arrays by laser induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla-Papavlu, Alexandra; Dinca, Valentina; Paraico, Iurie; Moldovan, Antoniu; Shaw-Stewart, James; Schneider, Christof W.; Kovacs, Eugenia; Lippert, Thomas; Dinescu, Maria

    2010-08-01

    In this study we describe a simple method to fabricate microarrays of polystyrene microbeads (PS-μbeads) on Thermanox coverslip surfaces using laser induced forward transfer (LIFT). A triazene polymer layer which acts as a dynamic release layer and propels the closely packed microspheres on the receiving substrate was used for this approach. The deposited features were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Ultrasonication was used to test the adherence of the transferred beads. In addition, the laser ejection of the PS-μbead pixels was investigated by time resolved shadowgraphy. It was found that stable PS-μbeads micropatterns without any specific immobilization process could be realized by LIFT. These results highlight the increasing role of LIFT in the development of biomaterials, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  7. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek K; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K; Thakur, Surya N; Rai, Pradeep K; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  8. Laser-induced vibration of a thin soap film.

    PubMed

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-09-21

    We report on the vibration of a thin soap film based on the optical radiation pressure force. The modulated low power laser induces a counter gravity flow in a vertical free-standing draining film. The thickness of the soap film is then higher in the upper region than in the lower region of the film. Moreover, the lifetime of the film is dramatically increased by a factor of 2. Since the laser beam only acts mechanically on the film interfaces, such a film can be employed in an optofluidic diaphragm pump, the interfaces behaving like a vibrating membrane and the liquid in-between being the fluid to be pumped. Such a pump could then be used in delicate micro-equipment, in chips where temperature variations are detrimental and even in biological systems.

  9. Application of the method of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateeva, Natalia L.; Matvienko, Gennadii G.

    2004-02-01

    Great attention is now paid to ecology of the environment, in whic plants are of great importance. However the present methods of biophysical analysis of plant states are very labor-intensive and require a lot of time. The structure of protein-pigment complexes is known to break in different dissolvents that results in the shift of maxima of chlorophyll absorption and fluorescence bands. That is why development of methods for remote diagnostics of plants is of great scientific and practical interest. They would make it possible to determine species and state of plants rather quickly and accurately. We have developed a setup and methods for optical diagnostics of the physiological state of plants to investigate the dynamics of the fastest part of fluorescence of plants in vivo. The method of laser-induced fluorescence makes it possible to observe the level of vegetative development of living plants, as well as their state under the impact of some stress factors.

  10. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the discrimination of Candida strains.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, S; Ugena, L; Tornero-Lopéz, J; Martín, H; Molina, M; Camacho, J J; Cáceres, J O

    2016-08-01

    The present study reports the evaluation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Neural Networks (NN) for the discrimination of different strains of various species of Candida. This genus of yeast was selected due to its medical relevance as it is commonly found in cases of fungal infection in humans. Twenty one strains belonging to seven species of Candida were included in the study. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) was employed as a complementary technique to provide information about elemental composition of Candida cells. The use of LIBS spectra in combination with optimized NN models provided reliable discrimination among the distinct Candida strains with a high spectral correlation index for the samples analyzed, without any false positive or false negative. Therefore, this study indicates that LIBS-NN based methodology has the potential to be used as fast fungal identification or even diagnostic method.

  11. Elemental analysis of urinary calculi by laser induced plasma spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao; Ahmad, S Rafi; Mayo, Mike; Iqbal, Syed

    2005-12-01

    Laser induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) has been applied to analyse and identify elemental constituents of urinary calculi. Measurements on seven different urinary stone samples were conducted and the concentrations of some key elemental species were estimated. The elements detected with the present system were: Calcium, Magnesium, Sodium, Samarium, Potassium and Lead. Absolute concentrations of the species were derived from pre-calibration of the system for each element. Their concentrations were found to be widely different in different samples. It was observed that the samples containing a significant amount of lead have large proportion of calcium. It has been established that LIPS would allow real time clinic measurements of elemental contents and the concentrations in the biomaterials without sample preparation. The technique has the potential for routine clinic applications in urological disorder diagnosis.

  12. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vivek K.; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K.; Thakur, Surya N.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  13. Pulsed UV laser induced desorption of ions from aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David Paul; Helvajian, Henry

    2000-04-01

    A study of pulsed UV laser induced desorption (LID) has been performed on an Al(111) sample. The positive ion desorption was investigated at low laser fluence, in a regime in which the ion yield exhibits a highly non-linear dependence on the laser fluence. The peak of the kinetic energy distribution of the desorbed ions has been measured to be about 15 eV. This result is consistent with the conjecture that the ion departing the metal surface can acquire a kinetic energy kick from a process associated with plasmon annihilation. The Al + ion kinetic energy peak is asymmetric and about 3 eV full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). This experiment indicates that plasmon excitation can play a significant role in laser stimulated desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET).

  14. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xianqian Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang; Zhong, Fachun

    2015-02-16

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  15. OH Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence from Microgravity Droplet Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael; Wegge, Jason; Kang, Kyung-Tae

    1997-01-01

    Droplet combustion under microgravity conditions has been extensively studied, but laser diagnostics have just begun to be employed in microgravity droplet experiments. This is due in part to the level of difficulty associated with laser system size, power and economic availability. Hydroxyl radical (OH) is an important product of combustion, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has proved to be an adequate and sensitive tool to measure OH. In this study, a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser and a doubled dye laser, compact and reliable enough to perform OH PLIF experiments aboard a parabolic flight-path aircraft, has been developed and successfully demonstrated in a methanol droplet flame experiment. Application to microgravity conditions is planned aboard parabolic flight-path aircraft.

  16. Radioactive contamination screening with laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sheely, R.; Di Benedetto, J.

    1994-06-01

    The ability to induce, detect and discriminate fluorescence of uranium oxides makes available new capabilities for screening the surface of large complex facilities for uranium. This paper will present the results of field tests evaluate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) as a contamination screening tool and report on the progress to produce a field portable instrument for uranium surveys on exposed surfaces. The principal effect is to illuminate the surface of an object or an area with a remotely-located light source, and to evaluate the re-radiated emission energy. A gated intensified CCD camera was used with ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation to discriminate the phosphorescent (persistent) green uranium emission from the prompt background fluorescence which results from excitation of plants, concrete, soils, and other background materials.

  17. Biological effects of laser-induced stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, A.; Lee, S.; McAuliffe, D.

    1995-12-31

    Laser-induced stress waves can be generated by one of the following mechanisms: Optical breakdown, ablation or rapid heating of an absorbing medium. These three modes of laser interaction with matter allow the investigation of cellular and tissue responses to stress waves with different characteristics and under different conditions. The most widely studied phenomena are those of the collateral damage seen in photodisruption in the eye and in 193 run ablation of cornea and skin. On the other hand, the therapeutic application of laser-induced stress waves has been limited to the disruption of noncellular material such as renal stones, atheromatous plaque and vitreous strands. The effects of stress waves to cells and tissues can be quite disparate. Stress waves can fracture tissue, damage cells, and increase the permeability of the plasma membrane. The viability of cell cultures exposed to stress waves increases with the peak stress and the number of pulses applied. The rise time of the stress wave also influences the degree of cell injury. In fact, cell viability, as measured by thymidine incorporation, correlates better with the stress gradient than peak stress. Recent studies have also established that stress waves induce a transient increase of the permeability of the plasma membrane in vitro. In addition, if the stress gradient is below the damage threshhold, the cells remain viable. Thus, stress waves can be useful as a means of drug delivery, increasing the intracellular drug concentration and allowing the use of drugs which are impermeable to the cell membrane. The present studies show that it is important to create controllable stress waves. The wavelength tunability and the micropulse structure of the free electron laser is ideal for generating stress waves with independently adjustable parameters, such as rise time, duration and peak stress.

  18. Discriminating crude oil grades using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hussein, A.; Marzouk, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of crude oil using laser-based analytical techniques such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has become of great interest to various specialists in different fields such as geology, petro-chemistry and environmental science. In this work, a detailed study is presented wherein the implementation of an efficient and simple LIBS technique to identify the elemental constituents of crude oil and to distinguish between different grades of petroleum crude oil is discussed. Laser-induced plasma (LIP) technique has been used in this work for direct measurements of atomic, ionic and molecular species in dry crude oil samples with API gravities ranging between 18 and 36. The technique was implemented using the first harmonic of a pulsed Nd-YAG laser source. Atomic and molecular emission bands were observed, consisting of characteristic spectral lines of atoms and diatomic molecular bands, namely from C, H, Si, Na, Ca, Mg, AL, Fe, Ti, Mo, C2 and CN. The intensities of high-resolution spectral lines for some atoms and molecules of elements such as Ca, Na, Fe, Mo, C2 and CN were evaluated at different wavelengths along the obtained spectra. The molecular bands and the elemental spectral lines were used to assess the possibility of adopting the LIBS technique in differentiating between crude oil samples with different American Petroleum Institute (API) gravity values. The results indicate the presence of a distinct correlation between the API gravity values of the various oil samples and the spectral line intensities of the elements and some molecular radical constituents. In addition, the possibility of identifying the API gravity values of unknown oil samples is also indicated.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence of the CH2CFO radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furubayashi, Masashi; Bridier, Isabelle; Inomata, Satoshi; Washida, Nobuaki; Yamashita, Koichi

    1997-04-01

    A new laser-induced fluorescence spectrum has been observed in the region of 307-335 nm. Since this spectrum is observed when reacting oxygen atoms with CH2CHF, or CH2CF2, or CH2CFCl and also by photolysis of CH3CFO, the fluorescing molecule is the CH2CFO (fluoroformyl methyl) radical. From an analysis of the laser-induced single vibronic level fluorescence, some of the vibrational frequencies can be assigned for the ground electronic state ν3=1724 cm-1 (C-O stretch), ν5=1211 cm-1 (C-F stretch), ν6=906 cm-1 (CH2 rock), ν7=847 cm-1 (C-C stretch), ν8=584 cm-1 (FCO bend), and ν9=416 cm-1 (CCO bend), for the excited state ν3=1790, ν5=1253, ν6=911, ν7=874, ν8=537, and ν9=421 cm-1. Ab initio calculations on the CH2CFO radical give a planar geometry with vibrational frequencies that are consistent with the observed fundamental frequencies. The vibrational frequencies show that the structure of the ground state is closer to fluoroformyl methyl (ṡCH2CFO) rather than a vinoxy-type (CH2=CFOṡ) radical. The collision-free radiative lifetimes of the excited state are 49-81 ns depending on excitation energy and vibrational modes. Strong predissociation is observed above v=1, especially in the ν3' mode.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence of the CD2CFO radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Furubayashi, Masashi; Imamura, Takashi; Washida, Nobuaki; Yamaguchi, Makoto

    1999-10-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence spectrum of the B˜ 2A″→X˜2A″ transition of the CD2CFO radical has been observed in the region 316-335 nm. The radical was produced by 193 nm photolysis or by fluorine atom reaction with acetyl-d3 fluoride. The spectrum of CD2CFO was similar to that of CH2CFO reported previously except for small isotope shifts in the range 7-343 cm-1. The isotope shifts support the assignment of these spectra to fluorinated vinoxy radicals, and rule out the alternate assignment to FCO proposed by others. The X˜→B˜ electronic transition energy (T0) for CD2CFO was measured to be 29 867 cm-1, which is only 7 cm-1 lower than that for CH2CFO. From an analysis of the laser-induced single vibronic level fluorescence, some of the vibrational frequencies can be assigned for the ground electronic state; ν3(CO str.)=1735; ν4(CD2 sciss.)=1043; ν5 (CF str.)=1248; ν6(CD2 rock.)=774; ν7(CC str.)=863; ν8(CCF bend)=597; and ν9(CCO bend)=370 cm-1. For the B˜ 2A″ state, ν3=1772; ν4=1073; ν5=1241; ν6=783; ν7=827; ν8=530; and ν9=370 cm-1. These assignments are supported by ab initio calculations. Among these fundamental frequencies, the ν4 and ν6 modes showed the largest isotope shifts, although isotope effects were observed in all the above vibrational fundamentals. The radiative lifetimes of the excited CD2CFO and the quantum yield of formation of the CH2CFO radical from photolysis of CH3CFO at 193 nm are also reported.

  1. Experimental Studies of Laser-Induced Breakdown in Transparent Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W

    2003-09-23

    The mechanisms by which transparent dielectrics damage when exposed to high power laser radiation has been of scientific and technological interest since the invention of the laser. In this work, a set of three experiments are presented which provide insight into the damage initiation mechanisms and the processes involved in laser-induced damage. Using an OPO (optical parametric oscillator) laser, we have measured the damage thresholds of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) from the near ultraviolet into the visible. Distinct steps, whose width is of order K{sub b}T, are observed in the damage threshold at photon energies associated with the number of photons (3{yields}2 or 4{yields}3) needed to promote a ground state electron across the energy gap. The wavelength dependence of the damage threshold suggests that a primary mechanism for damage initiation in DKDP is a multi-photon process in which the order is reduced through excited defect state absorption. In-situ fluorescence microscopy, in conjunction with theoretical calculations by Liu et al., has been used to establish that hydrogen displacement defects are potentially responsible for the reduction in the multi-photon cross-section. During the damage process, the material absorbs energy from the laser pulse and produces an ionized region that gives rise to broadband emission. By performing a time-resolved investigation of this emission, we demonstrate both that it is blackbody in nature, and we provide the first direct measurement of the localized temperature during and following laser damage initiation for various optical materials. For excitation using nanosecond laser pulses, the plasma, when confined in the bulk, is in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. These results allow for a detailed characterization of temperature, pressure, and electron densities occurring during laser-induced damage.

  2. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2} to the 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2}-5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  3. Formation of carbon nanotubes: In situ optical analysis using laser-induced incandescence and laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Trétout, B.; Cochon, J.-L.; Foutel-Richard, A.; Loiseau, A.; Krüger, V.; Tsurikov, M.; Scott, C. D.

    2010-04-01

    Gas-phase production of carbon nanotubes in presence of a metal catalyst with a continuous wave CO2 laser is investigated by combining coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and laser-induced incandescence (LII). These in situ techniques provide a unique investigation of the different transformation processes of the primarily carbon and metal vapors issued from the vaporization of the target by the laser and the temperature at which these processes occur. Continuous-wave laser provides with stable continuous vaporization conditions very well suited for such in situ investigations. Temperature profiles inside the reactor are known from CARS measurements and flow calculations. Carbon soot, density, and size of carbon aggregates are determined by LII measurements. LIF measurements are used to study the gas phases, namely, C2 and C3 radicals which are the very first steps of carbon recombination, and metal catalysts gas phase. Spectral investigations allow us to discriminate the signal from each species by selecting the correct pair of excitation/detection wavelengths. Spatial distributions of the different species are measured as a function of target composition and temperature. The comparison of LIF and LII signals allow us to correlate the spatial evolution of gas and soot in the scope of the different steps of the nanotube growth already proposed in the literature and to identify the impact of the chemical nature of the catalyst on carbon condensation and nanotube nucleation. Our study presents the first direct evidence of the nanotube onset and that the nucleation proceeds from a dissolution-segregation process from metal particles as assumed in the well-known vapor-liquid-solid model. Comparison of different catalysts reveals that this process is strongly favored when Ni is present.

  4. Titian: Data Provenance Support in Spark

    PubMed Central

    Interlandi, Matteo; Shah, Kshitij; Tetali, Sai Deep; Gulzar, Muhammad Ali; Yoo, Seunghyun; Kim, Miryung; Millstein, Todd; Condie, Tyson

    2015-01-01

    Debugging data processing logic in Data-Intensive Scalable Computing (DISC) systems is a difficult and time consuming effort. Today’s DISC systems offer very little tooling for debugging programs, and as a result programmers spend countless hours collecting evidence (e.g., from log files) and performing trial and error debugging. To aid this effort, we built Titian, a library that enables data provenance—tracking data through transformations—in Apache Spark. Data scientists using the Titian Spark extension will be able to quickly identify the input data at the root cause of a potential bug or outlier result. Titian is built directly into the Spark platform and offers data provenance support at interactive speeds—orders-of-magnitude faster than alternative solutions—while minimally impacting Spark job performance; observed overheads for capturing data lineage rarely exceed 30% above the baseline job execution time. PMID:26726305

  5. Spark discharge trace element detection system

    DOEpatents

    Adler-Golden, S.; Bernstein, L.S.; Bien, F.

    1988-08-23

    A spark discharge trace element detection system is provided which includes a spark chamber including a pair of electrodes for receiving a sample of gas to be analyzed at no greater than atmospheric pressure. A voltage is provided across the electrodes for generating a spark in the sample. The intensity of the emitted radiation in at least one primary selected narrow band of the radiation is detected. Each primary band corresponds to an element to be detected in the gas. The intensity of the emission in each detected primary band is integrated during the afterglow time interval of the spark emission and a signal representative of the integrated intensity of the emission in each selected primary bond is utilized to determine the concentration of the corresponding element in the gas. 12 figs.

  6. Spark discharge trace element detection system

    DOEpatents

    Adler-Golden, Steven; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Bien, Fritz

    1988-01-01

    A spark discharge trace element detection system is provided which includes a spark chamber including a pair of electrodes for receiving a sample of gas to be analyzed at no greater than atmospheric pressure. A voltage is provided across the electrodes for generating a spark in the sample. The intensity of the emitted radiation in at least one primary selected narrow band of the radiation is detected. Each primary band corresponds to an element to be detected in the gas. The intensity of the emission in each detected primary band is integrated during the afterglow time interval of the spark emission and a signal representative of the integrated intensity of the emission in each selected primary bond is utilized to determine the concentration of the corresponding element in the gas.

  7. Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barefield Il, James E; Clegg, Samuel M; Le, Loan A; Lopez, Leon N

    2010-01-01

    In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements

  8. In Vitro Effect of Laser-Induced Hydrodynamics on Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Elagin, V V; Pavlikov, A I; Yusupov, V I; Shirmanova, M V; Zagaynova, E V; Bagratashvili, V N

    2015-11-01

    We studied the effect of laser-induced hydrodynamic on viability of Colo-26 murine colon carcinoma cells in vitro. Laser-induced hydrodynamics was generated by a laser (λ=1.56 μ, power 3 W, 5 min exposure); to this end, the fiber end was submersed into a buffer above the cell monolayer. It was found that laser-induced hydrodynamics destructed the monolayer at standoff distances of between the working end of the laser fiber to cell monolayer of 1 and 5 mm and triggers apoptotic and necrotic death in remaining cells at a distance of 4 mm from the emitter.

  9. Electro-spark deposition technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.

    1997-12-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The ESD process was developed to produce coatings for use in severe environments where most other coatings fail. Because of the exceptional damage resistance of these coatings, and the versatility of the process to apply a wide variety of alloys, intermetallics, and cermets to metal surfaces, the ESD process has been designated critical to the life and economy of the advanced fossil energy systems as the higher temperatures and corrosive environments exceed the limits of known structural materials to accommodate the service conditions. Developments include producing iron aluminide-based coatings with triple the corrosion resistance of the best previous Fe{sub 3}Al coatings, coatings with refractory metal diffusion barriers and multi layer coatings for achieving functionally gradient properties between the substrate and the surface. A new development is the demonstration of advanced aluminide-based ESD coatings for erosion and wear applications. One of the most significant breakthroughs to occur in the last dozen years is the discovery of a process regime that yields an order of magnitude increase in deposition rates and achievable coating thicknesses. Achieving this regime has required the development of advanced ESD electronic capabilities. Development is now focused on further improvements in deposition rates, system reliability when operating at process extremes, and economic competitiveness.

  10. Resistance of a water spark.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2005-11-01

    The later time phase of electrical breakdown in water is investigated for the purpose of improving understanding of the discharge characteristics. One dimensional simulations in addition to a zero dimensional lumped model are used to study the spark discharge. The goal is to provide better electrical models for water switches used in the pulse compression section of pulsed power systems. It is found that temperatures in the discharge channel under representative drive conditions, and assuming small initial radii from earlier phases of development, reach levels that are as much as an order of magnitude larger than those used to model discharges in atmospheric gases. This increased temperature coupled with a more rapidly rising conductivity with temperature than in air result in a decreased resistance characteristic compared to preceding models. A simple modification is proposed for the existing model to enable the approximate calculation of channel temperature and incorporate the resulting conductivity increase into the electrical circuit for the discharge channel. Comparisons are made between the theoretical predictions and recent experiments at Sandia. Although present and past experiments indicated that preceding late time channel models overestimated channel resistance, the calculations in this report seem to underestimate the resistance relative to recent experiments. Some possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  11. Visualization of plasma turbulence with laser-induced fluorescence (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, Fred M.; Trintchouk, Fedor

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence is a key factor limiting the performance of fusion devices. Plasma edge turbulence determines the boundary values of the plasma density and temperature, which in turn determine the internal gradients and controls global plasma transport. In recent years, significant progress has been made in modeling turbulence behavior in plasmas and its effect on transport. Progress has also been made in diagnostics for turbulence measurement; however, there is still a large gap in our understanding of it. An approach to improve this situation is to experimentally visualize the turbulence, that is, a high resolution 2-D image of the plasma density. Visualization of turbulence can improve the connection to theory and help validate theoretical models. One method that has been successfully developed to visualize turbulence in gases and fluids is planar laser-induced fluorescence. We have recently applied this technique to visualize turbulence and structures in a plasma. This was accomplished using an Alexandrite laser that is tunable between 700 and 800 nm, and from 350 to 400 nm with second harmonic generation. The fluorescence light from an argon ion transition has been imaged onto an intensified charged coupled device camera that is gated in synchronization with the laser. Images from the plasma show a rotating structure at 30 kHz in addition to small scale turbulence.

  12. Neuronal growth cones respond to laser-induced axonal damage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Shi, Linda Z.; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Miotke, Jill; Meyer, Ronald L.; Berns, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well known that damage to neurons results in release of substances that inhibit axonal growth, release of chemical signals from damaged axons that attract axon growth cones has not been observed. In this study, a 532 nm 12 ns laser was focused to a diffraction-limited spot to produce site-specific damage to single goldfish axons in vitro. The axons underwent a localized decrease in thickness (‘thinning’) within seconds. Analysis by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy indicated that there was no gross rupture of the cell membrane. Mitochondrial transport along the axonal cytoskeleton immediately stopped at the damage site, but recovered over several minutes. Within seconds of damage nearby growth cones extended filopodia towards the injury and were often observed to contact the damaged site. Turning of the growth cone towards the injured axon also was observed. Repair of the laser-induced damage was evidenced by recovery of the axon thickness as well as restoration of mitochondrial movement. We describe a new process of growth cone response to damaged axons. This has been possible through the interface of optics (laser subcellular surgery), fluorescence and electron microscopy, and a goldfish retinal ganglion cell culture model. PMID:21831892

  13. Laser-induced incandescence measurements of particles in aeroengine exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, John D.

    1999-09-01

    Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) has been demonstrated as a non-intrusive technique for measurement of particle concentration in the exhausts of aero-engines on sea level test beds as part of a European Union collaborative program (AEROJET) aimed at replacing gas sampling rakes behind development engines with non-intrusive instrumentation. Currently emissions of CO, NOx, unburned hydrocarbon, and smoke from aero-engines must be shown to be less than internationally specified limits. Measurements are made on development engines on sea level test beds by applying a number of standard analytical methods to extracted exhaust gas samples. The hardware required for exhaust gas sampling is heavy and complex and is expensive to build and install. As a result, only the minimum number of emissions tests are conducted during an engine development program, and emissions data is only available to combustion engineers late in the program. Hence, there is a need for more versatile and less costly non-intrusive measurement techniques. Molecular species can be measured using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, while LII is a promising smoke measuring technique. The development of an LII system specifically designed for exhaust applications is described.

  14. [The Progress in Remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting-ting; Wan, Xiong; Shu, Rong; Liu, Peng-xi

    2015-07-01

    As a kind of spectroscopic technique, the remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (Remote LIBS) can measure elemental compositions of remote targets by using high-power lasers and focusing approaches. In this paper, three remote detection approaches (open path LIBS, fiber optic LIBS and compact probe fiber optic LIBS) and their system architectures are summarized and analyzed. Conventional open path LIBS, with high requirement of specifications of lasers, optical systems, spectrographs and detectors, has always been a research focus in remote testing field. Fiber optic LIBS has the advantages of simplification of optical focusing system and high collection efficiency of the plasma light. This paper reviews the progress in new techniques of LIBS, for instance Filament-LIBS techniques and LIBS combines with other spectral detection techniques, and emphatically analyzes their characteristics and advantages. These new techniques have greatly broadened the detection range of LIBS, enhanced material recognition ability of LIBS, and made a great contribution to expanding applications of remote LIBS. Latest development of applications of remote LIBS in fields of deep space exploration, hazardous material detection, pollution testing, metallurgical industries and heritage restoration is introduced in detail. With the development of laser techniques, spectral detection and calibration techniques, the detection range of remote LIBS has been expended, their application fields has been extended, and the detection precision and accuracy have been improved. PMID:26717768

  15. Laser-induced incandescence applied to dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on the laser heating of nanoparticles (diameters ≤slant 1 μm) confined in a reactive plasma by short (150 ps) and intense (˜ 63 mJ) UV (355 nm) laser pulses (laser-induced incandescence, LII). Important parameters such as the particle temperature and radius follow from analysis of the emission spectrum of the heated nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are not ideal black bodies, which is taken into account by calculating their emissivity using a light-scattering theory relevant to our conditions (Mie theory). Three sets of refractive index data from the literature serve as model input. The obtained radii range between 100 and 165 nm, depending on the choice of refractive index data set. By fitting the temperature decay of the particles to a heat exchange model, the product of their mass density and specific heat is determined as (1.3+/- 0.5) J K-1 cm-3, which is considerably smaller than the value for bulk graphite at the temperature our particles attain (3000 K): 4.8 J K-1 cm-3. The particle sizes obtained in situ with LII are compared with ex situ scanning electron microscopy analysis of collected particles. Quantitative assessment of the LII measurements is hampered by transport of particles in the plasma volume and the fact that LII probes locally, whereas the samples with collected particles have a more global character.

  16. Construction of a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Joseph; Palmer, Andria; Amos, James; Dynka, Tom; Ujj, Lazlo

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical and atomic composition of materials. The third harmonic output of a Nd:YAG Q-switched laser generating 5ns pulses with 10Hz repetition rate was used to ablate the sample and create a micro-plasma. The emission of the radiating plasma was focused into an optical fiber with 0.22 numerical aperture. The spectra was measured with an Ocean Optics micro spectrometer. A synchronized shutter was used to select single laser pulses. In order to reach the breakdown threshold of the sample using the available energy of the laser pulses (<5 mJ) a beam expander and a parabolic mirror was used for tight focusing. The optical and technical details including the characterization of the system will be presented. LIBS spectra taken from a variety of metal and organic samples show appropriate selectivity for quantitative and qualitative analysis for materials. UWF NIH MARC U-STAR 1T34GM110517-01, UWF Office of Undergraduate Research.

  17. The motional stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is the worldwide standard technique for internal magnetic field pitch angle measurements in magnetized plasmas. Traditionally, it is based on using polarimetry to measure the polarization direction of light emitted from a hydrogenic species in a neutral beam. As the beam passes through the magnetized plasma at a high velocity, in its rest frame it perceives a Lorentz electric field. This field causes the H-alpha emission to be split and polarized. A new technique under development adds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for an MSE measurement that will enable radially resolved magnetic field magnitude as well as pitch angle measurements in even low-field (<1 T) experiments. An MSE-LIF system will be installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It will enable reconstructions of the plasma pressure, q-profile and current as well as, in conjunction with the existing MSE system, measurements of radial electric fields.

  18. Analysis of human nails by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to analyze human fingernails using nanosecond laser pulses. Measurements on 45 nail samples are carried out and 14 key species are identified. The elements detected with the present system are: Al, C, Ca, Fe, H, K, Mg, N, Na, O, Si, Sr, Ti as well as CN molecule. Sixty three emission lines have been identified in the spectrum that are dominated by calcium lines. A discriminant function analysis is used to discriminate among different genders and age groups. This analysis demonstrates efficient discrimination among these groups. The mean concentration of each element is compared between different groups. Correlation between concentrations of elements in fingernails is calculated. A strong correlation is found between sodium and potassium while calcium and magnesium levels are inversely correlated. A case report on high levels of sodium and potassium in patients with hyperthyroidism is presented. It is shown that LIBS could be a promising technique for the analysis of nails and therefore identification of health problems.

  19. Development and applications of laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderwal, Randy L.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Zhou, Zhiquang; Choi, Mun Y.

    1995-01-01

    Several NASA-funded investigations focus on soot processes and radiative influences of soot in diffusion flames given their simplicity, practical significance, and potential for theoretical modeling. Among the physical parameters characterizing soot, soot volume fraction, f(sub v), a function of particle size and number density, is often of chief practical interest in these investigations, as this is the geometrical property that directly impacts radiative characteristics and the temperature field of the flame and is basic to understanding soot growth and oxidation processes. Diffusion flames, however, present a number of challenges to the determination of f(sub v) via traditional extinction measurements. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) possesses several advantages compared to line-of-sight extinction techniques for determination of f(sub v). Since LII is not a line-of-sight technique, similar to fluorescence, it possesses geometric versatility allowing spatially resolved measurements of f(sub v) in real time in nonaxisymmetric systems without using deconvolution techniques. The spatial resolution of LII is determined by the detector and imaging magnification used. Neither absorption by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) nor scattering contributes to the signal. Temporal capabilities are limited only by the laser pulse and camera gate duration, with measurements having been demonstrated with 10 ns resolution. Because of these advantages, LII should be applicable to a variety of combustion processes involving both homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. Our work has focussed on characterization of the technique as well as exploration of its capabilities and is briefly described.

  20. Resonance fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Koch, Sandra; Garen, Walter; Neu, Walter; Reuter, Rainer

    2006-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in liquids using a double-pulse Q-switched Nd:YAG laser system has provided reliable results that give trace detection limits in water. Resonant laser excitation has been added to enhance detection sensitivity. A primary laser pulse (at 532 nm), transmitted via an optical fiber, induces a cavitation bubble and shockwave at a target immersed in a 10 mg l(-1)-100 mg l(-1) indium (In) water suspension. The low-pressure rear of the shockwave induces bubble expansion and a resulting reduction in cavity pressure as it extends away from the target. Shortly before the maximum diameter is expected, a secondary laser pulse (also at 532 nm) is fed into the bubble in order to reduce quenching processes. The plasma field generated is then resonantly excited by a fiber-guided dye laser beam to increase detection selectivity. The resulting resonance fluorescence emission is optically detected and processed by an intensified optical multichannel analyzer system.

