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Sample records for laser-polarized noble gas

  1. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We pursued advanced technology development of laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This new multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation-as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 129Xe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We pursued two technology development specific aims: (1) development of low-field (less than 0.01 T) noble gas MRI of humans; and (2) development of functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized noble gas and related techniques.

  2. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    We are developing laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (e.g., of lung ventilation) as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (He-3 and Xe-129) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We are pursuing two specific aims in this research. The first aim is to develop a low-field (< 0.01 T) instrument for noble gas MRI of humans, and the second aim is to develop functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized Xe-129 and related techniques.

  3. Low-field MRI of laser polarized noble gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Pomeroy, V. R.; Mair, R. W.; Hinton, D. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Stoner, R. E.; Hersman, F. W.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    NMR images of laser polarized 3He gas were obtained at 21 G using a simple, homebuilt instrument. At such low fields magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of thermally polarized samples (e.g., water) is not practical. Low-field noble gas MRI has novel scientific, engineering, and medical applications. Examples include portable systems for diagnosis of lung disease, as well as imaging of voids in porous media and within metallic systems.

  4. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  5. A system for low field imaging of laser-polarized noble gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, G. P.; Tseng, C. H.; Pomeroy, V. R.; Mair, R. W.; Hinton, D. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Stoner, R. E.; Hersman, F. W.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a device for performing MRI with laser-polarized noble gas at low magnetic fields (<50 G). The system is robust, portable, inexpensive, and provides gas-phase imaging resolution comparable to that of high field clinical instruments. At 20.6 G, we have imaged laser-polarized (3)He (Larmor frequency of 67 kHz) in both sealed glass cells and excised rat lungs, using approximately 0.1 G/cm gradients to achieve approximately 1 mm(2) resolution. In addition, we measured (3)He T(2)(*) times greater than 100 ms in excised rat lungs, which is roughly 20 times longer than typical values observed at high ( approximately 2 T) fields. We include a discussion of the practical considerations for working at low magnetic fields and conclude with evidence of radiation damping in this system. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of rock permeability and effective porosity using laser-polarized noble gas NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2004-08-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of the permeability and effective porosity of oil-reservoir rock cores using one-dimensional NMR imaging of the penetrating flow of laser-polarized xenon gas. The permeability result agrees well with industry standard techniques, whereas effective porosity is not easily determined by other methods. This NMR technique may have applications to the characterization of fluid flow in a wide variety of porous and granular media.

  7. Novel MRI Applications of Laser-Polarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-04-01

    Gas-phase NMR has great potential as a probe for a variety of interesting physical and biomedical problems that are not amenable to study by water or similar liquid. However, NMR of gases was largely neglected due to the low signal obtained from the thermally-polarized gases with very low sample density. The advent of optical pumping techniques for enhancing the polarization of the noble gases 3He and 129Xe has bought new life to this field, especially in medical imaging where 3He lung inhalation imaging is approaching a clinical application. However, there are numerous applications in materials science that also benefit from the use of these gases. We review primarily non-medical applications of laser-polarized noble gases for both NMR imaging and spectroscopy, and highlight progress with examples from our laboratory including high-resolution imaging at mT applied field strength and velocity imaging of convective flow. Porous media microstucture has been probed with both thermal and laser-polarized xenon, as xenon is an ideal probe due to low surface interaction with the grains of the porous media.

  8. Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy with Laser Polarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, R. C.; Rosen, M. S.; Coulter, K. P.; Chupp, T. E.; Swanson, S. D.; Agranoff, B. W.; Prince, M. R.

    1996-05-01

    In the past year, a great deal of attention has been drawn to the use of laser polarized noble gases to produce magnetic resonance images of rodent and human lungs. Initial demonstrations proved the principle that air space images can be produced with noble gases polarized to several percent. (The noble gas density is thousands of times smaller, but the noble gas polarization is thousands of times greater than the proton polarization of order 10-5 at 2 Tesla.) The manifold motivations include improvement of pulmonary and circulatory diagnostic radiology techniques as well as study of physiological function including neurological response. We have undertaken a program of development and application of MR imaging and spectroscopy using laser polarized gases with several goals including development of techniques and technologies to facilitate research and eventual medical applications. This talk will describe this multi-disciplinary program combining laser and optical physics, magnetic resonance tomography, neurophysiology and medical science.

  9. Biomedical magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy with laser polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, R.C.; Rosen, M.S.; Coulter, K.P.; Chupp, T.E.; Swanson, S.D.; Agranoff, B.W.; Prince, M.R.

    1996-05-01

    In the past year, a great deal of attention has been drawn to the use of laser polarized noble gases to produce magnetic resonance images of rodent and human lungs. Initial demonstrations proved the principle that air space images can be produced with noble gases polarized to several percent. (The noble gas density is thousands of times greater than the proton polarization of order 10{sup {minus}5} at 2 Tesla.) The manifold motivations include improvement of pulmonary and circulatory diagnostic radiology techniques as well as study of physiological function including neurological response. The authors have undertaken a program of development and application of MR imaging and spectroscopy using laser polarized gases with several goals including development of techniques and technologies to facilitate research and eventual medical applications. This talk will describe this multi-disciplinary program combining laser and optical physics, magnetic resonance tomography, neurophysiology and medical science.

  10. Low field magnetic resonance imaging of laser-polarized noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, G. P.; Tseng, C.-H.; Mair, R. W.; Hoffmann, D.; Walsworth, R. L.; Pomeroy, V. R.; Hersman, F. W.; Cory, D. G.

    1998-05-01

    We have demonstrated low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using laser-polarized noble gases. Conventional MRI requires large magnetic fields ( ~ 1 tesla) to create an observable nuclear magnetization via thermal polarization of the nuclear spins (e.g. ^1H spins in water). Alternatively, optical pumping techniques using lasers can create large nuclear spin polarizations (> 10%) in the spin-1/2 noble gases, ^3He and ^129Xe. This laser polarization technique greatly enhances the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection sensitivity of the noble gases, enabling fast, gas-phase MRI at low magnetic fields (< 100 gauss). Using a simple, wire-wound solenoid, we made images at 21 gauss of laser-polarized ^3He in a variety of samples. Each image took approximately 15 seconds to acquire, with a typical resolution of 1 mm^2. In contrast, a water (^1H) image at the same field with comparable resolution would require ~ 2 months of signal averaging. We also made images that demonstrate the efficacy of low field noble gas MRI for materials that are problematic at high magnetic fields: (i) paramagnetic materials, whose magnetic susceptibilities induce image-distorting field gradients; and (ii) conductors, which prevent high field imaging because of Faraday (i.e. RF) shielding.

  11. Investigation of laser polarized xenon magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-based investigations of a new biomedical diagnostic technology: nuclear magnetic resonance of laser polarized noble gas are addressed. The specific research tasks discussed are: (1) Development of a large-scale noble gas polarization system; (2) biomedical investigations using laser polarized noble gas in conventional (high magnetic field) NMR systems; and (3) the development and application of a low magnetic field system for laser polarized noble gas NMR.

  12. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  13. Genesis Noble Gas Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    The original thrust of our Genesis funding was to extend and refine the noble gas analytical capabilities of this laboratory to improve the precision and accuracy of noble gas measurements in order to optimize the scientific return from the Genesis Mission. This process involved both instrumental improvement (supplemented by a SRLIDAP instrument grant) and refinement of technique. The Genesis landing mishap shifted our emphasis to the irregular aluminum heat shield material from the flat collector wafers. This has required redesign of our laser extraction cells to accommodate the longer focal lengths required for laser extraction from non-flat surfaces. Extraction of noble gases from solid aluminum surfaces, rather than thin coatings on transparent substrates has required refinement of controlled-depth laser ablation techniques. Both of these bring new problems, both with potentially higher blanks form larger laser cells and the larger quantities of evaporated aluminum which can coat the sapphire entrance ports. This is mainly a problem for the heavy noble gases where larger extraction areas are required, necessitating the new aluminum vapor containment techniques described below. With the Genesis Mission came three new multiple multiplier noble gas mass spectrometers to this laboratory, one built solely by us (Supergnome-M), one built in collaboration with Nu-Instruments (Noblesse), and one built in collaboration with GVI (Helix). All of these have multiple multiplier detection sections with the Nu-Instruments using a pair of electrostatic quad lenses for isotope spacing and the other two using mechanically adjustable positions for the electron multipliers. The Supergnome-M and Noblesse are installed and running. The GVI instrument was delivered a year late (in March 2005) and is yet to be installed by GVI. As with all new instruments there were some initial development issues, some of which are still outstanding. The most serious of these are performance issues

  14. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Marissa M.; Shuster, David L.; Balco, Greg

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical basis for reconstructing paleotemperatures from the open-system behavior of cosmogenic noble gases produced in minerals at Earth's surface. Experimentally-determined diffusion kinetics predicts diffusive loss of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at ambient temperatures; incomplete retention has also been observed empirically in field studies. We show that the theory of simultaneous production and diffusion that applies to radiogenic noble gases in minerals-the basis of thermochronology-can also be applied to cosmogenic noble gases to reconstruct past surface temperatures on Earth. We use published diffusion kinetics and production rates for 3He in quartz and 21Ne in orthoclase to demonstrate the resolving power of cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry with respect to exposure duration, temperature, and diffusion domain size. Calculations indicate that, when paired with a quantitatively retained cosmogenic nuclide such as 21Ne or 10Be, observations of cosmogenic 3He in quartz can constrain temperatures during surface exposure in polar and high altitude environments. Likewise, 21Ne retention in feldspars is sensitive to temperatures at lower latitudes and elevations, expanding the potential geographic applicability of this technique to most latitudes. As an example, we present paired measurements of 3He and 10Be in quartz from a suite of Antarctic sandstone erratics to test whether the abundances of cosmogenic 3He agree with what is predicted from first principles and laboratory-determined diffusion kinetics. We find that the amounts of cosmogenic 3He present in these samples are consistent with the known mean annual temperature (MAT) for this region of Antarctica between -25 and -30 °C. These results demonstrate the method's ability to record paleotemperatures through geologic time.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, Boyd McLean

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  16. Noble gas fractionation during subsurface gas migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Larson, Toti E.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of shale gas production and geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage requires identification of subsurface gas sources. Noble gases provide a powerful tool to distinguish different sources if the modifications of the gas composition during transport can be accounted for. Despite the recognition of compositional changes due to gas migration in the subsurface, the interpretation of geochemical data relies largely on zero-dimensional mixing and fractionation models. Here we present two-phase flow column experiments that demonstrate these changes. Water containing a dissolved noble gas is displaced by gas comprised of CO2 and argon. We observe a characteristic pattern of initial co-enrichment of noble gases from both phases in banks at the gas front, followed by a depletion of the dissolved noble gas. The enrichment of the co-injected noble gas is due to the dissolution of the more soluble major gas component, while the enrichment of the dissolved noble gas is due to stripping from the groundwater. These processes amount to chromatographic separations that occur during two-phase flow and can be predicted by the theory of gas injection. This theory provides a mechanistic basis for noble gas fractionation during gas migration and improves our ability to identify subsurface gas sources after post-genetic modification. Finally, we show that compositional changes due to two-phase flow can qualitatively explain the spatial compositional trends observed within the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir and some regional compositional trends observed in drinking water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett shale regions. In both cases, only the migration of a gas with constant source composition is required, rather than multi-stage mixing and fractionation models previously proposed.

  17. Noble gas trapping by laboratory carbon condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Marti, K.

    1982-01-01

    Trapping of noble gases by carbon-rich matter was investigated by synthesizing carbon condensates in a noble gas atmosphere. Laser evaporation of a solid carbon target yielded submicron grains which proved to be efficient noble gas trappers (Xe distribution coefficients up to 13 cu cm STP/g-atm). The carbon condensates are better noble gas trappers than previously reported synthetic samples, except one, but coefficients inferred for meteoritic acid-residues are still orders of magnitude higher. The trapped noble gases are loosely bound and elementally strongly fractionated, but isotopic fractionations were not detected. Although this experiment does not simulate nebular conditions, the results support the evidence that carbon-rich phases in meteorites may be carriers of noble gases from early solar system reservoirs. The trapped elemental noble gas fractionations are remarkably similar to both those inferred for meteorites and those of planetary atmospheres for earth, Mars and Venus.

  18. Study of gas-fluidization dynamics with laser-polarized 129Xe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruopeng; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Candela, Donald; Mair, Ross William; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    We report initial NMR studies of gas dynamics in a particle bed fluidized by laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas. We have made preliminary measurements of two important characteristics: gas exchange between the bubble and emulsion phases and the gas velocity distribution in the bed. We used T2* contrast to differentiate the bubble and emulsion phases by choosing solid particles with large magnetic susceptibility. Experimental tests demonstrated that this method was successful in eliminating 129Xe magnetization in the emulsion phase, which enabled us to observe the time dependence of the bubble magnetization. By employing the pulsed field gradient method, we also measured the gas velocity distribution within the bed. These results clearly show the onset of bubbling and can be used to deduce information about gas and particle motion in the fluidized bed.

  19. Noble Gas Temperature Proxy for Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noble gases in groundwater appear to offer a practical approach for quantitatively determining past surface air temperatures over recharge areas for any watershed. The noble gas temperature (NGT) proxy should then permit a paleothermometry of a region over time. This terrestria...

  20. On a cryogenic noble gas ion catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.

    2006-03-01

    In situ purification of the gas used as stopping medium in a noble gas ion catcher by operating the device at low temperatures of 60-150 K was investigated. Alpha-decay recoil ions from a 223Ra source served as energetic probes. The combined ion survival and transport efficiencies for 219Rn ions saturated below about 90 K, reaching 28.7(17)% in helium, 22.1(13)% in neon, and 17.0(10)% in argon. These values may well reflect the charge exchange and stripping cross-sections during the slowing down of the ions, and thus represent a fundamental upper limit for the efficiency of noble gas ion catcher devices. We suggest the cryogenic noble gas ion catcher as a technically simpler alternative to the ultra-high purity noble gas ion catcher operating at room temperature.

  1. Noble gas sputtering calculations using TRIM

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Nemanich, J.; Thomas, G.E.; Schiel, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    In conjunction with our experimental work on saddle field ion sputtering, we have attempted to apply the Monte Carlo program TRIM (Transport of Ions in Matter) to calculate the sputter yields for a variety of noble gas sputtering applications. Comparison with experiments are shown. Information extracted from these analyses have proved useful in optimizing the experimental sputtering parameters. Calculated sputter yields obtained utilizing TRIM are presented for noble gas sputtering of a variety of materials common to nuclear target production.

  2. Solubility of noble gases in serpentine - Implications for meteoritic noble gas abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaikowski, A.; Schaeffer, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the solubilities of the noble gases from synthesis and solubility studies of the sheet silicate mineral serpentine in carbonaceous chondrites is presented. Hydrothermal synthesis and exchange experiments were made at 340C and 1 kbar with noble gas partial pressures from 2 times 10 to the -8th power to 0.1 atm. The measured distribution coefficients for noble gases are not sufficiently high to account for the trapped noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites by exchange in solar nebula if meteoritic minerals have comparable distribution coefficients. Also, serpentine gains and loses noble gases to approach equilibrium values with the terrestrial atmosphere, indicating that this exposure may have influenced the noble gas abundances in phyllosilicate minerals of these chondrites. The dispersion of K-Ar ages of carbonaceous chondrites could be the result of phyllosilicates approaching equilibrium solubility of atmospheric Ar-40.

  3. Noble gas storage and delivery system for ion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Dwight Douglas (Inventor); Ramos, Charlie (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method and system for storing and delivering a noble gas for an ion propulsion system where an adsorbent bearing a noble gas is heated within a storage vessel to desorb the noble gas which is then flowed through a pressure reduction device to a thruster assembly. The pressure and flow is controlled using a flow restrictor and low wattage heater which heats an adsorbent bed containing the noble gas propellant at low pressures. Flow rates of 5-60 sccm can be controlled to within about 0.5% or less and the required input power is generally less than 50 W. This noble gas storage and delivery system and method can be used for earth orbit satellites, and lunar or planetary space missions.

  4. The Thermochemical Stability of Ionic Noble Gas Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents calculations that suggest stoichiometric, ionic, and noble gas-metal compounds may be stable. Bases calculations on estimated values of electron affinity, anionic radius for the noble gases and for the Born exponents of resulting crystals. Suggests the desirability of experiments designed to prepare compounds containing anionic,…

  5. Dating native gold by noble gas analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedermann, S.; Eugster, O.; Hofmann, B.; Thalmann, CH.; Reimold, W. U.

    1993-01-01

    Our recent work on He, Ne, and Ar in Alpine gold samples has demonstrated that gold is extremely retentive for He and could thus, in principle, be used for U/Th-He-4 dating. For vein-type gold from Brusson, Northern Italy, we derived a U/Th-He-4 age of 36 Ma, in agreement with the K-Ar formation age of associated muscovites and biotites. However, in placer gold from the Napf area, Central Switzerland, we observed large excesses of both He-4 and radiogenic Ar-40 (Ar-40 sub rad, defined as Ar-40-295.5-Ar-.36). The gas release systematics indicate two distinct noble gas components, one of which is released below about 800 C and the other one at the melting point of gold (1064 C). We now present results of He and Xe measurements in a 1 g placer gold sample from the river Kruempelgraben, as well as He and Ar data for Brusson vein-type gold and for gold from the Lily Gold Mine, South Africa. We calculate reasonable U/Th-He-4 as well as U-Xe ages based on those gases which are released at approximately 800 C. Probably the low-temperature components represent in-situ-produced radiogenic He and fission Xe, whereas the gases evolving when gold melts have been trapped during gold formation. Therefore, only the low-temperature components are relevant for dating purposes.

  6. The Noble Gas Fingerprint in a UK Unconventional Gas Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKavney, Rory; Gilfillan, Stuart; Györe, Domokos; Stuart, Fin

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, there has been an unprecedented expansion in the development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Concerns have arisen about the effect of this new industry on groundwater quality, particularly focussing on hydraulic fracturing, the technique used to increase the permeability of the targeted tight shale formations. Methane contamination of groundwater has been documented in areas of gas production1 but conclusively linking this to fugitive emissions from unconventional hydrocarbon production has been controversial2. A lack of baseline measurements taken before drilling, and the equivocal interpretation of geochemical data hamper the determination of possible contamination. Common techniques for "fingerprinting" gas from discrete sources rely on gas composition and isotopic ratios of elements within hydrocarbons (e.g. δ13CCH4), but the original signatures can be masked by biological and gas transport processes. The noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are inert and controlled only by their physical properties. They exist in trace quantities in natural gases and are sourced from 3 isotopically distinct environments (atmosphere, crust and mantle)3. They are decoupled from the biosphere, and provide a separate toolbox to investigate the numerous sources and migration pathways of natural gases, and have found recent utility in the CCS4 and unconventional gas5 industries. Here we present a brief overview of noble gas data obtained from a new coal bed methane (CBM) field, Central Scotland. We show that the high concentration of helium is an ideal fingerprint for tracing fugitive gas migration to a shallow groundwater. The wells show variation in the noble gas signatures that can be attributed to differences in formation water pumping from the coal seams as the field has been explored for future commercial development. Dewatering the seams alters the gas/water ratio and the degree to which noble gases degas from the formation water. Additionally the

  7. Noble gas atmospheric monitoring at reprocessing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhleh, C.W.; Perry, R.T. Jr.; Poths, J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Fearey, B.L.

    1997-05-01

    The discovery in Iraq after the Gulf War of the existence of a large clandestine nuclear-weapon program has led to an across-the-board international effort, dubbed Programme 93+2, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. One particularly significant potential change is the introduction of environmental monitoring (EM) techniques as an adjunct to traditional safeguards methods. Monitoring of stable noble gas (Kr, Xe) isotopic abundances at reprocessing plant stacks appears to be able to yield information on the burnup and type of the fuel being processed. To estimate the size of these signals, model calculations of the production of stable Kr, Xe nuclides in reactor fuel and the subsequent dilution of these nuclides in the plant stack are carried out for two case studies: reprocessing of PWR fuel with a burnup of 35 GWd/tU, and reprocessing of CAND fuel with a burnup of 1 GWd/tU. For each case, a maximum-likelihood analysis is used to determine the fuel burnup and type from the isotopic data.

  8. Underground Sources of Radioactive Noble Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, James C.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Misner, Alex C.; Olsen, Khris B.; Woods, Vincent T.; Emer, Dudley

    2013-05-01

    It is well known that radon is present in relatively high concentrations below the surface of the Earth due to natural decay of uranium and thorium. However, less information is available on the background levels of other isotopes such as 133Xe and 131mXe produced via spontaneous fission of either manmade or naturally occurring elements. The background concentrations of radioxenon in the subsurface are important to understand because these isotopes potentially can be used to confirm violations of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) during an On-Site Inspection (OSI). Recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured radioxenon concentrations from the subsurface at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS—formerly known as the Nevada Test Site) to determine whether xenon isotope background levels could be detected from spontaneous fission of naturally occurring uranium or legacy 240Pu as a result of historic nuclear testing. In this paper, we discuss the results of those measurements and review the sources of xenon background that must be taken into account during OSI noble gas measurements.

  9. Noble gas transport during devolatilization of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Smye, A.; Shuster, D. L.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Hesse, M. A.; Cooper, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Here we examine the role of slab dehydration in determining the elemental pattern of recycled noble gases. As a first step, we apply newly reported measurements of He-Ne-Ar (light noble gases) solubility and diffusivity in amphibole to parameterize a 1D diffusive-reaction transport model that simulates noble gas behavior during fluid loss from down-going oceanic crust. Recent experiments demonstrate that noble gases are highly soluble in ring-structured minerals, such as amphibole and other common hydrothermal products in slabs [1]. These results suggest that ring-structured minerals have the potential to strongly influence the budget of noble gases input into subduction zones and the elemental fractionations associated with volatile loss from slabs New measurements of He-Ne-Ar solubility in a suite of amphiboles have been completed utilizing the methodology described in [1]. These new measurements confirm that all light noble gases are highly soluble in amphibole, and that noble gas solubility correlates with the availability of unoccupied ring sites. New experimental measurements of He and Ne diffusivity have also been completed using a step-degassing approach at the Berkeley Geochronology Center. These measurements suggest that vacant ring sites in amphibole act to slow noble gas diffusion. We combine the newly acquired He and Ne diffusivity measurements with literature values for Ar diffusivity [2] to parameterize the diffusive-reaction transport model. Application of these data to the diffusive-reaction transport model yields several new insights. The relative mobility of Ne compared to Ar allows for efficient extraction of Ne from "hot" slabs by shallow depths (<50 km), while Ar is effectively retained to deeper depths, potentially past sub-arc conditions. Noble gas partition coefficients sharply increase with depth, following their increasing non-ideality in supercritical fluids, causing noble gases to partition back into minerals from any fluids retained in

  10. Noble-gas-rich separates from the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Mack, R.; Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    Predominantly carbonaceous HF/HCl-resistant residues from the Allende meteorite are studied. Samples are characterized by SEM/EDXA, X-ray diffraction, INAA, C, S, H, N, and noble gas analyses. Isotopic data for carbon show variations no greater than 5%, while isotopic data from noble gases confirm previously established systematics. Noble gas abundances correlate with those of C and N, and concomitant partial loss of C and normal trapped gas occur during treatments with oxidizing acids. HF/HCl demineralization of bulk meteorite results in similar fractional losses of C and trapped noble gases, which leads to the conclusion that various macromolecular carbonaceous substances serve as the main host phase for normal trapped noble gases and anomalous gases in acid-resistant residues, and as the carrier of the major part of trapped noble gases lost during HF/HCl demineralization. Limits on the possible abundances of dense mineralic host phases in the residues are obtained, and considerations of the nucleogenetic origin for CCF-XE indicate that carbonaceous host phases and various forms of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites may have a presolar origin.

  11. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  12. Solubility investigations in support of ultrasensitive noble gas detector development.

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K. C.

    1998-08-05

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Cincinnati (UC) have been developing a new class of ultrasensitive noble gas detectors that are based upon the ANL discovery that corn oil has a high affinity for heavy noble gas absorption at room temperature, but releases the noble gases with warming or by other low-energy-input means. Environmental applications for this new class of fluid-based detectors include ultrahigh sensitivity radioxenon detectors for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Surveillance, improved fission gas detectors for enhanced environmental surveillance in the vicinity of DOE, DOD, and NRC-licensed facilities, and improved integrating Rn detectors for earthquake prediction. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the solubility phenomena of heavy noble gases (Rn, Xe, and Kr) in triglyceride oils. It is the authors' intention that the findings presented herein may be used to guide future selection, development, and refinement of vegetable and other hydrocarbon oils to bring further enhancements to noble gas detection efficiencies.

  13. Defining Noble Gas Partitioning for Carbon Capture and Storage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, O.; Masters, A.; Rochelle, C.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    For viable CCS implementation variables such as CO2 dissolution rates, reactions with the host rock and the extent of groundwater interaction must be accurately constrained. Noble gases play an important role in these systems [e.g. 1,2]. Their application, however, requires accurate Henry's constants within dense CO2-H2O systems. Current interpretations use pure noble gas-H2O partitioning data [3,4] and assume CO2-noble gas interactions are negligible, even at high (>700 kg/m3) CO2 densities [2]. To test this assumption we experimentally determined noble gas CO2-H2O partitioning for the 170-656 kg/m3 CO2 density range; representative of most CCS environments. Contrary to assumption, CO2 density significantly affected noble gas partition coefficients. For helium, increasing CO2 density resulted in a negative deviation trend from CO2-free values whilst for argon, krypton and xenon strong, positive deviations were observed. At 656 kg/m3 these deviations were -35%, 74%, 114% and 321% respectively. This is interpreted as the CO2 phase acting as a polar solvent inducing polarisation in the noble gases. Deviation trends are well defined using a 2nd order polynomial. The effect of a dense CO2 phase can now be incorporated into existing noble gas models. We also present results from a Gibbs-Ensemble Monte Carlo molecular simulation to model partitioning for this binary system. This fundamental technique makes predictions based on the pair-potentials of interaction between the molecules. Here it gives the phase compositions and Henry coefficients for noble gases. With a proven ability in accurately replicating both the CO2-H2O system and low pressure noble gas Henry constants the focus is now on fully optimising the model to match high pressure observations. [1] Gilfillan et al. (2009) Nature 458 614-618 [2] Gilfillan et al. (2008) GCA 72 1174-1198 [3] Crovetto et al. (1982) J.Chem.Phys. 76 1077-1086 [4] Ballentine et al. in Porcelli et al. (eds.) (2002) Rev.Min.Geo. 47 539-614.

  14. Isotopic mass-dependence of noble gas diffusion coefficients inwater

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2007-06-25

    Noble gas isotopes are used extensively as tracers inhydrologic and paleoclimatic studies. These applications requireknowledge of the isotopic mass (m) dependence of noble gas diffusioncoefficients in water (D), which has not been measured but is estimatedusing experimental D-values for the major isotopes along with an untestedrelationship from kinetic theory, D prop m-0.5. We applied moleculardynamics methods to determine the mass dependence of D for four noblegases at 298 K, finding that D prop m-beta with beta<0.2, whichrefutes the kinetic theory model underlying all currentapplications.

  15. An Air Noble Gas Component in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarda, P.

    2005-12-01

    Noble gas geochemistry has for long attempted to recover isotopic signatures of mantle components through analyses of basalt glass or xenoliths, but this quest has been plagued by the occurrence of a conspicuous air component, which appears to have both the isotopic and elemental composition of air (except for helium). It is classically considered to be air added to samples close to the surface, in a poorly understood process called "contamination", due to the interaction of rocks and melts with air or water on emplacement. Focusing on Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts (and Ocean Island Basalts), gases are mostly borne by vesicles and a number of puzzling observations can be made: - vesicles appear to be heterogeneous at the scale of a centimeter, as shown by stepwise crushing experiments, some vesicles having air, some having mantle gases, some having mixtures of both, - vesicles appear over-pressured (P > 1 bar) in fresh samples, as shown by highly vesiculous samples such as Popping Rocks, - the air component appears to be borne by the largest vesicles, as it is recovered in the first steps of stepwise crushing analyses, - larger samples seem to have more of the air component than smaller ones, - in Popping Rocks, the air component borne by the largest vesicles is overwhelming, - the isotopic composition of Pb-Sr-Nd in Popping Rocks was interpreted as indicating a recycled component (related to the HIMU and EM1 mantle end-members). The air noble gas component was suggested recently to be not seawater, but modern air located in fractures of the glass, which should have opened on cooling and resealed immediately [1]. This model faces some difficulties, such as keeping pressure high in the vesicles. I suggest another interpretation, namely that a large part of the air noble gases in oceanic basalts is recycled in origin [2]. It would have been carried down into the mantle at subduction zones, even if most (typically 90%) of the air noble gases in the slab returns to the

  16. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-02-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  17. The Origin of Noble Gas Isotopic Heterogeneity in Icelandic Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Honda, M.; McDougall, I.

    2001-01-01

    Two models for generation of heterogeneous He, Ne and Ar isotopic ratios in Icelandic basalts are evaluated using a mixing model and the observed noble gas elemental ratios in Icelandic basalts,Ocean island Basalt (OIBs) and Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORBs). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Noble Gas Tracing of Fluid Transport in Shale Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. E.; Gardner, W. P.; Kuhlman, K. L.; Robinson, D. G.; Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate fluid transport mechanisms in a shale reservoir using natural noble gas tracers. Noble gas tracing is promising due to sensitivity of transport to: pore structure and sizes; phase partitioning between groundwater and liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing and creation of surface area. A time-series of over thirty wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells with different oil-to-gas ratios, along with production data (i.e., flowrate and pressure). Tracer and production data sets can be combined to infer production flow regimes, to estimate reservoir transport parameters, and to improve forecasts of production decline. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Light noble gas dissolution into ring structure-bearing materials and lattice influences on noble gas recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Colin R. M.; Parman, Stephen W.; Kelley, Simon P.; Cooper, Reid F.

    2015-06-01

    Light noble gas (He-Ne-Ar) solubility has been experimentally determined in a range of materials with six-member, tetrahedral ring structures: beryl, cordierite, tourmaline, antigorite, muscovite, F-phlogopite, actinolite, and pargasite. Helium solubility in these materials is relatively high, 4 × 10-10 to 3 × 10-7 mol g-1 bar-1, which is ∼100 to 100,000× greater than He solubility in olivine, pyroxene, or spinel. Helium solubility broadly correlates with the topology of ring structures within different minerals. Distinctive He-Ne-Ar solubility patterns are associated with the different ring structure topologies. Combined, these observations suggest ring structures have a strong influence on noble gas solubility in materials and could facilitate the recycling of noble gases, along with other volatiles (i.e., water, chlorine, and fluorine), into the mantle. Measurements of Ne and Ar solubility in antigorite, however, are highly variable and correlated with each other, suggesting multiple factors contribute the solubility of noble gases in serpentine-rich materials.

  20. Noble Gas Signatures in Greenland - Tracing Glacial Meltwater Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Castro, M. C.; Hall, C. M.; Aciego, S.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    This study is meant to explore the information noble gases can provide in glacial environments with respect to glacial meltwater sources, relative source contributions, water residence times, and spatial location where this glacial meltwater originates in the ice sheet. Ultimately, we seek to improve our understanding on the dynamics of these massive ice sheets, critical for the major role they play on climate change. This is possible due to the conservative nature of noble gases and temperature dependency of their concentrations in water in equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW) allowing for calculation of noble gas temperatures (NGTs) and, under certain assumptions, estimation of the altitude at which glacial meltwater originated. In addition, crustally produced isotopes such as He accumulate in water over time, allowing for estimation of water residence times. Glacial meltwater samples were collected and analyzed for noble gas concentrations and isotopic ratios at five different locations in southern Greenland, between sea level and 1221 m. All samples are enriched in He with respect to ASW and are depleted in all other noble gases. Two patterns are apparent. The first one presents a relative Ar enrichment with respect to Ne, Kr, and Xe, a pattern first observed in high-altitude springs in the Galápagos Islands. The second one displays a mass-dependent pattern, a pattern first observed in Michigan rainwater samples. Most samples point to equilibration temperatures at ~0°C and altitudes between 1000 m and 2000 m, values which are consistent with both temperatures and elevations in Greenland. He concentrations vary between 1.1 and 7 times that of ASW and suggest glacial meltwater ages between ~170 and 1150 yrs, a result which is consistent with a preliminary tritium analysis. He isotopes point to surface (precipitation as snow and rainfall) contributions for most samples between ~60% and 90% with a ~10% - 40% crustal contribution from groundwater.

  1. Nuclear monitoring by nonradioactive noble gas sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fearey, B.L.; Nakhleh, C.W.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The perceived importance of measuring the xenon and krypton isotopics of nuclear activities has increased substantially in recent years. We have performed a systems analysis and theoretical simulation of the production, atmospheric dispersion, and isotopic abundances of noble-gas fission products, addressing several questions of interest, including: the relative isotopic variation as a function of nuclear fuel composition, reactor operational history, reactor type, distance from stack, and ambient meteorological conditions. Of particular importance in this analysis was the question of back-calculating process parameters of interest given noble-gas isotopic data. An analysis of the effect of measurement uncertainties was also performed. The results of these analyses indicate that this monitoring concept should be experimentally feasible.

  2. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  3. Possible solar noble-gas component in Hawaiian basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honda, M.; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A.; Clague, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    THE noble-gas elemental and isotopic composition in the Earth is significantly different from that of the present atmosphere, and provides an important clue to the origin and history of the Earth and its atmosphere. Possible candidates for the noble-gas composition of the primordial Earth include a solar-like component, a planetary-like component (as observed in primitive meteorites) and a component similar in composition to the present atmosphere. In an attempt to identify the contributions of such components, we have measured isotope ratios of helium and neon in fresh basaltic glasses dredged from Loihi seamount and the East Rift Zone of Kilauea1-3. We find a systematic enrichment in 20Ne and 21Ne relative to 22Ne, compared with atmospheric neon. The helium and neon isotope signatures observed in our samples can be explained by mixing of solar, present atmospheric, radiogenic and nucleogenic components. These data suggest that the noble-gas isotopic composition of the mantle source of the Hawaiian plume is different from that of the present atmosphere, and that it includes a significant solar-like component. We infer that this component was acquired during the formation of the Earth.

  4. Noble Gas Analysis in the Quest to Find "Regolithic" Howardites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, Julia A.; Hermann, S.; Herrin, J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Ott, U.

    2011-01-01

    The howardite meteorites consist of approximately 200 polymict breccias of eucrite (basaltic) and diogenite (orthopyroxenitic) material (collectively, the HED group) that originate from the asteroid belt. Infrared reflectance spectroscopy of asteroids and laboratory studies of HEDs have indicated that the asteroid 4-Vesta is the likely parent body, and the partially-demolished south pole may be the source region. Asteroid regolith formation processes may be responsible for a number of observed petrological features including impact melt clasts, reworked clasts and mosaisicm. We have identified such features in a study of 30 howardites and polymict eucrites, and developed a regolith grading scheme based on petrology. However, the true regolithic nature of the howardite suite is not well defined, and previous research has suggested correlations between Ni contents of 300 - 1200 micron / g, a minimal variation in Al2O3 content around 8-9 wt% and the presence of solar wind noble gases are key hallmarks of an ancient regolith on Vesta . Through combined petrological, compositional and noble gas research, we aim to better understand howardite petrological diversity, regolith formation processes on parent asteroids, and to establish what defines a truly "regolithic" howardite. Our research will play an integral part in the interpretation of data gathered by the Dawn mission. Here we report the preliminary results from our noble gas analyses of four howardites: LEW 85313, EET 99408, MET 96500 and PCA 02066. Bulk major element compositional data have been collected, further petrological data for the HED group are reported by our colleagues, whilst trace-element analyses are underway. Our work will investigate the extent of whether previously described Ni, Al2O3 and noble gas characteristics are in fact indicative of a "regolithic" howardite.

  5. Cucurbit[6]uril: A Possible Host for Noble Gas Atoms.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2015-08-27

    Density functional and ab initio molecular dynamics studies are carried out to investigate the stability of noble gas encapsulated cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) systems. Interaction energy, dissociation energy and dissociation enthalpy are calculated to understand the efficacy of CB[6] in encapsulating noble gas atoms. CB[6] could encapsulate up to three Ne atoms having dissociation energy (zero-point energy corrected) in the range of 3.4-4.1 kcal/mol, whereas due to larger size, only one Ar or Kr atom encapsulated analogues would be viable. The dissociation energy value for the second Ar atom is only 1.0 kcal/mol. On the other hand, the same for the second Kr is -0.5 kcal/mol, implying the instability of the system. The noble gas dissociation processes are endothermic in nature, which increases gradually along Ne to Kr. Kr encapsulated analogue is found to be viable at room temperature. However, low temperature is needed for Ne and Ar encapsulated analogues. The temperature-pressure phase diagram highlights the region in which association and dissociation processes of Kr@CB[6] would be favorable. At ambient temperature and pressure, CB[6] may be used as an effective noble gas carrier. Wiberg bond indices, noncovalent interaction indices, electron density, and energy decomposition analyses are used to explore the nature of interaction between noble gas atoms and CB[6]. Dispersion interaction is found to be the most important term in the attraction energy. Ne and Ar atoms in one Ng entrapped analogue are found to stay inside the cavity of CB[6] throughout the simulation at 298 K. However, during simulation Ng2 units in Ng2@CB[6] flip toward the open faces of CB[6]. After 1 ps, one Ne atom of Ne3@CB[6] almost reaches the open face keeping other two Ne atoms inside. At lower temperature (77 K), all the Ng atoms in Ngn@CB[6] remain well inside the cavity of CB[6] throughout the simulation time (1 ps).

  6. Noble gas encapsulation: clathrate hydrates and their HF doped analogues.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sukanta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2014-09-07

    The significance of clathrate hydrates lies in their ability to encapsulate a vast range of inert gases. Although the natural abundance of a few noble gases (Kr and Xe) is poor their hydrates are generally abundant. It has already been reported that HF doping enhances the stability of hydrogen hydrates and methane hydrates, which prompted us to perform a model study on helium, neon and argon hydrates with their HF doped analogues. For this purpose 5(12), 5(12)6(8) and their HF doped analogues are taken as the model clathrate hydrates, which are among the building blocks of sI, sII and sH types of clathrate hydrate crystals. We use the dispersion corrected and gradient corrected hybrid density functional theory for the calculation of thermodynamic parameters as well as conceptual density functional theory based reactivity descriptors. The method of the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation is used through atom centered density matrix propagation (ADMP) techniques to envisage the structural behaviour of different noble gas hydrates on a 500 fs timescale. Electron density analysis is carried out to understand the nature of Ng-OH2, Ng-FH and Ng-Ng interactions. The current results noticeably demonstrate that the noble gas (He, Ne, and Ar) encapsulation ability of 5(12), 5(12)6(8) and their HF doped analogues is thermodynamically favourable.

  7. Neutron detection by scintillation of noble-gas excimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, Jacob Collin

    Neutron detection is a technique essential to homeland security, nuclear reactor instrumentation, neutron diffraction science, oil-well logging, particle physics and radiation safety. The current shortage of helium-3, the neutron absorber used in most gas-filled proportional counters, has created a strong incentive to develop alternate methods of neutron detection. Excimer-based neutron detection (END) provides an alternative with many attractive properties. Like proportional counters, END relies on the conversion of a neutron into energetic charged particles, through an exothermic capture reaction with a neutron absorbing nucleus (10B, 6Li, 3He). As charged particles from these reactions lose energy in a surrounding gas, they cause electron excitation and ionization. Whereas most gas-filled detectors collect ionized charge to form a signal, END depends on the formation of diatomic noble-gas excimers (Ar*2, Kr*2,Xe* 2) . Upon decaying, excimers emit far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons, which may be collected by a photomultiplier tube or other photon detector. This phenomenon provides a means of neutron detection with a number of advantages over traditional methods. This thesis investigates excimer scintillation yield from the heavy noble gases following the boron-neutron capture reaction in 10B thin-film targets. Additionally, the thesis examines noble-gas excimer lifetimes with relationship to gas type and gas pressure. Experimental data were collected both at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research, and on a newly developed neutron beamline at the Maryland University Training Reactor. The components of the experiment were calibrated at NIST and the University of Maryland, using FUV synchrotron radiation, neutron imaging, and foil activation techniques, among others. Computer modeling was employed to simulate charged-particle transport and excimer photon emission within the experimental apparatus. The observed excimer

  8. NOBLE GAS PRODUCTION FROM MERCURY SPALLATION AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, Joe R; Lu, Wei; Schwahn, Scott O

    2013-01-01

    Calculations for predicting the distribution of the products of spallation reactions between high energy protons and target materials are well developed and are used for design and operational applications in many projects both within DOE and in other arenas. These calculations are based on theory and limited experimental data that verifies rates of production of some spallation products exist. At the Spallation Neutron Source, a helium stream from the mercury target flows through a system to remove radioactivity from this mercury target offgas. The operation of this system offers a window through which the production of noble gases from mercury spallation by protons may be observed. This paper describes studies designed to measure the production rates of twelve noble gas isotopes within the Spallation Neutron Source mercury target.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of convection in laser-polarized xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the flow and diffusion of laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas undergoing convection above evaporating laser-polarized liquid xenon. The large xenon NMR signal provided by the laser-polarization technique allows more rapid imaging than one can achieve with thermally polarized gas-liquid systems, permitting shorter time-scale events such as rapid gas flow and gas-liquid dynamics to be observed. Two-dimensional velocity-encoded imaging shows convective gas flow above the evaporating liquid xenon, and also permits the measurement of enhanced gas diffusion near regions of large velocity variation.

  10. Noble Gas Signatures in Athabasca Glacier - Tracing Glacial Meltwater Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Hall, C. M.; Castro, M. C.; Aciego, S.; Arendt, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a noble gas study in glacial meltwater (GMW) from the Athabasca Glacier (AG) in the Columbia Icefield, Canada. It constrains the relative contributions of GMW sources, water residence times, and spatial locations where the GMW originates in the alpine glacier. This is possible due to the conservative nature of noble gases and temperature dependency of their concentrations in water in equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW) which allows for estimation of the altitude at which GMW originated. In addition, crustal He accumulates in water over time, allowing for estimation of water residence times. Water samples were collected in the morning on selected dates in May and July 2011 at two locations about 200 m apart near the terminus area at altitudes between 2000 m and 2100 m. Eight samples were collected in six different days. Results show that the major source of subglacial meltwater is ASW rather than old, compressed glacial ice, which has a distinct noble gas signature not seen in our samples. Given that, GMW samples from the AG do deviate to a certain extent from the ASW values corresponding to measured water temperature and altitude at collection points. Two patterns are observed in the concentrations of the AG samples. The first one presents a relative Ar enrichment with respect to Ne, Kr, and Xe, first observed in high-altitude springs in the Galápagos Islands (Warrier et al., 2012). The second one displays a mass-dependent pattern, first observed in Michigan rainwater (Warrier et al., 2013). A preliminary Xe analysis indicates equilibration altitudes between 2500 m and 3400 m, values compatible with local topography. Samples present He excess of 4% to 91%, and suggest an average residence time of ~400 yrs. References:Warrier, R. B., Castro, M. C., and Hall, C. M. (2012), Recharge and source-water insights from the Galapagos Islands using noble gases and stable isotopes, Water Resour. Res., 48, W03508, doi:10.1029/2011WR010954. Warrier, R. B., Castro

  11. Using 220Rn to calibrate liquid noble gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Yamashita, M.; Takeda, A.; Kishimoto, K.; Moriyama, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we describe 220Rn calibration source that was developed for liquid noble gas detectors. The key advantage of this source is that it can provide 212Bi-212 Po consecutive events, which enables us to evaluate the vertex resolution of a detector at low energy by comparing low-energy events of 212Bi and corresponding higher-energy α-rays from 212Po. Since 220Rn is a noble gas, a hot metal getter can be used when introduced using xenon as the carrier gas. In addition, no long-life radioactive isotopes are left behind in the detector after the calibration is complete; this has clear advantage over the use of 222Rn which leaves longlife radioactivity, i.e., 210Pb. Using a small liquid xenon test chamber, we developed a system to introduce 220Rn via the xenon carrier gas; we demonstrated the successful introduction of 6 × 102 220Rn atoms in our test environment.

  12. Heuristic overlap-exchange model of noble gas chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, Frank J.

    2004-05-01

    It is now generally recognized that overlap-exchange interactions are the primary cause of the medium-dependent magnetic shielding (chemical shift) in all noble gases except helium, although the attractive electrostatic-dispersion (van der Waals) interactions play an indirect role in determining the penetration of the interacting species into the repulsive overlap-exchange region. The short-range nature of these overlap-exchange interactions, combined with the fact that they often can be approximated by simple functions of the overlap of the wave functions of the interacting species, suggests a useful semiempirical model of these chemical shifts. In it the total shielding is the sum of shieldings due to pairwise interactions of the noble gas atom with the individual atoms of the medium, with the "atomic" shielding terms either estimated by simple functions of the atomic overlap integrals averaged over their Boltzmann-weighted separations, or determined by fits to experimental data in systems whose complexity makes the former procedure impractical. Results for 129Xe chemical shifts in the noble gases and in a variety of molecular and condensed systems, including families of n-alkanes, straight-chain alcohols, and the endohedral compounds Xe@C60 and Xe@C70 are encouraging for the applicability of the model to systems of technical and biomedical interest.

  13. Helium Solubility in Cyclosilicates and Implications for Noble Gas Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Kelley, S. P.; Cooper, R. F.; Parman, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    It is commonly assumed that noble gases strictly flux from the mantle to the atmosphere, with negligible recycling, because noble gases are thought to be extremely insoluble in all minerals. To test this hypothesis, we have experimentally determined the He solubility in a suite of cyclosilicate minerals: beryl, tourmaline and cordierite. The experiments were run in a gas pressure vessel. Run products were analyzed by UV laser ablation, noble gas mass spectrometry. He has a remarkably high solubility (>1000 ppm/1.8 kbar PHe) in cyclosilicates with nominally vacant six-member Si-Al-tetrahedra rings. Cyclosilicates with nominally occupied ring sites have substantially lower solubility. This suggests that He dissolution is facilitated by unfilled six-member rings. If true, He should have a high solubility in other minerals that include ring sites, such as phyllosilicates and amphiboles. Subduction zones commonly recycle these minerals, providing a possible mechanism for recycling of noble gases back into the mantle. Gem quality, natural, polished crystals of each mineral were placed into graphite capsules. Pure He gas was used as the pressure medium (1800 bar), allowing for precise control of PHe. Temperatures were held at 750 C and the experimental durations were 8 hours. A capsule of hydrated MgO powder was loaded in the TZM to maintain a non-zero fugacity of water during the experiment. Close visual inspection of the run products gave no indication of breakdown products. Depth profiles (10s of microns) of the mineral faces were completed using a 193 nm excimer laser. Multiple measurements were made on each phase. He concentrations were homogenous, both vertically and horizontally, indicating a close approach to equilibrium and absence of inclusions. Compared to tourmaline, we observe that He is >1000 and >100 times more soluble in cordierite and beryl, respectively. The ring sites, also known as A sites, in beryl and cordierite are nominally vacant, where as the

  14. Solubility controlled noble gas fractionation during magmatic degassing: Implications for noble gas compositions of primary melts of OIB and MORB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Junji; Burnard, Pete G.

    2005-02-01

    Noble gas abundances in basaltic glasses from ocean islands (OIBs) are generally lower than those of mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORBs), contrary to most geodynamic models which usually require that the source of OIBs is less degassed (resulting in higher primordial noble gas abundances) and more trace element enriched (resulting in higher radiogenic noble gas abundances) than the MORB source. Therefore, noble gas abundances in OIBs are often thought to have been reduced by extensive gas loss from the magma before eruption. The extent of magmatic degassing can be tested as it will cause characteristic changes in the composition of the volatiles; notably the 4He/ 40Ar* ratio (where 40Ar* is 40Ar corrected for atmospheric contamination) will increase in residual volatiles due to the higher solubility of He relative to Ar. The degree of He-Ar fractionation for a given fraction of gas loss depends on the ratio of the solubilities, S He/S Ar, which is sensitive to (among other things) the CO 2 and H 2O content of the basalt at the time of degassing. From a global database of OIB and MORB glasses, we show that 4He/ 40Ar* ratios of MORB glasses are broadly consistent with degassing of a magma with an initial 40Ar of ≈1.5 × 10 -5 ccSTP/g, i.e., similar to that of the "popping rock." However, OIB glasses generally have lower 40Ar* concentration for a given 4He/ 40Ar*. While this would appear to require lower 40Ar* abundances in the undegassed OIB magmas, the higher volatile contents of OIBs will reduce S He/S Ar (relative to MORBs) during degassing. By modeling S He/S Ar in OIBs, it is possible to show that extensive degassing of OIBs can occur without dramatically increasing the 4He/ 40Ar* ratio. We show that undegassed 40Ar concentrations of OIB magmas were probably similar to those of MORBs.

  15. Mechanical response of noble gas films to an oscillating substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hajime; Taniguchi, Junko; Suzuki, Masaru; Miura, Kouji; Arakawa, Ichiro

    2012-12-01

    We carried out quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) experiments for Xe films adsorbed on an exfoliated single-crystalline graphite substrate (Xe/Gr) and Kr 1ms adsorbed on a synthetic mica substrate (Kr/mica) around LN2 temperature. For Xe/Gr, it was found that the resonance frequency decreases greatly around the first layer completion, while it does not decrease at low coverages. The observed behavior is similar to that of Kr films on a graphite substrate (Kr/Gr). This demonstrates that the layer completion strongly affects the sliding motion of noble gas films on graphite.

  16. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Métayer, Olivier; Saurel, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOS named "Noble Abel stiffened gas," this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular "Stiffened Gas (SG)" EOS. It is a combination of the so-called "Noble-Abel" and "stiffened gas" equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.

  17. Structural Measurements from Images of Noble Gas Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadman, Robert V.; Kadlecek, Stephen J.; Emami, Kiarash; MacDuffie Woodburn, John; Vahdat, Vahid; Ishii, Masaru; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of externally polarized noble gases such as ^3He has been used for pulmonary imaging for more than a decade. Because gas diffusion is impeded by the alveoli, the diffusion coefficient of gas in the lung, measured on a time scale of milliseconds, is reduced compared to that of the same gas mixture in the absence of restrictions. When the alveolar walls decay, as in emphysema, diffusivity in the lung increases. In this paper, the relationship between diffusion measurements and the size of the restricting structures will be discussed. The simple case of diffusion in an impermeable cylinder, a structure similar to the upper respiratory airways in mammals, has been studied. A procedure will be presented by which airways of order 2 mm in diameter may be accurately measured; demonstration experiments with plastic tubes will also be presented. The additional developments needed before this technique becomes practical will be briefly discussed.

  18. Interaction of the Fe + cation with heavy noble gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Christoph; Schwarz, Joseph; Koch, Wolfram; Schwarz, Helmut

    1995-09-01

    The diatomic iron-noble gas complexes FeAr+, FeKr+, FeXe+, and FeRn+ have been theoretically investigated by means of quantum-chemical calculations including an extensive treatment of electron correlation. Potential energy curves and spectroscopic constants for the lowest 4Δ and 6Δ states are derived from an open-shell coupled-cluster approach and the relative energies of all seven low-lying electronic states are evaluated by the multireference configuration interaction method. While in FeAr+ the lowest quartet and sextet states are found to be energetically almost degenerate, the heavier Fe+-noble gas molecules are predicted to exhibit 4Φ ground states. From a qualitative point of view bonding in these species is shown to be electrostatic in origin with intrinsically higher interaction energies for the quartet as compared to the sextet states. For calibration purposes, also an accurate calculation of the 4F(4s03d7)-6D(4s13d6) energy difference in the atomic Fe+ cation is provided.

  19. Noble gas isotopic composition as a key reference parameter in a planetary atmospheric evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.

    2010-12-01

    The isotopic composition of noble gases is a key reference parameter in discussing the evolution of planetary atmospheres. Currently, two widely occurring noble gas components are identified in the early solar system, one is the Solar Wind noble gas (SW-noble gas, hereafter) and another is the Q-noble gas in unaltered meteorites: both noble gases are characterized by their ubiquitous occurrence and high isotopic homogeneity. Since the SW-noble gas is directly ejected from the Sun, it has been assumed to be a good proxy of the average noble gas isotopic composition in the Sun, namely the solar noble gas. The systematic enrichment of the heavier isotopes in the Q-noble gas relative to the SW-noble gas is then commonly attributed to its isotopic fractionation from the SW-noble gas. However, the isotopic compositions of the SW-noble gas either implanted on lunar soils or trapped by artificial targets show considerable isotopic variation depending on the velocity of the Solar Wind. Therefore, it is important to examine how closely the SW-noble gas represents the indigenous solar noble gas component or the mean isotopic composition of noble gases of the Sun. Here we show that the isotopic composition of the SW-noble gas is substantially fractionated relative to the solar value, and therefore should not be used as a reference parameter. We further suggest that the post D-burning Q-noble gas (see below) is the better proxy of the solar noble gas, and this should be used as a reference of the Solar noble gas isotopic composition in discussing the planetary atmospheric evolution. The most distinct difference between the Q- and the SW-noble gas is apparent in a 3He/4He isotopic ratio: 4.64e-4 in Q-He [1], but 1.23e-4 in SW-He[2]. The difference is attributed to the conversion of deuteron (D) to 3He in the Sun, namely the D-burning [3], due to high temperature during the pre-main sequence stage of the Sun. With the use of recent data on D/H ratios from helio-seismology [4] and

  20. Noble Gas Migration Experiment to Support the Detection of Underground Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Woods, Vincent T.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Lowrey, Justin D.; Lukins, Craig D.; Suarez, Reynold; Humble, Paul H.; Ellefson, Mark D.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Zhong, Lirong; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Prinke, Amanda M.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Mackley, Rob D.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Emer, Dudley; Biegalski, S.

    2016-03-01

    A Noble Gas Migration Experiment (NGME) funded by the National Center for Nuclear Security and conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore national Laboratory and National Security Technology provided critical on-site inspection (OSI) information related to the detection of an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) event using noble gas signatures.

  1. Development of a Liquefied Noble Gas Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, Ezra; White, Aaron; Aidala, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Liquefied noble gas detectors have been used for various applications in recent years for detecting neutrinos, neutrons, photons, and potentially dark matter. The University of Michigan is developing a detector with liquid argon to produce scintillation light and ionization electrons. Our data collection method will allow high-resolution energy measurement and spatial reconstruction of detected particles by using multi-pixel silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) and a cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire endplate. We have already designed a liquid argon condenser and purification unit surrounded by an insulating vacuum, constructed circuitry for temperature and pressure sensors, and created software to obtain high-accuracy sensor readouts. The status of detector development will be presented. Funded through the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project.

  2. INGAS: Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System for radioxenon measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doost-Mohammadi, V.; Afarideh, H.; Etaati, G. R.; Safari, M. J.; Rouhi, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System (INGAS) will be introduced. This system is based on beta-gamma coincidence technique and consists of a well-type NaI(Tl) as gamma or X radiation detector and a cylindrical plastic scintillator to detect beta or conversion electron. Standard NIM modules were utilized to detect coincidence events of detectors. Both the beta and gamma detectors were appropriately calibrated. The efficiency curve of gamma detector for volume geometry was obtained by comparing the results of gamma point sources measurements and simulations of GATE V7.0 Monte Carlo code. The performance of detection system was checked by injection of 222Rn and 131mXe gaseous source in the detection cell. The minimum detectable activity of the system for 133Xe is 1.240±0.024 mBq for 24 h measurement time.

  3. Noble gas partitioning behavior in the Sleipner Vest hydrocarbon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.; Lawson, M.; Warr, O.; Mabry, J.; Byrne, D. J.; Meurer, W. P.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Noble gases are chemically inert and variably soluble in crustal fluids. They are primarily introduced into hydrocarbon reservoirs through exchange with formation waters, and can be used to assess migration pathways, mechanisms and reservoir storage. Of particular interest is the role groundwater plays in hydrocarbon transport, which is reflected in hydrocarbon-water volume ratios. We present compositional, stable isotope and noble gas isotope and abundance data from the Sleipner Vest field, in the Norwegian North Sea. Sleipner gases are generated from primary cracking of kerogen and the thermal cracking of oil, sourced from type II marine source, with relatively homogeneous maturities and a range in vitrinite reflectance (1.2-1.7%). Gases are hosted in the lower shoreface sandstones of the Jurassic Hugin formation, which is sealed by the Jurassic Upper Draupne and Heather formations. Gases are composed of N2 (0.6-0.9%), CO2 (5.4-15.3%) and hydrocarbons (69-80%). Helium isotopes (3He/4He) are radiogenic and range from 0.065 to 0.116 RA, showing a small mantle contribution, consistent with Ne isotopes (20Ne/22Ne from 9.70-9.91; 21Ne/22Ne from 0.0290-0.0344) and Ar isotopes (40Ar/36Ar from 315-489). 20Ne/36Ar, 84Kr/36Ar and 132Xe/36Ar values are systematically higher relative to air saturated water ratios. These data are discussed within the framework of several conceptual models: i) Total gas-stripping model, which defines the minimum volume of water to have interacted with the hydrocarbon phase; ii) Equilibrium model, assuming simple equilibration between groundwater and hydrocarbon phase at reservoir P,T and salinity; and iii) Open and closed system gas-stripping models. Using Ne-Ar, we estimate gas-water ratios for the Sleipner system of 0.02-0.09, which compare with geologic gas-water estimates of ~0.24, and suggest more groundwater interaction than a static system estimate. Kr and Xe show evidence for an additional source or process involving oil or sediments.

  4. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-21

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-I{sub h}, ice-I{sub c}, ice-II, and C{sub 0} interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C{sub 0} water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C{sub 0} hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems.

  5. An isotope separator for small noble gas samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, B. E.; Rauber, D. F.; Thonnard, N.; Willis, R. D.

    1987-11-01

    A Wien filter isotope enrichment system has been combined with a small turbomolecular pump to form a closed isotope separator for small noble gas samples. Atoms which leave the exit aperture of the plasma discharge ion source without being ionized are circulated back into the source through a feedback line. The system can be operated for several hours in a closed mode to collect up to 50% of the total number of atoms of a selected isotope (e.g. 81Kr) out of a small gas sample of only 2 × 10 -3 cm 3 STP. Ions are implanted at 10 kV into an aluminized Kapton foil after a flight distance of 150 cm. A beam stabilization system centers the ion beam in two perpendicular directions onto a target aperture to maintain a high enrichment factor of at least 10 3 over extended periods of time. Calibration of the enrichment process is achieved by isotope dilution. The system is a key part of the sample processing for 81Kr and 85Kr analysis by laser resonance ionization spectroscopy for applications in isotope geophysics.

  6. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-Ih, ice-Ic, ice-II, and C0 interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C0 water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C0 hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems.

  7. Noble gas trapping and fractionation during synthesis of carbonaceous matter. [in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, U.; Mack, R.; Chang, S.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of noble gas entrapment during synthesis of carbonaceous, macromolecular, and kerogen-like substances is presented. High molecular weight organic matter synthesized in aqueous condensation reactions contained little gas, and the composition was consistent with fractionation due to noble gas solubility in water; however, propane soot produced during a modified Miller-Urey experiment in an aritificial gas mixture contained high concentrations of trapped noble gases that displayed strong elemental fractionation from their reservoirs. It is concluded that theses experiemnts show that processes exist for synthesis of carbonaceous carriers that result in high noble gas concentrations and strong elemental fractionation at temperatures well above those required by absorption to achieve similar effects.

  8. Determination of natural in vivo noble-gas concentrations in human blood.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S; Livingstone, David M; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry.

  9. Pyroxenes from Governador Valadares and Lafayette: A Nitrogen and Noble Gas Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Herrmann, S.; Ott, U.

    2006-03-01

    We present new noble gas and nitrogen data on pyroxene separates from Lafayette and Governador Valadares [rad. 4He, cosmogenic nuclides (in Ne, Ar), martian interior, fractionated and unfractionated martian, and fractionated terrestrial atmosphere].

  10. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  11. Noble Gas Polarimetry Using Rb EPR Frequency Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z. L.; Jeong, K.; Houghtby, E.; Paskvan, T.; Limes, M. E.; Saam, B.

    2014-05-01

    EPR frequency shifts of optically polarized alkali-metal atoms can be exploited for polarimetry of noble-gas nuclei polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping. Our group recently measured the enhancement factor κ0 = 493 for Rb-129Xe, which characterizes the electron wave-function overlap during collisions and is crucial to the calibration of the frequency-shift for 129Xe polarimetry. This type of polarimetry is useful in several applications involving optically polarized 129Xe; our particular motivation is an in situ measurement of absolute 129Xe polarization within the optical pumping cell of a flow-through 129Xe polarizer. This application has some particular challenges, and we have initially observed some unexpected shifts in the 87Rb EPR frequency measurement on board the polarizer. In effort to disentangle these apparent systematic effects, we have constructed a separate experiment to characterize Rb EPR shifts for both 3He and 129Xe in sealed cells. We present results and analysis of these experiments and discuss implications for using this method in flow-through polarizers. NSF PHY-0855482

  12. EXTERNAL PHOTOEVAPORATION OF THE SOLAR NEBULA: JUPITER's NOBLE GAS ENRICHMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Monga, Nikhil; Desch, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We present a model explaining the elemental enrichments in Jupiter's atmosphere, particularly the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe. While He, Ne, and O are depleted, seven other elements show similar enrichments (∼3 times solar, relative to H). Being volatile, Ar is difficult to fractionate from H{sub 2}. We argue that external photoevaporation by far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from nearby massive stars removed H{sub 2}, He, and Ne from the solar nebula, but Ar and other species were retained because photoevaporation occurred at large heliocentric distances where temperatures were cold enough (≲ 30 K) to trap them in amorphous water ice. As the solar nebula lost H, it became relatively and uniformly enriched in other species. Our model improves on the similar model of Guillot and Hueso. We recognize that cold temperatures alone do not trap volatiles; continuous water vapor production is also necessary. We demonstrate that FUV fluxes that photoevaporated the disk generated sufficient water vapor in regions ≲ 30 K to trap gas-phase species in amorphous water ice in solar proportions. We find more efficient chemical fractionation in the outer disk: whereas the model of Guillot and Hueso predicts a factor of three enrichment when only <2% of the disk mass remains, we find the same enrichments when 30% of the disk mass remains. Finally, we predict the presence of ∼0.1 M {sub ⊕} of water vapor in the outer solar nebula and protoplanetary disks in H II regions.

  13. The MSFC Noble Gas Research Laboratory (MNGRL): A NASA Investigator Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Noble-gas isotopes are a well-established technique for providing detailed temperature-time histories of rocks and meteorites. We have established the MSFC Noble Gas Research Laboratory (MNGRL) at Marshall Space Flight Center to serve as a NASA investigator facility in the wake of the closure of the JSC laboratory formerly run by Don Bogard. The MNGRL lab was constructed to be able to measure all the noble gases, particularly Ar-Ar and I-Xe radioactive dating to find the formation age of rocks and meteorites, and Ar/Kr/Ne cosmic-ray exposure ages to understand when the meteorites were launched from their parent planets.

  14. Review: gas-phase ion chemistry of the noble gases: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grandinetti, Felice

    2011-01-01

    This review article surveys recent experimental and theoretical advances in the gas-phase ion chemistry of the noble gases. Covered issues include the interaction of the noble gases with metal and non-metal cations, the conceivable existence of covalent noble-gas anions, the occurrence of ion-molecule reactions involving singly-charged xenon cations, and the occurrence of bond-forming reactions involving doubly-charged cations. Research themes are also highlighted, that are expected to attract further interest in the future.

  15. Experimental studies and model analysis of noble gas fractionation in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ding, Xin; Kennedy, B. Mack.; Evans, William C.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The noble gases, which are chemically inert under normal terrestrial conditions but vary systematically across a wide range of atomic mass and diffusivity, offer a multicomponent approach to investigating gas dynamics in unsaturated soil horizons, including transfer of gas between saturated zones, unsaturated zones, and the atmosphere. To evaluate the degree to which fractionation of noble gases in the presence of an advective–diffusive flux agrees with existing theory, a simple laboratory sand column experiment was conducted. Pure CO2 was injected at the base of the column, providing a series of constant CO2 fluxes through the column. At five fixed sampling depths within the system, samples were collected for CO2 and noble gas analyses, and ambient pressures were measured. Both the advection–diffusion and dusty gas models were used to simulate the behavior of CO2 and noble gases under the experimental conditions, and the simulations were compared with the measured depth-dependent concentration profiles of the gases. Given the relatively high permeability of the sand column (5 ´ 10−11 m2), Knudsen diffusion terms were small, and both the dusty gas model and the advection–diffusion model accurately predicted the concentration profiles of the CO2 and atmospheric noble gases across a range of CO2 flux from ?700 to 10,000 g m−2 d−1. The agreement between predicted and measured gas concentrations demonstrated that, when applied to natural systems, the multi-component capability provided by the noble gases can be exploited to constrain component and total gas fluxes of non-conserved (CO2) and conserved (noble gas) species or attributes of the soil column relevant to gas transport, such as porosity, tortuosity, and gas saturation.

  16. Applicability of Monte-Carlo Simulation to Equipment Design of Radioactive Noble Gas Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirotaka; Hattori, Kanako; Umemura, Norihiro

    In the nuclear facilities, radioactive noble gas is continuously monitored by using the radioactive noble gas monitor with beta-sensitive plastic scintillation radiation detector. The detection efficiency of the monitor is generally calibrated by using a calibration loop and standard radioactive noble gases such as 85Kr. In this study, the applicability of PHITS to the equipment design of the radioactive noble gas monitor was evaluated by comparing the calculated results to the test results obtained by actual calibration loop tests to simplify the radiation monitor design evaluation. It was confirmed that the calculated results were well matched to the test results of the monitor after the modeling. In addition, the key parameters for equipment design, such as thickness of detector window or depth of the sampler, were also specified and evaluated.

