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Sample records for lassa virus glycoprotein

  1. Uncoupling GP1 and GP2 Expression in the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Complex: Implications for GP1 Ectodomain Shedding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-23

    BioMed CentralVirology Journal ssOpen AcceResearch Uncoupling GP1 and GP2 expression in the Lassa virus glycoprotein complex: implications for GP1...contributors Abstract Background: Sera from convalescent Lassa fever patients often contains antibodies to Lassa virus (LASV) glycoprotein 1 (GP1...uncoupled Lassa virus (LASV) glycoprotein 1 (GP1) and glycoprotein 2 (GP2) were established. Soluble GP1 was generated using either the native

  2. Uncoupling GP1 and GP2 Expression in the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Complex: Implications for GPI Ectodomain Shedding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-23

    BioMed CentralVirology Journal ssOpen AcceResearch Uncoupling GP1 and GP2 expression in the Lassa virus glycoprotein complex: implications for GP1...contributors Abstract Background: Sera from convalescent Lassa fever patients often contains antibodies to Lassa virus (LASV) glycoprotein 1 (GP1...uncoupled Lassa virus (LASV) glycoprotein 1 (GP1) and glycoprotein 2 (GP2) were established. Soluble GP1 was generated using either the native

  3. Characterization of Lassa virus glycoprotein oligomerization and influence of cholesterol on virus replication.

    PubMed

    Schlie, Katrin; Maisa, Anna; Lennartz, Frank; Ströher, Ute; Garten, Wolfgang; Strecker, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mature glycoprotein spikes are inserted in the Lassa virus envelope and consist of the distal subunit GP-1, the transmembrane-spanning subunit GP-2, and the signal peptide, which originate from the precursor glycoprotein pre-GP-C by proteolytic processing. In this study, we analyzed the oligomeric structure of the viral surface glycoprotein. Chemical cross-linking studies of mature glycoprotein spikes from purified virus revealed the formation of trimers. Interestingly, sucrose density gradient analysis of cellularly expressed glycoprotein showed that in contrast to trimeric mature glycoprotein complexes, the noncleaved glycoprotein forms monomers and oligomers spanning a wide size range, indicating that maturation cleavage of GP by the cellular subtilase SKI-1/S1P is critical for formation of the correct oligomeric state. To shed light on a potential relation between cholesterol and GP trimer stability, we performed cholesterol depletion experiments. Although depletion of cholesterol had no effect on trimerization of the glycoprotein spike complex, our studies revealed that the cholesterol content of the viral envelope is important for the infectivity of Lassa virus. Analyses of the distribution of viral proteins in cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant membrane areas showed that Lassa virus buds from membrane areas other than those responsible for impaired infectivity due to cholesterol depletion of lipid rafts. Thus, derivation of the viral envelope from cholesterol-rich membrane areas is not a prerequisite for the impact of cholesterol on virus infectivity.

  4. Baculovirus expression of the glycoprotein gene of Lassa virus and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Hummel, K B; Martin, M L; Auperin, D D

    1992-09-01

    A recombinant baculovirus was constructed that expresses the glycoprotein gene of Lassa virus (Josiah strain) under the transcriptional control of the polyhedrin promoter. The expressed protein (B-LSGPC) comigrated with the authentic viral glycoprotein as observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), was reactive with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in Western blots, and was glycosylated. Although the recombinant protein was not processed into the mature glycoproteins, G1 and G2, it demonstrated reactivity with all known epitopes as measured by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA), and it was immunogenic, eliciting antisera in rabbits that recognized whole virus in IFAs. Regarding future applications to diagnostic assays, the recombinant glycoprotein proved to be an effective substitute for Lassa virus-infected mammalian cells in IFAs and it was able to distinguish sera from several human cases of Lassa fever, against a panel of known negative sera of African origin, in an enzyme immunoassay (EIA).

  5. Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Günther, Stephan; Lenz, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    Lassa virus is a RNA virus belonging to the family of Arenaviridae. It was discovered as the causative agent of a hemorrhagic fever--Lassa fever--about 30 years ago. Lassa fever is endemic in West Africa and is estimated to affect some 100,000 people annually. Great progress in the understanding of the life cycle of arenaviruses, including Lassa virus, has been made in recent years. New insights have been gained in the pathogenesis and molecular epidemiology of Lassa fever, and state-of the-art technologies for diagnosing this life-threatening disease have been developed. The intention of this review is to summarize in particular the recent literature on Lassa virus and Lassa fever. Several aspects ranging from basic research up to clinical practice and laboratory diagnosis are discussed and linked together.

  6. A recombinant Yellow Fever 17D vaccine expressing Lassa virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Bredenbeek, Peter J; Molenkamp, Richard; Spaan, Willy J M; Deubel, Vincent; Marianneau, Phillippe; Salvato, Maria S; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Zapata, Juan; Tikhonov, Ilia; Patterson, Jean; Carrion, Ricardo; Ticer, Anysha; Brasky, Kathleen; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2006-02-20

    The Yellow Fever Vaccine 17D (YFV17D) has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) resulting in construction of YFV17D/LASV-GPC recombinant virus. The virus was replication-competent and processed the LASV-GPC in cell cultures. The recombinant replicated poorly in guinea pigs but still elicited specific antibodies against LASV and YFV17D antigens. A single subcutaneous injection of the recombinant vaccine protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal Lassa Fever. This study demonstrates the potential to develop an YFV17D-based bivalent vaccine against two viruses that are endemic in the same area of Africa.

  7. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James E; Hastie, Kathryn M; Cross, Robert W; Yenni, Rachael E; Elliott, Deborah H; Rouelle, Julie A; Kannadka, Chandrika B; Smira, Ashley A; Garry, Courtney E; Bradley, Benjamin T; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G; Boisen, Matt L; Hartnett, Jessica N; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Rowland, Megan M; Heinrich, Megan L; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C; Andersen, Kristian G; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A; Okokhere, Peter O; Follarin, Onikepe A; Schieffelin, John S; Pitts, Kelly R; Geisbert, Joan B; Kulakoski, Peter C; Wilson, Russell B; Happi, Christian T; Sabeti, Pardis C; Gevao, Sahr M; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Geisbert, Thomas W; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M; Garry, Robert F

    2016-05-10

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design.

  8. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James E.; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Cross, Robert W.; Yenni, Rachael E.; Elliott, Deborah H.; Rouelle, Julie A.; Kannadka, Chandrika B.; Smira, Ashley A.; Garry, Courtney E.; Bradley, Benjamin T.; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G.; Boisen, Matt L.; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Zandonatti, Michelle A.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C.; Andersen, Kristian G.; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J.; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C.; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A.; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Follarin, Onikepe A.; Schieffelin, John S.; Pitts, Kelly R.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Kulakoski, Peter C.; Wilson, Russell B.; Happi, Christian T.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Gevao, Sahr M.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design. PMID:27161536

  9. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K.; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C. Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A.; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits. PMID:26849049

  10. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2016-02-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits.

  11. Shedding of Soluble Glycoprotein 1 Detected During Acute Lassa Virus Infection in Human Subjects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-09

    great importance for generating vaccines and therapeutics. Previous work by our group identified a soluble isoform of the Lassa virus (LASV) GP1 (sGP1...host’s immune system is of great importance for generating vaccines and therapeutics. Previous work by our group identified a soluble isoform of the...rate of 15% - 20% for hospitalized patients and as high as 50% during epidemics [9, 10]. Presently, there is no licensed vaccine or immunotherapy

  12. Detection of Lassa virus, Mali.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Lopez, Job E; Sogoba, Nafomon; Traore', Sékou F; Raffel, Sandra J; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Ebihara, Hideki; Branco, Luis; Garry, Robert F; Schwan, Tom G; Feldmann, Heinz

    2010-07-01

    To determine whether Lassa virus was circulating in southern Mali, we tested samples from small mammals from 3 villages, including Soromba, where in 2009 a British citizen probably contracted a lethal Lassa virus infection. We report the isolation and genetic characterization of Lassa virus from an area previously unknown for Lassa fever.

  13. Genetic diversity among Lassa virus strains.

    PubMed

    Bowen, M D; Rollin, P E; Ksiazek, T G; Hustad, H L; Bausch, D G; Demby, A H; Bajani, M D; Peters, C J; Nichol, S T

    2000-08-01

    The arenavirus Lassa virus causes Lassa fever, a viral hemorrhagic fever that is endemic in the countries of Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea and perhaps elsewhere in West Africa. To determine the degree of genetic diversity among Lassa virus strains, partial nucleoprotein (NP) gene sequences were obtained from 54 strains and analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses showed that Lassa viruses comprise four lineages, three of which are found in Nigeria and the fourth in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Overall strain variation in the partial NP gene sequence was found to be as high as 27% at the nucleotide level and 15% at the amino acid level. Genetic distance among Lassa strains was found to correlate with geographic distance rather than time, and no evidence of a "molecular clock" was found. A method for amplifying and cloning full-length arenavirus S RNAs was developed and used to obtain the complete NP and glycoprotein gene (GP1 and GP2) sequences for two representative Nigerian strains of Lassa virus. Comparison of full-length gene sequences for four Lassa virus strains representing the four lineages showed that the NP gene (up to 23.8% nucleotide difference and 12.0% amino acid difference) is more variable than the glycoprotein genes. Although the evolutionary order of descent within Lassa virus strains was not completely resolved, the phylogenetic analyses of full-length NP, GP1, and GP2 gene sequences suggested that Nigerian strains of Lassa virus were ancestral to strains from Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Compared to the New World arenaviruses, Lassa and the other Old World arenaviruses have either undergone a shorter period of diverisification or are evolving at a slower rate. This study represents the first large-scale examination of Lassa virus genetic variation.

  14. Yellow fever 17D-vectored vaccines expressing Lassa virus GP1 and GP2 glycoproteins provide protection against fatal disease in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J; Bredenbeek, Peter J; Carrion, Ricardo; Brasky, Kathleen; Patterson, Jean; Goicochea, Marco; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2011-02-01

    Yellow Fever (YF) and Lassa Fever (LF) are two prevalent hemorrhagic fevers co-circulating in West Africa and responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The YF vaccine 17D has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) or their subunits, GP1 (attachment glycoprotein) and GP2 (fusion glycoprotein). Cloning shorter inserts, LASV-GP1 and -GP2, between YF17D E and NS1 genes enhanced genetic stability of recombinant viruses, YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2, in comparison with YF17D/LASV-GPC recombinant. The recombinant viruses were replication competent and properly processed YF proteins and LASV GP antigens in infected cells. YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice and protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal LF. Unlike immunization with live attenuated reassortant vaccine ML29, immunization with YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 did not provide sterilizing immunity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of YF17D-based vaccine to control LF in West Africa.