  1. Kalman filtered MR temperature imaging for laser induced thermal therapies.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, D; Yung, J; Hazle, J D; Weinberg, J S; Stafford, R J

    2012-04-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3-D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comparing predictions in these regions to the original measurements. Performance was quantitatively evaluated in terms of a dimensionless L(2) (RMS) norm of the temperature error weighted by acquisition uncertainty. During periods of no data corruption, observed error histories demonstrate that the Kalman algorithm does not alter the high quality temperature measurement provided by MR thermal imaging. The KF-MRTI implementation considered is seen to predict the bioheat transfer with RMS error < 4 for a short period of time, ∆t < 10 s, until the data corruption subsides. In its present form, the KF-MRTI method currently fails to compensate for consecutive for consecutive time periods of data loss ∆t > 10 sec.

  2. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF.

  3. Enhancing the analytical performance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, D.A.; Chinni, R.C.; Pichahchy, A.E.; Thornquist, H.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work is to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is a method of elemental analysis in which powerful laser pulses are focused on a sample to form a microplasma. LIBS is perhaps the most versatile elemental analysis method, applicable to a variety of different real-world analysis problems. Therefore, it is important to enhance the capabilities of the method as much as possible. Accomplishments include: (1) demonstration of signal enhancements of 5--30 times from soils and metals using a double pulse method; (2) development of a model of the observed enhancement obtained using double pulses; (3) demonstration that the analytical performance achievable using low laser-pulse energies (10 and 25 mJ) can match that achievable using an energy of 100 mJ; and (4) demonstration that time-gated detection is not necessary with LIBS.

  4. Dust Removal on Mars Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Anderson, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Dust coatings on the surface of Mars complicate and, if sufficiently thick, mask the spectral characteristics and compositional determination of underlying material from in situ and remote sensing instrumentation. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) portion of the Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instrument, aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, will be the first active remote sensing technique deployed on Mars able to remove dust. ChemCam utilizes a 5 ns pulsed 1067 nm high-powered laser focused to less than 400 m diameter on targets at distances up to 7 m [1,2]. With multiple laser pulses, dust and weathering coatings can be remotely analyzed and potentially removed using this technique [2,3]. A typical LIBS measurement during MSL surface operations is planned to consist of 50 laser pulses at 14 mJ, with the first 5 to 10 pulses used to analyze as well as remove any surface coating. Additionally, ChemCam's Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) is capable of resolving 200 m details at a distance of 2 m, or 1 mm at 10 m [1,4]. In this study, we report on initial laboratory experiments conducted to characterize the removal of dust coatings using similar LIBS parameters as ChemCam under Mars-like conditions. These experiments serve to better understand the removal of surface dust using LIBS and to facilitate the analysis of ChemCam LIBS spectral data and RMI images.

  5. Kalman Filtered MR Temperature Imaging for Laser Induced Thermal Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, D.; Yung, J.; Hazle, J. D.; Weinberg, J. S.; Stafford, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comparing predictions in these regions to the original measurements. Performance was quantitatively evaluated in terms of a dimensionless L2 (RMS) norm of the temperature error weighted by acquisition uncertainty. During periods of no data corruption, observed error histories demonstrate that the Kalman algorithm does not alter the high quality temperature measurement provided by MR thermal imaging. The KF-MRTI implementation considered is seen to predict the bioheat transfer with RMS error < 4 for a short period of time, Δt < 10sec, until the data corruption subsides. In its present form, the KF-MRTI method currently fails to compensate for consecutive for consecutive time periods of data loss Δt > 10sec. PMID:22203706

  6. Laser-induced-plasma-assisted ablation for glass microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Minghui; Sugioka, Koji; Wu, Ding J.; Wong, L. L.; Lu, Yongfeng; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Chong, Tow Chong

    2001-10-01

    Glass is a hard transparent material with many applications in Photonics and advanced display industries. It is a high challenge to achieve crack-free glass microfabrication due to its special material characteristics. Laser-induced-plasma- assisted ablation is applied in this study to get the high quality glass microfabrication. In this processing, the laser beam goes through the glass substrate first and then irradiates on a solid target behind. For laser fluence above ablation threshold for the target, the generated plasma flies forward at a high speed. At a small target-to-substrate distance, there are strong interactions among laser light, target plasma and glass materials at the rear side of the substrate. Light absorption characteristic at the glass substrate is modified since the plasma may soften and dope into the glass in the interaction area. To have a better understanding of this processing, signal diagnostics are carried out to study the dynamic interaction. It is found that glass microfabrication is closely related to laser fluence, target-to-substrate distance, laser spot size and laser beam scanning speed. With proper control of the processing parameters, glass surface marking patterning and cutting can be achieved. With different materials as the targets, color marking of glass substrate can be obtained.

  7. Laser-induced coloration of magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrovsky, A. L.; Naumova, I. I.

    1992-12-01

    The nonlinear absorption in LiNbO3:Mg crystals exposed to pulsed green laser radiation was studied. A brown track in LiNbO3:Mg was observed at room temperature. A dose of green light about 2 J/cm2 was necessary to reach the maximum coloration, the corresponding absorption being proportional to the square of optical power density. This absorption adds to the two-photon absorption thus increasing the total nonlinear absorption approximately by a factor of eight. The coloration can be bleached by heating (the relaxation time constant being less than a second at 100 degree(s)C) and by exposure to the visible light with small peak power density. The nonlinear absorption limits the efficiency of second harmonic generation (SHG) at room temperature. A 40 to 50% efficiency rise accompanying the temperature increase was caused by the decay of coloration. The two-photon pumping of electron traps is a plausible trigger mechanism for laser-induced coloration.

  8. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (< ~2.5 °C) in temperature at the surface of the skin, examined by both thermal camera and the Monte Carlo simulation, indicate that laser does not evoke heat-induced nociceptive sensation. In the human EEG study, brain responses to both mechanical and laser stimulation are consistent, along with subjective reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli. PMID:26047142

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with spatial heterodyne spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gornushkin, Igor B; Smith, Ben W; Panne, Ulrich; Omenetto, Nicoló

    2014-01-01

    A spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) is tested for the first time in combination with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The spectrometer is a modified version of the Michelson interferometer in which mirrors are replaced by diffraction gratings. The SHS contains no moving parts and the gratings are fixed at equal distances from the beam splitter. The main advantage is high throughput, about 200 times higher than that of dispersive spectrometers used in LIBS. This makes LIBS-SHS a promising technique for low-light standoff applications. The output signal of the SHS is an interferogram that is Fourier-transformed to retrieve the original plasma spectrum. In this proof-of-principle study, we investigate the potential of LIBS-SHS for material classification and quantitative analysis. Brass standards with broadly varying concentrations of Cu and Zn were tested. Classification via principal component analysis (PCA) shows distinct groupings of materials according to their origin. The quantification via partial least squares regression (PLS) shows good precision (relative standard deviation < 10%) and accuracy (within ± 5% of nominal concentrations). It is possible that LIBS-SHS can be developed into a portable, inexpensive, rugged instrument for field applications. PMID:25226262

  10. Oxide nanoparticles synthesis via laser-induced plasma in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Taku; Weihs, Hansel; Honda, Mitsuhiro; Kulinich, Sergei; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2014-10-01

    Laser ablation in fluids has recently attracted a lot of attention as one of synthetic techniques to prepare new attractive nanomaterials, with the ability to control both product chemistry and morphology in many systems. In this study, we generated laser-induced plasma in H2O - ethanol mixtures, while ablating metal targets to produce oxide nanoparticles and to study the effect of the medium on their properties. The ablated targets used in this study were Zn or Sn plates. A nanosecond Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength of 532 nm (10 Hz, 20--30 mJ/pulse) was applied to irradiate the targets. The liquid media were maintained at 0.1 to 30 MPa to study the effect of pressure. We found that the H2O/ethanol ratio (at atmospheric pressure) can control the properties of the produced ZnO nanoparticles, such as defects and oxidation degree. The properties were examined by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopies, and so on. More details will be presented at the symposium.

  11. Laser-induced backside wet cleaning technique for glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Tsu-Shien; Tsai, Chwan-Huei

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the laser-induced backside wet cleaning techniques for glass substrates. Two kinds of laser cleaning techniques are proposed in this study. The first involves applying an Nd:YAG laser to the backside of the substrate which is submerged in water. A metal plate is placed below the glass substrate. Most of the laser energy will be absorbed by the metal plate. The metal then vaporizes the water and generates a turbulent bubble flow. The bubble flow removes the alumina particles from the surface of the glass substrate. The second involves using a CO2 laser to generate turbulent bubble flow to remove the particles. Both methods were successfully demonstrated for the removal of submicron particles of 0.5 μm in size. The phenomena of bubble generation and diffusion are presented in the paper. Because the laser is applied to the backside of the substrate, the damage due to the laser heat can be significantly reduced. The quality and efficient of the backside processing is better than those of the front side processing. The proposed techniques have great potential to provide an improved solution for glass cleaning.

  12. Laser-Induced Incandescence Measurements in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    A low-gravity environment offers advantages to investigations concerned with soot growth or flame radiation by eliminating of buoyancy-induced convection. Basic to each type of study is knowledge of spatially resolved soot volume fraction, (f(sub v). Laser-induced incandescence (LII) has emerged as a diagnostic for soot volume fraction determination because it possesses high temporal and spatial resolution, geometric versatility and high sensitivity. Implementation and system characterization of LII in a drop tower that provides 2.2 sec of low-gravity (micro)g) at the NASA Lewis Research Center are described here. Validation of LII for soot volume fraction determination in (micro)g is performed by comparison between soot volume fraction measurements obtained by light extinction [20] and LII in low-gravity for a 50/50 mixture (by volume) of 0 acetylene/nitrogen issuing into quiescent air. Quantitative soot volume fraction measurements within other laminar flames of ethane and propane and a turbulent diffusion flame in (micro)g via LII are also demonstrated. An analysis of LII images of a turbulent acetylene diffusion flame in 1-g and (micro)g is presented.

  13. Measuring turbulent fluid dispersion using laser induced phosphorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, Dennis; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; Kunnen, Rudie; Clercx, Herman; van Heijst, Gertjan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid dispersion due to turbulence is an important subject in both natural and engineering processes, from cloud formation to turbulent mixing and liquid spray combustion. The combination of small scales and often high velocities results in few experimental techniques that can follow the course of events. We introduce a novel technique, which measures the dispersion of ``tagged'' fluid particles by means of laser-induced phosphorescence, using a solution containing a europium-based molecular complex with a relatively long phosphorescence half-life. This technique is used to measure transport processes in both the dispersion of droplets in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the dispersion of fluid of near-nozzle spray breakup processes. By tagging a small amount of droplets/fluid via laser excitation, the tagged droplets can be tracked in a Lagrangian way. The absolute dispersion of the droplets can be measured in a variety of turbulent flows. Using this technique it is shows that droplets around St =τp /τη ~ 1 (Stokes number) disperse faster than true fluid tracers in homogeneous isotropic turbulence, as well as differences between longitudinal and radial dispersion in turbulent sprays. This work is part of the research programme of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  14. Ultraviolet Laser-induced ignition of RDX single crystal.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhonghua; Zhang, Chuanchao; Liu, Wei; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Ming; Wang, Xuming; Zhou, Guorui; Tan, Bisheng; Yang, Zongwei; Li, Zhijie; Li, Li; Yan, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zu, Xiaotao

    2016-01-01

    The RDX single crystals are ignited by ultraviolet laser (355 nm, 6.4 ns) pulses. The laser-induced damage morphology consisted of two distinct regions: a core region of layered fracture and a peripheral region of stripped material surrounding the core. As laser fluence increases, the area of the whole crack region increases all the way, while both the area and depth of the core region increase firstly, and then stay stable over the laser fluence of 12 J/cm(2). The experimental details indicate the dynamics during laser ignition process. Plasma fireball of high temperature and pressure occurs firstly, followed by the micro-explosions on the (210) surface, and finally shock waves propagate through the materials to further strip materials outside and yield in-depth cracks in larger surrounding region. The plasma fireball evolves from isotropic to anisotropic under higher laser fluence resulting in the damage expansion only in lateral direction while maintaining the fixed depth. The primary insights into the interaction dynamics between laser and energetic materials can help developing the superior laser ignition technique. PMID:26847854

  15. Evaluation of immunoglobulins in bovine colostrum using laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Z; Abdel Ghany, Sh; Harith, M A

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to exploit laser induced fluorescence (LIF) as a spectrochemical analytical technique for evaluation of immunoglobulin (IgG) in bovine colostrum. Colostrum samples were collected from different American Holstein cows at different times after calving. Four samples were gathered from each cow; the first three samples were obtained from the first three milkings (colostrum) and the fourth sample (milk) was obtained a week after calving. It has been demonstrated that LIF can be used as a simple, fast, sensitive and less costly spectrochemical analytical technique for qualitative estimation of IgG in colostrum. LIF results have been confirmed via the quantitative evaluation of IgG in the same samples adopting the single radial immunodiffusion conventional technique and a very good agreement has been obtained. Through LIF it was possible to evaluate bovine colostrum after different milking times and to differentiate qualitatively between colostrum from different animals which may reflect their general health status. A fluorescence linear calibration curve for IgG concentrations from 0 up to 120 g L(-1) has been obtained. In addition, it is feasible to adopt this technique for in situ measurements, i.e. in dairy cattle farms as a simple and fast method for evaluation of IgG in bovine colostrum instead of using lengthy and complicated conventional techniques in laboratories. PMID:25127559

  16. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, Uğur; Çakır, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique.

  17. Hyperspectral laser-induced autofluorescence imaging of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is a disease characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals leading to the penetration of bacteria into the dentine and pulp. Early detection of enamel demineralization resulting in increased enamel porosity, commonly known as white spots, is a difficult diagnostic task. Laser induced autofluorescence was shown to be a useful method for early detection of demineralization. The existing studies involved either a single point spectroscopic measurements or imaging at a single spectral band. In the case of spectroscopic measurements, very little or no spatial information is acquired and the measured autofluorescence signal strongly depends on the position and orientation of the probe. On the other hand, single-band spectral imaging can be substantially affected by local spectral artefacts. Such effects can significantly interfere with automated methods for detection of early caries lesions. In contrast, hyperspectral imaging effectively combines the spatial information of imaging methods with the spectral information of spectroscopic methods providing excellent basis for development of robust and reliable algorithms for automated classification and analysis of hard dental tissues. In this paper, we employ 405 nm laser excitation of natural caries lesions. The fluorescence signal is acquired by a state-of-the-art hyperspectral imaging system consisting of a high-resolution acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and a highly sensitive Scientific CMOS camera in the spectral range from 550 nm to 800 nm. The results are compared to the contrast obtained by near-infrared hyperspectral imaging technique employed in the existing studies on early detection of dental caries.

  18. Optofluidic tunable lenses using laser-induced thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingming; Jian, Aoqun; Li, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xuming

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a new design of optofluidic tunable lens using a laser-induced thermal gradient. It makes use of two straight chromium strips at the bottom of the microfluidic chamber to absorb the continuous pump laser to heat up the moving benzyl alcohol solution, creating a 2D refractive index gradient in the entrance part between the two hot strips. This design can be regarded as a cascade of a series of refractive lenses, and is distinctively different from the reported liquid lenses that mimic the refractive lens design and the 1D gradient index lens design. CFD simulation shows that a stable thermal lens can be built up within 200 ms. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the continuous tuning of focal length from initially infinite to the minimum 1.3 mm, as well as the off-axis focusing by offsetting the pump laser spot. Data analyses show the empirical dependences of the focal length on the pump laser intensity and the flow velocity. Compared with previous studies, this tunable lens design enjoys many merits, such as fast tuning speed, aberration-free focusing, remote control, and enabling the use of homogeneous fluids for easy integration with other optofluidic systems. PMID:26584422

  19. Laser-induced acoustic emissions in experimental dental composites.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Lin, C T; Keh, E S; Pan, L C; Huang, H M; Shih, Y H; Cheng, H C

    2000-07-01

    A laser thermoacoustic technique was innovated to evaluate laser-induced acoustic emissions (AEs) in experimental dental composites aged with 75% ethanol solution. Experimental composite systems of 75/25 BisGMA/TEGDMA resin filled with 0, 12.6, 30.0, and 56.5 vol% of 8-microm silanized and unsilanized BaSiO6 were analyzed. The sample size was 4.65 mm (diameter) x 0.5 mm (thick). Aging effects of immersing in 75% ethanol for up to 14 h on AEs were then evaluated. A continuous-wave CO2 laser was used to heat the samples. Acoustic emissions were collected as a function of filler fraction, laser power, silanization, and immersion time. Onset of burst-pattern acoustic signals characteristic of fracturing occurred at different laser powers for different tested groups. Acoustic emissions generally increased with laser power, in which lower laser powers produced low-amplitude (45-50 dB) signals; the amplitude distribution (50-85 dB) became more extensive as laser powers increased. After immersion, the lower laser powers could produce the same phenomenon. The higher the filler fraction, the fewer AEs generated. A large percentage AE reduction due to silanization was noted as a function of filler fraction. Unsilanized specimens showed more thermal damages than did silanized ones.

  20. Characteristics of laser-induced luminescence in poly(paraphenylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Changqin; Lu, Shaozhe; Su, Xi A.; Liu, Xing J.

    1992-02-01

    Under laser inducement, we have observed steady state photoluminescence from poly(paraphenylene) and transient photoliininescence from PPP in nanosecond time regime for the first time. PPP samples studied were produced using the Kovacic method. The experimental results indicate that the lininescence spectra are well-resolved. The peaks are rather sharp and located at 4340Å(100K), 4332Å(50K), 4318Å(8.5K) (transient state) and 4309Å, 4575Å (steady state). The luminescence spectra have been discussed by using the lattice relaxation process. The lifetime of the luminescence of PPP was measured. The decay curve of PPP is found to have a double exponential form with a lifetime of 7.47 ns and 5.13 ns. The decay kinetics was interpreted by the interchain recombination of photoexcited polaron pairs. The decay kinetics of photoinduced absorption between a few nanoseconds and a few microseconds is mainly due to the interchain recombination of the photoexcited polaron pairs and exhibits the radiative luminescence after relaxation.

  1. Fast analysis of wood preservers using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhl, A.; Loebe, K.; Kreuchwig, L.

    2001-06-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the investigation of wood preservers in timber and in furniture. Both experiments in laboratory and practical applications in recycling facilities and on a building site prove the new possibilities for the fast detection of harmful agents in wood. A commercial system was developed for mobile laser-plasma-analysis as well as for industrial use in sorting plants. The universal measuring principle in combination with an Echelle optics permits real simultaneous multi-element-analysis in the range of 200-780 nm with a resolution of a few picometers. It enables the user to detect main and trace elements in wood within a few seconds, nearly independent of the matrix, knowing that different kinds of wood show an equal elemental composition. Sample preparation is not required. The quantitative analysis of inorganic wood preservers (containing, e.g. Cu, Cr, B, As, Pb, Hg) has been performed exactly using carbon as reference element. It can be shown that the detection limits for heavy metals in wood are in the ppm-range. Additional information is given concerning the quantitative analysis. Statistical data, e.g. the standard deviation (S.D.), were determined and calibration curves were used for each particular element. A comparison between ICP-AES and LIBS is given using depth profile correction factors regarding the different penetration depths with respect to the different volumes in wood analyzed by both analytical methods.

  2. Elemental analysis of cotton by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, Emily R.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the elemental characterization of unprocessed cotton. This research is important in forensic and fraud detection applications to establish an elemental fingerprint of U.S. cotton by region, which can be used to determine the source of the cotton. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a LIBS method for the elemental analysis of cotton. The experimental setup consists of a Nd:YAG laser that operates at the fundamental wavelength as the LIBS excitation source and an echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The relative concentrations of elements Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, and Sr from both nutrients and environmental contributions were determined by LIBS. Principal component analysis was used to visualize the differences between cotton samples based on the elemental composition by region in the U.S. Linear discriminant analysis of the LIBS data resulted in the correct classification of >97% of the cotton samples by U.S. region and >81% correct classification by state of origin.

  3. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy application in joint European torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerok, A.; L'Hermite, D.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Lacour, J.-L.; Cheymol, G.; Kempenaars, M.; Bekris, N.; Grisolia, C.

    2016-09-01

    The results on the first successful application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for remote in situ diagnostics of plasma facing components (a deposited layer on a divertor tile) in Joint European Torus (JET) are presented. The studies were performed with an available JET EDGE LIDAR laser system. For in-depth analysis of deposited layers on JET divertor tiles, a number of laser shots were applied onto the same divertor place without laser beam displacement. The spectral lines of D, CII and impurity elements (CrI, BeII, …) were identified in a wide spectral range (400-670 nm). With the increase in a number of laser shots applied onto the same divertor place, we observed consecutive changes in spectral line intensities of deuterium, carbon, and impurities with the appearance of spectral lines of tungsten substrate (WI). In-depth analysis of deposited layers on JET divertor tiles was made on the basis of the spectral line behaviour in reference to the applied laser shots. The possibility of surface cartography with laser beam displacement on the tile surface was demonstrated as well. Based on the results obtained, we may conclude that LIBS method is applicable for in situ remote analysis of deposited layers of JET plasma facing components.

  4. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Filipescu, M.; Vizireanu, S.; Vogt, L.; Antohe, S.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2016-06-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO2 nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500-700 mJ/cm2 it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO2 pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  5. Laser-induced Forward Transfer of Ag Nanopaste

    PubMed Central

    Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been much development of non-lithographic methods1-3 for printing metallic inks or other functional materials. Many of these processes such as inkjet3 and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT)4 have become increasingly popular as interest in printable electronics and maskless patterning has grown. These additive manufacturing processes are inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and well suited for rapid prototyping, when compared to more traditional semiconductor processing techniques. While most direct-write processes are confined to two-dimensional structures and cannot handle materials with high viscosity (particularly inkjet), LIFT can transcend both constraints if performed properly. Congruent transfer of three dimensional pixels (called voxels), also referred to as laser decal transfer (LDT)5-9, has recently been demonstrated with the LIFT technique using highly viscous Ag nanopastes to fabricate freestanding interconnects, complex voxel shapes, and high-aspect-ratio structures. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple yet versatile process for fabricating a variety of micro- and macroscale Ag structures. Structures include simple shapes for patterning electrical contacts, bridging and cantilever structures, high-aspect-ratio structures, and single-shot, large area transfers using a commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) chip. PMID:27077645

  6. Drift mechanism of laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgovsky, L.

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum is possible due to the ejection of electrons from the beam as a consequence of the transverse drift orthogonal to the propagation direction. The transverse drift is derived from the general solution of the equations of motion of the electrons in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave with arbitrary polarization. It is shown that the energy gain is proportional to the square of the field strength additionally modulated by the function of the injection and ejection phases. In particular, for a linearly polarized beam this function is reduced to the squared difference between the cosines of these phases. The finite laser pulse duration restricts the range of the field strength suitable for direct electron acceleration in vacuum within certain limits. It is demonstrated that the high efficiency of energy transfer from the laser wave into the kinetic energy of the accelerated electrons demands phase matching between the electron quiver phase at the exit point and the phase of the energy transfer.

  7. Laser-induced Forward Transfer of Ag Nanopaste.

    PubMed

    Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been much development of non-lithographic methods(1-3) for printing metallic inks or other functional materials. Many of these processes such as inkjet(3) and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT)(4) have become increasingly popular as interest in printable electronics and maskless patterning has grown. These additive manufacturing processes are inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and well suited for rapid prototyping, when compared to more traditional semiconductor processing techniques. While most direct-write processes are confined to two-dimensional structures and cannot handle materials with high viscosity (particularly inkjet), LIFT can transcend both constraints if performed properly. Congruent transfer of three dimensional pixels (called voxels), also referred to as laser decal transfer (LDT)(5-9), has recently been demonstrated with the LIFT technique using highly viscous Ag nanopastes to fabricate freestanding interconnects, complex voxel shapes, and high-aspect-ratio structures. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple yet versatile process for fabricating a variety of micro- and macroscale Ag structures. Structures include simple shapes for patterning electrical contacts, bridging and cantilever structures, high-aspect-ratio structures, and single-shot, large area transfers using a commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) chip. PMID:27077645

  8. Femtosecond laser induced nanostructuring for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaoudi, H.; Das, S. K.; Lange, J.; Heinrich, F.; Schrader, S.; Frohme, M.; Grunwald, R.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of periodical nanostructures with femtosecond laser pulses was used to create highly efficient substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). We report about the structuring of silver and copper substrates and their application to the SERS of DNA (herring sperm) and protein molecules (egg albumen). The maximum enhancement factors were found on Ag substrates processed with the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a 1-kHz Ti:sapphire laser and structure periods near the SHG wavelength. In the case of copper, however, the highest enhancement was obtained with long-period ripples induced with at fundamental wavelength. This is explained by an additional significant influence of nanoparticles on the surface. Nanostructured areas in the range of 1.25 mm2 were obtained in 10 s. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fast Fourier Transform and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the role of the chemical modification of the metal structures is addressed. Thin oxide layers resulting from working in atmosphere which improve the biocompatibility were indicated by vibration spectra. It is expected that the detailed study of the mechanisms of laser-induced nanostructure formation will stimulate further applications of functionalized surfaces like photocatalysis, selective chemistry and nano-biology.

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for polymer identification.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Sylvain; Boudinet, Marjorie; Pelascini, Frédéric; Surma, Fabrice; Detalle, Vincent; Holl, Yves

    2011-07-01

    This study aims at differentiating several organic materials, particularly polymers, by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The goal is to apply this technique to the fields of polymer recycling and cultural heritage conservation. We worked with some usual polymers families: polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyoxymethylene, (POM), poly(vinyl chloride), polytetrafluoroethylene, polyoxyethylene (POE), and polyamide for the aliphatic ones, and poly(butylene terephthalate), acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polystyrene, and polycarbonate for the aromatic ones. The fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) in ambient air at atmospheric pressure was used. A careful analysis of the C(2) Swan system (0,0) band in polymers containing no C-C (POM), few C-C (POE), or aromatic C-C linkages led us to the conclusion that the C(2) signal might be native, i.e., the result of direct ablation from the sample. With use of these results, aliphatic and aromatic polymers could be differentiated. Further data treatments, such as properly chosen line ratios, principal component analysis, and partial least squares regression, were evaluated. It was shown that many polymers could be separated, including PE and PP, despite their similar chemical structures.

  10. Seedless Laser Velocimetry Using Heterodyne Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A need exists for a seedless equivalent of laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) for use in low-turbulence or supersonic flows or elsewhere where seeding is undesirable or impractical. A compact laser velocimeter using heterodyne non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) to measure a single component of velocity is described. Neither molecular (e.g. NO2) nor particulate seed is added to the flow. In non-resonant LITA two beams split from a short-pulse pump laser are crossed; interference produces two counterpropagating sound waves by electrostriction. A CW probe laser incident on the sound waves at the proper angle is directed towards a detector. Measurement of the beating between the Doppler-shifted light and a highly attenuated portion of the probe beam allows determination of one component of flow velocity, speed of sound, and temperature. The sound waves essentially take the place of the particulate seed used in LDV. The velocimeter was used to study the flow behind a rearward-facing step in NASA Langley Research Center's Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel. Comparison is made with pitot-static probe data in the freestream over the range 0 m/s - 55 m/s. Comparison with LDV is made in the recirculation region behind the step and in a well-developed boundary layer in front of the step. Good agreement is found in all cases.

  11. Study of Bacterial Samples Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W, A. Farooq; M, Atif; W, Tawfik; M, S. Alsalhi; Z, A. Alahmed; M, Sarfraz; J, P. Singh

    2014-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to investigate two different types of bacteria, Escherichia coli (B1) and Micrococcus luteus (B2) deposited on glass slides using Spectrolaser 7000. LIBS spectra were analyzed using spectrolaser software. LIBS spectrum of glass substrate was compared with bacteria spectra. Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, S, Cl, Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, C, H and CN-band appeared in bacterial samples in air. Two carbon lines at 193.02 nm, 247.88 nm and one hydrogen line at 656.28 nm with intensity ratios of 1.9, 1.83 and 1.53 appeared in bacterial samples B1 and B2 respectively. Carbon and hydrogen are the important components of the bio-samples like bacteria and other cancer cells. Investigation on LIBS spectra of the samples in He and Ar atmospheres is also presented. Ni lines appeared only in B2 sample in Ar atmosphere. From the present experimental results we are able to show that LIBS technique has a potential in the identification and discrimination of different types of bacteria.

  12. Laser-induced differential fluorescence for cancer diagnosis without biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.; Buckley III, P.

    1997-01-01

    An optical diagnostic procedure based on laser-induced fluorescence was developed for direct {ital in vivo} cancer diagnosis without requiring biopsy. The methodology was applied in a clinical study involving over 100 patients in order to differentiate normal tissue from malignant tumors of the esophagus. Endogenous fluorescence of normal and malignant tissues was measured directly with the use of a fiber-optic probe inserted through an endoscope. The measurements were performed {ital in vivo} during routine endoscopy. Detection of the fluorescence signal from the tissue was performed with the use of laser excitation. This report describes the differential normalized fluorescence (DNF) procedure using the amplified spectral differences between the normalized fluorescence of malignant tissue and normal mucosa. The results of this DNF approach were compared with histopathology results of the biopsy samples and indicated excellent agreement in the classification of normal tissue and malignant tumors for the samples investigated. Data related to various grades of Barrett{close_quote}s esophagus are discussed. The DNF procedure could lead to the development of a rapid and cost-effective technique for cancer diagnosis. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  13. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (< ~2.5 °C) in temperature at the surface of the skin, examined by both thermal camera and the Monte Carlo simulation, indicate that laser does not evoke heat-induced nociceptive sensation. In the human EEG study, brain responses to both mechanical and laser stimulation are consistent, along with subjective reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli. PMID:26047142

  14. Laser-Induced Shocks in Strongly Coupled Aluminum Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, T.; Benage, J.; Evans, S.; Glocer, A.; Kyrala, G.; Montoya, R.; Munson, C.; Roberts, J.; Skidmore, B.; Taylor, A.; Wood, B.; Workman, J.; Wysocki, F.

    2001-10-01

    Inverse bremsstrahlung is a dominant absorption mechanism at high densities and low temperatures, such as in strongly coupled plasmas. We electrically produce a 0.1 g/cm^3, 1 eV SCP target which is struck by a 2-3 J, 0.8 ns frequency-doubled Nd:Yag laser pulse. Under these conditions, the laser pulse couples into the plasma where the electron plasma frequency equals the laser frequency. For a wavelength of 532 nm, this happens at a critical density of ne = 4x10^21 cm-3. The rapid deposition of energy heats and compresses the plasma to shock conditions. The surface temperature of the plasma is measured using four filtered PMTs with the assumption of blackbody emission with constant emissivity. Pre-shocked and shocked density measurements are simultaneously made using a laser-produced Ti K-shell (4.75 keV) x-ray shadowgraph. We present the experiment design and results of a laser-induced shock in a strongly coupled plasma.