  17. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  18. Carbon and Noble Gas Isotope Banks in Two-Phase Flow: Changes in Gas Composition During Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In conjunction with the rise of unconventional oil and gas production, there has been a recent rise in interest in noble gas and carbon isotope changes that can occur during the migration of natural gas. Natural gas geochemistry studies use bulk hydrocarbon composition, carbon isotopes, and noble gas isotopes to determine the migration history of gases from source to reservoir, and to trace fugitive gas leaks from reservoirs to shallow groundwater. We present theoretical and experimental work, which helps to explain trends observed in gas composition in various migration scenarios. Noble gases are used as tracers for subsurface fluid flow due to distinct initial compositions in air-saturated water and natural gases. Numerous field studies have observed enrichments and depletions of noble gases after gas-water interaction. A theoretical two-phase gas displacement model shows that differences in noble gas solubility will cause volatile gas components will become enriched at the front of gas plumes, leaving the surrounding residual water stripped of dissolved gases. Changes in hydrocarbon gas composition are controlled by gas solubility in both formation water and residual oil. In addition to model results, we present results from a series of two-phase flow experiments. These results demonstrate the formation of a noble gas isotope banks ahead of a main CO2 gas plume. Additionally, we show that migrating hydrocarbon gas plumes can sweep biogenic methane from groundwater, significantly altering the isotope ratio of the gas itself. Results from multicomponent, two-phase flow experiments qualitatively agree with the theoretical model, and previous field studies. These experimentally verified models for gas composition changes can be used to aid source identification of subsurface gases.

  19. Determining noble gas partitioning within a CO2-H2O system at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, Oliver; Rochelle, Christopher A.; Masters, Andrew; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2015-06-01

    Quantifying the distribution of noble gases between phases is essential for using these inert trace gases to track the processes controlling multi-phase subsurface systems. Here we present experimental data that defines noble gas partitioning for two phase CO2-water systems. These are at the pressure and temperature range relevant for engineered systems used for anthropogenic carbon capture and geological storage (CCS) technologies, and CO2-rich natural gas reservoirs (CO2 density range 169-656 kg/m3 at 323-377 K and 89-134 bar). The new partitioning data are compared to predictions of noble gas partitioning determined in low-pressure, pure noble gas-water systems for all noble gases except neon and radon. At low CO2 density there was no difference between measured noble gas partitioning and that predicted in pure noble gas-water systems. At high CO2 density, however, partition coefficients express significant deviation from pure noble gas-water systems. At 656 kg/m3, these deviations are -35%, 74%, 113% and 319% for helium, argon, krypton and xenon, respectively. A second order polynomial fit to the data for each noble gas describes the deviation from the pure noble gas-water system as a function of CO2 density. We argue that the difference between pure noble gas-water systems and the high density CO2-water system is due to an enhanced degree of molecular interactions occurring within the dense CO2 phase due to the combined effect of inductive and dispersive forces acting on the noble gases. As the magnitude of these forces are related to the size and polarisability of each noble gas, xenon followed by krypton and argon become significantly more soluble within dense CO2. In the case of helium repulsive forces dominate and so it becomes less soluble as a function of CO2 density.

  20. Helium Isotopes and Noble Gas Abundances of Cave Dripping Water in Three Caves in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. T.; Shen, C. C.; Tan, M.; Li, T.; Uemura, R.; Asami, R.

    2015-12-01

    Paleo-temperature recorded in nature archives is a critical parameter to understand climate change in the past. With advantages of unique inert chemical characteristics and sensitive solubilities with temperature, dissolved noble gases in speleothem inclusion water were recently proposed to retrieve terrestrial temperature history. In order to accurately apply this newly-developed speleothem noble gas temperature (NGT) as a reliable proxy, a fundamental issue about behaviors of noble gases in the karst should be first clarified. In this study, we measured noble gas contents in air and dripping water to evaluate any ratio deviation between noble gases. Cave dripping water samples was collected from three selected caves, Shihua Cave in northern China, Furong Cave in southwestern, and Gyukusen Cave in an island located in the western Pacific. For these caves are characterized by a thorough mixing and long-term storage of waters in a karst aquifer by the absence of seasonal oxygen isotope shifts. Ratios of dripping water noble gases are statistically insignificant from air data. Helium isotopic ratios in the dripping water samples match air value. The results indicate that elemental and isotopic signatures of noble gases from air can be frankly preserved in the epikarst and support the fidelity of NGT techniques.

  1. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. Noble gases in gas shales : Implications for gas retention and circulating fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sudeshna; Jones, Adrian; Verchovsky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Gas shales from three cores of Haynesville-Bossier formation have been analysed simultaneously for carbon, nitrogen and noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Xe) to constrain their source compositions and identify signatures associated with high gas retention. Ten samples from varying depths of 11785 to 12223 feet from each core, retrieved from their centres, have been combusted from 200-1200°C in incremental steps of 100°C, using 5 - 10 mg of each sample. Typically, Xe is released at 200°C and is largely adsorbed, observed in two of the three cores. The third core lacked any measureable Xe. High 40Ar/36Ar ratio up to 8000, is associated with peak release of nitrogen with distinctive isotopic signature, related to breakdown of clay minerals at 500°C. He and Ne are also mostly released at the same temperature step and predominantly hosted in the pore spaces of the organic matter associated with the clay. He may be produced from the uranium related to the organic matter. The enrichment factors of noble gases defined as (iX/36Ar)sample/(iX/36Ar)air where iX denotes any noble gas isotope, show Ne and Xe enrichment observed commonly in sedimentary rocks including shales (Podosek et al., 1980; Bernatowicz et al., 1984). This can be related to interaction of the shales with circulating fluids and diffusive separation of gases (Torgersen and Kennedy, 1999), implying the possibility of loss of gases from these shales. Interaction with circulating fluids (e.g. crustal fluids) have been further confirmed using 20Ne/N2, 36Ar/N2 and 4He/N2 ratios. Deviations of measured 4He/40Ar* (where 40Ar* represents radiogenic 40Ar after correcting for contribution from atmospheric Ar) from expected values has been used to monitor gas loss by degassing. Bernatowicz, T., Podosek, F.A., Honda, M., Kramer, F.E., 1984. The Atmospheric Inventory of Xenon and Noble Gases in Shales: The Plastic Bag Experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research 89, 4597-4611. Podosek, F.A., Honda, M., Ozima, M., 1980

  3. Noble gas loss may indicate groundwater flow across flow barriers in southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.M.; Bryant, Hudson G.; Stute, M.; Clark, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Average calculated noble gas temperatures increase from 10 to 22oC in groundwater from recharge to discharge areas in carbonate-rock aquifers of southern Nevada. Loss of noble gases from groundwater in these regional flow systems at flow barriers is the likely process that produces an increase in recharge noble gas temperatures. Emplacement of low permeability rock into high permeability aquifer rock and the presence of low permeability shear zones reduce aquifer thickness from thousands to tens of meters. At these flow barriers, which are more than 1,000 m lower than the average recharge altitude, noble gases exsolve from the groundwater by inclusion in gas bubbles formed near the barriers because of greatly reduced hydrostatic pressure. However, re-equilibration of noble gases in the groundwater with atmospheric air at the low altitude spring discharge area, at the terminus of the regional flow system, cannot be ruled out. Molecular diffusion is not an important process for removing noble gases from groundwater in the carbonate-rock aquifers because concentration gradients are small.

  4. Performance of the High Resolution, Multi-collector Helix MC Plus Noble Gas Mass Spectrometer at the Australian National University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Honda, Masahiko; Hamilton, Doug

    2016-12-01

    Performance of the Helix MC Plus noble gas mass spectrometer installed at the Australian National University (ANU) is reported. Results for sensitivity, mass discrimination and their linearity against partial pressure of noble gases, and mass resolution of the mass spectrometer are presented, and the results are compared with those of conventional noble gas mass spectrometers. The application of the five detectors on the Helix MC Plus in measuring various noble gas isotopes in multi-collector modes and the integration of the software drivers of peripheral hardware devices into the controlling program Qtegra of the mass spectrometer are discussed. High mass resolution (>1800) and mass resolving power (>8000) make this mass spectrometer unique in noble gas cosmo-geochemistry. It provides the capability to measure isobaric interference-free noble gas isotopes in multi-collector mode, significantly improves the accuracy to determine isotopic ratios, and greatly increases the efficiency of data acquisition.

  5. Solar Noble Gases in Polymict Ureilites and an Update on Ureilite Noble Gas Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Lohr, H. P.; Begemann, F.

    1993-07-01

    Ureilites are one of the least understood classes of meteorites; they show signs of being processed, but also appear to be primitive, with abundant carbon and trapped noble gases [1-6]. We have now begun to analyze a number of recently recovered specimens: one from the Saharan desert (Acfer 277) amd five from the Antarctic (LEW 85328, LEW 85440, EET 87720, FRO 90036, and FRO 90054). Analyses of Acfer 277, LEW 85328, and EET 87720 are complete (Table 1). Solar noble gases are present in polymict EET 87720, as shown by the three- isotope plot of Fig. 1. There, in contrast to the bulk data point for Acfer 277, data points for EET 87720 deviate from a mixing line between "typical" spallation Ne (as approximated here by the spallation-dominated 1800 degrees C step for EET 87720) and Ne-U [7] toward higher ^20Ne/^22Ne. A line fitted to the EET 87720 data points passes slightly below Ne-B [8]. The situation is similar for sample F1 from polymict EET 83309 [9], which is shown for comparison. Additional support for the presence of solar gases arises from the abundance of ^4He (~9 x 10^-5 cm^3 STP/g in EET 87720-F1, corrected for spallogenic contributions), which in both cases is far higher than in other ureilite bulk samples [6,10]. Also, in the ratio of spallation-corrected ^4He to trapped ^36Ar, these two polymict ureilites clearly stand out. Helium-4/argon-36 ratios in EET 87720-F1 and EET 83309-F1 are ~20 and ~28 respectively, at least 1 order of magnitude higher than in bulk monomict ureilites and 2 orders of magnitude higher than what appears typical of ureilite diamonds [6]. Nilpena, another polymict ureilite [11], also has a ^4He/^36Ar ratio (2.1 in Nilpena II-1 [7]) higher than all monomict ureilites but one (Dingo Pup Donga), indicating the presence of solar noble gases (in variable contents) as a possible general feature of polymict ureilites, similar to the presence in them of nitrogen with high delta(^15N/^14N) [12]. Monomict LEW 85328 has a very high (^22Ne

  6. Noble gas encapsulation into carbon nanotubes: Predictions from analytical model and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramani, Sree Ganesh; Singh, Devendra; Swathi, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    The energetics for the interaction of the noble gas atoms with the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated using an analytical model and density functional theory calculations. Encapsulation of the noble gas atoms, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe into CNTs of various chiralities is studied in detail using an analytical model, developed earlier by Hill and co-workers. The constrained motion of the noble gas atoms along the axes of the CNTs as well as the off-axis motion are discussed. Analyses of the forces, interaction energies, acceptance and suction energies for the encapsulation enable us to predict the optimal CNTs that can encapsulate each of the noble gas atoms. We find that CNTs of radii 2.98 - 4.20 Å (chiral indices, (5,4), (6,4), (9,1), (6,6), and (9,3)) can efficiently encapsulate the He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms, respectively. Endohedral adsorption of all the noble gas atoms is preferred over exohedral adsorption on various CNTs. The results obtained using the analytical model are subsequently compared with the calculations performed with the dispersion-including density functional theory at the M06 - 2X level using a triple-zeta basis set and good qualitative agreement is found. The analytical model is however found to be computationally cheap as the equations can be numerically programmed and the results obtained in comparatively very less time.

  7. Noble gas encapsulation into carbon nanotubes: Predictions from analytical model and DFT studies

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramani, Sree Ganesh; Singh, Devendra; Swathi, R. S.

    2014-11-14

    The energetics for the interaction of the noble gas atoms with the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated using an analytical model and density functional theory calculations. Encapsulation of the noble gas atoms, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe into CNTs of various chiralities is studied in detail using an analytical model, developed earlier by Hill and co-workers. The constrained motion of the noble gas atoms along the axes of the CNTs as well as the off-axis motion are discussed. Analyses of the forces, interaction energies, acceptance and suction energies for the encapsulation enable us to predict the optimal CNTs that can encapsulate each of the noble gas atoms. We find that CNTs of radii 2.98 − 4.20 Å (chiral indices, (5,4), (6,4), (9,1), (6,6), and (9,3)) can efficiently encapsulate the He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms, respectively. Endohedral adsorption of all the noble gas atoms is preferred over exohedral adsorption on various CNTs. The results obtained using the analytical model are subsequently compared with the calculations performed with the dispersion-including density functional theory at the M06 − 2X level using a triple-zeta basis set and good qualitative agreement is found. The analytical model is however found to be computationally cheap as the equations can be numerically programmed and the results obtained in comparatively very less time.

  8. Method and apparatus for noble gas atom detection with isotopic selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, G. Samuel; Payne, Marvin G.; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Parks, James E.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus and methods of operation are described for determining, with isotopic selectivity, the number of noble gas atoms in a sample. The analysis is conducted within an evacuated chamber which can be isolated by a valve from a vacuum pumping system capable of producing a pressure of 10.sup.-8 Torr. Provision is made to pass pulses of laser beams through the chamber, these pulses having wavelengths appropriate for the resonance ionization of atoms of the noble gas under analysis. A mass filter within the chamber selects ions of a specific isotope of the noble gas, and means are provided to accelerate these selected ions sufficiently for implantation into a target. Specific types of targets are discussed. An electron measuring device produces a signal relatable to the number of ions implanted into the target and thus to the number of atoms of the selected isotope of the noble gas removed from the gas sample. The measurement can be continued until a substantial fraction, or all, of the atoms in the sample have been counted. Furthermore, additional embodiments of the apparatus are described for bunching the atoms of a noble gas for more rapid analysis, and for changing the target for repetitive cycling of the gas in the chamber. The number of repetitions of the cyclic steps depend upon the concentration of the isotope of interest, the separative efficiency of the mass filter, etc. The cycles are continued until a desired selectivity is achieved. Also described are components and a method of operation for a pre-enrichment operation for use when an introduction of a total sample would elevate the pressure within the chamber to levels in excess of those for operation of the mass filter, specifically a quadrupole mass filter. Specific examples of three noble gas isotope analyses are described.

  9. Noble Gas Signatures in Groundwater and Rainwater on the Island of Maui, Hawaii - Developing a New Noble Gas Application in Fractured, Volcanic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M. C.; Niu, Y.; Warrier, R. B.; Hall, C. M.; Gingerich, S. B.; Scholl, M. A.; Bouvier, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work in the Galapagos Islands suggests that noble gas temperatures (NGTs) in fractured groundwater systems reflect the temperature of the ground surface at the time of infiltration rather than the mean annual air temperature (MAAT) value as commonly assumed in sedimentary systems where NGTs are typically used as indicators of past climate. This suggests that noble gases in fractured areas may record seasonality, and thus, provide information about timing of recharge in addition to location. Calculation of NGTs assumes that rain-derived recharge at the water table is in equilibrium with ground air. Lack of noble gas equilibration with respect to surface conditions, however, was observed in high-altitude springs in the Galapagos Islands and in a rainwater pilot study in Michigan, supporting the NGT seasonality hypothesis. Developing this new NGT application will lead to a better understanding of fractured groundwater flow systems and will contribute to improved water resource management plans. This study, carried out on Maui, Hawaii, is meant to test these hypotheses while improving knowledge of this island's groundwater flow system where limited hydrologic data are available. Here, we present the first results of noble gas analyses from samples collected in springs, groundwater wells and rainwater on northeast Maui. Results show that like most Michigan rainwater samples, rainwater from Maui is in disequilibrium with surface conditions and follows a mass-dependent pattern. Spring samples follow a similar pattern to that of rainwater and suggest that spring water originates directly from rainfall. These findings further support the hypothesis of NGT seasonality. However, while the atmospheric composition of noble gases points to direct supply from rainfall to spring aquifer systems, a direct connection between spring water and deeper aquifer levels or the mantle is apparent from He isotopic ratios which display an almost pure He mantle component in some springs.

  10. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  11. Calibration of Dissolved Noble Gas Mass Spectrometric Measurements by an Air-Water Equilibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, Darren; Matsumoto, Takuya; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Han, Liang-Feng; Klaus, Philipp; Wassenaar, Leonard; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Precise measurements by mass spectrometry of dissolved noble gases (He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe) in water samples require careful calibration against laboratory standards with known concentrations. Currently, air pipettes are used for day-to-day calibrations, making estimation of overall analytical uncertainties for dissolved noble gas measurements in water difficult. Air equilibrated water (AEW) is often used as a matrix-equivalent laboratory standard for dissolved gases in groundwater, because of the well-known and constant fractions of noble gases in the atmosphere. AEW standards, however, are only useful if the temperature and pressure of the gas-water equilibrium can be controlled and measured precisely (i.e., to better than 0.5%); contamination and partial sample degassing must also be prevented during sampling. Here we present the details of a new custom air-water equilibration system which consists of an insulated 600 liter tank filled with deionized water, held isothermally at a precise target temperature (<0.05 °C) through the use of a heat exchanger. The temperature and total dissolved gas of the water in the tank are monitored continually, as are atmospheric pressure and air temperature in the laboratory. Different noble gas concentration standards can be reliably produced by accurately controlling the water temperature of the equilibration system. Equilibration characteristics and reproducibility of this system for production of copper tubes containing known amounts of noble gases will be presented.

  12. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed.

  13. Photoionization of noble-gas atoms by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Astapenko, V. A. Svita, S. Yu.

    2014-11-15

    The photoionization of atoms of noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses of a corrected Gaussian shape is studied theoretically. Computations are performed in the context of perturbation theory using a simple expression for the total probability of photoionization of an atom by electromagnetic pulses. The features of this process are revealed and analyzed for various ranges of the parameters of the problem.

  14. Relationship between recent cave temperatures and noble gas temperatures derived from fluid inclusions of modern soda straw stalactites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palcsu, Laszlo; Papp, Laszlo; Major, Zoltan; Molnar, Mihaly

    2010-05-01

    Recently, strong effort is devoted to establish a new method to derive palaeotemperatures from noble gas (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) concentrations dissolved in fluid inclusions of speleothems [1-2]. It has been already shown that the water content of the speleothems can be determined via the water vapour pressure after the water has been released from the carbonate samples and collected in a cold finger and then heated up to room temperature. Additionally, the noble gas contents can be precisely measured with noble gas mass spectrometers. Based on these noble gas concentration data sets, a so-called noble gas temperature (NGT) can be calculated meaning a temperature at which the noble gases have been dissolved in water. To use these NGT's as a palaeoclimate proxy, one of the main questions is how these noble gas temperatures reflect the prevailing cave temperature in which the carbonate has grown. We studied noble gas significances in recent soda straw stalactites from more than ten Central European caves covering a temperature range of 1 to 14 °C. Kluge et al. (2008) has shown the soda straw stalactites might contain less excess air, hence they are more suitable samples to derive NGT's, because noble gas abundances from large air inclusions can mask the temperature information. The 14C ages of these soda straw dripstones were obtained to be recent or at least Holocene ages. Thus one can assume that the cave temperatures during carbonate formation were as same as at present. We measured the water and noble gas contents of numerous carbonate samples from soda straw stalactites and calculated noble gas temperatures by a precision of 1 °C or better. Comparing these temperatures with cave temperatures we obtained that they agree well within the uncertainty of the noble gas temperature determination. Therefore, we can conclude if diffusion of noble gas isotopes does not play a significant role in the carbonate lattice this new tool helps the palaeoclimate community to gain

  15. Physiological response of rats to delivery of helium and xenon: implications for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Sigaloff, K. C.; Kubatina, L. V.; Donahue, M. A.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; ALbert, M. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The physiological effects of various hyperpolarized helium and xenon MRI-compatible breathing protocols were investigated in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats, by continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, EKG, temperature and endotracheal pressure. The protocols included alternating breaths of pure noble gas and oxygen, continuous breaths of pure noble gas, breath-holds of pure noble gas for varying durations, and helium breath-holds preceded by two helium rinses. Alternate-breath protocols up to 128 breaths caused a decrease in oxygen saturation level of less than 5% for either helium or xenon, whereas 16 continuous-breaths caused a 31.5% +/- 2.3% decrease in oxygen saturation for helium and a 30.7% +/- 1. 3% decrease for xenon. Breath-hold protocols up to 25 s did not cause the oxygen saturation to fall below 90% for either of the noble gases. Oxygen saturation values below 90% are considered pathological. At 30 s of breath-hold, the blood oxygen saturation dropped precipitously to 82% +/- 0.6% for helium, and to 76.5% +/- 7. 4% for xenon. Breath-holds longer than 10 s preceded by pre-rinses caused oxygen saturation to drop below 90%. These findings demonstrate the need for standardized noble gas inhalation procedures that have been carefully tested, and for continuous physiological monitoring to ensure the safety of the subject. We find short breath-hold and alternate-breath protocols to be safe procedures for use in hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Experimental evidence for high noble gas solubilities in silicate melts under mantle pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Burkhard C.; Keppler, Hans

    2002-02-01

    The solubilities of Ar and Xe in Fe-free synthetic haplogranitic and tholeiitic melts were experimentally determined in the pressure range of 1-11 GPa and at temperatures between 1500 and 2000°C. Experiments were performed in a piston cylinder apparatus (1-3 GPa) and in a multi-anvil apparatus (2-11 GPa). The noble gas concentrations in the quenched glasses were determined with electron microprobe. As a function of pressure, Ar solubility increases linearly up to about 4-5 GPa where it reaches about 4.0 and 0.8 wt% for the haplogranitic and tholeiitic melt, respectively. At higher pressure the amount of dissolved Ar remains constant, suggesting that some threshold concentration is reached. The Xe solubility in tholeiite melt exhibits a very similar pattern. It increases linearly up to about 6 GPa, where a threshold concentration of 0.8 wt% is reached. A further increase of pressure up to 11 GPa does not result in changes in Xe solubility. The leveling off in noble gas solubility at high pressures may imply that the interstitial sites in the melt structure, suitable for the accommodation of noble gas atoms, are fully occupied. Indeed, the experimental data can be successfully reproduced with the Langmuir isotherm, implying a solubility model in which the gas atoms occupy a certain population of interstitial sites. However, the data can be equally well described by a model assuming mixing of the noble gas atoms with the oxygen atoms of the silicate melt. From a thermodynamic point of view, the constant noble gas solubility at high pressures simply implies that the partial molar volumes of the respective noble gas in the fluid and in the melt are equal. Our results differ from those of Chamorro-Perez et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 145 (1996) 97-107; Nature 393 (1998) 352-355] who reported an abrupt, order-of-magnitude drop of Ar solubility in silica and olivine melt at around 5 GPa, suggesting that melt densification results in an abrupt decrease of the hole size

  17. Targets Involved in Cardioprotection by the Non-Anesthetic Noble Gas Helium.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nina C; Smit, Kirsten F; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Research data from the past decade indicate that noble gases like xenon and helium exert profound cardioprotection when applied before, during or after organ ischemia. Of all noble gases, especially helium, has gained interest in the past years because it does not have an anesthetic "side effect" like xenon, allowing application of this specific gas in numerous clinical ischemia/reperfusion situations. Because helium has several unique characteristics and no hemodynamic side effects, helium could be administered in severely ill patients. Investigations in animals as well as in humans have proven that this noble gas is not completely inert and can induce several biological effects. Though the underlying molecular mechanisms of helium-induced cardiac protection are still not yet fully understood, recently different signaling pathways have been elucidated.

  18. Noble gas isotopes in mineral springs within the Cascadia Forearc, Wasihington and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Constantz, James E.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey report presents laboratory analyses along with field notes for a pilot study to document the relative abundance of noble gases in mineral springs within the Cascadia forearc of Washington and Oregon. Estimates of the depth to the underlying Juan de Fuca oceanic plate beneath the sample sites are derived from the McCrory and others (2012) slab model. Some of these springs have been previously sampled for chemical analyses (Mariner and others, 2006), but none currently have publicly available noble gas data. Helium isotope values as well as the noble gas values and ratios presented below will be used to determine the sources and mixing history of these mineral waters.

  19. A Philippinite with an Unusually Large Bubble: Gas Pressure and Noble Gas Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, J.; Maruoka, T.; Pinti, D. L.; Koeberl, C.

    1995-09-01

    Bubbles are common in tektites, but usually their sizes range up to only a few mm. They are most abundant in Muong Nong-type tektites. The gases contained in these bubbles are of terrestrial atmospheric composition, with pressures below 1 atm (e.g., [1]). The abundances of light noble gases (He, Ne) are controlled by diffusion from the atmosphere [2], and noble gases dissolved in tektite glass indicate that the glass solidified at atmospheric pressures equivalent to about 40 km altitude [3]. Large bubbles in splash-form tektites are rather rare. Thus, the finding that a philippinite (size: 6.0 x 4.5 cm; weight: 199.6 g) contains an unusually large bubble justified a detailed study. The volume of the bubble, which was confirmed by X-ray photography, was estimated at 5.4 cm^3, by comparing the density of this tektite (2.288 g/cm^3) to that of normal philippinites (2.438 g/cm^3). A device was specifically constructed for crushing the present sample under vacuum. The 10x10 cm cylindrical device has a piston that allows to gently crush the sample by turning a handle. Various disk spacers can be used to adjust the inner height to that of the sample. The device is made of stainless steel, yielding a low noble gas blank. The crushing device is connected to a purification line and a noble gas sector-type mass spectrometer (VG 5400) [4]. Before crushing, the complete tektite was wrapped in aluminum foil. A first crushing attempt, using stainless steel disk spacers, failed and resulted in damage to the steel spacers, indicating a high strength of the tektite. Using iron disk spacers resulted in an ambient pressure increase (probably due to hydrogen from the Fe) in the sample chamber. However, the noble gas blanks were negligible. The background pressure, at 2 x 10-4 Torr, increased to 3 x 10-4 Torr when the sample was crushed. From the volume of the crushing device and that of the bubble in the tektite, the total gas pressure in the bubble was estimated at about 1 x 10-4 atm

  20. Isotopic and noble gas geochemistry in geothermal research

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.M.; DePaolo, D.J.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this program is to provide, through isotopic analyses of fluids, fluid inclusions, and rocks and minerals coupled with improved methods for geochemical data analysis, needed information regarding sources of geothermal heat and fluids, the spatial distribution of fluid types, subsurface flow, water-rock reaction paths and rates, and the temporal evolution of geothermal systems. Isotopic studies of geothermal fluids have previously been limited to the light stable isotopes of H, C, and O. However, other isotopic systems such as the noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) and reactive elements (e.g. B, N, S, Sr and Pb) are complementary and may even be more important in some geothermal systems. The chemistry and isotopic composition of a fluid moving through the crust will change in space and time in response to varying chemical and physical parameters or by mixing with additional fluids. The chemically inert noble gases often see through these variations, making them excellent tracers for heat and fluid sources. Whereas, the isotopic compositions of reactive elements are useful tools in characterizing water-rock interaction and modeling the movement of fluids through a geothermal reservoir.

  1. Potential Energy Curves and Associated Line Shape of Alkali-Metal and Noble-Gas Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-20

    xii I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Motivation...150 xii POTENTIAL ENERGY CURVES AND ASSOCIATED LINE SHAPE OF ALKALI-METAL AND NOBLE-GAS INTERACTIONS I. Introduction 1.1 Motivation...starting point for all modern developments of a quantum picture of pressure broadening, and show how this theory reduces to the classical theory under

  2. Holocene noble gas paleothermometry from springs in the Olympic Mountains, Washington.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noble gas temperature proxies are examined from 52 springs in the Olympic Mountains, Washington. Groundwater flows from seeps to pooled springs at <0.1 L s-1 - 2.5 L s-1 in the Elwha watershed (≈692 km2). About 85% of sampled springs issue from confined fracture reservoirs preser...

  3. Non-Adiabatic Atomic Transitions: Computational Cross Section Calculations of Alkali Metal-Noble Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    collisions were computationally simulated. The alkali metals were potassium, rubidium, and cesium and the noble gas partners were helium, neon, and argon...195 20. Spin-Orbit split energies of Potassium, Rubidium, and Cesium ...composed of an alkali metal typically Rubidium[26, 37] or Cesium [5, 18]. The unique character of the alkali atoms, having a single valence electron in

  4. Experimental determination of noble gas, SF6 and CO2 flow profiles through a porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgallon, Rachel; Gilfillan, Stuart; Edlmann, Katriona; McDermott, Chris

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) and SF6 have recently been used as artificial and inherent tracers of CO2 flow and migration from within[1,2] and from geological reservoirs[3]. However, outstanding questions remain, particularly regarding the flow behaviour of the noble gases compared to CO2. Here we present results from specially constructed experimental equipment, which has been used to determine the factors affecting transport of noble gases relative to CO2 in a porous sandstone. The experimental setup consists of a sample loop that can be loaded with a desired gas mixture. This sample can be released as a pulse into a feeder gas stream through a flow cell. The flow cell consists of a 3.6 cm diameter core, which can be of any length. The sample is surrounded by aluminium foil and treated with epoxy resin inside stainless steel tubing. The flow cell is encased by two purpose designed dispersion end plates. Real-time analysis of the arrival peaks of the gases downstream is recorded using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). For the experiments, a 0.96 m core of Fell Sandstone was selected to represent a porous media. Noble gases and SF6 pulses were flowed through a CO2 carrier gas at five different pressure gradients (10 - 50 kPa) with arrival profiles measured using the QMS. Surprisingly, peak arrival times of He were slower than the other noble gases at each pressure gradient. The differences in peak arrival times between He and other noble gases increased as pressure decreased and the curve profiles for each noble gas differ significantly. The heavier noble gases (Kr and Xe) along with SF6 show a steeper peak rise at initial appearance, but have a longer duration profile than the He curves. Interestingly, the breakthrough curve profiles for both Kr and Xe were similar to SF6 indicating that Kr and Xe could be substituted for SF6, which is a potent greenhouse gas, in tracing applications. In addition, CO2 pulses were passed through a N2 carrier gas. The

  5. Formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons revisited: diffusion-controlled reactions and hydrogen atom losses in solid noble gases.

    PubMed

    Tanskanen, Hanna; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Räsänen, Markku; Johansson, Susanna; Khyzhniy, Ivan; Savchenko, Elena

    2008-02-07

    UV photolysis and annealing of C2H2/Xe, C2H2/Xe/Kr, and HBr/Xe matrices lead to complicated photochemical processes and reactions. The dominating products in these experiments are noble-gas hydrides with general formula HNgY (Ng = noble-gas atom, Y = electronegative fragment). We concentrate on distinguishing the local and global mobility and losses of H atoms, barriers of the reactions, and the decay of solvated protons. Different deposition temperatures change the amount of lattice imperfections and thus the amount of traps for H atoms. The averaged distance between reacting species influencing the reaction kinetics is controlled by varying the precursor concentration. A number of solid-state processes connected to the formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons are discussed using a simple kinetic model. The most efficient formation of noble-gas hydrides is connected with global (long-range) mobility of H atoms leading to the H + Xe + Y reaction. The highest concentration of noble-gas hydrides was obtained in matrices of highest optical quality, which probably have the lowest concentration of defects and H-atom losses. In matrices with high amount of geometrical imperfections, the product formation is inefficient and dominated by a local (short-range) process. The decay of solvated protons is rather local than a global process, which is different from the formation of noble-gas molecules. However, the present data do not allow distinguishing local proton and electron mobilities. Our previous results indicate that these are electrons which move to positively-charged centers and neutralize them. It is believed that the image obtained here for solid xenon is applicable to solid krypton whereas the case of argon deserves special attention.

  6. Bartlett's discovery of noble gas fluorides, a milestone in chemical history.

    PubMed

    Christe, Karl O

    2013-05-21

    In 1962, Neil Bartlett published a terse note in Proc. Chem. Soc. eradicating the long held dogma that noble gases are inert and cannot form stable compounds. This historical discovery has revolutionized our views on chemistry and has given rise to thousands of papers on noble gas chemistry. The fact that his proposed reaction product "Xe(+)[PtF6](-)" has eluded experimental detection for more than half a century and actually was a mixture of XeF(+) and Xe2F3(+) salts does not diminish the enormous impact of his discovery. A plausible explanation for the failures to observe "Xe(+)[PtF6](-)" experimentally is presented.

  7. Element distribution and noble gas isotopic abundances in lunar meteorite Allan Hills A81005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraehenbuehl, U.; Eugster, O.; Niedermann, S.

    1986-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite ALLAN HILLS A81005, an anorthositic breccia, is recognized to be of lunar origin. The noble gases in this meteorite were analyzed and found to be solar-wind implanted gases, whose absolute and relative concentrations are quite similar to those in lunar regolith samples. A sample of this meteorite was obtained for the analysis of the noble gas isotopes, including Kr(81), and for the determination of the elemental abundances. In order to better determine the volume derived from the surface correlated gases, grain size fractions were prepared. The results of the instrumental measurements of the gamma radiation are listed. From the amounts of cosmic ray produced noble gases and respective production rates, the lunar surface residence times were calculated. It was concluded that the lunar surface time is about half a billion years.

  8. New interatomic potentials for studying the behavior of noble gas atoms in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fen; Fang, Jingzhong; Deng, Huiqiu; Liu, Jianglong; Xiao, Shifang; Shu, Xiaolin; Gao, Fei; Hu, Wangyu

    2015-12-01

    To study the behavior of noble gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar) in bulk tungsten, new DFT-based potentials for W-He, W-Ne and W-Ar interactions were developed by fitting the results obtained from density functional theory calculations. The new potentials adopt the embedded atom method (EAM) formalism, and the "s-band model" is used to describe the many-body interactions between each of the noble gas atoms and its neighboring W atoms. These potentials reproduce the formation energies of point defects and the migration barriers of single noble gas atoms. The simulations using these potentials successfully predict that the tetrahedral interstitial site is more stable than the octahedral interstitial site for X (= He, Ne or Ar) interstitials. Based on these new potentials, the binding interactions of a single X atom with the Xn and Xn-Vacancy clusters and the diffusion properties of Xn clusters in bulk W were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The present results indicate that the binding energies obtained using the new potentials are good in agreement with the results of DFT calculations. The migration energies of the clusters increase with both the increase in the atomic radius of noble gases and the increase in the size of the clusters.

  9. Computational investigation of noble gas adsorption and separation by nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sanders, Joseph C.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-10-01

    Molecular simulations are used to assess the ability of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials to store and separate noble gases. Specifically, grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation techniques are used to predict noble gas adsorption isotherms at room temperature. Experimental trends of noble gas inflation curves of a Zn-based material (IRMOF-1) are matched by the simulation results. The simulations also predict that IRMOF-1 selectively adsorbs Xe atoms in Xe/Kr and Xe/Ar mixtures at total feed gas pressures of 1 bar (14.7 psia) and 10 bar (147 psia). Finally, simulations of a copper-based MOF (Cu-BTC) predict this material's ability to selectively adsorb Xe and Kr atoms when present in trace amounts in atmospheric air samples. These preliminary results suggest that Cu-BTC may be an ideal candidate for the pre-concentration of noble gases from air samples. Additional simulations and experiments are needed to determine the saturation limit of Cu-BTC for xenon, and whether any krypton atoms would remain in the Cu-BTC pores upon saturation.

  10. Noble Metal Catalysts for Mercury Oxidation in Utility Flue Gas: Gold, Palladium and Platinum Formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J

    2008-07-01

    The use of noble metals as catalysts for mercury oxidation in flue gas remains an area of active study. To date, field studies have focused on gold and palladium catalysts installed at pilot scale. In this article, we introduce bench-scale experimental results for gold, palladium and platinum catalysts tested in realistic simulated flue gas. Our initial results reveal some intriguing characteristics of catalytic mercury oxidation and provide insight for future research into this potentially important process.

  11. Noble Gas Thermometry and Hydrologic Ages: Evidence for Late Holocene Warming in Southwest Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M.; Goblet, P.

    2003-12-01

    Paleoclimatic reconstruction through the use of noble gases dissolved in groundwater has been the object of numerous studies in recent years. Unlike many other continental temperature proxies, noble gases have the advantage of providing direct information on atmospheric temperatures at the time rainwater penetrated the ground and joined a particular groundwater reservoir. In recent years, new methods for determination of noble gas temperatures have been developed, which provide a high level of accuracy on such temperature estimations. The issue of paleoclimatic reconstruction through noble gases however, is not only one of accurate temperature determination, but also one of accurate water age estimation so that a correct correspondence between noble gas temperatures and groundwater age can be established and proper paleoclimatic reconstruction attempted. The typical approach to estimate groundwater ages has been based on computing water travel times along streamlines from the recharge to the observation point taking into account only advection. This approach is limited because, like any other tracer, the movement of water in porous media is also affected by cinematic dispersion and molecular diffusion. We have therefore undertaken the formulation of hydrologic models that yield significantly better constraints on groundwater ages in the Carrizo aquifer and surrounding formations of south Texas, where noble gas temperatures have already been determined. To account for groundwater mixing we treat age as one would treat a solute concentration. In order to simulate groundwater ages we used a finite element model of groundwater flow that has been validated by 4He and 3He. The finite model spans a 120.6 Km cross-section between altitudes of +220m and -2210 m, and comprises 58,968 elements and 31,949 nodes. Combination of these newly calculated water ages and previously reported noble gas temperatures reveals new aspects of late Pleistocene and Holocene climate in

  12. ORIGIN OF THERMAL FLUIDS AT LASSEN VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK: EVIDENCE FROM NOBLE AND REACTIVE GAS ABUNDANCES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, Alfred H.; Mazor, Emanuel; Nehring, Nancy L.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal fluid discharges at Lassen are dominated by high-altitude fumaroles and acid-sulfate hot springs in the Park, and lower altitude, neutral, high-chloride hot springs in Mill Valley 7-10 km to the south. The interrelations of these fluids have been studied by noble and reactive gas analyses. Atmospheric noble gas (ANG) contents of superheated fumaroles are similar to those of air-saturated recharge water (ASW) at 5 degree C and 2500-m elevation. Low-elevation, high-chloride, hot-spring waters are highly depleted in ANG, relative to the ASW. The surface temperatures and gas chemistry of the fumaroles and hot springs suggest that steam originating from partial to near-complete vaporization of liquid from a boiling, high-chloride, hot water aquifer is decompressed adiabatically, and more or less mixed with shallow groundwater to form superheated and drowned fumaroles within the Park. Refs.

  13. Fluorinated noble-gas cyanides FKrCN, FXeCN, and FXeNC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Cheng; Räsänen, Markku; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2015-08-21

    We report on three new noble-gas molecules, FKrCN, FXeCN, and FXeNC, prepared in low-temperature Kr and Xe matrices. These molecules are made by UV photolysis of FCN in the matrices and subsequent thermal annealing. The FCN precursor is produced by deposition of the matrix gas containing (FCN){sub 3} through a microwave discharge. The new noble-gas molecules are assigned with the help of quantum chemical calculations at the MP2(full) and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Similar Ar compounds (FArCN and FArNC) as well as FKrNC are not found in these experiments, which is in agreement with the calculated energetics.

  14. Positron Impact Ionization in Noble Gas Atoms and Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, J. P.

    2005-05-01

    Results are presented for absolute positronium formation and direct ionization by positron impact on Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, CO and O2 at energies from threshold up to 90 eV. The experiments use a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam and exploit the properties of positron orbits in a magnetic field [1]. Results for the noble gases are compared with theoretical predictions and with measurements obtained using a significantly different method [2]. Results for diatomic molecules are compared to other available measurements and theoretical calculations where available. There is generally good agreement between the experimental measurements, providing an important benchmark for theoretical calculations. Intriguing features in Ar and O2 will be discussed. [1] J.P. Sullivan, S.J. Gilbert, J.P. Marler, R.G. Greaves, S.J. Buckman and C.M. Surko., Phys. Rev. A. 66, 042708 (2002) [2] J.P. Marler, J.P. Sullivan and C.M. Surko, Phys. Rev. A (2005), in press.

  15. The Noble Gas Record of Gas-Water Phase Interaction in the Tight-Gas-Sand Reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballentine, C. J.; Zhou, Z.; Harris, N. B.

    2015-12-01

    The mass of hydrocarbons that have migrated through tight-gas-sandstone systems before the permeability reduces to trap the hydrocarbon gases provides critical information in the hydrocarbon potential analysis of a basin. The noble gas content (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) of the groundwater has a unique isotopic and elemental composition. As gas migrates through the water column, the groundwater-derived noble gases partition into the hydrocarbon phase. Determination of the noble gases in the produced hydrocarbon phase then provides a record of the type of interaction (simple phase equilibrium or open system Rayleigh fractionation). The tight-gas-sand reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains represent one of the most significant gas resources in the United States. The producing reservoirs are generally developed in low permeability (averaging <0.1mD) Upper Cretaceous fluvial to marginal marine sandstones and commonly form isolated overpressured reservoir bodies encased in even lower permeability muddy sediments. We present noble gas data from producing fields in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming; the the Piceance Basin, Colorado; and in the Uinta Basin, Utah. The data is consistent from all three basins. We show how in each basin the noble gases record open system gas migration through a water column at maximum basin burial. The data within an open system model indicates that the gas now in-place represents the last ~10% of hydrocarbon gas to have passed through the water column, most likely prior to permeability closedown.

  16. Long Term Field Calibration of the Noble Gas Temperature System in a Shallow Unconfined Pleistocene Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. M.; Castro, M. C.; Lohmann, K. C.; Ma, L.

    2005-12-01

    Noble gas temperatures (NGTs) are a potentially powerful tool for paleoclimate reconstruction on continents, but the assumptions underlying the technique have not been widely tested for aquifers in colder climates. In a recent study of NGTs from S. Michigan groundwater, Ma et al. (2004) found significant NGT variation over time, but apparently modern water yielded NGTs that were ~ 3 ° C or more below that expected from the local mean annual air temperature (MAAT). For nearly a year, we have monitored NGTs and stable isotopes at a shallow water well in the glacial drift that recharges the aquifer studied by Ma et al. (2004). Initial results are in press (Hall et al., 2005) and they confirm that modern NGTs measured from Oct. to Jul. are typically 5-6°C, instead of the MAAT of 9.1°C. Measured water temperatures during sampling are within 1-2°C of MAAT. Stable isotopic analyses of local snow and rain water suggest that the groundwater is a mixture of these two end member components. Short term variations in well pH and stable isotope ratios confirm that the groundwater is indeed modern, but initial noble gas results did not show similar variations. Ground ice noble gas concentrations are very low, with the exception of He, which is enriched, with 3He/4He equal to the air value. All early noble gas concentrations in groundwater were too high for the MAAT, including both He isotopes which had 3He/4He about 1.3 times air. Measured groundwater excess He values are compatible with 4He influx from below and tritium decay for ~ 30 yr. None of the standard NGT interpretational models adequately account for the complete data set, without modifications to normal assumptions. The most recent Aug. 2005 data after a very rainy Jul. does show a dramatic rise in NGT, with typical excess He, suggesting that noble gas concentrations acquired high in the unsaturated zone can persist and mix with those below the water table. This implies that dynamic effects may be very important in

  17. Investigating noble gas mixtures for use in TPCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungbluth, Anna

    2017-01-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. MITPC relies on a CCD camera and the TPC (time projection chamber) technique to visualize and reconstruct tracks of neutron-induced nuclear recoils within a chosen gas. The standard version of the detector uses a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% helium-4 and and 12.5% tetrafluoromethane (CF4) for precise measurements of the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. Previous studies demonstrated advantages of using neon as a replacement gas for helium-4. This talk will present a discussion of studies performed with helium and neon, as well as argon and krypton as primary neutron targets in the gas mixture with CF4.

  18. Investigating the nature of noble gas-copper bonds by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Eduardo F F; de Sá, Eduardo L; Haiduke, Roberto L A

    2010-04-22

    We investigated noble gas-copper bonds in linear complexes represented by the NgCuX general formula in which Ng and X stand for a noble gas (neon, argon, krypton, or xenon) and a halogen (fluorine, chlorine or bromine), respectively, by coupled cluster methods and modified cc-pVQZ basis sets. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) shows a linear relation between the dissociation energy of noble gas-copper bonds and the amount of electronic charge transferred mainly from the noble gas to copper during complexation. Large changes in the QTAIM quadrupole moments of copper and noble gases resulting from this bonding and a comparison between NgCuX and NgNaCl systems indicate that these noble gas-copper bonds should be better interpreted as predominantly covalent. Finally, QTAIM atomic dipoles of noble gases in NgNaCl systems agree satisfactorily with atomic dipoles given by a simple model for these NgNa van der Waals bonds.

  19. Noble gases solubility models of hydrocarbon charge mechanism in the Sleipner Vest gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.; Lawson, M.; Meurer, W. P.; Warr, O.; Mabry, J. C.; Byrne, D. J.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Noble gases are chemically inert and variably soluble in crustal fluids. They are primarily introduced into hydrocarbon reservoirs through exchange with formation waters, and can be used to assess migration pathways and mechanisms, as well as reservoir storage conditions. Of particular interest is the role groundwater plays in hydrocarbon transport, which is reflected in hydrocarbon-water volume ratios. Here, we present compositional, stable isotope and noble gas isotope and abundance data from the Sleipner Vest field, in the Norwegian North Sea. Sleipner Vest gases are generated from primary cracking of kerogen and the thermal cracking of oil. Gas was emplaced into the Sleipner Vest from the south and subsequently migrated to the east, filling and spilling into the Sleipner Ost fields. Gases principally consist of hydrocarbons (83-93%), CO2 (5.4-15.3%) and N2 (0.6-0.9%), as well as trace concentrations of noble gases. Helium isotopes (3He/4He) are predominantly radiogenic and range from 0.065 to 0.116 RA; reported relative to air (RA = 1.4 × 10-6; Clarke et al., 1976; Sano et al., 1988), showing predominantly (>98%) crustal contributions, consistent with Ne (20Ne/22Ne from 9.70 to 9.91; 21Ne/22Ne from 0.0290 to 0.0344) and Ar isotopes (40Ar/36Ar from 315 to 489). Air-derived noble gas isotopes (20Ne, 36Ar, 84Kr, 132Xe) are introduced into the hydrocarbon system by direct exchange with air-saturated water (ASW). The distribution of air-derived noble gas species are controlled by phase partitioning processes; in that they preferentially partition into the gas (i.e., methane) phase, due to their low solubilities in fluids. Therefore, the extent of exchange between hydrocarbon phases and formation waters - that have previously equilibrated with the atmosphere - can be determined by investigating air-derived noble gas species. We utilize both elemental ratios to address process (i.e., open vs. closed system) and concentrations to quantify the extent of hydrocarbon

  20. Temporal changes in noble gas compositions within the Aidlinsector ofThe Geysers geothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Kennedy, Mack; van Soest,Thijs; Lewicki, Jennifer

    2006-05-03

    The use of nonreactive isotopic tracers coupled to a full thermal-hydrological reservoir simulation allows for an improved method of investigating how reservoir fluids contained within matrix and fractures contribute over time to fluids produced from geothermal systems. A combined field and modeling study has been initiated to evaluate the effects of injection, production, and fracture-matrix interaction on produced noble gas contents and isotopic ratios. Gas samples collected periodically from the Aidlin steam field at The Geysers, California, between 1997 and 2006 have been analyzed for their noble gas compositions, and reveal systematic shifts in abundance and isotopic ratios over time. Because of the low concentrations of helium dissolved in the injection waters, the injectate itself has little impact on the helium isotopic composition of the reservoir fluids over time. However, the injection process may lead to fracturing of reservoir rocks and an increase in diffusion-controlled variations in noble gas compositions, related to gases derived from fluids within the rock matrix.

  1. Noble gas contents of shergottites and implications for the Martian origin of SNC meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Johnson, P.

    1984-09-01

    Three meteorites belonging to the rare group of SNC achondrites, which may have originated in the planet Mars, have been subjected to noble gas isotopic concentration measurements. The elemental and isotopic ratios obtained are unlike those for any other noble gas components except those obtained in analyses of the Martian atmosphere by Viking spacecraft. It is hypothesized that the Kr and Xe gases represent a portion of the Martian atmosphere which was shock-implanted in the case of Elephant Moraine A79001, and that they constitute direct evidence of a Martian origin for the shergottite meteorites. If the SNC meteorites were ejected from Mars at the shergottite shock age of about 180 My ago, they must have been objects more than 6 m in diameter which experienced at least three space collisions to initiate cosmic ray exposure.

  2. Noble gas contents of shergottites and implications for the Martian origin of SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Johnson, P.

    1984-01-01

    Three meteorites belonging to the rare group of SNC achondrites, which may have originated in the planet Mars, have been subjected to noble gas isotopic concentration measurements. The elemental and isotopic ratios obtained are unlike those for any other noble gas components except those obtained in analyses of the Martian atmosphere by Viking spacecraft. It is hypothesized that the Kr and Xe gases represent a portion of the Martian atmosphere which was shock-implanted in the case of Elephant Moraine A79001, and that they constitute direct evidence of a Martian origin for the shergottite meteorites. If the SNC meteorites were ejected from Mars at the shergottite shock age of about 180 My ago, they must have been objects more than 6 m in diameter which experienced at least three space collisions to initiate cosmic ray exposure.

  3. Quantum-chemical modeling of boron and noble gas dopants in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.

    1983-01-01

    The electron effects of the presence of boron and noble gas dopants in a model silicon lattice were investigated using a self-consistent charge extended Hueckel program. The extent of electronic interaction of the noble gas with the lattice is given by: Kr greater than Ar greater than Ne. Theoretically, boron diffusion in the presence of neon, argon or krypton was examined using a self-consistent charge extended Hueckel program. The net energy of interaction between boron and neon is strongly repulsive while argon-boron exhibits a region of relative stability; krypton exhibits behavior similar to argon though no region of stability was found for the range of separations used in the calculations. Finally, it is noted, from the relative energy of the topmost filled molecular orbital associated with boron (in an interstitial position), that activation of the boron does not require boron movement but can be accomplished by indirect transitions.

  4. Comparison of the bonding between ML(+) and ML2(+) (M = metal, L = noble gas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are reported of the spectroscopic constants for the low-lying states of the molecular ions ML2(+), where M = Li, Na, Mg, V, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu, and where L is usually Ar. Comparison with existing analogous calculations on the ML(+) ions shows how the bonding and binding energy change with the addition of a second noble gas atom. The second binding energy is predicted to be essentially the same as the first for the Li, Na, Mg, and V ions, but larger for the Fe, Co, Ni and Cu ions. The binding energies of the transition metal noble gas ions are not accurately predicted at the SCF level, because correlation is required to describe their M(0)Ln(+) character. All trends can be explained in terms of promotion and hybridization on the metal ion.

  5. Noble Gas Partitioning Behaviour During Mantle Melting: A Possible Explanation for 'The He Paradox'?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooker, R. A.; Heber, V.; Kelley, S. P.; Wood, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    New UVLAMP measurements of experimental noble gas crystal/melt partitioning values (including He) suggest reasonably incompatible behaviour for both olivine and cpx and no significant fractionation of noble gases relative to one another. This is consistent with models of noble gas incorporation at crystal lattice sites in both crystals (1). However the determined D values of approximately 8 x10-4 for cpx and 5 x10-3 for olivine suggest a small but significant amount of noble gas might be retained in the mantle after melting. It is also apparent that He is three orders of magnitude less incompatible than U and Th in olivine. As opx is predicted to show similar characteristic to olivine, melting to produce a highly depleted harzbugitic (low-cpx) mantle would involve the preferential removal of U+Th relative to He. This in turn would allow a relatively undisturbed primordial/radiogenic 3He/4He ratio to be retained in association with low He abundance. Thus, recycling of previously depleted mantle into the source region of 'hot spots' provides one possible explanation for the paradox of high 3/4 He ratios previously thought to indicate an undegassed, primordial lower mantle reservoir, with low He abundance indicating a degassed source (2). Preliminary UVLAMP depth profiles for noble gas diffusion in mantle minerals confirm that although sub-solidus diffusive removal of He relative to other noble gases from a gas-rich mantle plum is theoretically possible, the short distances involved are unlikely to produce an effect that can be sustained though a hot spot melting event. The slow diffusion rates and lack of fractionation of noble gases in our partitioning experiments suggests that low He/Ar (and Ne/Ar) ratios observed at hot spots are most likely to be features inherited from the source, or subsequently imposed by some shallow level process. In our partitioning experiments, it proved surprisingly difficult to grow olivine crystals that are free of bubbles, even from

  6. A Simple Model for Fine Structure Transitions in Alkali-Metal Noble-Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    fine- structure transition rates of the alkali atoms . The integration of this integral is primarily performed nu- merically, using an adaptive Romberg...Previous work on the fine structure transitions of alkali atoms as they collide with noble gas atoms includes a full quantum mechanical calculation of...adiabaticity in alkali atom fine structure mixing”. SPIE LASE, 896207–896207. International Society for Optics and Photonics, 2014. 4. Griffiths, David J

  7. Prediction of a neutral noble gas compound in the triplet state.

    PubMed

    Manna, Debashree; Ghosh, Ayan; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2015-05-26

    Discovery of the HArF molecule associated with H-Ar covalent bonding [Nature, 2000, 406, 874-876] has revolutionized the field of noble gas chemistry. In general, this class of noble gas compound involving conventional chemical bonds exists as closed-shell species in a singlet electronic state. For the first time, in a bid to predict neutral noble gas chemical compounds in their triplet electronic state, we have carried out a systematic investigation of xenon inserted FN and FP species by using quantum chemical calculations with density functional theory and various post-Hartree-Fock-based correlated methods, including the multireference configuration interaction technique. The FXeP and FXeN species are predicted to be stable by all the computational methods employed in the present work, such as density functional theory (DFT), second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), coupled-cluster theory (CCSD(T)), and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). For the purpose of comparison we have also included the Kr-inserted compounds of FN and FP species. Geometrical parameters, dissociation energies, transition-state barrier heights, atomic charge distributions, vibrational frequency data, and atoms-in-molecules properties clearly indicate that it is possible to experimentally realize the most stable state of FXeP and FXeN molecules, which is triplet in nature, through the matrix isolation technique under cryogenic conditions.

  8. A review of noble gas geochemistry in relation to early Earth history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most fundamental noble gas constraints on early Earth history is derived from isotopic differences in (129)Xe/(130)Xe between various terrestrial materials. The short half life (17 m.y.) of extinct (129I, parent of (129)Xe, means that these differences must have been produced within the first 100 m.y. after terrestrial accretion. The identification of large anomalies in (129)Xe/(130)Xe in mid ocean ridge basalts (MORB), with respect to atmospheric xenon, suggests that the atmosphere and upper mantle have remained separate since that time. This alone is a very strong argument for early catastrophic degassing, which would be consistent with an early fractionation resulting in core formation. However, noble gas isotopic systematics of oceanic basalts show that the mantle cannot necessarily be regarded as a homogeneous system, since there are significant variations in (3)He/(4)He, (40)Ar/(36)Ar, and (129)Xe/(130)Xe. Therefore, the early degassing cannot be considered to have acted on the whole mantle. The specific mechanisms of degassing, in particular the thickness and growth of the early crust, is an important variable in understanding present day noble gas inventories. Another constraint can be obtained from rocks that are thought to be derived from near the lithosphere asthenosphere boundary: ultramafic xenoliths.

  9. Atomistic-Scale Simulations of Defect Formation in Graphene under Noble Gas Ion Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kichul; Rahnamoun, Ali; Swett, Jacob L; Iberi, Vighter; Cullen, David A; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Sang, Xiahan; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Rondinone, Adam J; Unocic, Raymond R; van Duin, Adri C T

    2016-09-27

    Despite the frequent use of noble gas ion irradiation of graphene, the atomistic-scale details, including the effects of dose, energy, and ion bombardment species on defect formation, and the associated dynamic processes involved in the irradiations and subsequent relaxation have not yet been thoroughly studied. Here, we simulated the irradiation of graphene with noble gas ions and the subsequent effects of annealing. Lattice defects, including nanopores, were generated after the annealing of the irradiated graphene, which was the result of structural relaxation that allowed the vacancy-type defects to coalesce into a larger defect. Larger nanopores were generated by irradiation with a series of heavier noble gas ions, due to a larger collision cross section that led to more detrimental effects in the graphene, and by a higher ion dose that increased the chance of displacing the carbon atoms from graphene. Overall trends in the evolution of defects with respect to a dose, as well as the defect characteristics, were in good agreement with experimental results. Additionally, the statistics in the defect types generated by different irradiating ions suggested that the most frequently observed defect types were Stone-Thrower-Wales (STW) defects for He(+) irradiation and monovacancy (MV) defects for all other ion irradiations.

  10. Atomistic-scale simulations of defect formation in graphene under noble gas ion irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Kichul; Rahnamoun, Ali; Swett, Jacob L.; ...

    2016-08-17

    Despite the frequent use of noble gas ion irradiation of graphene, the atomistic-scale details, including the effects of dose, energy, and ion bombardment species on defect formation, and the associated dynamic processes involved in the irradiations and subsequent relaxation have not yet been thoroughly studied. Here, we simulated the irradiation of graphene with noble gas ions and the subsequent effects of annealing. Lattice defects, including nanopores, were generated after the annealing of the irradiated graphene, which was the result of structural relaxation that allowed the vacancy-type defects to coalesce into a larger defect. Larger nanopores were generated by irradiation withmore » a series of heavier noble gas ions, due to a larger collision cross section that led to more detrimental effects in the graphene, and by a higher ion dose that increased the chance of displacing the carbon atoms from graphene. Overall trends in the evolution of defects with respect to a dose, as well as the defect characteristics, were in good agreement with experimental results. In addition, the statistics in the defect types generated by different irradiating ions suggested that the most frequently observed defect types were Stone-Thrower-Wales (STW) defects for He+ irradiation and monovacancy (MV) defects for all other ion irradiations.« less

  11. Atomistic-scale simulations of defect formation in graphene under noble gas ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Kichul; Rahnamoun, Ali; Swett, Jacob L.; Iberi, Vighter; Cullen, David A.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Sang, Xiahan; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Unocic, Raymond R.; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2016-08-17

    Despite the frequent use of noble gas ion irradiation of graphene, the atomistic-scale details, including the effects of dose, energy, and ion bombardment species on defect formation, and the associated dynamic processes involved in the irradiations and subsequent relaxation have not yet been thoroughly studied. Here, we simulated the irradiation of graphene with noble gas ions and the subsequent effects of annealing. Lattice defects, including nanopores, were generated after the annealing of the irradiated graphene, which was the result of structural relaxation that allowed the vacancy-type defects to coalesce into a larger defect. Larger nanopores were generated by irradiation with a series of heavier noble gas ions, due to a larger collision cross section that led to more detrimental effects in the graphene, and by a higher ion dose that increased the chance of displacing the carbon atoms from graphene. Overall trends in the evolution of defects with respect to a dose, as well as the defect characteristics, were in good agreement with experimental results. In addition, the statistics in the defect types generated by different irradiating ions suggested that the most frequently observed defect types were Stone-Thrower-Wales (STW) defects for He+ irradiation and monovacancy (MV) defects for all other ion irradiations.

  12. Issues Involving The OSI Concept of Operation For Noble Gas Radionuclide Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C R; Sun, Y

    2011-01-21

    The development of a technically sound protocol for detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is critical to the successful operation of an on site inspection (OSI) under the CTBT and has broad ramifications for all aspects of the OSI regime including the setting of specifications for both sampling and analysis equipment used during an OSI. With NA-24 support, we are investigating a variety of issues and concerns that have significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work at LLNL focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments - a lesson we learned previously from the LLNL Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE). Evaluation of a number of important noble gas detection issues, potentially affecting OSI policy, has awaited the US re-engagement with the OSI technical community. Thus, there have been numerous issues to address during the past 18 months. Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of LLNL computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied in the field making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated during the past year. We complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that is intended to be a practical solution to most if not all the challenges addressed here.

  13. The noble gas geochemistry of natural CO 2 gas reservoirs from the Colorado Plateau and Rocky Mountain provinces, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Stuart M. V.; Ballentine, Chris J.; Holland, Greg; Blagburn, Dave; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Stevens, Scott; Schoell, Martin; Cassidy, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Identification of the source of CO 2 in natural reservoirs and development of physical models to account for the migration and interaction of this CO 2 with the groundwater is essential for developing a quantitative understanding of the long term storage potential of CO 2 in the subsurface. We present the results of 57 noble gas determinations in CO 2 rich fields (>82%) from three natural reservoirs to the east of the Colorado Plateau uplift province, USA (Bravo Dome, NM., Sheep Mountain, CO. and McCallum Dome, CO.), and from two reservoirs from within the uplift area (St. John's Dome, AZ., and McElmo Dome, CO.). We demonstrate that all fields have CO 2/ 3He ratios consistent with a dominantly magmatic source. The most recent volcanics in the province date from 8 to 10 ka and are associated with the Bravo Dome field. The oldest magmatic activity dates from 42 to 70 Ma and is associated with the McElmo Dome field, located in the tectonically stable centre of the Colorado Plateau: CO 2 can be stored within the subsurface on a millennia timescale. The manner and extent of contact of the CO 2 phase with the groundwater system is a critical parameter in using these systems as natural analogues for geological storage of anthropogenic CO 2. We show that coherent fractionation of groundwater 20Ne/ 36Ar with crustal radiogenic noble gases ( 4He, 21Ne, 40Ar) is explained by a two stage re-dissolution model: Stage 1: Magmatic CO 2 injection into the groundwater system strips dissolved air-derived noble gases (ASW) and accumulated crustal/radiogenic noble gas by CO 2/water phase partitioning. The CO 2 containing the groundwater stripped gases provides the first reservoir fluid charge. Subsequent charges of CO 2 provide no more ASW or crustal noble gases, and serve only to dilute the original ASW and crustal noble gas rich CO 2. Reservoir scale preservation of concentration gradients in ASW-derived noble gases thus provide CO 2 filling direction. This is seen in the Bravo Dome

  14. ABOUT THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF HYDROCARBON LAKES IN THE ORIGIN OF TITAN'S NOBLE GAS ATMOSPHERIC DEPLETION

    SciTech Connect

    Cordier, D.; Mousis, O.; Lebonnois, S.; Lavvas, P.; Lobo, L. Q.; Ferreira, A. G. M.

    2010-10-01

    An unexpected feature of Titan's atmosphere is the strong depletion in primordial noble gases revealed by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe during its descent on 2005 January 14. Although several plausible explanations have already been formulated, no definitive response to this issue has yet been found. Here, we investigate the possible sequestration of these noble gases in the liquid contained in lakes and wet terrains on Titan and the consequences for their atmospheric abundances. Considering the atmosphere and the liquid existing on the soil as a whole system, we compute the abundance of each noble gas relative to nitrogen. To do so, we make the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium between the liquid and the atmosphere, the abundances of the different constituents being determined via regular solution theory. We find that xenon's atmospheric depletion can be explained by its dissolution at ambient temperature in the liquid presumably present on Titan's soil. In the cases of argon and krypton, we find that the fractions incorporated in the liquid are negligible, implying that an alternative mechanism must be invoked to explain their atmospheric depletion.

  15. Apparatus for preparing a solution of a hyperpolarized noble gas for NMR and MRI analysis

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-06-10

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  16. Noble gas measurements from tiny water amounts: fluid inclusions in carbonates of speleothemes and coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Laszlo; Palcsu, Laszlo; Major, Zoltan

    2010-05-01

    Based on the concentrations of dissolved noble gases in fluid inclusions in speleothems and corals, noble gas temperatures (NGT) might be derived, that would be important climate information [1]. In the case of terrestrial carbonates, it means that the temperature dependency of noble gases in the evolving fluid inclusions is suitable to determine the prevailing temperature. This recognition provides new opportunities for the research of paleoclimate. Additionally, the dissolved noble gases in the fluid inclusions represented in corals could be used to study past sea surface temperatures that are one of the most essential parameter of climate reconstructions. To measure dissolved noble gases in fluid inclusions of a few micro-litres, a noble gas mass spectrometer equipped with an ultra high vacuum preparation line is the most suitable way. The preparation of the carbonate samples is performed in a sample preparation system connected to a static mode VG 5400 noble gas mass spectrometer. As a first step of the sample preparation, one piece of a sample is put into a crusher of the preparation line and then evacuated and heated at night. The crushing of dripstone and coral samples is carried out in a stainless steel pipe with a ferro-magnetic ball at 150 °C temperature, in such a way that the ball is kept on elevating and falling down onto the carbonate sample one hundred times. The aim of the heating is to avoid the water released from the fluid inclusions not to be adsorbed on the surface of the freshly broken carbonate [2]. The water released from the fluid inclusions is frozen into a cold finger, being held at temperature of -70 °C for 15 minutes. In this case, the collection efficiency is better than 99.7 %. Then the cold finger is warmed to 27 °C, and the pressure of the water vapour expanded to the volume of the cold finger is determined by a pressure gauge, which accuracy is better than 0.2 % in the pressure range of 10-2 mbar to 11 mbar. The water vapour

  17. Noble gas tracers of ventilation during deep-water formation in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. P.; Khatiwala, S.; Heimbach, P.