  15. Yellow fever 17D-vectored vaccines expressing Lassa virus GP1 and GP2 glycoproteins provide protection against fatal disease in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J.; Bredenbeek, Peter J.; Carrion, Ricardo; Brasky, Kathleen; Patterson, Jean; Goicochea, Marco; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S.; Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2010-01-01

    Yellow Fever (YF) and Lassa Fever (LF) are two prevalent hemorrhagic fevers co-circulating in West Africa and responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The YF vaccine 17D has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) or their subunits, GP1 (attachment glycoprotein) and GP2 (fusion glycoprotein). Cloning shorter inserts, LASV GP1 and GP2, between YF17D E and NS1 genes enhanced genetic stability of recombinant viruses, YF17D/LASV-GP1 and –GP2, in comparison with YF17D/LASV-GPC recombinant. The recombinant viruses were replication competent and properly processed YF and LASV GP proteins in infected cells. YF17D/LASV-GP1&GP2 induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice and protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal LF. Unlike immunization with live attenuated reassortant vaccine ML29, immunization with YF17D/LASV-GP1&GP2 did not provide sterilizing immunity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of YF17D-based vaccine to control LF in West Africa. PMID:21145373

  16. Cross-protection against lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus mediated by a CD4+ T-cell clone specific for an envelope glycoprotein epitope of Lassa virus.

    PubMed Central

    La Posta, V J; Auperin, D D; Kamin-Lewis, R; Cole, G A

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the Lassa virus (LV) envelope glycoprotein precursor, V-LSGPC, was used to study the basis of LV-induced cross-protective immunity against the closely related arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). C3H/HeJ mice primed with V-LSGPC developed neither circulating antibodies nor CD8+ cytotoxic T cells specific for LCMV, yet they resisted a normally lethal LCMV challenge. Spleen cells from such mice gave a proliferative response to LCMV in vitro that was inhibitable by anti-CD4 antibody. Synthetic peptides corresponding to predicted T-cell sites common to the envelope glycoprotein precursor (GP-C) of LV and that of LCMV were used to map the specificity of the proliferative response to an epitope located between amino acids 403 and 417 of LV GP-C. Several CD4+ T-cell clones specific for the 403-417 peptide were isolated and found to produce gamma interferon in response to both the peptide and LCMV. One of these clones, C9, was selected for further study. C9 lysed I-AK-bearing target cells, and when adoptively transferred to C3H/HeJ mice, it was capable of mediating both a peptide-specific delayed hypersensitivity reaction and resistance to lethal LCMV challenge. These collective findings demonstrate, for the first time, that CD4+ T cells can play a major role in arenavirus-specific cross-protective immunity. PMID:7684468

  17. [An update on Lassa virus].

    PubMed

    Leparc-Goffart, I; Emonet, S F

    2011-12-01

    Lassa virus, the etiologic agent of Lassa hemorrhagic fever, infects 100,000 to 300,000 people every year in West Africa with an overall mortality rate ranging from 1 to 2%. It was discovered in 1969 and remains a significant public health risk in endemic areas. Because airborne transmission is possible and mortality can be high under certain conditions, Lassa virus has been classified as a category A bioterrorism agent. Early diagnosis is difficult due to insidious non-specific onset and to the great genetic divergence of the virus that makes RT-PCR assays unreliable. The lack of proper diagnostic tools promotes nosocomial infection and diminishes the efficacy of treatment. Recently, numerous advances have been made in the development of both diagnostic and vaccination techniques. The purpose of this review is to present an update on that research as well as the current epidemiology of Lassa virus.

  18. Reverse genetics generation of chimeric infectious Junin/Lassa virus is dependent on interaction of homologous glycoprotein stable signal peptide and G2 cytoplasmic domains.

    PubMed

    Albariño, César G; Bird, Brian H; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Dodd, Kimberly A; White, David M; Bergeron, Eric; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Nichol, Stuart T

    2011-01-01

    The Arenaviridae are a diverse and globally distributed collection of viruses that are maintained primarily by rodent reservoirs. Junin virus (JUNV) and Lassa virus (LASV) can both cause significant outbreaks of severe and often fatal human disease throughout their respective areas of endemicity. In an effort to improve upon the existing live attenuated JUNV Candid1 vaccine, we generated a genetically homogenous stock of this virus from cDNA copies of the virus S and L segments by using a reverse genetics system. Further, these cDNAs were used in combination with LASV cDNAs to successfully generate two recombinant Candid1 JUNV/LASV chimeric viruses (via envelope glycoprotein [GPC] exchange). It was found that while the GPC extravirion domains were readily exchangeable, homologous stable signal peptide (SSP) and G2 transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail domains were essential for correct GPC maturation and production of infectious chimeric viruses. The switching of the JUNV and LASV G1/G2 ectodomains within the Candid1 vaccine background did not alter the attenuated phenotype of the vaccine strain in a lethal mouse model. These recombinant chimeric viruses shed light on the fundamental requirements of arenavirus GPC maturation and may serve as a strategy for the development of bivalent JUNV and LASV vaccine candidates.

  19. Small-Molecule Fusion Inhibitors Bind the pH-Sensing Stable Signal Peptide-GP2 Subunit Interface of the Lassa Virus Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Sundaresh; Whitby, Landon R.; Casquilho-Gray, Hedi E.; York, Joanne; Boger, Dale L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenavirus species are responsible for severe life-threatening hemorrhagic fevers in western Africa and South America. Without effective antiviral therapies or vaccines, these viruses pose serious public health and biodefense concerns. Chemically distinct small-molecule inhibitors of arenavirus entry have recently been identified and shown to act on the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) to prevent membrane fusion. In the tripartite GPC complex, pH-dependent membrane fusion is triggered through a poorly understood interaction between the stable signal peptide (SSP) and the transmembrane fusion subunit GP2, and our genetic studies have suggested that these small-molecule inhibitors act at this interface to antagonize fusion activation. Here, we have designed and synthesized photoaffinity derivatives of the 4-acyl-1,6-dialkylpiperazin-2-one class of fusion inhibitors and demonstrate specific labeling of both the SSP and GP2 subunits in a native-like Lassa virus (LASV) GPC trimer expressed in insect cells. Photoaddition is competed by the parental inhibitor and other chemically distinct compounds active against LASV, but not those specific to New World arenaviruses. These studies provide direct physical evidence that these inhibitors bind at the SSP-GP2 interface. We also find that GPC containing the uncleaved GP1-GP2 precursor is not susceptible to photo-cross-linking, suggesting that proteolytic maturation is accompanied by conformational changes at this site. Detailed mapping of residues modified by the photoaffinity adducts may provide insight to guide the further development of these promising lead compounds as potential therapeutic agents to treat Lassa hemorrhagic fever. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses cause lethal infections in humans and, in the absence of licensed vaccines or specific antiviral therapies, are recognized to pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. Lead small-molecule inhibitors that target the

  20. New Hosts of The Lassa Virus

    PubMed Central

    Olayemi, Ayodeji; Cadar, Daniel; Magassouba, N’Faly; Obadare, Adeoba; Kourouma, Fode; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Fasogbon, Samuel; Igbokwe, Joseph; Rieger, Toni; Bockholt, Sabrina; Jérôme, Hanna; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Garigliany, Mutien; Lorenzen, Stephan; Igbahenah, Felix; Fichet, Jean-Nicolas; Ortsega, Daniel; Omilabu, Sunday; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a deadly haemorrhagic fever in humans, killing several thousand people in West Africa annually. For 40 years, the Natal multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis, has been assumed to be the sole host of LASV. We found evidence that LASV is also hosted by other rodent species: the African wood mouse Hylomyscus pamfi in Nigeria, and the Guinea multimammate mouse Mastomys erythroleucus in both Nigeria and Guinea. Virus strains from these animals were isolated in the BSL-4 laboratory and fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of viral genes coding for glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, polymerase and matrix protein show that Lassa strains detected in M. erythroleucus belong to lineages III and IV. The strain from H. pamfi clusters close to lineage I (for S gene) and between II & III (for L gene). Discovery of new rodent hosts has implications for LASV evolution and its spread into new areas within West Africa. PMID:27140942

  1. New Hosts of The Lassa Virus.

    PubMed

    Olayemi, Ayodeji; Cadar, Daniel; Magassouba, N'Faly; Obadare, Adeoba; Kourouma, Fode; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Fasogbon, Samuel; Igbokwe, Joseph; Rieger, Toni; Bockholt, Sabrina; Jérôme, Hanna; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Garigliany, Mutien; Lorenzen, Stephan; Igbahenah, Felix; Fichet, Jean-Nicolas; Ortsega, Daniel; Omilabu, Sunday; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-05-03

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a deadly haemorrhagic fever in humans, killing several thousand people in West Africa annually. For 40 years, the Natal multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis, has been assumed to be the sole host of LASV. We found evidence that LASV is also hosted by other rodent species: the African wood mouse Hylomyscus pamfi in Nigeria, and the Guinea multimammate mouse Mastomys erythroleucus in both Nigeria and Guinea. Virus strains from these animals were isolated in the BSL-4 laboratory and fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of viral genes coding for glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, polymerase and matrix protein show that Lassa strains detected in M. erythroleucus belong to lineages III and IV. The strain from H. pamfi clusters close to lineage I (for S gene) and between II &III (for L gene). Discovery of new rodent hosts has implications for LASV evolution and its spread into new areas within West Africa.

  2. Pathogenesis of Lassa Virus Infection in Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    virus , an arenavirus distantly related to Lassa Lassa fever ...other arenaviruses in animal models (5. 6). In VOL. 37, 1982 LASSA VIRUS INFECTION IN GUINEA PIGS 777S[ iU FIG. 6. (A) Lassa viral antigens in...resem- ent with the hemoconcentration associated with bles human and primate Lassa virus infection other human hemorrhagic fever virus infections. than

  3. Lassa-Vesicular Stomatitis Chimeric Virus Safely Destroys Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wollmann, Guido; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Davis, John N.; Cepko, Connie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-grade tumors in the brain are among the deadliest of cancers. Here, we took a promising oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and tested the hypothesis that the neurotoxicity associated with the virus could be eliminated without blocking its oncolytic potential in the brain by replacing the neurotropic VSV glycoprotein with the glycoprotein from one of five different viruses, including Ebola virus, Marburg virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), rabies virus, and Lassa virus. Based on in vitro infections of normal and tumor cells, we selected two viruses to test in vivo. Wild-type VSV was lethal when injected directly into the brain. In contrast, a novel chimeric virus (VSV-LASV-GPC) containing genes from both the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and VSV showed no adverse actions within or outside the brain and targeted and completely destroyed brain cancer, including high-grade glioblastoma and melanoma, even in metastatic cancer models. When mice had two brain tumors, intratumoral VSV-LASV-GPC injection in one tumor (glioma or melanoma) led to complete tumor destruction; importantly, the virus moved contralaterally within the brain to selectively infect the second noninjected tumor. A chimeric virus combining VSV genes with the gene coding for the Ebola virus glycoprotein was safe in the brain and also selectively targeted brain tumors but was substantially less effective in destroying brain tumors and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. A tropism for multiple cancer types combined with an exquisite tumor specificity opens a new door to widespread application of VSV-LASV-GPC as a safe and efficacious oncolytic chimeric virus within the brain. IMPORTANCE Many viruses have been tested for their ability to target and kill cancer cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown substantial promise, but a key problem is that if it enters the brain, it can generate adverse neurologic consequences, including death. We

  4. Enhanced Efficacy of a Codon-Optimized DNA Vaccine Encoding the Glycoprotein Precursor Gene of Lassa Virus in a Guinea Pig Disease Model When Delivered by Dermal Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kathleen A; Broderick, Kate E; Wilkinson, Eric R; Shaia, Carl I; Bell, Todd M; Shurtleff, Amy C; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine V; Guttieri, Mary C; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2013-07-18

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa. Presently, there are no FDA-licensed medical countermeasures for this disease. In a pilot study, we constructed a DNA vaccine (pLASV-GPC) that expressed the LASV glycoprotein precursor gene (GPC). This plasmid was used to vaccinate guinea pigs (GPs) using intramuscular electroporation as the delivery platform. Vaccinated GPs were protected from lethal infection (5/6) with LASV compared to the controls. However, vaccinated GPs experienced transient viremia after challenge, although lower than the mock-vaccinated controls. In a follow-on study, we developed a new device that allowed for both the vaccine and electroporation pulse to be delivered to the dermis. We also codon-optimized the GPC sequence of the vaccine to enhance expression in GPs. Together, these innovations resulted in enhanced efficacy of the vaccine. Unlike the pilot study where neutralizing titers were not detected until after virus challenge, modest neutralizing titers were detected in guinea pigs before challenge, with escalating titers detected after challenge. The vaccinated GPs were never ill and were not viremic at any timepoint. The combination of the codon-optimized vaccine and dermal electroporation delivery is a worthy candidate for further development.