  15. Laser-induced porous graphene films from commercial polymers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian; Peng, Zhiwei; Liu, Yuanyue; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Ye, Ruquan; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Yakobson, Boris I.; Tour, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis and patterning of carbon nanomaterials cost effectively is a challenge in electronic and energy storage devices. Here report a one-step, scalable approach for producing and patterning porous graphene films with 3-dimensional networks from commercial polymer films using a CO2 infrared laser. The sp3-carbon atoms are photothermally converted to sp2-carbon atoms by pulsed laser irradiation. The resulting laser-induced graphene (LIG) exhibits high electrical conductivity. The LIG can be readily patterned to interdigitated electrodes for in-plane microsupercapacitors with specific capacitances of >4 mF·cm−2 and power densities of ~9 mW·cm−2. Theoretical calculations partially suggest that enhanced capacitance may result from LIG’s unusual ultra-polycrystalline lattice of pentagon-heptagon structures. Combined with the advantage of one-step processing of LIG in air from commercial polymer sheets, which would allow the employment of a roll-to-roll manufacturing process, this technique provides a rapid route to polymer-written electronic and energy storage devices. PMID:25493446

  16. Laser induced focusing for over-dense plasma beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Peter; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Mulser, Peter

    2015-09-15

    The capability of ion acceleration with high power, pulsed lasers has become an active field of research in the past years. In this context, the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) mechanism has been the topic of numerous theoretical and experimental publications. Within that mechanism, a high power, pulsed laser beam hits a thin film target. In contrast to the target normal sheath acceleration, the entire film target is accelerated as a bulk by the radiation pressure of the laser. Simulations predict heavy ion beams with kinetic energy up to GeV, as well as solid body densities. However, there are several effects which limit the efficiency of the RPA: On the one hand, the Rayleigh-Taylor-instability limits the predicted density. On the other hand, conventional accelerator elements, such as magnetic focusing devices are too bulky to be installed right after the target. Therefore, we present a new beam transport method, suitable for RPA-like/over-dense plasma beams: laser induced focusing.

  17. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, Uğur; Çakır, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique. PMID:25794738

  18. Laser-induced breakdown plasma-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2010-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is dependent on the interaction between the initiating Laser sequence, the sampled material and the intermediate plasma states. Pulse shaping and timing have been empirically demonstrated to have significant impact on the signal available for active/passive detection and identification. The transient nature of empirical LIBS work makes data collection for optimization an expensive process. Guidance from effective computer simulation represents an alternative. This computational method for CBRNE sensing applications models the Laser, material and plasma interaction for the purpose of performance prediction and enhancement. This paper emphasizes the aspects of light, plasma, and material interaction relevant to portable sensor development for LIBS. The modeling structure emphasizes energy balances and empirical fit descriptions with limited detailed-balance and finite element approaches where required. Dusty plasma from partially decomposed material sample interaction with pulse dynamics is considered. This heuristic is used to reduce run times and computer loads. Computer simulations and some data for validation are presented. A new University of Memphis HPC/super-computer (~15 TFLOPS) is used to enhance simulation. Results coordinated with related effort at Arkansas State University. Implications for ongoing empirical work are presented with special attention paid to the application of compressive sensing for signal processing, feature extraction, and classification.

  19. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krueger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2012-07-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on two different silica polymorphs (single-crystalline synthetic quartz and commercial fused silica glass) upon irradiation in air with multiple linearly polarized single- and double-fs-laser pulse sequences ({tau} = 150 fs pulse duration, {lambda} = 800 nm center wavelength, temporal pulse separation {Delta}t < 40 ps) is studied experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct types of fs-LIPSS [so-called low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSS (HSFL)] with different spatial periods and orientations were identified. Their appearance was characterized with respect to the experimental parameters peak laser fluence and number of laser pulses per spot. Additionally, the 'dynamics' of the LIPSS formation was addressed in complementary double-fs-pulse experiments with varying delays, revealing a characteristic change of the LSFL periods. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a Sipe-Drude model considering the carrier dependence of the optical properties of fs-laser excited silica. This new approach provides an explanation of the LSFL orientation parallel to the laser beam polarisation in silica - as opposed to the behaviour of most other materials.

  20. Laser-induced porous graphene films from commercial polymers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Peng, Zhiwei; Liu, Yuanyue; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Ye, Ruquan; Samuel, Errol L G; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Yakobson, Boris I; Tour, James M

    2014-01-01

    The cost effective synthesis and patterning of carbon nanomaterials is a challenge in electronic and energy storage devices. Here we report a one-step, scalable approach for producing and patterning porous graphene films with three-dimensional networks from commercial polymer films using a CO2 infrared laser. The sp(3)-carbon atoms are photothermally converted to sp(2)-carbon atoms by pulsed laser irradiation. The resulting laser-induced graphene (LIG) exhibits high electrical conductivity. The LIG can be readily patterned to interdigitated electrodes for in-plane microsupercapacitors with specific capacitances of >4 mF cm(-2) and power densities of ~9 mW cm(-2). Theoretical calculations partially suggest that enhanced capacitance may result from LIG's unusual ultra-polycrystalline lattice of pentagon-heptagon structures. Combined with the advantage of one-step processing of LIG in air from commercial polymer sheets, which would allow the employment of a roll-to-roll manufacturing process, this technique provides a rapid route to polymer-written electronic and energy storage devices. PMID:25493446

  1. Ultraviolet Laser-induced ignition of RDX single crystal

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhonghua; Zhang, Chuanchao; Liu, Wei; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Ming; Wang, Xuming; Zhou, Guorui; Tan, Bisheng; Yang, Zongwei; Li, Zhijie; Li, Li; Yan, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zu, Xiaotao

    2016-01-01

    The RDX single crystals are ignited by ultraviolet laser (355 nm, 6.4 ns) pulses. The laser-induced damage morphology consisted of two distinct regions: a core region of layered fracture and a peripheral region of stripped material surrounding the core. As laser fluence increases, the area of the whole crack region increases all the way, while both the area and depth of the core region increase firstly, and then stay stable over the laser fluence of 12 J/cm2. The experimental details indicate the dynamics during laser ignition process. Plasma fireball of high temperature and pressure occurs firstly, followed by the micro-explosions on the (210) surface, and finally shock waves propagate through the materials to further strip materials outside and yield in-depth cracks in larger surrounding region. The plasma fireball evolves from isotropic to anisotropic under higher laser fluence resulting in the damage expansion only in lateral direction while maintaining the fixed depth. The primary insights into the interaction dynamics between laser and energetic materials can help developing the superior laser ignition technique. PMID:26847854

  2. Production of biomolecule microarrays through laser induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Pradas, Juan Marcos; Serra, Pere; Colina, Monica; Morenza, Jose-Luis

    2004-10-01

    Biomolecule microarrays are a kind of biosensors that consist in patterns of different biological molecules immobilized on a solid substrate and capable to bind specifically to their complementary targets. In particular, DNA and protein microarrays have been revealed to be very efficient devices for genen and protein identification, what has converted them in powerful tools for many applications, like clinical diagnose, drug discovery analysis, genomics and proteomics. The production of these devices requires the manipulation of tiny amounts of a liquid solution containing biomolecules without damaging them. In this work laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) has been used for spotting a biomolecule in order to check the viability of this technique for the production of microarrays. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (355 nm wavelength) has been used to transfer droplets of a biomolecule containing solution onto a solid slide. Optical microscopy of the transferred material has been carried out to investigate the morphological characteristics of the droplets obtained under different irradiation conditions. Afterwards, a DNA microarray has been spotted. The viability of the transference has been tested by checking the biological activity of the biomolecule in front of its specific complementary target. This has revealed that, indeed, the LIFT technique is adequate for the production of DNA microarrays.

  3. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-06-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (< ~2.5 °C) in temperature at the surface of the skin, examined by both thermal camera and the Monte Carlo simulation, indicate that laser does not evoke heat-induced nociceptive sensation. In the human EEG study, brain responses to both mechanical and laser stimulation are consistent, along with subjective reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli.

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in industrial and security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; Liu Chunyi; Plumer, John R.; Russo, Richard E.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers rapid, localized chemical analysis of solid or liquid materials with high spatial resolution in lateral and depth profiling, without the need for sample preparation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares algorithms were applied to identify a variety of complex organic and inorganic samples. This work illustrates how LIBS analyzers can answer a multitude of real-world needs for rapid analysis, such as determination of lead in paint and children's toys, analysis of electronic and solder materials, quality control of fiberglass panels, discrimination of coffee beans from different vendors, and identification of generic versus brand-name drugs. Lateral and depth profiling was performed on children's toys and paint layers. Traditional one-element calibration or multivariate chemometric procedures were applied for elemental quantification, from single laser shot determination of metal traces at {approx}10 {mu}g/g to determination of halogens at 90 {mu}g/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation. The effectiveness of LIBS for security applications was demonstrated in the field by testing the 50-m standoff LIBS rasterizing detector.

  5. Laser induced mechanisms controlling the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeming; Vitrant, Guy; Lefkir, Yaya; Bakhti, Said; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-21

    This paper describes a model to simulate changes in the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in TiO2 films upon continuous wave light excitation. Interrelated laser induced physical and chemical processes initiated directly by photon absorption or by plasmon induced thermal heating are considered. Namely the model takes into account the NP coalescence, Ostwald ripening, the reduction of silver ions and the oxidation of metallic NPs, competitive mechanisms that can lead to counter-intuitive behaviors depending on the exposure conditions. Theoretical predictions are compared successfully to the experimental results deduced from a thorough analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) pictures of Ag:TiO2 films processed with a scanning visible laser beam at different speeds. Ag:TiO2 systems are considered for many applications in solar energy conversion, photocatalysis or secured data printing. Numerical investigations of such a system provide a better understanding of light induced growth and shrinking processes and open up prospects for designing more efficient photocatalytic devices based on metal NP doped TiO2 or for improving the size homogeneity in self-organized metallic NP patterns, for instance. PMID:27539293

  6. In vivo laser-induced breakdown in the rabbit eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Roach, William P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for femtosecond laser pulsewidths have been made for retinal minimum visible lesions (MVLs) in Dutch Belted rabbit and rhesus monkey eyes. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water have been measured and reported using an artificial eye. We have recorded on video the first LIB causing bubble formation in any eye in vivo using albino rabbit eyes (New Zealand white) with 120- femtosecond (fs) pulses and pulse energies as low as 5 microjoules ((mu) J). These bubbles were clearly formed anterior to the retina within the vitreous humor and, with 60 (mu) J of energy, they lasted for several seconds before disappearing and leaving no apparent damage to the retina. We believe this to be true LIB because of the lack of pigmentation or melanin granules within the albino rabbit eye (thus no absorptive elements) and because of the extremely high peak powers within the 5-(mu) J, 120-fs laser pulse. These high peak powers produce self-focusing of the pulse within the vitreous. The bubble formation at the breakdown site acts as a limiting mechanism for energy transmission and may explain why high-energy femotsecond pulses at energies up to 100 (mu) J sometimes do not cause severe damage in the pigmented rabbit eye. This fact may also explain why it is so difficult to produce hemorrhagic lesions in either the rabbit or primate eye with 100-fs laser pulses.

  7. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of congruent voxels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Beniam, Iyoel; Breckenfeld, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offers unique advantages and capabilities for the rapid prototyping of electronic, optical and sensor elements. The use of LIFT for printing high viscosity metallic nano-inks and nano-pastes can be optimized for the transfer of voxels congruent with the shape of the laser pulse, forming thin film-like structures non-lithographically. These processes are capable of printing patterns with excellent lateral resolution and thickness uniformity typically found in 3-dimensional stacked assemblies, MEMS-like structures and free-standing interconnects. However, in order to achieve congruent voxel transfer with LIFT, the particle size and viscosity of the ink or paste suspensions must be adjusted to minimize variations due to wetting and drying effects. When LIFT is carried out with high-viscosity nano-suspensions, the printed voxel size and shape become controllable parameters, allowing the printing of thin-film like structures whose shape is determined by the spatial distribution of the laser pulse. The result is a new level of parallelization beyond current serial direct-write processes whereby the geometry of each printed voxel can be optimized according to the pattern design. This work shows how LIFT of congruent voxels can be applied to the fabrication of 2D and 3D microstructures by adjusting the viscosity of the nano-suspension and laser transfer parameters.

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy enhanced by a micro torch.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Huang, X; Li, S; Lu, Yao; Chen, K; Jiang, L; Silvain, J F; Lu, Y F

    2015-06-01

    A commercial butane micron troch was used to enhance plasma optical emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Fast imaging and spectroscopic analyses were used to observe plasma evolution in the atmospheric pressure for LIBS without and with using a micro torch. Optical emission intensities and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) as functions of delay time were studied. Enhanced optical emission and SNRs were obtained by using a micro torch. The effects of laser pulse energy on the emission intensities and SNRs were studied. The same spectral intensity could be obtained using micro torch with much lower laser pulse energy. The investigation of SNR evolution with delay time at different laser pulse energies showed that the SNR enhancement factor is higher for plasmas generated by lower laser pulse energies than those generated by higher laser energies. The calibration curves of emission line intensities with elemental concentrations showed that detection sensitivities of Mn I 404.136 nm and V I 437.923 nm were improved by around 3 times. The limits of detection for both Mn I 404.136 nm and V I 437.923 nm are reduced from 425 and 42 ppm to 139 and 20 ppm, respectively, after using the micro torch. The LIBS system with micro torch was demonstrated to be cost-effective, compact, and capable of sensitivity improvement, especially for LIBS system operating with low laser pulse energy. PMID:26072861

  9. The stochastic nature of growth of laser-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, C. W.; Cross, David A.; Liao, Zhi M.; Norton, Mary A.; Negres, Raluca A.

    2015-07-01

    Laser fluence and operational tempo of ICF systems operating in the UV are typically limited by the growth of laser- induced damage on their final optics (primarily silica optics). In the early 2000 time frame, studies of laser damage growth with relevant large area beams revealed that for some laser conditions damage sites located on the exit surface of a fused silica optic grew following an exponential growth rule: D(n) = D0 exp (n α(φ)), where D is final site diameter, D0 is the initial diameter of the site, φ is the laser fluence, α(φ) is the growth coefficient, and n is the number of exposures. In general α is a linear function of φ, with a threshold of φTH. In recent years, it has been found that that growth behavior is actually considerably more complex. For example, it was found that α is not a constant for a given fluence but follows a probability distribution with a mean equal to α(φ). This is complicated by observations that these distributions are actually functions of the pulse shape, damage site size, and initial morphology of damage initiation. In addition, there is not a fixed fluence threshold for damage sites growth, which is better described by a probability of growth which depends on site size, morphology and laser fluence. Here will review these findings and discuss implications for the operation of large laser systems.

  10. Analysis of human nails by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to analyze human fingernails using nanosecond laser pulses. Measurements on 45 nail samples are carried out and 14 key species are identified. The elements detected with the present system are: Al, C, Ca, Fe, H, K, Mg, N, Na, O, Si, Sr, Ti as well as CN molecule. Sixty three emission lines have been identified in the spectrum that are dominated by calcium lines. A discriminant function analysis is used to discriminate among different genders and age groups. This analysis demonstrates efficient discrimination among these groups. The mean concentration of each element is compared between different groups. Correlation between concentrations of elements in fingernails is calculated. A strong correlation is found between sodium and potassium while calcium and magnesium levels are inversely correlated. A case report on high levels of sodium and potassium in patients with hyperthyroidism is presented. It is shown that LIBS could be a promising technique for the analysis of nails and therefore identification of health problems.

  11. Detection of hazardous pollutants in chrome-tanned leather using locally developed laser-induced breakdown spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Nasr, M M; Gondal, Mohammed Asharf; Seddigi, Z S

    2011-04-01

    Highly toxic contaminants like Cr, As, and Pb were detected in chrome-tanning process of animal skin to produce leather by applying locally developed laser-induced breakdown spectrometer. An Nd-YAG laser with 1,064 nm wavelength was focused on the surface of leather samples (natural and manufactured) to generate a plasma spark and spectrally resolved spectra were used for identification and quantification of contaminants. The leather samples were collected from a tannery located in industrial cities of Riyadh and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The study was carried out on fully, half manufactured (wet blue leather), and natural hide (skin). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt where laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied for the analysis of leather before and after tanning process. The maximum concentration of different elements of environmental significance like chromium, lead, arsenic, sulfur, magnesium were 199, 289, 31, 38, and 39 ppm, respectively, in one of the manufactured leather samples. The limit of detection (LOD) of our LIBS system for chromium, lead, arsenic, sulfur, and magnesium were 2, 3, 1.5,7, and 3 ppm, respectively. The safe permissible limit for tanned leather for highly toxic elements like chromium, lead, and arsenic are 1, 0.5, 0.01 ppm, respectively, as prescribed in Environmental Regulation Standards for Saudi Industries set by Royal Commission Jubail, Saudi Arabia. The LIBS technique is superior to other conventional techniques like ICP or atomic absorption that a little or no sample preparation is required, no chemicals are needed, multi-elemental analysis is possible for all kinds of samples (natural and anthropogenic materials), microgram of sample is essential, and LIBS could be applied for remote analysis. It is highly selective and sensitivity higher than ICP, and as no sample and chemicals are required, it is cost effective for multi-sample analysis per unit time as compared with other

  12. Penta(cyclopentadienyl)-[eta]5-cyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl: Structure and laser-induced conversion to fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, Mark P.; Cammack, J. Kevin; Goebel, Matthias; Wasser, Ian M.; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.; Drewello, Thomas

    1998-08-28

    The title compound [Cp5CpMn(CO)3], 1, has been characterized by X-ray crystallography and shown by laser-induced desorption/ionization (LDI) to undergo coalescence to fullerene C60 and other carbon clusters.

  13. APPLICATIONS OF CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION TO GROUND WATER MIGRATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been applied to the determination of groundwater migration based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and traditional spectrofluorimetry. The detection limits of injected dye-fluorescent whitening agent (tinopal) in the low parts per tr...

  14. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION OF FLUORESCEIN AS A GROUNDWATER MIGRATION TRACER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been applied to the determination of the groundwater migration tracer dye fluorescein based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and compared to determinations obtained with traditional spectrofluorimetry. Detection limits of injected d...

  15. Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Improving the Detection of Molecular Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koral, Can; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Mao, Xianglei; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas is important for improving sensitivity and limits of detection in molecular sensing and molecular isotope analysis. In this work we introduce the use of Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown (NELIBS) for the enhancement of molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas, and study the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed enhancement. The use of Ag nanoparticles leads to an order of magnitude enhancement for AlO (B2Σ+ → Χ+ Σ+) system emission from an Al-based alloy. We demonstrate that the mechanism responsible for the enhancement of molecular bands differs from that of atomic emission, and can be traced down to the increased number of atomic species in NELIBS which lead to AlO molecular formation. These findings showcase the potential of NELIBS as a simple and viable technology for enhancing molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  17. Electro-spark deposition technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.

    1996-08-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The ESD process was developed to produce coatings for use in severe environments where most other coatings fail. Because of the exceptional damage resistance of these coatings, and the versatility of the process to apply a wide variety of alloys, intermetallics, and cermets to metal surfaces, the ESD process has been designated as one of the enabling technologies for advanced energy systems. Developments include producing iron aluminide-based coatings with triple the corrosion resistance of the best previous Fe{sub 3}Al coatings, coatings with refractory metal diffusion barriers and multi layer coatings for achieving functionally gradient properties between the substrate and the surface. One of the most significant breakthroughs to occur in the last dozen years is the discovery of a process regime that promises an order of magnitude increase in deposition rates and achievable coating thicknesses. Since this regime borders on and exceeds the normal operating limits of existing ESD electronic equipment, development is in progress to produce equipment that can consistently and reliably achieve these conditions for a broad range of materials. Progress so far has resulted in a consistent 500% increase in deposition rates, and greater rates still are anticipated. Technology transfer activities are a significant portion of the ESD program effort. Notable successes now include the start-up of a new business to commercialize the ESD technology, the incorporation of the process into the operations of a major gas turbine manufacturer, major new applications in gas turbine blade and steam turbine blade protection and repair, and in military, medical, metal-working, and recreational equipment applications.

  18. Laser-based diagnostics for coal gasification instrumentation. [Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.J.; Loree, T.R.; Hartford, A. Jr.; Tiee, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this program the investigators have investigated the suitability of a number of optical diagnostic techniques for nonintrusive real-time measurements of species concentrations and temperatures of coal gasification streams. They have identified and evaluated several promising techniques including coherent Raman spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and laser-induced fluorescence. They emphasize that these are complementary, rather than competing, diagnostic technologies, as each can provide a different class of data for gasifier operation. The results of their gasifier field tests and supporting laboratory work on these diagnostic techniques have been summarized and recommendations for continued work on optical diagnostics for coal gasification streams are presented. 12 references, 17 figures.

  19. Laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Brelet, Yohann; Forestier, Benjamin; Houard, Aurelien; Yu, Linwei; Deng, Yongkai; Jiang, Hongbing

    2013-06-24

    We report on the formation of laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica irradiated with multiple femtosecond laser pulses. This surface morphology emerges after the disappearance of the conventional laser induced periodic surface structures, under successive laser pulse irradiation. It is independent of the laser polarization and universally observed for different focusing geometries. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the damage crater and the incident laser pulse.

  20. Investigation of the early stages in laser-induced ignition by Schlieren photography and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Maximilian; Charareh, S; Winter, F; Iskra, K; Rüdisser, D; Neger, T; Kopecek, H; Wintner, E

    2004-09-20

    Laser ignition has been discussed widely as a potentially superior ignition source for technical appliances such as internal combustion engines. Ignition strongly affects overall combustion, and its early stages in particular have strong implications on subsequent pollutant formation, flame quenching, and extinction. Our research here is devoted to the experimental investigation of the early stages of laser-induced ignition of CH4/air mixtures up to high pressures. Tests were performed in a 0.9-l combustion cell with initial pressures of up to 25 bar with stoichiometric to fuel-lean mixtures using a 5-ns 50-mJ 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser. Laserinduced fluorescence (LIF) was used to obtain two dimensionally resolved images of the OH radical distribution after the ignition event. These images were used to produce an animation of laser ignition and early flame kernel development. Schlieren photography was used to investigate the laserinduced shock wave, hot core gas, and developing flame ball. We extend existing knowledge to high-pressure regimes relevant for internal combustion engines.

  1. Investigation of the early stages in laser-induced ignition by Schlieren photography and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, Maximilian; Charareh, S.; Winter, F.; Iskra, K. F.; Rüdisser, D.; Neger, T.; Kopecek, H.; Wintner, E.

    2004-09-01

    Laser ignition has been discussed widely as a potentially superior ignition source for technical appliances such as internal combustion engines. Ignition strongly affects overall combustion, and its early stages in particular have strong implications on subsequent pollutant formation, flame quenching, and extinction. Our research here is devoted to the experimental investigation of the early stages of laser-induced ignition of CH4/air mixtures up to high pressures. Tests were performed in a 0.9-l combustion cell with initial pressures of up to 25 bar with stoichiometric to fuel-lean mixtures using a 5-ns 50-mJ 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser. Laserinduced fluorescence (LIF) was used to obtain two dimensionally resolved images of the OH radical distribution after the ignition event. These images were used to produce an animation of laser ignition and early flame kernel development. Schlieren photography was used to investigate the laserinduced shock wave, hot core gas, and developing flame ball. We extend existing knowledge to high-pressure regimes relevant for internal combustion engines.

  2. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  3. Detection of uranium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chinni, Rosemarie C; Cremers, David A; Radziemski, Leon J; Bostian, Melissa; Navarro-Northrup, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this work is a detailed study of uranium detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for application to activities associated with environmental surveillance and detecting weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The study was used to assist development of LIBS instruments for standoff detection of bulk radiological and nuclear materials and these materials distributed as contaminants on surfaces. Uranium spectra were analyzed under a variety of different conditions at room pressure, reduced pressures, and in an argon atmosphere. All spectra displayed a high apparent background due to the high density of uranium lines. Time decay curves of selected uranium lines were monitored and compared to other elements in an attempt to maximize detection capabilities for each species in the complicated uranium spectrum. A survey of the LIBS uranium spectra was conducted and relative emission line strengths were determined over the range of 260 to 800 nm. These spectra provide a guide for selection of the strongest LIBS analytical lines for uranium detection in different spectral regions. A detection limit for uranium in soil of 0.26% w/w was obtained at close range and 0.5% w/w was achieved at a distance of 30 m. Surface detection limits were substrate dependent and ranged from 13 to 150 microg/cm2. Double-pulse experiments (both collinear and orthogonal arrangements) were shown to enhance the uranium signal in some cases. Based on the results of this work, a short critique is given of the applicability of LIBS for the detection of uranium residues on surfaces for environmental monitoring and WMD surveillance. PMID:19891832

  4. Laser induced heat source distribution in bio-tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Fan, Shifu; Zhao, Youquan

    2006-09-01

    During numerical simulation of laser and tissue thermal interaction, the light fluence rate distribution should be formularized and constituted to the source term in the heat transfer equation. Usually the solution of light irradiative transport equation is given in extreme conditions such as full absorption (Lambert-Beer Law), full scattering (Lubelka-Munk theory), most scattering (Diffusion Approximation) et al. But in specific conditions, these solutions will induce different errors. The usually used Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) is more universal and exact but has difficulty to deal with dynamic parameter and fast simulation. Its area partition pattern has limits when applying FEM (finite element method) to solve the bio-heat transfer partial differential coefficient equation. Laser heat source plots of above methods showed much difference with MCS. In order to solve this problem, through analyzing different optical actions such as reflection, scattering and absorption on the laser induced heat generation in bio-tissue, a new attempt was made out which combined the modified beam broaden model and the diffusion approximation model. First the scattering coefficient was replaced by reduced scattering coefficient in the beam broaden model, which is more reasonable when scattering was treated as anisotropic scattering. Secondly the attenuation coefficient was replaced by effective attenuation coefficient in scattering dominating turbid bio-tissue. The computation results of the modified method were compared with Monte Carlo simulation and showed the model provided reasonable predictions of heat source term distribution than past methods. Such a research is useful for explaining the physical characteristics of heat source in the heat transfer equation, establishing effective photo-thermal model, and providing theory contrast for related laser medicine experiments.

  5. Laser-induced spreading arrest of Mytilus gill cilia

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Using a "slit camera" recording technique, we have examined the effects of local laser irradiation of cilia of the gill epithelium of Mytilus edulis. The laser produces a lesion which interrupts epithelial integrity. In artificial sea water that contains high K+ or is effectively Ca++ free, metachronism of the lateral cilia continues to either side of the lesion with only minor perturbations in frequency synchronization and wave velocity, such as would be expected if metachronal wave coordination is mechanical. However, in normal sea water and other appropriate ionic conditions (i.e., where Ca++ concentration is elevated), in addition to local damage, the laser induces distinct arrest responses of the lateral cilia. Arrest is not mechanically coordinated, since cilia stop in sequence depending on stroke position as well as distance from the lesion. The velocity of arrest under standard conditions is about 3 mm/s, several orders of magnitude faster than spreading velocities associated with diffusion of materials from the injured region. Two responses can be distinguished on the basis of the kinetics of recovery of the arrested regions. These are (a) a nondecremental response that resembles spontaneous ciliary stoppage in the gills, and (b) a decremental response, where arrest nearer the stimulus point is much longer lasting. The slower recovery is often periodic, with a step size approximating lateral cell length. Arrest responses with altered kinetics also occur in laterofrontal cilia. The responses of Mytilus lateral cilia resemble the spreading ciliary arrest seen in Elliptio and arrest induced by electrical and other stimuli, and the decremental response may depend upon electrotonic spread of potential change produced at the stimulus site. If this were coupled to transient changes in Ca++ permeability of the cell membrane, a local rise in Ca++ concentration might inhibit ciliary beat at a sensitive point in the stroke cycle to produce the observed arrest. PMID

  6. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  7. Analysis of slags using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghapi, Hervé K.; Ayyalasomayajula, Krishna K.; Yueh, Fang Y.; Singh, Jagdish P.; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Jain, Jinesh C.; Nakano, Jinichiro

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the analysis of gasification slags was investigated by comparing LIBS results to the results of an ICP-OES analyzer. A small amount of slag sample was placed on a piece of double sided adhesive tape attached to a glass microscope slide and analyzed for Al, Ca, Fe, Si, and V which are major elements found in slags. The partial least squares regression (PLS-R) and univariate simple linear regression (SLR) calibration methods indicated that apart from V (accuracy up to + 20%) the accuracy of analysis varies within 0.35-6.5% for SLR and 0.06-10% for PLS-R. A paired-sample t-test within the 95% confidence level yielded p-values greater than 0.05, meaning no appreciable statistical difference was observed between the univariate SLR with internal standardization and the multivariate PLS-R for most of the analytes. From the results obtained in this work, LIBS response varies depending on the element and the technique used for quantitative analysis. Simultaneous use of the univariate calibration curves with internal standard (intensity ratio) and PLS regression in multi-elemental analysis can help reduce the matrix effect of slags associated to their high variation in concentration. Overall, these results demonstrate the capability of LIBS as an alternative technique for analyzing gasification slags. Estimated limits of detection for Al, Ca, Fe, Si and V were 0.167, 0.78, 0.171, 0.243 and 0.01 wt.%, respectively.

  8. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  9. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained

  10. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectrum Characteristics of Paddy under Nitrogen Stress].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei; Du, Lin; Zhu, Bo; Ma, Ying-ying; Sun, Jia

    2016-02-01

    Order to guide fertilizing andreduce waste of resources as well as enviro nmental pollution, especially eutrophication, which are caused by excessive fertilization, a system of laser-induced fluorescence(LIF) was built. The system aimed to investigate the correlation between nitrogen(N) content of paddy leaf and the fluorescence intensity. We measuredNcontent and SPAD of paddy leaf (the samples came from the second upper leaves of paddy in tillering stage and the study area was located in Jianghan plain of China) by utilizing the Plant Nutrient (Tester TYS-3N). The fluorescence spectrum was also obtained by using the systembuilt based on theLIFtechnology. Fluorescence spectra of leaf with different N-content were collected and then a fluorescence spectra database wasestablished. It is analyzed that the relationship between the parameters of fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅ is the ratio of fluorescence intensity of 740 nm. dividing that of 685 nm) and the N level of paddy. It is found that the effect of different N-content on the fluorescence spectrum characteristics is significant. The experiment demonstrated the positive correlation between fluorescence parameters and paddy leaf N-content. Results showed a positive linear correlation between the ratio of peak fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅) and N-content The correlation coefficient (r) reached 0.871 8 and the root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.076 82. The experiment demonstrated that LIF spectroscopy detection technology has the advantages of rapidand non-destructive measurement, and it also has the potential to measure plant content of nutrient elements. It will provide a more accurate remote sensing method to rapidly detect the crop nitrogen levels.

  11. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Maes, N. C. J.; Lamberts, T.; Sweep, A. M.; van de Water, W.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Dam, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (˜1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation.