    2016-05-01

    To explore the dynamics and implications of incomplete air-sea equilibration during the formation of abyssal water masses, we simulated noble gases in the Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) global ocean state estimate. A novel computation approach utilizing a matrix-free Newton-Krylov (MFNK) scheme was applied to quickly compute the periodic seasonal solutions for noble gas tracers. MFNK allows for quick computation of a cyclo-stationary solution for tracers (i.e., a spun-up, repeating seasonal cycle), which would otherwise be computationally infeasible due to the long time scale of dynamic adjustment of the abyssal ocean (1000’s of years). A suite of experiments isolates individual processes, including atmospheric pressure effects, the solubility pump and air-sea bubble fluxes. In addition to these modeled processes, a volumetric contribution of 0.28 ± 0.07% of glacial melt water is required to reconcile deep-water observations in the Weddell Sea. Another primary finding of our work is that the saturation anomaly of heavy noble gases in model simulations is in excess of two-fold more negative than is suggested from Weddell Sea observations. This result suggests that model water masses are insufficiently ventilated prior to subduction and thus there is insufficient communication between atmosphere and ocean at high latitudes. The discrepancy between noble gas observations and ECCO simulations highlights that important inadequacies remain in how we model high-latitude ventilation with large implications for the oceanic uptake and storage of carbon.

  18. Using noble gas ratios to determine the origin of ground ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utting, Nicholas; Lauriol, Bernard; Lacelle, Denis; Clark, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Argon, krypton and xenon have different solubilities in water, meaning their ratios in water are different from those in atmospheric air. This characteristic is used in a novel method to distinguish between ice bodies which originate from the compaction of snow (i.e. buried snow banks, glacial ice) vs. ice which forms from the freezing of groundwater (i.e. pingo ice). Ice which forms from the compaction of snow has gas ratios similar to atmospheric air, while ice which forms from the freezing of liquid water is expected to have gas ratios similar to air-equilibrated water. This analysis has been conducted using a spike dilution noble gas line with gas extraction conducted on-line. Samples were mixed with an aliquot of rare noble gases while being melted, then extracted gases are purified and cryogenically separated. Samples have been analysed from glacial ice, buried snow bank ice, intrusive ice, wedge ice, cave ice and two unknown ice bodies. Ice bodies which have formed from different processes have different gas ratios relative to their formation processes.

  19. A new noble gas paleoclimate record in Texas — Basic assumptions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Maria Clara; Hall, Chris Michael; Patriarche, Delphine; Goblet, Patrick; Ellis, Brian Robert

    2007-05-01

    A generally accepted basic principle in relation to the use of the noble gas thermometer in groundwater flow systems is that high-frequency noble gas climatic signals are lost due to the effect of dispersion. This loss of signal, combined with 14C dating issues, makes it only suited to identify major climatic events such as the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Consequently, the identification of significant noble gas temperature (NGT) cooling (≥ 5 °C) with respect to present time has systematically been associated with the occurrence of the LGM even when reasonable water age controls were unavailable. It has also become apparent at a number of studied sites that modern NGTs estimated through standard models [M. Stute, P. Schlosser, Principles and applications of the noble gas paleothermometer, in: P.K. Swart, K.C. Lohmann, J.A. McKenzie, S. Savin, (Eds), Climate change in continental isotopic records, Geophysical monograph 78, AGU (1993) 89-100.; W. Aeschbach-Hertig, F. Peeters, U. Beyerle, R. Kipfer, Paleotemperature reconstruction from noble gases in ground water taking into account equilibration with entrapped air, Nature 405(6790) (2000) 1040-1044.] are unable to reproduce ground temperatures at the interface with the unsaturated zone, a basic requirement for proper paleoclimate reconstruction through noble gases. Instead, a systematic bias to low NGTs in recharge areas is observed. The Carrizo aquifer, in which the LGM was previously identified [M. Stute, P. Schlosser, J.F. Clark, W.S. Broecker, Paleotemperatures in the Southwestern United States derived from noble gases in ground water, Science 256(5059) (1992) 1000-1001.] and which presents an NGT bias of over 4 °C, is an ideal setting to analyze and revise basic principles and assumptions in relation with the use of the noble gas thermometer. Here, we present a new noble gas data set (49 measurements) collected at 20 different locations in the Carrizo aquifer. This new data set together with previously

  20. Noble gas isotopes and halogens in volatile-rich inclusions in diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Raymond; Turner, Grenville

    1994-01-01

    Application of the (40)Ar-(39)Ar method and noble gas studies to diamonds has increased our understanding of their age relationships to the host kimberlite or lamproite, and of the source and composition of volatile-rich fluids in the upper mantle. The properties of diamond (inert, high mechanical strength and low gas diffusivities) means they are especially useful samples for studying gases trapped deep within the earth (less than 150 km) as they are unlikely to have undergone loss or exchange of entrapped material since formation. Volatile-rich fluids (H2O-CO2) are important agents for metasomatic processes in the upper mantle, and the noble gases and halogens preferentially partition into this phase leading to a strong geochemical coherence between these groups of elements. The abundances of the halogens in the major reservoirs of the Earth shows a marked progression from chlorine, concentrated in the oceans, through to iodine which, through its affinity to organic material, is concentrated mainly in sediments. Abundances in the upper mantle are low. This is particularly true for iodine which is of special interest in view of its potential significance as an indicator of sediment recycling and by way of its link to (129)Xe amomalies in the mantle through the low extinct isotope (129)I. Extensions of the (40)Ar-(39)Ar technique enable measurements of halogens and other elements (K, Ca, Ba, U) by production of noble gas isotopes from these species during neutron irradiation. Samples analyzed in this way include 15 coated stones from an unknown source in Zaire, 3 boarts from the Jwaneng and 1 boart from the Orapa kimberlites, both in Botswana.

  1. Looking for a correlation between terrestrial age and noble gas record of H chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeken, Th.; Schultz, L.

    1994-07-01

    On the basis of statistically significant concentration differences of some trace elements, it has been suggested that H chondrites found in Antarctica and Modern Falls represent members of different extraterrestrial populations with different thermal histories. It was also concluded that H chondrites found in Victoria Land (Allan Hills) differ chemically from those found in Queen Maud Land (Yamato Mountains), an effect that could be based on the different terrestrial age distribution of both groups. This would imply a change of the meteoroid flux hitting the Earth on a timescale that is comparable to typical terrestrial ages of Antarctic chondrites. A comparison of the noble gas record of H chondrites from the Allan Hills icefields and Modern Fall shows that the distributions of cosmic-ray exposure ages and the concentrations of radiogenic He-4 and Ar-40 are very similar. In an earlier paper we compared the noble gas measurements of 20 Yamato H contents with meteorites from the Allan Hills region and Modern Falls. Similar distributions were found. The distribution of cosmic-ray exposure ages and radiogenic He-4 and Ar-40 gas contents as a function of the terrestrial age is investigated in these chondrites. The distribution shows the well-known 7-Ma-cluster indicating that about 40% of the H chondrites were excavated from their parent body in a single event. Both populations, Antarctic Meteorites and Modern Falls, exhibit the same characteristic feature: a major meteoroid-producing event about 7 Ma. This indicates that one H-group population delivers H chondrites to Antarctica and the rest of the world. Cosmic-ray exposure ages and thermal-history indicaters like radiogenic noble gases show no evidence of a change in the H chondrite meteoroid population during the last 200,000 years.

  2. Noble gas excimer scintillation following neutron capture in boron thin films

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, Jacob C.; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Coplan, Michael A.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2014-04-14

    Far-ultraviolet scintillation signals have been measured in heavy noble gases (argon, krypton, xenon) following boron-neutron capture ({sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li) in {sup 10}B thin films. The observed scintillation yields are comparable to the yields from some liquid and solid neutron scintillators. At noble gas pressures of 107 kPa, the number of photons produced per neutron absorbed following irradiation of a 1200 nm thick {sup 10}B film was 14 000 for xenon, 11 000 for krypton, and 6000 for argon. The absolute scintillation yields from the experimental configuration were calculated using data from (1) experimental irradiations, (2) thin-film characterizations, (3) photomultiplier tube calibrations, and (4) photon collection modeling. Both the boron films and the photomultiplier tube were characterized at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Monte Carlo modeling of the reaction cell provided estimates of the photon collection efficiency and the transport behavior of {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products escaping the thin films. Scintillation yields increased with gas pressure due to increased ionization and excitation densities of the gases from the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products, increased frequency of three-body, excimer-forming collisions, and reduced photon emission volumes (i.e., larger solid angle) at higher pressures. Yields decreased for thicker {sup 10}B thin films due to higher average energy loss of the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products escaping the films. The relative standard uncertainties in the measurements were determined to lie between 14% and 16%. The observed scintillation signal demonstrates that noble gas excimer scintillation is promising for use in practical neutron detectors.

  3. Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

  4. Confinement induced binding in noble gas atoms within a BN-doped carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Confinement induced binding interaction patterns for noble gas atoms (Hen/m, Arn, Krn; n = 2, m = 3) atoms inside pristine and -BN doped (3, 3) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) have been studied through density functional theory calculations. The kinetic stability for He dimer and trimer has been investigated at 100 K and 300 K through an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. The positive role of doping in SWCNT in enhancing the nature of interaction as well as the kinetic stability of the said systems has been found.

  5. A model to explain the various paradoxes associated with mantle noble gas geochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Don L.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of an energetic accretion, the Earth is a volatile-poor and strongly differentiated planet. The volatile elements can be accounted for by a late veneer (≈1% of total mass of the Earth). The incompatible elements are strongly concentrated into the exosphere (atmosphere, oceans, sediments, and crust) and upper mantle. Recent geochemical models invoke a large primordial undegassed reservoir with chondritic abundances of uranium and helium, which is clearly at odds with mass and energy balance calculations. The basic assumption behind these models is that excess “primordial” 3He is responsible for 3He/4He ratios higher than the average for midocean ridge basalts. The evidence however favors depletion of 3He and excessive depletion of 4He and, therefore, favors a refractory, residual (low U, Th) source Petrological processes such as melt-crystal and melt-gas separation fractionate helium from U and Th and, with time, generate inhomogeneities in the 3He/4He ratio. A self-consistent model for noble gases involves a gas-poor planet with trapping of CO2 and noble gases in the shallow mantle. Such trapped gases are released by later tectonic and magmatic processes. Most of the mantle was depleted and degassed during the accretion process. High 3He/4He gases are viewed as products of ancient gas exsolution stored in low U environments, rather than products of primordial reservoirs. PMID:9689038

  6. Mechanisms of disruptions caused by noble gas injection into tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, D. Kh.; Yurchenko, E. I.; Lukash, V. E.; Baronova, E. O.; Pozdnyakov, Yu. I.; Rozhansky, V. A.; Senichenkov, I. Yu.; Veselova, I. Yu.; Schneider, R.

    2005-08-01

    Noble gas injection for disruption mitigation in DIII-D is simulated. The simulation of the first two stages of the disruption is performed: the first one is the neutral gas jet penetration through the background plasmas, and the second one is the instability growth. In order to simulate the first stage, the MHD pellet code LLP with improved radiation model for noble gas is used. Plasma cooling at this stage is provided by the energy exchange with the jet. The opacity effects in radiation losses are found to be important in the energy balance calculations. The magnetic surfaces in contact with the jet are cooled significantly; however, the temperature as well as the electric conductivity, remains high. The cooling front propagates towards the plasma centre. It has been shown that the cooling front is accompanied by strongly localized 'shark fin-like' perturbation in toroidal current density profile. The simplified cylindrical model shows that the cooling front is able to produce the internal kink-like mode with growth rate significantly higher than the tearing mode. The unstable kink perturbation obtained is non-resonant for any magnetic surface, both inside the plasma column, and in the vacuum space outside the separatrix. The mode disturbs mainly the core region. The growth time of the 'shark fin-like' mode is higher than the Alfven time by a factor of 10-100 for DIII-D parameters.

  7. Disruption mitigation by injection of small quantities of noble gas in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pautasso, G.; Bernert, M.; Dibon, M.; Duval, B.; Dux, R.; Fable, E.; Fuchs, J. C.; Conway, G. D.; Giannone, L.; Gude, A.; Herrmann, A.; Hoelzl, M.; McCarthy, P. J.; Mlynek, A.; Maraschek, M.; Nardon, E.; Papp, G.; Potzel, S.; Rapson, C.; Sieglin, B.; Suttrop, W.; Treutterer, W.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-01-01

    The most recent experiments of disruption mitigation by massive gas injection in ASDEX Upgrade have concentrated on small—relatively to the past—quantities of noble gas injected, and on the search for the minimum amount of gas necessary for the mitigation of the thermal loads on the divertor and for a significant reduction of the vertical force during the current quench. A scenario for the generation of a long-lived runaway electron beam has been established; this allows the study of runaway current dissipation by moderate quantities of argon injected. This paper presents these recent results and discusses them in the more general context of physical models and extrapolation, and of the open questions, relevant for the realization of the ITER disruption mitigation system.

  8. NMR of laser-polarized 129Xe in blood foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, C. H.; Peled, S.; Nascimben, L.; Oteiza, E.; Walsworth, R. L.; Jolesz, F. A.

    1997-01-01

    Laser-polarized 129Xe dissolved in a foam preparation of fresh human blood was investigated. The NMR signal of 129Xe dissolved in blood was enhanced by creating a foam in which the dissolved 129Xe exchanged with a large reservoir of gaseous laser-polarized 129Xe. The dissolved 129Xe T1 in this system was found to be significantly shorter in oxygenated blood than in deoxygenated blood. The T1 of 129Xe dissolved in oxygenated blood foam was found to be approximately 21 (+/-5) s, and in deoxygenated blood foam to be greater than 40 s. To understand the oxygenation trend, T1 measurements were also made on plasma and hemoglobin foam preparations. The measurement technique using a foam gas-liquid exchange interface may also be useful for studying foam coarsening and other liquid physical properties.

  9. Noble Gas Analysis for Mars Robotic Missions: Evaluating K-Ar Age Dating for Mars Rock Analogs and Martian Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Ming, D. W.; Garrison, D. H.; Jones, J. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Nagao, K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this noble gas investigation was to evaluate the possibility of measuring noble gases in martian rocks and air by future robotic missions such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission has, as part of its payload, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument, which consists of a pyrolysis oven integrated with a GCMS. The MSL SAM instrument has the capability to measure noble gas compositions of martian rocks and atmosphere. Here we suggest the possibility of K-Ar age dating based on noble gas release of martian rocks by conducting laboratory simulation experiments on terrestrial basalts and martian meteorites. We provide requirements for the SAM instrument to obtain adequate noble gas abundances and compositions within the current SAM instrumental operating conditions, especially, a power limit that prevents heating the furnace above approx.1100 C. In addition, Martian meteorite analyses from NASA-JSC will be used as ground truth to evaluate the feasibility of robotic experiments to constrain the ages of martian surface rocks.

  10. Light noble gas chemistry: Structures, stabilities, and bonding of helium, neon and argon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Frenking, G. ); Koch, W. ); Reichel, F. ); Cremer, D. )

    1990-05-23

    Theoretically determined geometries are reported for the light noble gas ions Ng{sub 2}C{sup 2+}, Ng{sub 2}N{sup 2+}, Ng{sub 2}O{sup 2+}, NgCCNg{sup 2+}, NgCCH{sup +}, NgCN{sup +}, and NgNC{sup +} (Ng = He, Ne, Ar) at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. In a few cases, optimizations were carried out at CASSCF/6-31G(d,p). The thermodynamic stability of the Ng compounds is investigated at MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G(2df,2pd) for Ng = He, Ne and at MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G(d,p) for Ng = Ar. The structures and stabilities of the molecules are discussed in terms of donor-acceptor interactions between Ng and the respective fragment cation, by using molecular orbital arguments and utilizing the analysis of the electron density distribution and its associated Laplace field. Generally, there is an increase in Ng,X binding interactions of a noble gas molecule NgX with increasing atomic size of Ng. In some cases the Ne,X stabilization energies are slightly smaller than the corresponding He,X values because of repulsive p-{pi} interactions in the neon compounds. The argon molecules are in all cases significantly stronger bound.

  11. Noble gas patterns in the atmospheres of Mars and Earth: A comparison via the SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O.; Becker, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Noble gas and nitrogen compositions in the glassy phase of the EETA 79001 shergottite correspond closely with Viking measurements. This direct evidence for the origin of the SNC meteorites on Mars, and for trapping of an unfractionated sample of Martian atmospheric gases in the 79001 glass, provides a reasonable basis for comparing the Martian and terrestrial atmospheres with more precision than that afforded by the Viking data set. Results are that, with one exception, elemental and isotopic compositions of nonradiogenic Martian noble gases are similar to those in the Earth's atmosphere; relatively small isotopic discrepancies in Kr and perhaps Xe may be attributable to different degrees of mass fractionation of a common parent reservoir. The anomaly is in Ar composition, where Martian Ar-36/AR-38 approx. 4 is strikingly lower than the values near 5.3 that characterize both the Earth and major meteoritic gas carriers. Although a primordial Martian ratio of 5.3 could in principle be altered by some planet specific process (e.g., cosmic ray spallation of surface materials) operating over geologic time, one has not been found that works.

  12. Non-solar noble gas abundances in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Stevenson, David J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrate is calculated to predict the formation conditions corresponding to a range of solar system parameters. The calculations were performed using the statistical mechanical theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw (1959) and existing experimental data concerning clathrate hydrate and its components. Dissociation pressures and partition functions (Langmuir constants) are predicted at low pressure for CO clathrate (hydrate) using the properties of chemicals similar to CO. It is argued that nonsolar but well constrained noble gas abundances may be measurable by the Galileo spacecraft in the Jovian atmosphere if the observed carbon enhancement is due to bombardment of the atmosphere by clathrate-bearing planetesimals sometime after planetary formation. The noble gas abundances of the Jovian satellite Titan are predicted, assuming that most of the methane in Titan is accreted as clathrate. It is suggested that under thermodynamically appropriate conditions, complete clathration of water ice could have occurred in high-pressure nebulas around giant planets, but probably not in the outer solar nebula. The stability of clathrate in other pressure ranges is also discussed.

  13. Migration of noble gas atoms in interaction with vacancies in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzagalli, L.; Charaf-Eddin, A.

    2015-08-01

    First principles calculations in combination with the nudged elastic band method have been performed in order to determine the mobility properties of various noble gas species (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) in silicon, a model semiconducting material. We focussed on single impurity, in interstitial configuration or forming a complex with a mono- or a di-vacancy, since the latter are known to be present and to play a key role in the formation of extended defects like bubbles or platelets. We determined several migration mechanisms and associated activation energies and have discussed these results in relation to available experiments. In particular, conflicting measured values of the migration energy of helium are explained by the present calculations. We also predict that helium diffuses solely as an interstitial, while an opposite behaviour is found for heavier species such as Ar, Kr, and Xe, with the prevailing role of complexes in that case. Finally, our calculations indicate that extended defects evolution by Ostwald ripening is possible for helium and maybe neon, but is rather unlikely for heavier noble gas species.

  14. Atmospheric noble gases as tracers of biogenic gas dynamics in a shallow unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katherine L.; Lindsay, Matthew B. J.; Kipfer, Rolf; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric noble gases (NGs) were used to investigate biogenic gas dynamics in a shallow unconfined aquifer impacted by a crude oil spill, near Bemidji, MN. Concentrations of 3,4He, 20,22Ne, 36,40Ar, Kr, and Xe were determined for gas- and aqueous-phase samples collected from the vadose and saturated zones, respectively. Systematic elemental fractionation of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe with respect to air was observed in both of these hydrogeologic zones. Within the vadose zone, relative ratios of Ne and Ar to Kr and Xe revealed distinct process-related trends when compared to corresponding ratios for air. The degree of NG deviation from atmospheric concentrations generally increased with greater atomic mass (i.e., ΔXe > ΔKr > ΔAr > ΔNe), indicating that Kr and Xe are the most sensitive NG tracers in the vadose zone. Reactive transport modeling of the gas data confirms that elemental fractionation can be explained by mass-dependent variations in diffusive fluxes of NGs opposite to a total pressure gradient established between different biogeochemical process zones. Depletion of atmospheric NGs was also observed within a methanogenic zone of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation located below the water table. Solubility normalized NG abundances followed the order Xe > Kr > Ar > Ne, which is indicative of dissolved NG partitioning into the gas phase in response to bubble formation and possibly ebullition. Observed elemental NG ratios of Ne/Kr, Ne/Xe, Ar/Xe, and Kr/Xe and a modeling analysis provide strong evidence that CH4 generation below the water table caused gas exsolution and possibly ebullition and carbon transfer from groundwater to the vadose zone. These results suggest that noble gases provide sensitive tracers in biologically active unconfined aquifers and can assist in identifying carbon cycling and transfer within the vadose zone, the capillary fringe, and below the water table.

  15. Noble gas composition of subcontinental lithospheric mantle: An extensively degassed reservoir beneath Southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalowitzki, Tiago; Sumino, Hirochika; Conceição, Rommulo V.; Orihashi, Yuji; Nagao, Keisuke; Bertotto, Gustavo W.; Balbinot, Eduardo; Schilling, Manuel E.; Gervasoni, Fernanda

    2016-09-01

    Patagonia, in the Southern Andes, is one of the few locations where interactions between the oceanic and continental lithosphere can be studied due to subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath the continent. In order to characterize the noble gas composition of Patagonian subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), we present the first noble gas data alongside new lithophile (Sr-Nd-Pb) isotopic data for mantle xenoliths from Pali-Aike Volcanic Field and Gobernador Gregores, Southern Patagonia. Based on noble gas isotopic compositions, Pali-Aike mantle xenoliths represent intrinsic SCLM with higher (U + Th + K)/(3He, 22Ne, 36Ar) ratios than the mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) source. This reservoir shows slightly radiogenic helium (3He/4He = 6.84-6.90 RA), coupled with a strongly nucleogenic neon signature (mantle source 21Ne/22Ne = 0.085-0.094). The 40Ar/36Ar ratios vary from a near-atmospheric ratio of 510 up to 17700, with mantle source 40Ar/36Ar between 31100-6800+9400 and 54000-9600+14200. In addition, the 3He/22Ne ratios for the local SCLM endmember, at 12.03 ± 0.15 to 13.66 ± 0.37, are higher than depleted MORBs, at 3He/22Ne = 8.31-9.75. Although asthenospheric mantle upwelling through the Patagonian slab window would result in a MORB-like metasomatism after collision of the South Chile Ridge with the Chile trench ca. 14 Ma, this mantle reservoir could have remained unhomogenized after rapid passage and northward migration of the Chile Triple Junction. The mantle endmember xenon isotopic ratios of Pali-Aike mantle xenoliths, which is first defined for any SCLM-derived samples, show values indistinguishable from the MORB source (129Xe/132Xe =1.0833-0.0053+0.0216 and 136Xe/132Xe =0.3761-0.0034+0.0246). The noble gas component observed in Gobernador Gregores mantle xenoliths is characterized by isotopic compositions in the MORB range in terms of helium (3He/4He = 7.17-7.37 RA), but with slightly nucleogenic neon (mantle source 21Ne/22Ne = 0.065-0.079). We

  16. Pressure disequilibria induced by rapid valve closure in noble gas extraction lines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Leah; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Pressure disequilibria during rapid valve closures can affect calculated molar quantities for a range of gas abundance measurements (e.g., K-Ar geochronology, (U-Th)/He geochronology, noble gas cosmogenic chronology). Modeling indicates this effect in a system with a 10 L reservoir reaches a bias of 1% before 1000 pipette aliquants have been removed from the system, and a bias of 10% before 10,000 aliquants. Herein we explore the causes and effects of this problem, which is the result of volume changes during valve closure. We also present a solution in the form of an electropneumatic pressure regulator that can precisely control valve motion. This solution reduces the effect to ∼0.3% even after 10,000 aliquants have been removed from a 10 L reservoir.

  17. MRI of the lung gas-space at very low-field using hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind K.; Zhang, Adelaide X.; Mansour, Joey; Kubatina, Lyubov; Oh, Chang Hyun; Blasche, Gregory; Selim Unlu, M.; Balamore, Dilip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    In hyperpolarized (HP) noble-gas magnetic resonance imaging, large nuclear spin polarizations, about 100,000 times that ordinarily obtainable at thermal equilibrium, are created in 3He and 129Xe. The enhanced signal that results can be employed in high-resolution MRI studies of void spaces such as in the lungs. In HP gas MRI the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends only weakly on the static magnetic field (B(0)), making very low-field (VLF) MRI possible; indeed, it is possible to contemplate portable MRI using light-weight solenoids or permanent magnets. This article reports the first in vivo VLF MR images of the lungs in humans and in rats, obtained at a field of only 15 millitesla (150 Gauss).

  18. Demonstration of neutron detection utilizing open cell foam and noble gas scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, C. M. Miller, E. C.; Coplan, M.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Yue, A. T.; Kowler, A. L.; Koeth, T.; Al-Sheikhly, M.; Clark, Charles W.

    2015-03-02

    We present results demonstrating neutron detection via a closely spaced converter structure coupled to low pressure noble gas scintillation instrumented by a single photo-multiplier tube (PMT). The converter is dispersed throughout the gas volume using a reticulated vitreous carbon foam coated with boron carbide (B{sub 4}C). A calibrated cold neutron beam is used to measure the neutron detection properties, using a thin film of enriched {sup 10}B as a reference standard. Monte Carlo computations of the ion energy deposition are discussed, including treatment of the foam random network. Results from this study indicate that the foam shadows a significant portion of the scintillation light from the PMT. The high scintillation yield of Xe appears to overcome the light loss, facilitating neutron detection and presenting interesting opportunities for neutron detector design.

  19. Testing of a prototype of calibration facility for noble gas monitoring using 41Ar.

    PubMed

    Saibathulham, Holnisar; Wurdiyanto, Gatot; Marsum, Pujadi

    2012-09-01

    A prototype of a calibration facility for noble gas monitoring using (41)Ar in the PTKMR-BATAN has been tested. The facility was designed in such a way that the standard source of gas can be reused. The radioactive (41)Ar source was obtained by thermal neutron reaction of (40)Ar(n, γ)(41)Ar using a thermal neutron flux of 4.8×10(13) neutrons per cm(2) per second in two minutes on the multipurpose G.A. Siwabessy Reactor (Batan, Serpong, Indonesia). Gamma spectrometry was used to measure the radioactivity and purity of (41)Ar. The spectrum of the (41)Ar observed yields an energy of 1294 keV because of the highest intensity (99.2%). The activity of (41)Ar was 2821 kBq and 4% of the expanded uncertainty. The time required for (41)Ar to reach homogeneity was 7 min, and the effectiveness of resuse was 53%.

  20. Evaluating Gas-Phase Transport And Detection Of Noble Gas Signals From Underground Nuclear Explosions Using Chemical Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, C. R.; Hunter, S. L.; Sun, Y.; Wagoner, J. L.; Ruddle, D.; Anderson, G.; Felske, D.; Myers, K.; Zucca, J. J.; Emer, D. F.; Townsend, M.; Drellack, S.; Chipman, V.; Snelson, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) involved detonating 1 kiloton of chemical explosive in a subsurface cavity which also contained bottles of tracer gases (ref 1). That experiment provided an improved understanding of transport processes relevant to the detection of noble gas signals at the surface emanating from a clandestine underground nuclear explosion (UNE). As an alternative to performing large chemical detonations to simulate gas transport from UNEs, we have developed a test bed for subsurface gas transport, sampling and detection studies using a former UNE cavity. The test bed site allows for the opportunity to evaluate pathways to the surface created by the UNE as well as possible transport mechanisms including barometric pumping and cavity pressurization (ref 2). With the test bed we have monitored long-term chemical tracers as well as newly injected tracers. In order to perform high temporal resolution tracer gas monitoring, we have also developed a Subsurface Gas Smart Sampler (SGSS) which has application during an actual On Site Inspection (OSI) and is available for deployment in OSI field exercises planned for 2014. Deployment of five SGSS at the remote test bed has provided unparalleled detail concerning relationships involving tracer gas transport to the surface, barometric fluctuations and temporal variations in the natural radon concentration. We anticipate that the results of our tracer experiments will continue to support the development of improved noble gas detection technology for both OSI and International Monitoring System applications. 1. C.R. Carrigan et al., 1996, Nature, 382, p. 528. 2. Y. Sun and C.R. Carrigan, 2012, Pure Appl. Geophys., DOI 10.1007/s00024-012-0514-4.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with laser polarized {sup 129}Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Scott D.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Agranoff, Bernard W.; Coulter, Kevin P.; Welsh, Robert C.; Chupp, Timothy E.

    1998-01-20

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging with laser-polarized {sup 129}Xe can be utilized to trace blood flow and perfusion in tissue for a variety of biomedical applications. Polarized xenon gas introduced in to the lungs dissolves in the blood and is transported to organs such as the brain where it accumulates in the tissue. Spectroscopic studies combined with imaging have been used to produce brain images of {sup 129}Xe in the rat head. This work establishes that nuclear polarization produced in the gas phases survives transport to the brain where it may be imaged. Increases in polarization and delivered volume of {sup 129}Xe will allow clinical measurements of regional blood flow.

  2. Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The noble gases are the group of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon - in the rightmost column of the periodic table of the elements, those which have "filled" outermost shells of electrons (two for helium, eight for the others). This configuration of electrons results in a neutral atom that has relatively low electron affinity and relatively high ionization energy. In consequence, in most natural circumstances these elements do not form chemical compounds, whence they are called "noble." Similarly, much more so than other elements in most circumstances, they partition strongly into a gas phase (as monatomic gas), so that they are called the "noble gases" (also, "inert gases"). (It should be noted, of course, that there is a sixth noble gas, radon, but all isotopes of radon are radioactive, with maximum half-life a few days, so that radon occurs in nature only because of recent production in the U-Th decay chains. The factors that govern the distribution of radon isotopes are thus quite different from those for the five gases cited. There are interesting stories about radon, but they are very different from those about the first five noble gases, and are thus outside the scope of this chapter.)In the nuclear fires in which the elements are forged, the creation and destruction of a given nuclear species depends on its nuclear properties, not on whether it will have a filled outermost shell when things cool off and nuclei begin to gather electrons. The numerology of nuclear physics is different from that of chemistry, so that in the cosmos at large there is nothing systematically special about the abundances of the noble gases as compared to other elements. We live in a very nonrepresentative part of the cosmos, however. As is discussed elsewhere in this volume, the outstanding generalization about the geo-/cosmochemistry of the terrestrial planets is that at some point thermodynamic conditions dictated phase separation of solids from gases, and that the

  3. The contribution of hydrothermally altered ocean crust to the mantle halogen and noble gas cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavrit, Déborah; Burgess, Ray; Sumino, Hirochika; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Droop, Giles; Shimizu, Aya; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that seawater-derived noble gases and halogens are recycled into the deep mantle by the subduction of oceanic crust. To understand the processes controlling the availability of halogens and noble gases for subduction, we determined the noble gas elemental and isotopic ratios and halogen (Cl, Br, I) concentrations in 28 igneous samples from the altered oceanic crust (AOC) from 5 ODP sites in the Eastern and Western Pacific Ocean. Crushing followed by heating experiments enabled determination of noble gases and halogens in fluid inclusions and mineral phases respectively. Except for He and Ar, Ne, Kr and Xe isotopic ratios were all air-like suggesting that primary MORB signatures have been completely overprinted by air and/or seawater interaction. In contrast, 3He/4He ratios obtained by crushing indicate that a mantle helium component is still preserved, and 40Ar/36Ar values are affected by radiogenic decay in the mineral phases. The 130Xe/36Ar and 84Kr/36Ar ratios are respectively up to 15 times and 5 times higher than those of seawater and the highest ratios are found in samples affected by low temperature alteration (shallower than 800-900 m sub-basement). We consider three possible processes: (i) adsorption onto the clays present in the samples; (ii) fluid inclusions with a marine pore fluid composition; and (iii) fractionation of seawater through phase separation caused by boiling. Ninety percent of the Cl, Br and I were released during the heating experiments, showing that halogens are dominantly held in mineral phases prior to subduction. I/Cl ratios vary by 4 orders of magnitude, from 3 × 10-6 to 2 × 10-2. The mean Br/Cl ratio is 30% lower than in MORB and seawater. I/Cl ratios lower than MORB values are attributed to Cl-rich amphibole formation caused by hydrothermal alteration at depths greater than 800-900 m sub-basement together with different extents of I loss during low and high temperature alteration. At shallower depths, I

  4. Noble gas isotopes in mineral springs and wells within the Cascadia forearc, Washington, Oregon, and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Constantz, James E.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2017-01-31

    IntroductionThis U.S. Geological Survey report presents laboratory analyses along with field notes for an exploratory study to document the relative abundance of noble gases in mineral springs and water wells within the Cascadia forearc of Washington, Oregon, and California (fig. 1). This report describes 14 samples collected in 2014 and 2015 and complements a previous report that describes 9 samples collected in 2012 and 2013 (McCrory and others, 2014b). Estimates of the depth to the underlying Juan de Fuca oceanic plate beneath sample sites are derived from the McCrory and others (2012) slab model. Some of the springs have been previously sampled for chemical analyses (Mariner and others, 2006), but none of the springs or wells currently has publicly available noble gas data. The helium and neon isotope values and ratios presented below are used to determine the sources and mixing history of these mineral and well waters (for example, McCrory and others, 2016).

  5. Optimizing detection of noble gas emission at a former UNE site: sample strategy, collection, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkham, R.; Olsen, K.; Hayes, J. C.; Emer, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    Underground nuclear tests may be first detected by seismic or air samplers operated by the CTBTO (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization). After initial detection of a suspicious event, member nations may call for an On-Site Inspection (OSI) that in part, will sample for localized releases of radioactive noble gases and particles. Although much of the commercially available equipment and methods used for surface and subsurface environmental sampling of gases can be used for an OSI scenario, on-site sampling conditions, required sampling volumes and establishment of background concentrations of noble gases require development of specialized methodologies. To facilitate development of sampling equipment and methodologies that address OSI sampling volume and detection objectives, and to collect information required for model development, a field test site was created at a former underground nuclear explosion site located in welded volcanic tuff. A mixture of SF-6, Xe127 and Ar37 was metered into 4400 m3 of air as it was injected into the top region of the UNE cavity. These tracers were expected to move towards the surface primarily in response to barometric pumping or through delayed cavity pressurization (accelerated transport to minimize source decay time). Sampling approaches compared during the field exercise included sampling at the soil surface, inside surface fractures, and at soil vapor extraction points at depths down to 2 m. Effectiveness of various sampling approaches and the results of tracer gas measurements will be presented.

  6. Hyperpolarized noble gas magnetic resonance imaging of the animal lung: Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santyr, Giles E.; Lam, Wilfred W.; Parra-Robles, Juan M.; Taves, Timothy M.; Ouriadov, Alexei V.

    2009-05-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas (HNG) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a very promising noninvasive tool for the investigation of animal models of lung disease, particularly to follow longitudinal changes in lung function and anatomy without the accumulated radiation dose associated with x rays. The two most common noble gases for this purpose are H3e (helium 3) and X129e (xenon 129), the latter providing a cost-effective approach for clinical applications. Hyperpolarization is typically achieved using spin-exchange optical pumping techniques resulting in ˜10 000-fold improvement in available magnetization compared to conventional Boltzmann polarizations. This substantial increase in polarization allows high spatial resolution (<1 mm) single-slice images of the lung to be obtained with excellent temporal resolution (<1 s). Complete three-dimensional images of the lungs with 1 mm slice thickness can be obtained within reasonable breath-hold intervals (<20 s). This article provides an overview of the current methods used in HNG MR imaging with an emphasis on ventilation studies in animals. Special MR hardware and software considerations are described in order to use the strong but nonrecoverable magnetization as efficiently as possible and avoid depolarization primarily by molecular oxygen. Several applications of HNG MR imaging are presented, including measurement of gross lung anatomy (e.g., airway diameters), microscopic anatomy (e.g., apparent diffusion coefficient), and a variety of functional parameters including dynamic ventilation, alveolar oxygen partial pressure, and xenon diffusing capacity.

  7. Noble gas and hydrocarbon tracers in multiphase unconventional hydrocarbon systems: Toward integrated advanced reservoir simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, T.; Moortgat, J.; Poreda, R. J.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Whyte, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional energy resources has increased dramatically in the last decade, total unconventional oil and gas recovery from black shales is still less than 25% and 9% of the totals in place, respectively. Further, the majority of increased hydrocarbon production results from increasing the lengths of laterals, the number of hydraulic fracturing stages, and the volume of consumptive water usage. These strategies all reduce the economic efficiency of hydrocarbon extraction. The poor recovery statistics result from an insufficient understanding of some of the key physical processes in complex, organic-rich, low porosity formations (e.g., phase behavior, fluid-rock interactions, and flow mechanisms at nano-scale confinement and the role of natural fractures and faults as conduits for flow). Noble gases and other hydrocarbon tracers are capably of recording subsurface fluid-rock interactions on a variety of geological scales (micro-, meso-, to macro-scale) and provide analogs for the movement of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. As such geochemical data enrich the input for the numerical modeling of multi-phase (e.g., oil, gas, and brine) fluid flow in highly heterogeneous, low permeability formations Herein we will present a combination of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe abundances and isotope ratios) and molecular and isotopic hydrocarbon data from a geographically and geologically diverse set of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs in North America. Specifically, we will include data from the Marcellus, Utica, Barnett, Eagle Ford, formations and the Illinois basin. Our presentation will include geochemical and geological interpretation and our perspective on the first steps toward building an advanced reservoir simulator for tracer transport in multicomponent multiphase compositional flow (presented separately, in Moortgat et al., 2015).

  8. Numerical models, geochemistry and the zero-paradox noble-gas mantle.

    PubMed

    Ballentine, Chris J; Van Keken, Peter E; Porcelli, Don; Hauri, Erik H

    2002-11-15

    Numerical models of whole-mantle convection demonstrate that degassing of the mantle is an inefficient process, resulting in ca. 50% of the (40)Ar being degassed from the mantle system. In this sense the numerical simulations are consistent with the (40)Ar mass balance between the atmosphere and mantle reservoir. These models, however, are unable to preserve the large-scale heterogeneity predicted by models invoking geochemical layering of the mantle system. We show that the three most important noble-gas constraints on the geochemically layered mantle are entirely dependent on the (3)He concentration of the convecting mantle derived from the (3)He flux into the oceans and the average ocean-crust generation rate. A factor of 3.5 increase in the convecting-mantle noble-gas concentration removes all requirements for: a (3)He flux into the upper mantle from a deeper high (3)He source; a boundary in the mantle capable of separating heat from helium; and a substantial deep-mantle reservoir to contain a hidden (40)Ar rich reservoir. We call this model concentration for the convecting mantle the 'zero-paradox' concentration. The time-integrated flux of (3)He into the oceans is a robust observation, but only representative of the ocean-floor activity over the last 1000 years. In contrast, ocean-floor generation occurs over tens of millions of years. We argue that combining these two observations to obtain the (3)He concentration of the mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is unsound. Other indicators of mantle (3)He concentration suggest that the real value may be at least a factor of two higher. As the zero-paradox concentration is approached, the noble-gas requirement for mantle layering is removed. We further consider the role that recycled material plays in ocean-island-basalt generation and show that a source with high (3)He and (3)He/(4)He must exist within the mantle. Nevertheless, only a small amount of this material is required to generate both the observed ocean

  9. Noble gas as tracers for CO2 deep input in petroleum reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Magali; Stuart, Finlay; Gilfillan, Stuart; Montel, François; Masini, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    The sub-salt hydrocarbon reservoirs in the deep offshore part of the Atlantic Ocean passive margins are a new key target for frontier oil and gas exploration. Type I source rocks locally rich in TOC (Total Organic Carbon) combined with an important secondary connected porosity of carbonate reservoirs overlain by an impermeable salt layer gives rise to reservoirs with high petroleum potential. However, some target structures have been found to be mainly filled with CO2 rich fluids. δ13C of the CO2 is generally between -9 and -4 permil, compatible with a deep source (metamorphic or mantle). Understanding the origin of the CO2 and the relative timing of its input into reservoir layers in regard to the geodynamic context appears to be a key issue for CO2 risk evaluation. The inertness and ubiquity of noble gases in crustal fluids make them powerful tools to trace the origin and migration of mixed fluids (Ballentine and Burnard 2002). The isotopic signature of He, Ne and Ar and the elemental pattern (He to Xe) of reservoir fluid from pressurized bottom hole samples provide an insight into fluid source influences at each reservoir depth. Three main end-members can be mixed into reservoir fluids (e.g. Gilfillan et al., 2008): atmospheric signature due to aquifer recharge, radiogenic component from organic fluid ± metamorphic influence, and mantle input. Their relative fractionation provides insights into the nature of fluid transport (Burnard et al., 2012)and its relative migration timing. In the studied offshore passive margin reservoirs, from both sides of South Atlantic margin, a strong MORB-like magmatic CO2 influence is clear. Hence, CO2 charge must have occurred during or after lithospheric break-up. CO2 charge(s) history appears to be complex, and in some cases requires several inputs to generate the observed noble gas pattern. Combining the knowledge obtained from noble gas (origin, relative timing, number of charges) with organic geochemical and thermodynamic

  10. Assessing Compositional Variability and Migration of Natural Gas in the Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin Using Noble Gas Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Ellis, B. R.; Hall, C. M.; Lohmann, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Antrim Shale was one of the first economic shale gas plays in the U.S. and has been actively produced since the 1980's. While previous studies suggest co-produced water in the Antrim is a mixture of brine from deeper formations and freshwater recharge, the extent of water-gas interactions has yet to be determined. The extent and source of thermogenic methane in the Antrim Shale are also under debate. This study uses stable noble gases' (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) isotopic ratios and their volume fractions from the Antrim Shale gases to assess compositional variability and vertical fluid migration, in addition to distinguishing between the presence of thermogenic versus biogenic methane. R/Ra values of Antrim Shale gases (where R and Ra are the measured and atmospheric 3He/4He ratios, respectively) vary from 0.01 to 0.34 suggesting dominant crustal 4He in addition to minor mantle and atmospheric He. Elevated 20Ne/22Ne ratios (up to 10.4) point to mantle Ne. Similarly crustal 21Ne*, 40Ar* and 136Xe* are also suggested. High variability of noble gas signatures in the Antrim Shale are observed, which are mainly due to variable noble gas input from deep brines and, to a smaller extent, variable in-situ production in the Antrim Shale. Estimated 4He ages considering external 4He flux for Antrim water match well with timings of three major glaciation periods (Wisconsin, Illinoian and Kansan glaciations) in the Michigan Basin, suggesting that all our Antrim samples were more or less influenced by glaciation recharge. Consistency in measured and predicted 40Ar/36Ar assuming Ar release temperatures ≥ 250°C supports a thermogenic origin for the majority of the methane in our Antrim Shale gas samples. Thermogenic methane is likely to originate at greater depth, either from deeper portions of the Antrim Shale in the central Michigan Basin or from deeper formations underlying the Antrim Shale, as the thermal maturity of the Antrim Shale in our study area is low.

  11. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  12. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  13. Detection of a noble gas molecular ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula.

    PubMed

    Barlow, M J; Swinyard, B M; Owen, P J; Cernicharo, J; Gomez, H L; Ivison, R J; Krause, O; Lim, T L; Matsuura, M; Miller, S; Olofsson, G; Polehampton, E T

    2013-12-13

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of (36)ArH(+) at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed (36)ArH(+) emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  14. Solar wind neon from Genesis: implications for the lunar noble gas record.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Ansgar; Baur, Heinrich; Bochsler, Peter; Bühler, Fritz; Burnett, Donald S; Hays, Charles C; Heber, Veronika S; Jurewicz, Amy J G; Wieler, Rainer

    2006-11-17

    Lunar soils have been thought to contain two solar noble gas components with distinct isotopic composition. One has been identified as implanted solar wind, the other as higher-energy solar particles. The latter was puzzling because its relative amounts were much too large compared with present-day fluxes, suggesting periodic, very high solar activity in the past. Here we show that the depth-dependent isotopic composition of neon in a metallic glass exposed on NASA's Genesis mission agrees with the expected depth profile for solar wind neon with uniform isotopic composition. Our results strongly indicate that no extra high-energy component is required and that the solar neon isotope composition of lunar samples can be explained as implantation-fractionated solar wind.

  15. Detection of a Noble Gas Molecular Ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Owen, P. J.; Cernicharo, J.; Gomez, H. L.; Ivison, R. J.; Krause, O.; Lim, T. L.; Matsuura, M.; Miller, S.; Olofsson, G.; Polehampton, E. T.

    2013-12-01

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of 36ArH+ at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed 36ArH+ emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  16. Imaging the impulsive alignment of noble-gas dimers via Coulomb explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltheim, A. von; Borchers, B.; Steinmeyer, G.; Rottke, H.

    2014-02-01

    The impulsive alignment of the noble-gas dimers Ne2, Ar2, Kr2, and Xe2 is experimentally investigated by determining the alignment through Coulomb explosion imaging after their double ionization. This approach yields a favorably detailed insight into the temporal evolution of the alignment succeeding the aligning laser pulse. Particular emphasis is put on analyzing higher order coherences induced in the density matrix as these coherences determine the details of the temporal evolution of the aligned molecular ensemble. The recorded data enable an extraction of polarizability anisotropies for the dimers and of their rotational constants in the vibrational ground state. At the elevated level of rotational excitation obtained, centrifugal distortion starts influencing the temporal evolution of the alignment.

  17. Mechanoluminescence of terbium and cerium sulfates in a noble-gas atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukhbatullin, A. A.; Sharipov, G. L.; Abdrakhmanov, A. M.; Muftakhutdinov, M. R.

    2014-05-01

    Lines of Ne (3 p-3 s, 550-800 nm) and Xe (6 p-6 s, 800-1050 nm; 7 p-6 s, 475 nm) have been detected in the mechanoluminescence spectrum of terbium and cerium sulfate crystallohydrates. The luminescence of noble gas is observed jointly with the known bands of Ce3+ and Tb3+ ions and N*2 lines. The lines corresponding to excited Xe+ ions (500-550 nm), indicative of achievement of electric-field strengths on the order of 107 V/cm during mechanoluminescence, are also observed. It is established that, during mechanoluminescence of Tb2(SO4)3 · 8D2O in an argon atmosphere under a pressure of 1.3 atm, mechanochemical reactions of decomposition of crystallization water (D2O) molecules cause luminescence of OD radicals; this luminescence is initiated by electron impact occurring during electrization and in discharges in crystals during destruction.

  18. Delineation of Fast Flow Paths in Porous Media Using Noble Gas Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, G B; Moran, J E

    2002-03-21

    Isotopically enriched xenon isotopes are ideal for tracking the flow of relatively large volumes of groundwater. Dissolved noble gas tracers behave conservatively in the saturated zone, pose no health risk to drinking water supplies, and can be used with a large dynamic range. Different Xe isotopes can be used simultaneously at multiple recharge sources in a single experiment. Results from a tracer experiment at a California water district suggests that a small fraction of tracer moved from the recharge ponds through the thick, unconfined, coarse-grained alluvial aquifer to high capacity production wells at a horizontal velocity of 6 m/day. In contrast, mean water residence times indicate that the average rate of transport is 0.5 to 1 m/day.

  19. Infrared and density functional theory studies of formic acid hydrate clusters in noble gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Fumiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of formic acid hydrate clusters (HCOOH)m(H2O)n have been measured in noble gas matrices (Ar and Kr). The concentration dependence of the spectra and the comparison with a previous experimental study on HCOOH(H2O) and HCOOH(H2O)2 [Geoge et al., Spectrochim. Acta, Part A 60 (2004) 3225] led to the identification of large clusters. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP-DCP/6-31+G(2d,2p) level were carried out to determine the anharmonic vibrational properties of the clusters, enabling a consistent assignment of the observed vibrational peaks to specific clusters.

  20. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Thomas H; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Warner, Nathaniel R; Poreda, Robert J

    2014-09-30

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ(13)C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., (4)He, (20)Ne, (36)Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, (4)He) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) and the proportions of atmospheric gases (air-saturated water; e.g., N2, (36)Ar) were significantly lower (P < 0.01) relative to background groundwater. Noble gas isotope and hydrocarbon data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing.

  1. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales

    PubMed Central

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ13C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., 4He, 20Ne, 36Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, 4He) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) and the proportions of atmospheric gases (air-saturated water; e.g., N2, 36Ar) were significantly lower (P < 0.01) relative to background groundwater. Noble gas isotope and hydrocarbon data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25225410

  2. Using Noble Gas Geochemistry to Determine the Source and Mechanism of Natural Gas Leakage into Shallow Aquifers Near Unconventional Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, T.; Whyte, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts associated with unconventional energy development. The occurrence of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells near unconventional natural gas development has been central to the debate about the environmental impacts of hydraulic fracturing, but still has a controversial origin that has variably been attributed to natural geogenic occurrences, poor well bore integrity, and crustal-scale migration of natural gas along natural deformation features. Differentiating amongst these possibilities is critical to ongoing efforts to understand the environmental implications for the presence of elevated methane and aliphatic hydrocarbons (ethane, propane, etc.) in drinking-water and a necessary step toward the development of implementable solutions that limit the occurrence of future fugitive gas events. Here we will expand upon our recent work in the Marcellus and Barnett gas fields (Jackson et al., 2013; Darrah et al., 2014; 2015) that developed noble gas techniques for distinguishing natural and anthropogenic mechanisms of natural gas migration by integrating the molecular and isotopic composition of non-hydrocarbon molecules (N2, H2S, CO2) in addition to compound specific isotopes of hydrocarbons (d2H of CH4 and d2H-C2H6 and d13C of CH4, C2H6, and C3H8) and non-hydrocarbon compounds (d15N-N2). The expanded data sets validate our initial study and support the hypothesis that a subset of drinking-water wells experience natural gas contamination following faulty well construction or poor well integrity amid a background of naturally occurring gas and salt-rich groundwater.

  3. Unprecedented Enhancement of Noble Gas-Noble Metal Bonding in NgAu3(+) (Ng = Ar, Kr, and Xe) Ion through Hydrogen Doping.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayan; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2016-12-22

    Behavior of gold as hydrogen in certain gold compounds and a very recent experimental report on the noble gas-noble metal interaction in Ar complexes of mixed Au-Ag trimers have motivated us to investigate the effect of hydrogen doping on the Ng-Au (Ng = Ar, Kr, and Xe) bonding through various ab initio based techniques. The calculated results show considerable strengthening of the Ng-Au bond in terms of bond length, bond energy, stretching vibrational frequency, and force constant. Particularly, an exceptional enhancement of Ar-Au bonding strength has been observed in ArAuH2(+) species as compared to that in ArAu3(+) system, as revealed from the CCSD(T) calculated Ar-Au bond energy value of 32 and 72 kJ mol(-1) for ArAu3(+) and ArAuH2(+), respectively. In the calculated IR spectra, the Ar-Au stretching frequency is blue-shifted by 65% in going from ArAu3(+) to ArAuH2(+) species. Similar trends have been obtained in the case of all Ar, Kr, and Xe complexes with Ag and Cu trimers. Among all the NgM3-kHk(+) complexes (where k = 0-2), the strongest binding in NgMH2(+) complex is attributed to significant enhancement in the covalent characteristics of the Ng-M bond and considerable increase in charge-induced dipole interaction, as shown from the topological analysis.

  4. The role of soil air composition for noble gas tracer applications in tropical groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Simon; Jenner, Florian; Aeschbach, Werner; Weissbach, Therese; Peregovich, Bernhard; Machado, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved noble gases (NGs) in groundwater provide a well-established tool for paleo temperature reconstruction. However, reliable noble gas temperature (NGT) determination needs appropriate assumptions or rather an exact knowledge of soil air composition. Deviations of soil air NG partial pressures from atmospheric values have already been found in mid latitudes during summer time as a consequence of subsurface oxygen depletion. This effect depends on ambient temperature and humidity and is thus expected to be especially strong in humid tropical soils, which was not investigated so far. We therefore studied NGs in soil air and shallow groundwater near Santarém (Pará, Brazil) at the end of the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. Soil air data confirms a correlation between NG partial pressures, the sum value of O2+CO2 and soil moisture contents. During the rainy season, we find significant NG enhancements in soil air by up to 7% with respect to the atmosphere. This is twice as much as observed during the dry season. Groundwater samples show neon excess values between 15% and 120%. Nearly all wells show no seasonal variations of excess air, even though the local river level seasonally fluctuates by about 8 m. Assuming atmospheric NG contents in soil air, fitted NGTs underestimate the measured groundwater temperature by about 1-2° C. However, including enhanced soil air NG contents as observed during the rainy season, resulting NGTs are in good agreement with local groundwater temperatures. Our presented data allows for a better understanding of subsurface NG variations. This is essential with regard to NG tracer applications in humid tropical areas, for which reliable paleoclimate data is of major importance for modern climate research.

  5. Mineralogy and noble gas isotopes of micrometeorites collected from Antarctic snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tsujimoto, Shin-ichi; Tobimatsu, Yu; Nakamura, Tomoki; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Itoh, Shoichi; Nagahara, Hiroko; Tachibana, Shogo; Terada, Kentaro; Yabuta, Hikaru

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated seven micrometeorites (MMs) from Antarctic snow collected in 2003 and 2010 by means of electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation, and noble-gas isotope analysis. Isotopic ratios of He and Ne indicate that the noble gases in these MMs are mostly of solar wind (SW). Based on the release patterns of SW 4He, which should reflect the degree of heating during atmospheric entry, the seven MMs were classified into three types including two least heated, three moderately heated, and two severely heated MMs. The heating degrees are well correlated to their mineralogical features determined by TEM observation. One of the least heated MMs is composed of phyllosilicates, whereas the other consists of anhydrous minerals within which solar flare tracks were observed. The two severely heated MMs show clear evidence of atmospheric heating such as partial melt of the uppermost surface layer in one and abundant patches of dendritic magnetite and Si-rich glass within an olivine grain in the other. It is noteworthy that a moderately heated MM composed of a single crystal of olivine has a 3He/4He ratio of 8.44 × 10-4, which is higher than the SW value of 4.64 × 10-4, but does not show a cosmogenic 21Ne signature such as 20Ne/21Ne/22Ne = 12.83/0.0284/1. The isotopic compositions of He and Ne in this sample cannot be explained by mixing of a galactic cosmic ray (GCR)-produced component and SW gases. The high 3He/4He ratio without cosmogenic 21Ne signature likely indicates the presence of a 3He-enriched component derived from solar energetic particles.

  6. U.S. Geological Survey Noble Gas Laboratory’s standard operating procedures for the measurement of dissolved gas in water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-08-12

    This report addresses the standard operating procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Noble Gas Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, U.S.A., for the measurement of dissolved gases (methane, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide) and noble gas isotopes (helium-3, helium-4, neon-20, neon-21, neon-22, argon-36, argon-38, argon-40, kryton-84, krypton-86, xenon-103, and xenon-132) dissolved in water. A synopsis of the instrumentation used, procedures followed, calibration practices, standards used, and a quality assurance and quality control program is presented. The report outlines the day-to-day operation of the Residual Gas Analyzer Model 200, Mass Analyzer Products Model 215–50, and ultralow vacuum extraction line along with the sample handling procedures, noble gas extraction and purification, instrument measurement procedures, instrumental data acquisition, and calculations for the conversion of raw data from the mass spectrometer into noble gas concentrations per unit mass of water analyzed. Techniques for the preparation of artificial dissolved gas standards are detailed and coupled to a quality assurance and quality control program to present the accuracy of the procedures used in the laboratory.

  7. Fiber optic applications for laser polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, W.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1997-10-01

    For the past two years, the laser polarized target group at Argonne has been used multi-mode fiber optic patch cords for a variety of applications. In this paper, the authors describe the design for transporting high power laser beams with optical fibers currently in use at IUCF.

  8. Hydrochemistry and noble gas origin of geothermal waters of Icheon and Pocheon area in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Chan Ho; Shin, Seon Ho; Nagao, Keisuke; Kim, Kyu Han; Koh, Yung Kwon; Kim, Gun Young

    2010-05-01

    Hydrochemical, stable isotopic (δ18O and δD) and noble gas isotopic analyses of seven geothermal water samples, eleven groundwater samples and six surface water samples collected from the Icheon and Pocheon area were carried out to find out hydrochemical characteristics, and to interpret the source of noble gases and the geochemical evolution of the geothermal waters. The geothermal waters show low temperature type ranging from 21.5 to 31.4 ℃ and the pH value between 6.69 and 9.21. Electrical conductivity of geothermal waters has the range from 310 to 735 μS/cm. Whereas the geothermal in the Icheon area shows the geochemical characteristics of neutral pH, the Ca-HCO3(or Ca(Na)-HCO3) chemical type and a high uranium content, the geothermal water in the Pocheon area shows the characteristics of alkaline pH, the Na-HCO3 chemical type and a high fluorine content. These characteristics indicate that the geothermal water in the Icheon area is under the early stage in the geochemical evolution, and that geothermal water in the Pocheon area has been geochemically evolved. The δ18O and δD values of geothermal waters show the range of -10.1˜-8.69‰ and from -72.2˜-60.8‰, respectively, and these values supply the information of the recharge area of geothermal waters. The 3He/4He ratios of the geothermal waters range from 0.09×10-6 to 0.65×10-6 which are plotted above the mixing line between air and crustal components. Whereas the helium gas in the Icheon geothermal water was mainly provided from the atmospheric source mixing with the mantle(or magma) origin, the origin of helium gas in the Pocheon geothermal water shows a dominant crustal source. 40Ar/36Ar ratios of geothermal water are in the range of an atmosphere source. Key words: hot spring water, hydrochemical composition, low temperature type, 3He/4He ratios, crustal source

  9. The ATTA-Hefei Instrument for Radioactive Noble-gas Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Cheng, C.; Cheng, G.; Sun, Y. R.; Tu, L.; Yang, G.

    2013-12-01

    Long-lived noble-gas isotopes 85Kr (10.8 y), 39Ar (269 y) and 81Kr (229 ky) are ideal tracers for dating environmental samples such as groundwater and ice. Together with 14C, these nuclides can be used to cover the whole range of 100-106 y. Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) is an emerging method for the analysis of these isotopes at an isotopic abundance level as low as 10^-16 [1,2]. The ATTA instrument built in Hefei, China, can determine the isotopic abundances of 85Kr and 81Kr with typically 5-10% accuracy using krypton gas samples of a few micro-liters (STP) krypton gas [3]. The krypton gas sample can be extracted from several liters of air using a distillation-chromatograph setup with a typical efficiency of 85%, while the air sample can be extracted from groundwater or ices. The typical sample size for ATTA measurement is 100L groundwater or 40Kg ices. One such ATTA beamline can handle about 100 samples per year. [1] Chen, C. Y. et al. Ultrasensitive isotope trace analyses with a magneto-optical trap. Science 286, 1139-1141 (1999). [2] Jiang, W. et al. 39Ar detection at the 10-16 isotopic abundance level with atom trap trace analysis. Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 103001 (2011). [3] Yang, G. -M. et al. Analysis of 85Kr: a comparison at the 10-14 level using micro-liter samples, Sci. Rep. 3, 1596 (2013). Relative uncertainty of the determined 85Kr abundance by the ATTA-Hefei instrument.

  10. Cross-Calibration of Secondary Electron Multiplier in Noble Gas Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santato, Alessandro; Hamilton, Doug; Deerberg, Michael; Wijbrans, Jan; Kuiper, Klaudia; Bouman, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    The latest generation of multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometers has decisively improved the precision in isotopic ratio analysis [1, 2] and helped the scientific community to address new questions [3]. Measuring numerous isotopes simultaneously has two significant advantages: firstly, any fluctuations in signal intensity have no effect on the isotope ratio and secondly, the analysis time is reduced. This particular point becomes very important in static vacuum mass spectrometry where during the analysis, the signal intensity decays and at the same time the background increases. However, when multi-collector analysis is utilized, it is necessary to pay special attention to the cross calibration of the detectors. This is a key point in order to have accurate and reproducible isotopic ratios. In isotope ratio mass spectrometry, with regard to the type of detector (i.e. Faraday or Secondary Electron Multiplier, SEM), analytical technique (TIMS, MC-ICP-MS or IRMS) and isotope system of interest, several techniques are currently applied to cross-calibrate the detectors. Specifically, the gain of the Faraday cups is generally stable and only the associated amplifier must be calibrated. For example, on the Thermo Scientific instrument control systems, the 1011 and 1012 ohm amplifiers can easily be calibrated through a fully software controlled procedure by inputting a constant electric signal to each amplifier sequentially [4]. On the other hand, the yield of the SEMs can drift up to 0.2% / hour and other techniques such as peak hopping, standard-sample bracketing and multi-dynamic measurement must be used. Peak hopping allows the detectors to be calibrated by measuring an ion beam of constant intensity across the detectors whereas standard-sample bracketing corrects the drift of the detectors through the analysis of a reference standard of a known isotopic ratio. If at least one isotopic pair of the sample is known, multi-dynamic measurement can be used; in this

  11. Indigenous nitrogen in the Moon: Constraints from coupled nitrogen-noble gas analyses of mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füri, Evelyn; Barry, Peter H.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Marty, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen and noble gas (Ne-Ar) abundances and isotope ratios, determined by step-wise CO2 laser-extraction, static-mass spectrometry analysis, are reported for bulk fragments and mineral separates of ten lunar mare basalts (10020, 10057, 12008, 14053, 15555, 70255, 71557, 71576, 74255, 74275), one highland breccia (14321), and one ferroan anorthosite (15414). The mare basalt sub-samples 10057,183 and 71576,12 contain a large amount of solar noble gases, whereas neon and argon in all other samples are purely cosmogenic, as shown by their 21Ne/22Ne ratios of ≈0.85 and 36Ar/38Ar ratios of ≈0.65. The solar-gas-free basalts contain a two-component mixture of cosmogenic 15N and indigenous nitrogen (<0.5 ppm). Mare basalt 74255 and the olivine fraction of 15555,876 record the smallest proportion of 15Ncosm; therefore, their δ15 N values of -0.2 to + 26.7 ‰ (observed at the low-temperature steps) are thought to well represent the isotopic composition of indigenous lunar nitrogen. However, δ15 N values ≤ - 30 ‰ are found in several basalts, overlapping with the isotopic signature of Earth's primordial mantle or an enstatite chondrite-like impactor. While the lowest δ15 N values allow for nitrogen trapped in the Moon's interior to be inherited from the proto-Earth and/or the impactor, the more 15N-enriched compositions require that carbonaceous chondrites provided nitrogen to the lunar magma ocean prior to the solidification of the crust. Since nitrogen can efficiently be incorporated into mafic minerals (olivine, pyroxene) under oxygen fugacities close to or below the iron-wustite buffer (Li et al., 2013), the mare basalt source region is likely characterized by a high nitrogen storage capacity. In contrast, anorthosite 15414 shows no traces of indigenous nitrogen, suggesting that nitrogen was not efficiently incorporated into the lunar crust during magma ocean differentiation.

  12. Determining the source and genetic fingerprint of natural gases using noble gas geochemistry: a northern Appalachian Basin case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Silurian and Devonian natural gas reservoirs present within New York state represent an example of unconventional gas accumulations within the northern Appalachian Basin. These unconventional energy resources, previously thought to be noneconomically viable, have come into play following advances in drilling (i.e., horizontal drilling) and extraction (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) capabilities. Therefore, efforts to understand these and other domestic and global natural gas reserves have recently increased. The suspicion of fugitive mass migration issues within current Appalachian production fields has catalyzed the need to develop a greater understanding of the genetic grouping (source) and migrational history of natural gases in this area. We introduce new noble gas data in the context of published hydrocarbon carbon (C1,C2+) (13C) data to explore the genesis of thermogenic gases in the Appalachian Basin. This study includes natural gases from two distinct genetic groups: group 1, Upper Devonian (Marcellus shale and Canadaway Group) gases generated in situ, characterized by early mature (13C[C1  C2][13C113C2]: –9), isotopically light methane, with low (4He) (average, 1  103 cc/cc) elevated 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar (where the asterisk denotes excess radiogenic or nucleogenic production beyond the atmospheric ratio), and a variable, atmospherically (air-saturated–water) derived noble gas component; and group 2, a migratory natural gas that emanated from Lower Ordovician source rocks (i.e., most likely, Middle Ordovician Trenton or Black River group) that is currently hosted primarily in Lower Silurian sands (i.e., Medina or Clinton group) characterized by isotopically heavy, mature methane (13C[C1 – C2] [13C113C2]: 3), with high (4He) (average, 1.85  103 cc/cc) 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar near crustal production levels and elevated crustal noble gas content (enriched 4He,21Ne, 40Ar). Because the release of each crustal noble gas (i.e., He, Ne, Ar

  13. USGS-NoGaDat - A global dataset of noble gas concentrations and their isotopic ratios in volcanic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abedini, Atosa A.; Hurwitz, S.; Evans, William C.

    2006-01-01

    The database (Version 1.0) is a MS-Excel file that contains close to 5,000 entries of published information on noble gas concentrations and isotopic ratios from volcanic systems in Mid-Ocean ridges, ocean islands, seamounts, and oceanic and continental arcs (location map). Where they were available we also included the isotopic ratios of strontium, neodymium, and carbon. The database is sub-divided both into material sampled (e.g., volcanic glass, different minerals, fumarole, spring), and into different tectonic settings (MOR, ocean islands, volcanic arcs). Included is also a reference list in MS-Word and pdf from which the data was derived. The database extends previous compilations by Ozima (1994), Farley and Neroda (1998), and Graham (2002). The extended database allows scientists to test competing hypotheses, and it provides a framework for analysis of noble gas data during periods of volcanic unrest.

  14. The degassing history of the Earth: Noble gas studies of Archaean cherts and zero age glassy submarine basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, R.; Hogan, L.