  5. A rapid fluorometric assay for the proteolytic activity of SKI-1/S1P based on the surface glycoprotein of the hemorrhagic fever Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Basak, Ajoy; Chrétien, Michel; Seidah, Nabil G

    2002-03-13

    The subtilase subtilisin kexin isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P), has been implicated in the processing of Lassa virus glycoprotein C (GP-C) precursor into GP1 and GP2 that are responsible for viral fusion with the host cell membrane. Here, we studied in vitro the kinetics of this cleavage by hSKI-1 using an intramolecularly quenched fluorogenic (IQF) peptide, Q-GPC(251-263) [Abz-(251)Asp-Ile-Tyr-Ile-Ser-Arg-Arg-Leu-Leu/Gly-Thr-Phe-Thr(263)-3-NitroTyr-Ala-CONH(2)], containing the identified site. The measured V(max (app))/K(m (app)) was compared to those for other IQF SKI-substrates. Q-GPC(251-263) is cleaved 10-fold more efficiently than the previously known best SKI-substrate, Q-hproSKI(134-142). This study confirmed the role of SKI-1 in GP-C processing and provides a novel, rapid and efficient enzymatic assay of SKI-1.

  6. Virus entry. Lassa virus entry requires a trigger-induced receptor switch.

    PubMed

    Jae, Lucas T; Raaben, Matthijs; Herbert, Andrew S; Kuehne, Ana I; Wirchnianski, Ariel S; Soh, Timothy K; Stubbs, Sarah H; Janssen, Hans; Damme, Markus; Saftig, Paul; Whelan, Sean P; Dye, John M; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2014-06-27

    Lassa virus spreads from a rodent to humans and can lead to lethal hemorrhagic fever. Despite its broad tropism, chicken cells were reported 30 years ago to resist infection. We found that Lassa virus readily engaged its cell-surface receptor α-dystroglycan in avian cells, but virus entry in susceptible species involved a pH-dependent switch to an intracellular receptor, the lysosome-resident protein LAMP1. Iterative haploid screens revealed that the sialyltransferase ST3GAL4 was required for the interaction of the virus glycoprotein with LAMP1. A single glycosylated residue in LAMP1, present in susceptible species but absent in birds, was essential for interaction with the Lassa virus envelope protein and subsequent infection. The resistance of Lamp1-deficient mice to Lassa virus highlights the relevance of this receptor switch in vivo.

  7. Replicon system for Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Hass, Meike; Gölnitz, Uta; Müller, Stefanie; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan

    2004-12-01

    Lassa virus is endemic to West Africa and causes hemorrhagic fever in humans. To facilitate the functional analysis of this virus, a replicon system was developed based on Lassa virus strain AV. Genomic and antigenomic minigenomes (MG) were constructed consisting of the intergenic region of S RNA and a reporter gene (Renilla luciferase) in antisense orientation, flanked by the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of S RNA. MGs were expressed under the control of the T7 promoter. Nucleoprotein (NP), L protein, and Z protein were expressed from plasmids containing the T7 promoter and internal ribosomal entry site. Transfection of cells stably expressing T7 RNA polymerase (BSR T7/5) with MG in the form of DNA or RNA and plasmids for the expression of NP and L protein resulted in high levels of Renilla luciferase expression. The replicon system was optimized with respect to the ratio of the transfected constructs and by modifying the 5' end of the MG. Maximum activity was observed 24 to 36 h after transfection with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2 to 3 log units. Northern blot analysis provided evidence for replication and transcription of the MG. Z protein downregulated replicon activity close to background levels. Treatment with ribavirin and alpha interferon inhibited replicon activity, suggesting that both act on the level of RNA replication, transcription, or ribonucleoprotein assembly. In conclusion, this study describes the first replicon system for a highly pathogenic arenavirus. It is a tool for investigating the mechanisms of replication and transcription of Lassa virus and may facilitate the testing of antivirals outside a biosafety level 4 laboratory.

  8. Immune responses and Lassa virus infection.

    PubMed

    Russier, Marion; Pannetier, Delphine; Baize, Sylvain

    2012-11-05

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa and caused by Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus. It may be fatal, but most patients recover from acute disease and some experience asymptomatic infection. The immune mechanisms associated with these different outcomes have not yet been fully elucidated, but considerable progress has recently been made, through the use of in vitro human models and nonhuman primates, the only relevant animal model that mimics the pathophysiology and immune responses induced in patients. We discuss here the roles of the various components of the innate and adaptive immune systems in Lassa virus infection and in the control of viral replication and pathogenesis.

  9. Individual and bivalent vaccines based on alphavirus replicons protect guinea pigs against infection with Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    PubMed

    Pushko, P; Geisbert, J; Parker, M; Jahrling, P; Smith, J

    2001-12-01

    Lassa and Ebola viruses cause acute, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever diseases, for which no effective vaccines are currently available. Although lethal human disease outbreaks have been confined so far to sub-Saharan Africa, they also pose significant epidemiological concern worldwide as demonstrated by several instances of accidental importation of the viruses into North America and Europe. In the present study, we developed experimental individual vaccines for Lassa virus and bivalent vaccines for Lassa and Ebola viruses that are based on an RNA replicon vector derived from an attenuated strain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. The Lassa and Ebola virus genes were expressed from recombinant replicon RNAs that also encoded the replicase function and were capable of efficient intracellular self-amplification. For vaccinations, the recombinant replicons were incorporated into virus-like replicon particles. Guinea pigs vaccinated with particles expressing Lassa virus nucleoprotein or glycoprotein genes were protected from lethal challenge with Lassa virus. Vaccination with particles expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein gene also protected the animals from lethal challenge with Ebola virus. In order to evaluate a single vaccine protecting against both Lassa and Ebola viruses, we developed dual-expression particles that expressed glycoprotein genes of both Ebola and Lassa viruses. Vaccination of guinea pigs with either dual-expression particles or with a mixture of particles expressing Ebola and Lassa virus glycoprotein genes protected the animals against challenges with Ebola and Lassa viruses. The results showed that immune responses can be induced against multiple vaccine antigens coexpressed from an alphavirus replicon and suggested the possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines based upon alphavirus vectors for arenaviruses, filoviruses, and possibly other emerging pathogens.

  10. Lassa fever encephalopathy: Lassa virus in cerebrospinal fluid but not in serum.

    PubMed

    Günther, S; Weisner, B; Roth, A; Grewing, T; Asper, M; Drosten, C; Emmerich, P; Petersen, J; Wilczek, M; Schmitz, H

    2001-08-01

    The pathogenesis of neurologic complications of Lassa fever is poorly understood. A Nigerian patient had fever, disorientation, seizures, and blood-brain barrier dysfunction, and Lassa virus was found in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but not in serum. The concentration of Lassa virus RNA in CSF corresponded to 1 x 10(3) pfu/mL, as determined by a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. To characterize the Lassa virus in CSF, the 3.5-kb S RNA was sequenced. In the S RNA coding sequences, the CSF strain differed between 20% and 24.6% from all known prototype strains. These data suggest that Lassa virus or specific Lassa virus strains can persist in the central nervous system and thus contribute to neuropathogenesis. Lassa virus infection should be considered in West African patients or in travelers returning from this area who present only with fever and neurologic signs.

  11. Pathology of Lassa Virus Infection in the Rhesus Monkey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    examined. Lassa fever ’- is an infectious, febrile disease nuclear cell infiltrates and mucosal hemorrhages. of man caused by Lassa virus (LASV), a member... virus titers, suggests that virus replication 1. Buckley, S. M., and Casals, J., 1973. Lassa fever , in the kidney parenchyma was unlikely. A few a new...A., 1973. Comparative pathology of phology and morphogenesis of arenaviruses . BDg. Lassa virus infection in monkeys, guinea pip, W.H.O., 52: 409-419

  12. Viral Protein Determinants of Lassa Virus Entry and Release from Polarized Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Schlie, Katrin; Maisa, Anna; Freiberg, Fabian; Groseth, Allison; Strecker, Thomas; Garten, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The epithelium plays a key role in the spread of Lassa virus. Transmission from rodents to humans occurs mainly via inhalation or ingestion of droplets, dust, or food contaminated with rodent urine. Here, we investigated Lassa virus infection in cultured epithelial cells and subsequent release of progeny viruses. We show that Lassa virus enters polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells mainly via the basolateral route, consistent with the basolateral localization of the cellular Lassa virus receptor α-dystroglycan. In contrast, progeny virus was efficiently released from the apical cell surface. Further, we determined the roles of the glycoprotein, matrix protein, and nucleoprotein in directed release of nascent virus. To do this, a virus-like-particle assay was developed in polarized MDCK cells based on the finding that, when expressed individually, both the glycoprotein GP and matrix protein Z form virus-like particles. We show that GP determines the apical release of Lassa virus from epithelial cells, presumably by recruiting the matrix protein Z to the site of virus assembly, which is in turn essential for nucleocapsid incorporation into virions. PMID:20071570

  13. Viral protein determinants of Lassa virus entry and release from polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schlie, Katrin; Maisa, Anna; Freiberg, Fabian; Groseth, Allison; Strecker, Thomas; Garten, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    The epithelium plays a key role in the spread of Lassa virus. Transmission from rodents to humans occurs mainly via inhalation or ingestion of droplets, dust, or food contaminated with rodent urine. Here, we investigated Lassa virus infection in cultured epithelial cells and subsequent release of progeny viruses. We show that Lassa virus enters polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells mainly via the basolateral route, consistent with the basolateral localization of the cellular Lassa virus receptor alpha-dystroglycan. In contrast, progeny virus was efficiently released from the apical cell surface. Further, we determined the roles of the glycoprotein, matrix protein, and nucleoprotein in directed release of nascent virus. To do this, a virus-like-particle assay was developed in polarized MDCK cells based on the finding that, when expressed individually, both the glycoprotein GP and matrix protein Z form virus-like particles. We show that GP determines the apical release of Lassa virus from epithelial cells, presumably by recruiting the matrix protein Z to the site of virus assembly, which is in turn essential for nucleocapsid incorporation into virions.