  12. A handheld laser-induced fluorescence detector for multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-Xia; Li, Han-Yang; Fang, Pan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Fang, Qun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a compact handheld laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector based on a 450 nm laser diode and quasi-confocal optical configuration with a total size of 9.1 × 6.2 × 4.1 cm(3). Since there are few reports on the use of 450 nm laser diode in LIF detection, especially in miniaturized LIF detector, we systematically investigated various optical arrangements suitable for the requirements of 450 nm laser diode and system miniaturization, including focusing lens, filter combination, and pinhole, as well as Raman effect of water at 450 nm excitation wavelength. As the result, the handheld LIF detector integrates the light source (450 nm laser diode), optical circuit module (including a 450 nm band-pass filter, a dichroic mirror, a collimating lens, a 525 nm band-pass filter, and a 1.0mm aperture), optical detector (miniaturized photomultiplier tube), as well as electronic module (including signal recording, processing and displaying units). This detector is capable of working independently with a cost of ca. $2000 for the whole instrument. The detection limit of the instrument for sodium fluorescein solution is 0.42 nM (S/N=3). The broad applicability of the present system was demonstrated in capillary electrophoresis separation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled amino acids and in flow cytometry of tumor cells as an on-line LIF detector, as well as in droplet array chip analysis as a LIF scanner. We expect such a compact LIF detector could be applied in flow analysis systems as an on-line detector, and in field analysis and biosensor analysis as a portable universal LIF detector. PMID:26838391

  13. Laser-induced spreading arrest of Mytilus gill cilia.

    PubMed

    Motokawa, T; Satir, P

    1975-08-01

    Using a "slit camera" recording technique, we have examined the effects of local laser irradiation of cilia of the gill epithelium of Mytilus edulis. The laser produces a lesion which interrupts epithelial integrity. In artificial sea water that contains high K+ or is effectively Ca++ free, metachronism of the lateral cilia continues to either side of the lesion with only minor perturbations in frequency synchronization and wave velocity, such as would be expected if metachronal wave coordination is mechanical. However, in normal sea water and other appropriate ionic conditions (i.e., where Ca++ concentration is elevated), in addition to local damage, the laser induces distinct arrest responses of the lateral cilia. Arrest is not mechanically coordinated, since cilia stop in sequence depending on stroke position as well as distance from the lesion. The velocity of arrest under standard conditions is about 3 mm/s, several orders of magnitude faster than spreading velocities associated with diffusion of materials from the injured region. Two responses can be distinguished on the basis of the kinetics of recovery of the arrested regions. These are (a) a nondecremental response that resembles spontaneous ciliary stoppage in the gills, and (b) a decremental response, where arrest nearer the stimulus point is much longer lasting. The slower recovery is often periodic, with a step size approximating lateral cell length. Arrest responses with altered kinetics also occur in laterofrontal cilia. The responses of Mytilus lateral cilia resemble the spreading ciliary arrest seen in Elliptio and arrest induced by electrical and other stimuli, and the decremental response may depend upon electrotonic spread of potential change produced at the stimulus site. If this were coupled to transient changes in Ca++ permeability of the cell membrane, a local rise in Ca++ concentration might inhibit ciliary beat at a sensitive point in the stroke cycle to produce the observed arrest.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence in diagnosis of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakaki, Eleni A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan; Serafetinides, Alexandros A.

    2003-09-01

    laser induces better discrimination in deep caries diagnosis.

  15. Characterisation of estuarine intertidal macroalgae by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameiro, Carla; Utkin, Andrei B.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2015-12-01

    The article reports the application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for the assessment of macroalgae communities of estuarine intertidal areas. The method was applied for the characterisation of fifteen intertidal macroalgae species of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, and adjacent coastal area. Three bands characterised the LIF spectra of red macroalgae with emission maxima in the ranges 577-583 nm, 621-642 nm and 705-731 nm. Green and brown macroalgae showed one emission maximum in the red region (687-690 nm) and/or one in the far-red region (726-732 nm). Characteristics of LIF emission spectra were determined by differences in the main fluorescing pigments: phycoerythrin, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a (Chl a). In the green and brown macroalgae groups, the relative significance of the two emission maxima seems to be related to the thickness of the photosynthetic layer. In thick macroalgae, like Codium tomentosum or Fucus vesiculosus, the contribution of the far-red emission fluorescence peak was more significant, most probably due to re-absorption of the emitted red Chl a fluorescence within the dense photosynthetic layer. Similarly, an increase in the number of layers of the thin-blade green macroalgae Ulva rigida caused a shift to longer wavelengths of the red emission maximum and the development of a fluorescence peak at the far-red region. Water loss from Ulva's algal tissue also led to a decrease in the red/far-red Chl fluorescence ratio (F685/F735), indicating an increase in the density of chloroplasts in the shrinking macroalgal tissue during low tide exposure.

  16. Standoff laser-induced thermal emission of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galán-Freyle, Nataly Y.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Figueroa-Navedo, Amanda; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    A laser mediated methodology for remote thermal excitation of analytes followed by standoff IR detection is proposed. The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of using laser induced thermal emission (LITE) from vibrationally excited explosives residues deposited on surfaces to detect explosives remotely. Telescope based FT-IR spectral measurements were carried out to examine substrates containing trace amounts of threat compounds used in explosive devices. The highly energetic materials (HEM) used were PETN, TATP, RDX, TNT, DNT and ammonium nitrate with concentrations from 5 to 200 μg/cm2. Target substrates of various thicknesses were remotely heated using a high power CO2 laser, and their mid-infrared (MIR) thermally stimulated emission spectra were recorded. The telescope was configured from reflective optical elements in order to minimize emission losses in the MIR frequencies and to provide optimum overall performance. Spectral replicas were acquired at a distance of 4 m with an FT-IR interferometer at 4 cm- 1 resolution and 10 scans. Laser power was varied from 4-36 W at radiation exposure times of 10, 20, 30 and 60 s. CO2 laser powers were adjusted to improve the detection and identification of the HEM samples. The advantages of increasing the thermal emission were easily observed in the results. Signal intensities were proportional to the thickness of the coated surface (a function of the surface concentration), as well as the laser power and laser exposure time. For samples of RDX and PETN, varying the power and time of induction of the laser, the calculated low limit of detections were 2 and 1 μg/cm2, respectively.

  17. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy based deminers' probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, James P.; Walker, Mark; Hamadani, Siavosh; Bloomhardt, Natalie; Eagan, Justin

    2009-05-01

    We report on a prototype Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Deminers' Probe used to identify underground objects. We have built a prototype, and are in the process of developing a more advanced LIBS based Deminer' s Probe used to prod objects underground, and then sense them by creating a micro-plasma plume of the surface material and analyzing the spectrum of the emitted light to identify the object. It is expected that the Deminer will be able to eliminate many false positives, which consume most of the Deminers' time. SARA Fiber-Optics coupled LIBS system consists in a probe that can be inserted into the ground to provide a path for both the laser beam to the target, and for the micro-plasma plume fluorescence from the target to a spectrometer or spectrometers for analysis. The probe is closely modeled after the conventional Deminers' probe, resembling a saber. We have demonstrated that this simple system is capable of producing remarkably different spectra from different materials. Our next steps are to add a number of features to the Deminers' Probe. These include: a new optical configuration to increase the irradiance and fluence created by the pulsed laser at the target, a multiple channel fluorescence reception system that can increase the amount of light delivered to the spectrometers, a fluidic system to clear the detritus away from the probe tip, and a complete operational/control and readout system for the Deminer to use. Mine-lane tests are planned to be performed in the later part of 2009, or shortly thereafter.

  18. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  19. Detection of uranium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chinni, Rosemarie C; Cremers, David A; Radziemski, Leon J; Bostian, Melissa; Navarro-Northrup, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this work is a detailed study of uranium detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for application to activities associated with environmental surveillance and detecting weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The study was used to assist development of LIBS instruments for standoff detection of bulk radiological and nuclear materials and these materials distributed as contaminants on surfaces. Uranium spectra were analyzed under a variety of different conditions at room pressure, reduced pressures, and in an argon atmosphere. All spectra displayed a high apparent background due to the high density of uranium lines. Time decay curves of selected uranium lines were monitored and compared to other elements in an attempt to maximize detection capabilities for each species in the complicated uranium spectrum. A survey of the LIBS uranium spectra was conducted and relative emission line strengths were determined over the range of 260 to 800 nm. These spectra provide a guide for selection of the strongest LIBS analytical lines for uranium detection in different spectral regions. A detection limit for uranium in soil of 0.26% w/w was obtained at close range and 0.5% w/w was achieved at a distance of 30 m. Surface detection limits were substrate dependent and ranged from 13 to 150 microg/cm2. Double-pulse experiments (both collinear and orthogonal arrangements) were shown to enhance the uranium signal in some cases. Based on the results of this work, a short critique is given of the applicability of LIBS for the detection of uranium residues on surfaces for environmental monitoring and WMD surveillance.

  20. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capoen, Bruno; Chahadih, Abdallah; El Hamzaoui, Hicham; Cristini, Odile; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  1. Diamond detectors with laser induced surface graphite electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komlenok, M.; Bolshakov, A.; Ralchenko, V.; Konov, V.; Conte, G.; Girolami, M.; Oliva, P.; Salvatori, S.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the response of metal-less CVD polycrystalline-diamond pixel sensors under β-particles irradiation. A 21×21 array of 0.18×0.18 mm2 pixels was realized on one side of a 10.0×10.0×0.5 mm3 polycrystalline diamond substrate by means of laser induced surface graphitization. With the same technique, a large graphite contact, used for detector biasing, was fabricated on the opposite side. A coincidence detecting method was used with two other reference polycrystalline diamond detectors for triggering, instead of commonly used scintillators, positioned in the front and on the back of the sensor-array with respect to the impinging particles trajectory. The collected charge distribution at each pixel was analyzed as a function of the applied bias. No change in the pulse height distribution was recorded by inverting the bias voltage polarity, denoting contacts ohmicity and symmetry. A fairly good pixel response uniformity was obtained: the collected charge most probable value saturates for all the pixels at an electric field strength of about ±0.6 V/μm. Under saturation condition, the average collected charge was equal to =1.64±0.02 fC, implying a charge collection distance of about 285 μm. A similar result, within 2%, was also obtained for 400 MeV electrons at beam test facility at INFN Frascati National Laboratory. Experimental results highlighted that more than 84% of impinging particles involved only one pixel, with no significant observed cross-talk effects.

  2. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy under Polar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, J. L.; Hark, R.; Bol'shakov, A.; Plumer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade our research team has evaluated the use of commercial-off-the-shelf laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for chemical analysis of snow and ice samples under polar conditions. One avenue of research explored LIBS suitability as a detector of paleo-climate proxy indicators (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) in ice as it relates to atmospheric circulation. LIBS results revealed detection of peaks for C and N, consistent with the presence of organic material, as well as major ions (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) and trace metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ti). The detection of Ca, K, Mg, and Na confirmed that LIBS has sufficient sensitivity to be used as a tool for characterization of paleo-climate proxy indicators in ice-core samples. Techniques were developed for direct analysis of ice as well as indirect measurements of ice via melting and filtering. Pitfalls and issues of direct ice analysis using several cooling techniques to maintain ice integrity will be discussed. In addition, a new technique, laser ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS) was applied to detection of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in ice as isotopic analysis of ice is the main tool in paleoclimatology and glaciology studies. Our results demonstrated that spectra of hydroxyl isotopologues 16OH, 18OH, and 16OD can be recorded with a compact spectrograph to determine hydrogen and oxygen isotopes simultaneously. Quantitative isotopic calibration for ice analysis can be accomplished using multivariate chemometric regression as previously realized for water vapor. Analysis with LIBS and LAMIS required no special sample preparation and was about ten times faster than analysis using ICP-MS. Combination of the two techniques in one portable instrument for in-field analysis appears possible and would eliminate the logistical and cost issues associated with ice core management.

  3. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectrum Characteristics of Paddy under Nitrogen Stress].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei; Du, Lin; Zhu, Bo; Ma, Ying-ying; Sun, Jia

    2016-02-01

    Order to guide fertilizing andreduce waste of resources as well as enviro nmental pollution, especially eutrophication, which are caused by excessive fertilization, a system of laser-induced fluorescence(LIF) was built. The system aimed to investigate the correlation between nitrogen(N) content of paddy leaf and the fluorescence intensity. We measuredNcontent and SPAD of paddy leaf (the samples came from the second upper leaves of paddy in tillering stage and the study area was located in Jianghan plain of China) by utilizing the Plant Nutrient (Tester TYS-3N). The fluorescence spectrum was also obtained by using the systembuilt based on theLIFtechnology. Fluorescence spectra of leaf with different N-content were collected and then a fluorescence spectra database wasestablished. It is analyzed that the relationship between the parameters of fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅ is the ratio of fluorescence intensity of 740 nm. dividing that of 685 nm) and the N level of paddy. It is found that the effect of different N-content on the fluorescence spectrum characteristics is significant. The experiment demonstrated the positive correlation between fluorescence parameters and paddy leaf N-content. Results showed a positive linear correlation between the ratio of peak fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅) and N-content The correlation coefficient (r) reached 0.871 8 and the root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.076 82. The experiment demonstrated that LIF spectroscopy detection technology has the advantages of rapidand non-destructive measurement, and it also has the potential to measure plant content of nutrient elements. It will provide a more accurate remote sensing method to rapidly detect the crop nitrogen levels. PMID:27209764

  4. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, D D; Maes, N C J; Lamberts, T; Sweep, A M; van de Water, W; Kunnen, R P J; Clercx, H J H; van Heijst, G J F; Dam, N J

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (∼1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation. PMID:27036779

  5. Laser Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for the ASTRAL Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert; Kamar, Ola; Munoz, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    A Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic is presented in this poster. The ion temperature measurements are made in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source using a diode laser based LIF diagnostic. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and any gas can be used for the discharge. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. A number of diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device (Langmuir Probe, Spectrometer, LIF system). The LIF diagnostic makes use of a diode laser with the following characteristics: 1.5 MHz bandwidth, Littrow external cavity, mode-hop free tuning range up to 16 GHz, total power output of about 15 mW. The wavelength is measured by a precision wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevents wavelength drift. For Ar plasma, a new LIF scheme has been developed. The laser tuned at 686.354 nm, is used to pump the 3d^4F5/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p^4D5/2 state. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p^4D5/2 and the 4s^4P3/2 terms (442.6 nm) is monitored by a PMT.

  6. Laser-induced selective copper plating of polypropylene surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratautas, K.; Gedvilas, M.; Stankevičiene, I.; JagminienÄ--, A.; Norkus, E.; Li Pira, N.; Sinopoli, S.; Emanuele, U.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2016-03-01

    Laser writing for selective plating of electro-conductive lines for electronics has several significant advantages, compared to conventional printed circuit board technology. Firstly, this method is faster and cheaper at the prototyping stage. Secondly, material consumption is reduced, because it works selectively. However, the biggest merit of this method is potentiality to produce moulded interconnect device, enabling to create electronics on complex 3D surfaces, thus saving space, materials and cost of production. There are two basic techniques of laser writing for selective plating on plastics: the laser-induced selective activation (LISA) and laser direct structuring (LDS). In the LISA method, pure plastics without any dopant (filler) can be used. In the LDS method, special fillers are mixed in the polymer matrix. These fillers are activated during laser writing process, and, in the next processing step, the laser modified area can be selectively plated with metals. In this work, both methods of the laser writing for the selective plating of polymers were investigated and compared. For LDS approach, new material: polypropylene with carbon-based additives was tested using picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses. Different laser processing parameters (laser pulse energy, scanning speed, the number of scans, pulse durations, wavelength and overlapping of scanned lines) were applied in order to find out the optimal regime of activation. Areal selectivity tests showed a high plating resolution. The narrowest width of a copper-plated line was less than 23 μm. Finally, our material was applied to the prototype of the electronic circuit board on a 2D surface.

  7. Liquid Jet Formation in Laser-Induced Forward Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, C. Frederik

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-write technique capable of printing precise patterns of a wide variety of materials. In this process, a laser pulse is focused through a transparent support and absorbed in a thin donor film, propelling material onto an adjacent acceptor substrate. For fluid materials, this transfer occurs through the formation of a narrow liquid jet, which eventually pinches off due to surface tension. This thesis examines in detail the fluid mechanics of the jet formation process occurring in LIFT. The main focus is on a variant of LIFT known as blister-actuated LIFT (BA-LIFT), in which the laser pulse is absorbed in an ink-coated polymer layer, rapidly deforming it locally into a blister to induce liquid jet formation. The early-time response of a fluid layer to a deforming boundary is analyzed with a domain perturbation method and potential-flow simulations, revealing scalings for energy and momentum transfer to the fluid and providing physical insight on how and why a jet forms in BA-LIFT. The remaining chapters explore more complex applications and modifications of LIFT. One is the possibility of high-repetition rate printing and limits on time delay and separation between pulses imposed by a tilting effect found for adjacent jets. Another examines a focusing effect achieved by perturbing the interface with ring-shaped disturbances. The third contains an experimental study of LIFT using a silver paste as the donor material instead of a Newtonian liquid. The transfer mechanism is significantly different, although with repeated pulses at one location, a focusing effect is again observed. All three of these chapters investigate how perturbations to the interface can strongly influence the jet formation process.

  8. Infrared laser induced plasma diagnostics of silver target

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmat, L. Nadeem, Ali; Ahmed, I.

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, the optical emission spectra of silver (Ag) plasma have been recorded and analyzed using the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. The emission line intensities and plasma parameters were investigated as a function of lens to sample distance, laser irradiance, and distance from the target surface. The electron number density (n{sub e}) and electron temperature (T{sub e}) were determined using the Stark broadened line profile and Boltzmann plot method, respectively. A gradual increase in the spectral line intensities and the plasma parameters, n{sub e} from 2.89 × 10{sup 17} to 3.92 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} and T{sub e} from 4662 to 8967 K, was observed as the laser irradiance was increased 2.29 × 10{sup 10}–1.06 × 10{sup 11} W cm{sup −2}. The spatial variations in n{sub e} and T{sub e} were investigated from 0 to 5.25 mm from the target surface, yielding the electron number density from 4.78 × 10{sup 17} to 1.72 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} and electron temperature as 9869–3789 K. In addition, the emission intensities and the plasma parameters of silver were investigated by varying the ambient pressure from 0.36 to 1000 mbars.

  9. Infrared luminescence from spark-processed silicon and erbium-doped spark-processed silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwanghoon

    Spark-processed silicon has substantial potential as an optical material. In the past 15 years, our group has investigated a multitude of properties of this unique material, concentrating mostly on the visible and near UV spectral region. The present study expands our endeavors to infrared photoluminescence (PL) of undoped spark-processed silicon. A broad infrared photoluminescence peak at around 945 nm under Ar ion laser excitation was observed at room temperature when investigating a spark-processed layer on a silicon wafer. This light emission is interpreted to be the result of energy transfers between certain energy levels involving the spark-processed silicon matrix. The infrared PL intensity of spark-processed silicon was found to be proportional to the excitation energy. However, telecommunication requires presently a light emission near 1.54 mum (because fiber-optics "conductors" have a minimum in absorption at this wavelength). This cannot be achieved with pure spark-processed silicon. Therefore spark-processed silicon needs to be doped with a rare-earth element such as erbium to shift the emission to longer wavelengths. It is known that erbium has a light emission from intrashell energy transition, that is, from 4I13/2 →4I15/2. Erbium was deposited on a silicon wafer followed by spark-processing, which enables diffusion of some erbium into the SiOx matrix, thus achieving opto-electronically active spark-processed silicon. Rapid thermal annealing enhances the 1.54 mum wavelength intensity from erbium-doped spark-processed silicon. The processing conditions that result in the most efficient photoluminescence have been established and will be presented in this dissertation. In contrast to erbium-doped crystalline silicon, whose light emission is highly affected by temperature (103 times reduction in intensity when heating from 12 K to 150 K), the intensity of erbium-doped spark-processed silicon decreases by only a factor of 4 when heated from 15 K to room

  10. Using SPARK as a Solver for Modelica

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael; Wetter, Michael; Haves, Philip; Moshier, Michael A.; Sowell, Edward F.

    2008-06-30

    Modelica is an object-oriented acausal modeling language that is well positioned to become a de-facto standard for expressing models of complex physical systems. To simulate a model expressed in Modelica, it needs to be translated into executable code. For generating run-time efficient code, such a translation needs to employ algebraic formula manipulations. As the SPARK solver has been shown to be competitive for generating such code but currently cannot be used with the Modelica language, we report in this paper how SPARK's symbolic and numerical algorithms can be implemented in OpenModelica, an open-source implementation of a Modelica modeling and simulation environment. We also report benchmark results that show that for our air flow network simulation benchmark, the SPARK solver is competitive with Dymola, which is believed to provide the best solver for Modelica.

  11. Low current extended duration spark ignition system

    DOEpatents

    Waters, Stephen Howard; Chan, Anthony Kok-Fai

    2005-08-30

    A system for firing a spark plug is disclosed. The system includes a timing controller configured to send a first timing signal and a second timing signal. The system also includes an ignition transformer having a primary winding and a secondary winding and a spark-plug that is operably associated with the secondary winding. A first switching element is disposed between the timing controller and the primary winding of the ignition transformer. The first switching element controls a supply of power to the primary winding based on the first timing signal. Also, a second switching element is disposed between the timing controller and the primary winding of the ignition transformer. The second switching element controls the supply of power to the primary winding based on the second timing signal. A method for firing a spark plug is also disclosed.

  12. Development of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy sensor to assess groundwater quality impacts resulting from geologic carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Cantwell G.; Goueguel, Christian; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin

    2015-05-01

    The injection of CO2 into deep aquifers can potentially affect the quality of groundwater supplies were leakage to occur from the injection formation or fluids. Therefore, the detection of CO2 and/or entrained contaminants that migrate into shallow groundwater aquifers is important both to assess storage permanence and to evaluate impacts on water resources. Naturally occurring elements (i.e., Li, Sr) in conjunction with isotope ratios can be used to detect such leakage. We propose the use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as an analytical technique to detect a suite of elements in water samples. LIBS has real time monitoring capabilities and can be applied for elemental and isotopic analysis of solid, liquid, and gas samples. The flexibility of probe design and use of fiber optics make it a suitable technique for real time measurements in harsh conditions and in hard to reach places. The laboratory scale experiments to measure Li, K, Ca, and Sr composition of water samples indicate that the technique produces rapid and reliable data. Since CO2 leakage from saline aquifers may accompany a brine solution, we studied the effect of sodium salts on the accuracy of LIBS analysis. This work specifically also details the fabrication and application of a miniature ruggedized remotely operated diode pumped solid state passively Q-switched laser system for use as the plasma excitation source for a real time LIBS analysis. This work also proposes the optical distribution of many laser spark sources across a wide area for widespread leak detection and basin monitoring.

  13. Optical diagnostics integrated with laser spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-09-02

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  14. Experimental study of the spectral characteristics of laser-induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhaoxiang; Wu Jinquan; Sun Fenglou; Gong Shunsheng

    2010-05-01

    The characteristics of laser-induced air, N2, and O2 plasma spectra are investigated spectroscopically. The study concentrates mainly on the temporal behavior of laser-induced plasma after breakdown. We used delayed spectra and spectra evolution for this study. Except for the general one-beam laser-induced breakdown experiment, a second laser beam was added to further probe the behavior of plasma during its decay. We report the experimental results of spectra composition, spectra time evolution, and spectra affected by a second laser beam. We determined that all the laser-induced air plasma spectra are from a continuous spectrum and some line spectra superposed on the continuous spectrum. The stronger short wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by bremsstrahlung radiation of electrons in the plasma, and the weaker long wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by electron and ion recombination. Line spectra originate from excited molecules, atoms, and their first-order ions, but no line spectra form higher-order ions. The results show that the temporal behavior of some spectra is a decay-rise-redecay pattern. With the two laser beam experiment we found that all the spectra intensities are enhanced by the second laser beam, but the response of various spectra to the delay of the second laser beam is quite different, in particular, the intensity increments of some spectra increase with the delay of the second laser beam. Some microscopic processes of laser-induced plasma obtained from the experimental results are discussed. These results are useful for a better understanding of some laser-induced air plasma related applications, such as laser-guided lightning and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  15. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan; Li, Jie; Sun, Ye; Fu, Zhongjie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Evans, Lucy; Tian, Katherine; Saba, Nicholas; Fredrick, Thomas; Morss, Peyton; Chen, Jing; Smith, Lois E H

    2015-01-01

    The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model.

  16. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Fu, Zhongjie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Evans, Lucy; Tian, Katherine; Saba, Nicholas; Fredrick, Thomas; Morss, Peyton; Chen, Jing; Smith, Lois E. H.

    2015-01-01

    The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model. PMID:26161975

  17. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in Geochemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis is being applied to an increasing number of geochemical problems, including mineral and rock analysis on the Mars rover Curiosity, elemental concentrations in ore minerals, identification of ore minerals, provenance determination of gems and other conflict minerals, geochemical mapping, correlation of rock units, and sample screening. LIBS is a laser ablation technique in which the photons emitted from electron transitions in the cooling plasma are diffracted and recorded as a spectrum. LIBS has several characteristics that set it apart from traditional, lab-based techniques. First, LIBS is relatively simple and requires no sample preparation, resulting in analysis that is portable, in situ, real-time, rapid, and inexpensive (in terms of equipment purchase, maintenance, and operating personnel). Second, each LIBS spectrum contains an enormous amount of information about the material. Most elements emit photons in the typical LIBS spectral range (200-1000 nm). Spectral interferences for which corrections are necessary in traditional techniques are additional, useful information in the LIBS spectrum, and recent work has demonstrated that some isotopic ratios can be measured with LIBS data. Thus, LIBS spectra are detailed chemical fingerprints of materials and the use of multivariate analysis can resolve issues that have been untouchable using traditional techniques. A good example is determination of country of origin for rubies and sapphires. Concentrations of key trace elements, as analyzed by LA-ICP-MS, have been used with marginal success to demonstrate that different deposits yield rubies or sapphires with unique, identifiable compositions. However, the fields for each deposit overlap in the 2- or 3-component diagrams commonly used. In contrast, it is possible to determine country of origin with greater than 90% accuracy using LIBS data, in which the intensities of 13,700 wavelengths are used as variables in

  18. Laser-induced breakdown emission in hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Carter, Campbell; Do, Hyungrok

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved emission measurements of laser-induced breakdown plasmas have been carried out to investigate the effect that gas species might have on the kinetics, particularly in excited states, and the resulting plasma properties. For this purpose, fuel-oxygen (O2)-carbon dioxide (CO2) mixtures with either helium (He) or nitrogen (N2) balance are prepared while maintaining their atomic compositions. The fuels tested in this study are methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), propane (C3H8), and butane (C4H10). The breakdown is produced in the mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/He, C2H4/O2/He, C3H8/CO2/O2/He and C4H10/CO2/O2/He or CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) at room conditions using the second harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (with pulse duration of 10 ns). The temporal evolution of plasma temperature is deduced from the ratio of two oxygen lines (777 nm and 823 nm) through Boltzmann analysis, while the evolution of electron number density is estimated based on Stark broadening of the Balmer-alpha (H α ) line at 656 nm and the measured plasma temperature. From the results, the temporal evolution of emission spectra and decay rates of atomic line-intensities are found to be almost identical between the breakdown plasma in the different mixtures given balancing gases. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of plasma temperature and electron number density are also found to be independent of the species compositions. Therefore, this behavior—of the breakdown emissions and plasma properties in the different mixtures with identical atomic composition—may be because the breakdown gases reach similar thermodynamic and physiochemical states immediately after the breakdown.

  19. Modeling of Laser Induced Damage in NIF UV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2001-02-21

    Controlling damage to nominally transparent optical elements such as lenses, windows and frequency conversion crystals on high power lasers is a continuing technical problem. Scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms of laser energy absorption, material heating and vaporization and resultant mechanical damage is especially important for UV lasers with large apertures such as NIF. This LDRD project was a single year effort, in coordination with associated experimental projects, to initiate theoretical descriptions of several of the relevant processes. In understanding laser damage, we distinguish between damage initiation and the growth of existent damage upon subsequent laser irradiation. In general, the effect of damage could be ameliorated by either preventing its initiation or by mitigating its growth. The distinction comes about because initiation is generally due to extrinsic factors such as contaminants, which provide a means of local laser energy absorption. Thus, initiation tends to be local and stochastic in nature. On the other hand, the initial damaging event appears to modify the surrounding material in such a way that multiple pulse damage grows more or less regularly. More exactly, three ingredients are necessary for visible laser induced damage. These are adequate laser energy, a mechanism of laser energy absorption and mechanical weakness. For damage growth, the material surrounding a damage site is already mechanically weakened by cracks and probably chemically modified as well. The mechanical damage can also lead to electric field intensification due to interference effects, thus increasing the available laser energy density. In this project, we successfully accounted for the pulselength dependence of damage threshold in bulk DKDP crystals with the hypothesis of small absorbers with a distribution of sizes. We theoretically investigated expected scaling of damage initiation craters both to baseline detailed numerical simulations

  20. Talent Development in STEM Disciplines: Sparking Innovators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Julia Link

    2010-01-01

    What role can specialized schools with focus on mathematics, science, and technology have in sparking innovation? Such specialized schools can be and in some cases currently are leaders in promoting high-level content knowledge, creative and critical thinking, and problem solving--the basic ingredients of innovation. In this article, the author…

  1. Magnetite Nanoparticles Prepared By Spark Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, M.; Blums, E.; Kronkalns, G.; Krumina, A.; Lubane, M.

    2016-08-01

    In the present research, we study a possibility of using the electric spark erosion method as an alternative to the method of chemical co-precipitation for preparation of magnetic nanoparticles. Initiation of high frequency electric discharge between coarse iron particles under a layer of distilled water allows obtaining pure magnetite nanoparticles.

  2. Spark decomposition studies of dielectric gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauers, I.; Christophorou, L. G.

    The ultimate usefulness of a high voltage insulating gas depends not only on the ability of the gas to withstand high voltages, but also on the degradation of the gas resulting from spark discharges, corona or prolonged electrical stress and the effect(s) of the by-products on the equipment and, possibly, the environment. In view of these considerations, the study of long-range spark decomposition was undertaken in an effort to improve the decomposition characteristics of dielectric gases through proper tailoring of gas mixtures while maintaining high breakdown strengths. The data reported are on the analyses of gases sparked by capactive (0.1 micro F) discharge into a 0.5-mm gap, resulting in an energy input of approximately 5 J per spark. The nature of the decomposition products of SF6 formed by high voltage discharges observed is found to be critically dependent on impurities (particularly H2O), electrode material and insulating materials present in the system.

  3. Spark gap device for precise switching

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1984-01-01

    A spark gap device for precise switching of an energy storage capacitor into an exploding bridge wire load is disclosed. Niobium electrodes having a melting point of 2,415 degrees centrigrade are spaced apart by an insulating cylinder to define a spark gap. The electrodes are supported by conductive end caps which, together with the insulating cylinder, form a hermetically sealed chamber filled with an inert, ionizable gas, such as pure xenon. A quantity of solid radioactive carbon-14 within the chamber adjacent the spark gap serves as a radiation stabilizer. The sides of the electrodes and the inner wall of the insulating cylinder are spaced apart a sufficient distance to prevent unwanted breakdown initiation. A conductive sleeve may envelop the outside of the insulating member from the midpoint of the spark gap to the cap adjacent the cathode. The outer metallic surfaces of the device may be coated with a hydrogen-impermeable coating to lengthen the shelf life and operating life of the device. The device breaks down at about 1,700 volts for input voltage rates up to 570 volts/millisecond and allows peak discharge currents of up to 3,000 amperes from a 0.3 microfarad energy storage capacitor for more than 1,000 operations.