    1985-01-01

    Recent noble gas studies suggests the Earth's atmosphere outgassed from the Earth's upper mantle synchronous with sea floor spreading, ocean ridge hydrothermal activity and the formation of continents by partial melting in subduction zones. The evidence for formation of the atmosphere by outgassing of the mantle is the presence of radionuclides H3.-4, Ar-040 and 136 Xe-136 in the atmosphere that were produced from K-40, U and Th in the mantle. How these radionuclides were formed is reviewed.

  15. Making channeling visible: keV noble gas ion trails on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redinger, A.; Standop, S.; Rosandi, Y.; Urbassek, H. M.; Michely, T.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of argon and xenon noble gas ions on Pt(111) in grazing incidence geometry are studied through direct comparison of scanning tunneling microscopy images and molecular dynamics simulations. The energy range investigated is 1-15 keV and the angles of incidence with respect to the surface normal are between 78.5° and 88°. The focus of the paper is on events where ions gently enter the crystal at steps and are guided in channels between the top most layers of the crystal. The trajectories of the subsurface channeled ions are visible as trails of surface damage. The mechanism of trail formation is analyzed using simulations and analytical theory. Significant differences between Xe+ and Ar+ projectiles in damage, in the onset energy of subsurface channeling as well as in ion energy dependence of trail length and appearance are traced back to the projectile and ion energy dependence of the stopping force. The asymmetry of damage production with respect to the ion trajectory direction is explained through the details of the channel shape and subchannel structure as calculated from the continuum approximation of the channel potential. Measured and simulated channel switching in directions normal and parallel to the surface as well as an increase of ions entering into channels from the perfect surface with increasing angles of incidence are discussed.

  16. Communication: Nuclear quadrupole moment-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in noble gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li-juan; Vaara, Juha; Rizzo, Antonio

    2013-11-14

    New, high-sensitivity and high-resolution spectroscopic and imaging methods may be developed by exploiting nuclear magneto-optic effects. A first-principles electronic structure formulation of nuclear electric quadrupole moment-induced Cotton-Mouton effect (NQCME) is presented for closed-shell atoms. In NQCME, aligned quadrupole moments alter the index of refraction of the medium along with and perpendicular to the direction of nuclear alignment. The roles of basis-set convergence, electron correlation, and relativistic effects are investigated for three quadrupolar noble gas isotopes: {sup 21}Ne, {sup 83}Kr, and {sup 131}Xe. The magnitude of the resulting ellipticities is predicted to be 10{sup −4}–10{sup −6} rad/(M cm) for fully spin-polarized nuclei. These should be detectable in the Voigt setup. Particularly interesting is the case of {sup 131}Xe, in which a high degree of spin polarization can be achieved via spin-exchange optical hyperpolarization.

  17. Comparing Meteorite and Spacecraft Noble Gas Measurements to Trace Processes in the Martian Crust and Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    Our knowledge of the noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions in the Martian crust and atmosphere come from two sources, measurements of meteorites from Mars and in situ measurements by spacecraft. Measurements by the Viking landers had large uncertainties, but were precise enough to tie the meteorites to Mars. Hence most of the questions we have are currently defined by meteorite measurements. Curiosity's SAM has confirmed that the Ar isotopic composition of the atmosphere is highly fractionated, presumably representing atmospheric loss that can now be modeled with more confidence. What turns out to be a more difficult trait to explain is the fact that the ratio of Kr/Xe in nakhlites, chassignites and ALH84001 is distinct from the atmospheric ratio, as defined by measurements from shergottites. This discrepancy has been suggested to be a result of atmosphere/groundwater/rock interaction, polar clathrate formation, or perhaps local temperature conditions. More detailed atmospheric measurements, along with targeted simulation experiments, will be needed to make full use of this anomaly.

  18. Potential interstellar noble gas molecules: ArOH+ and NeOH+ rovibrational analysis from quantum chemical quartic force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Riley A.; Fortenberry, Ryan C.

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of ArH+ in the interstellar medium has shown that noble gas chemistry may be of more chemical significance than previously believed. The present work extends the known chemistry of small noble gas molecules to NeOH+ and ArOH+. Besides their respective neonium and argonium diatomic cation cousins, these hydroxyl cation molecules are the most stable small noble gas molecules analyzed of late. ArOH+ is once again more stable than the neon cation, but both are well-behaved enough for a complete quartic force field analysis of their rovibrational properties. The Ar-O bond in ArOH+ , for instance, is roughly three-quarters of the strength of the Ar-H bond in ArH+ highlighting the rigidity of this system. The rotational constants, geometries, and vibrational frequencies for both molecules and their various isotopologues are computed from ab initio quantum chemical theory at high-level, and it is shown that these cations may form in regions where peroxy or weakly-bound alcohols may be present. The resulting data should be of significant assistance for the laboratory or observational analysis of these potential interstellar molecules.

  19. Noble gas systematics for coexisting glass and olivine crystals in basalts and dunite xenoliths from Loihi Seamount

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaneoka, I.; Takaoka, N.; Clague, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Noble gas isotopes including 3He 4He, 40Ar 36Ar and Xe isotope ratios were determined for coexisting glass and olivine crystals in tholeiitic and alkalic basalts and dunite xenoliths from Loihi Seamount. Glass and coexisting olivine crystals have similar 3He 4He ratios (2.8-3.4) ?? 10-5, 20 to 24 times the atmospheric ratio (RA), but different 40Ar 36Ar ratios (400-1000). Based on the results of noble gas isotope ratios and microscopic observation, some olivine crystals are xenocrysts. We conclude that He is equilibrated between glass and olivine xenocrysts, but Ar is not. The apparent high 3He 4He ratio (3 ?? 10-5; = 21 RA) coupled with a relatively high 40Ar 36Ar ratio (4200) for dunite xenoliths (KK 17-5) may be explained by equilibration of He between MORB-type cumulates and the host magma. Except for the dunite xenoliths, noble gas data for these Loihi samples are compatible with a model in which samples from hot spot areas may be explained by mixing between P (plume)-type and M (MORB)-type components with the addition of A (atmosphere)-type component. Excess 129Xe has not been observed due to apparent large mass fractionation among Xe isotopes. ?? 1983.

  20. Noble Gas Isotopic Evidence for Primordial Evolution of the Earth's Atmosphere in Three Distinct Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, C. L., Jr.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    1995-09-01

    The deep Earth is the key to understanding the primordial evolution of the Earth's atmosphere. However the atmosphere was not derived by degassing of the Earth, as widely held. Isotopic characterization of mantle noble gases and modeling based on this information [1] suggests the atmosphere experienced a 3-stage early history. This follows from 5 basic observations: (i) Ne in the mantle is solar-like, with light (high) 20Ne/22Ne relative to the atmosphere [2]; (ii) mantle Xe has higher 128Xe/130Xe than the atmosphere [3], which carries an extreme heavy isotope enriched mass fractionation signature of >3%/amu (iii) most of the radiogenic Xe from l29I and 244Pu decay in the Earth is not present either in the mantle or in the atmosphere; (iv) the inferred abundances of noble gases in the deep Earth "plume source" are insufficient to generate the present atmospheric abundances, even for whole mantle degassing; and (v) mantle noble gases indicate a 2 component structure, with solar light gases (He and Ne) and planetary heavy gases [4]. The present day noble gas budgets (and likely also N2) must derive from late accretion of a volatile-rich "veneer." This is stage III. Stage II is a naked (no atmosphere) epoch indicated by evidence for Hadean degassing of 244Pu (T1/2 = 80 Ma) fission Xe from the whole mantle, which was not retained in the present atmosphere. The naked stage must have lasted for more than ~200 Ma, and was supported by the early intense solar EUV luminosity. Stage I, a massive solar-composition protoatmosphere, occurred during the Earth's early accretion phase. Its existence is indicated by the presence of the solar gas component in the Earth. This is not attributable to subduction of solar wind rich cosmic dust, or solar wind irradiation of coagulating objects. It is best explained by accretion of a solar composition atmosphere from the nebula. This provided a thermal blanket supporting a magma ocean in which solar gases dissolved. Under these conditions

  1. Nature of sonoluminescence: noble gas radiation excited by hot electrons in cold water

    PubMed

    Garcia; Levanyuk; Osipov

    2000-08-01

    It was proposed before that single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) may be caused by strong electric fields occurring in water near the surface of collapsing gas bubbles because of the flexoelectric effect involving polarization resulting from a gradient of pressure. Here we show that these fields can indeed provoke dynamic electric breakdown in a micron-size region near the bubble and consider the scenario of the SBSL. The scenario is (i) at the last stage of incomplete collapse of the bubble, the gradient of pressure in water near the bubble surface has such a value and a sign that the electric field arising from the flexoelectric effect exceeds the threshold field of the dynamic electrical breakdown of water and is directed to the bubble center; (ii) mobile electrons are generated because of thermal ionization of water molecules near the bubble surface; (iii) these electrons are accelerated in "cold" water by the strong electric fields; (iv) these hot electrons transfer noble gas atoms dissolved in water to high-energy excited states and optical transitions between these states produce SBSL UV flashes in the transparency window of water; (v) the breakdown can be repeated several times and the power and duration of the UV flash are determined by the multiplicity of the breakdowns. The SBSL spectrum is found to resemble a black-body spectrum where temperature is given by the effective temperature of the hot electrons. The pulse energy and some other characteristics of the SBSL are found to be in agreement with the experimental data when realistic estimates are made.

  2. Modulation by the noble gas argon of the catalytic and thrombolytic efficiency of tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    David, Hélène N; Haelewyn, Benoît; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H

    2013-01-01

    Argon has been shown to provide cortical as well as, under certain conditions, subcortical neuroprotection in all models so far (middle cerebral artery occlusion, trauma, neonatal asphyxia, etc.). This has led to the suggestion that argon could be a cost-efficient alternative to xenon, a metabolically inert gas thought to be gold standard in gas pharmacology but whose clinical development suffers its little availability and excessive cost of production. However, whether argon interacts with the thrombolytic agent tissue plasminogen activator, which is the only approved therapy of acute ischemic stroke to date, still remains unknown. This latter point is not trivial since previous data have clearly demonstrated the inhibiting effect of xenon on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency and the critical importance of the time at which xenon is administered, during or after ischemia, in order not to block thrombolysis and to obtain neuroprotection. Here, we investigated the effect of argon on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency using in vitro methods shown to provide reliable prediction of the in vivo effects of both oxygen and the noble inert gases on tPA-induced thrombolysis. We found that argon has a concentration-dependent dual effect on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency. Low and high concentrations of argon of 25 and 75 vol% respectively block and increase tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency. The possible use of argon at low and high concentrations in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke if given during ischemia or after tPA-induced reperfusion is discussed as regards to its neuroprotectant action and its inhibiting and facilitating effects on tPA-induced thrombolysis. The mechanisms of argon-tPA interactions are also discussed.

  3. Noble Gas Proxy Evidence Of Holocene Climate Fluctuations In The Elwha Watershed, Olympic Mountains, Washington

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paleotempertures retrieved from the groundwater archives in the largest watershed (≈800 km2) in the Olympic Mountains suggest asynchronous Olympic Peninsula climate responses during the Everson interstade period after the last continental glacial maximum. Dissolved noble gases fr...

  4. A Rapid, Low-Cost Method to Determine Travel Times at Managed Aquifer Recharge Operations Using Noble Gas Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. E.; Visser, A.; Singleton, M. J.; Esser, B. K.; Halliwell, M.; Hillegonds, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Managed aquifer recharge is a key component for the sustainable use of surface water and groundwater in the arid western U.S. When recycled water is a recharge water source, subsurface residence time, required for bacteria and virus deactivation, is best verified by application of an extrinsic tracer. Desirable tracer properties include: no real or perceived health risk, inexpensive even for a large volume of tagged water, large dynamic range, efficient introduction, convenient sampling methods, and rapid, low-cost analysis. We have developed and tested a dissolved noble gas tracer technique ideally suited for tracing large water volumes at managed aquifer recharge facilities. In an application of the method at a water district's facilities in the San Francisco Bay area, Xenon was introduced into a 106 m3 pond over a period of 7 days using a 300 m length of gas-permeable silicone tubing. Samples from the pond, near-field shallow monitoring wells, and production wells about 400 m from the recharge pond were analyzed for dissolved Xe by noble gas membrane inlet mass spectrometry (NGMIMS). The NGMIMS uses a syringe pump, gas-permeable membrane inlet, and quadrupole residual gas analyzer for measurement of noble gas concentrations. Samples are collected in VOA vials, and analysis can be carried out in real-time, with a measurement uncertainty of about 5% for Xe. Tracer first appeared in a production well 136 days after starting the tracer introduction at 0.7% (C/C0) of the peak pond xenon concentration. The cost of the tracer is about US650/106 m3 water, and the NGMIMS was assembled with parts totaling approximately US50,000, making application of the tracer method feasible for most managed aquifer recharge projects. This project is part of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program.

  5. Laser microprobe analyses of noble gas isotopes and halogens in fluid inclusions: Analyses of microstandards and synthetic inclusions in quartz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Irwin, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Ar, Kr, Xe, Cl, Br, I, and K abundances and isotopic compositions have been measured in microscopic fluid inclusions in minerals by noble gas mass spectrometry following neutron irradiation and laser extraction. The laser microprobe noble gas mass spectrometric (LMNGMS) technique was quantified by use of microstandards, including air-filled capillary tubes, synthetic basalt glass grains, standard hornblende grains, and synthetic fluid inclusions in quartz. Common natural concentrations of halogens (Cl, Br, and I) and noble gases (Ar and Kr) in trapped groundwaters and hydrothermal fluids can be analyzed simultaneously by LMNGMS in as little as 10-11 L of inclusion fluid, with accuracy and precision to within 5-10% for element and isotope ratios. Multicomponent element and isotope correlations indicate contaminants or persistent reservoirs of excess Xe and/or unfractionated air in some synthetic and natural fluid inclusion samples. LMNGMS analyses of natural fluid inclusions using the methods and calibrations reported here may be used to obtain unique information on sources of fluids, sources of fluid salinity, mixing, boiling (or unmixing), and water-rock interactions in ancient fluid flow systems. ?? 1992.

  6. Detection of Noble Gas Radionuclides from an Underground Nuclear Explosion During a CTBT On-Site Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Sun, Yunwei

    2014-03-01

    The development of a technically sound approach to detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is a critical component of the on-site inspection (OSI) protocol under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. In this context, we are investigating a variety of technical challenges that have a significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments—a lesson we learned previously from the non-proliferation experiment (NPE). Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied by field experiments, making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated and complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that addresses some of the sampling challenges discussed here.

  7. A preliminary report on noble gas isotope analyses using the Helix-MC multi-collector mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Zhang, X.; Phillips, D.; Szczepanski, S.; Deerberg, M.; Hamilton, D.; Krummen, M.; Schwieters, J.

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of noble gas isotopes by multi-collector mass spectrometry substantially improve measurement precision and accuracy, with the potential to revolutionise applications to cosmo-geo-sciences. The Helix-MC noble gas mass spectrometer manufactured by Thermo-Fisher is a 350mm, 120 degree extended geometry, high resolution, multi-collector mass spectrometer for the simultaneous analysis of noble gas isotopes. The detector array includes a fixed axial (Ax) detector, 2 adjustable high mass (H1 and H2) detectors and 2 adjustable low mass (L1 and L2) detectors. Each detector is equipped with a Faraday/ion counting multiplier CFM (Combined Faraday and CDD Multiplier) detector. Mass resolution and mass resolving power on the H2, Ax and L2 detectors of the Helix-MC installed at the Australian National University (ANU) are approximately 1,800 and 8,000, respectively. The noble gas handling system on-line to the Helix-MC consists of: (1) a resistively-heated, double-vacuum, tantalum furnace system, (2) air actuated vacuum crusher, (3) Photon-Machines diode laser heating system, (4) Janis He cryogenic trap assembly, (5) gas purification system and (6) standard gas pipette tanks, which are totally automated and controlled by the Qtegra software platform developed by Thermo-Fisher. Eleven repeat measurements of atmospheric Ar using the H2 Faraday (1E11 ohm resistor) and L2 CDD collectors on the Helix-MC, yield a mean 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 322.09 +- 0.28 (0.089%) with a 4,700 fA 40Ar beam current. This result compares favourably with the precision achieved by the Argus VI at the University of Melbourne (318.12 +- 0.17; 0.052%; n = 10) with a similar beam size of 4,200 fA. The high mass resolution of the L2 collector permits complete separation of the 36Ar and interfering 3 x 12C (required mass resolution (MR) of 1,100) and partial separation of H35Cl (MR = 3,900). This capability enables evaluation of the significance of Ar isotopic interferences related to the correction of

  8. WLS R&D for the detection of noble gas scintillation at LBL: seeing the light from neutrinos, to dark matter, to double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehman, V. M.

    2013-09-01

    Radiation detectors with noble gasses as the active medium are becoming increasingly common in experimental programs searching for physics beyond the standard model. Nearly all of these experiments rely to some degree on collecting scintillation light from noble gasses. The VUV wavelengths associated with noble gas scintillation mean that most of these experiments use a fluorescent material to shift the direct scintillation light into the visible or near UV band. We present an overview of the R&D program at LBL related to noble gas detectors for neutrino physics, double beta decay, and dark matter. This program ranges from precise measurements of the fluorescence behavior of wavelength shifting films, to the prototyping of large are VUV sensitive light guides for multi-kiloton detectors.

  9. Identifying the Sources of Methane in Shallow Groundwaters in Parker and Hood Counties, Texas through Noble Gas Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Nicot, J. P.; Hall, C. M.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    With rising demands for cleaner domestic energy resources, horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques in unconventional hydrocarbon exploration have been extensively developed. However, the observation that some water wells have showed elevated concentrations of dissolved methane and other light hydrocarbons has caused public concern regarding unconventional energy extraction. In this contribution, we present noble gas data of production shale gases from the Barnett and Strawn Formations, as well as nearby groundwater samples in south-central Texas. The Barnett Shale located in the Fort Worth Basin at an average depth of ~2300 m is one of the most prominent shale gas plays in the U.S. This DOE-sponsored study explores the potential of noble gases for fingerprinting shale gas and thus, for identifying the sources of gas in aquifers overlying the Barnett Shale, due either to natural hydrocarbon occurrences or potentially related to gas production from unconventional energy resources. A total of 35 groundwater samples were collected in Parker and Hood counties in areas where high amounts of methane (>10 mg/L) were detected in shallow groundwater. Two gas samples were also collected directly from groundwater wells where bubbling methane was present. Preliminary results show that He concentrations in water samples, in excess of up to three orders of magnitude higher than expected atmospheric values are directly correlated with methane concentrations. 3He/4He ratio values vary from 0.030 to 0.889 times the atmospheric ratio with the lowest, more pure radiogenic contributions being associated with highest methane levels. The presence of crustally-produced radiogenic 40Ar is also apparent in groundwater samples with 40Ar/36Ar ratios up to 316. A combined analysis of 40Ar/36Ar ratios from groundwater wells bubbling gas and that of shale gas suggests that the source of this methane is not the heavily exploited Barnett Shale, but rather, the Strawn Formation.

  10. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  11. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  12. Noble gas isotope signals of mid-ocean ridge basalts and their implication for upper mantle structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroncik, Nicole A.; Niedermann, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    The geochemical structure of the upper mantle in general and its noble gas isotopic structure in particular have been the subject of countless studies, as both provide important insights into mantle dynamic processes and are essential for the formulation of mantle geodynamic models. This contribution presents a noble gas study of basaltic glasses derived from the Mid-Atlantic-Ridge (MAR) between 4 and 12° S, an area well known for its high degree of lithophile isotope heterogeneity and exhibiting anomalous crustal thickness. The Sr, Nd, Pb and Hf isotopies along this segment of the MAR range from ultra-depleted (more than NMORB) to highly enriched, and different concepts have been proposed to explain the observed isotopic signatures. Here we show that the high degree of heterogeneity is not confined to the isotopes of the lithophile elements, but is also shown by the noble gas isotopes and noble gas interelement ratios, such as e.g. 3He/22NeM or 4He/40Ar*. 3He/4He, 21Ne/22Neextra and 40Ar/36Ar range from 7.3 to 9.3 RA, from 0.05 to 0.08, and from 346 to 37,400, respectively. Nevertheless, the majority of the Ne isotope data are clearly aligned along a single mixing line in the Ne-three-isotope diagram, represented by the equation 20Ne/22Ne=70.5 x 21Ne/22Ne + 7.782, with a slope distinctly different from that of the MORB line, indicating that the ultra-depleted material is characterised by a significantly more nucleogenic 21Ne/22Ne isotopy than the normal depleted mantle. We show, based on covariations between 3He/4He and 21Ne/22Neextra with 206Pb/204Pb and 178Hf/177Hf, that the ultra-depleted material erupted at this MAR segment was most likely produced by an ancient, deep melting event. This implies that isotopic heterogeneities in the upper mantle are not solely caused by the injection of enriched materials from deep-seated mantle plumes or by crustal recycling but may also be due to differences in the depth and degree of melting of upper mantle material within

  13. Stability of noble-gas-bound SiH₃⁺ clusters.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Moreno, Diego; Merino, Gabriel; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2014-11-10

    The stability of noble gas (Ng)-bound SiH3(+) clusters is explored by ab initio computations. Owing to a high positive charge (+1.53 e(-)), the Si center of SiH3(+) can bind two Ng atoms. However, the Si-Ng dissociation energy for the first Ng atom is considerably larger than that for the second one. As we go down group 18, the dissociation energy gradually increases, and the largest value is observed for the case of Rn. For NgSiH3(+) clusters, the Ar-Rn dissociation processes are endergonic at room temperature. For He and Ne, a much lower temperature is required for it to be viable. The formation of Ng2SiH3(+) clusters is also feasible, particularly for the heavier members and at low temperature. To shed light on the nature of Si-Ng bonding, natural population analysis, Wiberg bond indices computations, electron-density analysis, and energy-decomposition analysis were performed. Electron transfer from the Ng centers to the electropositive Si center occurs only to a small extent for the lighter Ng atoms and to a somewhat greater extent for the heavier analogues. The Si-Xe/Rn bonds can be termed covalent bonds, whereas the Si-He/Ne bonds are noncovalent. The Si-Ar/Kr bonds possess some degree of covalent character, as they are borderline cases. Contributions from polarization and charge transfer and exchange are key terms in forming Si-Ng bonds. We also studied the effect of substituting the H atoms of SiH3(+) by halide groups (-X) on the Ng binding ability. SiF3(+) showed enhanced Ng binding ability, whereas SiCl3(+) and SiBr3(+) showed a lower ability to bind Ng than SiH3(+). A compromise originates from the dual play of the inductive effect of the -X groups and X→Si π backbonding (p(z)-p(z) interaction).

  14. Geostatistical Analysis of Tritium, 3H/3He Age and Noble Gas Derived Parameters in California Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, A.; Singleton, M. J.; Moran, J. E.; Fram, M. S.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Esser, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Key characteristics of California groundwater systems related to aquifer vulnerability, sustainability, recharge locations and mechanisms, and anthropogenic impact on recharge, are revealed in a spatial geostatistical analysis of the data set of tritium, dissolved noble gas and helium isotope analyses collected for the California State Water Resources Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) and California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) programs. Over 4,000 tritium and noble gas analyses are available from wells across California. 25% of the analyzed samples contained less than 1 pCi/L indicating recharge occurred before 1950. The correlation length of tritium concentration is 120 km. Nearly 50% of the wells show a significant component of terrigenic helium. Over 50% of these samples show a terrigenic helium isotope ratio (Rter) that is significantly higher than the radiogenic helium isotope ratio (Rrad = 2×10-8). Rter values of more than three times the atmospheric isotope ratio (Ra = 1.384×10-6) are associated with known faults and volcanic provinces in Northern California. In the Central Valley, Rter varies from radiogenic to 2.25 Ra, complicating 3H/3He dating. The Rter was mapped by kriging, showing a correlation length of less than 50 km. The local predicted Rter was used to separate tritiogenic from atmospheric and terrigenic 3He. Regional groundwater recharge areas, indicated by young groundwater ages, are located in the southern Santa Clara Basin and in the upper LA basin and in the eastern San Joaquin Valley and along unlined canals carrying Colorado River water. Recharge in California is dominated by agricultural return flows, river recharge and managed aquifer recharge rather than precipitation excess. Combined application of noble gases and other groundwater tracers reveal the impact of engineered groundwater recharge and prove invaluable for the study of complex groundwater systems. This work was performed under the

  15. Groundwater noble gas, age, and temperature signatures in an Alpine watershed: Valuable tools in conceptual model development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, A.H.; Caine, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    [1] Bedrock groundwater in alpine watersheds is poorly understood, mainly because of a scarcity of wells in alpine settings. Groundwater noble gas, age, and temperature data were collected from springs and wells with depths of 3-342 m in Handcart Gulch, an alpine watershed in Colorado. Temperature profiles indicate active groundwater circulation to a maximum depth (aquifer thickness) of about 200 m, or about 150 m below the water table. Dissolved noble gas data show unusually high excess air concentrations (>0.02 cm3 STP/g, ??Ne > 170%) in the bedrock, consistent with unusually large seasonal water table fluctuations (up to 50 m) observed in the upper part of the watershed. Apparent 3H/3He ages are positively correlated with sample depth and excess air concentrations. Integrated samples were collected from artesian bedrock wells near the trunk stream and are assumed to approximate flow-weighted samples reflecting bedrock aquifer mean residence times. Exponential mean ages for these integrated samples are remarkably consistent along the stream, four of five being from 8 to 11 years. The tracer data in combination with other hydrologic and geologic data support a relatively simple conceptual model of groundwater flow in the watershed in which (1) permeability is primarily a function of depth; (2) water table fluctuations increase with distance from the stream; and (3) recharge, aquifer thickness, and porosity are relatively uniform throughout the watershed in spite of the geological complexity of the Proterozoic crystalline rocks that underlie it. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Noble Gas Inventory of Micrometeorites Collected at the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) and Indications for Their Provenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Baecker, B.; Folco, L.; Cordier, C.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of processes have been considered possibly contributing the volatiles including noble gases to the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets (e.g., [1-3]). Special consideration has been given to the concept of accretion of volatile-rich materials by the forming planets. This might include infalling planetesimals and dust, and could include material from the outer asteroid belt, as well as cometary material from the outer solar system. Currently, the dominant source of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth is represented by micrometeorites (MMs) with sizes mostly in the 100-300 micron range [3, 4]). Their role has been assessed by [3], who conclude that accretion of early micrometeorites played a major role in the formation of the terrestrial atmosphere and oceans. We have therefore set out to investigate in more detail the inventory of noble gases in MMs. Here we summarize some of our results obtained on MMs collected in micrometeorite traps of the Transantarctic Mountains [5].

  17. Experimental Investigations of Halogen and Noble Gas Geochemistry as Constraints on Planetary Outgassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Drake, M. J.; Swindle, T. D.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction The ^129Xe/^132Xe ratio in Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts (MORBs) is higher than in the atmosphere and Ocean Island Basalts. Enhanced ^129Xe/^132Xe ratios are widely regarded to be the result of ^129I decay (t(sub)1/2 = 16 m.y.) early in solar system history (e.g. Swindle et al., 1986). Allegre et al. (1983, 1988) proposed a catastrophic degassing scheme to explain this excess. Both Musselwhite et al. (1990) and Hiyagon and Ozima (1990) have noted that because mineral/melt partition coefficients (D) for I appear lower than for Xe, the I/Xe ratio may not be enhanced in the mantle by mineral/melt fractionation. Musselwhite et al. (1990) proposed recycling of I back into the mantle following outgassing, and Hiyagon and Ozima (1990) proposed impact degassing of the mantle as a way around this problem. Knowledge of the relative values of D(I) and D(Xe) is important to the discussion of early planetary outgassing models. Although the dataset for D(I) values is not complete, the known values so far are uniformly low. The dataset for Xe on the other hand is quite ambiguous. Experimentally determined values for D(Xe) vary widely--ranging from 0.05 to >> 1 (Hiyagon and Ozima, 1986; Broadhurst et al., 1992), and it is unclear which of the values is the geologically significant one. Particularly important is the question of whether D(Xe) is greater than or less than unity. Partitioning Experiments: We have undertaken to simultaneously determine the D(I) and D(Ar) values directly, then calculate the D(Xe) from D(Ar). This approach is possible because experiments investigating the mineral/melt partitioning of noble gases, while not consistent in an absolute sense between experiments, do display a consistent trend with the lightest noble gases being most incompatible and Xe most compatible. We are adapting our technique to determine D(Kr) and D(Xe) directly. Finely crushed silica glass (~100 micrometer grain size) was placed in a gas pressure vessel. The vessel was

  18. Noble Gas Tracing of Subsurface CO2 Origin and the Role of Groundwater as a CO2 Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Ballentine, C. J.; Schoell, M.; Stevens, S. H.

    2003-12-01

    The source, generation, migration and accumulation of CO2 gas associated either alone or with hydrocarbons are unclear and therefore hard to predict. So far, noble gases provide one of the best tools to resolve this question, because they are conservative within the subsurface system. The atmosphere-derived noble gases dissolved in groundwater do not react with the rock system, while noble gases produced in the rock phase by radioactive decay or input from magmatic source are isotopically distinct and can be resolved from the dissolved air-derived noble gases. 10 samples were taken from a CO2-rich natural gas reservoir in Jackson Dome, Mississippi, USA to investigate its origin and extent of interaction with the groundwater system. The area lies within the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. It is bounded on the north by the Pickens-Gilbertown fault system, the updip limit of the Jurassic Louann Salt unit, and on the south by basement highs of the Wiggins, South Mississippi, and Lasalle uplifts. We present compositional, stable isotope and noble gas results of Jackson Dome samples. Gas composition is 98.75-99.38% CO2, with small amounts of methane and nitrogen. CO2 content increases linearly with the decrease of CH4. d13C(CO2) in all samples ranges between -3.55 and -2.57 per mil, increasing with the increase of the CO2 content. Atmosphere-derived He contributions are negligible in all cases. 3He/4He ratios are between 4.27 and 5.01Ra, indicating a strong mantle signature. Crustal 4He in these samples therefore accounts for between 7.0% and 20.8%, the remainder being magmatic in origin. 40Ar/36Ar ratios are all above air ratio, ranging between 4071 and 6420. Air corrected 40Ar* vary between 92.7 and 95.4%, to give 4He/40Ar* ratios of between 1.26 and 2.52. This range is comparable with values estimated for the upper mantle. CO2/3He values are between 1.09E+9 and 4.62E+9, and also fall in the mantle range, indicating that the CO2 gas in Jackson Dome is also

  19. Gas transport below artificial recharge ponds: insights from dissolved noble gases and a dual gas (SF6 and 3He) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jordan F; Hudson, G Bryant; Avisar, Dror

    2005-06-01

    A dual gas tracer experiment using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and an isotope of helium (3He) and measurements of dissolved noble gases was performed at the El Rio spreading grounds to examine gas transport and trapped air below an artificial recharge pond with a very high recharge rate (approximately 4 m day(-1)). Noble gas concentrations in the groundwater were greater than in surface water due to excess air formation showing that trapped air exists below the pond. Breakthrough curves of SF6 and 3He at two nearby production wells were very similar and suggest that nonequilibrium gas transfer was occurring between the percolating water and the trapped air. At one well screened between 50 and 90 m below ground, both tracers were detected after 5 days and reached a maximum at approximately 24 days. Despite the potential dilution caused by mixing within the production well, the maximum concentration was approximately 25% of the mean pond concentration. More than 50% of the SF6 recharged was recovered by the production wells during the 18 month long experiment. Our results demonstrate that at artificial recharge sites with high infiltration rates and moderately deep water tables, transport times between recharge locations and wells determined with gas tracer experiments are reliable.

  20. Noble gas paleotemperatures and water contents of stalagmites - a new extraction tool and a new paleoclimate proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Scheidegger, Y.; Brennwald, M. S.; Fleitmann, D.; Figura, S.; Wieler, R.; Kipfer, R.

    2012-04-01

    Stalagmites represent excellent multi-proxy paleoclimate archives as they cover long timescales and can be dated with high precision [e.g., 1]. The absolute temperature at which a stalagmite grew, can be deduced from the amounts of atmospheric noble gases dissolved in the stalagmite's fluid inclusion water (= noble gas temperature, NGT) [2-4]. We present technical advances towards more robust NGT determinations and also propose a new paleoclimate proxy, namely the stalagmite's water content, which is a "by-product" of NGT determination. Water contents and oxygen isotope records of two Holocene stalagmites from Socotra Island (Yemen) were found to vary systematically: progressively lighter oxygen is accompanied by decreasing water contents and vice versa. Via the oxygen isotope records [5] the stalagmites' water contents are linked to the amounts of precipitation on Socotra Island. High precipitation, i.e., high drip rates lead to homogeneous calcite growth with low porosity and therefore a small number of water-filled inclusions, i.e. low water contents. A reduction of drip water supply fosters irregular crystal growth with higher porosity, leading to higher water contents of the calcite (see also [6]). Therefore the stalagmites' water contents seem to record changes in drip water supply and, under favourable conditions, changes in regional precipitation. The current method to extract water and noble gases from stalagmite samples is experimentally challenging and subject to certain limitations (e.g., time-consuming sample preparation in a glove box, temperature restrictions for water extraction, and the often inadequate correction for air from residual air-filled inclusions [3, 4]). To overcome these limitations we have developed a new type of crusher directly attached to our noble gas line. It not only allows crushing and separating the samples into different grain size fractions in vacuo, but the separates can be individually heated to significantly higher

  1. Noble gas composition and 40Ar/39Ar age in eclogites from the main hole of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Jens; Schwarz, Winfried H.; Trieloff, Mario; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Hanel, Michael; Altherr, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    We present the first comprehensive noble gas study on eclogites. The four eclogite samples were recovered during the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling and are from two distinct profile depth sections differing in their degree of interaction with meteoric water, based on their δ 18O-values (surface related and of mantle-type). Hence, noble gas analyses offer the potential to further discriminate between shallow (meteoric) and deep (mantle) fluid sources. Noble gas compositions reveal typical crustal fluid compositions, characterized by a variable mixture of atmospheric gases with significant contributions of nucleogenic neon, radiogenic 4He*, radiogenic 40Ar*, fissiogenic 131-136Xe, and presumably bariogenic 131Xe, but no significant addition of mantle gases. This signature can be also considered to represent one endmember component of eclogitic diamonds. Concentrations of non-radiogenic noble gases are rather low, with depletion of light relative to the heavier noble gases. Eclogites from lower depth which experienced a higher degree of interaction with meteoric water also showed higher contributions of atmospheric gas compared with eclogites recovered from greater depth. This is interpreted to result from interaction with high-salinity fluids during ultrahigh pressure (UH P). It demonstrates that the atmospheric noble gas abundance is a proxy for interaction with surface related fluids. 40Ar/39Ar (inverse) isochron ages of two phengite separates (241.2 ± 0.4 Ma and 275.0 ± 1.8 Ma, 1 σ-errors) predate the main phase of UH P metamorphism (ca. 220 Ma). Biotite yields an integrated age of about 1100 Ma. These age values are interpreted to reflect the likely addition of excess 40Ar without any chronological meaning.

  2. Modeling nuclear and electronic recoils in noble gas detectors with NEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Jeremy; NEST Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Noble gases such as xenon and argon are used as targets in single and dual phased rare event detectors like those used in the search for dark matter. Such experiments require an understanding of the behavior of the target material in the presence of low-energy ionizing radiation. This understanding allows an exploration of detector effects such as threshold, energy and position reconstruction, and pulse shape discrimination. The Noble Element Simulation Technique (NEST) package is a comprehensive code base that models the scintillation and ionization yields from liquid and gaseous xenon and argon in the energy regimes of interest to many types of experiments, like dark matter and neutrino detectors. NEST is built on multiple physics models, which are constrained by available data for both electronic and nuclear recoils. A substantial body of data exists in the literature, and we are reaching an era in which sub-keV yields can be explored experimentally. Here we present a new global analysis of all available nuclear recoil data, and the latest updates to the electronic recoil model, in light of recent low-energy measurements and an improved understanding of detector systematics.

  3. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, C. A.; Blanchard, W. R.; Kozub, T. A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-14

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  4. Coordination of ScO+ and YO+ by multiple Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms in noble gas matrixes: a matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanying; Gong, Yu; Chen, Mohua; Ding, Chuanfan; Zhou, Mingfei

    2005-12-29

    The combination of matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic and quantum chemical calculation results provide strong evidence that scandium and yttrium monoxide cations, ScO+ and YO+, coordinate multiple noble gas atoms in forming noble gas complexes. The results showed that ScO+ coordinates five Ar, Kr, or Xe atoms, and YO+ coordinates six Ar or Kr and five Xe atoms in solid noble gas matrixes. Hence, the ScO+ and YO+ cations trapped in solid noble gas matrixes should be regarded as the [ScO(Ng)5]+ (Ng = Ar, Kr, or Xe), [YO(Ng)6]+ (Ng = Ar or Kr) or [YO(Xe)5]+ complexes. Experiments with dilute krypton or xenon in argon or krypton in xenon produced new IR bands, which are due to the stepwise formation of the [ScO(Ar)(5-n)(Kr)n]+, [ScO(Kr)(5-n)(Xe)n]+ (n = 1-5), [YO(Ar)(6-n)(Kr)n]+ (n = 1-6), and [YO(Ar)(6-n)(Xe)n]+ (n = 1-4) complexes.

  5. Determining CO2 storage potential during miscible CO2 enhanced oil recovery: Noble gas and stable isotope tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hunt, Andrew; Beebe, Thomas L; Parker, Andrew D; Warwick, Peter; Drake, Ronald; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are fueling anthropogenic climate change. Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is one option for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere while enhancing oil recovery. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) sites in the United States for permanent CO2 storage, an active multi-stage miscible CO2flooding project in the Permian Basin (North Ward Estes Field, near Wickett, Texas) was investigated. In addition, two major natural CO2 reservoirs in the southeastern Paradox Basin (McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon) were also investigated as they provide CO2 for EOR operations in the Permian Basin. Produced gas and water were collected from three different CO2 flooding phases (with different start dates) within the North Ward Estes Field to evaluate possible CO2 storage mechanisms and amounts of total CO2retention. McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon were sampled for produced gas to determine the noble gas and stable isotope signature of the original injected EOR gas and to confirm the source of this naturally-occurring CO2. As expected, the natural CO2produced from McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon is a mix of mantle and crustal sources. When comparing CO2 injection and production rates for the CO2 floods in the North Ward Estes Field, it appears that CO2 retention in the reservoir decreased over the course of the three injections, retaining 39%, 49% and 61% of the injected CO2 for the 2008, 2010, and 2013 projects, respectively, characteristic of maturing CO2 miscible flood projects. Noble gas isotopic composition of the injected and produced gas for the flood projects suggest no active fractionation, while δ13CCO2 values suggest no active CO2dissolution into formation water, or mineralization. CO2 volumes capable of dissolving in residual formation fluids were also estimated along with the potential to store pure-phase supercritical CO2. Using a combination

  6. Ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray source: saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Charles K.; Boyer, Keith

    2004-02-17

    An apparatus and method for the generation of ultrabright multikilovolt x-rays from saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states is described. Conditions for x-ray amplification in this spectral region combine the production of cold, high-Z matter, with the direct, selective multiphoton excitation of hollow atoms from clusters using ultraviolet radiation and a nonlinear mode of confined, self-channeled propagation in plasmas. Data obtained is consistent with the presence of saturated amplification on several transition arrays of the hollow atom Xe(L) spectrum (.lambda..about.2.9 .ANG.). An estimate of the peak brightness achieved is .about.10.sup.29 .gamma..multidot.s.sup.-1.multidot.mm.sup.-2.multidot.mr.sup.-2 (0.1% Bandwidth).sup.-1, that is .about.10.sup.5 -fold higher than presently available synchotron technology.

  7. Neutralization of solvated protons and formation of noble-gas hydride molecules: Matrix-isolation indications of tunneling mechanisms?

    SciTech Connect

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Raesaenen, Markku

    2005-08-08

    The (NgHNg){sup +} cations (Ng=Ar and Kr) produced via the photolysis of HF/Ar, HF/Kr, and HBr/Kr solid mixtures are studied, with emphasis on their decay mechanisms. The present experiments provide a large variety of parameters connected to this decay phenomenon, which allows us to reconsider various models for the decay of the (NgHNg){sup +} cations in noble-gas matrices. As a result, we propose that this phenomenon could be explained by the neutralization of the solvated protons by electrons. The mechanism of this neutralization reaction probably involves tunneling of an electron from an electronegative fragment or another trap to the (NgHNg){sup +} cation. The proposed electron-tunneling mechanism should be considered as a possible alternative to the literature models based on tunneling-assisted or radiation-induced diffusion of protons in noble-gas solids. As a novel experimental observation of this work, the efficient formation of HArF molecules occurs at 8 K in a photolyzed HF/Ar matrix. It is probable that the low-temperature formation of HArF involves local tunneling of the H atom to the Ar-F center, which in turn supports the locality of HF photolysis in solid Ar. In this model, the decay of (ArHAr){sup +} ions and the formation of HArF molecules observed at low temperatures are generally unconnected processes; however, the decaying (ArHAr){sup +} ions may contribute to some extent to the formation of HArF molecules.

  8. Noble gas studies in vapor-growth diamonds: Comparison with shock-produced diamonds and the origin of diamonds in ureilites

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Junichi; Fukunaga, Kazuya; Ito, Keisuke )

    1991-07-01

    The authors synthesized vapor-trowth diamonds by two kinds of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using microwave (MWCVD) and hot filament (HFCVD) ionization of gases, and examined elemental abundances and isotopic compositions of the noble gases trapped in the diamonds. It is remarkable that strong differences existed in the noble gas concentrations in the two kinds of CVD diamonds: large amounts of noble gases were trapped in the MWCVD diamonds, but not in the HFCVD diamonds. The heavy noble gases (Ar to Xe) in the MWCVD diamonds were highly fractionated compared with those in the ambient atmosphere, and are in good agreement with the calculated fractionation patterns for plasma at an electron temperature of 7,000-9,000 K. These results strongly suggest that the trapping mechanism of noble gases in CVD diamonds is ion implantation during diamond growth. The degrees of fractionation of heavy noble gases were also in good agreement with those in ureilites. The vapor-growth hypothesis is discussed in comparison with the impact-shock hypothesis as a better model for the origin of diamonds in ureilites. The diamond (and graphite, amorphous carbon, too) may have been deposited on early condensates such as Re, Ir, W, etc. This model explains the chemical features of vein material in ureilites; the refractory siderophile elements are enriched in carbon and noble gases and low in normal siderophiles. The vapor-growth model is also compatible with the oxygen isotopic data of ureilites which suggests that nebular processes are primarily responsible for the composition of ureilites.

  9. Evaluating the accretion of meteoritic debris and interplanetary dust particles in the GPC-3 sediment core using noble gas and mineralogical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-05-01

    Extraterrestrial (ET) noble gases (helium and neon) in 35 sediment samples from Central Pacific core LL-44 GPC-3 demonstrate the variable flux of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and major meteorite impacts over the past 70 Ma (21-72 Ma). Spinel mineralogical and chemical compositions clearly distinguish major impact events from the continuous flux of IDPs, including the well-established Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) and late Eocene (E/O) impact boundaries. No spinel grains with chemical or mineralogical evidence of a distinctly ET origin were found in an extensive survey of 'background' samples (i.e. non E/O or K/T boundary) suggesting that either the carrier grains for ET noble gas occur within the Fe-Ti oxide mineral fraction observed in this study (found to include ilmenite and ulvospinel) or are too small for identification by SEM. The presence of ilmenite and ulvospinel suggest lunar regolith is a potential source for ET noble gas-rich particles. Noble gas analysis on both the EMF (extractable magnetic fraction) and the Bulk minus EMF (Bulk - EMF) show that the He and Ne compositions are consistent with partially degassed noble gas signatures of zero-age magnetic grains (Z-MAG) and stratospheric interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Conclusive evidence for a 'planetary' (Ne-A) noble gas signature is found only in the bulk sediments at the K/T boundary, although all GPC-3 K/T fractions (Bulk, EMF, and HF Digestion) plot along a mixing line between planetary (Ne-A) and solar wind (SW). Spinels from major impact boundaries (K/T; E/O) exhibit dendritic texture and elevated [Ni], consistent with previous reports. In contrast to the otherwise consistent [3He] signal from IDPs, the [3He] at the known impact boundaries (K/T and E/O) actually decreases. These anomalously low [3He] are accompanied by significantly elevated [Ne] and significantly lower (3He/20Ne)solar ratios (˜10× lower) produced by both preferentially degassing of He relative to Ne at times of

  10. Ore genesis constraints on the Idaho Cobalt Belt from fluid inclusion gas, noble gas isotope, and ion ratio analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofstra, Albert H.; Landis, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    The Idaho cobalt belt is a 60-km-long alignment of deposits composed of cobaltite, Co pyrite, chalcopyrite, and gold with anomalous Nb, Y, Be, and rare-earth elements (REEs) in a quartz-biotite-tourmaline gangue hosted in Mesoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Lemhi Group. It is the largest cobalt resource in the United States with historic production from the Blackbird Mine. All of the deposits were deformed and metamorphosed to upper greenschist-lower amphibolite grade in the Cretaceous. They occur near a 1377 Ma anorogenic bimodal plutonic complex. The enhanced solubility of Fe, Co, Cu, and Au as chloride complexes together with gangue biotite rich in Fe and Cl and gangue quartz containing hypersaline inclusions allows that hot saline fluids were involved. The isotopes of B in gangue tourmaline are suggestive of a marine source, whereas those of Pb in ore suggest a U ± Th-enriched source. The ore and gangue minerals in this belt may have trapped components in fluid inclusions that are distinct from those in post-ore minerals and metamorphic minerals. Such components can potentially be identified and distinguished by their relative abundances in contrasting samples. Therefore, we obtained samples of Co and Cu sulfides, gangue quartz, biotite, and tourmaline and post-ore quartz veins as well as Cretaceous metamorphic garnet and determined the gas, noble gas isotope, and ion ratios of fluid inclusion extracts by mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. The most abundant gases present in extracts from each sample type are biased toward the gas-rich population of inclusions trapped during maximum burial and metamorphism. All have CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios of evolved crustal fluids, and many yield a range of H2-CH4-CO2-H2S equilibration temperatures consistent with the metamorphic grade. Cretaceous garnet and post-ore minerals have high RH and RS values suggestive of reduced sulfidic conditions. Most extracts have anomalous 4He produced by decay of U and Th and

  11. Magma dynamics at mid-ocean ridges by noble gas kinetic fractionation: Assessment of magmatic ascent rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paonita, A.; Martelli, M.

    2006-01-01

    Despite its impact in understanding oceanic crust formation and eruptive styles of related volcanism, magma dynamics at mid-ocean ridges are poorly known. Here, we propose a new method to assess ascent rates of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) magmas, as well as their pre- and sin-eruptive dynamics. It is based on the idea that a rising magma can reach a variable degree of both CO2 supersaturation in melt and kinetic fractionation among noble gases in vesicles in relation to its ascent rate through the crust. To quantify the relationship, we have used a model of multicomponent bubble growth in MORB melts, developed by extending the single-component model of Proussevitch and Sahagian [A.A. Proussevitch, D.L. Sahagian, Dynamics and energetics of bubble growth in magmas: analytical formulation and numerical modeling, J. Geophys. Res. 103 (1998), 18223-18251.] to CO2-He-Ar gas mixtures. After proper parameterization, we have applied it to published suites of data having the required features (glasses from Pito Seamount and mid-Atlantic ridges). Our results highlight that the investigated MORB magmas display very different ranges of ascent rates: slow rises of popping rock forming-magmas that cross the crust (0.01-0.5 m/s), slightly faster rates of energetic effusions (0.1-1 m/s), up to rates of 1-10 m/s which fall on the edge between lava effusion and Hawaiian activity. Inside a single plumbing system, very dissimilar magma dynamics highlight the large differences in compressive stress of the oceanic crust on a small scale. Constraints on how the systems of ridges work, as well as the characteristics of the magmatic source, can also be obtained. Our model shows how measurements of both the dissolved gas concentration in melt and the volatile composition of vesicles in the same sample are crucial in recognizing the kinetic effects and definitively assessing magma dynamics. An effort should be made to correctly set the studied samples in the sequence of volcanic submarine

  12. Recycle and fractionation of U and K in the mantle via slab subduction; noble gas isotopic evidence from Polynesian HIMU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyu, Takeshi; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Jun-Ichi

    2013-04-01

    The abundance and distribution of U and K in the Earth are critical not only for isotope and noble gas geochemistry but also for internal heat production in the mantle. While the concentration of U in bulk silicate Earth (BSE) has been estimated from the chondritic value, K concentration in BSE is poorly constrained. K concentration in BSE has been estimated using U concentration in BSE multiplied by the canonical K/U ratio (13000) on the ground that crustal and mantle-derived rocks show uniform K/U. However, such theory might be uncertain if the subducted slab had fractionated K/U and it remained isolated as a hidden reservoir. We present He-Ne-Ar isotopic compositions for Polynesian HIMU lavas with radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions. It has been widely accepted that the HIMU lavas are sourced from subducted ancient oceanic crust. K/U of the HIMU reservoir is constrained using the relative abundances of radiogenic and nucleogenic noble gases, because 40Ar/36Ar evolves by decay of 40K while production of 4He and 21Ne is related with U and Th decay. In 4He/40Ar*-4He/21Ne* space (asterisks denote radiogenic component), the HIMU lavas define a trend that is parallel to, but offset from the trend previously observed for other ocean island basalts. Using 4He/21Ne* as a monitor of elemental fractionation of noble gasses, fractionation-corrected 4He/40Ar* is higher than that expected for the mantle with the canonical K/U of 13000. K/U of the HIMU reservoir converted from 4He/40Ar* is approximately 3000. Low K/U of the HIMU reservoir is best explained by a model where this reservoir originates from subducted oceanic crust that preferentially lost K relative to U via dehydration during its subduction. Since the HIMU reservoir, involving subducted oceanic crust, is enriched in U, but not in K, previous estimates of K/U and K concentrations for BSE, that did not take this reservoir into consideration, will be too high. The mass balance calculation, considering continental

  13. Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas

    SciTech Connect

    C.A.Gentile, W.R.Blanchard, T.Kozub, C.Priniski, I.Zatz, S.Obenschain

    2009-09-21

    It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (~ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a "gas shield" may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering metmethods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

  14. Heterogeneous upper mantle Ne, Ar and Xe isotopic compositions and a possible Dupal noble gas signature recorded in basalts from the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parai, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Standish, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Variations in heavy noble gas (Ne, Ar, Xe) isotopic compositions provide unique insights into the nature of heterogeneities in the mantle. However, few precise constraints on mantle source heavy noble gas isotopic compositions are available due to ubiquitous shallow-level atmospheric contamination. As a result, the extent of heterogeneity in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) mantle source Ne, Ar and Xe isotopic compositions is unknown. Basalts from the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) between 7°E and 25°E exhibit remarkable variability in He isotopic composition: SWIR 4He/3He spans half the total range observed in all mantle-derived basalts. Therefore, basalts from the SWIR provide a unique window into upper mantle heterogeneity and present an ideal opportunity to characterize variations in upper mantle heavy noble gas isotopic composition. Here we present new high-precision Ne, Ar and Xe isotopic compositions as well as He, CO2, Ne, Ar and Xe abundances measured in basalt glasses from the SWIR. After correcting the measured values for shallow-level atmospheric contamination, significant and systematic variations in mantle source Ne, Ar and Xe compositions are observed. We note that large variations in source 40Ar/36Ar and 129Xe/130Xe are observed in basalts removed from the influence of known hotspots, indicating a heterogeneous mid-ocean ridge basalt source. Thus, SWIR heavy noble gas data reveal a greater degree of source heterogeneity than is evident in the 4He/3He systematics alone. The observed heavy noble gas isotopic heterogeneities imply that the average MORB source 40Ar/36Ar and 129Xe/130Xe ratios are not yet well-determined. Variation in MORB source 40Ar/36Ar and 129Xe/130Xe at a given 4He/3He and 21Ne/22Ne may reflect heterogeneous recycling of atmospheric Ar and Xe. In particular, we find low mantle source 40Ar/36Ar and 129Xe/130Xe ratios in the eastern region of the study area, which may reflect the noble gas signature of the Dupal

  15. GAS-PHASE SEQUESTRATION OF NOBLE GASES IN THE PROTOSOLAR NEBULA: POSSIBLE CONSEQUENCES ON THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM COMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Ozgurel, O.; Mousis, O.; Ali Dib, M. E-mail: ellinger@lct.jussieu.fr E-mail: olivier.mousis@obs-besancon.fr

    2013-11-01

    We address the problem of the sequestration of Ar, Kr, and Xe by H{sub 3}{sup +} in the gas-phase conditions encountered during the cooling of protoplanetary disks when H{sub 3}{sup +} is competing with other species present in the same environment. Using high-level ab initio simulations, we try to quantify other sequestration possibilities involving He, H{sub 5}{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, and H{sub 3}O{sup +} present in the protosolar nebula. Apart from the fact that H{sub 3}{sup +} complexes formed with heavy noble gases are found to be by far much more stable than those formed with He or H{sub 2}O, we show that H{sub 2}D{sup +} and H{sub 3}O{sup +}, both products of the reactions of H{sub 3}{sup +} with HD and H{sub 2}O, can also be efficient trapping agents for Ar, Kr, and Xe. Meanwhile, the abundance profile of H{sub 3}{sup +} in the outer part of the nebula is revisited with the use of an evolutionary accretion disk model that allows us to investigate the possibility that heavy noble gases can be sequestered by H{sub 3}{sup +} at earlier epochs than those corresponding to their trapping in planetesimals. We find that H{sub 3}{sup +} might be abundant enough in the outer protosolar nebula to trap Xe and Kr prior their condensation epochs, implying that their abundances should be solar in Saturn's current atmosphere and below the observational limit in Titan. The same scenario predicts that comets formed at high heliocentric distances should also be depleted in Kr and Xe. In situ measurements, such as those planed with the Rosetta mission on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, will be critical to check the validity of our hypotheses.

  16. Noble gas component organization in Apollo 14 breccia 14318: /sup 129/I and /sup 244/Pu regolith chronology

    SciTech Connect

    Swindle, T.D.; Caffee, M.W.; Hohenberg, C.M.; Hudson, G.B.; Laul, J.C.; Simon, S.B.; Papike, J.J.

    1985-02-15

    Noble gas, petrological, and chemical studies made on grain-size separates from lunar regolith breccia 14318 demonstrate that the noble gases are organized into two functional components, volume-correlated and surface-correlated. As in regolith breccia 14301, volume-correlated xenon in 14318 is primarily spallation-derived and the surface-correlated component contains not only solar wind xenon but also significant amounts of ''parentless' xenon from the fission of now extinct /sup 244/Pu and the decay of now extinct /sup 129/I (''parentless'' means the daughter products were incorporated onto grain surfaces following decay of the parent nuclide elsewhere). The ratio of /sup 129/Xe//sup 136/Xe in the total surface-correlated parentless component, as identified in grain-size analysis, is substantially higher than in the least tightly bound parentless component identified in stepwise heating analyses, confirming the trend seen in 14301. If the order of release of gases in stepwise heating is related to the order of incorporation in the simplest way (first in, last out), incorporation of these grain-surface components was probably time-ordered. The /sup 129/Xe//sup 136/Xe ratio in each identifiable parentless component would then be characteristic of the xenon available for surface adsorption at the particular time of acquisition. Continuous variations in this ratio further suggest that incorporation of the parentless xenon was closely coupled with production. Such observations provide the basis for a new chronometer from which we conclude that acquisition of parentless xenon was an ongoing process spanning at least 90 m.y., beginning no more than 44 +- 34 m.y. after the formation of the most meteorites and possibly predating xenon acquisition for the earth.

  17. Hydrochemistry and origin of CO2 gas and noble gas of carbonated mineral water in the Gyeongbuk-Gangwon Province, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, C. H.; Yoo, S. W.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrochemical, carbon isotopic (δ13CDIC) analyses of 11 samples, and noble gas isotopic analyses of 8 samples collected in the Gangwon and the Gyeongbuk area of South Korea were carried out to elucidate hydrochemical characteristics and to interpret the source of noble gases and CO2 gas. The carbonated mineral waters show a weak acidic pH between 5.59 and 6.04. An electrical conductivity of carbonated mineral waters ranges from 302 to 864 μS/cm. The chemical composition of all carbonated mineral waters can be grouped into only one type such as Ca-HCO3. A high content of Fe and Mn in carbonated mineral waters exceeds a regulation limit of drinking water. The δ13CDIC values of carbonated mineral waters show the range of -5.30~-2.84 ‰. This range indicates that the carbon of carbonated mineral waters is mainly supplied from a deep-seated source and partly from an inorganic carbonate source. The 3He/4He ratios of the carbonated mineral waters show the range of 1.51×10-6 to 6.45×10-6. The carbonated mineral waters on the 3He/4He and 4He/20Ne diagram are plotted into three groups: deep seated area such as mantle source, atmospheric area, and air-mantle mixing area. A wide range of 4He/20Ne ratios is observed (0.036×10-6 to 1.76×10-6), showing evidence that while radiogenic 4He is dominant in these water samples, He of mantle-origin is also supplied to these waters. It is estimated that supply of CO2 gas and noble gas of a deep-seated source into carbonated waters is closely related to geologic structures such as fault and geologic boundary. Key words: carbonated mineral waters, hydrochemical composition, carbon isotope, 3He/4He, deep-seated origin

  18. The Role of Boron-Chloride and Noble Gas Isotope Ratios in TVZ Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hulston, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The model of the geothermal system in which deep circulating groundwater containing noble gases, at air saturated water concentrations, mixes with hot fluids of mantle origin at depth, is extended to include the effect of interaction of the ascending fluid with both solid and gaseous phases of basement (or other) rocks en route to the surface. It is demonstrated that this interaction is responsible for most of the CO{sub 2} in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) geothermal systems. It is proposed that the modeling of this interaction might be accomplished by techniques similar to those used for the understanding of the oxygen isotope shift found in geothermal systems. The water rock interaction experiments of Ellis and Mahon (1964, 1967) provides some data on the kinetic rates for B and Cl dissolution from rocks likely to be encountered in the geothermal system, but further information on the behavior of B may be needed. If these problems can be overcome this modeling technique has promise for the estimation of the recharge of geothermal systems and hence the sustainability of these systems.

  19. Geostatistical analysis of tritium, groundwater age and other noble gas derived parameters in California.

    PubMed

    Visser, A; Moran, J E; Hillegonds, Darren; Singleton, M J; Kulongoski, Justin T; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, B K

    2016-03-15

    Key characteristics of California groundwater systems related to aquifer vulnerability, sustainability, recharge locations and mechanisms, and anthropogenic impact on recharge are revealed in a spatial geostatistical analysis of a unique data set of tritium, noble gases and other isotopic analyses unprecedented in size at nearly 4000 samples. The correlation length of key groundwater residence time parameters varies between tens of kilometers ((3)H; age) to the order of a hundred kilometers ((4)Heter; (14)C; (3)Hetrit). The correlation length of parameters related to climate, topography and atmospheric processes is on the order of several hundred kilometers (recharge temperature; δ(18)O). Young groundwater ages that highlight regional recharge areas are located in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, in the southern Santa Clara Valley Basin, in the upper LA basin and along unlined canals carrying Colorado River water, showing that much of the recent recharge in central and southern California is dominated by river recharge and managed aquifer recharge. Modern groundwater is found in wells with the top open intervals below 60 m depth in the southeastern San Joaquin Valley, Santa Clara Valley and Los Angeles basin, as the result of intensive pumping and/or managed aquifer recharge operations.

  20. Updated compilations of electron scattering from ground-state, noble gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, S. F.

    2011-10-01

    An updated analysis of the cross sections for electron scattering from ground state atoms for noble gases in the energy range from thermalto 10 MeV is outlined. The work was driven by the necessity tounderstand the Penning transfers and light emission in detectors of high energy particles and dark matter. The published experimental data for electron scattering up to 2010 have been used in the analysis. Recent, theoretically improved cross sections have been used in the important threshold region for both the singlet and triplet states. Experimental or theoretical oscillator strengths and BEF scaling have been used above the resonance region for the singlet states. The number of excitation levels considered (typically about 40) is chosen so that the sum of the oscillator strengths for the considered levels is within a few percent of the theoretical sum rule. The resulting total cross sections are within a few percent of the measured values, and the calculated Fano factors are consistent with available data. These data are now available on the LXCat website. This work is part of the RD51 collaboration at CERN.

  1. Ground-Water Temperature, Noble Gas, and Carbon Isotope Data from the Espanola Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected from 56 locations throughout the Espanola Basin and analyzed for general chemistry (major ions and trace elements), carbon isotopes (delta 13C and 14C activity) in dissolved inorganic carbon, noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and 3He/4He ratio), and tritium. Temperature profiles were measured at six locations in the southeastern part of the basin. Temperature profiles suggest that ground water generally becomes warmer with distance from the mountains and that most ground-water flow occurs at depths 50 years old, consistent with the 14C ages. Terrigenic He (Heterr) concentrations in ground water are high (log Delta Heterr of 2 to 5) throughout much of the basin. High Heterr concentrations are probably caused by in situ production in the Tesuque Formation from locally high concentrations of U-bearing minerals (Northeast zone only), or by upward diffusive/advective transport of crustal- and mantle-sourced He possibly enhanced by basement piercing faults, or by both. The 3He/4He ratio of Heterr (Rterr) is commonly high (Rterr/Ra of 0.3-2.0, where Ra is the 3He/4He ratio in air) suggesting that Espanola Basin ground water commonly contains mantle-sourced He. The 3He/4He ratio of Heterr is generally the highest in the western and southern parts of the basin, closest to the western border fault system and the Quaternary to Miocene volcanics of the Jemez Mountains and Cerros del Rio.

  2. Noble Gas Systematics in MORBs and OIBs and Reconstitution of the Time-Evolution of Mantle Composition for Heavy Noble Gases: the Role of Subduction of Atmospheric Noble Gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubinet, C.; Moreira, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Chondrites are considered as the building rocks of the Earth as they represent remnants of the protoplanetary accretion stage. Among all chondritic classes, heavy noble gases are mainly concentrated in phase Q [1] hence it represents a likely primordial composition of the Earth. This is supported by the observation of [2] who detected this peculiar composition in CO2 well gases thanks to Kr isotopes. As CO2 well gases are supposed to derive from the same reservoir as MORBs [3], this signature should be observed in MORBs and OIBs as well. In this perspective, we will present analyses performed by mass spectrometry of MORBs and OIBs samples for all noble gases. Preliminary results are quite promising as the same trend seems to appear into OIB and MORB data for Kr isotopes. However, our analyses show that this primordial composition isn't displayed for stable isotopes of Xe as already observed by [4-5] and remains a trace in the mantle signature, which appears at first sight atmospheric. We thus propose that subduction of atmospheric noble gases has gradually covered this meteoritic imprint. In order to test this scenario, we will present a modelling performed for Ar and Xe in three distinct reservoirs: mantle, atmosphere and continental crust. The mantle is considered as homogenized by convection and similar to the MORB reservoir. Its degasing is divided in two stages: a massive early degasing followed by a decreasing one describing the cooling of the Earth's interior. Extraction of parent elements from the mantle to the continental crust is also taken into account as well as distillation of atmospheric Xe needed to explain the missing Xe paradox and the present Xe isotopic signature of the atmosphere. Finally, subduction of noble gases is assimilated to simple incorporation into the mantle of elementally fractionated air, enriched in heavy noble gases as supported by [6]. Thus, we show that starting with a chondritic composition, the present mantle composition can

  3. EFFECTS OF ALTERNATE ANTIFOAM AGENTS, NOBLE METALS, MIXING SYSTEMS AND MASS TRANSFER ON GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE FROM NONNEWTONIAN SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Mark Fowley, M; Charles Crawford, C; Michael Restivo, M; Robert Leishear, R

    2007-12-24

    Gas holdup tests performed in a small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing system at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) were reported in 2006. The tests were for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101 and featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A Antifoam agent. Results indicated that this antifoam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter intuitively, that the holdup increased as the simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). These results raised questions about how the AFA might affect gas holdup in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs). And whether the WTP air supply system being designed would have the capacity to handle a demand for increased airflow to operate the sparger-PJM mixing systems should the AFA increase retention of the radiochemically generated flammable gases in the waste by making the gas bubbles smaller and less mobile, or decrease the size of sparger bubbles making them mix less effectively for a given airflow rate. A new testing program was developed to assess the potential effects of adding the DOW Corning Q2-3183A AFA to WTP waste streams by first confirming the results of the work reported in 2006 by Stewart et al. and then determining if the AFA in fact causes such increased gas holdup in a prototypic sparger-PJM mixing system, or if the increased holdup is just a feature of the small-scale agitation system. Other elements of the new program include evaluating effects other variables could have on gas holdup in systems with AFA additions such as catalysis from trace noble metals in the waste, determining mass transfer coefficients for the AZ-101 waste simulant, and determining whether other AFA compositions such as Dow Corning 1520-US could also increase gas holdup in Hanford waste. This new testing program was split into two investigations, prototypic sparger

  4. Martian fluid and Martian weathering signatures identified in Nakhla, NWA 998 and MIL 03346 by halogen and noble gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Gilmour, J. D.; Burgess, R.