  14. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever virus infection: I. Susceptibility of mice to recombinant Lassa Gp/LCMV chimeric virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew M; Cruite, Justin; Welch, Megan J; Sullivan, Brian; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2013-08-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a BSL-4 restricted agent. To allow study of infection by LASV under BSL-2 conditions, we generated a recombinant virus in which the LASV glycoprotein (Gp) was placed on the backbone of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) Cl13 nucleoprotein, Z and polymerase genes (rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp). The recombinant virus displayed high tropism for dendritic cells following in vitro or in vivo infection. Inoculation of immunocompetent adults resulted in an acute infection, generation of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells and clearance of the infection. Inoculation of newborn mice with rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp resulted in a life-long persistent infection. Interestingly, adoptive transfer of rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp immune memory cells into such persistently infected mice failed to purge virus but, in contrast, cleared virus from mice persistently infected with wt LCMV Cl13.

  15. A Live Attenuated Vaccine for Lassa Fever Made by Reassortment of Lassa and Mopeia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.; Patterson, Jean; Carrion, Ricardo; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Ticer, Anysha; Zapata, Juan; Brasky, Kathleen; Geiger, Robert; Hubbard, Gene B.; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S.

    2005-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) and Mopeia virus (MOPV) are closely related Old World arenaviruses that can exchange genomic segments (reassort) during coinfection. Clone ML29, selected from a library of MOPV/LASV (MOP/LAS) reassortants, encodes the major antigens (nucleocapsid and glycoprotein) of LASV and the RNA polymerase and zinc-binding protein of MOPV. Replication of ML29 was attenuated in guinea pigs and nonhuman primates. In murine adoptive-transfer experiments, as little as 150 PFU of ML29 induced protective cell-mediated immunity. All strain 13 guinea pigs vaccinated with clone ML29 survived at least 70 days after LASV challenge without either disease signs or histological lesions. Rhesus macaques inoculated with clone ML29 developed primary virus-specific T cells capable of secreting gamma interferon in response to homologous MOP/LAS and heterologous MOPV and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Detailed examination of two rhesus macaques infected with this MOPV/LAS reassortant revealed no histological lesions or disease signs. Thus, ML29 is a promising attenuated vaccine candidate for Lassa fever. PMID:16254329

  16. Aseptic Meningitis Caused by Lassa Virus: Case Series Report.

    PubMed

    Okokhere, Peter O; Bankole, Idowu A; Iruolagbe, Christopher O; Muoebonam, Benard E; Okonofua, Martha O; Dawodu, Simeon O; Akpede, George O

    2016-01-01

    The Lassa virus is known to cause disease in different organ systems of the human body, with varying clinical manifestations. The features of severe clinical disease may include bleeding and/or central nervous system manifestations. Whereas Lassa fever encephalopathy and encephalitis are well described in the literature, there is paucity of data on Lassa virus meningitis. We present the clinical description, laboratory diagnosis, and management of 4 consecutive cases of aseptic meningitis associated with Lassa virus infection without bleeding seen in a region of Nigeria known to be endemic for both the reservoir rodent and Lassa fever. The 4 patients recovered fully following intravenous ribavirin treatment and suffered no neurologic complications.

  17. Protection of Lassa Virus-Infected Guinea Pigs with Lassa-Immune Plasma of Guinea Pig, Primate, and Human Origin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Diseases, Fort Detrick, Frederick, %Maryland Lassa virus-immune plasma has been used to treat human Lassa fever patients, however, criteria for plasma...21701. C ,83 Ali8 10 19 060 I 94 Jahrl, INTRODUCTION Lassa virus-immune plasma has been used to treat human Lassa fever since the disease was first...raising concerns related to immunologic enhancement of disease. For Lassa fever therapy. immune plasma has until now been selected on the basis of

  18. Cell entry of Lassa virus induces tyrosine phosphorylation of dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pythoud, Christelle; Turk, Rolf; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Pasquato, Antonella; Campbell, Kevin P; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor dystroglycan (DG) serves as a cellular receptor for the highly pathogenic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) that causes a haemorrhagic fever with high mortality in human. In the host cell, DG provides a molecular link between the ECM and the actin cytoskeleton via the adapter proteins utrophin or dystrophin. Here we investigated post-translational modifications of DG in the context of LASV cell entry. Using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, we found that tyrosine kinases are required for efficient internalization of virus particles, but not virus-receptor binding. Engagement of cellular DG by LASV envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP) in human epithelial cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of DG. LASV GP binding to DG further resulted in dissociation of the adapter protein utrophin from virus-bound DG. This virus-induced dissociation of utrophin was affected by genistein treatment, suggesting a role of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in the process.

  19. Cell entry of Lassa virus induces tyrosine phosphorylation of dystroglycan

    PubMed Central

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pythoud, Christelle; Turk, Rolf; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Pasquato, Antonella; Campbell, Kevin P.; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor dystroglycan (DG) serves as a cellular receptor for the highly pathogenic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) that causes a hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in man. In the host cell, DG provides a molecular link between the ECM and the actin cytoskeleton via the adapter proteins utrophin or dystrophin. Here we investigated post-translational modifications of DG in the context of LASV cell entry. Using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, we found that tyrosine kinases are required for efficient internalization of virus particles, but not virus-receptor binding. Engagement of cellular DG by LASV envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP) in human epithelial cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of DG. LASV GP binding to DG further resulted in dissociation of the adapter protein utrophin from virus-bound DG. This virus-induced dissociation of utrophin was affected by genistein treatment, suggesting a role of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in the process. PMID:23279385

  20. Immunobiology of Ebola and Lassa virus infections.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Joseph B; Marzi, Andrea; Safronetz, David; Robertson, Shelly J; Feldmann, Heinz; Best, Sonja M

    2017-03-01

    Two of the most important contemporary emerging viruses that affect human health in Africa are Ebola virus (EBOV) and Lassa virus (LASV). The 2013-2016 West African outbreak of EBOV was responsible for more than 11,000 deaths, primarily in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. LASV is constantly emerging in these and surrounding West African countries, with an estimate of more than 500,000 cases of Lassa fever, and approximately 5,000 deaths, annually. Both EBOV and LASV are zoonotic, and human infection often results in a severe haemorrhagic fever in both cases. However, the contribution of specific immune responses to disease differs between EBOV and LASV. This Review examines innate and adaptive immune responses to these viruses with the goal of delineating responses that are associated with protective versus pathogenic outcomes.

  1. A Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Based Lassa Fever Vaccine Protects Guinea Pigs and Macaques against Challenge with Geographically and Genetically Distinct Lassa Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Mire, Chad; Rosenke, Kyle; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Geisbert, Thomas; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Background Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic in several West African countries and is the etiological agent of Lassa fever. Despite the high annual incidence and significant morbidity and mortality rates, currently there are no approved vaccines to prevent infection or disease in humans. Genetically, LASV demonstrates a high degree of diversity that correlates with geographic distribution. The genetic heterogeneity observed between geographically distinct viruses raises concerns over the potential efficacy of a “universal” LASV vaccine. To date, several experimental LASV vaccines have been developed; however, few have been evaluated against challenge with various genetically unique Lassa virus isolates in relevant animal models. Methodologies/principle findings Here we demonstrate that a single, prophylactic immunization with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the glycoproteins of LASV strain Josiah from Sierra Leone protects strain 13 guinea pigs from infection / disease following challenge with LASV isolates originating from Liberia, Mali and Nigeria. Similarly, the VSV-based LASV vaccine yields complete protection against a lethal challenge with the Liberian LASV isolate in the gold-standard macaque model of Lassa fever. Conclusions/significance Our results demonstrate the VSV-based LASV vaccine is capable of preventing morbidity and mortality associated with non-homologous LASV challenge in two animal models of Lassa fever. Additionally, this work highlights the need for the further development of disease models for geographical distinct LASV strains, particularly those from Nigeria, in order to comprehensively evaluate potential vaccines and therapies against this prominent agent of viral hemorrhagic fever. PMID:25884628

  2. Current molecular epidemiology of Lassa virus in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ehichioya, Deborah U; Hass, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Ehimuan, Jacqueline; Asogun, Danny A; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Kleinsteuber, Katja; Lelke, Michaela; ter Meulen, Jan; Akpede, George O; Omilabu, Sunday A; Günther, Stephan; Olschläger, Stephan

    2011-03-01

    Recent Lassa virus strains from Nigeria were completely or partially sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the predominance of lineage II and III strains, the existence of a previously undescribed (sub)lineage in Nigeria, and the directional spread of virus in the southern part of the country. The Bayesian analysis also provided estimates for divergence times within the Lassa virus clade.

  3. Domain structure of Lassa virus L protein.

    PubMed

    Brunotte, Linda; Lelke, Michaela; Hass, Meike; Kleinsteuber, Katja; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The 200-kDa L protein of arenaviruses plays a central role in viral genome replication and transcription. This study aimed at providing evidence for the domain structure of L protein by combining bioinformatics with a stepwise mutagenesis approach using the Lassa virus minireplicon system. Potential interdomain linkers were predicted using various algorithms. The prediction was challenged by insertion of flexible sequences into the predicted linkers. Insertion of 5 or 10 amino acid residues was tolerated at seven sites (S407, G446, G467, G774, G939, S1952, and V2074 in Lassa virus AV). At two of these sites, G467 and G939, L protein could be split into an N-terminal and a C-terminal part, which were able to trans-complement each other and reconstitute a functional complex upon coexpression. Coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed physical interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains, irrespective of whether L protein was split at G467 or G939. In confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, the N-terminal domains showed a dot-like, sometimes perinuclear, cytoplasmic distribution similar to that of full-length L protein, while the C-terminal domains were homogenously distributed in cytoplasm. The latter were redistributed into the dot-like structures upon coexpression with the corresponding N-terminal domain. In conclusion, this study demonstrates two interdomain linkers in Lassa virus L protein, at G467 and G939, suggesting that L protein is composed of at least three structural domains spanning residues 1 to 467, 467 to 939, and 939 to 2220. The first domain seems to mediate accumulation of L protein into cytoplasmic dot-like structures.

  4. Aseptic Meningitis Caused by Lassa Virus: Case Series Report

    PubMed Central

    Bankole, Idowu A.; Iruolagbe, Christopher O.; Muoebonam, Benard E.; Okonofua, Martha O.; Dawodu, Simeon O.; Akpede, George O.

    2016-01-01

    The Lassa virus is known to cause disease in different organ systems of the human body, with varying clinical manifestations. The features of severe clinical disease may include bleeding and/or central nervous system manifestations. Whereas Lassa fever encephalopathy and encephalitis are well described in the literature, there is paucity of data on Lassa virus meningitis. We present the clinical description, laboratory diagnosis, and management of 4 consecutive cases of aseptic meningitis associated with Lassa virus infection without bleeding seen in a region of Nigeria known to be endemic for both the reservoir rodent and Lassa fever. The 4 patients recovered fully following intravenous ribavirin treatment and suffered no neurologic complications. PMID:27957363

  5. Functional interferon system is required for clearance of lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Poussard, Allison L; Seregin, Alexey V; Walker, Aida G; Smith, Jennifer K; Aronson, Judith F; Smith, Jeanon N; Soong, Lynn; Paessler, Slobodan

    2012-03-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa hemorrhagic fever (LF) in humans, a deadly disease endemic to West Africa that results in 5,000 to 10,000 deaths annually. Here we present results demonstrating that functional type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling is required for efficient control of LASV dissemination and clearance.