  4. Spark gap device for precise switching

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1984-10-02

    A spark gap device for precise switching of an energy storage capacitor into an exploding bridge wire load is disclosed. Niobium electrodes having a melting point of 2,415 degrees centigrade are spaced apart by an insulating cylinder to define a spark gap. The electrodes are supported by conductive end caps which, together with the insulating cylinder, form a hermetically sealed chamber filled with an inert, ionizable gas, such as pure xenon. A quantity of solid radioactive carbon-14 within the chamber adjacent the spark gap serves as a radiation stabilizer. The sides of the electrodes and the inner wall of the insulating cylinder are spaced apart a sufficient distance to prevent unwanted breakdown initiation. A conductive sleeve may envelop the outside of the insulating member from the midpoint of the spark gap to the cap adjacent the cathode. The outer metallic surfaces of the device may be coated with a hydrogen-impermeable coating to lengthen the shelf life and operating life of the device. The device breaks down at about 1,700 volts for input voltage rates up to 570 volts/millisecond and allows peak discharge currents of up to 3,000 amperes from a 0.3 microfarad energy storage capacitor for more than 1,000 operations. 3 figs.

  5. Reconstruction of laser-induced cavitation bubble dynamics based on a Fresnel propagation approach.

    PubMed

    Devia-Cruz, Luis Felipe; Camacho-López, Santiago; Cortés, Víctor Ruiz; Ramos-Muñiz, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2015-12-10

    A single laser-induced cavitation bubble in transparent liquids has been studied through a variety of experimental techniques. High-speed video with varying frame rate up to 20×10(7)   fps is the most suitable to study nonsymmetric bubbles. However, it is still expensive for most researchers and more affordable (lower) frame rates are not enough to completely reproduce bubble dynamics. This paper focuses on combining the spatial transmittance modulation (STM) technique, a single shot cavitation bubble and a very simple and inexpensive experimental technique, based on Fresnel approximation propagation theory, to reproduce a laser-induced cavitation spatial dynamics. Our results show that the proposed methodology reproduces a laser-induced cavitation event much more accurately than 75,000 fps video recording. In conclusion, we propose a novel methodology to reproduce laser-induced cavitation events that combine the STM technique with Fresnel propagation approximation theory that properly reproduces a laser-induced cavitation event including a very precise identification of the first, second, and third collapses of the cavitation bubble. PMID:26836867

  6. Time-Resolved Aluminum Monoxide Emission Measurements in Laser-Induced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, David; Parigger, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced plasmas are useful for diagnostic applications in a wide variety of fields. One application is the creation of laser-induced plasmas on the surface of an aluminum sample to simulate an aluminized flame. In this study, aluminum monoxide emissions are measured to characterize the temperature along the laser-induced plasma as a function of time delay following laser-induced optical breakdown. The breakdown event is achieved by focusing 1064 nanometer laser radiation from an Nd:YAG laser onto the surface of an aluminum sample. Light from the plasma is dispersed with the use of a Czerny-Turner spectrograph, and time resolved emission spectra are recorded with an intensified, gated detector. Temperatures are inferred from the diatomic molecular emissions by fitting the experimentally collected to theoretically calculated spectra using a Nelder-Mead algorithm. For computation of synthetic spectra we utilize accurate line strengths for selected AlO molecular bands. Atomic emissions from aluminum are also investigated in our study of laser-induced plasma.

  7. The use of spark photography in scientific research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, P. W. W.

    The paper begins with the work of various pioneers in the use of the optical spark up to the early 1920s. These include Fox Talbot, Mach, Cranz, Boyes, Worthington and Bull amongst others. Mention is made of some of their ingenious solutions for problems of triggering and the problems to which they applied spark photography. These efforts began with single exposures and gradually turned to various multiple spark systems in order to incorporate a time history into their observations. There follows descriptions of spark source types, their backing circuitry, optical properties, general usage, later advances and applications including their use in aeroballistic ranges. Finally spark source advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  8. Laser-induced THz magnetization precession for a tetragonal Heusler-like nearly compensated ferrimagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, S.; Sugihara, A.; Iihama, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Suzuki, K. Z.; Miyazaki, T.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-induced magnetization precessional dynamics was investigated in epitaxial films of Mn3Ge, which is a tetragonal Heusler-like nearly compensated ferrimagnet. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) mode was observed, the precession frequency for which exceeded 0.5 THz and originated from the large magnetic anisotropy field of approximately 200 kOe for this ferrimagnet. The effective damping constant was approximately 0.03. The corresponding effective Landau-Lifshitz constant is approximately 60 Mrad/s and is comparable with those of the similar Mn-Ga materials. The physical mechanisms for the Gilbert damping and for the laser-induced excitation of the FMR mode were also discussed in terms of the spin-orbit-induced damping and the laser-induced ultrafast modulation of the magnetic anisotropy, respectively.

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water based on graphite conch method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlong; Liu, Jianguo; Zhao, Nanjing; Shi, Huan; Liu, Lituo; Ma, Mingjun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Wenqing

    2012-10-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission characteristics of trace heavy metal lead in water is studied based on graphite conch method, with a 1064nm wavelength Nd: YAG laser as excitation source, the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector are used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. The delay time 900ns and gate time 1600ns are determined in the experiment. The calibration curve of Pb is plotted based on the different concentration measurement results, and a limit of detection of 0.0138mg / L is obtained for Pb in water. Graphite conch method effectively overcomes the current problems on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water. The detection limits and stability are improved. The reference data is provided for further study on the fast measurement of trace heavy metals in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique.

  10. Laser-induced plasmas in ambient air for incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruth, Albert A; Dixneuf, Sophie; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-03-01

    The emission from a laser-induced plasma in ambient air, generated by a high power femtosecond laser, was utilized as pulsed incoherent broadband light source in the center of a quasi-confocal high finesse cavity. The time dependent spectra of the light leaking from the cavity was compared with those of the laser-induced plasma emission without the cavity. It was found that the light emission was sustained by the cavity despite the initially large optical losses of the laser-induced plasma in the cavity. The light sustained by the cavity was used to measure part of the S(1) ← S(0) absorption spectrum of gaseous azulene at its vapour pressure at room temperature in ambient air as well as the strongly forbidden γ-band in molecular oxygen: b(1)Σ(g)(+)(ν'=2)←X(3)Σ(g)(-)(ν''=0). PMID:25836833

  11. Simulation and characterization of laser induced deformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yajun

    2006-04-01

    Laser induced deformation processes include laser forming (LF) and laser shock processing. LF is a recently developed and highly flexible thermal forming technique, and laser shock processing is an innovative mechanical process in which shock waves up to 10GPa are generated by a confined laser ablation process. The generated high pressure imparts beneficial residual stress into the surface layer of metal parts as well as shapes thin metal parts. In laser forming, it has been known that microstructural evolution has an important effect on the deformation process, and that the typical thermal cycles in laser forming are much steeper than those in other thermal mechanical processes like welding and hot rolling. In this study, microstructural evolution in laser forming has been investigated, and a thermal-microstructural-mechanical model is developed to predict microstructural changes (phase transformations and recrystallization) and their effects on flow behavior and deformation. Grain structure and phase transformation in heat affected zone (HAZ) is experimentally characterized, and measurement of bending curvature also helps to validate the proposed model. Based on the similar methodology, two different materials have been studied: AISI 1010 low carbon steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. In the case of Ti-6A1-4V alloy, the initial phase ratio of Ti-alpha and Ti-beta need to be measured by X-ray diffraction. In laser shock processing, under shock loading solid material behavior is fluidlike and shock-solid interactions play a key role in determining the induced residual stress distributions and the final deformed shape. In this work shock-solid interactions under high pressure and thus high strain rate in laser shock processing are studied and simulated based on conservation's law, equation of state and elastoplasticity of material. A series of carefully controlled experiments, including spatially resolved residual stress measurement by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and

  12. [Laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect in laser resonance ionization process of lead atom].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Shun; Li, Ying; Dai, Lin; Zheng, Rong-Er

    2008-07-01

    Isotope ratio measurements have been increasingly used in geochemistry, geochronology, cosmos chemistry and environmental science. Precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements are an important task in many applications such as the determination of isotope variations in geological and cosmic samples. Due to its high sensitivity, high ionization efficiency and high element selectivity, laser resonance ionization spectroscopy has nowadays become one of the key techniques, including isotope ratio measurements and trace amount analyses. Because of the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure, there is laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect in the process of laser resonance ionization. The different isotope ionization efficiency can affect precise and accurate measurement of isotope ratios. In the present paper, the dependences of the laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect on some of the laser parameters were studied by theoretical methods. Based on the numerical simulation of the population rate equations, laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect of lead isotopes was studied, by calculating laser resonance ionization transition "6s2 6p23 P0-6s2 6p7 s3 P1(0) --> ionization". The population rate equations was approximated considering some factors which affect the probability of laser resonance transition such as spectral lines width of laser and atom, isotope shifts and hyperfine structure. According to the approximated population rate equations, "1+1" laser resonant ionization process was employed to calculate the ionization probability of lead isotopes by means of computer simulation. The dependences of laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect on the laser parameters, such as laser central wavelength, bandwidth and intensity were investigated. The calculated results show that the laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect of lead isotopes could be almost eliminated by operating at optimized wavelength and could be lessened by using wide band laser

  13. Remote imaging laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy using nanosecond pulses from a mobile lidar system.

    PubMed

    Grönlund, Rasmus; Lundqvist, Mats; Svanberg, Sune

    2006-08-01

    A mobile lidar system was used in remote imaging laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments. Also, computer-controlled remote ablation of a chosen area was demonstrated, relevant to cleaning of cultural heritage items. Nanosecond frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser pulses at 355 nm were employed in experiments with a stand-off distance of 60 meters using pulse energies of up to 170 mJ. By coaxial transmission and common folding of the transmission and reception optical paths using a large computer-controlled mirror, full elemental imaging capability was achieved on composite targets. Different spectral identification algorithms were compared in producing thematic data based on plasma or fluorescence light. PMID:16925920

  14. High-voltage spark atomic emission detector for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkin, C. L.; Koeplin, S. M.; Crouch, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A dc-powered, double-gap, miniature nanosecond spark source for emission spectrochemical analysis of gas chromatographic effluents is described. The spark is formed between two thoriated tungsten electrodes by the discharge of a coaxial capacitor. The spark detector is coupled to the gas chromatograph by a heated transfer line. The gas chromatographic effluent is introduced into the heated spark chamber where atomization and excitation of the effluent occurs upon breakdown of the analytical gap. A microcomputer-controlled data acquisition system allows the implementation of time-resolution techniques to distinguish between the analyte emission and the background continuum produced by the spark discharge. Multiple sparks are computer averaged to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The application of the spark detector for element-selective detection of metals and nonmetals is reported.

  15. Femtosecond laser-induced breakdown in distilled water for fabricating the helical microchannels array.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Qu, Shiliang

    2011-11-01

    We have fabricated complex helical microchannel arrays with uniform diameter in silica glass using femtosecond laser-induced breakdown in distilled water. The generated high-speed jet and shockwave cause cavitation damage in silica glass. Distilled water injected into microchannels through a rubber hose is used for effectively ejecting the debris. The low concentration of debris in the ablated area ensure continuously femtosecond laser-induced breakdown. The distribution, coil number, coil diameter and pitch of the helical microchannel arrays can be controlled.

  16. Laser-induced synthesis and decay of Tritium under exposure of solid targets in heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Timashev, S. F.; Shafeev, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    The processes of laser-assisted synthesis of Tritium nuclei and their laser-induced decay in cold plasma in the vicinity of solid targets (Au, Ti, Se, etc.) immersed into heavy water are experimentally realized at peak laser intensity of 1010-1013 W/cm2. Initial stages of Tritium synthesis and their laser-induced beta-decay are interpreted on the basis of non-elastic interaction of plasma electrons having kinetic energy of 5-10 eV with nuclei of Deuterium and Tritium, respectively.

  17. (Study of flow properties of wet solids using laser induced photo chemical anemometry)

    SciTech Connect

    Falco, B.

    1992-04-09

    A new diagnostic measurement technique is being developed that will enable the investigation of the dynamics of flowing wet solids. The technique involves the use of Laser Induced Photochemical Anemometry (LIPA), enhanced to enable two photochemical species to be excited. It uses laser induced photochromic and photo luminescent molecules to separately tag the two phases for times long enough for them to distort the tagging. Recording the distortions of the tagging caused by the movement of each phase enables us to obtain local characterization of flow properties of both phases of the wet solids at many positions simultaneously across a pipe.

  18. Non-gated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water by position-selective detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Zheng, Ronger

    2015-09-14

    Temporal and spatial evolutions of the laser-induced plasma in bulk water are investigated using fast imaging and emission spectroscopic techniques. By tightly focusing a single-pulse nanosecond Nd: YAG laser beam into the bulk water, we generate a strongly expanded plasma with high reproducibility. Such a strong expanding plasma enables us to obtain well-resolved spectral lines by means of position-selective detection; hence, the time-gated detector becomes abdicable. The present results suggest not only a possible non-gated approach for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy but also give an insight into the plasma generation and expansion in bulk water.

  19. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Nanofibers and Laser-Induced Incandescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Kathy (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randy L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; Berger, Gordon M.; Patel, Premal D.

    2004-01-01

    Laser induced incandescence applied to a heterogeneous, multi-element reacting flows is characterized by a) temporally resolved emission spectra, time-resolved emission at selected detection wavelengths and fluence dependence. Laser fluences above 0.6 Joules per square centimeter at 1064 nm initiate laser-induced vaporization, yielding a lower incandescence intensity, as found through fluence dependence measurements. Spectrally derived temperatures show that values of excitation laser fluence beyond this value lead to a super-heated plasma, well above the vaporization of temperature of carbon. The temporal evolution of the emission signal at these fluences is consistent with plasma dissipation processes, not incandescence from solid-like structures.

  20. Modification of the photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Takashi; Buica, Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    We theoretically investigate how the photoelectron angular distribution is altered by the introduction of a dressing laser. The physical mechanism underlying this alteration is the so-called laser-induced continuum structure; namely, a strong dressing laser induces quantum mechanical interference, the degree of which is different for different ionization channels. Therefore the branching ratio into different ionization channels changes as a function of laser detuning, and accordingly the photoelectron angular distribution is altered. After a general argument, we present specific theoretical results for the K atom, which indeed exhibit significant modification of the photoelectron angular distribution.

  1. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Anmin; Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  2. Effect of unsteady stretch on spark-ignited flame kernel survival

    SciTech Connect

    Eichenberger, D.A.; Roberts, W.L.

    1999-08-01

    The chemistry-turbulence interaction remains one of the most important topics in combustion research. The ignition of premixed reactants in a highly turbulent environment is fundamentally coupled to this chemistry-turbulence interaction. The spark-ignition (SI) internal combustion (IC) engine relies on the ability of the flame kernel to survive the high-strain-rate, unsteady environment of a turbulent flowfield and successfully transition into a fully developed flame to operate cleanly and efficiently. If certain length and velocity scales within the turbulence spectrum are found to promote flame kernel growth, then by tailoring the flow passages and aerodynamics of the intake valves, piston, and combustion chamber, it may be possible to increase the efficiency and reduce the emissions of SI IC engines. This paper describes a novel experimental investigation of a spark-generated flame kernel interacting with a single vortex toroid with well-defined length and velocity scales. This experiment measured the ability of a vortex to quench a growing kernel in a very lean methane-air mixture at atmospheric pressure. The absence of superequilibrium OH concentrations, qualitatively determined by planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), was used as in indicator of quenching. It was found that larger eddies are more effective at globally quenching the flamefront, requiring a lower strength, when compared to vortices with a smaller characteristic length. At the globally quenching condition, the maturity of the kernel was then increased incrementally until the vortex was no longer able to completely strain out the kernel. The result of this was surprising in that the larger vortices had a much narrower range of kernel maturity for which the vortex could still quench the growing kernel.

  3. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Measurements of laser-induced shock waves in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werdiger, M.; Arad, B.; Moshe, E.; Eliezer, S.

    1995-02-01

    A simple optical method for measurements of high-irradiance (3×1013 W cm-2) laser-induced shock waves is described. The shock wave velocity (~13 km s-1) was measured with an error not exceeding 5%. The laser-induced one-to-two-dimensional (1D-to-2D) shock wave transition was studied.

  4. Spark gap switch with spiral gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Brucker, John P.

    1989-01-01

    A spark gap switch having a contaminate removal system using an injected gas. An annular plate concentric with an electrode of the switch defines flow paths for the injected gas which form a strong spiral flow of the gas in the housing which is effective to remove contaminates from the switch surfaces. The gas along with the contaminates is exhausted from the housing through one of the ends of the switch.

  5. High voltage spark carbon fiber detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pulse discharge technique was used to determine the length and density of carbon fibers released from fiber composite materials during a fire or aircraft accident. Specifications are given for the system which uses the ability of a carbon fiber to initiate spark discharge across a high voltage biased grid to achieve accurate counting and sizing of fibers. The design of the system was optimized, and prototype hardware proved satisfactory in laboratory and field tests.

  6. HIGH VOLTAGE, HIGH CURRENT SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Dike, R.S.; Lier, D.W.; Schofield, A.E.; Tuck, J.L.

    1962-04-17

    A high voltage and current spark gap switch comprising two main electrodes insulatingly supported in opposed spaced relationship and a middle electrode supported medially between the main electrodes and symmetrically about the median line of the main electrodes is described. The middle electrode has a perforation aligned with the median line and an irradiation electrode insulatingly supported in the body of the middle electrode normal to the median line and protruding into the perforation. (AEC)

  7. SPARK Version 1. 1 user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenburger, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    This manual describes the input required to use Version 1.1 of the SPARK computer code. SPARK 1.1 is a library of FORTRAN main programs and subprograms designed to calculate eddy currents on conducting surfaces where current flow is assumed zero in the direction normal to the surface. Surfaces are modeled with triangular and/or quadrilateral elements. Lorentz forces produced by the interaction of eddy currents with background magnetic fields can be output at element nodes in a form compatible with most structural analysis codes. In addition, magnetic fields due to eddy currents can be determined at points off the surface. Version 1.1 features eddy current streamline plotting with optional hidden-surface-removal graphics and topological enhancements that allow essentially any orientable surface to be modeled. SPARK also has extensive symmetry specification options. In order to make the manual as self-contained as possible, six appendices are included that present summaries of the symmetry options, topological options, coil options and code algorithms, with input and output examples. An edition of SPARK 1.1 is available on the Cray computers at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center at Livermore, California. Another more generic edition is operational on the VAX computers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and is available on magnetic tape by request. The generic edition requires either the GKS or PLOT10 graphics package and the IMSL or NAG mathematical package. Requests from outside the United States will be subject to applicable federal regulations regarding dissemination of computer programs. 22 refs.

  8. Simultaneous imaging of fuel vapor mass fraction and gas-phase temperature inside gasoline sprays using two-line excitation tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zigan, Lars; Trost, Johannes; Leipertz, Alfred

    2016-02-20

    This paper reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on the simultaneous imaging of the gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction distribution in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) spray under engine-relevant conditions using tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF). For measurements in the spray, the fluorescence tracer 3-pentanone is added to the nonfluorescent surrogate fuel iso-octane, which is excited quasi-simultaneously by two different excimer lasers for two-line excitation LIF. The gas-phase temperature of the mixture of fuel vapor and surrounding gas and the fuel vapor mass fraction can be calculated from the two LIF signals. The measurements are conducted in a high-temperature, high-pressure injection chamber. The fluorescence calibration of the tracer was executed in a flow cell and extended significantly compared to the existing database. A detailed error analysis for both calibration and measurement is provided. Simultaneous single-shot gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction fields are processed for the assessment of cyclic spray fluctuations. PMID:26906600

  9. Simultaneous imaging of fuel vapor mass fraction and gas-phase temperature inside gasoline sprays using two-line excitation tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zigan, Lars; Trost, Johannes; Leipertz, Alfred

    2016-02-20

    This paper reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on the simultaneous imaging of the gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction distribution in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) spray under engine-relevant conditions using tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF). For measurements in the spray, the fluorescence tracer 3-pentanone is added to the nonfluorescent surrogate fuel iso-octane, which is excited quasi-simultaneously by two different excimer lasers for two-line excitation LIF. The gas-phase temperature of the mixture of fuel vapor and surrounding gas and the fuel vapor mass fraction can be calculated from the two LIF signals. The measurements are conducted in a high-temperature, high-pressure injection chamber. The fluorescence calibration of the tracer was executed in a flow cell and extended significantly compared to the existing database. A detailed error analysis for both calibration and measurement is provided. Simultaneous single-shot gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction fields are processed for the assessment of cyclic spray fluctuations.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence of ketones at elevated temperatures for pressures up to 20 bars by using a 248 nm excitation laser wavelength: experiments and model improvements.

    PubMed

    Braeuer, Andreas; Beyrau, Frank; Leipertz, Alfred

    2006-07-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence of acetone and 3-pentanone for a 248 nm excitation wavelength was investigated for conditions relevant for internal combustion engines regarding temperature, pressure, and gas composition. An optically accessible calibration chamber with continuous gas flow was operated by using CO2 and air as a bath gas. According to the varying pressure and temperature conditions during the compression stroke of a spark ignition engine, fluorescence experiments were performed under isothermal pressure variations from 1 to 20 bars for different temperatures between 293 and 700 K. The ketone fluorescence behavior predictions, based on a model previously developed by Thurber et al. [Appl. Opt. 37, 4963 (1998)], were found to overestimate the pressure-related fluorescence increase for high temperature and small wavelength excitation at 248 nm. The parameters influencing the model only in the large vibrational energy regime were newly adjusted, which resulted in an improved model with a better agreement with the experiment. The model's validity for excitation at larger wavelengths was not influenced. For the air bath gas an additional collision and vibrational energy sensitive quenching rate was implemented in the model for both tracers, acetone and 3-pentanone. PMID:16807609

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence of ketones at elevated temperatures for pressures up to 20 bars by using a 248 nm excitation laser wavelength: experiments and model improvements.

    PubMed

    Braeuer, Andreas; Beyrau, Frank; Leipertz, Alfred

    2006-07-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence of acetone and 3-pentanone for a 248 nm excitation wavelength was investigated for conditions relevant for internal combustion engines regarding temperature, pressure, and gas composition. An optically accessible calibration chamber with continuous gas flow was operated by using CO2 and air as a bath gas. According to the varying pressure and temperature conditions during the compression stroke of a spark ignition engine, fluorescence experiments were performed under isothermal pressure variations from 1 to 20 bars for different temperatures between 293 and 700 K. The ketone fluorescence behavior predictions, based on a model previously developed by Thurber et al. [Appl. Opt. 37, 4963 (1998)], were found to overestimate the pressure-related fluorescence increase for high temperature and small wavelength excitation at 248 nm. The parameters influencing the model only in the large vibrational energy regime were newly adjusted, which resulted in an improved model with a better agreement with the experiment. The model's validity for excitation at larger wavelengths was not influenced. For the air bath gas an additional collision and vibrational energy sensitive quenching rate was implemented in the model for both tracers, acetone and 3-pentanone.

  12. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Ignition Sparks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Melville F; Summerville, Wayne L

    1931-01-01

    The effectiveness of ignition sparks was determined by measuring the volume (or mass) of hydrogen and of oxygen which combines at low pressures. The sparks were generated by a magneto and an ignition spark coil. It was found that with constant energy the amount of reaction increases as the capacitance component of the spark increases. The use of a series spark gap may decrease or increase the amount of reaction, the effect depending upon the amount and distribution of capacitance in the circuit. So far as the work has progressed, it has been found that sparks reported by other investigations as being most efficient for igniting lean mixtures cause the largest amount of reaction. Differences between the amount of reaction with a magneto spark and an ignition spark coil were noted. The method appears to offer a means of determining the most efficient spark generator for internal-combustion engines as well as determining a relation between the character of spark, energy, and effectiveness in igniting inflammable mixtures.

  13. Relationship between Exploding Bridgewire & Spark Initiation of Low Density PETN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Elizabeth; Drake, Rod

    2015-06-01

    Recent work has shown that the energy delivered after bridgewire burst affects the function time of an EBW detonator. The spark which is formed post bridgewire burst is the means by which the remaining fireset energy is delivered into the detonator. Therefore, by studying the characteristics of spark-gap detonators insight into the contribution of spark initiation to the functioning of EBW detonators may be achieved. Spark initiation of low density explosives consists of; (i) spark formation, (ii) spark interaction with the bed, and (iii) ignition and growth of reaction. Experiments were performed in which beds of an inert simulant were used to study the formation and propagation of sparks. The effect of the spark on inert porous beds was studied over a limited delivered energy range. The disruption of the bed was found to be dependent on the particle size / pore structure of the bed. The effect of spark initiation on a low density PETN bed was then examined, the relationship between delivered energy and function time was found to be the same as for EBW detonators. This necessitated the development of electrical diagnostic techniques to measure the energy delivered to the spark.

  14. An acoustic based, laser induced breakdown method for determining the sizes and concentrations of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyun; Kim, Ji-Woong; Son, Ji-A; Choi, Joong-Gill

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic, laser induced breakdown (LIBD) method has been developed for determining the sizes and concentrations of nano-sized colloids. The size distributions from a mixture of aquatic nanoparticles are determined by measuring amplitudes of plasma shockwave that are fitted to multi-curve Gaussian distributions displayed in separate peaks with positions corresponding to particle sizes and areas being proportional to concentrations.

  15. Recognition of edible oil by using BP neural network and laser induced fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Tao-tao; Chen, Si-ying; Zhang, Yin-chao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He; Zhang, Hong-yan; Liu, Xiao-hua; Wang, Yuan; Bu, Zhi-chao

    2013-09-01

    In order to accomplish recognition of the different edible oil we set up a laser induced fluorescence spectrum system in the laboratory based on Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, and then collect the fluorescence spectrum of different edible oil by using that system. Based on this, we set up a fluorescence spectrum database of different cooking oil. It is clear that there are three main peak position of different edible oil from fluorescence spectrum chart. Although the peak positions of all cooking oil were almost the same, the relative intensity of different edible oils was totally different. So it could easily accomplish that oil recognition could take advantage of the difference of relative intensity. Feature invariants were extracted from the spectrum data, which were chosen from the fluorescence spectrum database randomly, before distinguishing different cooking oil. Then back propagation (BP) neural network was established and trained by the chosen data from the spectrum database. On that basis real experiment data was identified by BP neural network. It was found that the overall recognition rate could reach as high as 83.2%. Experiments showed that the laser induced fluorescence spectrum of different cooking oil was very different from each other, which could be used to accomplish the oil recognition. Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, combined BP neural network,was fast, high sensitivity, non-contact, and high recognition rate. It could become a new technique to accomplish the edible oil recognition and quality detection.

  16. [Study of enhancement effect of laser-induced crater on plasma radiation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Qing-Lin; Su, Hong-Xin; Li, Guang

    2009-02-01

    Single pulses exported from high-energy neodymium glass laser were used to act on the same position of soil sample surface repeatedly, and the plasma emission spectra generated from sequential laser pulse action were collected by spectral recording system. The experimental results show that the laser-induced soil plasma radiation was enhanced continuously under the confinement effect of the crater walls, and the line intensities and signal-to-background ratios both had different improvements along with increasing the number of acting pulses. The photographs of the plasma image and crater appearance were taken to study the plasma shape, laser-induced crater appearance, and the mass of the ablated sample. The internal mechanism behind that laser-induced crater enhanced plasma radiation was researched. Under the sequential laser pulse action, the forming plasma as a result enlarges gradually first, leading to distortion at the trail of plasma plume, and then, its volume diminishes slowly. And also, the color of the plasma changes from buff to white gradually, which implies that the temperature increases constantly. The laser-induced crater had a regular shape, that is, the diameter increased from its bottom to top gradually, thus forming a taper. The mass of the laser-ablated substance descends along with increasing the amount of action pulse. Atomization degree of vaporized substance was improved in virtue of the crater confinement effect, Fresnel absorption produced from the crater walls reflection, and the inverse bremsstrahlung, and the plasma radiation intensity was enhanced as a result.

  17. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edwards; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1991-04-09

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  18. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1996-02-20

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  19. Laser-Induced Damage Threshold and Certification Procedures for Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This document provides instructions for performing laser-induced-damage-threshold tests and pass-fail certification tests on optical materials used in pulsed-laser systems. The optical materials to which these procedures apply include coated and uncoated optical substrates, laser crystals, Q-switches, polarizers, and other optical components employed in pulsed-laser systems.

  20. Use of laser-induced ionization to detect soot inception in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzello, Samuel L.; Lee, Eui Ju; Mulholland, George W.

    2005-08-01

    Experimental measurements of laser-induced ionization were performed for ethene-air premixed flames operated near the soot inception point. Soot was ionized with a pulsed laser operated at 532 nm. The ionization signal was collected with a tungsten electrode located in the postflame region. Ionization signals were collected by use of both single-electrode and dual-electrode configurations. Earlier laser-induced- ionization studies focused on the use of a single biased electrode to generate the electric field, with the burner head serving as the path to ground. In many practical combustion systems, a path to ground is not readily available. To apply the laser-induced- ionization diagnostic to these geometries, a dual-electrode geometry must be employed. The influence of electrode configuration, flame equivalence ratio, and flame height on ionization signal detection was determined. The efficacy of the laser-induced-ionization diagnostic in detecting soot inception in the postflame region of a premixed flame by use of a dual-electrode configuration was investigated. Of the dual-electrode configurations tested, the dual-electrode geometry oriented parallel to the laser beam was observed to be most sensitive for detecting the soot inception point in a premixed flame.

  1. Prospects for single-molecule detection in liquids by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Dovichi, N.J.

    1983-01-01

    A laser-induced fluoresence determination of aqueous solutions of rhodamine 6G resulted in a detection limit of 18 attograms, or 22,000 molecules, of rhodamine 6G. These results allow the projection to single-molecule detection with reasonable improvements in the experimental apparatus.

  2. Use of laser-induced ionization to detect soot inception in premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Manzello, Samuel L.; Lee, Eui Ju; Mulholland, George W

    2005-08-20

    Experimental measurements of laser-induced ionization were performed for ethene-air premixed flames operated near the soot inception point. Soot was ionized with a pulsed laser operated at 532 nm. The ionization signal was collected with a tungsten electrode located in the postflame region. Ionization signals were collected by use of both single-electrode and dual-electrode configurations. Earlier laser-induced- ionization studies focused on the use of a single biased electrode to generate the electric field, with the burner head serving as the path to ground. In many practical combustion systems, a path to ground is not readily available. To apply the laser-induced- ionization diagnostic to these geometries, a dual-electrode geometry must be employed. The influence of electrode configuration, flame equivalence ratio, and flame height on ionization signal detection was determined. The efficacy of the laser-induced-ionization diagnostic in detecting soot inception in the postflame region of a premixed flame by use of a dual-electrode configuration was investigated. Of the dual-electrode configurations tested, the dual-electrode geometry oriented parallel to the laser beam was observed to be most sensitive for detecting the soot inception point in a premixed flame.