    2013-03-01

    We report argon (Ar) noble gas, Ar-Ar ages and halogen abundances (Cl, Br, I) of Martian nakhlites Nakhla, NWA 998 and MIL 03346 to determine the presence of Martian hydrous fluids and weathering products. Neutron-irradiated samples were either crushed and step-heated (Nakhla only), or simply step-heated using a laser or furnace, and analysed for noble gases using an extension of the 40Ar-39Ar technique to determine halogen abundances. The data obtained provide the first isotopic evidence for a trapped fluid that is Cl-rich, has a strong correlation with 40ArXS (40ArXS = 40Armeasured - 40Arradiogenic) and displays 40ArXS/36Ar of ˜1000 - consistent with the Martian atmosphere. This component was released predominantly in the low temperature and crush experiments, which may suggest a fluid inclusion host. For the halogens, we observe similar Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios between the nakhlites and terrestrial reservoirs, which is surprising given the absence of crustal recycling, organic matter and frequent fluid activity on Mars. In particular, Br/Cl ratios in our Nakhla samples (especially olivine) are consistent with previously analysed Martian weathering products, and both low temperature and crush analyses show a similar trend to the evaporation of seawater. This may indicate that surface brines play an important role on Mars and on halogen assemblages within Martian meteorites and rocks. Elevated I/Cl ratios in the low temperature NWA 998 and MIL 03346 releases may relate to in situ terrestrial contamination, though we are unable to distinguish between low temperature terrestrial or Martian components. Whilst estimates of the amount of water present based on the 36Ar concentrations are too high to be explained by a fluid component alone, they are consistent with a mixed-phase inclusion (gas and fluid) or with shock-implanted Martian atmospheric argon. The observed fluid is dilute (low salinity, but high Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios), contains a Martian atmospheric component

  5. Recycling of volatiles at subduction zones: Noble gas evidence from the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni arc of papua New Guinea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Kenneth; Mcinnes, Brent; Patterson, Desmond

    1994-01-01

    Convergent margin processes play an important but poorly understood role in the distribution of terrestrial volatile species. For example, subduction processes filter volatiles from the subducting package, thereby restricting their return to the mantle. In addition, once extracted from the downgoing slab, volatiles become an essential component in the petrogenesis of island arc magmas. The noble gases, with their systematic variation in physical properties and diversity of radiogenic isotopes, should carry a uniquely valuable record of these processes. However, thus far studies of noble gases in arc volcanics have achieved only limited success in this regard. Subduction-related lavas and geothermal fluids carry (3)He/(4)He ratios equal to or slightly lower than those found in the depleted upper mantle source of mid-ocean ridge basalts. Apparently slab-derived helium (which should have (3)He/(4)He much less than MORB) is extensively diluted by MORB-like helium from the mantle wedge, making it difficult to use helium as a tracer of convergent margin processes. Interpretation of the heavier noble gases (Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe) in arc lavas has also proven difficult, because the lavas carry low noble gas concentrations and hence are subject to pervasive atmospheric contamination. The low noble gas concentrations may be a consequence of degassing in the high level magma chambers characteristic of arc stratovolcanos. We have recently initiated a project to better constrain the behavior of volatiles in subduction zones through geochemical studies of the tectonically unusual volcanoes of the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni (TLTF) arc in the Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea.

  6. Tracing groundwater input into Lake Vanda, Wright Valley, Antarctica using major ions, stable isotopes and noble gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, C. B.; Poreda, R. J.; Snyder, G. T.

    2008-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV), Antarctica, is the largest ice-free region on Antarctica. Lake Vanda, located in central Wright Valley, is the deepest lake among the MDV lakes. It has a relatively fresh water layer above 50 m with a hypersaline calcium-chloride brine below (50-72 m). The Onyx River is the only stream input into Lake Vanda. It flows westward from the coastal Lower Wright Glacier and discharges into Lake Vanda. Suggested by the published literature and this study, there has been and may still be groundwater input into Lake Vanda. Stable isotopes, major ions, and noble gas data from this study coupled with previously published data indicate that the bottom waters of Lake Vanda have had significant contributions from a deep groundwater system. The dissolved gas of the bottom waters of Lake Vanda display solubility concentrations rather than the Ar-enriched dissolved gas seen in the Taylor Valley lakes (such as Lake Bonney). The isotopic data indicate that the bottom calcium-chloride-brine of Lake Vanda has undergone very little evaporation. The calcium-chloride chemistry of the groundwater that discharges into Lake Vanda most likely results from the chemical weathering and dissolution of cryogenic evaporites (antarcticite and gypsum) within the glacial sediments of Wright Valley. The high calcium concentrations of the brine have caused gypsum to precipitate on the lake bottom. Our work also supports previous physical and chemical observations suggesting that the upper portion actively circulates and the hypersaline bottom layer does not. The helium and calcium chloride values are concentrated at the bottom, with a very narrow transition layer between it and the above fresh water. If the freshwater layer did not actively circulate, then diffusion over time would have caused the helium and calcium chloride to slowly permeate upwards through the water column.

  7. Comparison of induced damage, range, reflection, and sputtering yield between amorphous, bcc crystalline, and bubble-containing tungsten materials under hydrogen isotope and noble gas plasma irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Seiki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Tokitani, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Binary-collision-approximation simulation of hydrogen isotope (i.e., hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium) and noble gas (i.e., helium, neon, and argon) injections into tungsten materials is performed. Three tungsten structures (i.e., amorphous, bcc crystalline, and helium bubble-containing structures) are prepared as target materials. Then, the trajectories of incident atoms, the distribution of recoil atoms, the penetration depth range of incident atoms, the sputtering yield, and the reflection rate are carefully investigated for these target materials.

  8. Comparative Study on the Noble-Gas Binding Ability of BeX Clusters (X = SO4, CO3, O).

    PubMed

    Saha, Ranajit; Pan, Sudip; Merino, Gabriel; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2015-06-25

    Ab initio computations are carried out to assess the noble gas (Ng) binding capability of BeSO4 cluster. We have further compared the stability of NgBeSO4 with that of the recently detected NgBeCO3 cluster. The Ng-Be bond in NgBeCO3 is somewhat weaker than that in NgBeO cluster. In NgBeSO4, the Ng-Be bond is found to be stronger compared with not only the Ng-Be bond in NgBeCO3 but also that in NgBeO, except the He case. The Ar-Rn-bound BeSO4 analogues are viable even at room temperature. The Wiberg bond indices of Be-Ng bonds and the degree of electron transfer from Ng to Be are somewhat larger in NgBeSO4 than those in NgBeCO3 and NgBeO. Electron density and energy decomposition analyses are performed in search of the nature of interaction in the Be-Ng bond in NgBeSO4. The orbital energy term (ΔE(orb)) contributes the maximum (ca. 80-90%) to the total attraction energy. The Ar/Kr/Xe/Rn-Be bonds in NgBeSO4 could be of partial covalent type with a gradual increase in covalency along Ar to Rn.

  9. Ultrahigh sensitivity heavy noble gas detectors for long-term monitoring and monitoring air. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, J.D.; Gross, K.

    1998-06-01

    'The primary objective of this research project is to develop heavy noble gas (krypton, xenon, and radon) detectors for: (1) long-term monitoring of transuranic waste, spent fuel, and other uranium and thorium bearing wastes, and (2) alpha particle air monitors that discriminate between radon emissions and other alpha emitters. A University of Cincinnati/Argonne National Laboratory (UC/ANL) Team has been assembled to complete this detector development project. DOE needs that are addressed by this project include improved long-term monitoring capability and improved air monitoring capability during remedial activities. Successful development and implementation of the proposed detection systems could significantly improve current capabilities with relatively simple and inexpensive equipment. As of June 1, 1998, the UC/ANL Team has: (1) made significant progress toward characterizing the fluid transfer process which is the basis for this detector development project and (2) evaluated several radiation detectors and several potential pulse processing schemes. The following discussion describes the progress made during the first year of this project and the implications of this progress.'

  10. Coulomb explosion in dicationic noble gas clusters: A genetic algorithm-based approach to critical size estimation for the suppression of Coulomb explosion and prediction of dissociation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Subhajit; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present a genetic algorithm based investigation of structural fragmentation in dicationic noble gas clusters, Arn+2, Krn+2, and Xen+2, where n denotes the size of the cluster. Dications are predicted to be stable above a threshold size of the cluster when positive charges are assumed to remain localized on two noble gas atoms and the Lennard-Jones potential along with bare Coulomb and ion-induced dipole interactions are taken into account for describing the potential energy surface. Our cutoff values are close to those obtained experimentally [P. Scheier and T. D. Mark, J. Chem. Phys. 11, 3056 (1987)] and theoretically [J. G. Gay and B. J. Berne, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 194 (1982)]. When the charges are allowed to be equally distributed over four noble gas atoms in the cluster and the nonpolarization interaction terms are allowed to remain unchanged, our method successfully identifies the size threshold for stability as well as the nature of the channels of dissociation as function of cluster size. In Arn2+, for example, fissionlike fragmentation is predicted for n =55 while for n =43, the predicted outcome is nonfission fragmentation in complete agreement with earlier work [Golberg et al., J. Chem. Phys. 100, 8277 (1994)].

  11. Using noble-gas and stable-isotope data to determine groundwater origin and flow regimes: Application to the Ceneri Base Tunnel (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomonaga, Yama; Marzocchi, Roberto; Pera, Sebastian; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf; Kipfer, Rolf; Decrouy, Laurent; Vennemann, Torsten

    2017-02-01

    Tunnel drilling provides a unique opportunity to sample and study deep groundwaters that are otherwise difficult to access. Understanding deep groundwater flow is of primary importance in assessing the possible impacts of tunnelling on hydrogeological systems. During this study, water was sampled for noble-gas analysis from tunnel inflows in the AlpTransit Ceneri Base Tunnel (Canton Ticino, southern Switzerland), which passes through an area mainly characterized by metamorphic rocks (gneiss). Furthermore, water was sampled from springs located in the same geological environment. Based on the measurement of noble-gas concentrations and isotope ratios, tritium concentrations, the stable isotope composition of hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O), and the concentrations of major ions in the water, a conceptual hydrogeological model was established for this case study that allowed the most probable origin of the groundwaters sampled at different locations to be determined. The measured abundances of 3He, 4He, and 20Ne allow the geochemical characterization of old groundwaters strongly enriched in terrigenic helium of crustal origin and the identification of mixing with water that circulates preferentially through cataclastic structures. Noble-gas concentrations and isotope ratios as well as tritium are useful proxies for the characterization of faults that may be critical for tunnel drilling because of their active hydrogeological role and their influence on the mechanics of the rocks.

  12. Theoretical prediction of maximum capacity of C₈₀ and Si₈₀ fullerenes for noble gas storage.

    PubMed

    Mahdavifar, Zabiollah

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we try to demonstrate that how many helium, neon and argon atoms can be trapped into fullerene cages until the pressure becomes large enough to break the C80 and Si80 frameworks. The maximum number of helium, neon and argon atoms which can be encapsulated into C80 fullerene, is found with 46, 24 and 10 atoms respectively. Having investigated the mechanism of C80 opening, we found that if the number of helium and argon atoms reaches to 50 and 12 respectively, the C-C bonds of C80 are broken and the gas molecules escaped from the fullerene cage. The final optimization geometries of latter complexes are similar to the shopping cart. Therefore, this appearance is named as molecular cart. Moreover, the maximum capacity of Si80 fullerene for encapsulated noble gas atoms is found 95, 56 and 22 for helium, neon and argon atoms correspondingly. It is worth highlighting that the new phenomenon of trapping argon atoms into Si80 cage is observed, when a Si atom randomly added to the center of Ar19@Si80 structures. In this case, the Si-Si bonds of Si80 are broken and two argon atoms will escape from the cage. After that, the framework rebuilds its structure like the initial one. This phenomenon is introduced as molecular cesarean section. The estimated internal pressure of Ng atoms trapped into the fullerene cages is also investigated. Results show that the maximum calculated internal pressure is related to He46@C80 and He95@Si80 structures with 212.3 and 144.1GPa respectively.

  13. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements.

  14. Measuring surface-area-to-volume ratios in soft porous materials using laser-polarized xenon interphase exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. P.; Mair, R. W.; Hoffmann, D.; Hrovat, M. I.; Rogers, R. A.; Topulos, G. P.; Walsworth, R. L.; Patz, S.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate a minimally invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique that enables determination of the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of soft porous materials from measurements of the diffusive exchange of laser-polarized 129Xe between gas in the pore space and 129Xe dissolved in the solid phase. We apply this NMR technique to porous polymer samples and find approximate agreement with destructive stereological measurements of S/V obtained with optical confocal microscopy. Potential applications of laser-polarized xenon interphase exchange NMR include measurements of in vivo lung function in humans and characterization of gas chromatography columns.

  15. Understanding the interaction of injected CO2 and reservoir fluids in the Cranfield enhanced oil recovery (EOR) field (MS, USA) by non-radiogenic noble gas isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyore, Domokos; Stuart, Finlay; Gilfillan, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the mechanism by which the injected CO2 is stored in underground reservoirs is a key challenge for carbon sequestration. Developing tracing tools that are universally deployable will increase confidence that CO2 remains safely stored. CO2 has been injected into the Cranfield enhanced oil recovery (EOR) field (MS, USA) since 2008 and significant amount of CO2 has remained (stored) in the reservoir. Noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are present as minor natural components in the injected CO2. He, Ne and Ar previously have been shown to be powerful tracers of the CO2 injected in the field (Györe et al., 2015). It also has been implied that interaction with the formation water might have been responsible for the observed CO2 loss. Here we will present work, which examines the role of reservoir fluids as a CO2 sink by examining non-radiogenic noble gas isotopes (20Ne, 36Ar, 84Kr, 132Xe). Gas samples from injection and production wells were taken 18 and 45 months after the start of injection. We will show that the fractionation of noble gases relative to Ar is consistent with the different degrees of CO2 - fluid interaction in the individual samples. The early injection samples indicate that the CO2 injected is in contact with the formation water. The spatial distribution of the data reveal significant heterogeneity in the reservoir with some wells exhibiting a relatively free flow path, where little formation water is contacted. Significantly, in the samples, where CO2 loss has been previously identified show active and ongoing contact. Data from the later stage of the injection shows that the CO2 - oil interaction has became more important than the CO2 - formation water interaction in controlling the noble gas fingerprint. This potentially provides a means to estimate the oil displacement efficiency. This dataset is a demonstration that noble gases can resolve CO2 storage mechanisms and its interaction with the reservoir fluids with high resolution

  16. The Thermo Scientific HELIX-SFT noble gas mass spectrometer: (preliminary) performance for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfod, D. N.; Mark, D. F.; Morgan, L. E.; Tomkinson, T.; Stuart, F.; Imlach, J.; Hamilton, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Thermo Scientific HELIX-platform Split Flight Tube (HELIX-SFT) noble gas mass spectrometer is specifically designed for simultaneous collection of helium isotopes. The high mass spur houses a switchable 1011 - 1012 Ω resistor Faraday cup and the low mass spur a digital pulse-counting secondary electron multiplier (SEM). We have acquired the HELIX-SFT with the specific intention to measure argon isotopes for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. This contribution will discuss preliminary performance (resolution, reproducibility, precision etc.) with respect to measuring argon isotope ratios for 40Ar/39Ar dating of geological materials. We anticipate the greatest impact for 40Ar/39Ar dating will be increased accuracy and precision, especially as we approach the techniques younger limit. Working with Thermo Scientific we have subtly modified the source, alpha and collector slits of the HELIX-SFT mass spectrometer to improve its resolution for resolving isobaric interferences at masses 36 to 40. The enhanced performance will allow for accurate and precise measurement of argon isotopes. Preliminary investigations show that we can obtain a valley resolution of >700 and >1300 (compared to standard HELIX-SFT specifications of >400 and >700) for the high and low mass spurs, respectively. The improvement allows for full resolution of hydrocarbons (C3+) at masses 37 - 40 and almost full resolution at mass 36. The HELIX-SFT will collect data in dual collection mode with 40Ar+ ion beams measured using the switchable 1011 - 1012 Ω resistor Faraday cup and 39Ar through 36Ar measured using the SEM. The HELIX-SFT requires Faraday-SEM inter-calibration but negates the necessity to inter-calibrate multiple electron multipliers. We will further present preliminary data from the dating of mineral standards: Alder Creek sanidine, Fish Canyon sanidine and Mount Dromedary biotite (GA1550).

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of framework flexibility effects on noble gas diffusion in HKUST-1 and ZIF-8

    DOE PAGES

    Parkes, Marie V.; Demir, Hakan; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; ...

    2014-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate trends in noble gas (Ar, Kr, Xe) diffusion in the metal-organic frameworks HKUST-1 and ZIF-8. Diffusion occurs primarily through inter-cage jump events, with much greater diffusion of guest atoms in HKUST-1 compared to ZIF-8 due to the larger cage and window sizes in the former. We compare diffusion coefficients calculated for both rigid and flexible frameworks. For rigid framework simulations, in which the framework atoms were held at their crystallographic or geometry optimized coordinates, sometimes dramatic differences in guest diffusion were seen depending on the initial framework structure or the choice of frameworkmore » force field parameters. When framework flexibility effects were included, argon and krypton diffusion increased significantly compared to rigid-framework simulations using general force field parameters. Additionally, for argon and krypton in ZIF-8, guest diffusion increased with loading, demonstrating that guest-guest interactions between cages enhance inter-cage diffusion. No inter-cage jump events were seen for xenon atoms in ZIF-8 regardless of force field or initial structure, and the loading dependence of xenon diffusion in HKUST-1 is different for rigid and flexible frameworks. Diffusion of krypton and xenon in HKUST-1 depends on two competing effects: the steric effect that decreases diffusion as loading increases, and the “small cage effect” that increases diffusion as loading increases. Finally, a detailed analysis of the window size in ZIF-8 reveals that the window increases beyond its normal size to permit passage of a (nominally) larger krypton atom.« less

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of framework flexibility effects on noble gas diffusion in HKUST-1 and ZIF-8

    SciTech Connect

    Parkes, Marie V.; Demir, Hakan; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Sholl, David S.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Allendorf, Mark D.

    2014-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate trends in noble gas (Ar, Kr, Xe) diffusion in the metal-organic frameworks HKUST-1 and ZIF-8. Diffusion occurs primarily through inter-cage jump events, with much greater diffusion of guest atoms in HKUST-1 compared to ZIF-8 due to the larger cage and window sizes in the former. We compare diffusion coefficients calculated for both rigid and flexible frameworks. For rigid framework simulations, in which the framework atoms were held at their crystallographic or geometry optimized coordinates, sometimes dramatic differences in guest diffusion were seen depending on the initial framework structure or the choice of framework force field parameters. When framework flexibility effects were included, argon and krypton diffusion increased significantly compared to rigid-framework simulations using general force field parameters. Additionally, for argon and krypton in ZIF-8, guest diffusion increased with loading, demonstrating that guest-guest interactions between cages enhance inter-cage diffusion. No inter-cage jump events were seen for xenon atoms in ZIF-8 regardless of force field or initial structure, and the loading dependence of xenon diffusion in HKUST-1 is different for rigid and flexible frameworks. Diffusion of krypton and xenon in HKUST-1 depends on two competing effects: the steric effect that decreases diffusion as loading increases, and the “small cage effect” that increases diffusion as loading increases. Finally, a detailed analysis of the window size in ZIF-8 reveals that the window increases beyond its normal size to permit passage of a (nominally) larger krypton atom.

  19. High precision nitrogen isotope measurements in oceanic basalts using a static triple collection noble gas mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.; Hilton, D. R.; Halldórsson, S. A.; Hahm, D.; Marti, K.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new system for the simultaneous static triple-collection of nitrogen isotopes at the <10μcm3 STP [N2] (<1 × 10-5 cm3STP; <0.5 nmol) level using a modified VG-5440 noble gas mass spectrometer. The system consists of an internal N2-STD with aδ15N value of -0.11 ± 0.22 ‰ (1σ) calibrated against an air-standard (Air-STD). The N2-STD was measured repeatedly with an average uncertainty on an individualδ15N measurement being 0.03 ‰ (1σ) versus an average single day reproducibility of 0.38 ‰ (1σ). Additional refinements include (1) monitoring of interfering CO contributions at mass 30, allowing a comprehensive CO correction to be applied to all samples, (2) quantification of procedural N2 blanks (n = 22) in both size (4.2 ± 0.5 μcm3 STP) and isotopic composition (δ15N = 12.64 ± 2.04 ‰), allowing consistent blank corrections to all samples, and (3) independent measurement of N2/Ar ratios using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). The new system was tested by measuring nitrogen isotopes (δ15N), concentrations and N2/Ar ratios on 11 submarine basalt glasses. Results show that the uncertainty on the δ15N data is improved as a consequence of multiple standards being run per day. Reduced analytical times, afforded by triple collection, also minimize sample depletion and memory effects, thus improving measurement statistics. Additionally, we show that CO corrections can be accomplished using mass 30 to monitor CO interferences, leading to substantial improvements in reproducibility and the overall accuracy of results when the contribution of CO is significant.

  20. The noble gas argon modifies extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling in neurons and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, Astrid V; Rossaint, Rolf; Haase, Hajo; Al Kassam, Hussam; Ryang, Yu-Mi; Beyer, Cordian; Coburn, Mark

    2012-01-15

    Recently, the noble gas argon has been identified as a potent neuroprotective agent, but little is known about its cellular effects. In this in vitro study, we investigated argon's influence on the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, a ubiquitous enzyme with numerous functions in cell proliferation and survival. Primary neuronal and astroglial cell cultures and the microglial cell line BV-2 were exposed to 50 vol.% argon. Further possible effects were studied following stimulation of microglia with 50 ng/ml LPS. ERK 1/2 activation was assessed by phosphorylation state-specific western blotting, cytokine levels by real-time PCR and western blotting. Total phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity was examined with p-nitrophenylphosphate. After 30 min exposure, argon significantly activated ERK 1/2 signaling in microglia. Enhanced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 was also found in astrocytes and neurons following argon exposure, but it lacked statistical significance. In microglia, argon did not substantially interfere with LPS-induced ERK1/2 activation and inflammatory cytokine induction. Addition of the MEK-Inhibitor U0126 abolished the induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. Cellular phosphatase activity and the inactivation of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 were not altered by argon. In conclusion, argon enhanced ERK 1/2 activity in microglia via the upstream kinase MEK, probably through a direct mode of activation. ERK 1/2 signaling in astrocytes and neurons in vitro was also influenced, although not with statistical significance. Whether ERK 1/2 activation by argon affects cellular functions like differentiation and survival in the brain in vivo will have to be determined in future experiments.

  1. Fluid circulation and reservoir conditions of the Los Humeros Geothermal Field (LHGF), Mexico, as revealed by a noble gas survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Daniele L.; Castro, M. Clara; Lopez-Hernandez, Aida; Han, Guolei; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hall, Chris M.; Ramírez-Montes, Miguel

    2017-03-01

    Los Humeros Geothermal Field (LHGF) is one of four geothermal fields currently operating in Mexico, in exploitation since 1990. Located in a caldera complex filled with very low-permeability rhyolitic ignimbrites that are the reservoir cap-rock, recharge of the geothermal field is both limited and localized. Because of this, planning of any future geothermal exploitation must be based on a clear understanding of the fluid circulation. To this end, a first noble gas survey was carried out in which twenty-two production wells were sampled for He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe isotope analysis. Air-corrected 3He/4He ratios (Rc) measured in the fluid, normalized to the helium atmospheric ratio (Ra; 1.384 × 10- 6), are consistently high across the field, with an average value of 7.03 ± 0.40 Ra. This value is close to that of the sub-continental upper mantle, indicating that LHGF mines heat from an active magmatic system. Freshwater recharge does not significantly affect He isotopic ratios, contributing 1-10% of the total fluid amount. The presence of radiogenic 40Ar* in the fluid suggests a fossil fluid component that might have circulated within the metacarbonate basement with radiogenic argon produced from detrital dispersed illite. Solubility-driven elemental fractionation of Ne/Ar, Kr/Ar, and Xe/Ar confirm extreme boiling in the reservoir. However, a combined analysis of these ratios with 40Ar/36Ar reveals mixing with an air component, possibly introduced by re-injected geothermal fluids.

  2. Quantum dynamics of an excited alkali atom in a noble gas cluster: lithium attached to a helium cluster.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Thorndyke, Brian; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2007-12-28

    An alkali atom-noble gas cluster system is considered as a model for solvation effects in optical spectra, within a quantum-classical description based on the density operator of a many-atom system and its partial Wigner transform. This leads to an eikonal-time-dependent molecular orbital treatment suitable for a time-dependent description of the coupling of light emission and atom dynamics in terms of the time-dependent electric dipole of the whole system. As an application, we consider an optically excited lithium atom as the dopant in a helium cluster at 0.5 K. We describe the motions of the excited Li atom interacting with a cluster of He atoms and calculate the time-dependent electric dipole of the Li-He(99) system during the dynamics. The electronic Hamiltonian is taken as a sum of three-body Li-He diatomic potentials including electronic polarization and repulsion, with l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials for Li and He, while we use a modified pair potential for He-He. The calculations involve the coupling of 12 quantum states with 300 classical degrees of freedom. We present results for the dynamics and spectra of a Li atom interacting with a model cluster surface of He atoms and also interacting with a droplet of He. We have found that the Li atom is attracted or repulsed from the He surface, depending on the orientation of its 2p orbitals. The spectra and dynamics of Li inside and at the surface of a cluster are found to be strongly dependent on its electronic states, its velocity direction, and whether light is present during emission or not.

  3. PARAMETRIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-FOAM COMPOSITION, SIMULANT PROPERTIES AND NOBLE METALS ON THE GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE OF A NON-NEWTONIAN WASTE SLURRY SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Charles Crawford, C; Mark Fowley, M

    2008-08-07

    Gas holdup tests were performed in bench-scale and small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing systems at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101. These featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A anti-foam agent. Results indicated that this anti-foam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter-intuitively, that the holdup increased as the non-newtonian simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). Such results raised the potential of increased flammable gas retention in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs) during a Design Basis Event (DBE). Additional testing was performed to determine the effects of simulant properties, composition of alternate AFAs, and presence of trace noble metals. Key results are that: (1) Increased gas holdup resulting from addition of Q2-3183A is due to a decrease in surface tension that supports small bubbles which have low rise velocities. (2) Dow Corning 1520-US AFA shows it to be a viable replacement to Dow Corning Q2-3183A AFA. This alternative AFA, however, requires significantly higher dosage for the same anti-foam function. (3) Addition of noble metals to the AZ-101 waste simulant does not produce a catalytic gas retention effect with the AFA.

  4. Noble gas adsorption in two-dimensional zeolites: a combined experimental and density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengen; Zhong, Jianqiang; Boscoboinik, Jorge Anibal; Lu, Deyu

    Zeolites are important industrial catalysts with porous three-dimensional structures. The catalytically active sites are located inside the pores, thus rendering them inaccessible for surface science measurements. We synthesized a two-dimensional (2D) zeolite model system, consisting of an (alumino)silicate bilayer weakly bound to a Ru (0001) surface. The 2D zeolite is suitable for surface science studies; it allows a detailed characterization of the atomic structure of the active site and interrogation of the model system during the catalytic reaction. As an initial step, we use Ar adsorption to obtain a better understanding of the atomic structure of the 2D zeolite. In addition, atomic level studies of rare gas adsorption and separation by zeolite are important for its potential application in nuclear waste sequestration. Experimental studies found that Ar atoms can be trapped inside the 2D-zeolite, raising an interesting question on whether Ar atoms are trapped inside the hexagonal prism nano-cages or at the interface between the (alumino)silicate bilayer and Ru(0001), or both. DFT calculations using van der Waals density functionals were carried out to determine the preferred Ar adsorption sites and the corresponding adsorption energies. This research used resources of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, which is a U.S. DOE Office of Science Facility, at Brookhaven National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-SC0012704.

  5. Magma Dynamics at Mid-Ocean Ridges by Noble Gas Kinetic Fractionation: Assessment of Magmatic Ascent Rates and Mantle Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paonita, A.; Martelli, M.

    2007-12-01

    Topical scientific literature on magma degassing at mid-ocean ridges more and more focuses on exsolution processes occurring under conditions that are far from thermodynamic equilibrium between bubbles and silicate melt. Indeed, the dynamics of magma ascent and decompression can be faster than that of CO2 diffusion into bubbles, in which case the diffusivity ratios among volatiles are the main control of the composition of the exsolving gas phase. We have developed a model of bubble growth in silicate melts that calculates the extent of both CO2 supersaturation and kinetic fractionation among noble gases in vesicles in relation to the decompressive rate of basaltic melts. The model predicts that, due to comparable Ar and CO2 diffusivity, magma degassing at low pressure fractionates both He/Ar and He/CO2 ratios by a similar extent, while the slower CO2 diffusion at high pressure causes early kinetic effects on Ar/CO2 ratio and dramatically changes the degassing paths. By using this tool, we have reviewed the global He-Ar-CO2 dataset of fluid inclusions in mid-ocean-ridge glasses. We display that non-equilibrium fractionations among He, Ar and CO2, driven by their different diffusivities in silicate melts, are common in most of the natural conditions of magma decompression and their signature strongly depends on pressure of degassing. The different geochemical signatures among suites of data coming from different ridge segments mainly depend on the depth of the magma chamber where the melt was stored. Moreover, variations inside a single suite emerge due to the interplay between variable ascent speed of magma and cooling rate of the emplaced lava. As a result, two data groups coming from the Pito Seamount suite (Easter Microplate East ridge), showing different degree of CO2 supersaturation and He/Ar fractionation, provide ascent rates which differ by ten folds or even more. The large variations in both the He/CO2 and Ar/CO2 ratios at almost constant He/Ar, displayed

  6. Explaining the Noble Gas Content of the Planets: Theoretical Models for Argon-Trapping by Amorphous Ices in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, C. B.; Ciesla, F.

    2014-12-01

    The composition of planets in the modern solar system can be traced to the chemistry and physics of the solar nebula, the diffuse disk of gas and dust that surrounded the young sun immediately after its formation. Materials such as the noble gases were too volatile to be chemically incorporated by planetary embryos. Instead, it is likely that they were trapped physically and transported to the inner planets by migrating comets and planetesimals. One trapping mechanism under consideration is the capture of noble gas atoms in amorphous ices on the surface of cold grains. We created a simple numerical model to explore this mechanism, using argon as a representative volatile gas. We have demonstrated that our model reproduces experimental trapping efficiencies (ratio of the volatile atoms to water molecules in the deposited ice) when we constrain the binding energy of our representative volatile to 3500-5500K and the sticking efficiency of volatile atoms to 0.004x gas phase water pressure. Binding energy and sticking efficiency are poorly understood for most volatile substances, but this study finds that they are among the most critical when predicting the trapping of volatiles in the physical world. Constraining these parameters under nebular conditions will allow us to evaluate how much argon could have been trapped in nebular ices and ultimately assess the role of amorphous ice trapping in the origin of planetary volatiles.

  7. Laser-polarized {sup 129}Xe: A new direction for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wagshui, M.E.; Liang, Z.; Zhong, K.; Wishnia, A.

    1996-05-01

    While the recent demonstrations of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging using laser-polarized {sup 3}He are impressive, there is great interest in utilizing the technique for {sup 129}Xe. The high solubility of {sup 129}Xe in tissue (10-20mM) and the large chemical shift separation between gas and solution environments (200 ppm) make spectroscopic differentiation of gas phase and tissue compartments facile. To understand the physicological and magnetic behavior of {sup 129}Xe, for imaging, the authors have obtained MR spectra from the mouse thorax in vivo using laser-polarized {sup 129}Xe. These show many peaks and much detail: (1) Alveolar gas phase {sup 129}Xe shows intensity and frequency fluctuations correlated with breathing-induced variations in bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) of the lung. (2) {sup 129}Xe dissolved in the lung parenchyma also shows BMS correlated variation as well as very rapid T{sub 2} relaxation (< 20ms), attributable to BMS broadening and respiratory motion. (3) Blood and thoracic muscle components are easily distinguished by their different frequencies and intensity buildup rates. These show T{sub 2} times of 60 and 80 ms, respectively. (4) Effective T{sub 1} relaxation times, (including {sup 129}Xe washout) are long in all tissue environments, about 25-30 s. The authors will discuss these results as well as advances toward systems capable of producing large quantities of laser-polarized {sup 129}Xe.

  8. Mineralogy and noble-gas signatures of the carbonate-rich lithology of the Tagish Lake carbonaceous chondrite: evidence for an accretionary breccia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Zolensky, Michael E.; Tanaka, Masahiko

    2003-02-01

    The carbonate-rich lithology of the Tagish Lake carbonaceous chondrite was characterized by noble-gas mass spectrometry, synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Noble-gas analysis was performed on two samples and the results showed that primordial noble gases are abundant and solar noble gases are absent in the samples of carbonate-rich lithology. The concentrations of Ne-A2 and -E in both samples are at the maximum level observed for CI and CM chondrites, suggesting high abundances of presolar diamonds and SiC/graphite, respectively. The cosmic-ray exposure age cannot be determined precisely, because the shielding depth of our Tagish Lake samples is unknown, but the minimum exposure age was determined to be 5.5±0.7 Myr on the basis of cosmogenic 21Ne concentrations and the highest 21Ne production rate. X-ray and electron-microscopic study showed that the carbonate-rich lithology is dominated by loosely packed porous matrix that consists mainly of fine-grained saponite and ferromagenesian carbonate. The matrix contains very few chondrules, but many fine-grained clasts having angular shape with longest dimensions up to 1 mm. The clasts differ from host matrix in both texture and mineralogy. They are massive, compacted material with porosity much lower than matrix and contain abundant magnetite and a coherent intergrowth of serpentine and saponite that is rare in matrix. The presence of texturally and mineralogically distinct clasts indicates that the carbonate-rich lithology is a breccia, but the absence of solar noble gases and impact-induced deformational features in host matrix distinguish it from an asteroid regolith breccia. Our results instead indicate that it is an accretionary breccia formed by simultaneous accretion of diverse objects in a massive dust cloud. The clasts often enclose chondrules and anhydrous silicate fragments such as low-iron-manganese-enriched olivines. This observation and their highly

  9. Prediction of neutral noble gas insertion compounds with heavier pnictides: FNgY (Ng = Kr and Xe; Y = As, Sb and Bi).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayan; Manna, Debashree; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2016-04-28

    A novel class of interesting insertion compounds obtained through the insertion of a noble gas atom into the heavier pnictides have been explored by various ab initio quantum chemical techniques. Recently, the first neutral noble gas insertion compounds, FXeY (Y = P, N), were theoretically predicted to be stable; the triplet state was found to be the most stable state, with a high triplet-singlet energy gap, by our group. In this study, we investigated another noble gas inserted compound, FNgY (Ng = Kr and Xe; Y = As, Sb and Bi), with a triplet ground state. Density functional theory (DFT), second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), coupled-cluster theory (CCSD(T)) and multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) based techniques have been utilized to investigate the structures, stabilities, harmonic vibrational frequencies, charge distributions and topological properties of these compounds. These predicted species, FNgY (Ng = Kr and Xe; Y = As, Sb and Bi) are found to be energetically stable with respect to all the probable 2-body and 3-body dissociation pathways, except for the 2-body channel leading to the global minimum products (FY + Ng). Nevertheless, the finite barrier height corresponding to the saddle points of the compounds connected to their respective global minima products indicates that these compounds are kinetically stable. The structural parameters, energetics, and charge distribution results as well as atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis suggest that these predicted molecules can be best represented as F(-)[(3)NgY](+). Thus, all the aforementioned computed results clearly indicate that it may be possible to experimentally prepare the most stable triplet state of FNgY molecules under cryogenic conditions through a matrix isolation technique.

  10. Structure and stability of noble gas bound EX3+ compounds (E = C, Ge, Sn, Pb; X = H, F, Cl, Br).

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Moreno, Diego; Ghosh, Sreyan; Chattaraj, Pratim K; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-01-15

    It has been analyzed at the MP2/def2-QZVPPD level whether EX3+ (E = C-Pb; X = H, F-Br) can bind noble gas atoms. Geometrical and electronic structures, dissociation energy values, thermochemical parameters, natural bond order, electron density, and energy decomposition analyses highlight the possibility of such noble gas bound EX3+ compounds. Except He and Ne, the other heavier congeners of this family make quite strong bonds with E. In fact, the dissociations of Ar-Rn bound analogues turn out to be endergonic in nature at 298 K, except in the cases of ArGe Cl3+, Ar/KrGeBr3+, and ArSnBr3+. GeH3+ and EF3+ (E = Ge-Pb) can even bind two Ng atoms with reasonably high dissociation energy. As the pz orbital of the E center in EX3+ plays a crucial role in its binding with the noble gas atoms, the effect of the π back-bonding causing X → E electron transfer ought to be properly understood. Due to the larger back-donation, the Ng binding ability of EX3+ gradually decreases along F to Br. EH2+ and the global minimum HE(+…) H2 (E = Sn, Pb) complexes are also able to bind Ar-Rn atoms quite effectively. The NgE bonds in Ar-Rn bound CH3+, GeH3+, and EF3+ (E = Ge-Pb) and Xe/RnE bonds in NgECl3+ and NgEBr3+ (E = Ge, Sn) are mainly of covalent type.

  11. Calculation of Collisional Cross Sections for the 2P3/2 - 2P1/2 Transition in Alkali-Noble Gas Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    collisional cross sections given input potentials of a system may provide a partial answer to this question in systems where collisions play a major...CALCULATION OF COLLISIONAL CROSS SECTIONS FOR THE 2P3/2 → 2P1/2 TRANSITION IN ALKALI-NOBLE GAS SYSTEMS THESIS Sam Butler, Captain, USAF AFIT/GAP/ENP...States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. AFIT/GAP/ENP/10-M04 CALCULATION OF COLLISIONAL CROSS SECTIONS FOR THE 2P3/2

  12. Dual Species Noble Gas Nuclear Spin Polarizer for a New Search for the Atomic EDM of Xe-129 at FRM-II (Munich Research Reactor)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Jared; Coulter, Daniel; Frisbie, Dustin; Fromm, Steven; Huneau, Jake; Rabga, Tenzin; Underwood, Walter; Singh, Jaideep; Fierlinger, Peter; Kraegeloh, Eva; Kuchler, Florian; Lins, Tobias; Marino, Mike; Meinel, Jonas; Neissen, Benjamin; Stuiber, Stefan; Fan, Isaac; Kilian, Wolfgang; Knappe-Gruenberg, Silvia; Trahms, Lutz; Chupp, Tim; Degenkolb, Skyler; Sachdeva, Natasha; Gong, Fei; Babcock, Earl; Fierlinger Group Team; Chupp Laboratory Team; Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Collaboration; Juelich CenterNeutron Science Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Electric dipole moments are believed to be very sensitive probes of CP violation beyond the Standard Model. A new search for the atomic electric dipole moment of Xe-129 is currently underway at FRM-II in Munich. Our technique takes advantage of a state of the art magnetically shielded room, ultra-sensitive magnetometry using SQUIDs, and control of systematics using a He-3 co-magnetometer. Our goal is an order of magnitude improvement over the previous Xe-129 atomic EDM limit. We will describe the design and construction of a noble gas polarizer using spectrally-narrow diode lasers. Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  13. Origin and Processes Highlighted By Noble Gases Geochemistry of Submarine Gas Emissions from Seeps at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay):

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battani, A.; Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Bignon, L.; Pujol, M.; Levaché, D.

    2014-12-01

    Noble gases are widely used as tracers to both determine fluid origin and identify transfer processes governing fluid flow in natural systems. This work presents the preliminary results and interpretations from submarine gas samples collected during the GAZCOGNE2 cruise (2013). The seepage activity and the spatial distribution of the widespread emission sites encountered at this area are described by (Dupré et al. 2014). Gas composition shows that methane is the dominant species compared to the C2+. The associated δ13C and δD signatures point to a biogenic origin- through CO2 reduction- of the gas. Helium concentrations are very low, ranging from 0.1 and 2.3 ppm, indicating a low residence time of the fluids in the subsurface. However, the resulting helium isotopic ratios are mostly crustal fingerprinted (around 0.02). The R/Ra values sometimes exhibit higher value of 0.2, indicative either an ASW (air saturated water) value, or the fingerprint of ancient mantle helium, the later in agreement with the geological structural context of the Parentis Basin. Most of the samples exhibit a mixing between ASW and air, probably by excess air addition to the initial ASW concentration. The elemental Ne/Ar ratio is remarkably constant for the totality of the samples, with a value typical of ASW (0.2). This result implies that the migrating gas phase is "stripping" the original water matrix from its noble gas content, as described by Gillfillian et al., 2008. This further indicates that an intermediate reservoir of biogenic gas should be present at depth. The GAZCOGNE study is co-funded by TOTAL and IFREMER as part of the PAMELA (Passive Margin Exploration Laboratories) scientific project. References: Dupré, S., L. Berger, N. Le Bouffant, C. Scalabrin, and J. F. Bourillet (2014), Fluid emissions at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay, France): a biogenic origin or the expression of hydrocarbon leakage?, Continental Shelf Research, doi:10.1016/j.csr.2014.07.004. Gilfillan S

  14. The intrusion of new magma triggered the 2011-2012 unrest at Santorini: evidence from noble-gas isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, A.; Barberi, F.; Carapezza, M.; Di Piazza, A.; Francalanci, L.; Sortino, F.; D'Alessandro, W.

    2013-12-01

    Santorini is one of the most famous active volcanoes of the world for its catastrophic explosive eruption that occurred during the Minoan civilization. Since then the Kameni eruptive centers that formed within the caldera erupted repeatedly until 1950. In 2011-2012 the volcano has been characterized by a seismic unrest, that was unprecedented at Santorini at least since the 1950 eruption, and that led to fear for an imminent eruption. Because more than 100,000 visitors are present on the island during the tourist season, and considering the eruptive potential of Santorini, it is crucial to evaluate the hazard of this volcano, which depends on the type of magma actually present in the volcanic system. With the aim to address this question, this research shows the first comparison between noble-gas isotope composition of the present fumarolic gases with that of fluid inclusions hosted in enclaves contained in the 1570 and 1925 AD dacitic magmas erupted at Nea Kameni. These enclaves are a portion of mafic magma batches that replenished the shallow chamber of the plumbing system hosting cooler and more silicic melts. Their Sr-Nd isotope ratios are quite similar to those measured in the host dacitic rocks, implying a common parental magma. Therefore, the analyzed enclaves may be considered representative of the historic magma erupted at Nea Kameni which could be still present in the volcano plumbing system feeding the crater fumaroles. The 3He/4He ratios of enclaves, once corrected for air contamination (3.1-3.6 Ra), partially overlap those of the gases (3.5-4.0 Ra) collected from Nea and Palea Kameni. The range of 3He/4He ratios (3.1-4.0 Ra) is appreciably lower than typical arc volcanoes (R/Ra ~7-8), implying that a contamination by 4He-rich fluids occurred either directly in the mantle and/or in the plumbing system. Comparison of 3He/4He and 4He/40Ar* ratios measured in enclaves with those of gases, as well as long-term monitoring of R/Ra in the latters, coherently

  15. Origin and age of thermal waters in Cieplice Spa, Sudeten, Poland, inferred from isotope, chemical and noble gas data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciȩżkowski, W.; Gröning, M.; Leśniak, P. M.; Weise, S. M.; Zuber, A.

    1992-12-01

    Isotope and hydrochemical data of the thermal water system in Cieplice Ṡlaskie Zdrój (Spa) indicate the existence of two subsystems that greatly differ in volume and which meet at the fault zones of a granitic horst, where they discharge at an altitude of about 340m. One of the subsystems is very small (about 4 × 10 3 m 3) as indicated by the tritium age of the order of 10 years and a low outflow rate. Its recharge area found from the δ18O and δD values, is about 200m above the springs, most probably on the slopes of the foothills of the Karkonosze Mountains south-southwest of the spa. The large subsystem contains water which is free of tritium and whose 14C content is from 1 to 8 pmc with δ13C = -8.0 to -9.2‰. The isotopic composition of this water reflects either the climatic effect (low-altitude recharge during a cooler pre-Holocene climate) or the altitude effect (recharge in the early Holocene period at about 1000m at the heights of the Karkonosze assuming that the 14C concentration is strongly reduced by exchange with calcite in veins). For the former hypothesis, the recharge area of this water is probably either at the foot of the southeastern slopes of the Kaczawa Mountains or/and at the foot of the Rudawy Janowickie Mountains, to the east of Cieplice. The noble gas temperatures are more consistent with the pre-Holocene recharge. Similarly, the 4He excess and {40Ar}/{36Ar} ratio support the hypothesis of a pre-Holecene age. The constant {3He}/{4He} ratio of 26 × 10 -8 for highly different helium contents indicates crustal origin of helium. For the pre-Holocene age of water its volume is calculated at >- 10 9m 3 (stagnant water in micropores and mobile water in fractures) and the hydraulic conductivity of the host granite massif is estimated at about 7 × 10 -8 ms -1. Two outflows from this subsystem have different and variable fractions of a modern water component (bomb age), most probably originating from the bank infiltration of a nearby stream.

  16. Using noble gas tracers to estimate residual CO2 saturation in the field: results from the CO2CRC Otway residual saturation and dissolution test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForce, T.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.

    2013-12-01

    Residual CO2 saturation is a critically important parameter in CO2 storage as it can have a large impact on the available secure storage volume and post-injection CO2 migration. A suite of single-well tests to measure residual trapping was conducted at the Otway test site in Victoria, Australia during 2011. One or more of these tests could be conducted at a prospective CO2 storage site before large-scale injection. The test involved injection of 150 tonnes of pure carbon dioxide followed by 454 tonnes of CO2-saturated formation water to drive the carbon dioxide to residual saturation. This work presents a brief overview of the full test sequence, followed by the analysis and interpretation of the tests using noble gas tracers. Prior to CO2 injection krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) tracers were injected and back-produced to characterise the aquifer under single-phase conditions. After CO2 had been driven to residual the two tracers were injected and produced again. The noble gases act as non-partitioning aqueous-phase tracers in the undisturbed aquifer and as partitioning tracers in the presence of residual CO2. To estimate residual saturation from the tracer test data a one-dimensional radial model of the near-well region is used. In the model there are only two independent parameters: the apparent dispersivity of each tracer and the residual CO2 saturation. Independent analysis of the Kr and Xe tracer production curves gives the same estimate of residual saturation to within the accuracy of the method. Furthermore the residual from the noble gas tracer tests is consistent with other measurements in the sequence of tests.

  17. Using dissolved noble gas and isotopic tracers to evaluate the vulnerability of groundwater resources in a small, high elevation catchment to predicted climate changes

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E

    2009-10-02

    We use noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers in groundwater and stream water in a small high elevation catchment to provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge; and to determine subsurface residence times of different groundwater components. They identify three sources that contribute to groundwater flow: (1) seasonal groundwater recharge with short travel times, (2) water from bedrock aquifers that have elevated radiogenic {sup 4}He, and (3) upwelling of deep fluids that have 'mantle' helium and hydrothermal carbon isotope signatures. Although a bimodal distribution in apparent groundwater age indicates that groundwater storage times range from less than a year to several decades, water that recharges seasonally is the largest likely contributor to stream baseflow. Under climate change scnearios with earlier snowmelt, the groundwater that moves through the alluvial aquifer seasonally will be depleted earlier, providing less baseflow and possible extreme low flows in the creek during summer and fall. Dissolved noble gas measurements indciate recharge temperatures are 5 to 11 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that excess air concentrations are lower than would be expected for recharge through bedrock fractures. Instead, recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, as indicated by {delta}{sup 13}C-DIC values that are consistent with incorporation of CO{sub 2} from soil respiration. Recharge temperatures are close to or slightly higher than mean annual air temperature, and are consistent with recharge during May and June, when snowpack melting occurs.

  18. The evolution of Devonian hydrocarbon gases in shallow aquifers of the northern Appalachian Basin: Insights from integrating noble gas and hydrocarbon geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Jackson, Robert B.; Vengosh, Avner; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Whyte, Colin J.; Walsh, Talor B.; Kondash, Andrew J.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2015-12-01

    The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in domestic energy production from unconventional reservoirs. This energy boom has generated marked economic benefits, but simultaneously evoked significant concerns regarding the potential for drinking-water contamination in shallow aquifers. Presently, efforts to evaluate the environmental impacts of shale gas development in the northern Appalachian Basin (NAB), located in the northeastern US, are limited by: (1) a lack of comprehensive "pre-drill" data for groundwater composition (water and gas); (2) uncertainty in the hydrogeological factors that control the occurrence of naturally present CH4 and brines in shallow Upper Devonian (UD) aquifers; and (3) limited geochemical techniques to quantify the sources and migration of crustal fluids (specifically methane) at various time scales. To address these questions, we analyzed the noble gas, dissolved ion, and hydrocarbon gas geochemistry of 72 drinking-water wells and one natural methane seep all located ≫1 km from shale gas drill sites in the NAB. In the present study, we consciously avoided groundwater wells from areas near active or recent drilling to ensure shale gas development would not bias the results. We also intentionally targeted areas with naturally occurring CH4 to characterize the geochemical signature and geological context of gas-phase hydrocarbons in shallow aquifers of the NAB. Our data display a positive relationship between elevated [CH4], [C2H6], [Cl], and [Ba] that co-occur with high [4He]. Although four groundwater samples show mantle contributions ranging from 1.2% to 11.6%, the majority of samples have [He] ranging from solubility levels (∼45 × 10-6 cm3 STP/L) with below-detectable [CH4] and minor amounts of tritiogenic 3He in low [Cl] and [Ba] waters, up to high [4He] = 0.4 cm3 STP/L with a purely crustal helium isotopic end-member (3He/4He = ∼0.02 times the atmospheric ratio (R/Ra)) in samples with CH4 near saturation for shallow

  19. Characterization of gas chemistry and noble-gas isotope ratios of inclusion fluids in magmatic-hydrothermal and magmatic-steam alunite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Rye, R.O.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical and isotope data were obtained for the active gas and noble gas of inclusion fluids in coarse-grained samples of magmatic-hydrothermal and magmatic-steam alunite from well-studied deposits (Marysvale, Utah; Tambo, Chile; Tapajo??s, Brazil; Cactus, California; Pierina, Peru), most of which are discussed in this Volume. Primary fluid inclusions in the alunite typically are less than 0.2 ??m but range up to several micrometers. Analyses of the active-gas composition of these alunite-hosted inclusion fluids released in vacuo by both crushing and heating indicate consistent differences in the compositions of magmatic-hydrothermal and magmatic-steam fluids. The compositions of fluids released by crushing were influenced by contributions from significant populations of secondary inclusions that trapped largely postdepositional hydrothermal fluids. Thermally released fluids gave the best representation of the fluids that formed primary alunite. The data are consistent with current models for the evolution of magmatic-hydrothermal and magmatic-steam fluids. Magmatic-steam fluids are vapor-dominant, average about 49 mol% H2O, and contain N2, H2, CH4, CO, Ar, He, HF, and HCl, with SO2 the dominant sulfur gas (average SO2/ H2S=202). In contrast, magmatic-hydrothermal fluids are liquid-dominant, average about 88 mol% H2O, and N2, H2, CO2, and HF, with H2S about as abundant as SO2 (average SO2/H2 S=0.7). The low SO2/H2S and N2/Ar ratios, and the near-absence of He in magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, are consistent with their derivation from degassed condensed magmatic fluids whose evolution from reduced-to-oxidized aqueous sulfur species was governed first by rock and then by fluid buffers. The high SO2/H2S and N2/Ar with significant concentrations of He in magmatic-steam fluids are consistent with derivation directly from a magma. None of the data supports the entrainment of atmospheric gases or mixing of air-saturated gases in meteoric water in either magmatic

  20. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  1. Using Noble Gas Tracers to Estimate CO2 Saturation in the Field: Results from the 2014 CO2CRC Otway Repeat Residual Saturation Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForce, T.; Ennis-King, J.; Boreham, C.; Serno, S.; Cook, P. J.; Freifeld, B. M.; Gilfillan, S.; Jarrett, A.; Johnson, G.; Myers, M.; Paterson, L.

    2015-12-01

    Residual trapping efficiency is a critical parameter in the design of secure subsurface CO2 storage. Residual saturation is also a key parameter in oil and gas production when a field is under consideration for enhanced oil recovery. Tracers are an important tool that can be used to estimate saturation in field tests. A series of measurements of CO2 saturation in an aquifer were undertaken as part of the Otway stage 2B extension field project in Dec. 2014. These tests were a repeat of similar tests in the same well in 2011 with improvements to the data collection and handling method. Two single-well tracer tests using noble gas tracers were conducted. In the first test krypton and xenon are injected into the water-saturated formation to establish dispersivity of the tracers in single-phase flow. Near-residual CO2 saturation is then established near the well. In the second test krypton and xenon are injected with CO2-saturated water to measure the final CO2 saturation. The recovery rate of the tracers is similar to predicted rates using recently published partitioning coefficients. Due to technical difficulties, there was mobile CO2 in the reservoir throughout the second tracer test in 2014. As a consequence, it is necessary to use a variation of the previous simulation procedure to interpret the second tracer test. One-dimensional, radial simulations are used to estimate average saturation of CO2 near the well. Estimates of final average CO2 saturation are computed using two relative permeability models, thermal and isothermal simulations, and three sets of coefficients for the partitioning of the tracers between phases. Four of the partitioning coefficients used were not previously available in the literature. The noble gas tracer field test and analysis of the 2011 and 2014 data both give an average CO2 saturation that is consistent with other field measurements. This study has demonstrated the repeatability of the methodology for noble gas tracer tests in the

  2. Absorption spectroscopy of xenon and ethylene-noble gas mixtures at high pressure: towards Bose-Einstein condensation of vacuum ultraviolet photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Christian; Brausemann, Rudolf; Schmitt, Julian; Vewinger, Frank; Christopoulos, Stavros; Weitz, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation is a phenomenon well known for material particles as cold atomic gases, and this concept has in recent years been extended to photons confined in microscopic optical cavities. Essential for the operation of such a photon condensate is a thermalization mechanism that conserves the average particle number, as in the visible spectral regime can be realized by subsequent absorption re-emission processes in dye molecules. Here we report on the status of an experimental effort aiming at the extension of the concept of Bose-Einstein condensation of photons towards the vacuum ultraviolet spectral regime, with gases at high-pressure conditions serving as a thermalization medium for the photon gas. We have recorded absorption spectra of xenon gas at up to 30 bar gas pressure of the 5p^6-5p^56s transition with a wavelength close to 147 nm. Moreover, spectra of ethylene noble gas mixtures between 158 and 180 nm wavelength are reported.

  3. Photosensitive dopants for liquid noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1988-01-01

    In an ionization type detector for high energy radiation wherein the energy of incident radiation is absorbed through the ionization of a liquid noble gas and resulting free charge is collected to form a signal indicative of the energy of the incident radiation, an improvement comprising doping the liquid noble gas with photosensitive molecules to convert scintillation light due to recombination of ions, to additional free charge.

  4. Ageing studies of TPB in noble gas detectors for dark matter and neutrinoless ββ decay searches.

    PubMed

    Yahlali, N; Garcia, J M; Díaz, J; Soriano, A; Fernandes, L M P

    2017-02-05

    Noble gases (Xe, Ar, Kr) are very attractive as detector media in Dark Matter search and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. However, the detection of their scintillation light (in the VUV spectral region) requires shifting the VUV light to visible light, where standard photosensors are more efficient. Tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) is widely used as wavelength shifter, absorbing the VUV light and re-emitting in the blue region (~430nm). TPB is an organic molecule that may degrade due to exposure to environmental agents and also to ultraviolet light. In this work, we present TPB ageing studies due to exposure to VUV light, aiming at quantifying the reduction of the absolute fluorescence yield of TPB coatings of several thicknesses (130nm, 260nm, 390nm, 1600nm), exposed to various doses of VUV light at 170nm (similar to the Xe scintillation). In our setup, the VUV light is produced from a vacuum monochromator coupled to a deuterium lamp. The VUV exposure in our setup is compared to the exposure obtained in the electroluminescent gaseous Xe TPC of the NEXT-100 experiment for neutrinoless double-beta decay search.

  5. Ageing studies of TPB in noble gas detectors for dark matter and neutrinoless ββ decay searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahlali, N.; Garcia, J. M.; Díaz, J.; Soriano, A.; Fernandes, L. M. P.

    2017-02-01

    Noble gases (Xe, Ar, Kr) are very attractive as detector media in Dark Matter search and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. However, the detection of their scintillation light (in the VUV spectral region) requires shifting the VUV light to visible light, where standard photosensors are more efficient. Tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) is widely used as wavelength shifter, absorbing the VUV light and re-emitting in the blue region ( 430 nm). TPB is an organic molecule that may degrade due to exposure to environmental agents and also to ultraviolet light. In this work, we present TPB ageing studies due to exposure to VUV light, aiming at quantifying the reduction of the absolute fluorescence yield of TPB coatings of several thicknesses (130 nm, 260 nm, 390 nm, 1600 nm), exposed to various doses of VUV light at 170 nm (similar to the Xe scintillation). In our setup, the VUV light is produced from a vacuum monochromator coupled to a deuterium lamp. The VUV exposure in our setup is compared to the exposure obtained in the electroluminescent gaseous Xe TPC of the NEXT-100 experiment for neutrinoless double-beta decay search.

  6. 77 FR 38790 - Noble Americas Gas & Power Corp., LNG Development Company, LLC, LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Americas Gas & Power Corp., LNG Development Company, LLC, LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b/a Oregon LNG... Corp. authority to import/ export natural gas from/ to Canada/Mexico, and to import LNG from various international sources by vessel. 3099 05/31/12 12-43-NG LNG Development Order granting blanket Company,...

  7. Laser polarization fluorescence of the networks of optically anisotropic biological crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, Y. A.; Dubolazov, A. V.; Angelsky, A. P.; Sidor, M. I.; Bodnar, G. B.; Koval, G.; Zabolotna, N. I.; Smolarz, A.; Junisbekov, M. Sh.

    2013-01-01

    The present work is devoted to investigation of mechanisms of optical anisotropy of biological tissues polycrystalline networks and laser polarization fluorescence. The model of complex optical anisotropy, which takes into account both linear and circular birefringence, as well as linear and circular dichroism of fibrillar networks of histological sections of women reproductive sphere is proposed. The data of statistical, correlation and fractal processing of coordinate distributions of laser polarization fluorescence is provided. The technique of azimuthally invariant Mueller-matrix mapping of laser polarization fluorescence of protein networks in the tasks of differentiation of benign and malignant tumors of uterus wall is elaborated.

  8. Basin scale natural gas source, migration and trapping traced by noble gases and major elements: the Pakistan Indus basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battani, Anne; Sarda, Philippe; Prinzhofer, Alain

    2000-08-01

    He, Ne and Ar concentrations, He and Ar isotopic ratios, carbon isotopic ratios and chemical compositions of hydrocarbon gases were measured in natural gas samples from gas-producing wells in the Indus basin, Pakistan, where no oil has ever been found. 3He/ 4He ratios are in the range 0.01-0.06 Ra (Ra is the atmospheric value of 1.38×10 -6) indicating the absence of mantle-derived helium despite the Trias extension. 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios range from 296 to 800, consistent with variable additions of radiogenic argon to atmospheric, groundwater-derived argon. Rare gas concentrations show large variations, from 6×10 -5 to 1×10 -3 mol/mol for 4He and from 3×10 -7 to 3×10 -5 mol/mol for 36Ar. In general, 36Ar concentrations are high compared to literature data for natural gas. CO 2 and N 2 concentrations are variable, ranging up to 70 and 20%, respectively. Mantle-derived He is not observed, therefore CO 2 and N 2 are not mantle-derived either. Hydrocarbon gas maturity is high, but accumulation efficiency is small, suggesting that early-produced hydrocarbons, including oil, were lost as well as mantle helium. This is consistent with the generally late, Pliocene, trap formation, and explains the high N 2 concentrations, since N 2 is the final species generated at the end of organic matter maturation. Based on δ 13C data, CO 2 originates from carbonate decomposition. Very elevated 20Ne/ 36Ar ratios are found, reaching a maximum of 1.3 (compared to 0.1-0.2 for air-saturated water and 0.5 for air), and these high values are related to the lowest rare gas concentrations. We suggest that this highly fractionated signature is the trace of the past presence of oil in the basin and appeared in groundwater. We propose a model where oil-water contact is followed by gas-water contact, both with Rayleigh distillation for rare gas abundance ratios, thereby generating the fractionated 20Ne/ 36Ar signature in groundwater first and transferring it to gas later. Assuming the gas

  9. Transport of methane and noble gases during gas push-pull tests in variably saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Katherine; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Schroth, Martin H; Zeyer, Josef

    2008-04-01

    The gas push-pull test (GPPT) is a single-well gas-tracer method to quantify in situ rates of CH4 oxidation in soils. To improve the design and interpretation of GPPT field experiments, gas component transport during GPPTs was examined in abiotic porous media over a range of water saturations (0.0 < or = Sw < or = 0.61). A series of GPPTs using He, Ne, and Ar as tracers for CH4 were performed at two injection/extraction gas flow rates (approximately 200 and approximately 700 mL min(-1)) in a laboratory tank. Extraction phase breakthrough curves and mass recovery curves of the gaseous components became more similar at higher Sw as water in the pore space restricted diffusive gas-phase transport. Diffusional fractionation of the stable carbon isotopes of CH4 during the extraction period of GPPTs also decreased with increasing Sw (particularly when Sw > 0.42). Gas-component transport during GPPTs was numerically simulated using estimated hydraulic parameters for the porous media and no fitting of data for the GPPTs. Numerical simulations accurately predicted the relative decline of the gaseous components in the breakthrough curves, but slightly overestimated recoveries at low Sw (< or = 0.35) and underestimated recoveries at high Sw (> or = 0.49). Comparison of numerical simulations considering and not considering air-water partitioning indicated that removal of gaseous components through dissolution in pore water was not significant during GPPTs, even at Sw = 0.61. These data indicate that Ar is a good tracer for CH4 physical transport over the full range of Sw studied, whereas, at Sw > 0.61, any of the tracers could be used. Greater mass recovery at higher Sw raises the possibility to reduce gas flow rates, thereby extending GPPT times in environments such as tundra soils where low activity due to low temperatures may require longer test times to establish a quantifiable difference between reactant and tracer breakthrough curves.

  10. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wade C; Lewis, Charlotte R; Openshaw, Anna P; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  12. Band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids using accurate Kohn-Sham potentials with self-interaction correction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Krieger, J.B. ); Norman, M.R. ); Iafrate, G.J. )

    1991-11-15

    The optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method and a method developed recently by Krieger, Li, and Iafrate (KLI) are applied to the band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids employing the self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The resulting band gaps from both calculations are found to be in fair agreement with the experimental values. The discrepancies are typically within a few percent with results that are nearly the same as those of previously published orbital-dependent multipotential SIC calculations, whereas the LSD results underestimate the band gaps by as much as 40%. As in the LSD---and it is believed to be the case even for the exact Kohn-Sham potential---both the OEP and KLI predict valence-band widths which are narrower than those of experiment. In all cases, the KLI method yields essentially the same results as the OEP.

  13. A coupled-cluster study on the noble gas binding ability of metal cyanides versus metal halides (metal = Cu, Ag, Au).

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Gupta, Ashutosh; Saha, Ranajit; Merino, Gabriel; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2015-11-05

    A coupled-cluster study is carried out to investigate the efficacy of metal(I) cyanide (MCN; M = Cu, Ag, Au) compounds to bind with noble gas (Ng) atoms. The M-Ng bond dissociation energy, enthalpy change, and Gibbs free energy change for the dissociation processes producing Ng and MCN are computed to assess the stability of NgMCN compounds. The Ng binding ability of MCN is then compared with the experimentally detected NgMX (X = F, Cl, Br) compounds. While CuCN and AgCN have larger Ng binding ability than those of MCl and MBr (M = Cu, Ag), AuCN shows larger efficacy toward bond formation with Ng than that of AuBr. Natural bond orbital analysis, energy decomposition analysis in conjunction with the natural orbital for chemical valence theory, and the topological analysis of the electron density are performed to understand the nature of interaction occurring in between Ng and MCN. The Ng-M bonds in NgMCN are found comprise an almost equal contribution from covalent and electrostatic types of interactions. The different electron density descriptors also reveal the partial covalent character in the concerned bonds.

  14. Noble Gas (Argon and Xenon)-Saturated Cold Storage Solutions Reduce Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Rat Model of Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Y.; Pype, J.L.; Martin, A.R.; Chong, C.F.; Daniel, L.; Gaudart, J.; Ibrahim, Z.; Magalon, G.; Lemaire, M.; Hardwigsen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Following kidney transplantation, ischemia-reperfusion injury contributes to adverse outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a cold-storage solution saturated with noble gas (xenon or argon) could limit ischemia-reperfusion injury following cold ischemia. Methods Sixty Wistar rats were randomly allocated to 4 experimental groups. Kidneys were harvested and then stored for 6 h before transplantation in cold-storage solution (Celsior®) saturated with either air, nitrogen, xenon or argon. A syngenic orthotopic transplantation was performed. Renal function was determined on days 7 and 14 after transplantation. Transplanted kidneys were removed on day 14 for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results Creatinine clearance was significantly higher and urinary albumin significantly lower in the argon and xenon groups than in the other groups at days 7 and 14. These effects were considerably more pronounced for argon than for xenon. In addition, kidneys stored with argon, and to a lesser extent those stored with xenon, displayed preserved renal architecture as well as higher CD-10 and little active caspase-3 expression compared to other groups. Conclusion Argon- or xenon-satured cold-storage solution preserved renal architecture and function following transplantation by reducing ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:22470401

  15. Evidence for prolonged El Nino-like conditions in the Pacific during the Late Pleistocene: a 43 ka noble gas record from California groundwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, J.T.; Hilton, David R.; Izbicki, J.A.; Belitz, K.