  6. Imported lassa fever in Germany: molecular characterization of a new lassa virus strain.

    PubMed

    Günther, S; Emmerich, P; Laue, T; Kühle, O; Asper, M; Jung, A; Grewing, T; ter Meulen, J; Schmitz, H

    2000-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a new Lassa virus strain imported into Germany by a traveler who had visited Ghana, Côte D'Ivoire, and Burkina Faso. This strain, designated "AV," originated from a region in West Africa where Lassa fever has not been reported. Viral S RNA isolated from the patient's serum was amplified and sequenced. A long-range reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction allowed amplification of the full-length (3.4 kb) S RNA. The coding sequences of strain AV differed from those of all known Lassa prototype strains (Josiah, Nigeria, and LP) by approximately 20%, mainly at third codon positions. Phylogenetically, strain AV appears to be most closely related to strain Josiah from Sierra Leone. Lassa viruses comprise a group of genetically highly diverse strains, which has implications for vaccine development. The new method for full-length S RNA amplification may facilitate identification and molecular analysis of new arenaviruses or arenavirus strains.

  7. Sequence variability and geographic distribution of Lassa virus, Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Leski, Tomasz A; Stockelman, Michael G; Moses, Lina M; Park, Matthew; Stenger, David A; Ansumana, Rashid; Bausch, Daniel G; Lin, Baochuan

    2015-04-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to parts of West Africa and causes highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. The multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) is the only known reservoir of LASV. Most human infections result from zoonotic transmission. The very diverse LASV genome has 4 major lineages associated with different geographic locations. We used reverse transcription PCR and resequencing microarrays to detect LASV in 41 of 214 samples from rodents captured at 8 locations in Sierra Leone. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of nucleoprotein (NP), glycoprotein precursor (GPC), and polymerase (L) genes showed 5 separate clades within lineage IV of LASV in this country. The sequence diversity was higher than previously observed; mean diversity was 7.01% for nucleoprotein gene at the nucleotide level. These results may have major implications for designing diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents for LASV infections in Sierra Leone.

  8. Sequence Variability and Geographic Distribution of Lassa Virus, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Stockelman, Michael G.; Moses, Lina M.; Park, Matthew; Stenger, David A.; Ansumana, Rashid; Bausch, Daniel G.; Lin, Baochuan

    2015-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to parts of West Africa and causes highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. The multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) is the only known reservoir of LASV. Most human infections result from zoonotic transmission. The very diverse LASV genome has 4 major lineages associated with different geographic locations. We used reverse transcription PCR and resequencing microarrays to detect LASV in 41 of 214 samples from rodents captured at 8 locations in Sierra Leone. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of nucleoprotein (NP), glycoprotein precursor (GPC), and polymerase (L) genes showed 5 separate clades within lineage IV of LASV in this country. The sequence diversity was higher than previously observed; mean diversity was 7.01% for nucleoprotein gene at the nucleotide level. These results may have major implications for designing diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents for LASV infections in Sierra Leone. PMID:25811712

  9. [Immunogenic and protective characteristics of recombinant Lassa virus NP protein].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, G M

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant fragment of Lassa virus (strain Josiah) nucleocapsid protein (corresponding to amino acid residues 141 + 569) constructed by Dr. Jan ter Meulen (Tropenmedizine, Hamburg) was used for immunizing CBA/calac mice. The preparation was injected intraperitoneally twice with 2-week interval in a dose of 10 micrograms. The parameters of the resultant specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity were comparable to those in reference animals immunized with inactivated Lassa virus. Challenge with Lassa virus (10,000 PFU) resulted in 100% death of the reference animals, while of 15 animals immunized with the recombinant NP protein 8 survived.

  10. Aerosol Stability and Respiratory Infectivity of Lassa Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    diVaIlabLjjo, Cd, /1 ------- t I- 2 Lassa virus , an arenavirus , is endemic in western Africa and causes a severe generalized hemorrhagic disease in human...guinea pigs to infection with Lassa virus (P. B. Jahrling et al., manuscript in preparation) and other arenaviruses (8) when the virus is presented by...Prog. Mod. Viral. 18:111-126. 4. Fabiyi. A. 1976. Lassa fever ( arenaviruses ) as a public health problem. Bull. PAHO. 100335-337. 5. Guyton. A. C. 1947

  11. Molecular characterization of a reassortant virus derived from Lassa and Mopeia viruses.

    PubMed

    Moshkoff, Dmitry A; Salvato, Maria S; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2007-04-01

    In this article we describe two new complete genomic sequences of Old World Arenaviruses: the Mopeia (MOP) virus and the reassortant MOP/LAS virus, clone 29, or ML29. This reassortant has the large (L) RNA from MOP virus and the small (S) RNA from Lassa (LAS) virus, Josiah strain. Recent studies showed that the ML29 virus is not pathogenic for mice, guinea pigs, or macaques, can completely protect guinea pigs from Lassa virus, and elicit vigorous cell-mediated immunity in immunized monkeys (Lukashevich, I. S., Patterson, J., Carrion, R., Moshkoff, D., Ticer, A., Zapata, J., Brasky, K., Geiger, R., Hubbard, G. B., Bryant, J., and Salvato, M. S., J Virol 79, 13934-13942, 2005). This is a molecular characterization of a reassortant virus, which has been put forward as a live attenuated vaccine candidate against Lassa Fever. Sequence analysis of this reassortant virus revealed 5 non-conservative amino acid substitutions that distinguished it from the parental LAS and MOP viruses. Three substitutions were found outside the conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) motifs. A fourth substitution was located between the glycoprotein (GPC)-cleavage site and the putative fusion peptide of GP2. The nucleocapsid protein (NP) contained a fifth substitution in the carboxyl-terminal region of the protein. Two mutations were found within each non-coding terminus of the L segment and one mutation was located in the 3' non-coding region of the S segment of the MOP/LAS virus. ML29 mutations in its genomic termini may have implications for the genetic stability and replication efficiency of ML29 reassortant.

  12. Lassa virus infection in Nigeria: clinical perspective overview.

    PubMed

    Idemyor, Vincent

    2010-12-01

    Lassa fever is a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever caused by Lassa virus, an Arenavirus that can be transmitted to humans from asymptomatically infected multimammate rats. The speculation is that Lassa viral infection may affect between 2 to 3 million people each year in certain portions of the West African region, causing a mortality of about 10000 during the same period. Lassa fever is one of the endemic zoonosis in Nigeria with a high probability for nosocomial transmission due to several health care sector challenges. Although treatment is available for Lassa fever, early diagnosis is still difficult in almost all Nigerian health care institutions. The intention of this clinical overview is to: (1) summarize the pertinent literature for clinicians in primary, secondary, and tertiary health care centers; and (2) suggest a need to use the information from basic research and laboratory diagnosis to incorporate international best practices into public health and clinical practice guidelines.

  13. Lassa Virus Seroprevalence in Sibirilia Commune, Bougouni District, Southern Mali.

    PubMed

    Sogoba, Nafomon; Rosenke, Kyle; Adjemian, Jennifer; Diawara, Sory Ibrahim; Maiga, Ousmane; Keita, Moussa; Konaté, Drissa; Keita, Abdoul Salam; Sissoko, Ibrahim; Boisen, Matt; Nelson, Diana; Oottamasathien, Darin; Millett, Molly; Garry, Robert F; Branco, Luis M; Traoré, Sékou F; Doumbia, Seydou; Feldmann, Heinz; Safronetz, David

    2016-04-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to several nations in West Africa. In Mali, LASV was unknown until an exported case of Lassa fever was reported in 2009. Since that time, rodent surveys have found evidence of LASV-infected Mastomys natalensis rats in several communities in southern Mali, near the border with Côte d'Ivoire. Despite increased awareness, to date only a single case of Lassa fever has been confirmed in Mali. We conducted a survey to determine the prevalence of LASV exposure among persons in 3 villages in southern Mali where the presence of infected rodents has been documented. LASV IgG seroprevalence ranged from 14.5% to 44% per village. No sex bias was noted; however, seropositivity rates increased with participant age. These findings confirm human LASV exposure in Mali and suggest that LASV infection/Lassa fever is a potential public health concern in southern Mali.

  14. Lassa Virus Seroprevalence in Sibirilia Commune, Bougouni District, Southern Mali

    PubMed Central

    Sogoba, Nafomon; Rosenke, Kyle; Adjemian, Jennifer; Diawara, Sory Ibrahim; Maiga, Ousmane; Keita, Moussa; Konaté, Drissa; Keita, Abdoul Salam; Sissoko, Ibrahim; Boisen, Matt; Nelson, Diana; Oottamasathien, Darin; Millett, Molly; Garry, Robert F.; Branco, Luis M.; Traoré, Sékou F.; Doumbia, Seydou; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to several nations in West Africa. In Mali, LASV was unknown until an exported case of Lassa fever was reported in 2009. Since that time, rodent surveys have found evidence of LASV-infected Mastomys natalensis rats in several communities in southern Mali, near the border with Côte d’Ivoire. Despite increased awareness, to date only a single case of Lassa fever has been confirmed in Mali. We conducted a survey to determine the prevalence of LASV exposure among persons in 3 villages in southern Mali where the presence of infected rodents has been documented. LASV IgG seroprevalence ranged from 14.5% to 44% per village. No sex bias was noted; however, seropositivity rates increased with participant age. These findings confirm human LASV exposure in Mali and suggest that LASV infection/Lassa fever is a potential public health concern in southern Mali. PMID:26981786

  15. Characterization of the Lassa virus matrix protein Z: electron microscopic study of virus-like particles and interaction with the nucleoprotein (NP).

    PubMed

    Eichler, Robert; Strecker, Thomas; Kolesnikova, Larissa; ter Meulen, Jan; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Becker, Stephan; Klenk, Hans Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang; Lenz, Oliver

    2004-03-15

    Lassa virus is the causative agent of a hemorrhagic fever endemic in west Africa. The RNA genome of Lassa virus encodes the glycoprotein precursor GP-C, a nucleoprotein (NP), the viral polymerase L and a small protein Z (11 kDa). Here, we analyze the role of Z protein for virus maturation. We have recently shown that expression of Z protein in the absence of other viral proteins is sufficient for the release of enveloped Z-containing particles. In this study, we examined particles secreted into the supernatant of a stably Z protein-expressing CHO cell line by electron microscopy. The observed Z-induced virus-like particles did not significantly differ in their morphology and size from Lassa virus particles. Mutation of two proline-rich domains within Z which are known to drastically reduce the release of virus-like particles, had no effect on the cellular localization of the protein nor on its membrane-association. Furthermore, we present evidence that Z interacts with the NP. We assume that Z recruits NP to cellular membranes where virus assembly takes place. We conclude from our data that Lassa virus Z protein plays an essential role in Lassa virus maturation.