  3. [The Spectral Analysis of Laser-Induced Plasma in Laser Welding with Various Protecting Conditions].

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao; Yang, Li-jun; Liu, Tong; Jiao, Jiao; Wang, Hui-chao

    2016-01-01

    The shielding gas plays an important role in the laser welding process and the variation of the protecting conditions has an obvious effect on the welding quality. This paper studied the influence of the change of protecting conditions on the parameters of laser-induced plasma such as electron temperature and electron density during the laser welding process by designing some experiments of reducing the shielding gas flow rate step by step and simulating the adverse conditions possibly occurring in the actual Nd : YAG laser welding process. The laser-induced plasma was detected by a fiber spectrometer to get the spectral data. So the electron temperature of laser-induced plasma was calculated by using the method of relative spectral intensity and the electron density by the Stark Broadening. The results indicated that the variation of protecting conditions had an important effect on the electron temperature and the electron density in the laser welding. When the protecting conditions were changed, the average electron temperature and the average electron density of the laser-induced plasma would change, so did their fluctuation range. When the weld was in a good protecting condition, the electron temperature, the electron density and their fluctuation were all low. Otherwise, the values would be high. These characteristics would have contribution to monitoring the process of laser welding. PMID:27228732

  4. Colorizing pure copper surface by ultrafast laser-induced near-subwavelength ripples.

    PubMed

    Ou, Zhigui; Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate that the colorizing effect of angle dependence can be efficiently and conveniently achieved on the rippled surface of pure copper processed by the femtosecond laser with an out-of-focus method, which greatly improves the machining speed. Such a laser-induced colorization can occur in a wide range of laser fluence, which determines the coverage and morphological characteristics of laser-induced ripples and thus can finely tune the colorizing effect. By inspecting the colors and corresponding spectra of treated areas at different angles, the relationship between the diffracted light central wavelength and the laser-induced near-subwavelength grating is analyzed quantitatively based on the fundamental grating equation with the experimental grating parameters. The spectrum analysis indicates that for the laser fluence increasing in a suitable range, the more clarity and regularity of formed ripples should bring out a more prominent grating effect, which becomes further matching of the grating equation in a larger inspecting angle for the elimination of the influence of the diffused reflection light. In short, the study confirms that the colorizing phenomenon mainly ascribes to the grating diffraction effect of the laser-induced periodic surface ripples, which would help to enable the flexible control of the colorizing effect induced by laser processing on pure copper.

  5. Study of mid IR fiber transmission and mode patterns under laser induced stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.; Chong, Yat C.; Zhou, Hongyi

    1990-01-01

    Mid IR fiber transmission and exit radiation mode patterns at various incident CO2 laser power levels appear to be effective diagnostic tools for monitoring laser induced stimulated Brillouin scattering in various mid IR fibers. Such processes are deemed to be essential mechanisms for fiber-optic amplifiers and switches as potential replacements of current repeaters and bistable devices.

  6. Optimization study of the femtosecond laser-induced forward-transfer process with thin aluminum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudipta; Sabbah, A. J.; Yarbrough, J. M.; Allen, C. G.; Winters, Beau; Durfee, Charles G.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2007-07-01

    The parameters for an effective laser-induced forward-transfer (LIFT) process of aluminum thin films using a femtosecond laser are studied. Deposited feature size as a function of laser fluence, donor film thickness, quality of focus, and the pulse duration are varied, providing a metric of the most desirable conditions for femtosecond LIFT with thin aluminum films.

  7. Laser-induced blood serum fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy for cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Wang, Qiuyu; Lin, Junxiu

    1999-09-01

    Laser induced auto-fluorescence and Raman spectra of serum from cancerous and normal people are measured and analyzed. The content of (beta) -carotene in the serum from normal man is higher than that from the cancerous one, this result agrees with other reports.

  8. Sorbitol as an efficient reducing agent for laser-induced copper deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemirovsky, V. A.; Logunov, L. S.; Safonov, S. V.; Tumkin, I. I.; Tver'yanovich, Yu. S.; Menchikov, L. G.

    2012-10-01

    We have pioneered in revealing the fact that sorbitol may be used as an efficient reducing agent in the process of laser-induced copper deposition from solutions; in this case, it is possible to obtain copper lines much higher quality than by using conventional formalin.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source.

  10. Effects of thermo-plasmonics on laser-induced backside wet etching of silicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, M. Yu; Yusupov, V. I.; Minaev, N. V.; Timashev, P. S.; Golant, K. M.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2016-10-01

    The thermo-plasmonic effect (heat deposition via absorption of laser light by metal nanoparticles) is applied to substantially enhance the effectiveness and controllability of the microstructure formation by laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE). Experiments were carried out with silicate glass plates using a pulsed 527 nm wavelength laser and an aqueous solution of AgNO3 as a precursor of the Ag nanoparticles. Mechanisms of such thermo-plasmonic LIBWE (TP-LIBWE) versions are considered. They involve: laser-induced photo-thermal reducing of silver (Ag) and self-assembling of Ag nanoparticles in water and the water/glass interface; fast laser-induced overheating of a water and glass surface through the thermo-plasmonic effect; formation of highly reactive supercritical water that causes glass etching and crater formation; generation of steam-gas bubbles in a liquid. It is significant that the emergence of the Marangoni convection results in bubble retention in the focal point at the interface and the accumulation of nanoparticles on the surface of the laser-induced crater, as this facilitates the movement of the bubbles with captured Ag particles from the fluid volume in the crater region, and accelerates the formation of the area of strong ‘surface absorption’ of laser energy. All these mechanisms provide a highly efficient and reproducible process for laser microstructure formation on the surface of glass using a novel TP-LIBWE technique.

  11. Laser-induced micro-plasmas in air for incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, Albert; Dixneuf, Sophie; Orphal, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) is an experimentally straightforward absorption method where the intensity of light transmitted by an optically stable (high finesse) cavity is measured. The technique is realized using broadband incoherent sources of radiation and therefore the amount of light transmitted by a cavity consisting of high reflectance mirrors (typically R > 99.9%) can be low. In order to find an alternative to having an incoherent light source outside the cavity, an experiment was devised, where a laser-induced plasma in ambient air was generated inside a quasi-confocal cavity by a high-power femtosecond laser. The emission from the laser-induced plasma was utilized as pulsed broadband light source. The time-dependent spectra of the light leaking from the cavity were compared with those of the laser-induced plasma emission without the cavity. It was found that the light emission was sustained by the cavity despite the initially large optical losses caused by the laser-induced plasma in the cavity. The light sustained by the cavity was used to measure part of the S1 ← S0 absorption spectrum of gaseous azulene at its vapour pressure at room temperature in ambient air, as well as the strongly forbidden γ-band in molecular oxygen (b1Σ(2,0) ← X3Σ(0,0)).

  12. Laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin: Optical method of elimination of hypoxia (oxygen deficiency in biotissue)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimov, M. M.; Thanh, Nguyen Cong

    2011-08-01

    We consider the effect of laser-induced in vivo photodissociation of blood oxyhemoglobin on gas exchange in biological tissues. An optical method of laser-induced oxygenation of biotissues is developed and proposed. We show that, in the region of the action of the laser radiation, the degree of oxygenation of a tissue increases. We experimentally confirm that the phenomenon of laser-induced in vivo photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin opens up a new possibility of controlling the local concentration of free molecular oxygen in tissues, eliminating tissue hypoxia, and stimulating aerobic metabolism of cells. We show that the efficiency of the proposed method of laser-induced oxygenation of biotissues proves to be comparable with the efficiency of the hyperbaric oxygenation, but has the advantage of the locality of the action. The proposed optical method of local oxygenation of biotissues will make it possible to eliminate the problem of hypoxia in cancerous tumor tissue and to considerably increase the efficiency of photodynamic, radiation, and chemotherapy in modern oncology.

  13. LLNL small-scale static spark machine: static spark sensitivity test

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, M F; Simpson, L R

    1999-08-23

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives and other energetic materials is done in order to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli, such as friction, static spark, and impact. Typically this testing is done to discover potential handling problems that may exist for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior, or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing ''Static Spark Test Apparatus'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as the method used to evaluate the relative static spark sensitivity of energetic materials. The basic design, originally developed by the Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey, is discussed. The accumulated data for the materials tested to date is not included here, with the exception of specific examples that have yielded interesting or unusual results during the tests.

  14. In situ investigation of laser-induced ignition and the early stages of methane-air combustion at high pressures using a rapidly tuned diode laser at 2.55 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, Maximilian; Forsich, Christian; Winter, Franz; Kopecek, Herbert; Wintner, Ernst

    2003-11-01

    The laser-induced ignition of methane/air-mixtures at elevated pressures was investigated by an absorption spectroscopic technique. A room temperature continuous wave InGaAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum well ridge diode laser was wavelength tuned around 2.55 μm by periodically modulating the injection current from 0 to 174 mA at a 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser heat sink temperature was fixed at 291 K. The infrared laser beam was sent through the pressurized combustion vessel perpendicularly to the igniting laser beam (Nd:YAG laser, 10 ns pulse duration, 20 mJ) at the position of the ignition spark. Fuel-rich to fuel-lean mixtures of methane/air (air equivalence ratio 0.89, 1.06, 1.42, 2.50) were investigated at initial pressures of up to 3 MPa. The initial temperature was 473 K, the volume of the combustion vessel 0.9×10 -3 m 3. The formation of water vapor in the vicinity of the laser spark was tracked by the diode laser. The time resolution of the measurements was 0.2 ms for a total continuous measurement time of up to 1 s. In this way, the laser-induced ignition and its accompanying effects could be investigated on a time scale spanning four orders of magnitude. Apart from the absorbance of water vapor which could be determined semi-quantitatively (due to the effects of severe pressure broadening at high pressures and the ignorance of the exact temperature distribution after ignition), the emissions from the flame (broadband, 1-10 μm) and a gas inhomogeneity index were recorded. The gas inhomogeneity index was obtained by extracting a frequency variable from the time-dependent fluctuations of the transmitted laser intensities and calculating its derivation. The absorbance of water vapor, the emissions from the flame and the gas inhomogeneity index were found to be a powerful tool to characterize laser-induced ignition. Major implications of in situ species concentration measurements at high pressures for the design and development of high-load combustors are

  15. Use of laser-induced spark for studying ignition stability and unburned hydrogen escaping from laminar diluted hydrogen diffusion jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Tran X.; Chen, Ruey-Hung

    2007-08-01

    Ignition and unburned hydrogen escaping from hydrogen jet diffusion flames diluted with nitrogen up to 70% were experimentally studied. The successful ignition locations were about 2/3 of the flame length above the jet exit for undiluted flames and moved much closer to the exit for diluted flames. For higher levels of dilution or higher flow rates, there existed a region within which a diluted hydrogen diffusion flame can be ignited and burns with a stable liftoff height. This is contrary to previous findings that pure and diluted hydrogen jet diffusion cannot achieve a stable lifted flame configuration. With liftoff, the flame is noisy and short with significant amount of unburned hydrogen escaping into the product gases. If ignition is initiated below this region, the flame propagates upstream quickly and attaches to the burner rim. Results from measurements of unburned hydrogen in the combustion products showed that the amount of unburned hydrogen increased as the nitrogen dilution level was increased. Thus, hydrogen diffusion flame diluted with nitrogen cannot burn completely.

  16. Spark assisted chemical engraving (SACE) in microfactory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, R.; Fujisaki, K.; Couthy, Ph; Hof, L. A.; Bleuler, H.

    2005-10-01

    Spark assisted chemical engraving (SACE) is a method for 3D microstructuring of glass or other non-conductive materials with high aspect ratio and smooth surface quality. It is applicable for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices, for MEMS interfacing and similar applications. Typical feature size is in the hundreds of micrometres, down to a few tens of micrometres. It is a table-top technology requiring no clean rooms and no masks and with very modest space usage. It is thus well suited for microfactories. This paper gives a basic introduction to SACE and some machining examples.

  17. Anticipating change, sparking innovation: framing the future.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Donna J; Finnegan, John R; Spencer, Harrison C

    2015-03-01

    As the 100th anniversary of the 1915 Welch-Rose report approaches, the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) has been pursuing two initiatives to spark innovation in academic partnerships for enhancing population health: (1) Framing the Future: The Second 100 Years of Education for Public Health and (2) Reconnecting Public Health and Care Delivery to Improve the Health of Populations. We describe how ASPPH-member schools and programs accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health, along with their extraordinarily diverse array of partners, are working to improve education that better prepares health professionals to meet 21st-century population health needs.

  18. The Miller volcanic spark discharge experiment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adam P; Cleaves, H James; Dworkin, Jason P; Glavin, Daniel P; Lazcano, Antonio; Bada, Jeffrey L

    2008-10-17

    Miller's 1950s experiments used, besides the apparatus known in textbooks, one that generated a hot water mist in the spark flask, simulating a water vapor-rich volcanic eruption. We found the original extracts of this experiment in Miller's material and reanalyzed them. The volcanic apparatus produced a wider variety of amino acids than the classic one. Release of reduced gases in volcanic eruptions accompanied by lightning could have been common on the early Earth. Prebiotic compounds synthesized in these environments could have locally accumulated, where they could have undergone further processing. PMID:18927386

  19. Shielding properties of laser-induced breakdown in water for pulse durations from 5 ns to 125 fs.

    PubMed

    Hammer, D X; Jansen, E D; Frenz, M; Noojin, G D; Thomas, R J; Noack, J; Vogel, A; Rockwell, B A; Welch, A J

    1997-08-01

    The shielding effectiveness of laser-induced breakdown from focused, visible laser pulses from 5 ns to 125 fs is determined from measurements of transmission of energy through the focal volume. The shielding efficiency decreases as a function of pulse duration from 5 ns to 300 fs and increases from 300 fs to 125 fs. The results are compared with past studies at similar pulse durations. The results of the measurements support laser-induced breakdown models and may lead to an optimization of laser-induced breakdown in ophthalmic surgery by reduction of collateral effects. PMID:18259389

  20. Nanosecond laser-induced ablation and laser-induced shockwave structuring of polymer foils down to sub-μm patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.; Engisch, L.

    2015-03-01

    Micro- and nanostructures exhibit a growing commercial interest where a fast, cost-effective, and large-area production is attainable. Laser methods have a great potential for the easy fabrication of surface structures into flexible polymer foils like polyimide (PI). In this study two different concepts for the structuring of polymer foils using a KrF excimer laser were tested and compared: the laser-induced ablation and the laser-induced shock wave structuring. The direct front side laser irradiation of these polymers allows the fabrication of different surface structures. For example: The low laser fluence treatment of PI results in nano-sized cone structures where the cone density can be controlled by the laser parameters. This allows inter alia the laser fabrication of microscopic QR code and high-resolution grey-tone images. Furthermore, the laser treatment of the front side of the polymer foil allows the rear side structuring due to a laserinduced shock wave. The resultant surface structures were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as white light interferometry (WLI).

  1. A generalized chemistry version of SPARK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.

    1988-01-01

    An extension of the reacting H2-air computer code SPARK is presented, which enables the code to be used on any reacting flow problem. Routines are developed calculating in a general fashion, the reaction rates, and chemical Jacobians of any reacting system. In addition, an equilibrium routine is added so that the code will have frozen, finite rate, and equilibrium capabilities. The reaction rate for the species is determined from the law of mass action using Arrhenius expressions for the rate constants. The Jacobian routines are determined by numerically or analytically differentiating the law of mass action for each species. The equilibrium routine is based on a Gibbs free energy minimization routine. The routines are written in FORTRAN 77, with special consideration given to vectorization. Run times for the generalized routines are generally 20 percent slower than reaction specific routines. The numerical efficiency of the generalized analytical Jacobian, however, is nearly 300 percent better than the reaction specific numerical Jacobian used in SPARK.

  2. Development of a SPARK Training Dataset

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Amanda M.; Olson, Jarrod R.

    2015-03-01

    In its first five years, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) sponsored more than 400 undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral students in internships and research positions (Wyse 2012). In the past seven years, the NGSI program has, and continues to produce a large body of scientific, technical, and policy work in targeted core safeguards capabilities and human capital development activities. Not only does the NGSI program carry out activities across multiple disciplines, but also across all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/NNSA locations in the United States. However, products are not readily shared among disciplines and across locations, nor are they archived in a comprehensive library. Rather, knowledge of NGSI-produced literature is localized to the researchers, clients, and internal laboratory/facility publication systems such as the Electronic Records and Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). There is also no incorporated way of analyzing existing NGSI literature to determine whether the larger NGSI program is achieving its core safeguards capabilities and activities. A complete library of NGSI literature could prove beneficial to a cohesive, sustainable, and more economical NGSI program. The Safeguards Platform for Automated Retrieval of Knowledge (SPARK) has been developed to be a knowledge storage, retrieval, and analysis capability to capture safeguards knowledge to exist beyond the lifespan of NGSI. During the development process, it was necessary to build a SPARK training dataset (a corpus of documents) for initial entry into the system and for demonstration purposes. We manipulated these data to gain new information about the breadth of NGSI publications, and they evaluated the science-policy interface at PNNL as a practical demonstration of SPARK’s intended analysis capability. The analysis demonstration sought to answer the

  3. Experimental investigation on dynamic characteristics and strengthening mechanism of laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; He, H; Tong, Y Q; Ren, Y P; Yuan, S Q; Liu, R; Zuo, C Y; Wu, K; Sui, S; Wang, D S

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic features of nanosecond laser-induced cavitation bubbles near the light alloy boundary were investigated with the high-speed photography. The shock-waves and the dynamic characteristics of the cavitation bubbles generated by the laser were detected using the hydrophone. The dynamic features and strengthening mechanism of cavitation bubbles were studied. The strengthening mechanisms of cavitation bubble were discussed when the relative distance parameter γ was within the range of 0.5-2.5. It showed that the strengthening mechanisms caused by liquid jet or shock-waves depended on γ much. The research results provided a new strengthening method based on laser-induced cavitation shotless peening (CSP).

  4. The effect of multiple wavelengths on Laser-induced damage in DKDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Auerbach, J M

    2005-07-11

    Laser-induced damage is a key factor that constrains how optical materials are used in high-power laser systems. In this work the size and density of bulk laser-induced damage sites formed during frequency tripling in a DKDP crystal are studied. The characteristics of the damage sites formed during tripling, where 1053-nm, 526-nm, and 351-nm light is simultaneously present, are compared to damage sites formed by 351-nm light alone. The fluence of each wavelength is calculated as a function of depth with a full 4D(x,y,z,t) frequency conversion code and compared to measured damage density and size distributions. The density of damage is found be predominantly governed by 351-nm light with some lesser, though non-negligible contribution from 526-nm light. The morphology of the damage sites, however, is seen to be relatively insensitive to wavelength and depend only on total fluence of all wavelengths present.

  5. Experimental investigation on dynamic characteristics and strengthening mechanism of laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; He, H; Tong, Y Q; Ren, Y P; Yuan, S Q; Liu, R; Zuo, C Y; Wu, K; Sui, S; Wang, D S

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic features of nanosecond laser-induced cavitation bubbles near the light alloy boundary were investigated with the high-speed photography. The shock-waves and the dynamic characteristics of the cavitation bubbles generated by the laser were detected using the hydrophone. The dynamic features and strengthening mechanism of cavitation bubbles were studied. The strengthening mechanisms of cavitation bubble were discussed when the relative distance parameter γ was within the range of 0.5-2.5. It showed that the strengthening mechanisms caused by liquid jet or shock-waves depended on γ much. The research results provided a new strengthening method based on laser-induced cavitation shotless peening (CSP). PMID:27150764

  6. Solution-based adaptive parallel patterning by laser-induced local plasmonic surface defunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bongchul; Kim, Jongsu; Yang, Minyang

    2012-12-17

    Adaptive mass fabrication method based on laser-induced plasmonic local surface defunctionalization was suggested to realize solution-based high resolution self-patterning on transparent substrate in parallel. After non-patterned functional monolayer was locally deactivated by laser-induced metallic plasma species, various micro/nano metal structures could be simultaneously fabricated by the parallel self-selective deposition of metal nanoparticles on a specific region. This method makes the eco-friendly and cost-effective production of high resolution pattern possible. Moreover, it can respond to design change actively due to the broad controllable range and easy change of key patterning specifications such as a resolution (subwavelength~100 μm), thickness (100 nm~6 μm), type (dot and line), and shape.

  7. Laser-induced shock wave plasma spectrometry using a small chamber designed for in situ analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Hendrik; Jie Lie, Tjung; Kagawa, Kiichiro; On Tjia, May

    2000-07-01

    Direct spectrochemical analyses on large bulk samples such as metal plates have been performed by using a small vacuum chamber, which was attached directly to the sample surface through an o-ring. This technique allowed the in situ generation of laser plasma and hence overcome to a good extent the inconvenient and sometime clumsy sample preparation procedure required in Laser-Induced Shock Wave Plasma Spectrometry. Additionally, the presence of the o-ring near the target surface effectively shielded off the surrounding area from the undesirable continuum emission from the primary plasma, and thereby enhanced the detection sensitivity of this technique. Using zinc plate and Pb glass as samples, it was further demonstrated in this experiment that even the time-integrated spectra, obtained by employing an OMA system, still exhibited a lower background than those obtained by ordinary time-resolved Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

  8. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  9. Fraunhofer-type absorption lines in double-pulse laser-induced plasma.

    PubMed

    Nagli, Lev; Gaft, Michael; Gornushkin, Igor

    2012-03-01

    We studied the confocal double-pulse laser-induced plasma in the very beginning of its life. It was found that the second laser pulse fired 0.7 to 5 µs after the first pulse produces plasma which, during the first 0 to 20 ns, resembles solar configuration. There is a very hot and compact plasma core that radiates a broad continuum spectrum and a much larger and cooler outer shell. The light from the hot core passes through the cold outer shell and is partly absorbed by atoms and ions that are in ground (or close to ground) states. This produces absorption lines that are similar to Fraunhofer lines observed in the sun spectrum. The possibility to use these absorption lines for new direct and calibration free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analytical applications, both in laboratory and industrial conditions, is proved.

  10. Investigation of laser induced breakdown in liquid nitromethane using nanosecond shadowgraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wencan; Zheng, Xianxu; Yu, Guoyang; Zhao, Jun; Zeng, Yangyang; Liu, Cangli

    2016-09-01

    A nanosecond time-resolved shadowgraphy is performed to observe a laser-induced breakdown in nitromethane. The digital delays are introduced between a pump beam and an illumination light to achieve a measuring range from 40 ns to 100 ms, which enable us to study the shock wave propagation, bubble dynamics, and other process of the laser-induced breakdown. Compared with distilled water, there are two obvious differences observed in nitromethane: (1) the production of a non-evaporative gas at the final stage, and (2) an absence of the secondary shock wave after the first collapse of the bubble. We also calculated the bubble energy in nitromethane and distilled water under a different incident energy. The results indicate that the bubble energy in nitromethane is more than twice as large as that in water. It is suggested that chemical reactions contribute to the releasing of energy.

  11. Preliminary Design of Laser - induced Breakd own Spectroscopy for Proto - MPEX

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Guinevere C; Biewer, T.M.; Martin, Madhavi Z; Martin, Rodger Carl

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique for measuring surface matter composition. LIBS is performed by focusing laser radiation onto a target surface, ablating the surface, forming a plasma, and analyzing the light produced. LIBS surface analysis is a possible diagnostic for characterizing plasma-facing materials in ITER. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has enabled the initial installation of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic on the prototype Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), which strives to mimic the conditions found at the surface of the ITER divertor. This paper will discuss the LIBS implementation on Proto-MPEX, preliminary design of the fiber optic LIBS collection probe, and the expected results.

  12. Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer series in laboratory air.

    PubMed

    Swafford, Lauren D; Parigger, Christian G

    2014-01-01

    Stark-broadened emission profiles for the hydrogen alpha and beta Balmer series lines in plasma are measured to characterize electron density and temperature. Plasma is generated using a typical laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) arrangement that employs a focused Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd : YAG) laser, operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The temporal evolution of the hydrogen Balmer series lines is explored using LIBS. Spectra from the plasma are measured following laser-induced optical breakdown in laboratory air. The electron density is primarily inferred from the Stark-broadened experimental data collected at various time delays. Due to the presence of nitrogen and oxygen in air, the hydrogen alpha and beta lines become clearly discernible from background radiation for time delays of 0.4 and 1.4 μs, respectively.

  13. [A multivariate nonlinear model for quantitative analysis in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing-Long; Fu, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jing-Ge; Ni, Zhi-Bo; He, Wen-Gan; Xu, Jun; Rao Rui-zhong; Dong, Rui-Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Most quantitative models used in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are based on the hypothesis that laser-induced plasma approaches the state of local thermal equilibrium (LTE). However, the local equilibrium is possible only at a specific time segment during the evolution. As the populations of each energy level does not follow Boltzmann distribution in non-LTE condition, those quantitative models using single spectral line would be inaccurate. A multivariate nonlinear model, in which the LTE is not required, was proposed in this article to reduce the signal fluctuation and improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis. This multivariate nonlinear model was compared with the internal calibration model which is based on the LTE condition. The content of Mn in steel samples was determined by using the two models, respectively. A minor error and a minor relative standard deviation (RSD) were observed in multivariate nonlinear model. This result demonstrates that multivariate nonlinear model can improve measurement accuracy and repeatability.

  14. On two optomechanical effects of laser-induced electrostriction in dielectric liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Bejtullahu, Rasim; Obayashi, Shigeru

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents electrostriction from the phenomenological perspective, and gives details on two mechanical effects arising from laser-matter interaction. Electrostriction is the tendency of materials to compress in the presence of a varying electric field. In this paper, the investigated materials are polar and nonpolar dielectric liquids. It is stressed that the dominant factor is the time evolution of the laser pulse, which causes tensile stresses and acoustic waves. The study is supported by experimental realization of electrostriction, which can be detected only at favorable conditions (observed in water, but not in castor oil). This study will shed light in developing measurement techniques (e.g., laser-induced grating spectroscopy) and in explaining the onset of cavities and laser-induced liquid breakdown.

  15. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of environmental samples by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorov, N. B.; Popov, A. M.; Zaytsev, S. M.; Labutin, T. A.

    2015-10-01

    The key achievements in the determination of trace amounts of components in environmental samples (soils, ores, natural waters, etc.) by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry are considered. Unique capabilities of this method make it suitable for rapid analysis of metals and alloys, glasses, polymers, objects of cultural heritage, archaeological and various environmental samples. The key advantages of the method that account for its high efficiency are demonstrated, in particular, a small amount of analyzed material, the absence of sample preparation, the possibility of local and remote analysis of either one or several elements. The use of chemometrics in laser-induced breakdown spectrometry for qualitative sample classification is described in detail. Various approaches to improving the figures of merit of quantitative analysis of environmental samples are discussed. The achieved limits of detection for most elements in geochemical samples are critically evaluated. The bibliography includes 302 references.

  16. Note: A novel technique for analysis of aqueous solutions by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rusak, D. A.; Bell, Z. T.; Anthony, T. P.

    2015-11-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates typically consist of gold or silver nanoparticles deposited on a non-conductive substrate. In Raman spectroscopy, the nanoparticles produce an enhancement of the electromagnetic field which, in turn, leads to greater electronic excitation of molecules in the local environment. Here, we show that these same surfaces can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio obtained in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aqueous solutions. In this case, the SERS substrates not only lower breakdown thresholds and lead to more efficient plasma initiation but also provide an appropriately wettable surface for the deposition of the liquid. We refer to this technique as surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  17. Short pulse, high power microwave radiation source with a laser-induced sheet plasma mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated the short pulse, high power microwave radiation source using an ultraviolet laser-induced sheet plasma mirror in a gas-filled x-band rectangular waveguide from the conventional microwave sources and components. A laser-induced sheet plasma with an overdense plasma acts as a plasma mirror. The long pulse propagating in the gas-filled waveguide was sliced by the sheet plasma mirror at two different points along the waveguide. We observed about twice the power of the pulse by adding the two sliced microwave pulses produced by this scheme. A maximum peak power of 200 kW with a pulse duration of 10 ns (full width at half maximum) from the long microwave pulse source with a pulse duration of 0.8 mus was observed.

  18. Influence of external magnetic field on laser-induced gold nanoparticles fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, A. A.; Rakov, I. I.; Simakin, A. V.; Kuzmin, P. G.; Shafeev, G. A.; Mikhailova, G. N.; Antonova, L. Kh.; Troitskii, A. V.; Kuzmin, G. P.

    2016-08-01

    Laser-assisted fragmentation is an efficient method of the nanoparticles size and morphology control. However, its exact mechanisms are still under consideration. One of the remaining problems is the plasma formation, inevitably occurring upon the high intensity laser irradiation. In this Letter, the role of the laser-induced plasma is studied via introduction of high-intensity external magnetic field (up to 7.5 T). Its presence is found to cause the plasma emission to start earlier regarding to a laser pulse, also increasing the plume luminosity. Under these conditions, the acceleration of nanoparticles fragmentation down to a few nanometers is observed. Laser-induced plasma interaction with magnetic field and consequent energy transfer from plasma to nanoparticles are discussed.

  19. Mechanisms of two-color laser-induced field-free molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Spanner, Michael; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul

    2012-09-14

    Two mechanisms of two-color (ω+2ω) laser-induced field-free molecular orientation, based on the hyperpolarizability and ionization depletion, are explored and compared. The CO molecule is used as a computational example. While the hyperpolarizability mechanism generates small amounts of orientation at intensities below the ionization threshold, ionization depletion quickly becomes the dominant mechanism as soon as ionizing intensities are reached. Only the ionization mechanism leads to substantial orientation (e.g., on the order of ≳0.1). For intensities typical of laser-induced molecular alignment and orientation experiments, the two mechanisms lead to robust, characteristic timings of the field-free orientation wave-packet revivals relative to the alignment revivals and the revival time. The revival timings can be used to detect the active orientation mechanism experimentally.

  20. Application of laser-induced autofluorescence spectra detection in human colorectal cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Chia, Teck-Chee; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Diong, Cheong Hoong; Tang, Choong Leong; Choen, Francis S.; Krishnan, S. M.

    2003-10-01

    We investigated 48 normal patients and 25 diseased patients using our laser-induced autofluorescence spectra detection system during their regular colonoscopy. The colon and rectum mucosa autofluorescence were excited by 405 nm continue wavelength laser. We observed that cancer or diseased colorectal mucosa, their autofluorescence spectra are significantly different from normal area. The autofluorescence spectra intensity at about 500 nm was been used for our intensity ratio characteristics intensity for our diagnostic algorithm. The intensity ratios of RI-680/I-500 and RI-630/I-500 were performed to identify the detection area. From experimental result we concluded that both intensity ratios of RI-680/I-500 and RI-630/I-500 as guidelines can detect cancerous and polyps disease completely. Our investigation provided some useful insight for laser induced autofluorescence spectra as a diagnosis technique for clinical application.