    2009-01-01

    Information on the ocean/atmosphere state over the period spanning the Last Glacial Maximum - from the Late Pleistocene to the Holocene - provides crucial constraints on the relationship between orbital forcing and global climate change. The Pacific Ocean is particularly important in this respect because of its dominant role in exporting heat and moisture from the tropics to higher latitudes. Through targeting groundwaters in the Mojave Desert, California, we show that noble gas derived temperatures in California averaged 4.2 ?? 1.1 ??C cooler in the Late Pleistocene (from ???43 to ???12 ka) compared to the Holocene (from ???10 to ???5 ka). Furthermore, the older groundwaters contain higher concentrations of excess air (entrained air bubbles) and have elevated oxygen-18/oxygen-16 ratios (??18O) - indicators of vigorous aquifer recharge, and greater rainfall amounts and/or more intense precipitation events, respectively. Together, these paleoclimate indicators reveal that cooler and wetter conditions prevailed in the Mojave Desert from ???43 to ???12 ka. We suggest that during the Late Pleistocene, the Pacific ocean/atmosphere state was similar to present-day El Nino-like patterns, and was characterized by prolonged periods of weak trade winds, weak upwelling along the eastern Pacific margin, and increased precipitation in the southwestern U.S.

  16. Effect of hydration on the organo-noble gas molecule HKrCCH: role of krypton in the stabilization of hydrated HKrCCH complexes.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Biswajit; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2015-11-11

    The effect of hydration on the fluorine free organo-noble gas compound HKrCCH and the role of krypton in the stabilization of the hydrated HKrCCH complexes have been investigated using the quantum chemical calculations on the HKrCCH-(H2O)n=1-6 clusters. Structure and energetics calculations show that water stabilizes HKrCCH through the π hydrogen bond in which the OH group of water interacts with the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C group of HKrCCH. A maximum of four water molecules can directly interact with the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C of HKrCCH and after that only inter-hydrogen bonding takes place between the water molecules indicating that the primary hydration shell contains four water molecules. Atom in molecule analysis depicts that π hydrogen bonded complexes of the hydrated HKrCCH are cyclic structures in which the OKr interaction cooperates in the formation of strong O-HC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C interaction. Structure, energetics and charge analysis clearly established that krypton plays an important role in the stabilization as well as the formation of the primary hydration shell of hydrated HKrCCH complexes.

  17. Solute transport in formations of very low permeability: profiles of stable isotope and dissolved noble gas contents of pore water in the Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rübel, André P.; Sonntag, Christian; Lippmann, Johanna; Pearson, F. J.; Gautschi, Andreas

    2002-04-01

    Pore water profiles of water, stable isotope, and dissolved noble gas content have been determined across the Opalinus Clay and adjacent formations at the rock laboratory at Mont Terri. We have found enhanced helium contents (up to [ 4He] = 1 × 10 -4 cubic centimeters at standard pressure and temperature per gram of pore water) and argon isotope ratios ( 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios up to 334) due to accumulation of 4He and 40Ar produced in situ. The helium profile was found to be in steady state with respect to in situ production and diffusive loss into the adjacent limestones where groundwater circulates. From this profile a representative mean value of the apparent diffusion coefficient for helium in the pore water of the whole formation was derived for the first time to be D a = 3.5 × 10 -11 m 2 · s -1, which is more than two orders of magnitude lower than the diffusion coefficient D 0 in free water. The stable isotope profile, however, indicates a component of fossil marine pore water, which has not yet been replaced by molecular diffusion of meteoric water from the adjacent limestone and shale formations over the past 10 million years.

  18. Noble metal alloy clusters in the gas phase derived from protein templates: unusual recognition of palladium by gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T.

    2013-11-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster formation occurs from protein adducts where Au is in the 1+ state while Pd is in the 2+ state. The creation of alloys in the gas phase is not affected whether a physical mixture of Au and Pd adducts or a Au and Pd co-adduct is used as the precursor. The formation of Au cores and AuPd alloy cores of the kind comparable to monolayer protected clusters implies that naked clusters themselves may be nucleated in solution.Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster

  19. Laser polarization and phase control of up-conversion fluorescence in rare-earth ions

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yunhua; Zhang, Shian; Zhang, Hui; Ding, Jingxin; Jia, Tianqing; Qiu, Jianrong; Sun, Zhenrong

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the up-conversion fluorescence control via resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions by varying both the laser polarization and phase. We show that both the laser polarization and phase can control the up-conversion fluorescence, and the up-conversion fluorescence intensity is decreased when the laser polarization changes from linear through elliptical to circular. We also show that the laser polarization will affect the control efficiency of the up-conversion fluorescence by varying the laser phase, and the circular polarization will reduce the control efficiency. Furthermore, we suggest that the control efficiency by varying the laser polarization and the effect of the laser polarization on the control efficiency by varying the laser phase can be artificially manipulated by controlling the laser spectral bandwidth. This optical control method opens a new opportunity to control the up-conversion fluorescence of rare-earth ions, which may have significant impact on the related applications of rare-earth ions. PMID:25465401

  20. The physical nature of the phenomenon of positive column plasma constriction in low-pressure noble gas direct current discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kurbatov, P. F.

    2014-02-15

    The essence of the positive-column plasma constriction for static (the diffusion mode) and dynamic ionization equilibrium (the stratificated and constricted modes) is analyzed. Two physical parameters, namely, the effective ionization rate of gas atoms and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient of electrons and ions, determine the transverse distribution of discharge species and affect the current states of plasma. Transverse constriction of the positive column takes place as the gas ionization level (discharge current) and pressure increase. The stratified mode (including the constricted one) is observed between the two adjacent types of self-sustained discharge phases when they coexist together at the same time or in the same place as a coherent binary mixture. In the case, a occurrence of the discharge phase with more high electron density presently involve a great decrease in the cross-section of the current channel for d.c. discharges. Additional physical factors, such as cataphoresis and electrophoresis phenomena and spatial gas density inhomogeneity correlated with a circulatory flow in d.c. discharges, are mainly responsible for the current hysteresis and partially constricted discharge.

  1. Fast Plasma Shutdowns Obtained With Massive Hydrogenic, Noble and Mixed-Gas Injection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Wesley, J; Hollmann, E; Jernigan, T; Van Zeeland, M; Baylor, L; Boedo, J; Combs, S; Evans, T; Groth, M; Humphreys, D; Hyatt, A; Izzo, V; James, A; Moyer, R; Parks, P; Rudakov, D; Strait, E; Wu, W; Yu, J

    2008-10-14

    Massive gas injection (MGI) experiments with H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, He, Ne and Ar and 'mixed' (H{sub 2} + Ar and D{sub 2} + Ne) gases injected into 'ITER-similar' 1.3-MA H-mode plasmas are described. Gas species, injected quantity Q, delivery time, t{sub inj}, rate-of-rise and intrinsic and added impurities are found to affect the attributes and 'disruption mitigation' efficacies of the resulting fast plasma shutdowns. With sufficient Q and t{sub inj} < {approx}2 ms, all species provide fast (within {le} {approx}3 ms), more-or-less uniform radiative dissipation of the 0.7-MJ plasma thermal energy and fast but benign current decays with reduced vacuum vessel vertical force impulse. With pure and mixed low-Z gases, free-electron densities up to 2 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} are obtained. While these densities are high relative to normal tokamak densities, they are still an order of magnitude smaller than the densities required for unconditional mitigation of the runaway electron avalanche process. Key information relevant to the design of effective MGI systems for larger tokamaks and ITER has been obtained and the collective species and Q-variation data provides a rich basis for validation of emerging 2D + t MHD/transport/radiation models.

  2. Production of Mg and Al Auger electrons by noble gas ion bombardment of Mg and Al surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Pepper, S. V.

    1976-01-01

    Relative production efficiencies of Mg and Al Auger electrons by He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe ion bombardment are reported as a function of ion energy for energies not exceeding 3 keV. The experimental apparatus employed consisted of a LEED-Auger system equipped with an ion gun and a four-grid retarding-potential analyzer. It is found that: (1) the shape of the ion-excited Auger signal was independent of the rare gas and quite symmetric; (2) the Al signal was about an order of magnitude smaller than the Mg signal for a given bombarding species and ion-gun voltage; (3) no signal was observed for He(+) bombardment under any of the experimental conditions; (4) signal strengths were independent of temperature and ion dose; (5) the Auger production efficiencies differed by no more than a factor of two among the different gases - except for He(+) - on a given metal; (6) all the signal strengths increased with increasing ion-gun voltage, with no maximum exhibited; and (7) the apparent threshold energy for the Al signal was higher than that for the Mg signal. The differences between the results for the two metals are attributed to the fact that the Al 2p orbital lies deeper in energy and closer to the nucleus than the corresponding Mg orbital.

  3. Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Markun, Francis; Zawadzki, Mary T.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir.

  4. Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Markun, F.; Zawadzki, M.T.

    1998-04-28

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir. 6 figs.

  5. The Noble Gases in A-Level Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchant, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests two methods of developing the study of the noble gases: first, the discovery of the elements and recent discovery of xenon show the human face of chemistry (historical development); second, the properties of noble gas compounds (particularly xenon) can be used to test the framework of conventional chemistry. (Author/JM)

  6. Noble gas isotopic ratios from historical lavas and fumaroles at Mount Vesuvius (southern Italy): constraints for current and future volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedesco, Dario; Nagao, Keisuke; Scarsi, Paolo

    1998-12-01

    Helium, neon and argon isotope ratios have been analysed from phenocrysts of eleven lava samples belonging to the last eruptive cycle of Mount Vesuvius (1631 until 1944). The phenocrysts separates include pyroxene ( N=10) and olivine ( N=1). All phenocryst samples show similarly low gas contents (He, Ne and Ar ˜10 -10 cm 3/g). 3He/ 4He ratios, 5.3-2.11 Ra, are generally low if compared to those typical of the MORB and those of the European Subcontinental Mantle (ESCM), respectively R/ Ra 8.5±1 and 6.0-6.5. A decreasing trend is found from 1631 to 1796, while a more homogeneous set of data is obtained for more recent eruptions, as evidenced by an average R/ Ra value of 2.85. Neon ratios ( 21Ne/ 22Ne and 20Ne/ 22Ne) strongly differ from those typically found on volcanoes and suggest that a crustal component has been added in the source region to Mt. Vesuvius magmas. Argon ratios ( 40Ar/ 36Ar and 38Ar/ 36Ar) have values similar to the atmosphere and are well correlated. The low 40Ar/ 36Ar ratio (max. 302) is, however, in the range of the 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios obtained from several lava samples at other Italian volcanoes and might be considered to have a deep origin. Two hypothesis have been discussed: (1) a deep argon-like-air source, due to subduction of air-rich sediments and/or (2) a preferential loss of Ar, in comparison to lighter noble gases, from silicic melts. Helium isotopic analysis of gas samples recently collected from crater and submarine fumaroles are similar to those of lavas belonging to the final part of this eruptive cycle. This result supports the idea that no new juvenile fluids from the source region have been injected into the magmatic reservoir during the 1631-1944 eruptive cycle and, more importantly, until 1993. Both sets of data help to understand the genesis of these fluids and to constrain the current activity of the volcano.

  7. Selective Growth of Noble Gases at Metal/Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Oka, Hiroshi; Ohnuki, Somei

    2016-02-17

    The locations and roles of noble gases at an oxide/metal interface in oxide dispersed metal are theoretically and experimentally investigated. Oxide dispersed metal consisting of FCC Fe and Y2Hf2O7 (Y2Ti2O7) is synthesized by mechanical alloying under a saturated Ar gas environment. Transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory observes the strain field at the interface of FCC Fe {111} and Y2Hf2O7 {111} whose physical origin emerges from surface reconstruction due to charge transfer. Noble gases are experimentally observed at the oxide (Y2Ti2O7) site and calculations reveal that the noble gases segregate the interface and grow toward the oxide site. In general, the interface is defined as the trapping site for noble gases; however, transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory found evidence which shows that noble gases grow toward the oxide, contrary to the generally held idea that the interface is the final trapping site for noble gases. Furthermore, calculations show that the inclusion of He/Ar hardens the oxide, suggesting that material fractures could begin from the noble gas bubble within the oxides. Thus, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that noble gases grow from the interface toward the oxide and that oxides behave as a trapping site for noble gases.

  8. Growth of β-FeSi2 films via noble-gas ion-beam mixing of Fe/Si bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, M.; Dhar, S.; Schaaf, P.; Bibić, N.; Huang, Y.-L.; Seibt, M.; Lieb, K. P.

    2001-11-01

    A detailed study of the formation of β-FeSi2 films by ion-beam mixing of Fe/Si bilayers with noble gas ions is presented. Fe films of 35-50 nm deposited on Si (100) were irradiated with 80-700 keV Ar, Kr, or Xe ions in a wide temperature interval, from room temperature to 600 °C. The structures were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, cross-section high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Already after Xe irradiation at 300 °C the whole Fe layer is transformed to a mixture of Fe3Si, ɛ-FeSi, and β-FeSi2 phases. At 400-450 °C, a unique, layer by layer growth of β-FeSi2 starting from the surface was found. A full transformation of 35 nm Fe on Si to a 105 nm β-FeSi2 layer was achieved by irradiation with 205 keV Xe to 2×1016 ions/cm2, at a temperature of 600 °C. The fully ion-beam grown layers exhibit a pronounced surface roughness, but a sharp interface to Si. This structure is assigned to a growth of β-FeSi2 grains in a local surrounding of interdiffused silicon. Rapid diffusion of silicon to the surface was observed during all ion irradiations. Single-phase β-FeSi2 layers were also synthesized by vacuum annealing for 2 h at 600 °C of 35 nm Fe/Si bilayers premixed with Xe at 450 °C. In this case, the layers form with a smoother surface topography. It is concluded that ion-beam mixing can be used successfully for growth of β-FeSi2 layers at moderate temperatures, either directly or combined with postirradiation annealing.

  9. Noble-Gas Atomic Interferometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-19

    Awards W. E. Lamb Medal for Laser Science and Quantum Optics (2008). Lewiner Distinguished Lecturer, Technion, Israel (2009). Graduate Students...effort to explain Maxwell’s demon in terms of information entropy . Single-photon cooling was demonstrated experimentally on magnetically trapped

  10. Periodic input of primitive magmas in a complex plumbing system revealed by noble gas geochemistry: the case of Mt Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paonita, Antonio; Caracausi, Antonio; Martelli, Mauro; Rizzo, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    A long-term series of noble gas compositions (He and Ar isotope abundances plus elemental Ne) coming from geochemical monitoring of five peripheral gas emissions at the base of Mt Etna, integrated by some fumaroles located in the rim of the summit crater, have allowed to put constraints on the magmatic system feeding the volcano. The peripheral gas emissions seem to be released by magmatic degassing occurring at depths of 200-400 MPa, while the crater fumaroles receive contributes coming from magmas residing at shallower levels (up to 130 MPa), which mix to the fluids from the deep levels. These estimations are in good agreement with the depth of the two main magma ponding zones (i.e., 5-12 km and 2-3 km b.s.l.) inferred by petrological and geophysical studies. The long-term monitoring of 3He/4He ratios from both peripheral and crater gases has allowed us to recognize phases of increase of the isotope ratios, occurred at all the sampled emissions some months before the onset of eruptive activities. This behaviour has been systematic for all the main eruptive phases occurred at Mt Etna since 2001 (i.e., 2001, 2002-2003, 2006, 2008-2009, 2011-2012, 2013, and 2014, except for the 2004-2005 eruption), making this parameter a very powerful tool in evaluating the activity level of the volcano and in eruption forecast. A detailed investigation of the 3He/4He time series displays that there is no defined time gap between the isotope ratio increase and the onset of the eruptive activity, this interval ranging from one to several months. After examination of shape and duration of the isotope increases versus main features of the eruptive events (e.g. duration, amount of erupted material, eruption rate), no systematic relationships emerge. It seems only that the rate of 3He/4He increase was anomalously high (by almost 10 times) during the only two eccentric eruptions since 2001 (i.e., 2001 and 2002-2003). The differences among He isotopic composition between the peripheral

  11. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  12. Consent Decree for Noble Energy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Noble Energy, Inc. (Noble) that comprehensively identifies and addresses issues with vapor control systems at Noble’s condensate storage tank batteries in the Denver-area 8-hour ozone marginal nonattainment area (nonattainment area).

  13. Laser polarization fluorescence of optically anisotropic crystals molecular imaging in the differentiation of biological benign and malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, Yu. A.; Dubolazov, A. V.; Karachevtsev, A. O.; Motrich, A. V.; Sidor, M. I.

    2013-09-01

    The model of laser polarization fluorescence of biological tissues considering the mechanisms of optically anisotropic absorption - linear and circular dichroism of protein networks was suggested.Muellermatrix rotation invariants characterizing polarization manifestations of laser fluorescence are determined.The interconnections between the statistical, correlation and fractal parameters characterizing the Mueller-matrix images of laser polarization fluorescence and the peculiarities of the mechanisms of optically anisotropic absorption of histological sections of uterus wall biopsy were found. Effectiveness of the method of azimuthinvariant Mueller-matrix mapping of laser polarization fluorescence of protein networks in the task of differentiation of benign and malignant tumors of uterus wall was demonstrated.

  14. Preserving noble gases in a convecting mantle.

    PubMed

    Gonnermann, Helge M; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    2009-05-28

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios sampled at many ocean islands are usually attributed to an essentially undegassed lower-mantle reservoir with high (3)He concentrations. A large and mostly undegassed mantle reservoir is also required to balance the Earth's (40)Ar budget, because only half of the (40)Ar produced from the radioactive decay of (40)K is accounted for by the atmosphere and upper mantle. However, geophysical and geochemical observations suggest slab subduction into the lower mantle, implying that most or all of Earth's mantle should have been processed by partial melting beneath mid-ocean ridges and hotspot volcanoes. This should have left noble gases in both the upper and the lower mantle extensively outgassed, contrary to expectations from (3)He/(4)He ratios and the Earth's (40)Ar budget. Here we suggest a simple solution: recycling and mixing of noble-gas-depleted slabs dilutes the concentrations of noble gases in the mantle, thereby decreasing the rate of mantle degassing and leaving significant amounts of noble gases in the processed mantle. As a result, even when the mass flux across the 660-km seismic discontinuity is equivalent to approximately one lower-mantle mass over the Earth's history, high (3)He contents, high (3)He/(4)He ratios and (40)Ar concentrations high enough to satisfy the (40)Ar mass balance of the Earth can be preserved in the lower mantle. The differences in (3)He/(4)He ratios between mid-ocean-ridge basalts and ocean island basalts, as well as high concentrations of (3)He and (40)Ar in the mantle source of ocean island basalts, can be explained within the framework of different processing rates for the upper and the lower mantle. Hence, to preserve primitive noble gas signatures, we find no need for hidden reservoirs or convective isolation of the lower mantle for any length of time.

  15. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wei-Rong Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Ai, Bao-Quan

    2014-02-24

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments using molecular dynamics simulations. It is reported that the thermal conductivity of perfect graphene nanoribbons decreases with the gaseous pressure. The decreasing is more obvious for the noble gas with large atomic number. However, the gaseous pressure cannot change the thermal conductivity of defective graphene nanoribbons apparently. The phonon spectra of graphene nanoribbons are also provided to give corresponding supports.

  16. Where do noble gases hide in space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.

    Observations showing anomalous amounts of noble gas, especially in planetary atmospheres, are at the origin of a series of controversial interpretations from 1990 to nowadays (Hersant et al. (2004)). If, in a first step, we adopt a chemical point of view, we have to consider the possibility of associations of such elements (though usually considered as non reactive), with other molecules or atoms. Such complexes could trap the noble gases in some astrophysical objects at one time of their evolution, for example, in the early step of formation of protoplanetary disks. But two questions have to be answered to assert this type of hypothesis: which stable compounds could exist taking into account the environnement and which reactions could lead to such compounds? Hydrogen being by far the most abundant element in space, and neutral systems whose cohesion is driven by weak Van der Waals forces being unable to resist turbulence in space, the first and simplest association to consider is the one between the noble gas and the H3+ ion. Thus, DFT in the B3LYP, PW91 and BHandHLYP formalisms together with ab-initio methods of Coupled Cluster type have been employed to determine the equilibrium geometries, the spectroscopic constants and the bonding energies of the possible complexes between noble gases and hydrogen. We have first performed an extensive study of the associations ArnH3+ possible with Argon (the first noble gas which rose questions in the area of Jupiter's poles). We have found that several Argon atoms can be stabilized around the H3+ ion, the first complexation being in the plane of the ion. The spectroscopic data (rotational constants, dipole moments and IR signatures) were calculated (Pauzat & Ellinger (2005)) so that the laboratory experiments and spatial observations of these species could then be carried out. From our results and previous observations on this complex (Bogey et al. (1987)) we can say that the ArH3+ ion is certainly a good candidate for

  17. Widespread distribution of ascending fluids transporting mantle helium in the fore-arc region and their upwelling processes: Noble gas and major element composition of deep groundwater in the Kii Peninsula, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Noritoshi; Kazahaya, Kohei; Takahashi, Masaaki; Inamura, Akihiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi A.; Yasuhara, Masaya; Ohwada, Michiko; Sato, Tsutomu; Nakama, Atsuko; Handa, Hiroko; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    Chemical and isotopic studies including analyses of noble gases were comprehensively conducted on the groundwater of the entire Kii Peninsula, which is located in the fore-arc region of southwest Japan. Groundwater of Na-Cl-HCO3, Na-HCO3-Cl, and Na-Cl types was shown to be distributed across the whole area. Groundwater in the inland central part of the peninsula shows relatively low salinity, whereas groundwater from the area along the ENE-trending Median Tectonic Line (MTL), on the north side of the peninsula, shows high salinity (up to 18,800 mg/L of Cl-) and the presence of unusual heavy oxygen isotopes. This trend is similar to that documented in saline waters from the Arima region (the so-called "Arima-type thermal water"). High 3He/4He ratios relative to the atmospheric value (up to 6.7 Ra) were recorded throughout the Kii Peninsula, covering a wider area than documented previously. The saline groundwater is also strongly depleted in 20Ne and heavy noble gases. From the wide distribution of high 3He/4He values and the associated 20Ne and Cl- concentrations, we infer that aqueous fluids derived from dehydration of the subducting slab are present at depth beneath almost the entire Kii Peninsula. These aqueous fluids may ascend along the major north-dipping boundary faults. The isotopic composition of groundwater from the southern part of the peninsula suggests that the contribution from these dehydration-derived fluids is relatively small in this region. However, volatile components (e.g., noble gases and CO2) in the groundwater of this area may originate from the dehydration-derived fluids. Upwelling of Arima-type thermal water of the Na-Cl-HCO3 type is expected to undergo a phase separation of volatile species due to decompression as the fluid ascends. The variety of water types documented may be due to this water-gas separation and the subsequent incorporation of gaseous species into shallow meteoric groundwater. The observed high 3He/4He ratios in the

  18. Modeling of the laser polarization as control parameter in self-organized surface pattern.

    PubMed

    Varlamova, Olga; Reif, Juergen; Varlamov, Sergey; Bestehorn, Michael

    2011-10-01

    To shed light on nanopattern formation upon femtosecond laser ablation, an adopted surface erosion model is developed, based on the description for ion beam sputtering. In particular, the dependence of generated patterns on the laser polarization is taken into account. We find that an asymmetry in deposition and dissipation of incident laser energy results in a respective dependence of coefficients in a nonlinear equation of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky type. Surface morphologies obtained by this model for different polarization of the laser beam are presented and the time evolution of the nanopattern is discussed. A comparison of these numerical results with experimental data shows an excellent agreement. Dependence of femtosecond laser induced formation on the polarization of the incident beam within an adopted surface erosion model is considered. A continuum theory of erosion by polarized laser radiation is developed. We exploit the similarity to ion-beam sputtering and extend a corresponding model for laser ablation by including laser polarization. This yields a respective dependence of coefficients in a nonlinear equation of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky type. We present the surface morphologies obtained by this model for different polarization of the laser beam and discuss a time evolution of the nanopattern. These numerical results are in a good agreement with numerous experimental data. We show that the correlation of ripples orientation with laser polarization can be described within a model where the polarization causes the breaking of symmetry at the surface. Our results support the non-linear self-organization mechanism of pattern formation on the surface of solids.

  19. A lattice Boltzmann model for noble gas diffusion in solids: The importance of domain shape and diffusive anisotropy and implications for thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Christian; Cassata, William S.; Renne, Paul R.

    2011-04-01

    Thermochronometry based on radiogenic noble gases is critically dependent upon accurate knowledge of the kinetics of diffusion. With few exceptions, complex natural crystals are represented by ideal geometries such as infinite sheets, infinite cylinders, or spheres, and diffusivity is assumed to be isotropic. However, the physical boundaries of crystals generally do not conform to ideal geometries and diffusion within some crystals is known to be anisotropic. Our failure to incorporate such complexities into diffusive models leads to inaccuracies in both thermal histories and diffusion parameters calculated from fractional release data. To address these shortcomings we developed a code based on the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method to model diffusion from complex 3D geometries having isotropic, temperature-independent anisotropic, and temperature-dependent anisotropic diffusivity. In this paper we outline the theoretical basis for the LB code and highlight several advantages of this model relative to more traditional finite difference approaches. The LB code, along with existing analytical solutions for diffusion from simple geometries, is used to investigate the affect of intrinsic crystallographic features (e.g., crystal topology and diffusion anisotropy) on calculated diffusion parameters and a novel method for approximating thermal histories from crystals with complex topologies and diffusive anisotropy is presented.

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring purity of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, Robert

    2008-04-01

    A device for detecting impurities in a noble gas includes a detection chamber and a source of pulsed ultraviolet light. The pulse of the ultraviolet light is transferred into the detection chamber and onto a photocathode, thereby emitting a cloud of free electrons into the noble gas within the detection chamber. The cloud of electrons is attracted to the opposite end of the detection chamber by a high positive voltage potential at that end and focused onto a sensing anode. If there are impurities in the noble gas, some or all of the electrons within the cloud will bond with the impurity molecules and not reach the sensing anode. Therefore, measuring a lower signal at the sensing anode indicates a higher level of impurities while sensing a higher signal indicates fewer impurities. Impurities in the range of one part per billion can be measured by this device.

  1. Similarities and differences between the solar wind light noble gas compositions determined on Apollo 15 SWC foils and on NASA Genesis targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Bochsler, P.; Bühler, F.; Heber, V. S.; Grimberg, A.; Baur, H.; Horstmann, M.; Bischoff, A.; Wieler, R.

    2015-10-01

    We compare the solar wind (SW) He, Ne, and Ar compositions collected during the Apollo Solar Wind Composition (SWC) experiments (1969-1972; Al- & Pt-foils) and the Genesis mission (2002-2004; so-called DOS targets considered here). While published SW 20Ne/22Ne and 36Ar/38Ar ratios of both data sets agree, differences exist in the 4He/3He, 4He/20Ne, and 20Ne/36Ar ratios. However, 20Ne/36Ar ratios from Apollo-16 Pt-foils, exclusively adopted as SW values by the SWC team, are consistent with the Genesis results. We investigate if the differences indicate a variability of the SW over the course of about 30 yr, or systematic biases of the two data sets, which were collected in different environments and measured several decades apart in different laboratories (University of Bern; ETH Zurich). New measurements of Apollo-15 SWC aluminum foils in Zurich generally agree with the original measurements performed in Bern. Zurich samples show slightly lower 4He concentrations suggesting a few percent of diffusive loss of 4He during storage of the foils. A 3% difference between the He isotopic ratios measured in Bern and in Zurich possibly represents an analytical bias between the laboratories. The low SW 4He/20Ne and 20Ne/36Ar ratios in Apollo-15 Al-foils compared to Genesis data are consistent with a mixture of Genesis-like SW and noble gases from small amounts of lunar dust. Our data suggest that the mean SW He, Ne, and Ar isotopic and elemental compositions have not significantly changed between the overall Apollo and Genesis mission collection periods.

  2. Using integrated noble gas and hydrocarbon geochemistry to constrain the source of hydrocarbon gases in shallow aquifers in the northern Appalachian Basin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Rising demands for domestic energy sources, mandates for cleaner burning fuels for electricity generation, and the approach of peak global hydrocarbon production are driving the transformation from coal to natural gas from unconventional energy resources.

  3. Howardite Noble Gases as Indicators of Asteroid Surface Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Herrin, J. S.; Ott, U.

    2011-01-01

    The HED (Howardite, Eucrite and Diogenite) group meteorites likely or iginate from the Asteroid 4 Vesta - one of two asteroid targets of NA SA's Dawn mission. Whilst Howardites are polymict breccias of eucriti c and diogenitic material that often contain "regolithic" petrologica l features, neither their exact regolithic nature nor their formation processes are well defined. As the Solar Wind (SW) noble gas compon ent is implanted onto surfaces of solar system bodies, noble gas anal yses of Howardites provides a key indicator of regolithic origin. In addition to SW, previous work by suggested that restricted Ni (300-12 00 micro g/g) and Al2O3 (8-9 wt%) contents may indicate an ancient we ll-mixed regolith. Our research combines petrological, compositional and noble gas analyses to help improve understanding of asteroid reg olith formation processes, which will play an intergral part in the i nterpretation of Dawn mission data. Following compositional and petrological analyses, we developed a regolith grading scheme for our sampl e set of 30 Howardites and polymict Eucrites. In order to test the r egolith indicators suggested by, our 8 selected samples exhibited a r ange of Ni, Al2O3 contents and regolithic grades. Noble gas analyses were performed using furnace stepheating on our MAP 215-50 noble gas mass spectrometer. Of our 8 howardites, only 3 showed evidence of SW noble gases (e.g approaching Ne-20/Ne-22 approximately equals 13.75, Ne-21/Ne-22 approximately equals 0.033). As these samples display low regolithic grades and a range of Ni and Al2O3 contents, so far we are unable to find any correlation between these indicators and "regolit hic" origin. These results have a number of implications for both Ho wardite and Vesta formation, and may suggest complex surface stratigr aphies and surface-gardening processes.

  4. 77 FR 70159 - Marble River, LLC v. Noble Clinton Windpark I, LLC, Noble Ellenburg Windpark, LLC, Noble...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Marble River, LLC v. Noble Clinton Windpark I, LLC, Noble Ellenburg Windpark..., Marble River, LLC (Marble River or Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Noble Clinton Windpark I... pay Marble River for headroom created by common system upgrade facilities that benefit Noble and...

  5. Noble metals in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Markowska, Anna; Jaszczyńska-Nowinka, Karolina; Lubin, Jolanta; Markowska, Janina

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide research groups are searching for anticancer compounds, many of them are organometalic complexes having platinum group metals as their active centers. Most commonly used cytostatics from this group are cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. Cisplatin was used fot the first time in 1978, from this time many platinum derivatives were created. In this review we present biological properties and probable future clinical use of platinum, gold, silver, iridium and ruthenium derivatives. Gold derivative Auranofin has been studied extensively. Action of silver nanoparticles on different cell lines was analysed. Iridium isotopes are commonly used in brachyterapy. Ruthenium compound new anti-tumour metastasis inhibitor (NAMI-A) is used in managing lung cancer metastases. Electroporation of another ruthenium based compound KP1339 was also studied. Most of described complexes have antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties. Further studies need to be made. Nevertheless noble metal based chemotherapheutics and compounds seem to be an interesting direction of research. PMID:26557773

  6. Noble gases in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, O. K.; Srinivasan, B.; Hennecke, E. W.; Sinclair, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon which were released by stepwise heating of lunar fines (15601.64) and (15271.65) were measured spectrometrically. The results of a composition of noble gases released from the lunar fines with noble gases in meteorites and in the earth are presented along with the isotopic composition of noble gases in lunar fines, in meteorites, and in the atmosphere. A study of two isotopically distinct components of trapped xenon in carbonaceous chondrites is also included.

  7. Laser-polarization-dependent and magnetically controlled optical bistability in diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Duo; Yu, Rong; Li, Jiahua; Ding, Chunling; Yang, Xiaoxue

    2013-11-01

    We explore laser-polarization-dependent and magnetically controlled optical bistability (OB) in an optical ring cavity filled with diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect centers under optical excitation. The shape of the OB curve can be significantly modified in a new operating regime from the previously studied OB case, namely, by adjusting the intensity of the external magnetic field and the polarization of the control beam. The influences of the intensity of the control beam, the frequency detuning, and the cooperation parameter on the OB behavior are also discussed in detail. These results are useful in real experiments for realizing an all-optical bistate switching or coding element in a solid-state platform.

  8. Effects of laser polarization on photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure

    SciTech Connect

    Buica, Gabriela; Nakajima, Takashi

    2005-11-15

    We theoretically investigate the effects of laser polarization on the photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure. We focus on a polarization geometry where the probe and dressing lasers are both linearly polarized and change the relative polarization angle between them. We find that the total ionization yield and the branching ratio into different ionization channels change as a function of the relative polarization angle, and accordingly the photoelectron angular distribution is altered. We present specific results for the 4p{sub 1/2}-6p{sub 1/2} and 4p{sub 3/2}-6p{sub 3/2} systems of the K atom and show that the change of the polarization angle leads to a significant modification of the photoelectron angular distribution.

  9. A mathematical model for the release of noble gas and Cs from porous nuclear fuel based on VEGA 1&2 experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simones, M. P.; Reinig, M. L.; Loyalka, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    Release of fission products from nuclear fuel in accidents is an issue of major concern in nuclear reactor safety, and there is considerable room for development of improved models, supported by experiments, as one needs to understand and elucidate role of various phenomena and parameters. The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program on several irradiated nuclear fuels investigated the release rates of radionuclides and results demonstrated that the release rates of radionuclides from all nuclear fuels tested decreased with increasing external gas pressure surrounding the fuel. Hidaka et al. (2004-2011) accounted for this pressure effect by developing a 2-stage diffusion model describing the transport of radionuclides in porous nuclear fuel. We have extended this 2-stage diffusion model to account for mutual binary gas diffusion in the open pores as well as to introduce the appropriate parameters to cover the slip flow regime (0.01 ⩽ Kn ⩽ 0.1). While we have directed our numerical efforts toward the simulation of the VEGA experiments and assessments of differences from the results of Hidaka et al., the model and the techniques reported here are of larger interest as these would aid in modeling of diffusion in general (e.g. in graphite and other nuclear materials of interest).

  10. On the origin of noble gases in mantle plumes.

    PubMed

    Coltice, Nicolas; Ricard, Yanick

    2002-11-15

    The chemical differences between deep- and shallow-mantle sources of oceanic basalts provide evidence that several distinct components coexist within the Earth's mantle. Most of these components have been identified as recycled in origin. However, the noble-gas signature is still a matter of debate and questions the preservation of primitive regions in the convective mantle. We show that a model where the noble-gas signature observed in Hawaii and Iceland comes from a pristine homogeneous deep layer would imply a primitive (3)He content and (3)He/(22)Ne ratio that are very unlikely. On the contrary, mass balances show that the partly degassed peridotite of a marble-cake mantle can be the noble-gas end-member with an apparent 'primitive'-like composition. This component is mixed with recycled oceanic crust in different proportions in the plume sources and in the shallow mantle. A recycling model of the mantle, involving gravitational segregation of the oceanic crust at the bottom of the mantle, potentially satisfies trace-element as well as noble-gas constraints.

  11. On the vibrational linear and nonlinear optical properties of compounds involving noble gas atoms: HXeOXeH, HXeOXeF, and FXeOXeF.

    PubMed

    Avramopoulos, Aggelos; Reis, Heribert; Luis, Josep M; Papadopoulos, Manthos G

    2013-06-30

    The vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities of some selected Xe derivatives are studied in the context of Bishop-Kirtman perturbation theory (BKPT) and numerical finite field methodology. It was found that for this set of rare gas compounds, the static vibrational properties are quite large, in comparison to the corresponding electronic ones, especially those of the second hyperpolarizability. This also holds for the dc-Pockels β(-ω;ω,0), Kerr γ(-ω;ω,0,0) and electric field second harmonic generation γ (-2ω;ω,ω,0) effects, although the computed nuclear relaxation (nr) vibrational contributions are smaller in magnitude than the static ones. HXeOXeH was used to study the effects of electron correlation, basis set, and geometry. Geometry effects were found to lead to noticeable changes of the vibrational and electronic second hyperpolarizability. A limited study of the effect of Xe insertion to the nr vibrational properties is also reported. Assessment of the results revealed that Xe insertion has a remarkable effect on the nr (hyper)polarizabilities. In terms of the BKPT, this is associated with a remarkable increase of the electrical and mechanical anharmonicity terms. The latter is consistent with the anharmonic character of several vibrational modes reported for rare gas compounds.

  12. Methane activation using noble gases in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-08-15

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gases—He, Ne, and Ar—as additives. The empirical results obtained clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by thy type of noble gas used. Through 0-D calculations, the discharge parameters inside the reactor, i.e., electron temperature and electron density, are estimated using experiment results. A comparison of the discharge characteristics and experimental results shows that the electron temperature is an important factor in achieving high methane activation and the mixture with Ar gas shows the highest methane conversion. These results are constructed using the mechanisms of energy and charge transfer from excited and ionized noble gas atoms to methane molecules, considering the number density of active atoms of noble gases. Finally, electron temperatures obtained for gas mixtures having different reactant compositions and concentrations are analyzed to estimate methane activation.

  13. Spectroscopy of low-energy atoms released from a solid noble-gas matrix: Proposal for a trap-loading technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lambo, R.; Rodegheri, C. C.; Silveira, D. M.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-12-15

    We have studied the velocity distribution of chromium atoms released from a solid neon matrix at cryogenic temperatures via Doppler spectroscopy. The Ne matrix is grown by directing a small flux of gas onto a cold substrate, while Cr atoms are simultaneously implanted by laser ablation, with the resultant plume directed toward the growing matrix. The atoms are then released by a heat pulse. We have observed neutral Cr atoms at temperatures around 13 K with densities close to 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. The released atoms have a large initial drift velocity, explained by simple kinetic theory arguments, due to the light species' drag force. The scheme could be adapted to produce cryogenic beams of atoms, molecules, and possibly ions, for collisional studies and spectroscopy. However, our main motivation was the construction of a hydrogen trap, and here we discuss the prospects and problems of using this technique for this purpose.

  14. New insight from noble gas and stable isotopes of geothermal/hydrothermal fluids at Caviahue-Copahue Volcanic Complex: Boiling steam separation and water-rock interaction at shallow depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulleau, Emilie; Tardani, Daniele; Sano, Yuji; Takahata, Naoto; Vinet, Nicolas; Bravo, Francisco; Muñoz, Carlos; Sanchez, Juan

    2016-12-01

    We measured noble gas and stable isotopes of the geothermal and hydrothermal fluids of the Caviahue-Copahue Volcanic Complex (CCVC), one of the most important geothermal systems in Argentina/Chile, in order to provide new insights into fluid circulation and origin. With the exception of Anfiteatro and Chancho-co geothermal systems, mantle-derived helium dominates in the CCVC fluids, with measured 3He/4He ratios up to 7.86Ra in 2015. Their positive δ15N is an evidence for subducted sediment-derived nitrogen, which is commonly observed in subduction settings. Both He-N2-Ar composition and positive correlation between δD-H2O and δ18O-H2O suggest that the fluids from Anfiteatro and Chancho-co (and partly from Pucon-Mahuida as well, on the southern flank of Copahue volcano) represent a meteoric water composition with a minor magmatic contribution. The Ne, Kr and Xe isotopic compositions are entirely of atmospheric origin, but processes of boiling and steam separation have led to fractionation of their elemental abundances. We modeled the CCVC fluid evolution using Rayleigh distillation curves, considering an initial air saturated geothermal water (ASGW) end-member at 250 and 300 °C, followed by boiling and steam separation at lower temperatures (from 200 °C to 150 °C). Between 2014 and 2015, the CCVC hydrogen and oxygen isotopes shifted from local meteoric water-dominated to andesitic water-dominated signature. This shift is associated with an increase of δ13C values and Stotal, HCl and He contents. These characteristics are consistent with a change in the gas ascent pathway between 2014 and 2015, which in turn induced higher magmatic-hydrothermal contribution in the fluid signature. The composition of the magmatic source of the CCVC fluids is: 3He/4He = 7.7Ra, δ15N = + 6‰, and δ13C = - 6.5‰. Mixing models between air-corrected He and N suggest the involvement of 0.5% to 5% of subducted sediments in the magmatic source. The magmatic sulfur isotopic

  15. Confinement induced binding of noble gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatua, Munmun; Pan, Sudip; Chattaraj, Pratim K.

    2014-04-01

    The stability of Ngn@B12N12 and Ngn@B16N16 systems is assessed through a density functional study and ab initio simulation. Although they are found to be thermodynamically unstable with respect to the dissociation of individual Ng atoms and parent cages, ab initio simulation reveals that except Ne2@B12N12 they are kinetically stable to retain their structures intact throughout the simulation time (500 fs) at 298 K. The Ne2@B12N12 cage dissociates and the Ne atoms get separated as the simulation proceeds at this temperature but at a lower temperature (77 K) it is also found to be kinetically stable. He-He unit undergoes translation, rotation and vibration inside the cavity of B12N12 and B16N16 cages. Electron density analysis shows that the He-He interaction in He2@B16N16 is of closed-shell type whereas for the same in He2@B12N12 there may have some degree of covalent character. In few cases, especially for the heavier Ng atoms, the Ng-N/B bonds are also found to have some degree of covalent character. But the Wiberg bond indices show zero bond order in He-He bond and very low bond order in cases of Ng-N/B bonds. The energy decomposition analysis further shows that the ΔEorb term contributes 40.9% and 37.3% towards the total attraction in the He2 dimers having the same distances as in He2@B12N12 and He2@B16N16, respectively. Therefore, confinement causes some type of orbital interaction between two He atoms, which akins to some degree of covalent character.

  16. Complementary optical diagnostics of noble gas plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. J.; Stewart, R. S.

    2001-10-01

    In this talk we will discuss our theoretical modeling and application of an array of four complementary optical diagnostic techniques for low-temperature plasmas. These are cw laser collisionally induced fluorescence (LCIF), cw optogalvanic effect (OGE), optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS). We will briefly present an overview of our investigation of neon positive column plasmas for reduced axial electrical fields ranging from 3x10-17 Vcm^2 to 2x10-16 Vcm^2 (3-20 Td), detailing our determination of five sets of important collisional rate coefficients involving the fifteen lowest levels, the ^1S0 ground state and the 1s and 2p excited states (in Paschen notation), hence information on several energy regions of the electron distribution function (EDF). The discussion will be extended to show the new results obtained from analysis of the argon positive column over similar reduced fields. Future work includes application of our multi-diagnostic technique to move complex systems, including the addition of molecules for EDF determination.

  17. Ionization and positronium formation in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J.P.; Sullivan, J.P.; Surko, C.M.

    2005-02-01

    Absolute measurements are presented for the positron-impact cross sections for direct ionization and positronium formation of noble gas atoms in the range of energies from threshold to 90 eV. The experiment uses a cold, trap-based positron beam and the technique of studying positron scattering in a strong magnetic field. The current data show generally good, quantitative agreement with previous measurements taken using a qualitatively different method. However, significant differences in the cross sections for both direct ionization and positronium formation are also observed. An analysis is presented that yields another, independent measurement of the direct ionization and positronium formation cross sections that is in agreement with the present, direct measurements to within {+-}10% for argon, krypton, and xenon. Comparison with available theoretical predictions yields good quantitative agreement for direct ionization cross sections, and qualitative agreement in the case of positronium formation.

  18. Biomedical imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases (HNGs), polarized to approximately 50% or higher, have led to major advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of porous structures and air-filled cavities in human subjects, particularly the lung. By boosting the available signal to a level about 100 000 times higher than that at thermal equilibrium, air spaces that would otherwise appear as signal voids in an MR image can be revealed for structural and functional assessments. This review discusses how HNG MR imaging differs from conventional proton MR imaging, how MR pulse sequence design is affected and how the properties of gas imaging can be exploited to obtain hitherto inaccessible information in humans and animals. Current and possible future imaging techniques, and their application in the assessment of normal lung function as well as certain lung diseases, are described.

  19. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (< 1 g) facilitates determining the solute transport in the pore space and identifying the origin of bio- and geogenic fluids in (un) consolidated sediments [1]. Advanced techniques that combine crushing and sieving speleothem samples in ultra-high-vacuum to a specific grain size allow to separate air and water-bearing fluid inclusions and thus enables noble-gas-based reconstruction of environmental conditions from water masses as small as 1mg [2]. B. The coupling of noble gas analysis with approaches of gas chromatography permits combined analysis of noble gases and other gases species (e.g., SF6, CFCs, O2, N2) from a single water sample. The new method substantially improves ground water dating by SF6 and CFCs as excess air is quantified from the same sample and hence can adequately be corrected for [3]. Portable membrane-inlet mass spectrometers enable the quasi-continuous and real-time analysis of noble gases and other dissolved gases directly in the field, allowing, for instance, quantification of O2 turnover rates on small time scales [4]. C. New technical developments perfect 222Rn analysis in water by the synchronous the determination of the short-lived 220Rn. The combined 220,222Rn analysis sheds light on the emanation behaviour of radon by identifying soil water content to be the crucial

  20. Oxygen adsorption at noble metal/TiO2 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Babaei, F.; Alaei-Sheini, Navid; Lajvardi, Mehdi M.

    2016-03-01

    Electric conduction in titanium dioxide is known to be oxygen sensitive and the conductivity of a TiO2 ceramic body is determined mainly by the concentration of its naturally occurring oxygen vacancy. Recently, fabrications and electronic features of a number of noble metal/TiO2-based electronic devices, such as solar cells, UV detectors, gas sensors and memristive devices have been demonstrated. Here, we investigate the effect of oxygen adsorption at the noble metal/TiO2 junction in such devices, and show the potentials of these junctions in chemical sensor fabrication. The polycrystalline, poly-phase TiO2 layers are grown by the selective and controlled oxidation of titanium thin films vacuum deposited on silica substrates. Noble metal thin films are deposited on the oxide layers by physical vapor deposition. Current-voltage (I-V) diagrams of the fabricated devices are studied for Ag/, Au/, and Pt/TiO2 samples. The raw samples show no junction energy barrier. After a thermal annealing in air at 250° C, I-V diagrams change drastically. The annealed samples demonstrate highly non-linear I-V indicating the formation of high Schottky energy barriers at the noble metal/TiO2 junctions. The phenomenon is described based on the effect of the oxygen atoms adsorbed at the junction.

  1. Stellar condensates in meteorites - Isotopic evidence from noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. S.; Alaerts, L.; Matsuda, J.-I.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The Murchison carbonaceous chondrite contains three isotopically anomalous noble-gas components of apparently presolar origin: two kinds of Ne-E, (Ne-20)/(Ne-22) less than 0.6, and s-process Kr + Xe (enriched in the even isotopes 82, 84, 86, 128, 130, 132). Their carriers are tentatively identified as spinel and two carbonaceous phases, the principal high-temperature stellar condensates at low and high C/O ratios, respectively.

  2. Noble metal reforming of naphtha

    SciTech Connect

    Bonacci, J.C.; Patterson, J.R.

    1981-09-29

    Conventional noble metal reforming to upgrade the octane number of petroleum naphtha is an endothermic reaction which is carried out in a series of reactors with intermediate furnace heating of the petroleum fraction being upgraded. This specification discloses a process and apparatus configuration to increase the octane number of the reformate at a minimum liquid yield loss by cooling the first reforming stage effluent and then contacting the cooled effluent with a zsm-5 type zeolite catalyst prior to the first intermediate furnace heating.

  3. The record of cosmogenic, radiogenic, fissiogenic, and trapped noble gases in recently recovered Chinese and other chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, O.; Michel, Th.; Niedermann, S.; Wang, D.; Yi, W.

    1993-03-01

    Noble-gas isotopic abundances were determined in 36 recently recovered chondrites including 27 chondrites recovered in China. The comparison of the release patterns of trapped noble gases from ordinary and from carbonaceous chondrites showed that the planetary trapped noble gases in ordinary chondrites were released mainly above 1200 C, whereas more than 85 percent of noble gases trapped in carbonaceous chondrites were released at or below 1200 C, indicating that the carrier phases of the trapped noble gases in ordinary and in carbonaceous chondrites may not be the same. It is suggested that the ordinary chondrites started to retain fission Xe about 48 +/- 30 Ma earlier than Angra dos Reis. No systematic differences were observed between H, L, and LL or type 5 and 6 chondrites with respect to the time of fission Xe retention. Eight chondrites displayed neutron capture effects due to secondary cosmic-ray-produced neutrons.

  4. The study of Xe adsorption behavior in meso-size pores of carbon black materials using laser-polarized 129Xe NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Koji; Kimura, Atsuomi; Fujiwara, Hideaki

    2003-01-01

    The meso size pores of carbon black materials with Pt critically affect catalysts which play an important role for fuel cells of electric vehicles. Time-consuming BET methods are usually used to measure the physisorption enthalpy which determines the characteristics of catalysts. The laser polarized method enhances 129Xe polarization by 4 orders of magnitude, overcoming a low sensitivity, making this measurement technique faster than conventional experiments. In this paper, we first demonstrate Laser-Polarized 129Xe NMR Spectroscopy for studying carbon black materials with Pt of fuel cells of electric vehicles in order to determine the physisorption enthalpy. At the same time, T1 experiments using Laser-Polarized 129Xe will be discussed in order to clarify the surface condition and adsorption behavior.

  5. Dynamics of strong-field laser-induced microplasma formation in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, D. A.; Compton, R.; Filin, A.; Levis, R. J.

    2010-03-15

    The ultrafast dynamics of microplasmas generated by femtosecond laser pulses in noble gases has been investigated using four-wave mixing (FWM). The time dependence of the FWM signal is observed to reach higher intensity levels faster for Xe, with progressively lower scattering intensity and longer time dynamics for the noble gas series Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne, and He. The temporal dynamics is interpreted in terms of a tunnel ionization and impact cooling mechanism. A formalism to interpret the observed phenomena is presented here with comparison to the measured laser intensity and gas pressure trends.

  6. Platinum-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell electrocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2015-04-14

    Core-shell particles encapsulated by a thin film of a catalytically active metal are described. The particles are preferably nanoparticles comprising a non-noble core with a noble metal shell which preferably do not include Pt. The non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles are encapsulated by a catalytically active metal which is preferably Pt. The core-shell nanoparticles are preferably formed by prolonged elevated-temperature annealing of nanoparticle alloys in an inert environment. This causes the noble metal component to surface segregate and form an atomically thin shell. The Pt overlayer is formed by a process involving the underpotential deposition of a monolayer of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a Pt salt. A thin Pt layer forms via the galvanic displacement of non-noble surface atoms by more noble Pt atoms in the salt. The overall process is a robust and cost-efficient method for forming Pt-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles.

  7. CANCELLED Molecular dynamics simulations of noble gases in liquidwater: Solvati on structure, self-diffusion, and kinetic isotopeeffect

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2007-05-25

    Despite their great importance in low-temperaturegeochemistry, self-diffusion coefficients of noble gas isotopes in liquidwater (D) have been measured only for the major isotopes of helium, neon,krypton and xenon. Data on the self-diffusion coefficients of minor noblegas isotopes are essentially non-existent and so typically are estimatedby a kinetic theory model in which D varies as the inverse square root ofthe isotopic mass (m): D proportional to m-0.5. To examine the validityof the kinetic theory model, we performed molecular dynamics (MD)simulations of the diffusion of noble gases in ambient liquid water withan accurate set of noble gas-water interaction potentials. Our simulationresults agree with available experimental data on the solvation structureand self-diffusion coefficients of the major noble gas isotopes in liquidwater and reveal for the first time that the isotopic mass-dependence ofall noble gas self-diffusion coefficients has the power-law form Dproportional to m-beta with 0noble gasisotopes caused by diffusion in ambient liquid water.

  8. The quest for regolithic howardites. Part 2: Surface origins highlighted by noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Ott, U.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2014-09-01

    We report noble gas data of helium (He), neon (Ne), argon (Ar), krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe), cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages and nominal gas retention (K-Ar, U-Th-He) ages for seven howardites (CRE 01400, EET 87513, EET 87518, EET 99400, GRO 95535, GRO 95602, SAN 03472), in continuing research to identify regolithic samples, and better understand the vestan regolith. In our previous work, we found little correlation between suggested regolith parameters of Ni > 300 μg/g, Al2O3 8-9 wt% and eucrite/diogenite (E:D) ratio of 2:1 (Warren et al., 2009), and trapped solar wind (SW), fractionated solar wind (FSW) or planetary noble gas components (from impacted material) - noble gas indicators of a regolithic origin. Here, we have expanded our data set to include samples outside of these parameters to further explore composition, and the differences in Ni content as indicators for the presence of non-Vesta material. In addition, our sample set includes two potentially paired meteorites from the GRO suite. Finally, in our petrographic studies, the samples selected showed no evidence for carbonaceous chondrite fragments, which should reduce the effect of "contamination" by planetary noble gas components, and will allow us to better identify SW/FSW components, where present. Of the samples studied here, three howardites GRO 95535, GRO 95602 and EET 87513 show evidence for a regolithic origin, with both isotopic and element noble gas ratios clearly pointing to the presence of trapped components similar to SW/FSW or planetary. The two GRO howardites, GRO 95535 and GRO 95602, show similar noble gas ratios to our previously defined SW/FSW dominated regolithic group (LEW 85313 and MET 00423), suggesting a surface origin for these samples. However, interestingly, the GRO samples show vastly different cosmogenic noble gas abundances, and thus different CRE ages, which suggests that they are not paired. For howardite EET 87513, the data hint to the presence of CM-material, with a

  9. Nonequilibrium electron dynamics in noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Fatti, N.; Voisin, C.; Achermann, M.; Tzortzakis, S.; Christofilos, D.; Vallée, F.

    2000-06-01

    Electron-electron and electron-lattice interactions in noble metals are discussed in the light of two-color femtosecond pump-probe measurements in silver films. The internal thermalization of a nonequilibrium electron distribution created by intraband absorption of a pump pulse is followed by probing the induced optical property changes in the vicinity of the frequency threshold for the d band to Fermi surface transitions. This is shown to take place with a characteristic time constant of 350 fs, significantly shorter than previously reported in gold. This difference is ascribed to a weaker screening of the electron-electron interaction by the d-band electrons in silver than in gold. These results are in quantitative agreement with numerical simulations of the electron relaxation dynamics using a reduced static screening of the electron-electron Coulomb interaction, and including bound electron screening. Electron-lattice thermalization has been studied using a probe frequency out of resonance with the interband transitions. In both materials, the transient nonthermal nature of the electron distribution leads to the observation of a short-time delay reduction of the energy-loss rate of the electron gas to the lattice, in very good agreement with our theoretical model.

  10. The noble gases: how their electronegativity and hardness determines their chemistry.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Jonathan; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2015-02-26

    The establishment of an internally consistent scale of noble gas electronegativities is a long-standing problem. In the present study, the problem is attacked via the Mulliken definition, which in recent years gained widespread use to its natural appearance in the context of conceptual density functional theory. Basic ingredients of this scale are the electron affinity and the ionization potential. Whereas the latter can be computed routinely, the instability of the anion makes the judicious choice of computational technique for evaluating electron affinities much more tricky. We opted for Puiatti's approach, extrapolating the energy of high ε solvent stabilized anions to the ε = 1 (gas phase) case. The results give negative electron affinity values, monotonically increasing (except for helium which is an outlier in most of the story) to almost zero at eka-radon in agreement with high level calculations. The stability of the B3LYP results is successfully tested both via improving the level of theory (CCSD(T)) and expanding the basis set. Combined with the ionization energies (in good agreement with experiment), an electronegativity scale is obtained displaying (1) a monotonic decrease of χ when going down the periodic table, (2) top values not for the noble gases but for the halogens, as opposed to most (extrapolation) procedures of existing scales, invariably placing the noble gases on top, and (3) noble gases having electronegativities close to the chalcogens. In the accompanying hardness scale (hardly, if ever, discussed in the literature) the noble gases turn out to be by far the farthest the hardest elements, again with a continuous decrease with increasing Z. Combining χ value of the halogens and the noble gases the Ng(δ+)F(δ-) bond polarity emerging from ab initio calculations naturally emerges. In conclusion, the chemistry of the noble gases is for a large part determined by their extreme hardness, equivalent to a high resistance to change in its

  11. Effect of noble gases on oxygen and glucose deprived injury in human tubular kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Maleeha; Jawad, Noorulhuda; Li, Yuantao; Vizcaychipi, Marcela P; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2010-07-01

    The noble gas xenon has been shown to be protective in preconditioning settings against renal ischemic injury. The aims of this study were to determine the protective effects of the other noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon, on human tubular kidney HK2 cells in vitro. Cultured human renal tubular cells (HK2) were exposed to noble gas preconditioning (75% noble gas; 20% O(2); 5% CO(2)) for three hours or mock preconditioning. Twenty-four hours after gas exposure, cell injury was provoked with oxygen-glucose deprived (OGD) culture medium for three hours. Cell viability was assessed 24 h post-OGD by a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay. Other cohorts of cultured cells were incubated in the absence of OGD in 75% noble gas, 20% O(2) and 5% CO(2) and cellular signals phospho-Akt (p-Akt), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and Bcl-2 were assessed by Western blotting. OGD caused a reduction in cell viability to 0.382 +/- 0.1 from 1.0 +/- 0.15 at control (P < 0.01). Neon, argon and krypton showed no protection from injury (0.404 +/- 0.03; 0.428 +/- 0.02; 0.452 +/- 0.02; P > 0.05). Helium by comparison significantly enhanced cell injury (0.191 +/- 0.05; P < 0.01). Xenon alone exerted a protective effect (0.678 +/- 0.07; P < 0.001). In the absence of OGD, helium was also detrimental (0.909 +/- 0.07; P < 0.01). Xenon caused an increased expression of p-Akt, HIF-1alpha and Bcl-2, while the other noble gases did not modify protein expression. These results suggest that unlike other noble gases, preconditioning with the anesthetic noble gas xenon may have a role in protection against renal ischemic injury.

  12. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, L.M.; Sanner, R.D.; Coronado, P.R.

    1998-12-22

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such as environmental remediation are disclosed. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P){sub 2}, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  13. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, Lucy M.; Sanner, Robert D.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such environmental remediation. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P).sub.2, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  14. Recovery and use of fission product noble metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.A.; Rohmann, C.A.; Perrigo, L.D.

    1980-06-01

    Noble metals in fission products are of strategic value. Market prices for noble metals are rising more rapidly than recovery costs. A promising concept has been developed for recovery of noble metals from fission product waste. Although the assessment was made only for the three noble metal fission products (Rh, Pd, Ru), there are other fission products and actinides which have potential value. (DLC)

  15. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  20. Distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples depends on implantation energy, fluence, diffusion, radiation damage and erosion. It is known that at least the lighter rare gases are fractionated after implantation, but the redistribution processes, which mainly drive the losses, are not well understood. Some information about this one can get by looking at the concentration profiles of solar wind implanted He-4 measured by the Gas Ion Probe in single lunar grains. The observed profiles were divided in three groups. These groups are illustrated and briefly discussed.

  1. Noble metal superparticles and methods of preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Yugang; Hu, Yongxing

    2016-07-12

    A method comprises heating an aqueous solution of colloidal silver particles. A soluble noble metal halide salt is added to the aqueous solution which undergoes a redox reaction on a surface of the silver particles to form noble metal/silver halide SPs, noble metal halide/silver halide SPs or noble metal oxide/silver halide SPs on the surface of the silver particles. The heat is maintained for a predetermined time to consume the silver particles and release the noble metal/silver halide SPs, the noble metal halide/silver halide SPs or the noble metal oxide/silver halide SPs into the aqueous solution. The aqueous solution is cooled. The noble metal/silver halide SPs, the noble metal halide/silver halide SPs or noble metal oxide/silver halide SPs are separated from the aqueous solution. The method optionally includes adding a soluble halide salt to the aqueous solution.

  2. Slab-derived halogens and noble gases illuminate closed system processes controlling volatile element transport into the mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke; Ishimaru, Satoko; Arai, Shoji; Yoshikawa, Masako; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Kumagai, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Burgess, Ray; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2017-01-01

    Halogen and noble gas systematics are powerful tracers of volatile recycling in subduction zones. We present halogen and noble gas compositions of mantle peridotites containing H2O-rich fluid inclusions collected at volcanic fronts from two contrasting subduction zones (the Avacha volcano of Kamchatka arc and the Pinatubo volcano of Luzon arcs) and orogenic peridotites from a peridotite massif (the Horoman massif, Hokkaido, Japan) which represents an exhumed portion of the mantle wedge. The aims are to determine how volatiles are carried into the mantle wedge and how the subducted fluids modify halogen and noble gas compositions in the mantle. The halogen and noble gas signatures in the H2O-rich fluids are similar to those of marine sedimentary pore fluids and forearc and seafloor serpentinites. This suggests that marine pore fluids in deep-sea sediments are carried by serpentine and supplied to the mantle wedge, preserving their original halogen and noble gas compositions. We suggest that the sedimentary pore fluid-derived water is incorporated into serpentine through hydration in a closed system along faults at the outer rise of the oceanic, preserving Cl/H2O and 36Ar/H2O values of sedimentary pore fluids. Dehydration-hydration process within the oceanic lithospheric mantle maintains the closed system until the final stage of serpentine dehydration. The sedimentary pore fluid-like halogen and noble gas signatures in fluids released at the final stage of serpentine dehydration are preserved due to highly channelized flow, whereas the original Cl/H2O and 36Ar/H2O ratios are fractionated by the higher incompatibility of halogens and noble gases in hydrous minerals.

  3. Noble Gases in Recently Found Hot and Cold Desert Lunar Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, P.; Maden, C.; Busemann, H.

    2016-08-01

    We report He-Xe noble gas data for 7 lunar meteorites. Of 4 paired and unbrecciated mare basalts 2 surprisingly contain abundant solar wind - so far unknown for mare basalts. Potential implications for our understanding of the Moon will be discussed.

  4. Noble Gases in Nakhla and Three Nakhlites Miller Range 090030, 090032, and 090136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, K.; Haba, M. K.; Park, J.; Choi, J.; Baek, J. M.; Park, C.; Lee, J. I.; Lee, M. J.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Herzog, G. F.; Turrin, B. D.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III

    2016-08-01

    Noble gas compositions of the Miller Range nakhlites release Kr and Xe with low 84Kr/132Xe of ≤1 and high 129Xe/132Xe of 1.95-2.13 at low heating temperature (300-400°C). The gases would be heavily fractionated martian atmosphere trapped in aqueously altered materials.

  5. Noble Gases in Giant Cluster IDP U2-20GCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, R. O.; Palma, R. L.; Schlutter, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D.

    2015-07-01

    Noble gas analyses of 15 particles from U2-20GCA reveal a suite of trapped 20Ne/22Ne ratios similar to HL-Ne, Q-Ne and SW-Ne. Highly spallogenic 21Ne/22Ne points to past residence in an environment of intense energetic proton radiation.

  6. Release of radiogenic noble gases as a new signal of rock deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, W. Payton; Lee, Hyunwoo

    2016-10-01

    In this study we investigate the release of radiogenic noble gas isotopes during mechanical deformation. We developed an analytical system for dynamic mass spectrometry of noble gas composition and helium release rate of gas produced during mechanical deformation of rocks. Our results indicate that rocks release accumulated radiogenic helium and argon from mineral grains as they undergo deformation. We found that the release of accumulated 4He and 40Ar from rocks follows a reproducible pattern and can provide insight into the deformation process. Increased gas release can be observed before dilation, and macroscopic failure is observed during high-pressure triaxial rock deformation experiments. Accumulated radiogenic noble gases can be released due to fracturing of mineral grains during small-scale strain in Earth materials. Helium and argon are highly mobile, conservative species and could be used to provide information on changes in the state of stress and strain in Earth materials, and as an early warning signal of macroscopic failure. These results pave the way for the use of noble gases to trace and monitor rock deformation for earthquake prediction and a variety of other subsurface engineering projects.

  7. Synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadory, Mozhgan

    Improved methods were developed for the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles. Laboratory experiments were designed for introducing of nanotechnology into the undergraduate curriculum. An optimal set of conditions for the synthesis of clear yellow colloidal silver was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were obtained by borohydride reduction of silver nitrate, a method which produces particles with average size of 12+/-2 nm, determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The plasmon absorbance is at 397 nm and the peak width at half maximum (PWHM) is 70-75 nm. The relationship between aggregation and optical properties was determined along with a method to protect the particles using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). A laboratory experiment was designed in which students synthesize yellow colloidal silver, estimate particle size using visible spectroscopy, and study aggregation effects. The synthesis of the less stable copper nanoparticles is more difficult because copper nanopaticles are easily oxidized. Four methods were used for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles, including chemical reduction with sodium borohydride, sodium borohydride with potassium iodide, isopropyl alcohol with cetyltrimethylammonium bormide (CTAB) and reducing sugars. The latter method was also the basis for an undergraduate laboratory experiment. For each reaction, the dependence of stability of the copper nanoparticles on reagent concentrations, additives, relative amounts of reactants, and temperature is explored. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM and UV-Visible Spectroscopy were used to characterize the copper nanoparticles. A laboratory experiment to produce copper nanoparticles from household chemicals was developed.

  8. Elastic Properties of Films of Water and Noble Gases Condensed at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohl, Robert O.