  16. Annual Incidence of Lassa Virus Infection in Southern Mali.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Sogoba, Nafomon; Diawara, Sory Ibrahim; Bane, Sidy; Rosenke, Kyle; Maiga, Ousmane; Boisen, Matt; Garry, Robert F; Branco, Luis M; Lindsay, L Robbin; Traoré, Sékou F; Feldmann, Heinz; Doumbia, Seydou

    2017-01-16

    Previously, we reported a high seroprevalence rate of Lassa virus antibodies in inhabitants of three villages in southern Mali where infected rodents have been demonstrated. Herein, we report a 1-year follow-up study in which we were able to collect a second blood samples from 88.7% of participants of the same cohort. We identified 23 seroconversions for IgG antibodies reactive against Lassa virus, representing an incidence of 6.3% (95% confidence interval = 3.8-8.8%). Seroconversion was frequently seen in preteenage children (12/23, 51.7%) and two household/familial clusters were identified. These results confirm active transmission of Lassa virus is occurring in southern Mali and appropriate diagnostic testing should be established for this often severe etiological agent viral hemorrhagic fever.

  17. Protection of Lassa virus-infected guinea pigs with Lassa-immune plasma of guinea pig, primate, and human origin.

    PubMed

    Jahrling, P B

    1983-01-01

    Lassa virus-immune plasma has been used to treat human Lassa fever patients; however, criteria for plasma selection were based arbitrarily on available serologic tools and protective efficacy was never directly assessed. To test the validity of plasma therapy for Lassa virus infections in an animal model, and to develop biologically relevant criteria for selection of protective immune plasma, inbred, strain 13 guinea pigs were infected with a lethal dose of Lassa virus and treated with various Lassa-immune plasmas obtained from guinea pigs, primates, and convalescent human patients. Neutralizing antibody titers were determined in a virus dilution, plaque reduction test, and were expressed as a log10 plaque-forming units (PFU) neutralization index (LNI). All guinea pigs treated with immune plasma 6 ml/kg/treatment on days 0, 3, and 6 after virus inoculation were protected, provided the LNI exceeded 2.0. Plasmas obtained from donors in early convalescence (32-45 days) had low titers of N-antibody (LNI less than 2) and failed to confer protection, despite high titers of Lassa antibody measured in the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test. Higher doses of marginally titered plasma conferred increased protection. The degree of protection and suppression of viremia was closely associated with LNI an not IFA titers. Administration of low-titered plasma did not result in immune enhancement. A high dose of human plasma from Liberia (12 ml/kg/treatment) was required to confer complete protection to guinea pigs infected with a Lassa virus strain from Sierra Leone (LNI = 1.6), while a lower dose (3 ml/kg/treatment) was sufficient for protection against a Liberian strain (LNI = 2.8), suggesting that a geographic matching of immune plasma and Lassa virus strain origin may increase treatment success. These studies support the concept of plasma therapy for Lassa infection and suggest that the plaque reduction neutralization test is more appropriate than the IFA test for

  18. Lassa Virus Infection of Rhesus Monkeys: Pathogenesis and Treatment with Ribavirin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    viruses [5, 61, is effective in treating severe The views of the authors do not purport to reflect the posi- Lassa virus disease in rhesus monkeys...THE JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES - VOL. 141, NO. 5 MAY 1980 1980 by The University of Chicago. 0022-1899/80/410500 .95 ECr C- Lassa Virus Infection...Atlanta, Georgia Rhesus monkeys were experimentally infected with Lassa virus to establish their suita- bility as a nonhuman primate model for the human

  19. Identification of cell surface molecules involved in dystroglycan-independent Lassa virus cell entry.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Masayuki; Ströher, Ute; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2012-02-01

    Although O-mannosylated dystroglycan is a receptor for Lassa virus, a causative agent of Lassa fever, recent findings suggest the existence of an alternative receptor(s). Here we identified four molecules as receptors for Lassa virus: Axl and Tyro3, from the TAM family, and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial calcium-dependent lectin (LSECtin), from the C-type lectin family. These molecules enhanced the binding of Lassa virus to cells and mediated infection independently of dystroglycan. Axl- or Tyro3-mediated infection required intracellular signaling via the tyrosine kinase activity of Axl or Tyro3, whereas DC-SIGN- or LSECtin-mediated infection and binding were dependent on a specific carbohydrate and on ions. The identification of these four molecules as Lassa virus receptors advances our understanding of Lassa virus cell entry.

  20. Lassa fever in Guinea: II. Distribution and prevalence of Lassa virus infection in small mammals.

    PubMed

    Demby, A H; Inapogui, A; Kargbo, K; Koninga, J; Kourouma, K; Kanu, J; Coulibaly, M; Wagoner, K D; Ksiazek, T G; Peters, C J; Rollin, P E; Bausch, D G

    2001-01-01

    Rodents of the genus Mastomys form the reservoir for Lassa virus (LV), an arenavirus that causes a potentially severe hemorrhagic illness, Lassa fever (LF). Although Mastomys rodents exist throughout sub-Saharan Africa, areas of human LF appear to be quite focal. The distribution of small mammals and LV-infected Mastomys has been assessed in only a few countries. We conducted a survey of small mammals in selected regions of Guinea to assess the degree to which LV poses a public health risk in that country. A total of 1,616 small mammals, including 956 (59%) Mastomys, were captured from 444 households and seven bush sites. Mastomys made up > 90% of the captured animals in the savannah, savannah-forest transition, and forest regions of Guinea, while Mus musculus dominated in coastal and urban sites. Animals were analyzed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for LV-specific antigen (blood and spleen homogenate) and IgG antibody (blood only). Virus isolation from spleen homogenates was also performed on a subset of animals. Lassa antibody and antigen were found in 96 (11%) and 46 (5%), respectively, of 884 tested Mastomys. Antibody and antigen were essentially mutually exclusive and showed profiles consistent with vertical transmission of both LV and antibody. LV was isolated only from Mastomys. ELISA antigen constituted an acceptable surrogate for virus isolation, with a sensitivity and specificity when performed on blood of 78% (95% confidence interval: 68-83%) and 98% (95-99%), respectively. The proportion of LV-infected Mastomys per region ranged from 0 to 9% and was highest in the savannah and forest zones. The proportion of infected animals per village varied considerably, even between villages in close proximity. Infected animals tended to cluster in relatively few houses, suggesting the existence of focal "hot spots" of LV-infected Mastomys that may account for the observed heterogeneous distribution of LF.

  1. Expression of the Lassa virus nucleocapsid protein in insect cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus: application to diagnostic assays for Lassa virus infection.

    PubMed

    Barber, G N; Clegg, J C; Lloyd, G

    1990-01-01

    The coding region of the gene for the nucleocapsid protein of Lassa virus has been inserted into the genome of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) using the transfer vector pAcYM1, so that expression of the foreign DNA is under the control of the promoter of the AcNPV polyhedrin gene. Infection of cultured Spodoptera frugiperda cells with recombinant virus resulted in the synthesis of high levels of a protein that was indistinguishable from the authentic Lassa virus protein by SDS gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with a variety of specific immune sera and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The kinetics of appearance of the protein were comparable to those of polyhedrin production in wild-type AcNPV-infected cells. The recombinant material was antigenic when used in ELISA for Lassa virus-specific antibodies, reacting well with MAbs specific for the nucleocapsid protein and with sera from experimentally infected guinea-pigs. The recombinant ELISA was able to clearly distinguish sera from human cases of Lassa fever against a panel of known negative sera of African origin. Recombinant-infected insect cells were an effective substitute for mammalian cells infected with Lassa virus itself in the immunofluorescence assay for Lassa virus-specific antibodies. This system offers attractive alternatives to the use of Lassa virus-infected materials as reagents in diagnostic procedures.

  2. Pathology of Lassa virus infection in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Callis, R T; Jahrling, P B; DePaoli, A

    1982-09-01

    The clinical signs and gross and microscopic lesions of Lassa virus infection in the rhesus monkey are described. Of 17 monkeys infected with Lassa virus, nine died or were killed when moribund. The clinical signs were lethargy, aphagia, constipation, fever, conjunctivitis, and skin rash. Pulmonary congestion, pleural effusion, pericardial edema, hydropericardium, and a few visceral hemorrhages were present grossly. Major microscopic lesions were necrotizing hepatitis and interstitial pneumonia. Other microscopic changes were present in the heart, small intestine, spleen, lymph nodes, kidney, urinary bladder, adrenal glands, and central nervous system; however, most of these lesions were mild. In fact, death could not always be attributed to the morphologic changes; therefore, function alterations must be examined.

  3. Cis- and cell-type-dependent trans-requirements for Lassa virus-like particle production.

    PubMed

    Urata, Shuzo; Yasuda, Jiro

    2015-07-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) small zinc-finger protein (Z), which contains two L-domain motifs, plays a central role in virus budding. Here, we report that co-expression of glycoprotein (GPC) altered the requirements for cholesterol but not the L-domains and host factor, Tsg101, for Z-induced virus-like particle (VLP) production. In particular, the cholesterol requirement for VLP production was cell-type-dependent. In addition, GPC was found to be important for co-localization of Z with CD63, a late endosomal marker. We also found that the N-terminal region (aa 3-10) of Z was critical for its myristoylation and VLP production. These findings will contribute to our understanding of LASV assembly and budding.

  4. Improved detection of Lassa virus by reverse transcription-PCR targeting the 5' region of S RNA.

    PubMed

    Olschläger, Stephan; Lelke, Michaela; Emmerich, Petra; Panning, Marcus; Drosten, Christian; Hass, Meike; Asogun, Danny; Ehichioya, Deborah; Omilabu, Sunday; Günther, Stephan

    2010-06-01

    The method of choice for the detection of Lassa virus is reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. However, the high degree of genetic variability of the virus poses a problem with the design of RT-PCR assays that will reliably detect all strains. Recently, we encountered difficulties in detecting some strains from Liberia and Nigeria in a commonly used glycoprotein precursor (GPC) gene-specific RT-PCR assay (A. H. Demby, J. Chamberlain, D. W. Brown, and C. S. Clegg, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:2898-2903, 1994), which prompted us to revise the protocol. The design of the new assay, the GPC RT-PCR/2007 assay, took into account 62 S RNA sequences from all countries where Lassa fever is endemic, including 40 sequences generated from the strains in our collection. The analytical sensitivity of the new assay was determined with 11 strains from Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ivory Coast, and Nigeria by probit analysis; the viral loads detectable with a probability of 95% ranged from 342 to 2,560 S RNA copies/ml serum, which corresponds to 4 to 30 S RNA copies/assay. The GPC RT-PCR/2007 assay was validated with 77 serum samples and 1 cerebrospinal fluid sample from patients with laboratory-confirmed Lassa fever. The samples mainly originated from Liberia and Nigeria and included strains difficult to detect in the assay of 1994. The GPC RT-PCR/2007 assay detected virus in all clinical specimens (100% sensitivity). In conclusion, a new RT-PCR assay, based in part on the protocol developed by Demby et al. in 1994, for the detection of Lassa virus is described. Compared to the assay developed in 1994, the GPC RT-PCR/2007 assay offers improved sensitivity for the detection of Liberian and Nigerian Lassa virus strains.

  5. Passive antibody therapy of Lassa fever in cynomolgus monkeys: importance of neutralizing antibody and Lassa virus strain.