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy system for remote measurement of salt in a narrow gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Shuzo; Fujii, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    We performed remotely measured, with a 5-m optical path, the chlorine concentration of a sea salt attached to stainless steel (SS) located at the side wall of a narrow gap (width ~ 50 mm) by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in two configurations. One uses mirrors for transmitting laser pulses in air, while the other uses multimode fiber. A compact optical device was developed to access the surface of SS for focusing laser pulses and collecting laser-induced plasma. With the configuration in which laser pulses pass through the fiber, the chlorine spectrum could be detected by fiber-coupled LIBS. In addition, with the configuration in which laser pulses pass through air, chlorine concentrations from 0 to 100 mg/m2 could be evaluated quantitatively by using the calibration data of chlorine emission intensity. These results show that the proposed system enables the measurement of chlorine at the surface of SS remotely, instantly, and quantitatively.

  2. Effect of laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin on biomedical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimov, Mustafo M.; Asimov, Rustam M.; Mirshahi, M.; Gisbrecht, Alexander

    2001-04-01

    In the present report we draw attention to the phenomenon of laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin in cutaneous blood vessels as an important factor in biostimulating and therapeutic action of low energy laser radiation. Calculations of absorption efficiency of laser radiation both by oxyhemoglobin and carbon monoxide hemoglobin were carried out by a computer simulation using Kubelka-Munk model of tissue. It has been shown that the absorption of the oxyhemoglobin in the visible region corresponding to the Q-band of absorption spectra possesses a relatively high selectivity. The obtained results are discussed in terms of developing new methods for wound healing, as well as for carbon monoacid poisoning. Some aspects of the laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin complexes are discussed in view of its practical use for developing new diagnostic methods. An attractive way to use this phenomenon is monitoring of local concentrations of oxygen by laser light irradiation.

  3. Absolute tracer dye concentration using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The use of simultaneous airborne-laser-induced dye fluorescence and water Raman backscatter to measure the absolute concentration of an ocean-dispersed tracer dye is discussed. Theoretical considerations of the calculation of dye concentration by the numerical comparison of airborne laser-induced fluorescence spectra with laboratory spectra for known dye concentrations using the 3400/cm OH-stretch water Raman scatter as a calibration signal are presented which show that minimum errors are obtained and no data concerning water mass transmission properties are required when the laser wavelength is chosen to yield a Raman signal near the dye emission band. Results of field experiments conducted with an airborne conical scan lidar over a site in New York Bight into which rhodamine dye had been injected in a study of oil spill dispersion are then indicated which resulted in a contour map of dye concentrations, with a minimum detectable dye concentration of approximately 2 ppb by weight.

  4. Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence on an oscillatory xenon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-11-15

    A novel approach to time-synchronizing laser-induced fluorescence measurements to an oscillating current in a 60 Hz xenon discharge lamp using a continuous wave laser is presented. A sample-hold circuit is implemented to separate out signals at different phases along a current cycle, and is followed by a lock-in amplifier to pull out the resulting time-synchronized fluorescence trace from the large background signal. The time evolution of lower state population is derived from the changes in intensity of the fluorescence excitation line shape resulting from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 6s{sup Prime }[1/2]{sub 1}{sup 0}-6p{sup Prime }[3/2]{sub 2} xenon atomic transition at {lambda}= 834.68 nm. Results show that the lower state population oscillates at twice the frequency of the discharge current, 120 Hz.

  5. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-05-26

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency reflection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multilayer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.

  6. Crystallo-optic diagnostics method of the soft laser-induced effects in biological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skopinov, S. A.; Yakovleva, S. V.

    1991-05-01

    Presently, it is well known that individual cells"2 and higher organisms3'4 exhibit a marked response to soft laser irradiation in certain parts of the visible and near infrared spectral ranges. Broad clinical applications of laser therapy and slow progress in understanding of the physical, chemical and biological mechanisms of this phenomenon make the task to search new methods of objectivisation of laser-induces bioeffects very insistent. In this paper we give a short review of the methods of structural-optical diagnostics of the soft laser-induced effects in biofluids (blood and its fractions, saliva, juices, mucuses, exudations, etc.) and suggest their applications in experimental and clinical studies of the soft laser bioeffects.

  7. Investigations for the correction of presbyopia by fs-laser-induced cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripken, Tammo; Oberheide, Uwe; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Gerten, Georg; Lubatschowski, Holger

    2004-07-01

    The most probable reason for presbyopia is an age-related loss of the elasticity of the lens. It develops through the whole life, but is first noticeable typically at the age of about 45. From that on it leads within 15 years to a total loss of the accommodation ability. However, both, the ciliary muscle and the lens capsule stay active and elastic, respectively. With respect to this, a possible treatment conception is to increase or regain the elasticity. The possibility to increase elasticity with ps-laser induced cuts inside the lens was already shown by Krueger. We made an improvement in cutting quality while using a fs laser with 5~kHz repetition rate emitting in the near infrared. Different fs-laser-induced μm smooth cuts inside fresh enucleated ex-vivo pig lenses will be presented.

  8. Inkjet Printing of Viscous Monodisperse Microdroplets by Laser-Induced Flow Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrot, Paul; Modestino, Miguel A.; Gallaire, François; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The on-demand generation of viscous microdroplets to print functional or biological materials remains challenging using conventional inkjet-printing methods, mainly due to aggregation and clogging issues. In an effort to overcome these limitations, we implement a jetting method to print viscous microdroplets by laser-induced shockwaves. We experimentally investigate the dependence of the jetting regimes and the droplet size on the laser-pulse energy and on the inks' physical properties. The range of printable liquids with our device is significantly extended compared to conventional inkjet printers's performances. In addition, the laser-induced flow-focusing phenomenon allows us to controllably generate viscous microdroplets up to 210 mPa s with a diameter smaller than the nozzle from which they originated (200 μ m ). Inks containing proteins are printed without altering their functional properties, thus demonstrating that this jetting technique is potentially suitable for bioprinting.

  9. Laser-induced deposition of nanostructured copper microwires on surfaces of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumkin, Ilia I.; Panov, Maxim S.; Shishkova, Ekaterina V.; Bal'makov, Michail D.

    2015-05-01

    Microelectronics industry is growing fast and the rate of new devices' development increases every year. Therefore, methods for simple and high-precision metal coating on dielectrics are needed. Existing methods do not allow performing the high-precision metal deposition without using photomasks, while making photomask for each prototype is long and expensive process. One of the methods of maskless metal deposition is laser-induced chemical liquid-phase deposition (LCLD). In this work we show the effect of substrate surface type on a result of LCLD. Deposited copper structures were characterized by SEM, EDX and impedance spectroscopy. The results show that laser-induced copper deposition is highly affected by the surface being homogeneous or composite material. It was found that the deposits with low resistivity and high quality metal localization mostly appear on the two-phase surfaces. In contrast, deposits on one-phase surfaces exhibited poor topology of copper material.

  10. Hyperspectral laser-induced flourescence imaging for assessing internal quality of kiwi fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Muhua; Liao, Yifeng; Zhou, Xiaomei

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on non-destructive methods for predicting quality of kiwifruits using fluorescence imaging. The method is based on hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging in the region between 700 and 1110 nm, and estimates the kiwifruits quality in terms of internal sugar content and firmness. A station for acquiring hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging has been designed and carefully choosing each component. The fluorescence imaging acquired by the station has been pre-processed by selecting regions of interest (ROIs) of 50 100 × pixels. A line regressing prediction method estimates the quality of kiwifruit samples. The results obtained in classification show that the station and prediction model enables the correct discrimination of kiwifruits internal sugar content and firmness with a percentage of r= 98.5%, SEP=0.4 and r=99.9%, SEP=0.62.

  11. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  12. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  13. Combustion and operating characteristics of spark-ignition engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Keck, J. C.; Beretta, G. P.; Watts, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The spark-ignition engine turbulent flame propagation process was investigated. Then, using a spark-ignition engine cycle simulation and combustion model, the impact of turbocharging and heat transfer variations or engine power, efficiency, and NO sub x emissions was examined.

  14. Dual Spark Plugs For Stratified-Charge Rotary Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, John; Bracco, Frediano V.

    1996-01-01

    Fuel efficiency of stratified-charge, rotary, internal-combustion engine increased by improved design featuring dual spark plugs. Second spark plug ignites fuel on upstream side of main fuel injector; enabling faster burning and more nearly complete utilization of fuel.

  15. Properties and preparation of ceramic insulators for spark plugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsbee, F B; Honaman, R K; Fonseca, E L; Bleininger, A V; Staley, H F

    1920-01-01

    Report describes in detail the preliminary experiments which were made on the conductivity of spark-plug insulators in order to develop a satisfactory comparative method for testing various spark-plug materials. Materials tested were cements, porcelain, feldspar, and quartz.

  16. Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence and Raman imaging inside a hydrogen engine.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sascha Ronald; Koch, Peter; Braeuer, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-12-10

    We report on the simultaneous and two-dimensional measurement of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman scattering (Ramanography) applied inside a hydrogen internal combustion (IC) engine. Two different LIF tracer molecules, triethylamine (TEA) and trimethylamine (TMA), were used for the LIF experiments. The LIF and Raman results were found to be in very good agreement. The simultaneous application of Ramanography and LIF imaging indicated that TMA is the more suitable LIF tracer molecule, compared to TEA. PMID:20011004

  17. [Laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy--in vitro trial and animal experiment studies].

    PubMed

    Wenk, H; Benecke, W; Thomas, S; Barreton, G; Lange, V; Möller, K O; Schildberg, F W

    1988-01-01

    Laser induced shock wave lithotripsy is a new procedure to destroy gallstones. Stones of up to 500 mg are destroyed within 5 min. Severe reactions of the soft tissue cannot be observed in animal studies. No perforations, stenoses or thermic lesions after wound healing were observed. The development of an optomechanical transducer replacing the optical lens system at the end of the transmission guide allows its handling in flexible endoscopes. Clinical use is therefore possible from the technical aspect.

  18. Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of high-enthalpy free jet flow with nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Jennifer L.; Mcmillin, Brian K.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of property fields in a high-enthalpy, supersonic, underexpanded free jet generated in a reflection-type shock tunnel are reported. PLIF images showing velocity and temperature sensitivity are presented. The inferred radial velocity and relative rotational temperature fields are found to be in agreement with those predicted by a numerical simulation of the flowfield using the method of characteristics.

  19. Time-resolved digital holographic microscopy of laser-induced forward transfer process

    PubMed Central

    Ma, H.; Venugopalan, V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a method for time-resolved digital holographic microscopy to obtain time-resolved 3-D deformation measurements of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) processes. We demonstrate nanometer axial resolution and nanosecond temporal resolution of our method which is suitable for measuring dynamic morphological changes in LIFT target materials. Such measurements provide insight into the early dynamics of the LIFT process and a means to examine the effect of laser and material parameters on LIFT process dynamics. PMID:24748724

  20. Toward 3D Printing of Pure Metals by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Pohl, Ralph; Sun, Chao; Römer, Gert-Willem; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-07-15

    3D printing of common metals is highly challenging because metals are generally solid at room conditions. Copper and gold pillars are manufactured with a resolution below 5 μm and a height up to 2 mm, using laser-induced forward transfer to create and eject liquid metal droplets. The solidified drop's shape is crucial for 3D printing and is discussed as a function of the laser energy. PMID:26045211

  1. Laser-induced explosion of H2O droplets: spatially resolved spectra.

    PubMed

    Eickmans, J H; Hsieh, W F; Chang, R K

    1987-01-01

    Photographs and spatially resolved spectra were obtained with radiation generated by an exploding water droplet. The emission within the droplet consists of stimulated Raman scattering and a continuum associated with the created plasma. The forward plume (outside the shadow face) contains plasma and atomic hydrogen ejected from the droplet. The backward plume (behind the illuminated face) contains plasma, H, and ionized O and N, resulting from ionized air. Mechanisms for laser-induced explosion of large transparent water droplets are briefly discussed.

  2. Toward 3D Printing of Pure Metals by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Pohl, Ralph; Sun, Chao; Römer, Gert-Willem; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-07-15

    3D printing of common metals is highly challenging because metals are generally solid at room conditions. Copper and gold pillars are manufactured with a resolution below 5 μm and a height up to 2 mm, using laser-induced forward transfer to create and eject liquid metal droplets. The solidified drop's shape is crucial for 3D printing and is discussed as a function of the laser energy.

  3. Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence and Raman imaging inside a hydrogen engine.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sascha Ronald; Koch, Peter; Braeuer, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-12-10

    We report on the simultaneous and two-dimensional measurement of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman scattering (Ramanography) applied inside a hydrogen internal combustion (IC) engine. Two different LIF tracer molecules, triethylamine (TEA) and trimethylamine (TMA), were used for the LIF experiments. The LIF and Raman results were found to be in very good agreement. The simultaneous application of Ramanography and LIF imaging indicated that TMA is the more suitable LIF tracer molecule, compared to TEA.

  4. Analysis of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of in vitro plant tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Ana Celia; Gutiérrez-Pulido, Humberto; Rodríguez-Domínguez, José Manuel; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín; Cervantes-Martínez, Jesús

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for monitoring the development and stress detection of in vitro tissue cultures in a nondestructive and noninvasive way. The changes in LIF spectra caused by the induction of organogenesis, the increase of the F690/F740 ratio as a result of the stress originated in the organogenic explants due to shoot emergence, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and shoot development were detected by LIF through closed containers of Saintpaulia ionantha.

  5. Correlation among the laser-induced breakdown thresholds in solids, liquids, and gases.

    PubMed

    Bettis, J R

    1992-06-20

    A simple expression is developed that permits a correlation among laser-induced breakdown thresholds in solids, liquids, and gases. It is shown that the breakdown thresholds for the bulk of solid dielectrics, linear liquids, and gases all follow a linear fit to the expression N(2/3)/(n(2) - 1), where N is the atomic number density and n is the refractive index. The gas breakdown threshold versus pressure is compared with the predicted dependence. PMID:20725310

  6. Single cell transfection by laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped gold nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Ploschner, Martin; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-03-01

    Cell selective introduction of therapeutic agents remains a challenging problem. Cavitation-based therapies including ultrasound-induced sonoporation and laser-induced optoporation have led the way for novel approaches to provide the potential of sterility and cell selectivity compared with viral or biochemical counterparts. Acoustic streaming, shockwaves and liquid microjets associated with the cavitation dynamics are implicated in gene and drug delivery. These approaches, however, often lead to non-uniform and sporadic molecular uptake that lacks refined spatial control and suffers from a significant loss of cell viability. Here we demonstrate spatially controlled cavitation instigated by laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped single gold nanoparticle. Our unique approach employs optical tweezers to trap a single nanoparticle, which when irradiated by a nanosecond laser pulse is subject to laser-induced breakdown followed by cavitation. Using this method for laser-induced cavitation, we can gain additional degrees of freedom for the cavitation process - the particle material, its size, and its position relative to cells or tissues. We show the energy breakdown threshold of gold nanoparticles of l00nm with a single nanosecond laser pulse at 532 nm is three orders of magnitude lower than that for water, which leads to gentle nanocavitation enabling single cell transfection. We optimize the shear stress to the cells from the expanding bubble to be in the range of 1-10 kPa for transfection by precisely positioning a trapped gold nanoparticle, and thus nanobubble, relative to a cell of interest. The method shows transfection of plasmid-DNA into individual mammalian cells with an efficiency of 75%.

  7. New energy levels of atomic niobium by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, I. K.; Başar, Gö; Er, A.; Güzelçimen, F.; Başar, Gü; Kröger, S.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy was applied in order to find new energy levels of the niobium atom. A continuous wave tuneable titanium-sapphire laser in the wavelength range from 750 to 865 nm and a hollow-cathode lamp were used. We discovered four energy levels of even parity, three lying levels below 19 000 cm-1 and one at much higher energy. Additionally hyperfine structure data of six levels of odd parity were determined.

  8. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Analysis of Protein-Based Binding Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Cather, S.; Anglos, D.; Fotakis, Costas

    Laser-induced fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores of organic media found in paintings (casein, animal glue and egg proteins) provides a means of characterising general classes of media depending on the amino acid composition and presence of degradation cross-linkages. Wavelength dependence of spectra is investigated for non-destructive and non-invasive analyses of thin films of protein-based binding media.

  9. Laser induced thermal therapy (LITT) for pediatric brain tumors: case-based review

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Integration of Laser induced thermal therapy (LITT) to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have created new options for treating surgically challenging tumors in locations that would otherwise have represented an intrinsic comorbidity by the approach itself. As new applications and variations of the use are discussed, we present a case-based review of the history, development, and subsequent updates of minimally invasive MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT) ablation in pediatric brain tumors. PMID:26835340

  10. Laser-induced two-photon blackbody radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zych, L. J.; Young, J. F.; Harris, S. E.; Lukasik, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental measurements of a new type of vacuum-ultraviolet radiation source are reported. It is shown that the maximum source brightness, within its narrow linewidth, is that of a blackbody at the temperature of a metastable storage level. The laser-induced emission at 569 A from a He glow discharge corresponded to a metastable temperature of 22,700 K and was over 100 times brighter than the 584-A He resonance line.

  11. Laser induced plasma on copper target, a non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Oumeziane, Amina Ait Liani, Bachir; Parisse, Jean-Denis

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive numerical model for the UV laser ablation of metal targets, it focuses mainly on the prediction of laser induced plasma thresholds, the effect of the laser-plasma interaction, and the importance of the electronic non-equilibrium in the laser induced plume and its expansion in the background gas. This paper describes a set of numerical models for laser-matter interaction between 193-248 and 355 nm lasers and a copper target. Along with the thermal effects inside the material resulting from the irradiation of the latter with the pulsed laser, the laser-evaporated matter interaction and the plasma formation are thoroughly modelled. In the laser induced plume, the electronic nonequilibrium and the laser beam absorption have been investigated. Our calculations of the plasmas ignition thresholds on copper targets have been validated and compared to experimental as well as theoretical results. Comparison with experiment data indicates that our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, the inclusion of electronic non-equilibrium in our work indicated that this important process must be included in models of laser ablation and plasma plume formation.

  12. Influence of organic contamination on laser induced damage of multilayer dielectric mirrors by subpicosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favrat, O.; Sozet, M.; Tovena-Pécault, I.; Lamaignère, L.; Néauport, J.

    2014-10-01

    Laser induced damage of optical components is often a limiting factor for the development of high power lasers. Indeed, for many years, organic contamination is identified as a factor decreasing the laser induced damage threshold of optical surfaces, limiting the use of high fluencies. Also, for the development of its laser facilities, Laser MégaJoule and PETawatt Aquitaine Laser, the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives investigates the influence of organic contamination on the performances of the optical components. Actually, although great care is provided on the cleanliness of the optics, organic volatile compounds outgassed from surrounding materials can be adsorbed by the sensitive surfaces during its timelife. Thus, for this study, performances of clean and contaminated multilayer dielectric mirrors are compared. Contamination is intentionally realized either by controlled protocols or by exposing optics inside the laser facilities. Qualification and quantification of the organic contamination is realized by automated thermal desorption and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Laser induced damage threshold of clean and contaminated mirrors are then investigated by 1053 nm laser at 670 fs.

  13. Stoichiometric changes to KH2PO4 during laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Kucheyev, S O; DeMange, P; Carr, C W; Demos, S G

    2004-11-15

    The local structure of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} crystals (so-called KDP) at laser-induced damage sites created by irradiation with {approx} 3-ns, 355-nm laser pulses is studied by a combination of Raman scattering and photoluminescence spectroscopies. We compare spectra from pristine material, surface and bulk laser-induced damage sites, as well as from KPO{sub 3} references. Results show that irradiation with uences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold leads to stoichiometric changes at surface damage sites but not at bulk damage sites. New spectroscopic features are attributed to dehydration products. For the laser irradiation conditions used in this study, the decomposed near-surface layer absorbs photons at {approx} 3.4 eV (364 nm). These results may help explain the recently reported observation that surface laser damage sites in KDP crystals tend to grow with subsequent exposure to high-power laser pulses, while bulk damage sites do not.

  14. Stoichiometric changes in KH2PO4 crystals during laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Kucheyev, S O; DeMange, P; Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Nelson, A J; Demos, S G

    2004-08-31

    The structure of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} single crystals (so-called KDP) irradiated with {approx} 3-ns, 355-nm laser pulses with fluences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold is studied by a combination of Raman scattering, photoluminescence, and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies. We compare spectra from the as-grown material, surface and bulk laser-induced damage sites, as well as from KPO{sub 3} references. Results show that irradiation with fluences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold leads to stoichiometric changes at surface damage sites but not at bulk damage sites. New spectroscopic features are attributed to dehydration products. For the laser irradiation conditions used in this study, the decomposed near-surface layer absorbs photons at {approx} 3.4 eV (364 nm). These results may explain the recently reported fact that surface laser damage sites in KDP crystals tend to grow with subsequent exposure to high-power laser pulses, while bulk damage sites do not.

  15. In-depth analysis of ITER-like samples composition using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercadier, L.; Semerok, A.; Kizub, P. A.; Leontyev, A. V.; Hermann, J.; Grisolia, C.; Thro, P.-Y.

    2011-07-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic in-depth measurements were undertaken for two ITER-like calibrated multi-layered samples made of W-Mo or W/C layers on Ti-substrates. The samples were previously characterized by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. For laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic measurements, pulses generated by Nd:YAG laser sources with 1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm and 266 nm wavelengths were applied. The effects of laser beam shaping, fluence and wavelength as well as the gas nature (air, Ar, He) and pressure were investigated. The results obtained with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic in-depth measurements were compared to those obtained with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and found to be in agreement. However, a mixing of the layers was observed and attributed to diffusion through the melted material and to the non-homogeneity of the laser beam spatial distribution. The depth resolution was found of the order of several thermal diffusion lengths but should be improved by using picosecond laser pulse duration. The results promote applications to tritium concentration measurements with depth resolution in the deposited layers of Tokamak first walls, as in the case of the future fusion reactor ITER.

  16. Variational study of the constituents of cholesterol stones by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek K; Rai, Vinita; Rai, A K

    2009-01-01

    The major and minor constituents of cholesterol gallstones were investigated by Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The elements detected in the center and in the shell part were calcium (Ca), carbon (C), copper (Cu), hydrogen (H), magnesium (Mg), nitrogen (N), sodium (Na), oxygen (O) and potassium (K), but Cu was absent from the surface of the cholesterol gallstones. Our experimental results revealed that calcium was a major constituent of cholesterol gallstones. Our results also showed that the concentration of Ca, Cu and Mg were large in the center in comparison with the shell. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) spectra of both portions of the surface (colored part and discolored part) of the cholesterol gallstones were recorded. The concentrations of sodium and potassium were higher in the non-pigmented (colored) part than in the pigmented part (discolored/pigment), which showed that the deficiency of sodium and potassium was playing a key role in the formation of discoloration at the different locations on the outer surfaces of the cholesterol gallstones. Thus, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a suitable technique for the analysis of cholesterol gallstones without any sample preparation.

  17. Microwave interferometry of laser induced air plasmas formed by short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, P.W.

    1993-08-01

    Applications for the interaction of laser induced plasmas with electromagnetic probes requires time varying complex conductivity data for specific laser/electromagnetic probe geometries. Applications for this data include plasma switching (Q switching) and the study of ionization fronts. The plasmas were created in laboratory air by 100 ps laser pulses at a wavelength of 1 {mu}m. A long focal length lens focused the laser pulse into WR90 (X band) rectangular waveguide. Two different laser beam/electromagnetic probe geometries were investigated. For the longitudinal geometry, the laser pulse and the microwave counterpropagated inside the waveguide. For the transverse geometry, the laser created a plasma ``post`` inside the waveguide. The effects of the laser beam deliberately hitting the waveguide were also investigated. Each geometry exhibits its own characteristics. This research project focused on the longitudinal geometry. Since the laser beam intensity varies inside the waveguide, the charge distribution inside the waveguide also varies. A 10 GHz CW microwave probe traveled through the laser induced plasma. From the magnitude and phase of the microwave probe, a spatially integrated complex conductivity was calculated. No measurements of the temporal or spatial variation of the laser induced plasma were made. For the ``plasma post,`` the electron density is more uniform.

  18. Fast vacuum slag analysis in a steel works by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, V.; Schmitz, H.-U.; Reuter, T.; Fleige, R.; Noll, R.

    2008-10-01

    Samples taken from the liquid slag layer in a vacuum degasser station of a steel works are analyzed after solidification by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) without any further sample preparation. The mass fractions of the major components of the vacuum slags are in the range of 50-60% for CaO, 0.5-12% for SiO 2 and 20-40% for Al 2O 3. The species are distributed heterogeneously in the solid samples having diameters of 35 mm. Furthermore the color and structure of the samples is varying significantly. A fast spatial averaging of representative sample areas is realized by spatial laser beam shaping. Multivariate calibration and its validation is carried out with calibration and validation sets of production samples which are analyzed by X-ray fluorescence measurements or as borate beads for reference. The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument is installed in the steel works at a distance of about 10 m from the vacuum degasser. The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis runs automatically after the sample placement and it takes 80 s including data transfer to the host computer of the steel works. Operational tests are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of a fast slag analysis in the harsh environment of the vacuum degasser plant.

  19. Enhanced efficiency of laser shock cleaning process by geometrical confinement of laser-induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Deoksuk; Oh, Joon Ho; Kim, Dongsik; Lee, Jong-Myoung

    2009-07-01

    Surface cleaning based on the laser-induced breakdown of gas and subsequent plasma and shock wave generation can remove small particles from solid surfaces. Accordingly, several studies were performed to expand the cleaning capability of the process. In this work, the cleaning process using laser-induced plasma (LIP) under geometrical confinement is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Two-dimensional numerical analysis is conducted to examine the behavior of the LIP shock wave under geometrical confinement for several geometries. As a result of the analysis, we propose a simple and practical method to amplify the intensity of laser-induced shock. In the proposed method, a flat quartz plate placed close to the focal point of the laser pulse confines the expansion of the LIP, allowing the plasma to expand only in one direction. As a consequence of the plasma confinement, the intensity of the shock wave produced is increased significantly. Experiments demonstrate that the enhanced shock wave can remove smaller particles from the surface better than the existing process.

  20. Time-resolved characterization of laser-induced plasma from fresh potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wenqi; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Boueri, Myriam; Ma, Qianli; Zhang, Dacheng; Zheng, Lijuan; Zeng, Heping; Yu, Jin

    2009-09-01

    Optical emission of laser-induced plasma on the surface of fresh vegetables provides sensitive analysis of trace elements for in situ or online detection of these materials. This emergent technique promises applications with expected outcomes in food security or nutrition quality, as well as environment pollution detection. Characterization of the plasma induced on such soft and humid materials represents the first step towards quantitative measurement using this technique. In this paper, we present the experimental setup and protocol that optimize the plasma generation on fresh vegetables, potatoes for instance. The temporal evolution of the plasma properties are investigated using time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In particular, the electron density and the temperatures of the plasma are reported as functions of its decay time. The temperatures are evaluated from the well known Boltzmann and Saha-Boltzmann plot methods. These temperatures are further compared to that of the typical molecular species, CN, for laser-induced plasma from plant materials. This comparison validates the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in the specific case of fresh vegetables ablated in the typical LIBS conditions. A study of the temporal evolution of the signal to noise ratio also provides practical indications for an optimized detection of trace elements. We demonstrate finally that, under certain conditions, the calibration-free LIBS procedure can be applied to determine the concentrations of trace elements in fresh vegetables.

  1. Plasma diagnostics from self-absorbed doublet lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, C. A.; Garcimuño, M.; Díaz Pace, D. M.; Bertuccelli, G.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a generalized approach is developed and applied for plasma characterization and quantitative purposes in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) experiences by employing a selected pair of spectral lines belonging to the same multiplet. It is based on the comparison between experimental ratios of line parameters and the theoretical calculus obtained under the framework of a homogeneous plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The applicability of the method was illustrated by using the atomic resonance transitions 279.55-280.27 nm of Mg II, which are usually detected in laser-induced plasma (LIP) during laser ablation of many kinds of targets. The laser induced plasmas were produced using a Nd:YAG laser from a pressed pellet of powdered calcium hydroxide with a concentration of 300 ppm of Mg. The experimental ratios for peak intensities, total intensities and Stark widths were obtained for different time windows and matched to the theoretical calculus. The temperature and the electron density of the plasma, as well as the Mg columnar density (the atom/ion concentration times the length of the plasma along the line-of-sight), were determined. The results were interpreted under the employed approach.

  2. Addressing the Numerical Challenges Associated With Laser-Induced Melt Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Brian; Nourgaliev, Robert; Delplanque, Jean Pierre; Anderson, Andy

    2015-11-01

    We present a new robust and efficient numerical framework for simulating multi-material flows with phase change. The work is motivated by laser-induced phase change applications, particularly the selective laser melting (SLM) process in additive manufacturing. Physics-based simulations of the laser melt dynamics requires a fully compressible framework, since incompressible flow solvers are inefficient for stiff systems, arising from laser-induced rapid phase change. In this study, the liquid and solid phases are both modeled with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solid phase has an additional combined variable viscosity and drag force model to suppress the velocity in the solid. Our all-speed Navier-Stokes solver is based on a fully-implicit, high-order reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin method. A Newton-Krylov based framework is used to solve the resulting set of non-linear equations, enabling robust simulations of the highly stiff compressible Navier-Stokes equations. We demonstrate the method's capabilities for phase change on several different melting and freezing configurations, including a three-dimensional laser-induced melt convection problem. Future model enhancements will incorporate material evaporation and rapid solidification.

  3. Application Prospects and Microstructural Features in Laser-Induced Rapidly Solidified High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Pan, Ye; He, Yi-Zhu; Wu, Ji-Li; Yue, T. M.; Guo, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Recently, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) have attracted much interest in the materials community, as they offer massive opportunities to observe new phenomena, explore new structure, and develop new materials. Particularly, it is attractive to prepare high-performance HEA coatings by laser-induced rapid solidification, which can be formed on the surface of components and parts in a variety of sizes and shapes with a lower cost in comparison with those bulk material fabrication methods. From the technical point of view, laser-induced rapid solidification could hamper the compositional segregation, improve the solubility in solid-solution phases, and lead to the strengthening effect by the grain refinement. This article reviews the recent work on the typical microstructural features and the mechanical and chemical properties in laser-induced rapidly solidified HEAs, and these data are compared with conventional Co- and Ni-based alloy coatings. The article concludes with suggestions for future research and development in HEAs, from considerations of their characteristic properties.