    2003-01-01

    We have shown that there are extensive similarities between the quench-condensed noble gas films and those of amorphous water ice. In particular, both can be quite soft upon deposition and can stiffen considerably when annealed. Furthermore, this stiffening follows a logarithmic time dependence for all substances. The temperature dependence of these behaviors scales with the triple point. The results shown here show a strong thickness dependence, which has implications for any study of mechanical properties of films on substrates. The temperature dependence of the stiffening and the stiffening rate have now been characterized for the noble gases, and these observations provide a roadmap for new experiments on amorphous water ice.

  9. Noble gases in twenty Yamato H-chondrites: Comparison with Allan Hills chondrites and modern falls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeken, TH.; Scherer, P.; Schultz, L.

    1993-01-01

    Concentration and isotopic composition of noble gases have been measured in 20 H-chrondrites found on the Yamato Mountains ice fields in Antarctica. The distribution of exposure ages as well as of radiogenic He-4 contents is similar to that of H-chrondrites collected at the Allan Hills site. Furthermore, a comparison of the noble gas record of Antarctic H-chrondrites and finds or falls from non-Antarctic areas gives no support to the suggestion that Antarctic H-chrondrites and modern falls derive from differing interplanetary meteorite populations.

  10. Using noble gases measured in spring discharge to trace hydrothermal processes in the Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, W.P.; Susong, D.D.; Solomon, D.K.; Heasler, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved noble gas concentrations in springs are used to investigate boiling of hydrothermal water and mixing of hydrothermal and shallow cool water in the Norris Geyser Basin area. Noble gas concentrations in water are modeled for single stage and continuous steam removal. Limitations on boiling using noble gas concentrations are then used to estimate the isotopic effect of boiling on hydrothermal water, allowing the isotopic composition of the parent hydrothermal water to be determined from that measured in spring. In neutral chloride springs of the Norris Geyser Basin, steam loss since the last addition of noble gas charged water is less than 30% of the total hydrothermal discharge, which results in an isotopic shift due to boiling of ?? 2.5% ??D. Noble gas concentrations in water rapidly and predictably change in dual phase systems, making them invaluable tracers of gas-liquid interaction in hydrothermal systems. By combining traditional tracers of hydrothermal flow such as deuterium with dissolved noble gas measurements, more complex hydrothermal processes can be interpreted. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Adsorption behavior of ternary mixtures of noble gases inside single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroutan, Masumeh; Nasrabadi, Amir Taghavi

    2010-09-01

    In order to study the gas-storage and gas-filtering capability of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles simultaneously, we considered the adsorption behavior of a ternary mixture of noble gases, including Argon (Ar), Krypton (Kr), and Xenon (Xe), i.e., Ar-Kr-Xe mixture, on (10, 10) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different temperatures of (75, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300) K were performed, and adsorption energies, self-diffusion coefficients, activation energies, and radial distribution functions (RDFs) were computed to analyze the thermodynamics, transport and structural properties of the adsorption systems. It is observed that the SWCNT bundles have larger contents of heavier noble gases compared to the lighter ones. This interesting behavior of SWCNT bundles makes them proper candidates for gas-storage and gas molecular-sieving processes.

  12. Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: The first two noble metals operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, N.D.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Smith, M.E.; Miller, D.H.; Ritter, J.A.

    1991-06-06

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas systems. The facility is the first pilot-scale melter system capable of processing mercury, and flowsheet levels of halides and noble metals. In order to characterize the processing of noble metals (Pd, Rh, Ru, and Ag) on a large scale, the IDMS will be operated batchstyle for at least nine feed preparation cycles. The first two of these operations are complete. The major observation to date occurred during the second run when significant amounts of hydrogen were evolved during the feed preparation cycle. The runs were conducted between June 7, 1990 and March 8, 1991. This time period included nearly six months of ``fix-up`` time when forced air purges were installed on the SRAT MFT and other feed preparation vessels to allow continued noble metals experimentation.

  13. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  14. Heavily fractionated noble gases in an acid residue from the Klein Glacier 98300 EH3 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Daisuke; Ott, Ulrich; El Goresy, Ahmed; Nakamura, Tomoki

    2010-09-01

    Noble gases were measured both in bulk samples (stepped pyrolysis and total extraction) and in a HF/HCl residue (stepped pyrolysis and combustion) from the Klein Glacier (KLE) 98300 EH3 chondrite. Like the bulk meteorite and as seen in previous studies of bulk type 3 E chondrites ("sub-Q"), the acid residue contains elementally fractionated primordial noble gases. As we show here, isotopically these are like those in phase-Q of primitive meteorites, but elementally they are heavily fractionated relative to these. The observed noble gases are different from "normal" Q noble gases also with respect to release patterns, which are similar to those of Ar-rich noble gases in anhydrous carbonaceous chondrites and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (with also similar isotopic compositions). While we cannot completely rule out a role for parent body processes such as thermal and shock metamorphism (including a later thermal event) in creating the fractionated elemental compositions, parent body processes in general seem not be able to account for the distinct release patterns from those of normal Q noble gases. The fractionated gases may have originated from ion implantation from a nebular plasma as has been suggested for other types of primordial noble gases, including Q, Ar-rich, and ureilite noble gases. With solar starting composition, the corresponding effective electron temperature is about 5000 K. This is lower than inferred for other primordial noble gases (10,000-6000 K). Thus, if ion implantation from a solar composition reservoir was a common process for the acquisition of primordial gas, electron temperatures in the early solar system must have varied spatially or temporally between 10,000 and 5000 K. Neon and xenon isotopic ratios of the residue suggest the presence of presolar silicon carbide and diamond in abundances lower than in the Qingzhen EH3 and Indarch EH4 chondrites. Parent body processes including thermal and shock metamorphism and a late thermal

  15. Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João; Veigas, Bruno; Giestas, Leticia; Almeida, Carina; Assunção, Maria; Rosa, João; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the use of nanomaterials has been having a great impact in biosensing. In particular, the unique properties of noble metal nanoparticles have allowed for the development of new biosensing platforms with enhanced capabilities in the specific detection of bioanalytes. Noble metal nanoparticles show unique physicochemical properties (such as ease of functionalization via simple chemistry and high surface-to-volume ratios) that allied with their unique spectral and optical properties have prompted the development of a plethora of biosensing platforms. Additionally, they also provide an additional or enhanced layer of application for commonly used techniques, such as fluorescence, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Herein we review the use of noble metal nanoparticles for biosensing strategies—from synthesis and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics laboratory. PMID:22438731

  16. Elemental and isotopic compositions of noble gases in the mantle: Pete's path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Manuel; Péron, Sandrine; Colin, Aurélia

    2016-04-01

    Noble gases are tracers of the origin of the volatiles on Earth and other terrestrial planets. The determination of their isotopic compositions in oceanic basalts allows discriminating between different possible scenarios for the origin of volatiles (chondritic, solar, cometary). However, oceanic basalts show a ubiquitous component having atmospheric noble gas compositions, which reflects a shallow air contamination. This component masks the mantle composition and only step crushing is able to (partially) remove it. Nevertheless, the exact mantle composition is always unconstrained due to the uncertainty on its complete removal. Developed by Pete Burnard (Burnard et al., 1997; Burnard, 1999), single vesicle analysis using laser ablation is a challenging technique to determine the mantle composition, free of atmospheric contamination. We have used this technique to measure He, Ne, Ar isotopes and CO2 in single vesicles from both MORB and OIB (Galapagos, Iceland). Vesicles are located using microtomography and the noble gases are measured using the Noblesse mass spectrometer from IPGP using an Excimer laser to open the vesicles. Both Galapagos and Iceland samples show that the 20Ne/22Ne ratio is limited to ~12.8 in the primitive mantle, suggesting that the origin of the light noble gases can be attributed to irradiated material instead of a simple dissolution of solar gases into a magma ocean (Moreira and Charnoz, 2016). Such a scenario of incorporation of light noble gases by irradiation also explains the terrestrial argon isotopic composition. However, the Kr and Xe contribution of implanted solar wind is small and these two noble gases were carried on Earth by chondrites and/or cometary material. Burnard, P., D. Graham and G. Turner (1997). "Vesicle-specific noble gas analyses of « popping rock »: implications for primordial noble gases in the Earth." Science 276: 568-571. Burnard, P. (1999). "The bubble-by-bubble volatile evolution of two mid-ocean ridge

  17. Chemical composition of Titan's lakes and noble gases sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, D.; Mousis, O.; Lunine, J.-I.; Lavvas, P.; Lobo, L.; Ferreira, A.

    2010-04-01

    Titan is one of the most enigmatic objects in the Solar System. The presence of hydrocarbon lakes and even a global ocean have been suspected for decades. The dark features discovered by the CASSINI spacecraft are good candidates for these expected lakes (see McEwen et al. 2005 and Stofan et al. 2007). Their chemical composition has still not been measured but numerical models can give relatively accurate predictions. In the present work, we use the recent model of Titan's lakes chemical composition elaborated by Cordier et al. (2009) in light of the recent Cassini-Huygens measurements in order to investigate the possibility of sequestration of large quantities of noble gases in these liquids. Indeed, the noble gas abundances have been found to be largely in subsolar abundances in the atmosphere of Titan and the origin of this impoverishment is still poorly understood. Our preliminary results show that, under specific circumstances, at least the atmospheric depletion in krypton could be caused by its dissolution in the Titan's surface hydrocarbon liquid phase.

  18. Solubilities of nitrogen and noble gases in basalt melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazaki, A.; Hiyagon, H.; Sugiura, N.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen and noble gases are important tracers in geochemistry and chosmochemistry. Compared to noble gases, however, physicochemical properties of nitrogen, such as solubility in melt or melt/silicate partition, are not well known. Solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt depends on redox condition of the atmosphere. For example, solubility of nitrogen in E chondrite melt under reducing conditions is as high as 2 mol percent at 1500 C, suggesting that nitrogen is chemically dissolved in silicate melts, i.e., being dissolved as free anions or replacing oxygen sites in silicate network. However, the solubility and the dissolution mechanism of nitrogen under oxidizing conditions are not well investigated. To obtain nitrogen solubility in silicate melts under various redox conditions and to understand its mechanism, we are conducting experiments by using (15)N(15)N-labeled nitrogen gas. This makes it easy to distinguish dissolved nitrogen from later contamination of atmospheric nitrogen, and hence enables us to measure the nitrogen solubility accurately. As a preliminary experiment, we have measured solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt under the atmospheric oxygen pressure.

  19. Shock Reflection in a Binary Mixture of Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, S. T.; Baganoff, D.

    1996-11-01

    The standard implementation of Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for the simulation of multiple-specie flows uses single-specie transport data as input to an ad hoc combining formula to define parameters used in binary collisions between non-like species. To ascertain the suitability of this approach, we focus on the details of translational nonequilibrium in the flow of a binary mixture of noble gases. Existing experimental results for the one-dimensional reflection of a shock wave in a mixture of helium (He) and xenon (Xe) yield a standard of comparison. The molecular weight and diameter of He:Xe are sufficiently disparate so that the relevant time scales of the reflection process are distinct. Simulations are performed on the Intel Paragon using an adaptation of the DSMC method suitable for the parallel computing environment. Using the best characterizations of noble gas intermolecular potentials that have been published to date, we are able to produce simulations of the reflection process which compare favorably with experiment over a range of Xe concentrations. Investigations of various combining rules to arrive at non-like specie collision parameters indicate that any reasonable combining rule works provided that the single-specie data is physically realistic.

  20. Noble Metal Arsenides and Gold Inclusions in Northwest Africa 8186

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, P.; McCubbin, F. M.; Rahman, Z.; Keller, L. P.; Agee, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites are a highly thermally altered group of carbonaceous chondrites, experiencing temperatures ranging between approx.576-867 C. Additionally, the mineralogy of the CK chondrites record the highest overall oxygen fugacity of all chondrites, above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. Metallic Fe-Ni is extremely rare in CK chondrites, but magnetite and Fe,Ni sulfides are commonly observed. Noble metal-rich inclusions have previously been found in some magnetite and sulfide grains. These arsenides, tellurides, and sulfides, which contain varying amounts of Pt, Ru, Os, Te, As, Ir, and S, are thought to form either by condensation from a solar gas, or by exsolution during metamorphism on the chondritic parent body. Northwest Africa (NWA) 8186 is a highly metamorphosed CK chondrite. This meteorite is predominately composed of NiO-rich forsteritic olivine (Fo65), with lesser amounts of plagioclase (An52), augite (Fs11Wo49), magnetite (with exsolved titanomagnetite, hercynite, and titanohematite), monosulfide solid solution (with exsolved pentlandite), and the phosphate minerals Cl-apatite and merrillite. This meteorite contains coarse-grained, homogeneous silicates, and has 120deg triple junctions between mineral phases, which indicates a high degree of thermal metamorphism. The presence of NiO-rich olivine, oxides phases all bearing Fe3+, and the absence of metal, are consistent with an oxygen fugacity above the FMQ buffer. We also observed noble metal-rich phases within sulfide grains in NWA 8186, which are the primary focus of the present study.

  1. A Grounded Theory of the Development of Noble Youth Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronk, Kendall Cotton

    2012-01-01

    Having a noble purpose in life is an important component of positive youth development; however, little is known about how noble purposes develop over time. Therefore, using three waves of interviews over a 5-year period with 9 adolescents (N = 9) who demonstrated intense commitments to various noble purposes, the present study developed a…

  2. The Colour of the Noble Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the physical basis for colors of noble metals (copper, silver, gold) developed from energy conservation/quantum mechanical view of free electron photoabsorption. Describes production of absorption edges produced by change in density of occupied valence electron states in the d-band, which allows stronger absorption in the visible photon…

  3. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF NOBLE NANOSTRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-assisted (MW) spontaneous reduction of noble metal salts, silver (Ag), gold (Au), platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) is reported using sugar solutions such as -D glucose, sucrose and maltose, etc. to generate nanomaterials. These MW-assisted reactions, conducted in aqueo...

  4. Natural Death and the Noble Savage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Tony

    1995-01-01

    The belief that dying and grieving are natural processes is widely held in modern bereavement care. Examines four assumption often made in this connection: (1) most primitive cultures deal with death in an accepting way; (2) this way is different than our own; (3) it is a good and noble way; and (4) traditional societies see death as natural. (JBJ)

  5. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A NON-NOBLE METAL HYDROGEN PURIFICATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; Kyle Brinkman, K; Thad Adams, T; George Rawls, G

    2008-11-25

    Development of advanced hydrogen separation membranes in support of hydrogen production processes such as coal gasification and as front end gas purifiers for fuel cell based system is paramount to the successful implementation of a national hydrogen economy. Current generation metallic hydrogen separation membranes are based on Pd-alloys. Although the technology has proven successful, at issue is the high cost of palladium. Evaluation of non-noble metal based dense metallic separation membranes is currently receiving national and international attention. The focus of the reported work was to develop a scaled reactor with a VNi-Ti alloy membrane to replace a production Pd-alloy tube-type purification/diffuser system.

  7. Neuroprotection (and lack of neuroprotection) afforded by a series of noble gases in an in vitro model of neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Noorulhuda; Rizvi, Maleeha; Gu, Jianteng; Adeyi, Olar; Tao, Guocai; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2009-09-04

    Xenon-induced neuroprotection has been well studied both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, the neuroprotective properties of the other noble gases, namely, krypton, argon, neon and helium, were explored in an in vitro model of neuronal injury. Pure neuronal cultures, derived from foetal BALB/c mice cortices, were provoked into injury by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultures were exposed to either nitrogen hypoxia or noble gas hypoxia in balanced salt solution devoid of glucose for 90min. The cultures were allowed to recover in normal culture medium for a further 24h in nitrogen or noble gas. The effect of noble gases on cell reducing ability in the absence of OGD was also investigated. Cell reducing ability was quantified via an MTT assay and expressed as a ratio of the control. The OGD caused a reduction in cell reducing ability to 0.56+/-0.04 of the control in the absence of noble gas (p<0.001). Like xenon (0.92+/-0.10; p<0.001), neuroprotection was afforded by argon (0.71+/-0.05; p<0.01). Neon and krypton did not have a protective effect under our experimental conditions. Helium had a detrimental effect on the cells. In the absence of OGD, krypton reduced the reducing ability of uninjured cells to 0.84+/-0.09 (p<0.01), but argon showed an improvement in reducing ability to 1.15+/-0.11 (p<0.05). Our data suggest that the cheap and widely available noble gas argon may have potential as a neuroprotectant for the future.

  8. Noble gases, K, U, Th, and Pb in native gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engster, O.; Niedermann, S.; Thalmann, C.; Frei, R.; Kramers, J.; KräHenbühl, U.; Liu, Y. Z.; Hofmann, B.; Boer, R. H.; Reimold, W. U.; Bruno, L.

    1995-12-01

    We present determinations of the noble gas and Pb isotopic abundances and of K, Th, and U concentrations of native gold. Our results demonstrate that gold is an excellent carrier for crustal volatiles, but direct dating of gold using the U, Th-4He, 40K-40Ar, and U fission Xe methods was not successful for various reasons. The main significance of this work is the great sensitivity of gold for trapped gases as well as for gases that were produced in situ which gives the prospects of using gold and its fluid and solid inclusions for the study of paleogas composition. Numerous nuclear effects characterize the noble gas inventory of placer gold from Switzerland and Italy, vein gold from Italy, South Africa, and Venezuela, and lode gold from South Africa. The degassing patterns obtained by mass spectrometry show a low-temperature release of volatiles around 500°C from fluid inclusions mainly in vein gold and a high-temperature release from solid inclusions and the gold itself. The low-temperature volatiles represent species that were trapped when the gold crystallized. We investigated the following trapped species: the isotopes of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Pb, and the abundances of K, U, Th, H2O, and CO2. The crustal gases trapped by gold comprise 3He from 6Li(n,α)3H → β- → 3He, 4He and 40Ar from the U, Th, and K decay, and Xe from 238U fission. We observe 4He/40Ar = 3.9 for the radiogenic trapped gases of tertiary gold and a ratio of 1.4 for Archean gold. These ratios are consistent with the production ratios from U and K at the respective times and demonstrate that gold can be used as a sampler of ancient atmospheric gases. The concentrations of U and Th range from a few parts per billion to a few parts per million, and those of K and Pb range up to some tens of parts per million. The antiquity of trapped Pb is indicated by the Pb-Pb model age of about 3000 Ma for the lead extracted from vein gold and quartz of the Lily gold mine (South Africa). Gold also

  9. REMOVAL OF TITAN'S ATMOSPHERIC NOBLE GASES BY THEIR SEQUESTRATION IN SURFACE CLATHRATES

    SciTech Connect

    Mousis, Olivier; Picaud, Sylvain; Cordier, Daniel; Mandt, Kathleen E.; Hunter Waite, J. Jr.

    2011-10-10

    A striking feature of the atmosphere of Titan is that no heavy noble gases other than argon were detected by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe during its descent to Titan's surface in 2005 January. Here we provide an explanation of the mysterious absence or rarity of these noble gases in Titan's atmosphere: the thermodynamic conditions prevailing at the surface-atmosphere interface of the satellite allow the formation of multiple guest clathrates that preferentially store some species, including all heavy noble gases, over others. The clean water ice needed for the formation of these clathrates could be delivered by successive episodes of cryovolcanic lavas that have been hypothesized to regularly cover the surface of Titan. The formation of clathrates in the porous lavas and their propensity for trapping Ar, Kr, and Xe would progressively remove these species from the atmosphere of Titan over the course of its history. In some circumstances, a global clathrate crust with an average thickness not exceeding a few meters could be sufficient on Titan for a complete removal of the heavy noble gases from the atmosphere.

  10. Investigation of Lung Structure-Function Relationships Using Hyperpolarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomen, Robert P.

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an application of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phenomenon to non-invasively generate 3D tomographic images. MRI is an emerging modality for the lung, but it suffers from low sensitivity due to inherent low tissue density and short T(*/2) . Hyperpolarization is a process by which the nuclear contribution to NMR signal is greatly enhanced to more than 100,000 times that of samples in thermal equilibrium. The noble gases 3He and 129Xe are most often hyperpolarized by transfer of light angular momentum through the electron of a vaporized alkali metal to the noble gas nucleus (called Spin Exchange Optical Pumping). The enhancement in NMR signal is so great that the gas itself can be imaged via MRI, and because noble gases are chemically inert, they can be safely inhaled by a subject, and the gas distribution within the interior of the lung can be imaged. The mechanics of respiration is an elegant physical process by which air is is brought into the distal airspaces of the lungs for oxygen/carbon dioxide gas exchange with blood. Therefore proper description of lung function is intricately related to its physical structure , and the basic mechanical operation of healthy lungs -- from pressure driven airflow, to alveolar airspace gas kinetics, to gas exchange by blood/gas concentration gradients, to elastic contraction of parenchymal tissue -- is a process decidedly governed by the laws of physics. This dissertation will describe experiments investigating the relationship of lung structure and function using hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. In particular HP gases will be applied to the study of several pulmonary diseases each of which demonstrates unique structure-function abnormalities: asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Successful implementation of an HP gas acquisition protocol for pulmonary studies is an involved and stratified undertaking which requires a solid theoretical foundation in NMR

  11. Highly Fluorescent Noble Metal Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Nicovich, Philip R.; Dickson, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Highly fluorescent, water-soluble, few-atom noble metal quantum dots have been created that behave as multi-electron artificial atoms with discrete, size-tunable electronic transitions throughout the visible and near IR. These “molecular metals” exhibit highly polarizable transitions and scale in size according to the simple relation, Efermi/N1/3, predicted by the free electron model of metallic behavior. This simple scaling indicates that fluorescence arises from intraband transitions of free electrons and that these conduction electron transitions are the low number limit of the plasmon – the collective dipole oscillations occurring when a continuous density of states is reached. Providing the “missing link” between atomic and nanoparticle behavior in noble metals, these emissive, water-soluble Au nanoclusters open new opportunities for biological labels, energy transfer pairs, and light emitting sources in nanoscale optoelectronics. PMID:17105412

  12. Noble Gases in the Chelyabinsk Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haba, Makiko K.; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke; Mikouchi, Takashi; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fell in Russia on February 15, 2013 and was classified as LL5 chondrite. The diameter before it entered the atmosphere has been estimated to be about 20 m [1]. Up to now, numerous fragments weighing much greater than 100 kg in total have been collected. In this study, all noble gases were measured for 13 fragments to investigate the exposure history of the Chelyabinsk meteorite and the thermal history of its parent asteroid.

  13. Identifying Glacial Meltwater Sources in Greenland using Noble Gases as Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Castro, M. C.; Aciego, S.; Hall, C. M.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.; Das, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a noble gas study in glacial meltwater (GMW) from the Greenland Ice Sheet. It explores the information noble gases can provide in glacial environments with respect to GMW sources, relative source contributions, water residence times, and spatial locations where this GMW originates within the ice sheet. This study seeks to improve our understanding of the dynamics of the ice sheets, critical for the major role they play in climate change. This is possible due to the conservative nature of noble gases and the temperature dependency of their concentrations in water in equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW) which allows estimation of the altitude at which GMW originated. In addition, crustal He accumulates in water over time, allowing for estimation of water residence times. GMW samples were collected at five locations in southern Greenland. Results show that the major source of subglacial meltwater is ASW rather than old, compressed glacial ice, which has a distinct noble gas signature not seen in our samples. Given that, GMW samples do deviate to a certain extent from ASW, with concentrations displaying two distinct patterns. The first one presents a relative Ar enrichment with respect to Ne, Kr, and Xe, first observed in high-altitude springs in the Galápagos Islands (Warrier et al., 2012). The second one displays a mass-dependent pattern, first observed in Michigan rainwater (Warrier et al., 2013). Ne and Xe analysis suggests that about half of the samples equilibrated at a temperature of ~0°C and altitudes between 1 km and 2 km, with a few samples pointing to lower equilibration altitudes and temperatures between 2°C and 5°C. Two samples suggest an origin as melted ice and lack of equilibration with surface conditions. He concentrations vary between 1.1 and 7 times that of ASW and suggest glacial meltwater ages between 100 and 3600 yrs, a result that is consistent with a preliminary 3H analysis. References: Warrier, R. B., Castro, M. C., and Hall, C

  14. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. III - Sorption of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon on carbon - Elemental fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe was studied in carbon black, acridine carbon, and diamond in an attempt to understand the origin of trapped noble gases in meteorites. The results support a model in which gases are physically adsorbed on interior surfaces formed by a pore labyrinth within amorphous carbons. The data show that: (1) the adsorption/desorption times are controlled by choke points that restrict the movement of noble gas atoms within the pore labyrinth, and (2) the physical adsorption controls the temperature behavior and elemental fractionation patterns.

  15. The Behavior and Effects of the Noble Metals in the DWPF Melter System

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.E.; Bickford, D.F.

    1997-11-30

    Governments worldwide have committed to stabilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) by vitrification to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. All of these nuclear wastes contain the fission-product noble metals: ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium. SRS wastes also contain natural silver from iodine scrubbers. Closely associated with the noble metals are the fission products selenium and tellurium which are chemical analogs of sulfur and which combine with noble metals to influence their behavior and properties. Experience has shown that these melt insoluble metals and their compounds tend to settle to the floor of Joule-heated ceramic melters. In fact, almost all of the major research and production facilities have experienced some operational problem which can be associated with the presence of dense accumulations of these relatively conductive metals and/or their compounds. In most cases, these deposits have led to a loss of production capability, in some cases, to the point that melter operation could not continue. HLW nuclear waste vitrification facilities in the United States are the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the planned Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the operating West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. An extensive noble metals testing program was begun in 1990. The objectives of this task were to explore the effects of the noble metals on the DWPF melter feed preparation and waste vitrification processes. This report focuses on the vitrification portion of the test program.

  16. Noble Metal Arsenides and Gold Inclusions in Northwest Africa 8186

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, P.; McCubbin, F. M.; Rahman, Z.; Keller, L. P.; Agee, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites are a highly thermally altered group of carbonaceous chondrites, experiencing temperatures ranging between approximately 576-867 degrees Centigrade. Additionally, the mineralogy of the CK chondrites record the highest overall oxygen fugacity of all chondrites, above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. Me-tallic Fe-Ni is extremely rare in CK chondrites, but magnetite and Fe,Ni sulfides are commonly observed. Noble metal-rich inclusions have previously been found in some magnetite and sulfide grains. These arsenides, tellurides, and sulfides, which contain varying amounts of Pt, Ru, Os, Te, As, Ir, and S, are thought to form either by condensation from a solar gas, or by exsolution during metamorphism on the chondritic parent body. Northwest Africa (NWA) 8186 is a highly metamorphosed CK chondrite. This meteorite is predominately composed of NiO-rich forsteritic olivine (Fo65), with lesser amounts of plagioclase (An52), augite (Fs11Wo49), magnetite (with exsolved titanomagnetite, hercynite, and titanohematite), monosulfide solid solution (with exsolved pentlandite), and the phosphate minerals Cl-apatite and merrillite. This meteorite contains coarse-grained, homogeneous silicates, and has 120-degree triple junctions between mineral phases, which indicates a high degree of thermal metamorphism. The presence of NiO-rich olivine, oxides phases all bearing Fe3 plus, and the absence of metal, are consistent with an oxygen fugacity above the FMQ buffer. We also observed noble metal-rich phases within sulfide grains in NWA 8186, which are the primary focus of the present study.

  17. The quest for regolithic howardites. Part 1: Two trends uncovered using noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Ott, U.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Herrin, J. S.; Herrmann, S.; Mertzman, S. A.; Mertzman, K. R.; Peng, Z. X.; Quinn, J. E.

    2013-03-01

    We report noble gas data (helium (He), neon (Ne), argon (Ar), krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe)), nominal gas retention ages (K-Ar, U-Th-He) and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages for the ten howardites EET 83376, EET 99408, LEW 85313, MET 00423, MET 96500, PCA 02066, PRA 04401, QUE 94200, QUE 97002, and SCO 06040, in research to better understand the regolith of the HED parent body - Vesta - through a combined petrological, compositional and noble gas study. Our main aim is to determine which howardites are truly regolithic - as defined by the presence of solar noble gas components (e.g. solar wind (SW), fractionated solar wind (FSW)) and/or by the presence of planetary components (e.g. Q, HL) associated with foreign clasts of carbonaceous chondrite material within the breccias. Of our ten howardites, four (LEW 85313, MET 00423, PRA 04401 and SCO 06040) show evidence for a regolithic origin, with noble gas ratios indicating the presence of trapped components. Howardites PRA 04401 and SCO 06040 contain significant amounts of CM type carbonaceous chondrite material, and these samples are dominated by a planetary component similar to that observed in CM meteorites Murchison and Maribo. Overall, we find evidence for two regolithic groups with different release trends: (1) SW/FSW component dominated howardites (LEW 85313 and MET 00423), where SW/FSW is dominant at low temperature releases, and less pronounced at higher temperatures; (2) Planetary component dominated howardites (PRA 04401 and SCO 06040) that also contain SW/FSW - the planetary component is associated with incorporated carbonaceous chondrite material, and is dominant at the mid-temperature release. The remaining six howardites EET 83376, EET 99408, MET 96500, PCA 02066, QUE 94200, and QUE 97002, are dominated by cosmogenic noble gases, and are not considered regolithic. Previous work by Warren et al. (2009) suggested that high siderophile element contents (specifically nickel (Ni) > 300 μg/g) were a regolith

  18. CO-oxidation catalysts: Low-temperature CO oxidation over Noble-Metal Reducible Oxide (NMRO) catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxidation of CO to CO2 is an important reaction technologically and environmentally and a complex and interesting reaction scientifically. In most cases, the reaction is carried out in order to remove CO as an environmental hazard. A major application of heterogeneous catalysts is catalytic oxidation of CO in the exhaust of combustion devices. The reaction over catalysts in exhaust gas is fast and often mass-transfer-limited since exhaust gases are hot and O2/CO ratios are high. The main challenges to catalyst designers are to control thermal sintering and chemical poisoning of the active materials. The effect of the noble metal on the oxide is discussed, followed by the effect of the oxide on the noble metal, the interaction of the noble metal and oxide to form unique catalytic sites, and the possible ways in which the CO oxidation reaction is catalyzed by the NMRO materials.

  19. Fractionated (Martian) Noble Gases — EFA, Experiments and Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Barnes, G.; Bridges, J. C.; Bullock, M. A.; Chavez, C. L.; Filiberto, J.; Herrmann, S.; Hicks, L. J.; Kelley, S. P.; Miller, M. A.; Moore, J. M.; Ott, U.; Smith, H. D.; Steer, E. D.; Swindle, T. D.; Treiman, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    Noble gases are tracers for physical processes, including adsorption, dissolution and secondary mineral formation. We examine the Martian fractionated atmosphere through literature, terrestrial analogs and experiments.

  20. New applications of noble metal catalysts in hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.H.G.; Bertram, R.V.; Dencker, G.D.

    1995-09-01

    The paper explores how a noble metal hydrocracking catalyst functions stably in a hydrogen sulfide and ammonia environment and, in particular, how the physical positioning of the noble metal molecules affects catalyst performance. A commercial example, HC-28 catalyst in the Unicracking unit at Marathon Oil Refinery in Robinson, Illinois, demonstrates the success of the noble metal catalyst approach for naphtha production. In addition, a new Unicracking catalyst, HC-35, which uses a noble metal component to produce high-quality middle distillates, is introduced. The paper also shows how refiners may derive increased economic and operational benefits from their catalyst investment by using the latest developments in reactor internals design.

  1. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.; Dawless, Robert K.; Hosler, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  2. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.; Dawless, Robert K.; Hosler, Robert B.

    2001-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  3. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. I - Magnetite and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    The trapping of meteoritic noble gases by solids is simulated through the synthesis of 18 Fe3O4 samples at 350-720 K in a noble gas atmosphere, by means of the reactions: (1) 3Fe + 4H2O yields Fe3O4 + 4H2, using Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe; and (2) 3Fe + 4CO yields Fe3O4 + 4C + carbides, using Xe. Etching experiments suggest an analogy with 'Phase Q' in meteorites. Adsorbed atmospheric gases are present in all samples, and dominate whenever the noble gas partial pressure in the atmosphere is greater than that in the synthesis. While many of the results of Lancet and Anders (1973) appear to have been dominated by such an atmospheric component, others are suspect. When the doubtful samples of Lancet and Anders are corrected or eliminated, the fractionation pattern no longer peaks at Ar, but rather, as in the present sample, rises monotonically from Ne to Xe. No evidence is found for the earlier study's claim of a strong temperature dependence.

  4. Highly concentrated nebular noble gases in porous nanocarbon separates from the Saratov (L4) meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Amari, Sachiko; Matsuda, Jun-ichi; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2013-11-20

    The majority of heavy noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) in primitive meteorites are stored in a poorly understood phase called Q. Although Q is thought to be carbonaceous, the full identity of the phase has remained elusive for almost four decades. In order to better characterize phase Q and, in turn, the early solar nebula, we separated carbon-rich fractions from the Saratov (L4) meteorite. We chose this meteorite because Q is most resistant in thermal alteration among carbonaceous noble gas carriers in meteorites and we hoped that, in this highly metamorphosed meteorite, Q would be present but not diamond: these two phases are very difficult to separate from each other. One of the fractions, AJ, has the highest {sup 132}Xe concentration of 2.1 × 10{sup –6} cm{sup 3} STP g{sup –1}, exceeding any Q-rich fractions that have yet been analyzed. Transmission electron microscopy studies of the fraction AJ and a less Q-rich fraction AI indicate that they both are primarily porous carbon that consists of domains with short-range graphene orders, with variable packing in three dimensions, but no long-range graphitic order. The relative abundance of Xe and C atoms (6:10{sup 9}) in the separates indicates that individual noble gas atoms are associated with only a minor component of the porous carbon, possibly one or more specific arrangements of the nanoparticulate graphene.

  5. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. I - Magnetite and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1982-06-01

    The trapping of meteoritic noble gases by solids is simulated through the synthesis of 18 Fe3O4 samples at 350-720 K in a noble gas atmosphere, by means of the reactions: (1) 3Fe + 4H2O yields Fe3O4 + 4H2, using Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe; and (2) 3Fe + 4CO yields Fe3O4 + 4C + carbides, using Xe. Etching experiments suggest an analogy with 'Phase Q' in meteorites. Adsorbed atmospheric gases are present in all samples, and dominate whenever the noble gas partial pressure in the atmosphere is greater than that in the synthesis. While many of the results of Lancet and Anders (1973) appear to have been dominated by such an atmospheric component, others are suspect. When the doubtful samples of Lancet and Anders are corrected or eliminated, the fractionation pattern no longer peaks at Ar, but rather, as in the present sample, rises monotonically from Ne to Xe. No evidence is found for the earlier study's claim of a strong temperature dependence.

  6. The atmospheric inventory of Xenon and noble cases in shales The plastic bag experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Honda, M.; Kramer, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    A novel trapped gas analysis protocol is applied to five shales in which the samples are sealed in air to eliminate the possibility of gas loss in the preanalysis laboratory vacuum exposure of a conventional protocol. The test is aimed at a determination concerning the hypothesis that atmospheric noble gases occur in the same proportion as planetary gases in meteorites, and that the factor-of-23 deficiency of air Xe relative to planetary Xe is made up by Xe stored in shales or other sedimentary rocks. The results obtained do not support the shale hypothesis.

  7. Enhancement of NMR and MRI in the presence of hyperpolarized noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2004-11-16

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  8. Solubilities of noble gases in magnetite - Implications for planetary gases in meteorites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancet, M. S.; Anders, E.

    1973-01-01

    Solubilities of noble gases in magnetite were determined by growing magnetite in a noble-gas atmosphere between 450 and 700 K. Henry's law is obeyed at pressures up to .01 atm for He, Ne, Ar and up to .00001 atm for Kr, Xe, with the following distribution coefficients at 500 K: He 0.042, Ne 0.016, Ar 3.6, Kr 1.3, Xe 0.88, some 100 to 100,000 times higher than previous determinations on silicate and fluoride melts. Apparent heats of solution are in sharp contrast with earlier determinations on melts which were small and positive, but are comparable to the values for clathrates. Presumably the gases are held in anion vacancies.

  9. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  10. Properties of Laser Produced TMAE Plasma Admixed with Air Constituents, Nitrogen and Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guowen; Scharer, John; Kelly, Kurt

    1999-10-01

    A high initial density (> 10^13 cm-3) and a large volume (hundreds of cm^3) plasma is created by a 193 nm laser ionization of an organic molecule, tetrakis(dimethyl-amino)ethylene(TMAE). The properties of this plasma mixed with nitrogen and noble gases are studied. Fast probe measurements which include a detailed considerations of probe structure, probe surface cleaning, shielding, probe perturbation, frequency response, temporal and spatial resolutions, dummy probe corrections and noise analysis will be described. Electron densities obtained by this method are independent on the ion species mixture. A plasma emission diagnostic is used to estimate plasma densities for the higher admixture pressures. Electron density and temperature vs. time for various TMAE, nitrogen and noble gas pressures and laser power will be presented. The role of super-excited and metastable states in the decay process will also be discussed.

  11. H3(+) as a trap for noble gases-3: multiple trapping of neon, argon, and krypton in X(n)H3(+) (n = 1-3).

    PubMed

    Pauzat, F; Ellinger, Y; Pilmé, J; Mousis, O

    2009-05-07

    Recent studies on the formation of XH(3)(+) noble gas complexes have shown strategic implications for the composition of the atmospheres of the giant planets as well as for the composition of comets. One crucial factor in the astrophysical process is the relative abundances of the noble gases versus H(3)(+). It is the context in which the possibility for clustering with more than one noble gas (X(n)H(3)(+) up to n = 3) has been investigated for noble gases X ranging from neon to krypton. In order to assert our results, a variety of methods have been used including ab initio coupled cluster CCSD and CCSD(T), MP2, and density functional BH&HLYP levels of theory. All complexes with one, two, and three noble gases are found to be stable in the Ne, Ar, and Kr families. These stable structures are planar with the noble gases attached to the apices of the H(3)(+) triangle. The binding energy of the nth atom, defined as the X(n)H(3)(+) --> X(n-1)H(3)(+) + X reaction energy, increases slightly with n varying from 1 to 3 in the neon series, while it decreases in the argon series and shows a minimum for n = 2 in the krypton series. The origin of this phenomenon is to be found in the variations in the respective vibrational energies. A topological analysis of the electron localization function shows the importance of the charge transfer from the noble gases toward H(3)(+) as a driving force in the bonding along the series. It is also consistent with the increase in the atomic polarizabilities from neon to krypton. Rotational constants and harmonic frequencies are reported in order to provide a body of data to be used for the detection in laboratory prior to space observations. This study strongly suggests that the noble gases could be sequestered even in an environment where the H(3)(+) abundance is small.

  12. The unification of psychology: a noble quest.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Lawrence G

    2004-12-01

    Henriques' effort to develop a unified theory for psychology represents a noble quest (this issue). Even if the quest fails, the effort itself may produce benefits for psychology. This article focuses first on some general comments on the unified theory, with some suggestions about elements that seem desirable in the theory and some elements that may benefit from further elaboration. A specific application to the area of posttraumatic growth suggests the theory is capable of providing a framework for understanding specific areas of human psychology. Finally, the potential future of the unified theory is considered with a focus on its potential as a "useful mass movement" in psychology.

  13. The solubility of noble gases in crude oil at 25-100°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Specht, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    The solubility of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe was measured in two typical crude oils at temperatures of 25–100°C. The oil samples were obtained from the Elk Hills oil field located in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. The experimental procedure consisted of placing a known amount of gas with a known volume of crude oil in a stainless steel hydrothermal pressure vessel. The vessel was housed inside an oven and the entire unit rotates providing continuous mixing. The amount of gas dissolved in oil at a measured temperature and partial pressure of gas was used to calculate the solubility constants for these gases. Results show that the solubility of He and Ne in both oils is approximately the same; solubility then increases with atomic mass, with the solubility of Xe at 25°C being two orders of magnitude higher than that of He. The gas solubilities are somewhat higher in the lower density (higher API gravity) oil. The solubility of Ar is approximately constant in the range of temperatures of this study. The solubilities of He and Ne increase, but those of Kr and Xe decrease with increasing temperatures. Solubilities of noble gases in crude oil are significantly higher than their solubilities in water. For example, the solubilities of He and Xe at 25°C in the light oil of this study are, respectively, 3 and 24 times higher than their solubilities in pure water, and they are 15 and 300 times higher than in a brine with a salinity of 350,000 mg/l dissolved solids. These large and variable differences in the solubilities of noble gases in oil and water indicate that, in sedimentary basins with oil, these gases must be partitioned between oil, water and natural gas before they are used to deduce the origin and residence time of these fluids.

  14. Fullerenes and Noble Gases in the Murchison and Allende Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Bunch, Ted E.

    2000-01-01

    In this work we report the detection of fullerenes (C60 to C250) in the Murchison and Allende meteorites. By exploiting the unique ability of these molecules to trap noble gases, we have determined that fullerene is indeed a new carrier phase for noble gases in meteorites.

  15. Nitrogen and noble gases in the 71501 bulk soil and ilmenite as records of the solar wind exposure: Which is correct?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signer, P.; Baur, H.; Etique, P.; Wieler, R.

    1986-01-01

    The N determination in mg sized mineral separates from lunar soils by static mass spectrometry is an experimental break-through likely to contribute to the deciphering of the records left in the mineral grains by the exposure to the solar wind. In this discussion some comparisons of the results of N and noble gas analyses of the 71501 bulk soil and an ilmenite separate thereof are focussed on. Conclusions from noble gas data obtained on mineral separates from some 20 soils are summarized in a companion paper and are also discussed herein.

  16. Nano bubbles in liquid of a noble-gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takenori; Ohnishi, Shuhei

    2010-02-07

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with over one million atoms are used to investigate nano bubbles in Ar-Ne liquid. The simulations demonstrate cavitations in the stretched liquid, and bubble creation and collapse. We find that a small cavity created in the stretched liquid spontaneously transforms into a nano bubble with the homogeneous vapor region. The equilibrium spherical bubble of 11.4 nm in radius is obtained after the long-time MD run. The surface tension of the nano bubble is found to be larger than that of the flat surface.

  17. A lattice-Boltzman model for noble gas diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Huber, C.; Renne, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Thermochronometry by the 40Ar/39Ar, 4He/3He, and (U-Th)/He techniques provides insights into a array of planetary processes that span immense time and temperature regimes, from rapid and high temperature asteroid impact events to mountain uplift occurring over plate tectonic timescales at near surface temperatures. Thermal modeling has expanded from simple calculations for quantifying diffusion from a single spherical domain or log normal distributions of domains to include crystals having discrete domain distributions, fast diffusion pathways, diffusive anisotropy, complex crystal geometries, alpha damage, and alpha ejection. Despite these advances, our understanding of diffusion within crystals that have complex microstructural features (e.g., exsolution and diffusive sinks) or highly asymmetric concentration gradients remains fragmentary. Improved computational speeds now enable thermochronologists to quantitatively explore many such problems. We have developed a code based on the lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method to model diffusion from a variety of complex 2-D geometries having isotropic, temperature-independent anisotropic, and temperature-dependent anisotropic diffusivity. We utilize the LB diffusion code to examine the effects of non-zero concentration boundaries, fast diffusion pathways, diffusive sinks, exsolution lamellae, asymmetrical concentration distributions, and temperature gradients on calculated diffusion parameters, age data, and inferred thermal histories. Animations and geological examples illustrate the applicability of the code to natural settings.

  18. Nucleogenic noble gas components in the Cape York iron meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. V. S.; Marti, K.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports data on neutron capture products of the secondary cosmic ray component, the inferred proton and neutron fluences, and the identification of double beta decay of Se-82 in heavily shielded samples of the Cape York iron meteorite. One purpose of this study is to develop a new chronometer for cosmic ray exposure, based on the nuclides I-129 (16 My half-life) and Xe-129 from low energy cosmic ray reactions on Te. The abundance ratio of these two nuclides permits the determination of an (effective) exposure age of 93 + or - 16 My, which represents the first exposure age datum of Cape York. The very small concentrations of spallogenic Ar-38 = 6.5 x 10 to the -10th cu cm STP/g in the metal and troilite (per g Fe) document the heavily shielded locations of the sample. An excess of Xe-129 in the troilite is shown to be entirely due to the decay of cosmic-ray-produced I-129. On the other hand, an inclusion in the troilite reveals the presence of Xe-129 from extinct I-129 and documents its about 4.5 Gy formation age. Mono-isotopic excess of Kr-82 is identified as due to beta-beta-decay of Se-82 with an inferred half-life of 1.0 x 10 to the 20th y. This represents the first beta-beta-decay product observed in a meteorite.

  19. Enhanced Noble Gas Adsorption in Ag@MOF-74Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-01-14

    Various amounts of Ag nanoparticles were successfully deposited in porous MOF-74Ni (or Ni/DOBDC) with an auto-reduction method. An optimized silver-loaded MOF-74Ni was shown to have an improved Xe adsorption capacity (15% more) at STP compared to the MOF without silver nanoparticles. The silver-loaded sample also has a higher Xe/Kr selectivity. These results are explained by the stronger interactions between polarizable Xe molecules and the well-dispersed Ag nanoparticles.

  20. Molecular and crystal structures of noble gas compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiev, Sh Sh; Sokolov (deceased, V. B.; Chaivanov, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Data on the structures of xenon and krypton compounds in various physical states are analyzed and generalized. The structures of simple, coordination, polymeric and clathrate-like compounds of these elements with various types of bonds are considered. Characteristic features of their vibrational spectra are discussed in relation to structural transformations caused by cation-anion interactions, structurally non-rigid intramolecular rearrangements and other factors. The bibliography includes 332 references.

  1. Charge transfer between fullerenes and highly charged noble gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narits, A. A.

    2008-07-01

    A semiclassical model for the description of charge-exchange processes in collisions between fullerenes and multiply charged ions is developed. It is based on the decay model combined with the impact-parameter representation for the heavy particles' relative motion. The charge-transfer process in our model is treated as a transition of the active electron over and under the quasistatic potential barrier formed by the electric fields of the target and projectile. Due to the high electron delocalization on the surface of fullerene we represent it as a perfectly conducting hard sphere, whose radius is determined by the dipole polarizability of C60. The energies of the active electrons are assumed to be equal to the corresponding ionization potentials including the Stark-shift effect. We have developed an efficient technique for the evaluation of the electron transmission coefficient through the asymmetric potential barrier. It is shown that our model provides a good agreement with the available experimental data on single-electron charge-exchange processes. Moreover, it allows us to get an adequate description of multi-electron transfer processes. The first theoretical results on charge exchange between the fullerene ions and highly charged ions have been obtained.

  2. Effect of laser polarization and pulse energy on therapeutic, femtosecond laser-induced second harmonic generation in corneal tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, William R.; Ilev, Ilko K.

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most commonly performed surgical operations in the world, including laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK), lens replacement (e.g. cataract surgery), and keratoplasty (cornea transplant), now employ therapeutic infrared femtosecond lasers (FSLs) for their extreme precision, low energy delivered into tissue and advanced ablation characteristics. Although the widely exploited applications of FSLs in medical therapeutics offer significant benefits, FSLs must generate very high intensities in order to achieve optical breakdown, the predominant tissue ablative mechanism, which can also stimulate nonlinear optical effects such as harmonic generation, an effect that generates coherent visible and UV light in the case of second- (SHG) and third-harmonic generation (THG), respectively. In order to improve the understanding of HG in corneal tissue, the effect of FSL polarization and pulse energy were investigated. FSL stimulated SHG intensity in corneal tissue was measured as the laser polarization was rotated 360 degrees. Further, the pulse energy at the SHG wavelength were measured for single FSL pulses as the pulse energy at the fundamental wavelength was varied through a range of clinically relevant values. The results of this study revealed SHG intensity oscillated with laser polarization, having a variation greater than 20%. This relationship seems to due to the intrinsic anisotropy of collagen fibril hyperpolarizability, not related to tissue birefringence. SHG pulse energy measurements showed an increase in SHG pulse energy with increasing FSL pulse energy, however conversion efficiency decreased. This may be related to the dynamic relationship between optical breakdown leading to tissue destruction and HG evolution.

  3. Impact of artificial recharge on dissolved noble gases in groundwater in California.

    PubMed

    Cey, Bradley D; Hudson, G Bryant; Moran, Jean E; Scanlon, Bridget R

    2008-02-15

    Dissolved noble gas concentrations in groundwater can provide valuable information on recharge temperatures and enable 3H-3He age-dating with the use of physically based interpretive models. This study presents a large (905 samples) data set of dissolved noble gas concentrations from drinking water supply wells throughout California, representing a range of physiographic, climatic, and water management conditions. Three common interpretive models (unfractionated air, UA; partial re-equilibration, PR; and closed system equilibrium, CE) produce systematically different recharge temperatures or ages; however, the ability of the different models to fit measured data within measurement uncertainty indicates that goodness-of-fit is not a robust indicator for model appropriateness. Therefore caution is necessary when interpreting model results. Samples from multiple locations contained significantly higher Ne and excess air concentrations than reported in the literature, with maximum excess air tending toward 0.05 cm3 STP g(-1) (deltaNe approximately 400%). Artificial recharge is the most plausible cause of the high excess air concentrations. The ability of artificial recharge to dissolve greater amounts of atmospheric gases has important implications for oxidation-reduction dependent chemical reactions. Measured gas concentration ratios suggest that diffusive degassing may have occurred. Understanding the physical processes controlling gas dissolution during groundwater recharge is critical for optimal management of artificial recharge and for predicting changes in water quality that can occur following artificial recharge.

  4. Noble Gases in Two Fragments of Different Lithologies from the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagao, K.; Haba, M. K.; Zolensky, M.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    The Almahata Sitta meteorite, whose preat-mospheric body was the asteroid 2008 TC3, fell on October 7, 2008 in the Nubian Desert in northern Sudan [e.g., 1, 2]. Numer-ous fragments have been recovered during several expeditions organized from December 2008 [2]. The meteorite was classified as an anomalous polymict ureilite with several different kinds of chondritic fragments [e.g., 3-5]. Noble gas studies performed on several fragments from the meteorite showed cosmic-ray expo-sure ages of about 20 My [e.g., 6-8], although slightly shorter ages were also reported in [9, 10]. Concentrations of trapped heavy noble gases are variable among the fragments of different lithologies [9, 10]. We report noble gas data on two samples from the #1 and #47 fragments [2], which were the same as those re-ported by Ott et al. [9]. Experimental Procedure: Weights of bulk samples #1 and #47 used in this work were 16.1 mg and 17.6 mg, respectively. Noble gases were extracted by stepwise heating at the tempera-tures of 800, 1200 and 1800°C for #1 and 600, 800, 1000, 1200, 1400, 1600 and 1800°C for #47. Concentrations and isotopic ra-tios of noble gases were measured with a modified-VG5400/MS-III at the Geochemical Research Center, University of Tokyo. Results and Discussion: Cosmogenic He and Ne are domi-nant in both #1 and #47, but trapped Ar, Kr and Xe concentra-tions are much higher in #47 than in #1, showing that noble gas compositions in #47 are similar to those of ureilites. 3He/21Ne and 22Ne/21Ne of cosmogenic He and Ne are 4.8 and 1.12 for #1 and 3.6 and 1.06 for #47, respectively, both of which plot on a Bern line [11]. This indicates negligible loss of cosmogenic 3He from #1 in our sample, unlike the low 3He/21Ne of 3.1 for #1 by Ott et al. [9]. Concentrations of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne (10-8 cc/g) are 30 and 6.3 for #1 and 32 and 9.0 for #47, respectively, which are higher than those in [9] and give cosmic-ray exposure ages of ca. 20 My depending on assumed production

  5. Ionization and Positronium Formation in Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, J. P.; Sullivan, J. P.; Surko, C. M.

    2006-11-01

    This paper reviews key results of our recent study [Marler et al., Phys. Rev. A 71, 022701 (2005)] of direct ionization and positronium formation in the noble gases from the thresholds for these processes to 90 eV. Results for argon and xenon are emphasized. The original study also reports similar results for neon and krypton. The experiment uses a cold, trap-based positron beam and scattering in a strong magnetic field to make absolute cross section measurements. Comparison with a detailed set of previous measurements yields reasonably good absolute agreement. A third, independent analysis was used to resolve the remaining discrepancies to a < 5% level in argon, krypton and xenon. Key aspects of the work, comparison with available theory, and open questions for future research are discussed.

  6. Noble Metal Nanoparticles Applications in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde, João; Doria, Gonçalo; Baptista, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has prompted new and improved materials for biomedical applications with particular emphasis in therapy and diagnostics. Special interest has been directed at providing enhanced molecular therapeutics for cancer, where conventional approaches do not effectively differentiate between cancerous and normal cells; that is, they lack specificity. This normally causes systemic toxicity and severe and adverse side effects with concomitant loss of quality of life. Because of their small size, nanoparticles can readily interact with biomolecules both at surface and inside cells, yielding better signals and target specificity for diagnostics and therapeutics. This way, a variety of nanoparticles with the possibility of diversified modification with biomolecules have been investigated for biomedical applications including their use in highly sensitive imaging assays, thermal ablation, and radiotherapy enhancement as well as drug and gene delivery and silencing. Here, we review the available noble metal nanoparticles for cancer therapy, with particular focus on those already being translated into clinical settings. PMID:22007307

  7. Sir William Ramsay and the noble gases.

    PubMed

    Davies, Alwyn G

    2012-01-01

    Sir William Ramsay was one of the world's leading scientists at the end of the 19th century, and in a spectacular period of research between 1894 and 1898, he discovered five new elements. These were the noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon; they added a whole new group to the Periodic Table of the elements, and provided the keystone to our understanding of the electronic structure of atoms, and the way those electrons bind the atoms together into molecules. For this work he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904, the first such prize to come to a British subject. He was also a man of great charm, a good linguist, and a composer and performer of music, poetry and song. This review will trace his career, describe his character and give and account of the chemistry which led to the award of the Nobel Prize.

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition Route To Tailor Nanoalloys of Noble and Non-noble Metals.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ranjith K; Dendooven, Jolien; Filez, Matthias; Galvita, Vladimir V; Poelman, Hilde; Solano, Eduardo; Minjauw, Matthias M; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Fonda, Emiliano; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Bras, Wim; Marin, Guy B; Detavernier, Christophe

    2016-09-27

    Since their early discovery, bimetallic nanoparticles have revolutionized various fields, including nanomagnetism and optics as well as heterogeneous catalysis. Knowledge buildup in the past decades has witnessed that the nanoparticle size and composition strongly impact the nanoparticle's properties and performance. Yet, conventional synthesis strategies lack proper control over the nanoparticle morphology and composition. Recently, atomically precise synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles has been achieved by atomic layer deposition (ALD), alleviating particle size and compositional nonuniformities. However, this bimetal ALD strategy applies to noble metals only, a small niche within the extensive class of bimetallic alloys. We report an ALD-based approach for the tailored synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles containing both noble and non-noble metals, here exemplified for Pt-In. First, a Pt/In2O3 bilayer is deposited by ALD, yielding precisely defined Pt-In nanoparticles after high-temperature H2 reduction. The nanoparticles' In content can be accurately controlled over the whole compositional range, and the particle size can be tuned from micrometers down to the nanometer scale. The size and compositional flexibility provided by this ALD-approach will trigger the fabrication of fully tailored bimetallic nanomaterials, including superior nanocatalysts.

  9. Degassing and contamination of noble gases in Mid-Atlantic Ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnard, P.; Harrison, D.; Turner, G.; Nesbitt, R.

    2003-01-01

    New He, Ne, Ar and CO2 stepped-crushing data from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge show that contamination of basalts by atmospheric noble gases involves three or more components: unfractionated air, fractionated air with high 36Ar/22Ne (≥45) and fractionated air with low 36Ar/22Ne (≤5). In addition, the magmatic noble gases trapped in these basaltic glasses are variably fractionated such that 4He/40Ar* (where the asterisk indicates corrected for atmospheric contamination based on all 36Ar being atmospheric in origin) is in the range 3-12. Single samples have a range in 4He/40Ar* with the highest ratios in the final crush steps, consistent with the most fractionated (highest 4He/40Ar*) volatiles trapped in the smallest vesicles. It is not possible to distinguish between batch and Rayleigh degassing mechanisms. The complexities of the contamination and magmatic fractionation processes means that it is not possible to estimate 40Ar/36Ar of the mantle source to these basalts other than it must be higher than the highest ratio measured (26,200 ± 5200). Noble gas/CO2 ratios are also variable. While some CO2 adsorption during crushing exaggerates the variations in He/CO2 and Ar/CO2, we show that it is not possible to account for the entire variation as an analytical artefact: some of the variation is present in the vesicles. Variations in He/CO2 cannot be attributed to solubility controlled degassing because of the broadly similar solubilities of He and CO2 in tholeiitic magmas. The large range in He/CO2 in these glasses (factor of 10) is not accompanied by indications of major changes in melting regime or source region chemistry, therefore is thought to reflect late-stage (magmatic) fractionation of CO2 from the noble gases. It is not possible to identify an explicit mechanism, although both CO2 reduction (e.g., to hydrocarbons or graphite) and kinetic CO2-noble gas fractionation could account for the variations.

  10. The Interaction of Hydrogen with Simple and Noble Metals Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprunger, Phillip T.

    The basic concepts of adsorption are illustrated by the investigation of a simple adsorbate (hydrogen) with the "simplest" metals (simple and noble metals). Theoretically tractable, these systems serve as an excellent test of our basic understanding of chemisorption. The interaction of atomic and molecular hydrogen with the surfaces of Mg(0001), Mg(1120), Li(110), K(110), Ag(110), and Ag(111) have been studied with a variety of experimental probes. In all cases, no evidence for H_2 associative or dissociative adsorption is observed at the substrate temperature investigated (>=q90 K). In the case of the simple metals below 150 K, atomic hydrogen is bound to the surfaces in a strongly chemisorbed state (hydride). For Mg and Li, the hydride is localized to the surface wherein the substrate electron density is lower than the bulk. Because of the low electron density, hydrogen is absorbed into the bulk of K at low temperatures and forms a bulk-hydride phase. However, these low-temperature phases are metastable. In the case of Mg, hydrogen moves into lower energy configuration bonding sites which are closer to or below the surface plane. However, the hydride characteristics are absent; the H atom is effectively screened because of the higher jellium density. In contrast, upon annealing, hydrogen is absorbed into the bulk of Li and K and phase separation occurs forming regions of clean metal and bulk hydride areas. The results are compared to theoretical studies; the propensity for absorption over adsorption is understood in terms of jellium-based models. In the case of silver, at 100 K, atomic hydrogen bonds in trigonal sites on both the (110) and (111) surfaces. As a function of H concentration, a sequence of lattice gas superstructures is observed; these phases are accompanied by small H-induced displacements of the substrate surface atoms. In the case of Ag(110), the low-temperature phase is metastable; upon annealing, hydrogen desorption from low energy states is

  11. Subduction zone fluxes of halogens and noble gases in seafloor and forearc serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Mark A.; Honda, Masahiko; Pettke, Thomas; Scambelluri, Marco; Phillips, David; Giuliani, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Serpentinites form by hydration of ultramafic lithologies in a range of seafloor and shallow subduction zone settings. Serpentinites are recognised as major reservoirs of fluid mobile elements and H2O in subducting oceanic lithosphere, and together with forearc serpentinites formed in the mantle wedge, provide critical information about shallow-level volatile fluxes during subduction. The current study provides new Cl, as well as the first comprehensive Br, I and noble gas analyses reported for seafloor and forearc chrysotile-lizardite serpentinites. The samples were recovered from IODP drilling campaigns of mid-ocean ridge, passive margin and forearc settings (n=17), and ophiolites in the Italian Alps and Apennines (n=10). The aims of this study were to determine the compositional variability of noble gases and halogens in serpentinites entering subduction zones and evaluate the efficiency of gas loss during the early stages of serpentinite subduction. The chrysotile-lizardite serpentinites and serpentised peridotites contain 43-2300 ppm Cl and 3×10-13-2×10-11 mol g-136Ar, with the concentrations of these elements broadly related to the estimated degree of serpentinisation. The serpentinites have extremely variable Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios with many samples preserving compositions similar to organic-rich sedimentary marine pore fluids. Serpentinites from the Marianas Forearc have very high I concentrations of up to 45 ppm I and I/Cl ratios of ˜14,000 times the seawater value that is even higher than the maximum I/Cl enrichment observed in sedimentary marine pore fluids. The serpentinites have 130Xe/36Ar and 84Kr/36Ar ratios that are mostly close to or above seawater values, and 20Ne/36Ar ratios that range from seawater to lower values. The serpentinites contain <10-270 ppm K and, irrespective of age (0 Ma to ˜160 Ma), are characterised by 40Ar/36Ar ratios of 300-340 that are slightly higher than the seawater value of 296, thus indicating the presence of minor

  12. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. II - Chromite and carbon. III - Sulfides, spinels, and other substances; on the origin of planetary gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    The trapping of noble gases by chromite and carbon, two putative carriers of primordial noble gases in meteorites, was studied by synthesizing 19 samples in a Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe atmosphere at 440-720 K. Noble gas contents are found to approximately obey Henry's Law, but only slight correlations are found with composition, surface area, or adsorption temperature. Geometric mean distribution coefficients for bulk samples and HCl residues in 10 cu cm STP/g atm are: Xe 100, Kr 15, Ar 3.5, and Ne 0.62. Elemental fractionation data support the suggestion of Lewis et al. (1977) that chromite and carbon in C2 and C3 chondrites were formed by the reaction: Fe, Cr + 4CO yields (Fe, Cr)3O4 + 4C + carbides. In contrast to meteoritic minerals, the synthetic specimens show no isotopic fractionation of noble gases. In a subsequent study, attention is given to the cases of sulfides and spinels, on the way to consideration of the origin of planetary gases. Sulfides showed three distinctive trends relative to chromite or magnetite. The elemental fractionation pattern of Ar, Kr and Xe in meteorites, terrestrial rocks and planets resembles the adsorption patterns on the carbons, spinels, sulfides, and other solids studied. The high release temperature of meteoritic noble gases may be explained by transformation of the physisorbed or chemisorbed gas. The ready loss of meteoritic heavy gases on surficial oxidation is consistent with adsorption, as is the high abundance.

  13. Noble gases in submarine pillow basalt glasses from Loihi and Kilauea, Hawaii: A solar component in the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honda, M.; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A.; Clague, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Noble gas elemental and isotopic abundances have been analysed in twenty-two samples of basaltic glass dredged from the submarine flanks of two currently active Hawaiian volcanoes, Loihi Seamount and Kilauea. Neon isotopic ratios are enriched in 20Ne and 21Ne by as much as 16% with respect to atmospheric ratios. All the Hawaiian basalt glass samples show relatively high 3He 4He ratios. The high 20Ne 22Ne values in some of the Hawaiian samples, together with correlations between neon and helium systematics, suggest the presence of a solar component in the source regions of the Hawaiian mantle plume. The solar hypothesis for the Earth's primordial noble gas composition can account for helium and neon isotopic ratios observed in basaltic glasses from both plume and spreading systems, in fluids in continental hydrothermal systems, in CO2 well gases, and in ancient diamonds. These results provide new insights into the origin and evolution of the Earth's atmosphere. ?? 1993.

  14. Stable Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence without the presence of noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsen, M. T.; Dam, J. S.

    2007-10-01

    We report that in spite of the commonly accepted view that stable Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence (SBSL) can only be achieved in water in the presence of a noble gas or hydrogen, long term stable SBSL can in fact be sustained with only diatomic gases like e.g. nitrogen being present. Compared to that of a stable argon bubble, the emission is much weaker and the spectrum looks much colder. Simulations support that the above quoted view, based on the dissociation hypothesis, is an erroneous inference from this theory.

  15. Method for localized deposition of noble metal catalysts with control of morphology

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Huber, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 .degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick .times.10 .mu.m wide .times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer.

  16. Estimating the recharge properties of the deep ocean using noble gases and helium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, Brice; Jenkins, William J.; Moriarty, Roisin; Brown, Peter; Jullion, Loic; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.; Torres Valdes, Sinhue; Hoppema, Mario; Ballentine, Chris; Meredith, Michael P.

    2016-08-01

    The distribution of noble gases and helium isotopes in the dense shelf waters of Antarctica reflects the boundary conditions near the ocean surface: air-sea exchange, sea ice formation, and subsurface ice melt. We use a nonlinear least squares solution to determine the value of the recharge temperature and salinity, as well as the excess air injection and glacial meltwater content throughout the water column and in the precursor to Antarctic Bottom Water. The noble gas-derived recharge temperature and salinity in the Weddell Gyre are -1.95°C and 34.95 psu near 5500 m; these cold, salty recharge values are a result of surface cooling as well as brine rejection during sea ice formation in Antarctic polynyas. In comparison, the global value for deep water recharge temperature is -0.44°C at 5500 m, which is 1.5°C warmer than the southern hemisphere deep water recharge temperature, reflecting a distinct contribution from the north Atlantic. The contrast between northern and southern hemisphere recharge properties highlights the impact of sea ice formation on setting the gas properties in southern sourced deep water. Below 1000 m, glacial meltwater averages 3.5‰ by volume and represents greater than 50% of the excess neon and argon found in the water column. These results indicate glacial melt has a nonnegligible impact on the atmospheric gas content of Antarctic Bottom Water.

  17. Itqiy: A study of noble gases and oxygen isotopes including its terrestrial age and a comparison with Zaklodzie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzer, Andrea; Hill, Dolores H.; Boynton, William V.; Franke, Luitgard; Schultz, Ludolf; Jull, A. J. Timothy; McHargue, Lanny R.; Franchi, Ian A.