    PubMed

    Jahrling, P B; Peters, C J

    1984-05-01

    Lassa virus-infected cynomolgus monkeys were passively immunized with immune plasma of primate or human origin to gain insight into criteria for plasma selection and administration to human Lassa fever patients. Protective efficacy was correlated with neutralizing antibody concentrations, expressed as a log10 neutralization index (LNI). Convalescent Lassa-immune monkey plasma was titrated for protective efficacy in monkeys by intravenous inoculation with dilutions of plasma on the day of subcutaneous Lassa virus inoculation (day 0) and again on days 3 and 6. Monkeys that received undiluted plasma (LNI = 4.1) (1 ml/kg per treatment) survived a lethal viral dose, whereas those given a 1:3 dilution (LNI = 2.6) of this same plasma (1 ml/kg per treatment) died. Protection was restored when the volume of the 1:3 plasma dilution was increased to 3 ml/kg per treatment. Plasma diluted 1:9 or more (LNI = 1.5 or less) delayed onset and suppressed the magnitude of viremia but failed to confer protection at 3 ml/kg per treatment. Immunological enhancement, defined as increased viremia or accelerated death, did not occur following inadequate treatment. Human convalescent plasma also protected recipient monkeys; reductions in mortality and viremia were accurately predicted by the LNI of the plasma. Plasma of Liberian origin neutralized a Liberian Lassa strain more effectively than a Sierra Leone strain in vitro (LNI = 2.8 and 1.6, respectively) and protected monkeys more effectively against the Liberian strain. Geographic origin is thus a factor in the selection of optimal plasma for treatment of human Lassa fever, since geographically matched plasma is more likely to contain adequate LNI titers against homologous Lassa virus strains.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Genome Sequence of Lassa Virus Isolated from the First Domestically Acquired Case in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Svenja; Schultze, Tilman; Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Mengel, Jan Philipp; Kann, Gerrit; Wolf, Timo; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a zoonotic, hemorrhagic fever-causing virus endemic in West Africa, for which no approved vaccines or specific treatment options exist. Here, we report the genome sequence of LASV isolated from the first case of acquired Lassa fever disease outside of Africa. PMID:27660771

  7. Genome Sequence of Lassa Virus Isolated from the First Domestically Acquired Case in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Svenja; Schultze, Tilman; Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Mengel, Jan Philipp; Kann, Gerrit; Wolf, Timo; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan; Hain, Torsten; Strecker, Thomas

    2016-09-22

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a zoonotic, hemorrhagic fever-causing virus endemic in West Africa, for which no approved vaccines or specific treatment options exist. Here, we report the genome sequence of LASV isolated from the first case of acquired Lassa fever disease outside of Africa.

  8. Effective vaccine for lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, S P; Hutwagner, L; Brown, B; McCormick, J B

    2000-08-01

    Lassa fever has been estimated to cause 5,000 deaths annually in West Africa. Recently, war in the zone where Lassa fever is hyperendemic has severely impeded control and treatment. Vaccination is the most viable control measure. There is no correlation between antibody levels and outcome in human patients, and inactivated vaccines produce high titers of antibodies to all viral proteins but do not prevent virus replication and death in nonhuman primates. Accordingly, we vaccinated 44 macaques with vaccinia virus-expressed Lassa virus structural proteins separately and in combination, with the object of inducing a predominantly TH1-type immune response. Following Lassa virus challenge, all unvaccinated animals died (0% survival). Nine of 10 animals vaccinated with all proteins survived (90% survival). Although no animals that received full-length glycoprotein alone had a high titer of antibody, 17 of 19 survived challenge (88%). In contrast, all animals vaccinated with nucleoprotein developed high titers of antibody but 12 of 15 died (20% survival). All animals vaccinated with single glycoproteins, G1 or G2, died, but all those that received both single glycoproteins (G1 plus G2) at separate sites survived, showing that both glycoproteins are independently important in protection. Neither group had demonstrable antibody levels prior to challenge. We demonstrate that in primates, immune responses to epitopes on both glycoproteins are required to protect against lethal challenge with Lassa virus without having untoward side effects and that this protection is likely to be primarily cell mediated. We show that an effective, safe vaccine against Lassa virus can and should be made and that its evaluation for human populations is a matter of humanitarian priority.

  9. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-10-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with /sup 60/CO gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of /sup 60/CO radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. The authors found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents.

  10. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-10-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with /sup 60/Co gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of /sup 60/Co radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. We found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents.

  11. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines against Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Safronetz, David

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrated that previous vaccination with a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based Lassa virus vaccine does not alter protective efficacy of subsequent vaccination with a VSV-based Ebola virus vaccine. These findings demonstrate the utility of VSV-based vaccines against divergent viral pathogens, even when preexisting immunity to the vaccine vector is present.

  12. Lead optimization of an acylhydrazone scaffold possessing antiviral activity against Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Burgeson, James R; Gharaibeh, Dima N; Moore, Amy L; Larson, Ryan A; Amberg, Sean M; Bolken, Tove' C; Hruby, Dennis E; Dai, Dongcheng

    2013-11-01

    Previously we reported the optimization of antiviral scaffolds containing benzimidazole and related heterocycles possessing activity against a variety of arenaviruses. These series of compounds were discovered through an HTS campaign of a 400,000 small molecule library using lentivirus-based pseudotypes incorporated with the Lassa virus envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP). This screening also uncovered an alternate series of very potent arenavirus inhibitors based upon an acylhydrazone scaffold. Subsequent SAR analysis of this chemical series involved various substitutions throughout the chemical framework along with assessment of the preferred stereochemistry. These studies led to an optimized analog (ST-161) possessing subnanomolar activity against LASV and submicromolar activity against a number of other viruses in the Arenaviridae family.

  13. Mice lacking functional STAT1 are highly susceptible to lethal infection with Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Seregin, Alexey V; Walker, David H; Popov, Vsevolod L; Walker, Aida G; Smith, Jeanon N; Miller, Milagros; de la Torre, Juan C; Smith, Jennifer K; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Fair, Joseph N; Wauquier, Nadia; Grant, Donald S; Bockarie, Bayon; Bente, Dennis; Paessler, Slobodan

    2013-10-01

    Lassa fever (LF) is a potentially lethal human disease that is caused by the arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV). Annually, around 300,000 infections with up to 10,000 deaths occur in regions of Lassa fever endemicity in West Africa. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking a functional STAT1 pathway are highly susceptible to infection with LASV and develop lethal disease with pathology similar to that reported in humans.

  14. Endemic Lassa fever in Liberia. V. Distribution of Lassa virus activity in Liberia: hospital staff surveys.

    PubMed

    Frame, J D; Yalley-Ogunro, J E; Hanson, A P

    1984-01-01

    Serological testing of hospital personnel by the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) technique was used to indicate the distribution of Lassa virus (LV) activity in Liberia. Determination of the places of origin of the staff members as well as the sites of the hospitals indicated that LV is active in throughout Liberia. Prevalences of IFA varied from 3.8% at the J. J. Dossen Hospital on the coast in the south-east to 22.3, 23.5 and 40.4% in Lofa County hospitals inland in the north-west. Rises in LV antibody prevalences, high prevalences and relatively high IFA titres in hospital personnel suggest the LV activity is particularly high in Lofa, Grand Cape Mount and Nimba Counties.

  15. Clinical Sequencing Uncovers Origins and Evolution of Lassa Virus.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shapiro, B Jesse; Matranga, Christian B; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E; Moses, Lina M; Folarin, Onikepe A; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M; Gire, Stephen K; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J; Ryan, Elizabeth M; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A; Lukens, Amanda K; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B; Lander, Eric S; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F; Okokhere, Peter O; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Akpede, George O; Asogun, Danny A; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z; Happi, Christian T; Garry, Robert F; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2015-08-13

    The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us of how little is known about biosafety level 4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  16. Clinical sequencing uncovers origins and evolution of Lassa virus

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Shapiro, B. Jesse; Matranga, Christian B.; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E.; Moses, Lina M.; Folarin, Onikepe A.; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E.; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M.; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M.; Gire, Stephen K.; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D.; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K.; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J.; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M.; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J.; Ryan, Elizabeth M.; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S.; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G.; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B.; Lander, Eric S.; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Akpede, George O.; Asogun, Danny A.; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z.; Happi, Christian T.; Garry, Robert F.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us how little is known about biosafety level-4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. PMID:26276630

  17. Role of LAMP1 Binding and pH Sensing by the Spike Complex of Lassa Virus.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Israeli, Hadar; Shani, Orly; Katz, Aliza; Diskin, Ron

    2016-11-15

    To effectively infect cells, Lassa virus needs to switch in an endosomal compartment from its primary receptor, α-dystroglycan, to a protein termed LAMP1. A unique histidine triad on the surface of the receptor-binding domain from the glycoprotein spike complex of Lassa virus is important for LAMP1 binding. Here we investigate mutated spikes that have an impaired ability to interact with LAMP1 and show that although LAMP1 is important for efficient infectivity, it is not required for spike-mediated membrane fusion per se Our studies reveal important regulatory roles for histidines from the triad in sensing acidic pH and preventing premature spike triggering. We further show that LAMP1 requires a positively charged His230 residue to engage with the spike complex and that LAMP1 binding promotes membrane fusion. These results elucidate the molecular role of LAMP1 binding during Lassa virus cell entry and provide new insights into how pH is sensed by the spike.

  18. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Inhibition of Lassa Virus Infection through Aberrant GP1 Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Bergeron, Éric; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Albariño, César G; Flint, Mike; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-12-20

    Lassa virus (LASV) infection is a major public health concern due to high fatality rates and limited effective treatment. The interferon-stimulated gene cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the production of 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC). 25HC is involved in regulating cholesterol biosynthesis and has recently been identified as a potent antiviral targeting enveloped virus entry. Here, we show a previously unrecognized role of CH25H in inhibiting LASV glycoprotein glycosylation and the production of infectious virus. Overexpression of CH25H or treatment with 25HC decreased LASV G1 glycoprotein N-glycan maturation and reduced the production of infectious LASV. Depletion of endogenous CH25H using small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced the levels of fully glycosylated G1 and increased infectious LASV production. Finally, LASV particles produced from 25HC-treated cells were found to be less infectious, to incorporate aberrantly glycosylated GP1 species, and to be defective in binding alpha-dystroglycan, an attachment and entry receptor. Our findings identify a novel role for CH25H in controlling LASV propagation and indicate that manipulation of the expression of CH25H or the administration of 25HC may be a useful anti-LASV therapy.