  4. PIC-DSMC analysis on interaction of a laser induced discharge and shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Kohei

    2015-09-01

    Laser induced discharge and the shock wave have attracted great interest for use in the electrical engineering. When the high intensity laser (10 GW >) is focused in the atmosphere, the breakdown occurs and the discharge wave propagates toward to the laser irradiation. The shock wave is generated around the discharge wave, which is called as the laser supported detonation wave. After breakdown occurred, the initial electron of the avalanche ionization is produced by the photoionization due to the plasma radiation. It is well recognized that the radiation of the laser plasma affects the propagation mechanism of the laser induced discharge wave after the initiation of the breakdown. However, it is difficult to observe the interaction between the plasma radiation and the electron avalanche in the ionization-wave front in experimentally except in the high intensity laser. In the numerical calculation of the laser-induced discharge, the fluid dynamics based on the Navier-Stokes equation have been widely used. However, it is difficult to investigate the avalanche ionization at the wave front using the fluid dynamics simulation. To investigate the interaction of the ionization-wave front and the shock wave, it is appropriate to utilize the PIC-DSMC method. The present study showed the propagation of the ionization front of the discharge wave and the shock wave using the particle simulation. This work was supported by Kato Foundation for Promotion of Science and Japan Power Academy.

  5. DETERMINATION OF ALIPHATIC AMINES IN WATER USING DERIVATIZATION WITH FLUORESCEIN ISOTHIOCYANATE AND CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection-oriented derivatization of aliphatic amines and amine functional groups in coumpounds of environmental interest was studied using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) with separation/determination by capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence. Determinative level...

  6. KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption in silica glasses produced by melting synthetic silica powder

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuu, Nobu; Sasaki, Toshiya; Kojima, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Jun-ichiro; Nakamura, Takayuki; Horikoshi, Hideharu

    2013-07-07

    KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption of silica glasses produced by electric melting and flame fusion of synthetic silica powder were investigated. The growth of KrF-laser-induced absorption was more gradual than that of ArF-laser-induced absorption. Induced absorption spectra exhibited a peak at about 5.8 eV, of which the position and width differed slightly among samples and laser species. Widths of ArF-laser-induced absorption spectra were wider than those of KrF-laser-induced spectra. KrF-laser-induced absorption is reproducible by two Gaussian absorption bands peaking at 5.80 eV with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.62 eV and at 6.50 eV with FWHM of 0.74 eV. For reproduction of ArF-laser-induced absorption, Gaussian bands at 5.41 eV with FWHM of 0.62 eV was necessary in addition to components used for reproducing KrF-laser-induced absorption. Based on the discussion of the change of defect structures evaluated from change of absorption components, we proposed that the precursor of the 5.8-eV band ascribed to E Prime center ({identical_to}Si{center_dot}) is {identical_to}Si-H HO-Si{identical_to} structures formed by the reaction between strained Si-O-Si bonds and interstitial H{sub 2} molecules during the irradiation.

  7. Unraveling the Image of Commutation Spark Generated in Universal Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanazawa, Tamio; Almazroui, Ali; Egashira, Torao

    A universal motor, which is mainly used in vacuum cleaners, generates commutation sparks at the moment when the brush and the commutator segment are separated from each other during rotation. This study investigates the mechanism of commutation spark generation by analyzing high-speed camera images and its electrical aspect. We invented a new external trigger method that used laser light as the trigger signal for the shuttering a high-speed camera. This method enabled us to photograph sparks on any desired commutator segments during high-speed rotation, and that made the analysis after photographing easier. This paper shows that commutation sparks in universal motors are generated on every other commutator segment and at the peak of pulses in the voltage between the brush and commutator segment. Other aspects are also clarified, such as the generation of the singular and plural number of sparks on one commutator segment at a time, the time from the moment of spark generation to extinction, and spark generation during a single rotation.

  8. Simultaneous visualization of water and hydrogen peroxide vapor using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence and photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Olof; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    A concept based on a combination of photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) and two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is for the first time demonstrated for simultaneous detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and water (H2O) vapor. Water detection is based on two-photon excitation by an injection-locked krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser (248.28 nm), which induces broadband fluorescence (400-500 nm) from water. The same laser simultaneously photodissociates H2O2, whereupon the generated OH fragments are probed by LIF after a time delay of typically 50 ns, by a frequency-doubled dye laser (281.91 nm). Experiments in six different H2O2/H2O mixtures of known compositions show that both signals are linearly dependent on respective species concentration. For the H2O2 detection there is a minor interfering signal contribution from OH fragments created by two-photon photodissociation of H2O. Since the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O2 is found to be at least ∼24,000 times higher than the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O at room temperature, this interference is negligible for most H2O/H2O2 mixtures of practical interest. Simultaneous single-shot imaging of both species was demonstrated in a slightly turbulent flow. For single-shot imaging the minimum detectable H2O2 and H2O concentration is 10 ppm and 0.5%, respectively. The proposed measurement concept could be a valuable asset in several areas, for example, in atmospheric and combustion science and research on vapor-phase H2O2 sterilization in the pharmaceutical and aseptic food-packaging industries. PMID:25358016

  9. Spark and Deligne-Beilinson cohomology on orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Cheng-Yong; Zhao, Xiaojuan

    2016-06-01

    A homological spark complex (FU∗, EU∗, IU∗) is constructed for any good atlas U of an effective orbifold X =(X , [ U ]) . It is proved that all these homological spark complexes are quasi-isomorphic for X. Furthermore, smooth Deligne-Beilinson cohomology HDp (X , Z(q)) of X is investigated and it is shown that the ring Hˆ∗(X) of spark classes of X is isomorphic to the subring HD∗ (X , Z(∗)) of the orbifold Deligne-Beilinson cohomology ring of X.

  10. Extending lean operating limit and reducing emissions of methane spark-ignited engines using a microwave-assisted spark plug

    DOE PAGES

    Rapp, Vi H.; DeFilippo, Anthony; Saxena, Samveg; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Dibble, Robert W.; Nishiyama, Atsushi; Moon, Ahsa; Ikeda, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Amore » microwave-assisted spark plug was used to extend the lean operating limit (lean limit) and reduce emissions of an engine burning methane-air. In-cylinder pressure data were collected at normalized air-fuel ratios of λ = 1.46, λ = 1.51, λ = 1.57, λ = 1.68, and λ = 1.75. For each λ, microwave energy (power supplied to the magnetron per engine cycle) was varied from 0 mJ (spark discharge alone) to 1600 mJ. At lean conditions, the results showed adding microwave energy to a standard spark plug discharge increased the number of complete combustion cycles, improving engine stability as compared to spark-only operation. Addition of microwave energy also increased the indicated thermal efficiency by 4% at λ = 1.68. At λ = 1.75, the spark discharge alone was unable to consistently ignite the air-fuel mixture, resulting in frequent misfires. Although microwave energy produced more consistent ignition than spark discharge alone at λ = 1.75, 59% of the cycles only partially burned. Overall, the microwave-assisted spark plug increased engine performance under lean operating conditions (λ = 1.68) but did not affect operation at conditions closer to stoichiometric.« less

  11. Influence of exothermic chemical reactions on laser-induced shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2014-10-21

    Differences in the excitation of non-energetic and energetic residues with a 900 mJ, 6 ns laser pulse (1064 nm) have been investigated. Emission from the laser-induced plasma of energetic materials (e.g. triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], cyclotrimethylene trinitramine [RDX], and hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane [CL-20]) is significantly reduced compared to non-energetic materials (e.g. sugar, melamine, and l-glutamine). Expansion of the resulting laser-induced shock wave into the air above the sample surface was imaged on a microsecond timescale with a high-speed camera recording multiple frames from each laser shot; the excitation of energetic materials produces larger heat-affected zones in the surrounding atmosphere (facilitating deflagration of particles ejected from the sample surface), results in the formation of additional shock fronts, and generates faster external shock front velocities (>750 m s(-1)) compared to non-energetic materials (550-600 m s(-1)). Non-explosive materials that undergo exothermic chemical reactions in air at high temperatures such as ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate produce shock velocities which exceed those of the inert materials but are less than those generated by the exothermic reactions of explosive materials (650-700 m s(-1)). The most powerful explosives produced the highest shock velocities. A comparison to several existing shock models demonstrated that no single model describes the shock propagation for both non-energetic and energetic materials. The influence of the exothermic chemical reactions initiated by the pulsed laser on the velocity of the laser-induced shock waves has thus been demonstrated for the first time. PMID:25182866

  12. Influence of the laser-induced temperature rise in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, Wolfgang; Hengst, Joachim; Sroka, Ronald; Unsoeld, Eberhard

    1991-06-01

    The influence of laser-induced temperature increase in transcutaneous PDT was examined in this study. First the subcutaneous temperature and the relative light intensity between tumor and skin were measured as a function of the applied power density in a series of studies. In a second experiment the influence of temperature on the effect of photodynamic therapy was studied. Determination of temperature and of relative light intensity was performed on three groups of mice: one group of C3H mice with macroscopically strong pigmentation, a second group of the same species with weak pigmentation and a third group of extensively unpigmented, homozygote nude mice of the NMRI family were used. For the second series of experiments the SSK2 fibrosarcoma was used as a tumor model on the C3H mouse. The photosensitized tumors from three animal groups, each with 5 animals, were irradiated subcuratively. In Group 1 the tumor surface was cooled in order to prevent laser- induced temperature effects. In Group 2 and 3 no cooling was used. Evaluation of the therapeutic effect was performed in respect to the regrowth delay time. With the use of transcutaneous PDT it could be shown that the temperature and the relative light intensity between tumor and skin depended essentially on the concentration of pigmentation of the skin above the tumor. Dependent on pigmentation and cooling, temperatures of more than 42 degree(s)C were established with irradiation at power densities starting at about 300 mW/cm2. In the second series of experiments a clear prolongation of the regrowth delay time, i.e. a better therapeutic effect, was achieved in uncooled irradiated tumors. Curative therapy was successful only in uncooled irradiated tumors. For this reason the synergistic influence of laser-induced hyperthermia on the therapeutical result of PDT could be shown on the tumor model used.

  13. Influence of exothermic chemical reactions on laser-induced shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2014-10-21

    Differences in the excitation of non-energetic and energetic residues with a 900 mJ, 6 ns laser pulse (1064 nm) have been investigated. Emission from the laser-induced plasma of energetic materials (e.g. triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], cyclotrimethylene trinitramine [RDX], and hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane [CL-20]) is significantly reduced compared to non-energetic materials (e.g. sugar, melamine, and l-glutamine). Expansion of the resulting laser-induced shock wave into the air above the sample surface was imaged on a microsecond timescale with a high-speed camera recording multiple frames from each laser shot; the excitation of energetic materials produces larger heat-affected zones in the surrounding atmosphere (facilitating deflagration of particles ejected from the sample surface), results in the formation of additional shock fronts, and generates faster external shock front velocities (>750 m s(-1)) compared to non-energetic materials (550-600 m s(-1)). Non-explosive materials that undergo exothermic chemical reactions in air at high temperatures such as ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate produce shock velocities which exceed those of the inert materials but are less than those generated by the exothermic reactions of explosive materials (650-700 m s(-1)). The most powerful explosives produced the highest shock velocities. A comparison to several existing shock models demonstrated that no single model describes the shock propagation for both non-energetic and energetic materials. The influence of the exothermic chemical reactions initiated by the pulsed laser on the velocity of the laser-induced shock waves has thus been demonstrated for the first time.

  14. Objective Assessment of Endogenous Collagen In Vivo during Tissue Repair by Laser Induced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Satish B. S.; Fernandes, Edward Mark; Rao, Anuradha C. K.; Prasad, Keerthana; Mahato, Krishna K.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen, a triple helical protein with the primary role of mechanical function, provides tensile strength to the skin, and plays a pivotal task in tissue repair. During tissue regeneration, collagen level increases gradually and therefore, monitoring of such changes in vivo by laser induced fluorescence was the main objective behind the present study. In order to accomplish this, 15 mm diameter excisional wounds were created on six to eight week old Swiss albino mice. The collagen deposition accelerated upon irradiation of single exposure of 2 J/cm2 He-Ne laser dose immediately after wounding was recorded by laser induced autofluorescence in vivo along with un-illuminated and un-wounded controls. Autofluorescence spectra were recorded for each animal of the experimental groups on 0, 5, 10, 30, 45 and 60 days post-wounding, by exciting the granulation tissue/skin with 325 nm He-Cd laser. The variations in the average collagen intensities from the granulation tissue/skin of mice were inspected as a function of age and gender. Further, the spectral findings of the collagen synthesis in wound granulation tissue/un-wounded skin tissues were validated by Picro-Sirius red- polarized light microscopy in a blinded manner through image analysis of the respective collagen birefringence. The in vivo autofluorescence studies have shown a significant increase in collagen synthesis in laser treated animals as compared to the un-illuminated controls. Image analysis of the collagen birefringence further authenticated the ability of autofluorescence in the objective monitoring of collagen in vivo. Our results clearly demonstrate the potential of laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of collegen synthesis during tissue regeneration, which may have clinical implications. PMID:24874229

  15. Quasi-resonance enhancement of laser-induced-fluorescence diagnosis of endometriosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Ralph H., Jr.; Vancaillie, Thierry G.

    1990-05-01

    Endometriosis, a common disease in women in the reproductive age group, is defined pathologically by the presence of endometrial tissue (inner lining of the uterus) outside the uterus. The displaced tissue is histologically identical to endometrium. In addition to being a highly prevalent disease, this disease is associated with many distressing and debilitating symptoms. Motivated by the need to improve diagnosis by endoscopic imaging instrumentation, we have previously used several drugs to cause selective laser-induced fluorescence of active surgically induced endometriosis in the rabbit model in vivo using ultraviolet-wavelength (351.1 and 363.8 nm) excitation from an argon-ion laser. In the present study we have investigated methods of enhancing differentiation between normal and abnormal tissue by using other excitation wavelengths. In addition to an enhanced capability for detecting abnormal tissue, there are several other advantages associated with using visible-wavelength excitation, such as deeper penetration into the tissue, as well as increased equipment performance, reliability, versatility, and availability. The disadvantage is that because only wavelengths longer than the excitation wavelength can be used for detection, some of the spectral information is lost. Because human endomeiriosis samples were somewhat limited in quantity, as well as specimen size, we used normal ovarian tissue for the laser-induced-fluorescence differentiation-enhancement studies. Positive enhancement of the laser-induced- fluorescence differentiation was found in human ovarian tissue in vitro utilizing 514.5-nm excitation from an argonion laser. Additionally, preliminary verification of this concept was accomplished in active surgically induced endometriosis in the rabbit model in vivo with visible argon-ion laser excitation of two tetracycline-based drugs. Future experiments with other drug treatments and excitation/detection parameters are planned.

  16. Enhancement of Laser Induced Breakdown Emission in the Presence of External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Virendra N.; Zhang, Hansheng; Yueh, Fang Y.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2001-04-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a useful method for determining the elemental composition in solid, liquid and gaseous samples. Elemental analysis of sample is accomplished by measuring the emission of the elemental atom or ions present in the plasma from any kind of samples. The ability to form and study the plasma on unprepared sample makes LIBS a very attractive analytical technique. Various techniques have been used for enhancing the analytical characteristics of the plasma sources used for elemental analysis. Many complicated magnetic field geometries have been used earlier with various types of plasma sources to enhance the plasma emission. In this paper characterization of laser induced plasma emission from Manganese (Mn) in liquid solution is presented. The plasma was formed in between the poles of two magnets with 1200 Gauss pole strength separated by 5 mm. The effect of magnetic field on various emission properties was studied. An one and half times enhancement in the intensity of Mn emission line at 403.076, 403.307 and 403.449 nm was observed for the laser intensity below 1.5x10e12 W/cm2. The intensity of Mn line decreases at higher laser intensity in the presence of magnetic field. This decrease in the emission at higher laser intensity seems to be due to turbulence as a result of laser induced shock as well as generation of instability in the plasma in the presence of magnetic field. The calibration curve for Mn was obtained in an optimized condition in the absence and presence of magnetic field. The limit of detection for Mn in liquid was found to be 0.63 PPM in the presence of magnetic field, which is less in comparison to the absence of magnetic field ( 0.87 PPM). * Visiting Scientist from Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452 013 (INDIA)

  17. Objective assessment of endogenous collagen in vivo during tissue repair by laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Satish B S; Fernandes, Edward Mark; Rao, Anuradha C K; Prasad, Keerthana; Mahato, Krishna K

    2014-01-01

    Collagen, a triple helical protein with the primary role of mechanical function, provides tensile strength to the skin, and plays a pivotal task in tissue repair. During tissue regeneration, collagen level increases gradually and therefore, monitoring of such changes in vivo by laser induced fluorescence was the main objective behind the present study. In order to accomplish this, 15 mm diameter excisional wounds were created on six to eight week old Swiss albino mice. The collagen deposition accelerated upon irradiation of single exposure of 2 J/cm2 He-Ne laser dose immediately after wounding was recorded by laser induced autofluorescence in vivo along with un-illuminated and un-wounded controls. Autofluorescence spectra were recorded for each animal of the experimental groups on 0, 5, 10, 30, 45 and 60 days post-wounding, by exciting the granulation tissue/skin with 325 nm He-Cd laser. The variations in the average collagen intensities from the granulation tissue/skin of mice were inspected as a function of age and gender. Further, the spectral findings of the collagen synthesis in wound granulation tissue/un-wounded skin tissues were validated by Picro-Sirius red- polarized light microscopy in a blinded manner through image analysis of the respective collagen birefringence. The in vivo autofluorescence studies have shown a significant increase in collagen synthesis in laser treated animals as compared to the un-illuminated controls. Image analysis of the collagen birefringence further authenticated the ability of autofluorescence in the objective monitoring of collagen in vivo. Our results clearly demonstrate the potential of laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of collegen synthesis during tissue regeneration, which may have clinical implications. PMID:24874229

  18. Temperatures in Spark Plugs Having Steel and Brass Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cragoe, C S

    1919-01-01

    This investigation was conducted at the Bureau of Standards for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Brass has often been assumed superior to steel for spark plug shells because of its greater heat conductivity. The measurements described in this report prove the contrary, showing that the interior of a spark plug having a brass shell is from 50 degrees to 150 degrees c. (90 degrees to 270 degrees f.) hotter than that of a similar steel plug. Consistent results were obtained in both an aviation and a truck engine, and under conditions which eliminated all other sources of difference between the plugs. It is to be concluded that steel is to be preferred to brass for spark plug shells. This report embodies the results of measurements taken of electrodes and a comparison of brass and steel insulators of spark plugs while they were in actual operation. The data throw considerable light upon the problem of the proper control of temperatures in these parts.

  19. Spark discharge method of liquid rare-gas purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokachalov, S. G.; Kirsanov, M. A.; Kruglov, A. A.; Obodovski, I. M.

    1993-03-01

    The spark disharge method of liquid rare-gas purification is describe. The method is sufficiently more simple than those widely used. Physical aspects of the method are discussed, and examples of its application are presented.

  20. Sintering of zirconia ceramics using microwave and spark heating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashutenko, A. S.; Frangulyan, T. S.; Ghyngazov, S. A.; Petrova, A. B.

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents the results of an complex study of structural and mechanical properties of zirconia ceramics sintered using different techniques. The samples were sintered via the conventional method of heating, in the field of microwave radiation and spark plasma. The experimental data indicates that a microwave field and spark plasma have a stimulating effect on zirconia ceramics sintering. In contrast to the microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering provides ceramics with improved properties at similar time-temperature annealing modes. Moreover, the properties of the ceramics under spark plasma sintering at T=1300 °C are similar to the properties of the ceramics sintered in a microwave field at T=1400 °C.

  1. Exploring the Performance of Spark for a Scientific Use Case

    SciTech Connect

    Sehrish, Saba; Kowalkowski, Jim; Paterno, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We present an evaluation of the performance of a Spark implementation of a classification algorithm in the domain of High Energy Physics (HEP). Spark is a general engine for in-memory, large-scale data processing, and is designed for applications where similar repeated analysis is performed on the same large data sets. Classification problems are one of the most common and critical data processing tasks across many domains. Many of these data processing tasks are both computation- and data-intensive, involving complex numerical computations employing extremely large data sets. We evaluated the performance of the Spark implementation on Cori, a NERSC resource, and compared the results to an untuned MPI implementation of the same algorithm. While the Spark implementation scaled well, it is not competitive in speed to our MPI implementation, even when using significantly greater computational resources.

  2. Pulse-actuated fuel-injection spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Murray, Ian; Tatro, Clement A.

    1978-01-01

    A replacement spark plug for reciprocating internal combustion engines that functions as a fuel injector and as a spark plug to provide a "stratified-charge" effect. The conventional carburetor is retained to supply the main fuel-air mixture which may be very lean because of the stratified charge. The replacement plug includes a cylindrical piezoelectric ceramic which contracts to act as a pump whenever an ignition pulse is applied to a central rod through the ceramic. The rod is hollow at its upper end for receiving fuel, it is tapered along its lower length to act as a pump, and it is flattened at its lower end to act as a valve for fuel injection from the pump into the cylinder. The rod also acts as the center electrode of the plug, with the spark jumping from the plug base to the lower end of the rod to thereby provide spark ignition that has inherent proper timing with the fuel injection.

  3. Large discharge-volume, silent discharge spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Michael

    1995-01-01

    A large discharge-volume spark plug for providing self-limiting microdischarges. The apparatus includes a generally spark plug-shaped arrangement of a pair of electrodes, where either of the two coaxial electrodes is substantially shielded by a dielectric barrier from a direct discharge from the other electrode, the unshielded electrode and the dielectric barrier forming an annular volume in which self-terminating microdischarges occur when alternating high voltage is applied to the center electrode. The large area over which the discharges occur, and the large number of possible discharges within the period of an engine cycle, make the present silent discharge plasma spark plug suitable for use as an ignition source for engines. In the situation, where a single discharge is effective in causing ignition of the combustible gases, a conventional single-polarity, single-pulse, spark plug voltage supply may be used.

  4. Enhancement of femtosecond laser-induced nucleation of protein in a gel solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Ryota; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sazaki, Gen; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    We found that the use of a gel solution with agarose enhanced femtosecond laser-induced nucleation and produced hen egg white lysozyme crystals at three to five times lower supersaturation than those by the femtosecond laser or agarose alone. The fast fluorescence imaging of the protein in the gel solution revealed that cavitation bubbles created high-concentration regions at the focal point, which could be the trigger for protein nucleation. The lower diffusions of protein molecules in agarose gel retained the high-concentration regions for a longer time, and facilitated the nucleation.

  5. Calibrating the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for carbonate minerals on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, Nina L.; Wiens, Roger C.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Ollila, Ann M.; Humphries, Seth D.; Newsom, Horton E.; Barefield, James E.

    2010-05-01

    The ChemCam instrument suite onboard the NASA Mars Science Laboratory rover includes the first laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for extraterrestrial applications. Here we examine carbonate minerals in a simulated martian environment to better understand the LIBS signature of these materials on Mars. Both chemical composition and rock type are determined using multivariate analysis techniques. Composition is confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. Our results show that ChemCam can recognize and differentiate between different types of carbonate materials on Mars.

  6. Stabilization of laser-induced plasma in bulk water using large focusing angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Zheng, Ronger

    2016-08-01

    Laser focusing geometry effects on plasma emissions in bulk water were investigated with five focusing angles ranging from 11.9° to 35.4°. Fast imaging and space-resolved spectroscopy techniques were used to observe the plasma emission distributions and fluctuations. We demonstrated that by increasing the focusing angle, discrete and irregular plasma formed in multiple sites could be turned into continuous and stable plasma with single core fixed at the laser focal point. This indicates the key role of laser focusing angle in the stabilization of plasma positions, which is crucial to the improvement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy repeatability in bulk water.

  7. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  8. Spectroscopic studies of different brands of cigarettes using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyad, M. H.; Saleem, M.; Shah, M.; Baig, M. A.; Shaikh, N. M.

    2008-05-20

    In this work the technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used for the elemental analysis of cigarettes. For this purpose emission spectra have been measured of eleven different kinds of cigarette brands sold and/or produced in Pakistan. Analysis of the spectral peaks observed shows that Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Cr, Fe, Sr and Ba are contained in all brands. Exhibiting the LIBS results, the powerful potential of this method for the identification of the elemental content of cigarettes is demonstrated.

  9. Cooperative effect of ultraviolet and near-infrared beams in laser-induced condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.; Henin, S.; Pomel, F.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P.; Théberge, F.; Daigle, J.-F.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C.

    2013-12-23

    We demonstrate the cooperative effect of near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) beams on laser-induced condensation. Launching a UV laser after a NIR pulse yields up to a 5-fold increase in the production of nanoparticles (25–300 nm) as compared to a single NIR beam. This cooperative effect exceeds the sum of those from the individual beams and occurs for delays up to 1 μs. We attribute it to the UV photolysis of ozone created by the NIR pulses. The resulting OH radicals oxidize NO{sub 2} and volatile organic compounds, producing condensable species.

  10. Correlation between laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signal and moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Gigant, Lionel; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin

    2012-07-01

    The possibility of using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for measuring the moisture content of fresh food samples is studied. The normalized line emission of oxygen is highly correlated with the moisture content of the sample, cheese in our case, and can be used as a moisture marker in situations where oxygen interference from the matrix is not a critical issue. The linear correlation between the oxygen signal and the moisture content in the sample shows great potential for using LIBS as an alternative spectroscopic method for moisture monitoring.

  11. Equivalent of a cartilage tissue for simulations of laser-induced temperature fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kondyurin, A V; Sviridov, A P

    2008-07-31

    The thermal and optical properties of polyacrylamide hydrogels and cartilages are studied by the method of IR laser radiometry. The thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and the effective absorption coefficient at a wavelength of 1.56 {mu}m measured for polyacrylamide gel with 70% water content and the degree of cross-linking 1:9 and for the nasal septum cartilage proved to be close. This allows the use of polyacrylamide hydrogels as equivalents of cartilages in simulations of laser-induced temperature fields. (biophotonics)

  12. Broadband two-color laser-induced incandescence pyrometry approach for nanoparticle characterization with improved sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flügel, Alexandre; Kiefer, Johannes; Will, Stefan; Leipertz, Alfred

    2013-09-01

    A spectral filtering approach for improving the sensitivity of two-color laser-induced incandescence measurements is proposed. The commonly used bandpass filters providing wavelength selection, and hence temperature sensitivity, are replaced by shortpass and longpass filters, respectively, allowing significantly higher signal intensities to be detected. This modification is of particular interest when nanoparticles with low emissivity, for instance, metal and metal oxide particles, are investigated. An example case in which the conventional optical components are compared with the new approach reveals an improvement by more than one order of magnitude.

  13. Laser-induced shockwave paired with FRET: a method to study cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Preece, Daryl; Shi, Linda; Khatibzadeh, Nima; Rosales, Derrick; Pan, Yijia; Lei, Lie; Wang, Yingxiao; Berns, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Cells within the body are subject to various forces; however, the details concerning the way in which cells respond to mechanical stimuli are not well understood. We demonstrate that laser-induced shockwaves (LIS) combined with biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a promising new approach to study biological processes in single live cells. As "proof-of-concept," using a FRET biosensor, we show that in response to LIS, cells release intracellular calcium. With the parameters used, cells retain their morphology and remain viable. LIS combined with FRET permits observation of the cells immediate response to a sudden shear force.

  14. Laser-induced resonance states as dynamic suppressors of ionization in high-frequency short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny; Orel, Ann E.; Baer, Roi

    2000-01-01

    An adiabatic-Floquet formalism is used to study the suppression of ionization in short laser pulses. In the high-frequency limit the adiabatic equations involve only the pulse envelope where transitions are purely ramp effects. For a short-ranged potential having a single-bound state we show that ionization suppression is caused by the appearance of a laser-induced resonance state, which is coupled by the pulse ramp to the ground state and acts to trap ionizing flux. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  15. Influence of plasma conditions on the intensity ratio calibration curve during laser induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan-Kyu; In, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Seok-Hee; Jeong, Sungho

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative prediction of elemental concentration or concentration ratio of solid samples can be achieved by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy if a calibration curve that is little influenced by plasma conditions could be obtained. This work demonstrates that such a calibration curve is available for copper indium gallium diselenide (CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se₂) thin film solar cells for properly selected spectral lines. The possible changes of calibration curves based on the selected spectral lines are discussed in consideration of self-absorption in optically thick plasma and the dependency of spectral line properties on plasma temperature.

  16. Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2013-09-30

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ∼50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

  17. Polymer/carbon nanotube composite patterns via laser induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Boutopoulos, Christos; Pandis, Christos; Pissis, Polycarpos; Zergioti, Ioanna; Giannakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-25

    Direct and high spatial resolution printing of polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite layers has been demonstrated by means of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT). Laser irradiation of composite target materials, such as poly(acrylic acid)/CNT and polyvinylpyrrolidone/CNT, enabled dry deposition of well resolved composite pixels onto glass substrates. The dispersion of the CNT into the deposited composite pixels was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The LIFT technique was also employed for the accurate deposition of polymer/CNT composite pixels onto aluminum microelectrodes for the fabrication of chemical sensors based on polymer/CNT compounds.

  18. Photoneutron Cross Section Measurements on {sup 9}Be Using Laser-Induced Compton-Backscattered Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, Hiroaki; Yonezawa, Yoriko; Akimune, Hidetoshi; Yamagata, Tamio; Ohta, Masahisa; Fujishiro, Masatoshi; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2000-12-31

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for {sup 9}Be in the energy range from 1.77 to 3.75 MeV using quasi-monochromatic {gamma}-rays produced in laser-induced Compton backscattering. These cross sections are relevant to the reaction rate of the first step of the {alpha}-process of Type II and Type Ib supernovae, i.e. {alpha}({alpha}n,{gamma}){sup 9}Be. Results are compared to the data taken with other photon sources like radioactive isotopes and Bremsstrahlung.

  19. Colour marking of transparent materials by laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Yasutaka; Sugioka, Koji; Miyamoto, Iwao; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate colour marking of a transparent material using laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA) system. After the LIPAA process, metal thin film is deposited on the surface of the ablated groove. This feature is applied to RGB (red, green and blue) colour marking by using specific metal targets. The metal targets, for instance, are Pb3O4 for red, Cr2O3 for green and [Cu(C32H15ClN8)] for blue colour marking. Additionally, adhesion of the metal thin film deposited on the processed groove by various experimental conditions is investigated.

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the classification of unknown powders

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Emily Gibb; Munson, Chase A.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; De Lucia, Frank C. Jr.; Gullett, Brian; Miziolek, Andrzej

    2008-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to discern between two biological agent surrogates (Bacillus atrophaeus and ovalbumin) and potential interferent compounds (mold spores, humic acid, house dust, and Arizona road dust). Multiple linear regression and neural network analysis models were constructed by using B. atrophaeus and ovalbumin spectra, and limits of detection were calculated. Classification of the agent surrogates' LIBS spectra was attempted by using a neural network model. False negative rates of 0% were observed for B. atrophaeus (100 colony forming units) spore spectra with the neural network model used for classification.