    2002-06-01

    We report noble gas, oxygen isotope, 14C and 10Be data of Itqiy as well as noble gas, 14C and 10Be results for Zaklodzie. Both samples have been recently classified as anomalous enstatite meteorites and have been compared in terms of their mineralogy and chemical composition. The composition of enstatite and kamacite and the occurrence of specific sulfide phases in Itqiy indicate it formed under similar reducing conditions to those postulated for enstatite chondrites. The new results now seem to point at a direct spatial link. The noble gas record of Itqiy exhibits the presence of a trapped subsolar component, which is diagnostic for petrologic types 4-6 among enstatite chondrites. The concentration of radiogenic 4He is very low in Itqiy and indicates a recent thermal event. Its 21Ne cosmic-ray exposure age is 30.1 ~ 3.0 Ma and matches the most common age range of enstatite chondrites (mostly EL6 chondrites) but not that of Zaklodzie. Itqiy's isotopic composition of oxygen is in good agreement with that observed in Zaklodzie as well as those found in enstatite meteorites suggesting an origin from a common oxygen pool. The noble gas results, on the other hand, give reason to believe that the origin and evolution of Itqiy and Zaklodzie are not directly connected. Itqiy's terrestrial age of 5800 ~ 500 years sheds crucial light on the uncertain circumstances of its recovery and proves that Itqiy is not a modern fall, whereas the 14C results from Zaklodzie suggest it hit Earth only recently.

  18. High Voltage in Noble Liquids for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, B.; Bernard, E.; Faham, C. H.; Ito, T. M.; Lundberg, B.; Messina, M.; Monrabal, F.; Pereverzev, S. P.; Resnati, F.; Rowson, P. C.; Soderberg, M.; Strauss, T.; Tomas, A.; Va'vra, J.; Wang, H.

    2014-08-22

    A workshop was held at Fermilab November 8-9, 2013 to discuss the challenges of using high voltage in noble liquids. The participants spanned the fields of neutrino, dark matter, and electric dipole moment physics. All presentations at the workshop were made in plenary sessions. This document summarizes the experiences and lessons learned from experiments in these fields at developing high voltage systems in noble liquids.

  19. Anionic chemistry of noble gases: formation of Mg-NG (NG = Xe, Kr, Ar) compounds under pressure.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mao-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Li; Brgoch, Jakoah; Spera, Frank; Jackson, Matthew G; Kresse, Georg; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-11-11

    While often considered to be chemically inert, the reactivity of noble gas elements at elevated pressures is an important aspect of fundamental chemistry. The discovery of Xe oxidation transformed the doctrinal boundary of chemistry by showing that a complete electron shell is not inert to reaction. However, the reductive propensity, i.e., gaining electrons and forming anions, has not been proposed or examined for noble gas elements. In this work, we demonstrate, using first-principles electronic structure calculations coupled to an efficient structure prediction method, that Xe, Kr, and Ar can form thermodynamically stable compounds with Mg at high pressure (≥125, ≥250, and ≥250 GPa, respectively). The resulting compounds are metallic and the noble gas atoms are negatively charged, suggesting that chemical species with a completely filled shell can gain electrons, filling their outermost shell(s). Moreover, this work indicates that Mg2NG (NG = Xe, Kr, Ar) are high-pressure electrides with some of the electrons localized at interstitial sites enclosed by the surrounding atoms. Previous predictions showed that such electrides only form in Mg and its compounds at very high pressures (>500 GPa). These calculations also demonstrate strong chemical interactions between the Xe 5d orbitals and the quantized interstitial quasiatom (ISQ) orbitals, including the strong chemical bonding and electron transfer, revealing the chemical nature of the ISQ.

  20. The diverse biological properties of the chemically inert noble gases.

    PubMed

    Winkler, David A; Thornton, Aaron; Farjot, Géraldine; Katz, Ira

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases represent an intriguing scientific paradox. They are extremely inert chemically but display a remarkable spectrum of clinically useful biological properties. Despite a relative paucity of knowledge of their mechanisms of action, some of the noble gases have been used successfully in the clinic. Studies with xenon have suggested that the noble gases as a class may exhibit valuable biological properties such as anaesthesia; amelioration of ischemic damage; tissue protection prior to transplantation; analgesic properties; and a potentially wide range of other clinically useful effects. Xenon has been shown to be safe in humans, and has useful pharmacokinetic properties such as rapid onset, fast wash out etc. The main limitations in wider use are that: many of the fundamental biochemical studies are still lacking; the lighter noble gases are likely to manifest their properties only under hyperbaric conditions, impractical in surgery; and administration of xenon using convectional gaseous anaesthesia equipment is inefficient, making its use very expensive. There is nonetheless a significant body of published literature on the biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical properties of noble gases but no comprehensive reviews exist that summarize their properties and the existing knowledge of their models of action at the molecular (atomic) level. This review provides such an up-to-date summary of the extensive, useful biological properties of noble gases as drugs and prospects for wider application of these atoms.

  1. Noble gases in anhydrous mantle xenoliths from Tasmania in comparison with other localities from eastern Australia: Implications for the tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuppon, György; Matsumoto, Takuya; Matsuda, Jun-ichi; Everard, John; Sutherland, Lin

    2010-11-01

    Ultramafic xenoliths from Tasmanian basalts were analysed for elemental and isotopic compositions of noble gases, for greater understanding of the evolution of the underlying subcontinental lithosphere. The noble gas isotopic compositions indicate contributions of radiogenic and MORB-like components to the xenoliths. The MORB-like component is characterized by 3He/ 4He ratios between 7 and 9 Ra while the radiogenic component shows lower 3He/ 4He ratios than those in MORB (8.75 ± 2.14 Ra, Graham, 2002). The identified radiogenic component in xenoliths from Tasmania may stem from subduction events, during which the mantle wedge and subcontinental lithospheric mantle were metasomatised by U- and Th-rich fluids. As subduction processes have played important role in the evolution of Eastern Australia during the Paleozoic, the radiogenic component is probably associated with this event. Incorporation of MORB-like noble gases in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath Tasmania is likely related to extensional rifting and associated opening of the Tasman Sea in the Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. The identified noble gas components of the xenoliths are consistent with the geochemical character of the host basalt based on the radiogenic isotope and trace element systematics. This agreement and the petrographic observations (e.g. fluid inclusion trails connected with the reaction rim of the minerals close to the host basalt, spongy texture) indicate that fluids (noble gases, CO 2) most likely propagated from the host basalts to the xenoliths forming fluid inclusions. The observed noble gas isotopic heterogeneity in mantle-derived xenoliths from Tasmanian to North Queensland reflects isotopic heterogeneity at regional scale in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath eastern Australia.

  2. Incorporation of Solar Noble Gases from a Nebula-Derived Atmosphere During Magma Ocean Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Cassen, P.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Porcelli, D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The presence of solar noble gases in the deep interior of the Earth is inferred from the Ne isotopic compositions of MORB (Mid-ocean Ridge Basalts) and OIB (Oceanic Island Basalt); Ar data may also consistent with a solar component in the deep mantle. Models of the transport and distribution of noble gases in the earth's mantle allow for the presence of solar Ar/Ne and Xe/Ne ratios and permit the calculation of lower mantle noble gas concentrations. These mantle data and models also indicate that the Earth suffered early (0.7 to 2 x 10(exp 8) yr) and large (greater than 99 percent) losses of noble gases from the interior, a result previously concluded for atmospheric Xe. We have pursued the suggestion that solar noble gases were incorporated in the forming Earth from a massive, nebula-derived atmosphere which promoted large-scale melting, so that gases from this atmosphere dissolved in the magma ocean and were mixed downward. Models of a primitive atmosphere captured from the solar nebula and supported by accretion luminosity indicate that pressures at the Earth's surface were adequate (and largely more than the required 100 Atm) to dissolve sufficient gases. We have calculated the coupled evolution of the magma ocean and the overlying atmosphere under conditions corresponding to the cessation (or severe attenuation) of the sustaining accretion luminosity, prior to the complete removal of the solar nebula. Such a condition was likely to obtain, for instance, when most of the unaccumulated mass resided in large bodies which were only sporadically accreted. The luminosity supporting the atmosphere is then that provided by the cooling Earth, consideration of which sets a lower limit to the time required to solidify the mantle and terminate the incorporation of atmospheric gases within it. In our initial calculations, we have fixed the nebula temperature at To = 300K, a value likely to be appropriate for nebular temperatures at lAU in the early planet-building epoch

  3. Geochemistry of reduced gas related to serpentinization of the Zambales ophiolite, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrajano, T.A.; Sturchio, N.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Lyon, G.L.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Böhlke, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    Methane-hydrogen gas seeps with mantle-like C and noble gas isotopic characteristics issue from partially serpentinized ultramafic rocks in the Zambales ophiolite, Philippines. New measurements of noble gas and 14C isotope abundances, rock/mixed-volatile equilibrium calculations, and previous chemical and isotopic data suggest that these reduced gases are products of periodotite hydration. The gas seeps are produced in rock-dominated zones of serpentinization, and similar gases may be ubiquitous in ultramafic terranes undergoing serpentinization. ?? 1990.

  4. Noble magnetic barriers in the ASDEX UG tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Halima; Punjabi, Alkesh; Vazquez, Justin

    2010-02-01

    The second-order perturbation method of creating invariant tori inside chaos in Hamiltonian systems (Ali, H.; Punjabi, A. Plasma Phys. Contr. F. 2007, 49, 1565-1582) is applied to the axially symmetric divertor experiment upgrade (ASDEX UG) tokamak to build noble irrational magnetic barriers inside chaos created by resonant magnetic perturbations (m, n)=(3, 2)+(4, 3), with m and n the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers of the Fourier expansion of the magnetic perturbation. The radial dependence of the Fourier modes is ignored. The modes are considered to be locked and have the same amplitude δ. A symplectic mathematical mapping in magnetic coordinates is used to integrate magnetic field line trajectories in the ASDEX UG. Tori with noble irrational rotational transform are the last ones to be destroyed by perturbation in Hamiltonian systems. For this reason, noble irrational magnetic barriers are built inside chaos, and the strongest noble irrational barrier is identified. Three candidate locations for the strongest noble barrier in ASDEX UG are selected. All three candidate locations are chosen to be roughly midway between the resonant rational surfaces ψ32 and ψ43. ψ is the magnetic coordinate of the flux surface. The three candidate surfaces are the noble irrational surfaces close to the surface with q value that is a mediant of q=3/2 and 4/3, q value of the physical midpoint of the two resonant surfaces, and the q value of the surface where the islands of the two perturbing modes just overlap. These q values of the candidate surfaces are denoted by q MED, q MID, and q OVERLAP. The strongest noble barrier close to q MED has the continued fraction representation (CFR) [1;2,2,1∞] and exists for δ≤2.6599×10-4; the strongest noble barrier close to q MID has CFR [1;2,2,2,1∞] and exists for δ≤4.6311×10-4; and the strongest noble barrier close to q OVERLAP has CFR [1;2,2,6,2,1∞] and exists for δ≤1.367770×10-4. From these results, the strongest

  5. Solubility and Partitioning of Noble Gases in Anorthite, Diopside, Forsterite, Spinel, and Synthetic Basaltic Melts: Implications for the Origin and Evolution of Terrestrial Planet Atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadhurst, Catherine Leigh

    The noble gas abundances and isotopic ratios of the terrestrial planets differ from each other and from the average of chondritic meteorites. These different abundance patterns result from primordial heterogeneities or different degassing histories. Magmatic transport is the only degassing mechanism that can be demonstrated to occur on Venus, Earth, and Mars, and is presently the dominant form of volatile transport to a planet's free surface. An alternative technique was developed to determine the partitioning and solubility of noble gases in mineral/melt systems. Natural end member minerals and synthetic melts known to be in equilibrium were held in separate crucibles in a one bar flowing noble gas atmosphere. Experiments were run 7-18 days at 1300 or 1332^circ C, in 99.95% Ar or a Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe mix. Gas concentrations were measured by mass spectrometry. The solubility of noble gases in minerals was surprisingly high, and individual samples of a particular mineral composition are distinct in their behavior. The data is consistent with lattice vacancy defect siting. Noble gas solubility in the minerals increases with increasing atomic number; this may be related to polarizability. Noble gas solubilities in melts decrease with increasing atomic number. Solubility is directly proportional to melt molar volume; values overlap the lower end of the range defined for natural basalts. The lower solubilities are related to the higher MgO and CaO concentrations and lower degree of polymerization and Fe^{3+ } concentration in synthetic vs. natural melts. Partition coefficient patterns show a clear trend of increasing compatibility with increasing noble gas atomic number, but many individual values are >1. Calculations show that the terrestrial planet atmospheres cannot have formed from partial melting of a common chondritic source. When results are examined with isotopic constraints and MOR and hot-spot activities, there is no compelling evidence that the Earth is

  6. Trapping of Noble Gases by Radiative Association with H3 + in the Protosolar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, F.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Ellinger, Y.; Mousis, O.

    2016-04-01

    The heavy noble gas deficiencies observed in Titan’s atmosphere and in comets have been proposed to be related to a sequestration process by {{{H}}}3+ in the gas phase at the early protosolar nebula. Chemical thermodynamics and astrophysics modeling are favorable to this hypothesis, as presented in preceding papers. However, there is a point still to be raised, i.e., that no dynamical study of the efficiency of the collisional processes had been performed so far. Here, we show that, apart from the expected exception of Ne, the rate constants obtained, i.e., 0.7 × 10-18, 0.5 × 10-16, and 10-16 (cm3 s-1) for Ar, Kr, and Xe, respectively, are reasonably high for such processes, particularly in the case of Kr and Xe. The temperature dependence is also considered, showing a similar behavior for all noble gases with a peak efficiency in the range 50-60 K. Globally, we can conclude that the scenario of sequestration by {{{H}}}3+ is definitively comforted by the results of our quantum dynamical treatment. This process may also be responsible of the Ar impoverishment just measured in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the ROSINA mass spectrometer on board the Rosetta spacecraft.

  7. Bubble formation, vesicularity and fractionation of noble gases during MORB degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sator, N.; Guillot, B. B.; Aubry, G.

    2012-12-01

    and the equations of state of the two coexisting phases, deduced from the MD simulation, we have evaluated the evolution of the vesicularity of a MORB melt at depth as function of its initial CO2 contents. An excellent agreement is obtained between our results and data on MORB samples collected at oceanic ridges. A conclusion is that CO2-rich magmas may exist at 100 km depth or more in the oceanic mantle. Moreover, we have evaluated the partitioning and the fractionation of noble gases between the CO2-saturated melt and supercritical CO2 vesicles as function of the pressure. We show that the large distribution of the 4He/40Ar* ratio reported in the literature can be explained if the magma experiences a suite of vesiculation and vesicle loss during ascent. Finally, by applying a pressure drop to a volatile bearing melt (CO2+noble gas), the MD simulation reveals the main steps of bubble formation and noble gas transfer at the nanometric scale. A key result is that the transfer of noble gases is found to be concomitant with CO2 bubble nucleation, a finding which suggests that the difference in diffusivity between He and Ar in the degassing melt has practically no effect on the 4He/40Ar* ratio measured in the vesicles. Guillot B., Sator N. (2011), GCA 75, 1829-1857 Hekinian et al. (2000), J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 98, 49-77 Helo et al. (2011), Nature Geoscience 4, 260-263

  8. Are protonated ions efficient sequestration agents for noble gases in the primitive nebula context?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Ellinger, Yves; ozgurel, Ozge; Bacchus-montabonel, Marie-christine; Mousis, Olivier; Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Institut Lumière Matière, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille

    2016-10-01

    One explanation for the deficiencies of argon, krypton and xenon observed in the atmosphere of Titan might be related to a scenario of sequestration by H3+ in the gas phase at the early evolution of the solar nebula. The chemical process implied is a radiative association, evaluated as rather efficient in the case of H3+, especially for krypton and xenon. In fact, this mechanism of chemical trapping might not be limited to H3+ only, considering that the protonated ions produced in the destruction of H3+ by its main competitors, namely H2O, CO and N2, present in the primitive nebula, might also give stable complexes with the noble gases.Here, the reactivity of the noble gases Ar, Kr, Xe, with all the protonated ions issued from H2O, CO and N2, expected to be present in the nebula with reasonably high abundances, i.e. H3O+, HCO+, HOC+, N2H+, has been studied with quantum simulation methods, quantum dynamics included. All of them give stable complexes; the rate coefficients of their radiative associations have been calculated as a function of temperature between 10 and 100 °K and found ranging from 10-18 to 10-16 cm3s-1, which can be considered as high for this type of reactions and are comparable to the rates obtained with H3+.Consequently, we can consider this process as universal for all protonated ions, which, if present in the primitive nebula as astrophysical models predict, should act as efficient sequestration agents for all three noble gases, in addition to the original H3+ captor.

  9. Degassing of Noble Gases in Mid-Ocean Ridge and Ocean-Island Basalts: A Self- Consistent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, H. M.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2006-12-01

    We present results from numerical degassing models for H2O, CO2, He, Ne, and Ar during ascent-driven decompression of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) and ocean island basalts (OIBs). Degassing is modeled for a range of decompression rates, encompassing equilibrium through disequilibrium, and for open-system loss of exsolved gas ranging from 100% through 0% (closed-system). Our calculations predict the abundances and elemental ratios of noble gases dissolved in the melt during ascent to the sea floor. The resultant degassing trajectories are compared against measured volatiles in oceanic basalt glasses. We also calculate abundances and elemental ratios of the exsolved volatiles forming bubbles within the magma and compare them against measured values from crushed basalt glasses. From a comprehensive compilation of published analyses we find that concentrations and elemental ratios of CO2, He, Ne and Ar in MORB and OIB glasses are consistent with varying degrees of open-system degassing during magma ascent. Exsolution of He and Ne are primarily controlled by their solubilities. Because solubilities are dependent on fugacities via Henry's law, exsolution of He and Ne is dependent on the CO2 content of the magma. In contrast, Ar exsolution appears to be kinetically controlled, consistent with its relatively low diffusivity. CO2 and H2O concentrations of the modeled parental magma are within the range of observed values (1000 to 5000 ppm). We find that noble gases in MORBs are explained self-consistently by degassing of a parental magma with initial noble gas concentrations that fall within the range of values derived from hydrothermal 3He/CO2 ratios and measured values in popping rock 2ΠD43. Most OIBs are best explained by degassing of a parental magma with similar radiogenic and nucleogenic noble-gases, but an enrichment in primordial 3He and ^{22}Ne, relative to MORB.

  10. Infiltration of river water to a shallow aquifer investigated with 3H/ 3He, noble gases and CFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, U.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.; Hofer, M.; Imboden, D. M.; Baur, H.; Kipfer, R.

    1999-09-01

    Noble gas isotopes ( 3He, 4He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), tritium ( 3H), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and dissolved oxygen (O 2) were seasonally measured in a small groundwater system recharged by infiltration of river water at Linsental, northeastern Switzerland. All Groundwater samples contained an excess of atmospheric noble gases ('excess air') usually with an elemental composition equal to air. The concentrations of atmospheric noble gases in the groundwater were used to calculate the excess air component and the water temperature at recharge. The noble gas temperatures (NGTs) in the boreholes close to the river vary seasonally, however, the average NGT of all samples lies close to the mean annual temperature of the river water. Groundwater ages were calculated using the tritium/helium-3 ( 3H/ 3He) dating method. The water ages of the samples obtained near the river depend on the amount of recently infiltrated river water and are young during times of active river discharge. In contrast, the mean water age of about 3 years of the deep aquifer remained nearly constant over the sampling period. The observed CFC-11 (CFCl 3) and CFC-12 (CF 2Cl 2) concentrations are significantly higher than the atmospheric equilibrium concentrations and therefore CFCs do not provide any direct information on the residence time of the groundwater. Nevertheless, the CFC excess in the groundwater shows a linear increase with the 3H/ 3He age. Additionally, both accumulation of radiogenic He ( 4He rad) and O 2 consumption are strongly correlated with residence time. All these correlations can be interpreted either in terms of mixing of recently infiltrated river water with older groundwater or in terms of accumulation/consumption rates.

  11. Biomimetic synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chin-Yi

    At the nanometer scale, the physical and chemical properties of materials heavily depend on their sizes and shapes. This fact has triggered considerable efforts in developing controllable nanomaterial synthesis. The controlled growth of colloidal nanocrystal is a kinetic process, in which high-energy facets grow faster and then vanish, leading to a nanocrystal enclosed by low-energy facets. Identifying a surfactant that can selectively bind to a particular crystal facet and thus lower its surface energy, is critical and challenging in shape controlled synthesis of nanocrystals. Biomolecules exhibiting exquisite molecular recognition properties can be exploited to precisely engineer nanostructured materials. In the first part of my thesis, we employed the phage display technique to select a specific multifunctional peptide sequence which can bind on Pd surface and mediate Pd crystal nucleation and growth, achieving size controlled synthesis of Pd nanocrystals in aqueous solution. We further demonstrated a rational biomimetic approach to the predictable synthesis of nanocrystals enclosed by a particular facet in the case of Pt. Specifically, Pt {100} and Pt {111} facet-specific peptides were identified and used to synthesize Pt nanocubes and Pt nano-tetrahedrons, respectively. The mechanistic studies of Pt {111} facet-specific peptide had led us to study the facet-selective adsorption of aromatic molecules on noble metal surfaces. The discoveries had achieved the development of design strategies to select facet-selective molecules which can synthesize nanocrystals with expected shapes in both Pt and Pd system. At last, we exploited Pt facet-specific peptides and controlled the molecular interaction to produce one- and three- dimensional nanostructures composed of anisotropic nanoparticles in synthetic conditions without supramolecular pre-organization, demonstrating the full potential of biomolecules in mediating material formation process. My research on biomimetic

  12. Spectroscopic enhancement from noble mettalic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shu-Ju

    2011-12-01

    Resonant coupling of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in noble metallic nanostructures to incident radiation and the related subject of localized behavior of electromagnetic waves are currently of great interest due to their potential application to sensors, biochemical assays, optical transmission, and photovoltaic devices. My thesis research is made up of two related parts. In part one I examined enhanced fluorescence in dye molecules in proximity to Ag nanostructures. In part two I studied the effect of Au nanostructure arrays on the performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) : [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs). Nanostructures were fabricated by two different methods: e-beam lithography (top down) and spray pyrolysis (bottom up). Using e-beam lithography, we produced arrays of nanostructures with well defined shapes, sizes, and spacings. By systematically varying these topographical parameters, we measured their effect on nanometer-sized metallic structure-enhanced fluorescence (nMEF) and on absorption and external quantum efficiency (EQE) in OSC devices as a function of optical wavelength. In analyzing experimental results, we carried out numerical simulations of the local electric field under incident light, across plasmonic resonances. The comparison between the calculated local field squared and measured fluorescence/EQE provides physical insight on the configuration-dependence of these two processes. Our results indicate that local field enhancement near nanostructures is dominant in nMEF, and that the local field is strongly affected by the substrate and device architectures. For the OSCs, both measurements and calculations show that absorbance within the active layer is enhanced only in a narrow band of wavelengths (˜640-720 nm) where the active layer is not very absorbing for our prototype nanopillar-patterned devices. The peak enhancement for 180 nm wide Au

  13. Fractionation of the noble metals by physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhaus, Chris; Bockrath, Conny; Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser, Cora; Laurenz, Vera; Berndt, Jasper

    2006-12-01

    During partial melting in the earth’s mantle, the noble metals become fractionated. Os, Ir, Ru, and Rh tend to remain in the mantle residue whereas Pt, Pd, and Re behave mildly incompatible and are sequestered to the silicate melt. There is consensus that sulfide plays a role in the fractionation process; the major noble metal repository in the mantle is sulfide, and most primitive mantle melts are sulfide-saturated when they leave their mantle sources. However, with sulfide-silicate partitioning, the fractionation cannot be modeled properly. All sulfide-silicate partition coefficients are so extremely high that a silicate melt segregating from a mantle source with residual sulfide should be largely platinum-group elements free. We offer a physical alternative to sulfide-silicate chemical partitioning and provide a mechanism of generating a noble metal-rich melt from a sulfide-saturated source: Because sulfide is at least partially molten at asthenospheric temperature, it will behave physically incompatible during melt segregation, and a silicate melt segregating from a mantle residue will entrain molten residual sulfide in suspension and incorporate it in the basaltic pool melt. The noble metal abundances of a basalt then become independent of sulfide-silicate chemical partitioning. They reflect the noble metal abundances in the drained sulfide fraction as well as the total amount of sulfide entrained. Contrary to convention, we suggest that a fertile, sulfide-rich mantle source has more potential to generate a noble metal-enriched basaltic melt than a refractory mantle source depleted by previous partial melting events.

  14. NMR and structural features of noble-metal fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Gabuda, S.P.; Zemskov, S.V.

    1987-11-01

    NMR studies are reported on the structures of binary and other noble-metal fluorides. Revised measurements have been made on /sup 19/F chemical shifts and the anisotropy in them. A relationship is considered between the screening tensor for /sup 19/F and the electronic structure of the molecule or ion containing the noble-metal cation in the electronic configuration d/sup 6/, d/sup 8/, or d/sup 10/. The observed anomalous shifts in this class of compound are explained qualitatively in terms of paired electrons in filled d shells affecting the result within the framework of the classical theory of magnetic nuclear screening.

  15. Fullerenes: A New Carrier Phase for Noble Gases in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann

    2004-01-01

    The major focus of our research effort has been to measure the noble gases encapsulated within fullerenes, a new carbon carrier phase and compare it to the myriad of components found in the bulk meteorite acid residues. We have concentrated on the carbonaceous chondrites (Allende, Murchison and Tagish Lake) since they have abundant noble gases, typically with a planetary signature that dominates the stepped-release of the meteorite bulk acid residue. They also contain an extractable fullerene component that can be isolated and purified from the same bulk material.

  16. Noble Gases and Nitrogen Released from a Lunar Soil Pyroxene Separate by Acid Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, P. E.

    1993-07-01

    We report initial results from a series of experiments designed to measure recently implanted solar wind (SW) ions in lunar soil mineral grains [1]. An acid-etching technique similar to the CSSE method developed at ETH Zurich was used to make abundance and isotope measurements of the SW noble gas and nitrogen compositions. Among the samples examined was a pyroxene separate from soil 75081. It was first washed with H2O to remove contamination from the sample finger walls and grain surfaces. H2O also acted as a weak acid, releasing gases from near-surface sites. Treatment with H2SO3 followed the water washes. Acid pH (~1.8 to ~1.0) and temperature (~23 degrees C to ~90 degrees C) and duration of acid attack (several minutes to several days) were varied from step to step. Finally, the sample was pyrolyzed in several steps to remove the remaining gases, culminating with a high-temperature pyrolysis at 1200 degrees C. Measurements of the light noble gases were mostly consistent with those from previous CSSE experiments performed on pyroxene [2,3]. It should be noted, however, that the Zurich SEP component was not easily distinguishable in the steps where it was expected to be observed. We suspect our experimental protocol masked the SEP reservoir, preventing us from seeing its distinctive signature. The most interesting results from this sample are its Kr and Xe isotopic and elemental compositions. Pyroxene apparently retains heavy noble gases as well as ilmenite (and plagioclase [4]). The heavy noble gas element ratios from this sample along with those previously reported [5,6] are, however, considerably heavier than the theoretically determined "solar system" values [7,8]. Explanations for the difference include the possibility that the derivations are incorrect, that there is another component of lunar origin mixing with the solar component, or that some type of loss mechanism is altering the noble gas reservoirs of the grains. The Kr and Xe isotopic compositions for

  17. Noble gases in the Oceanic Crust: Preliminary results from ODP Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, M. D.; Curtice, J. M.; IODP Expedition 335 Science Party

    2011-12-01

    Noble gas isotopes and abundance ratios have been extensively used as tracers of oceanic mantle sources and fluxes. Most of the existing data are from seafloor basalt glasses and hydrothermal fluids, and there are very few studies of noble gases in the oceanic crust, which is an important component in global subduction flux estimates. In an effort to determine the relative contributions of mantle, radiogenic, and atmospheric/hydrothermal noble gas components in the ocean crust, we have performed helium, neon and argon measurements on a suite of gabbros and granoblastic dikes collected during IODP Expeditions 312 and 335 to Hole 1256D, a deep crustal borehole drilled into 15 Ma ocean crust formed at the East Pacific Rise during an episode of superfast spreading (>200 mm/yr). All measurements were carried out by coupled vacuum crushing and melting of whole rock samples, in order to determine the distribution of noble gases within the ocean crust. Total helium abundances in the gabbros range from 0.46 to 1.22 micro cc STP/gram, which is 2 to 5 times higher than literature data, all of which are from the slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (Kumagai et al., 2003; Moreira et al., 2003). These strikingly higher helium concentrations place constraints on the thermal crustal history (due to rapid helium diffusivity) and are assumed to reflect fundamentally different emplacement/degassing processes within crust formed at a super fast spreading rate. Crushing releases 12-25 % of the total helium in the gabbros demonstrating that most of the helium resides in the solid mineral phases. Contact metamorphosed granoblastic dikes have total helium contents lower than the gabbros (typically ~ 0.15 micro cc STP/gram), but significantly higher than the assumed degassed basaltic protolith, thus suggesting that metamorphism actually adds helium to the crust, an important hypothesis that requires further testing. The helium isotopes obtained by crushing of both the gabbros and

  18. Trapping of xenon in ice - Implications for the origin of the earth's noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.; Anders, E.

    1984-01-01

    Although the earth's atmosphere contains Ne, Ar, and Kr in about C1,2-chondrite proportions, Xe is depleted about 20-fold. To test the suggestion that the 'missing' Xe is trapped in Antarctic ice, distribution coefficients for Xe in artifically formed frost at -20 to -60 C were measured, using Xe-127 tracer. The values are 0.098 + or - 0.004 cc STP/g atm for trapping and less than 5 cc STP/g atm for trapping plus adsorption. If these results are representative of natural ice, then the Antarctic ice cap contains less than 1 percent of the atmospheric Xe inventory, or not greater than about 0.001 the amount needed for a C1,2-chondrite pattern. Two possibilities remain for the 'missing' Xe, both on the premise that the earth's noble gases, along with other volatiles, came from chondritic material: (1) xenon is preferentially retained in the mantle and lower crust, due to the strong affinity of Xe for clean silicate surfaces and amorphous carbon; and (2) the source material of the earth's volatiles had high, relatively unfractionated, Ar/Xe and Kr/Xe ratios, like the non-carbonaceous noble gas carriers in C3O and E-chondrites.

  19. Noble Metal Nanoparticle-loaded Mesoporous Oxide Microspheres for Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhao

    Noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals have attracted much attention as catalysts due to their unique characteristics, including high surface areas and well-controlled facets, which are not often possessed by their bulk counterparts. To avoid the loss of their catalytic activities brought about by their size and shape changes during catalytic reactions, noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals are usually dispersed and supported finely on solid oxide supports to prevent agglomeration, nanoparticle growth, and therefore the decrease in the total surface area. Moreover, metal oxide supports can also play important roles in catalytic reactions through the synergistic interactions with loaded metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals. In this thesis, I use ultrasonic aerosol spray to produce hybrid microspheres that are composed of noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals embedded in mesoporous metal oxide matrices. The mesoporous metal oxide structure allows for the fast diffusion of reactants and products as well as confining and supporting noble metal nanoparticles. I will first describe my studies on noble metal-loaded mesoporous oxide microspheres as catalysts. Three types of noble metals (Au, Pt, Pd) and three types of metal oxide substrates (TiO2, ZrO2, Al 2O3) were selected, because they are widely used for practical catalytic applications involved in environmental cleaning, pollution control, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical syntheses. By considering every possible combination of the noble metals and oxide substrates, nine types of catalyst samples were produced. I characterized the structures of these catalysts, including their sizes, morphologies, crystallinity, and porosities, and their catalytic performances by using a representative reduction reaction from nitrobenzene to aminobenzene. Comparison of the catalytic results reveals the effects of the different noble metals, their incorporation amounts, and oxide substrates on the catalytic abilities. For this particular

  20. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-03-21

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules in the pressure range of 1-1000 bar and at a temperature of 310 K. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anaesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremors in hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distribution functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of the gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor, while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar order parameter patterns for both DOPC acyl chains, which are opposite of the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the 'critical volume' hypothesis of anaesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1-100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremors at the atomic scale. The non-immobiliser neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing the monolayer undulation rate, which indicates that enhanced diffusivity rather than atomic size is the key factor.

  1. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-08

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns-long) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules at a pressure range of 1 - 1000 bar and temperature of 310 Kelvin. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremor at hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distribution functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor; while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar patterns of the order parameter for both DOPC acyl chains, which is opposite to the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the ‘critical volume’ hypothesis of anesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1 - 100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremor at the atomic scale. The non-immobilizer neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing monolayers undulations rate, which indicates enhanced diffusivity, rather than atom size, as the key factor.

  2. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-08

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns-long) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules at a pressure range of 1 - 1000 bar and temperature of 310 Kelvin. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremor at hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distributionmore » functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor; while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar patterns of the order parameter for both DOPC acyl chains, which is opposite to the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the ‘critical volume’ hypothesis of anesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1 - 100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremor at the atomic scale. The non-immobilizer neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing monolayers undulations rate, which indicates enhanced diffusivity, rather than atom size, as the key factor.« less

  3. Field Enhancement using Noble Metal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Benliang

    Resonance may be one of the most fundamental rules of nature. Electromagnetic resonance at nanometer scale could produce a giant field enhancement at optical frequency, providing a way to measure and control the process of atoms and molecules at single molecule scale. For example, the giant field enhancement would provide single molecule sensitivity for Raman scattering, which provides unique tools in measuring the quantity in extremely low concentration. In addition, light-emitting diodes could have high brightness but low input power that would be revolutionary in the optoelectronic industry. Although light enhancement is promising in several key technology areas, there are several challenges remain to be tackled. In particular, since the field enhancement is so strongly geometry dependent that slight modification of the geometry can lead to large variations in the outcome, a thorough understanding in how the geometry of the structure affects the field enhancement and creating proper methods to fabricate these structures reproducibly is of most importance. This thesis is devoted to design, fabrication and characterization of field enhancement generated on the surface of noble metals such as silver or gold with 1D structure. The s-polarized field enhancement arising from one-dimensional metal gratings is designed and optimized by using Rigorous Coupling Wave Analysis (RCWA). After optimization, the strongest enhancement factor is found to be 9.7 for 514nm wavelength light. The theoretical results arc confirmed by angle-dependent reflectivity measurements and the experimental results are found to support the theory. A novel single slit structure employing surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) for enhancing the electric field is studied. SPPs are first generated on a 50 nm thick metal film using attenuated total reflection coupling, and they are subsequently coupled to the cavity mode induced by the single slit. As a result, the field enhancement is found at least 3

  4. Investigation of radioactive noble gases distribution in atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Achkasov, S.K.; Duginets, G.A.; Krylov, A.Yu.

    1993-12-31

    This report describes two tasks pertaining to the study of radioactive noble gases in the atmosphere: research of global effects, and using the results of measurements of the concentrations in the atmosphere as a specific tool for control of environmental radiation condition near nuclear facilities.

  5. Making A Noble-Metal-On-Metal-Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Irvin M.; Davis, Patricia P.; Upchurch, Billy T.

    1989-01-01

    Catalyst exhibits superior performance in oxidation of CO in CO2 lasers. Two-step process developed for preparing platinum- or palladium-on-tin-oxide catalyst for recombination of CO and O2, decomposition products that occur in high-voltage discharge region of closed-cycle CO2 laser. Process also applicable to other noble-metal/metal-oxide combinations.

  6. Noble Gases in the Hamlet Meteorite (LL4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, S.; Sabe, Y.; Shiraishi, T.; Matsuda, J.

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed noble gases in a bulk sample and an HF-HCl residue of Hamlet (LL4). The Xe composition of the residue shows that no diamond is contained in the residue. The 20Ne/22Ne ratio of Hamlet Ne-Q has been determined to be 11.0 ± 0.5.

  7. Noble metal-titania hybrid nanoparticle clusters and the interaction to proteins for photo-catalysis in aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tung-Yu; Wang, Hong-Li; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chang, Wei-Chang; Chang, Je-Wei; Lu, Shih-Yuan; Tsai, De-Hao

    2017-03-15

    We report a systematic study of the controlled synthesis of new hybrid spherical TiO2 nanoparticle cluster (TiO2-NPC) homogeneously decorated with noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) by gas-phase evaporation-induced self-assembly. Silver NP (AgNP) was used as the representative noble metal NP. The degradation of methyl blue (MB) in the aqueous solution was chosen as the representative system for the study of photocatalysis, which were tested and evaluated with respect to irradiation conditions and the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results show that particle size and chemical composition of the hybrid nanostructure were tunable by choosing the suitable concentration of precursors. The photocatalytic activity of AgNP-decorated TiO2-NPC was strongly affected by the light irradiation and the ligand-nanoparticle interfacial interaction. The presence of BSA influenced molecular conjugation to the surface of the hybrid nanostructure. Under conditions of simultaneous competitive adsorption of MB and BSA, the combination of AgNPs improved the photocatalytic activity of the TiO2-NPC-based catalysts. Our work describes a prototype methodology to fabricate TiO2-NPC homogeneously decorated with noble metal NPs with well-controlled material properties. The mechanistic understanding developed in this study can be useful for the future optimization of material properties of hybrid nanostructures versus interfacial interactions with the surrounding molecules.

  8. Santa Lucia (2008) (L6) Chondrite, a Recent Fall: Composition, Noble Gases, Nitrogen and Cosmic Ray Exposure Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Ramakant R.; Varela, Maria Eugenia; Joron, Jean Louis

    2016-04-01

    The Santa Lucia (2008)—one the most recent Argentine meteorite fall, fell in San Juan province, Argentina, on 23 January 2008. Several masses (total ~6 kg) were recovered. Most are totally covered by fusion crust. The exposed interior is of light-grey colour. Chemical data [olivine (Fa24.4) and low-Ca pyroxene (En77.8 Fs20.7 Wo1.6)] indicate that Santa Luica (2008) is a member of the low iron L chondrite group, corresponding to the equilibrated petrologic type 6. The meteorite name was approved by the Nomenclature Committee (NomCom) of the Meteoritical Society (Meteoritic Bulletin, no. 97). We report about the chemical composition of the major mineral phases, its bulk trace element abundance, its noble gas and nitrogen data. The cosmic ray exposure age based on cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar around 20 Ma is comparable to one peak of L chondrites. The radiogenic K-Ar age of 2.96 Ga, while the young U, Th-He are of 1.2 Ga indicates that Santa Lucia (2008) lost radiogenic 4He more recently. Low cosmogenic (22Ne/21Ne)c and absence of solar wind noble gases are consistent with irradiation in a large body. Heavy noble gases (Ar/Kr/Xe) indicated trapped gases similar to ordinary chondrites. Krypton and neon indicates irradiation in large body, implying large pre-atmospheric meteoroid.

  9. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  10. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  11. IMPACT REGIMES AND POST-FORMATION SEQUESTRATION PROCESSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORIGIN OF HEAVY NOBLE GASES IN TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mousis, Olivier; Petit, Jean-Marc; Picaud, Sylvain; Thomas, Caroline; Schmitt, Bernard

    2010-05-10

    The difference between the measured atmospheric abundances of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon for Venus, Earth, and Mars is striking. Because these abundances drop by at least 2 orders of magnitude as one moves outward from Venus to Mars, the study of the origin of this discrepancy is a key issue that must be explained if we are to fully understand the different delivery mechanisms of the volatiles accreted by the terrestrial planets. In this work, we aim to investigate whether it is possible to quantitatively explain the variation of the heavy noble gas abundances measured on Venus, Earth, and Mars, assuming that cometary bombardment was the main delivery mechanism of these noble gases to the terrestrial planets. To do so, we use recent dynamical simulations that allow the study of the impact fluxes of comets upon the terrestrial planets during the course of their formation and evolution. Assuming that the mass of noble gases delivered by comets is proportional to the rate at which they collide with the terrestrial planets, we show that the krypton and xenon abundances in Venus and Earth can be explained in a manner consistent with the hypothesis of cometary bombardment. In order to explain the krypton and xenon abundance differences between Earth and Mars, we need to invoke the presence of large amounts of CO{sub 2}-dominated clathrates in the Martian soil that would have efficiently sequestered these noble gases. Two different scenarios based on our model can also be used to explain the differences between the neon and argon abundances of the terrestrial planets. In the first scenario, cometary bombardment of these planets would have occurred at epochs contemporary with the existence of their primary atmospheres. Comets would have been the carriers of argon, krypton, and xenon, while neon would have been gravitationally captured by the terrestrial planets. In the second scenario, we consider impacting comets that contained significantly smaller amounts of argon

  12. Irradiation History of Itokawa Regolith Material Deduced from Noble Gases in the Hayabusa Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Okazaki, Ryuji; Nakamura, Tomoki; Miura, Yayoi N.; Osawa, Takahito; Bajo, Ken-ichi; Matsuda, Shintaro; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ireland, Trevor R.; Kitajima, Fumio; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Zolensky, Michael E.; Uesugi, Masayuki; Shirai, Kei; Abe, Masanao; Yada, Toru; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Akio; Mukai, Toshifumi; Ueno, Munetaka; Okada, Tatsuaki; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2011-08-01

    Noble gas isotopes were measured in three rocky grains from asteroid Itokawa to elucidate a history of irradiation from cosmic rays and solar wind on its surface. Large amounts of solar helium (He), neon (Ne), and argon (Ar) trapped in various depths in the grains were observed, which can be explained by multiple implantations of solar wind particles into the grains, combined with preferential He loss caused by frictional wear of space-weathered rims on the grains. Short residence time of less than 8 million years was implied for the grains by an estimate on cosmic-ray-produced 21Ne. Our results suggest that Itokawa is continuously losing its surface materials into space at a rate of tens of centimeters per million years. The lifetime of Itokawa should be much shorter than the age of our solar system.

  13. Pressure effects on the X-ray intrinsic position resolution in noble gases and mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, C. D. R.; González-Díaz, D.; Correia, P. M. M.; Biagi, S.; Silva, A. L. M.; Carramate, L. F. N. D.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2016-12-01

    A study of the effect of gas pressure in the position resolution of an interacting X or γ-ray photon in a gas medium is performed. The intrinsic position resolution for pure noble gases (Argon and Xenon) and their mixtures with CO2 and CH4 was calculated for several gas pressures (1-10 bar) and for photon energies between 1 and 60 keV, being possible to establish a linear relation between the intrinsic position resolution and the inverse of the gas pressure in the indicated energy range, as intuitively expected. We show how, at high pressures and low photoelectron energies, this intrinsic 1/P scaling is modified due to the diffusion of the primary ionization in the direction perpendicular to the electric field. In order to evaluate the quality of the method here described, a comparison between the available experimental data and microscopic simulations is presented in this work and discussed. In the majority of cases, a good agreement is observed. The conditions to achieve position resolutions down to 10 μm in a realistic detector are shown and discussed.

  14. Fullerenes: an extraterrestrial carbon carrier phase for noble gases.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Poreda, R J; Bunch, T E

    2000-03-28

    In this work, we report on the discovery of naturally occurring fullerenes (C60 to C400) in the Allende and Murchison meteorites and some sediment samples from the 65 million-year-old Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary layer (KTB). Unlike the other pure forms of carbon (diamond and graphite), fullerenes are extractable in an organic solvent (e.g., toluene or 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene). The recognition of this unique property led to the detection and isolation of the higher fullerenes in the Kratschmer/Huffmann arc evaporated graphite soot and in the carbon material in the meteorite and impact deposits. By further exploiting the unique ability of the fullerene cage structure to encapsulate and retain noble gases, we have determined that both the Allende and Murchison fullerenes and the KTB fullerenes contain trapped noble gases with ratios that can only be described as extraterrestrial in origin.

  15. Identification of potential protein markers of noble rot infected grapes.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Marilinda; Millioni, Renato; Franchin, Cinzia; Zapparoli, Giacomo; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Simonato, Barbara

    2015-07-15

    The evaluation of Botrytis cinerea as noble rot on withered grapes is of great importance to predict the wine sensory/organoleptic properties and to manage the winemaking process of Amarone, a passito dry red wine. This report describes the first proteomic analysis of grapes infected by noble rot under withering conditions to identify possible markers of fungal infection. 2-D gel electrophoresis revealed that protein profiles of infected and not infected grape samples are significantly different in terms of number of spots and relative abundance. Protein identification by MS analysis allowed to identify only in infected berries proteins of B. cinerea that represent potential markers of the presence of the fungus in the withered grapes.

  16. Noble Metal-Iron Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials: Emerging Applications.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Xuan, Shouhu

    2016-02-01

    This account provides an overview of current research activities that focus on the synthesis and applications of nanomaterials from noble metal (e.g., Au, Ag, Pd) and iron oxide (Fe3O4) hybrids. An introduction to the synthetic strategies that have been developed for generating M-Fe3O4 nanomaterials with different novel structures is presented. Surface functionalization and bioconjugation of these hybrid nanoparticles and nanocomposites are also reviewed. The utilization of the advantageous properties of both noble metals and iron oxide for a variety of applications, such as theranostics, gene delivery, biosensing, cell sorting, bioseparation, and catalysis, is discussed and highlighted. Finally, future trends and perspectives of these sophisticated nanocomposites are outlined. The fundamental requirements underpinning the effective preparation of M-Fex Oy hybrid nanomaterials shed light on the future development of heterogeneous catalysts, nanotheranostics, nanomedicines, and other chemical technologies.

  17. Fullerenes: An extraterrestrial carbon carrier phase for noble gases

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Bunch, Ted E.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, we report on the discovery of naturally occurring fullerenes (C60 to C400) in the Allende and Murchison meteorites and some sediment samples from the 65 million-year-old Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary layer (KTB). Unlike the other pure forms of carbon (diamond and graphite), fullerenes are extractable in an organic solvent (e.g., toluene or 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene). The recognition of this unique property led to the detection and isolation of the higher fullerenes in the Kratschmer/Huffmann arc evaporated graphite soot and in the carbon material in the meteorite and impact deposits. By further exploiting the unique ability of the fullerene cage structure to encapsulate and retain noble gases, we have determined that both the Allende and Murchison fullerenes and the KTB fullerenes contain trapped noble gases with ratios that can only be described as extraterrestrial in origin. PMID:10725367

  18. Method for low temperature preparation of a noble metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Even, Jr., William R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing fine, essentially contamination free, noble metal alloys is disclosed. The alloys comprise particles in a size range of 5 to 500 nm. The method comprises 1. A method for preparing a noble metal alloy at low temperature, the method comprising the steps of forming solution of organometallic compounds by dissolving the compounds into a quantity of a compatible solvent medium capable of solvating the organometallic, mixing a portion of each solution to provide a desired molarity ratio of ions in the mixed solution, adding a support material, rapidly quenching droplets of the mixed solution to initiate a solute-solvent phase separation as the solvent freezes, removing said liquid cryogen, collecting and freezing drying the frozen droplets to produce a dry powder, and finally reducing the powder to a metal by flowing dry hydrogen over the powder while warming the powder to a temperature of about 150.degree. C.

  19. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  20. Noble Gases in the Lunar Meteorites Calcalong Creek and QUE 93069

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Burkland, M. K.; Grier, J. A.

    1995-09-01

    Although the world's collections contain comparable numbers of martian and lunar meteorites (about 10 each), their ejection histories seem to be quite different [1]. We have sampled no more than four martian craters, but almost every one of the lunar meteorites apparently represents a separate cratering event. Furthermore, most lunar meteorites were apparently ejected from the top meter of the surface, unlike any of the martian meteorites. We have measured noble gases in two bulk samples of the lunar meteorite QUE93069 and three of Calcalong Creek, ranging in size from 7 to 15 mg. Averaged results are given in Table 1. Both meteorites contain solar-wind-implanted noble gas. QUE 93069, which is a mature anorthositic regolith breccia [2], contains amounts comparable to the most gas-rich lunar meteorites. The relatively low 40Ar/36Ar ratios of both meteorites suggest surface exposures no more than 2.5 Ga ago [3]. Calcalong Creek has readily observable spallogenic gas. The 131Xe/126Xe ratio of 4.8+/-0.3 corresponds to an average shielding depth of slightly more than 40 gm/cm^2 [4]. In common with many lunar breccias, Calcalong Creek has been exposed to cosmic rays for several hundred Ma (calculations based on [4] and [5]). The 3He apparent exposure age is much shorter, suggesting diffusive loss of He. To determine the detailed exposure history, it is necessary to have measurements of cosmogenic radionuclides. Our samples were too small to measure 81Kr, but [6] have measured 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl. Their data are consistent with either extended exposure at <70 gm/cm^2 in the lunar regolith followed by a short (200,000 years) transit to Earth, or with ejection from several meters depth about 2 Ma ago [6]. Our data, requiring several hundred Ma of exposure at an average depth of 40-50 gm/cm^2, are clearly more consistent with the first scenario. The only other lunar meteorite which could have been ejected at the same time is MAC 88104/5 [1], but the chemical differences

  1. Developing Optimal Parameters for Hyperpolarized Noble Gas and Inert Fluorinated Gas MRI of Lung Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Lung Transplant; Lung Resection; Lung Cancer; Asthma; Cystic Fibrosis; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Emphysema; Mesothelioma; Asbestosis; Pulmonary Embolism; Interstitial Lung Disease; Pulmonary Fibrosis; Bronchiectasis; Seasonal Allergies; Cold Virus; Lung Infection; Pulmonary Hypertension; Pulmonary Dysplasia; Obstructive Sleep Apnea

  2. Wigner Distribution Functions as a Tool for Studying Gas Phase Alkali Metal Plus Noble Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    time, energy must be provided to the laser system from an external source. The process of exciting constituents of the active medium into a higher...This process is repeated as long as the photons aren’t lost to the laser system. This implies that the third property that a laser must have is an...optical feedback system in order to maintain the stimulated emission process . Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) has an active

  3. Crustal Noble Gases in Jwaneng Diamonds With Links to Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Phillips, D.; Harris, J. W.; Yatsevich, I.

    2005-12-01

    contrast, diamonds from the peridotitic mines could contain pristine ancient mantle noble gas compositions at the time of their formation. Verification of our hypothesis will be significant in providing a basis for the reconciliation of geophysical and geochemical observations in terms of mantle structure and mantle geodynamics.

  4. Are the C delta light nitrogen and noble gases located in the same carrier?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.; Fisenko, A. V.; Shukolyukov, Yuri A.

    1993-01-01

    Light nitrogen and the HL family noble gas components of C(sub delta) appear to be separable by high resolution pyrolysis experiments. Thus C(sub delta) is not a homogeneous material and probably consists of debris of many stars. The question of whether the N and Xe(HL) actually reside in different carriers continues to be addressed. It is well known that C(sub delta) which was identified as nanometer sized diamonds contains isotopically anamalous elements, in particular noble gases including Xe(HL) and its family and light nitrogen (delta(N-15) down to -350 percent). Before the true nature of C(sub delta) was recognized, it was easy to suppose that the Xe(HL) and light nitrogen were located in the same carrier. However, recognition that light nitrogen in diamond from different samples varies by greater than a factor of six compared to Xe(HL) fluctuations of ca. 20 percent makes such an assumption questionable. On the basis of simple arithmetic logic, the Xe and nitrogen cannot be absolutely co-located. The average diamond grain consists of only about 1000-2000 atoms of carbon; one grain among a few x 10(exp 6) contains an atom of Xe(HL) while 5-30 atoms of light nitrogen are the typical number which need to be in every diamond grain to account for observed concentrations. If some grains are devoid of N, the others have to have a higher N concentration. Even if we were able to analyze an individual grain of the diamond for noble gases and nitrogen, we would be faced with the monumental task of locating the one amongst 10(exp 6) identical grains containing the Xe atom to examine its nitrogen content. The problem can be simplified to some extent if instead of Xe, He which is 10(exp 4) times more abundant is assumed to be a member of the HL family. Attempts to fractionate the separate carriers might be attempted using He and N as guiding indicators but even experiments of this nature are for the future. Faced with apparently insoluble problems, we have returned to an

  5. Diverging effects of isotopic fractionation upon molecular diffusion of noble gases in water: mechanistic insights through ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pinto de Magalhães, Halua; Brennwald, Matthias S; Kipfer, Rolf

    2017-02-10

    Atmospheric noble gases are routinely used as natural tracers to analyze gas transfer processes in aquatic systems. Their isotopic ratios can be employed to discriminate between different physical transport mechanisms by comparison to the unfractionated atmospheric isotope composition. In many applications of aquatic systems molecular diffusion was thought to cause a mass dependent fractionation of noble gases and their isotopes according to the square root ratio of their masses. However, recent experiments focusing on isotopic fractionation within a single element challenged this broadly accepted assumption. The determined fractionation factors of Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe isotopes revealed that only Ar follows the prediction of the so-called square root relation, whereas within the Ne, Kr and Xe elements no mass-dependence was found. The reason for this unexpected divergence of Ar is not yet understood. The aim of our computational exercise is to establish the molecular-resolved mechanisms behind molecular diffusion of noble gases in water. We make the hypothesis that weak intermolecular interactions are relevant for the dynamical properties of noble gases dissolved in water. Therefore, we used ab initio molecular dynamics to explicitly account for the electronic degrees of freedom. Depending on the size and polarizability of the hydrophobic particles such as noble gases, their motion in dense and polar liquids like water is subject to different diffusive regimes: the inter-cavity hopping mechanism of small particles (He, Ne) breaks down if a critical particle size achieved. For the case of large particles (Kr, Xe), the motion through the water solvent is governed by mass-independent viscous friction leading to hydrodynamical diffusion. Finally, Ar falls in between the two diffusive regimes, where particle dispersion is propagated at the molecular collision time scale of the surrounding water molecules.

  6. Electrochemical Synthesis of Nanostructured Noble Metal Films for Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Jay K.

    Nanostructures of noble metals (gold and silver) are of interest because of their important intrinsic properties. Noble metals by themselves are physically robust, chemically inert, highly conductive, and possess the capability to form strong bonds with thiols or dithiol molecules present in organic compounds, creating self-assembled monolayers with tunable functional groups at exposed interfaces. However, when the nanostructures are formed, they in addition possess high surface area and unique optical properties which can be tuned by adjusting the shape and the size of the nanostructures. All of these properties make nanostructures of noble metals suitable candidates to be used as a transducer for optical and electrochemical biosensing. Individual nanostructures might be easier to prepare but difficult to handle to use as a transducer. Therefore, we prepared and analyzed nanostructured films/coating of noble metals and used them as a transducer for optical and electrochemical biosensing. We have electrochemically prepared nanoporous gold (NPG) on gold wire varying different dependable parameters (deposition potential, time, and compositional ratio) to obtain an optimal structure in term of stability, morphology, and better surface area. NPG prepared using a deposition potential of --1.0 V for 10 min from 30:70% 50 mM potassium dicyanoaurate(I) and 50 mM potassium dicyanoargentate(I) was used as an optimal surface for protein immobilization, and to perform square wave voltammetry (SWV) based enzyme-linked lectinsorbent assays. On flat gold surfaces, adjacent protein molecules sterically block their active sites due to high-density packing, which can be minimized using NPG as a substrate. NPG can also show significant peak current in SWV experiments, a sensitive electrochemical technique that minimizes non-Faradaic current, which is difficult to obtain using a flat gold surface. These all make NPG a suitable substrate, electrode, and transducer to be used in

  7. MOCVD of multimetal and noble metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endle, James Patrick

    2000-11-01

    Carbon content in TiN films produced with tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium (TDMAT) and methylhydrazine or dimethylhydrazine can be controlled at or below 10% with a N/Ti ratio of ˜1.3 at growth temperatures between 573 and 723 K. Post-dosing either hydrazine on a CVD TiN film results in additional N-Ti bonds, indicating a surface reaction between the two precursors occurs. Co-dosing hydrazine-like compounds with larger alkyl ligands than methyl resulted in additional carbon incorporation in the TiN film. A growth system, consisting of a load lock and growth chamber, and a precursor pyrolysis system were designed and built to study metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Addition of a bubbler and a direct liquid injection system allowed for the vaporization of solid and liquid precursors and solutions of multiple precursors. A precursor pyrolysis system was designed for high and low vapor pressure precursors and high carrier gas flow rates. The systems were used to study (Al,Ti)N and Ir film growth. (Al,Ti)N was used as a template to study the incorporation of elements into a multimetal chemical vapor deposited film using NH3 and a DLI solution of TDMAT and the tris(dimethylarnino)alane dimer (TDMAA) in toluene-NH 3 significantly decreases the decomposition temperature of both precursors. Carbon was reduced by increasing the NH3 partial pressure, and the Al incorporation was increased by increasing the TDMAA/TDMAT ratio in the DLI solution. Exposure to ambient resulted in significant oxygen incorporation and the removal of carbon and nitrogen from the (AI,Ti)N film. Conformal (AI,Ti)N films were produced at 450 K in the presence of NH3 and at 550 K without NH3. The role of O2 in Ir film growth was studied with the newly designed equipment. O2 significantly decreases the decomposition temperature of (MeCp)Ir(COD) below 425 K by preventing a carbonaceous build-up on the iridium film. By decreasing the oxygen partial pressure, the island nucleation and coalescence

  8. Noble gases in submarine pillow basalt glasses from Loihi and Kilauea, Hawaii: A solar component in the Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, M.; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A. ); Clague, D.A. )

    1993-02-01

    Noble gas elemental and isotopic abundances have been analysed in twenty-two samples of basaltic glass dredged from the submarine flanks of two currently active Hawaiian volcanoes, Loihi Seamount and Kilauea. Neon isotopic ratios are enriched in [sup 20]Ne and [sup 21]Ne by as much as 16% with respect to atmospheric ratios. All the Hawaiian basalt glass samples show relatively high [sup 3]He/[sup 4]He ratios. The high [sup 20]Ne/[sup 22]Ne values in some of the Hawaiian samples, together with correlations between neon and helium systematics, suggest the presence of a solar component in the source regions of the Hawaiian mantle plume. The solar hypothesis for the Earth's primordial noble gas composition can account for helium and neon isotopic ratios observed in basaltic glasses from both plume and spreading systems, in fluids in continental hydrothermal systems, in CO[sub 2] well gases, and in ancient diamonds. These results provide new insights into the origin and evolution of the Earth's atmosphere.

  9. Noble Metals and Spinel Settling in High Level Waste Glass Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; Perez, Joseph M.

    2000-09-30

    In the continuing effort to support the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the noble metals issue is addressed. There is an additional concern about the amount of noble metals expected to be present in the future batches that will be considered for vitrification in the DWPF. Several laboratory, as well as melter-scale, studies have been completed by various organizations (mainly PNNL, SRTC, and WVDP in the USA). This letter report statuses the noble metals issue and focuses at the settling of noble metals in melters.

  10. Effective Giromagnetic Ratios in Artifical Nuclear Magnetization Pumping of the Noble Gases Mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, E. N.; Barantsev, K. A.; Litvinov, A. N.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic of the nuclear magnetization of the two noble gases mix was studied in this research. Nuclear magnetization pumped along the induction of external magnetic field. Vector of nuclear magnetization is given a tilt by the week rotational magnetic field, which makes NMR for noble gases. Interaction between the nuclear magnetic moments of the different noble gases adducted to shifts at the frequency of nuclear moments precession in external magnetic field. Effective gyromagnetic ratios of the nuclear of noble gases is defined and it different from the tabulated value. There is theoretical calculation of effective gyromagnetic ratios in this research.

  11. Inert anode containing base metal and noble metal useful for the electrolytic production of aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua

    2000-01-01

    An inert anode for production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a base metal selected from Cu and Ag, and at least one noble metal selected from Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os. The inert anode may optionally be formed of sintered particles having interior portions containing more base metal than noble metal and exterior portions containing more noble metal than base metal. In a preferred embodiment, the base metal comprises Cu, and the noble metal comprises Ag, Pd or a combination thereof.

  12. Halogens and noble gases in Mathematician Ridge meta-gabbros, NE Pacific: implications for oceanic hydrothermal root zones and global volatile cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Mark A.; Honda, Masahiko; Vanko, David A.

    2015-12-01

    Six variably amphibolitised meta-gabbros cut by quartz-epidote veins containing high-salinity brine, and vapour fluid inclusions were investigated for halogen (Cl, Br, I) and noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) concentrations. The primary aims were to investigate fluid sources and interactions in hydrothermal root zones and determine the concentrations and behaviours of these elements in altered oceanic crust, which is poorly known, but has important implications for global volatile (re)cycling. Amphiboles in each sample have average concentrations of 0.1-0.5 wt% Cl, 0.5-3 ppm Br and 5-68 ppb I. Amphibole has Br/Cl of ~0.0004 that is about ten times lower than coexisting fluid inclusions and seawater, and I/Cl of 2-44 × 10-6 that is 3-5 times lower than coexisting fluid inclusions but higher than seawater. The amphibole and fluid compositions are attributed to mixing halogens introduced by seawater with a large halogen component remobilised from mafic lithologies in the crust and fractionation of halogens between fluids and metamorphic amphibole formed at low water-rock ratios. The metamorphic amphibole and hydrothermal quartz are dominated by seawater-derived atmospheric Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe and mantle-derived He, with 3He/4He of ~9 R/Ra (Ra = atmospheric ratio). The amphibole and quartz preserve high 4He concentrations that are similar to MORB glasses and have noble gas abundance ratios with high 4He/36Ar and 22Ne/36Ar that are greater than seawater and air. These characteristics result from the high solubility of light noble gases in amphibole and suggest that all the noble gases can behave similarly to `excess 40Ar' in metamorphic hydrothermal root zones. All noble gases are therefore trapped in hydrous minerals to some extent and can be inefficiently lost during metamorphism implying that even the lightest noble gases (He and Ne) can potentially be subducted into the Earth's mantle.

  13. Measuring the Noble Metal and Iodine Composition of Extracted Noble Metal Phase from Spent Nuclear Fuel Using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palomares, R. I.; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Biegalski, Steven R.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Casella, Amanda J.; Brady Raap, Michaele C.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-04-01

    Mass quantities of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA). Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and mass quantification is derived from standard gamma spectroscopy and radionuclide decay analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. Lastly, the implications of the rapid analytic speed of instrumental NAA are discussed in relation to potential nuclear forensics applications.

  14. Noble metal nanoparticles: Optical forces, electrochemical Ostwald ripening, and photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, Peter

    This thesis describes three distinct aspects of the chemical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. The first chapter introduces the surface plasmon resonance of noble metal nanoparticles. The second chapter presents an electrodynamic model for the calculation of the attractive optical forces that arise when two dielectric particles are irradiated in a light field. These forces show resonances at dipolar plasmon wavelengths, similar to resonances in the near-field electromagnetic intensities. At MW/cm2 intensities, optical forces can be stronger than van der Waals forces. The third chapter investigates the size dependent electrochemical properties of silver nanoparticles. These thermally evaporated silver nanoparticles spontaneously evolve in size when immersed in pure water on conducting substrates. The process is understood through an electrochemical Ostwald ripening mechanism driven by the size dependence of the work function and standard electrode potential. The fourth and fifth chapters consider photo-induced surface reactivity of noble metal particles. First, in the fourth chapter, the light driven deposition of copper onto gold nanoparticle electrodes is presented. The photocurrent is a nonlinear function of laser intensity and increases sharply with cathodic voltage in the underpotential deposition region. The photoreduction is attributed to laser heating (caused by decay of the plasmon oscillation) of the Au nanoparticles, rather than "hot electron" processes. Secondly, in the fifth chapter, the photo-induced oxidation of citrate is studied on silver nanoparticle electrodes. Irradiation of the citrate coated particles is shown to cause the particles to charge negatively from the irreversible transfer of electrons from citrate to the particles. It is hypothesized that the particle plasmon oscillation decays into electron hole pair(s) that causes the photo-oxidation of the surface bound citrate. Both the gold and silver particle systems are simulated using

  15. Ab initio study of the trapping of polonium on noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijpstra, Kim; Van Yperen-De Deyne, Andy; Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Neuhausen, Jörg; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Cottenier, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    In the future MYRRHA reactor, lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) will be used both as coolant and as spallation target. Due to the high neutron flux a small fraction of the bismuth will transmute to radiotoxic 210Po. Part of this radiotoxic element will evaporate into the gas above the coolant. Extracting it from the gas phase is necessary to ensure a safe handling of the reactor. An issue in the development of suitable filters is the lack of accurate knowledge on the chemical interaction between a candidate filter material and either elemental polonium or polonium containing molecules. Experimental work on this topic is complicated by the high radiotoxicity of polonium. Therefore, we present in this paper a first-principles study on the adsorption of polonium on noble metals as filter materials. The adsorption of monoatomic Po is considered on the candidate filter materials palladium, platinum, silver and gold. The case of the gold filter is looked upon in more detail by examining how bismuth pollution affects its capability to capture polonium and by studying the adsorption of the heavy diatomic molecules Po2, PoBi and PoPb on this gold filter.

  16. Numerical study of light-induced drift of Na in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, J. E. M.; Werij, H. G. C.; Woerdman, J. P.

    1988-10-01

    We present a model for light-induced drift (LID) in the Na-noble-gas system which should enable direct comparison with experiment. In contrast to previous theories of LID based on a two-level description of the optical absorbers and on a simplified collision treatment, the present model is based on a realistic description of laser-driven Na atoms immersed in a buffer gas. Starting from the generalized Bloch equations, we introduce a rate-equation model for the velocity distributions in the four important Na levels. The velocity-changing and fine-structure-changing collisions are described using composite Keilson-Storer collision kernels in which all adjustable parameters have been eliminated by using available literature data. We apply the model in numerical calculations