  19. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Inhibition of Lassa Virus Infection through Aberrant GP1 Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Chakrabarti, Ayan K.; Albariño, César G.; Flint, Mike; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus (LASV) infection is a major public health concern due to high fatality rates and limited effective treatment. The interferon-stimulated gene cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the production of 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC). 25HC is involved in regulating cholesterol biosynthesis and has recently been identified as a potent antiviral targeting enveloped virus entry. Here, we show a previously unrecognized role of CH25H in inhibiting LASV glycoprotein glycosylation and the production of infectious virus. Overexpression of CH25H or treatment with 25HC decreased LASV G1 glycoprotein N-glycan maturation and reduced the production of infectious LASV. Depletion of endogenous CH25H using small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced the levels of fully glycosylated G1 and increased infectious LASV production. Finally, LASV particles produced from 25HC-treated cells were found to be less infectious, to incorporate aberrantly glycosylated GP1 species, and to be defective in binding alpha-dystroglycan, an attachment and entry receptor. Our findings identify a novel role for CH25H in controlling LASV propagation and indicate that manipulation of the expression of CH25H or the administration of 25HC may be a useful anti-LASV therapy. PMID:27999160

  20. Infectious Lassa virus, but not filoviruses, is restricted by BST-2/tetherin.

    PubMed

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Dong, Lian; Chi, Xiaoli; Clester, Jeremiah C; Retterer, Cary; Spurgers, Kevin; Kuhn, Jens H; Sandwick, Sarah; Ruthel, Gordon; Kota, Krishna; Boltz, Dutch; Warren, Travis; Kranzusch, Philip J; Whelan, Sean P J; Bavari, Sina

    2010-10-01

    Bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2/tetherin) is a cellular membrane protein that inhibits the release of HIV-1. We show for the first time, using infectious viruses, that BST-2 also inhibits egress of arenaviruses but has no effect on filovirus replication and spread. Specifically, infectious Lassa virus (LASV) release significantly decreased or increased in human cells in which BST-2 was either stably expressed or knocked down, respectively. In contrast, replication and spread of infectious Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Lake Victoria marburgvirus (MARV) were not affected by these conditions. Replication of infectious Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and cowpox virus (CPXV) was also not affected by BST-2 expression. Elevated cellular levels of human or murine BST-2 inhibited the release of virus-like particles (VLPs) consisting of the matrix proteins of multiple highly virulent NIAID Priority Pathogens, including arenaviruses (LASV and Machupo virus [MACV]), filoviruses (ZEBOV and MARV), and paramyxoviruses (Nipah virus). Although the glycoproteins of filoviruses counteracted the antiviral activity of BST-2 in the context of VLPs, they could not rescue arenaviral (LASV and MACV) VLP release upon BST-2 overexpression. Furthermore, we did not observe colocalization of filoviral glycoproteins with BST-2 during infection with authentic viruses. None of the arenavirus-encoded proteins rescued budding of VLPs in the presence of BST-2. Our results demonstrate that BST-2 might be a broad antiviral factor with the ability to restrict release of a wide variety of human pathogens. However, at least filoviruses, RVFV, and CPXV are immune to its inhibitory effect.

  1. Lassa Virus Cell Entry Reveals New Aspects of Virus-Host Cell Interaction.

    PubMed

    Torriani, Giulia; Galan-Navarro, Clara; Kunz, Stefan

    2017-02-15

    Viral entry represents the first step of every viral infection and is a determinant for the host range and disease potential of a virus. Here, we review the latest developments on cell entry of the highly pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus, providing novel insights into the complex virus-host cell interaction of this important human pathogen. We will cover new discoveries on the molecular mechanisms of receptor recognition, endocytosis, and the use of late endosomal entry factors.

  2. Bacterial-based systems for expression and purification of recombinant Lassa virus proteins of immunological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Luis M; Matschiner, Alex; Fair, Joseph N; Goba, Augustine; Sampey, Darryl B; Ferro, Philip J; Cashman, Kathleen A; Schoepp, Randal J; Tesh, Robert B; Bausch, Daniel G; Garry, Robert F; Guttieri, Mary C

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a significant requirement for the development and acquisition of reagents that will facilitate effective diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Lassa fever. In this regard, recombinant Lassa virus (LASV) proteins may serve as valuable tools in diverse antiviral applications. Bacterial-based systems were engineered for expression and purification of recombinant LASV nucleoprotein (NP), glycoprotein 1 (GP1), and glycoprotein 2 (GP2). Results Full-length NP and the ectodomains of GP1 and GP2 were generated as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusions in the Rosetta strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli) using pMAL-c2x vectors. Average fusion protein yields per liter of culture for MBP-NP, MBP-GP1, and MBP-GP2 were 10 mg, 9 mg, and 9 mg, respectively. Each protein was captured from cell lysates using amylose resin, cleaved with Factor Xa, and purified using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Fermentation cultures resulted in average yields per liter of 1.6 mg, 1.5 mg, and 0.7 mg of purified NP, GP1 and GP2, respectively. LASV-specific antibodies in human convalescent sera specifically detected each of the purified recombinant LASV proteins, highlighting their utility in diagnostic applications. In addition, mouse hyperimmune ascitic fluids (MHAF) against a panel of Old and New World arenaviruses demonstrated selective cross reactivity with LASV proteins in Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Conclusion These results demonstrate the potential for developing broadly reactive immunological assays that employ all three arenaviral proteins individually and in combination. PMID:18538016

  3. Persistence in darkness of virulent alphaviruses, Ebola virus, and Lassa virus deposited on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, Jose-Luis; Rom, Amanda M; Holland, Louis E

    2010-12-01

    Ebola, Lassa, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, and Sindbis viruses were dried onto solid surfaces, incubated for various time periods under controlled conditions of temperature and relative humidity, and quantitatively eluted from surfaces, and viral titers in the recovered samples were determined. The viral inactivation kinetics that were obtained indicated that viral resistance to natural inactivation in the dark follows (in decreasing order of stability) alphavirus > Lassa virus > Ebola virus. The findings reported in this study on the natural decay in the dark should assist in understanding the biophysical properties of enveloped RNA viruses outside the host and in estimating the persistence of viruses in the environment during epidemics or after an accidental or intentional release.

  4. Effect of environmental factors on aerosol-induced Lassa virus infection.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, E H; Larson, E W; Dominik, J W

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that the most frequent means of transmission of Lassa virus was by either direct or indirect contact with infectious material. Aerosol stability and respiratory infectivity of the Josiah strain of Lassa virus were assessed to determine the effect of environmental factors on aerosol-induced infection. The stability of the virus in aerosol, particularly at low relative humidity (30% RH), plus the ability of the virus to infect guinea pigs and monkeys via the respiratory route emphasize the potential for aerosol transmission of Lassa virus. Biological half-lives at both 24 and 32 degrees C ranged from 10.1 to 54.6 min, and were sufficient for aerosol dispersion of virus to considerable distances in natural situations. Infectivity of Lassa virus in small particle aerosol was demonstrated in outbred guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys using dynamic aerosol equipment. Monkeys exposed to inhaled doses to 465 PFU were infected and died. The median infectious dose (ID50) for guinea pigs was 15 PFU, yet a definitive median lethal aerosol dose (LD50) could not be established. Organ tropism of aerosol-induced Lassa virus infections in outbred guinea pigs was similar to that previously reported for inbred guinea pigs infected by subcutaneous inoculation.

  5. Lassa virus infection in experimentally infected marmosets: liver pathology and immunophenotypic alterations in target tissues.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Ricardo; Brasky, Kathleen; Mansfield, Keith; Johnson, Curtis; Gonzales, Monica; Ticer, Anysha; Lukashevich, Igor; Tardif, Suzette; Patterson, Jean

    2007-06-01

    Lassa virus causes thousands of deaths annually in western Africa and is considered a potential biological weapon. In an attempt to develop a small nonhuman primate model of Lassa fever, common marmosets were subcutaneously inoculated with Lassa virus strain Josiah. This inoculation resulted in a systemic disease with clinical and morphological features mirroring those in fatal human Lassa infection: fever, weight loss, high viremia and viral RNA load in tissues, elevated liver enzymes, and severe morbidity between days 15 and 20. The most prominent histopathology findings included multifocal hepatic necrosis with mild inflammation and hepatocyte proliferation, lymphoid depletion, and interstitial nephritis. Cellular aggregates in regions of hepatocellular necrosis were largely composed of HAM56-positive macrophages, devoid of CD3-positive and CD20-positive cells, and characterized by marked reductions in the intensity of HLA-DP, DQ, DR staining. A marked reduction in the major histocompatibility complex class II expression was also observed in the lymph nodes. Immunophenotypic alterations in spleen included reductions in overall numbers of CD20-positive and CD3-positive cells and the disruption of lymphoid follicular architecture. These findings identify the common marmoset as an appropriate model of human Lassa fever and present the first experimental evidence that replication of Lassa virus in tissues is associated with alterations that would be expected to impair adaptive immunity.

  6. Cutting edge: impairment of dendritic cells and adaptive immunity by Ebola and Lassa viruses.

    PubMed

    Mahanty, Siddhartha; Hutchinson, Karen; Agarwal, Sudhanshu; McRae, Michael; Rollin, Pierre E; Pulendran, Bali

    2003-03-15

    Acute infection of humans with Ebola and Lassa viruses, two principal etiologic agents of hemorrhagic fevers, often results in a paradoxical pattern of immune responses: early infection, characterized by an outpouring of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6, vs late stage infections, which are associated with poor immune responses. The mechanisms underlying these diverse outcomes are poorly understood. In particular, the role played by cells of the innate immune system, such as dendritic cells (DC), is not known. In this study, we show that Ebola and Lassa viruses infect human monocyte-derived DC and impair their function. Monocyte-derived DC exposed to either virus fail to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, do not up-regulate costimulatory molecules, and are poor stimulators of T cells. These data represent the first evidence for a mechanism by which Ebola and Lassa viruses target DC to impair adaptive immunity.

  7. Lassa virus hepatitis. Observations on a fatal case from the 1972 Sierra Leone epidemic.

    PubMed

    Winn, W C; Monath, T P; Murphy, F A; Whitfield, S G

    1975-11-01

    During a recent outbreak of Lassa fever in Sierre Leone, a 20-year-old woman developed an acute febrile disease with tonsillar exudates and hemorrhagic manifestations. Lassa virus was isolated in cell cultures from pharyngeal secretions and pleural fluid and was identified by complement fixation. Typical arenavirus particles were observed in these infected cell cultures. In a liver biopsy specimen, diffuse hepatocellular damage and focal necroses were evident, with a spectrum of liver cell change, ranging from slight vacuolizaiton to frank lysis. Virus was frequently observed in nearby extracellular spaces and was clearly associated with hepatocytes rather than sinusoidal cells. The demonstration for the first time of Lassa virus particules in human tissue provides direct evidence that the virus is responsible for the observed pathologic changes.

  8. Role of DC-SIGN in Lassa virus entry into human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Ana-Rita; Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pasquato, Antonella; Helenius, Ari; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    The arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans. Antigen-presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DCs), are early and preferred targets of LASV, and their productive infection contributes to the virus-induced immunosuppression observed in fatal disease. Here, we characterized the role of the C-type lectin DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in LASV entry into primary human DCs using a chimera of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) expressing the LASV glycoprotein (rLCMV-LASVGP). We found that differentiation of human primary monocytes into DCs enhanced virus attachment and entry, concomitant with the upregulation of DC-SIGN. LASV and rLCMV-LASVGP bound to DC-SIGN via mannose sugars located on the N-terminal GP1 subunit of LASVGP. We provide evidence that DC-SIGN serves as an attachment factor for rLCMV-LASVGP in monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (MDDC) and can accelerate the capture of free virus. However, in contrast to the phlebovirus Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), which uses DC-SIGN as an authentic entry receptor, productive infection with rLCMV-LASVGP was less dependent on DC-SIGN. In contrast to the DC-SIGN-mediated cell entry of UUKV, entry of rLCMV-LASVGP in MDDC was remarkably slow and depended on actin, indicating the use of different endocytotic pathways. In sum, our data reveal that DC-SIGN can facilitate cell entry of LASV in human MDDC but that its role seems distinct from the function as an authentic entry receptor reported for phleboviruses.

  9. Identification of protective Lassa virus epitopes that are restricted by HLA-A2.

    PubMed

    Botten, Jason; Alexander, Jeff; Pasquetto, Valerie; Sidney, John; Barrowman, Polly; Ting, Joey; Peters, Bjoern; Southwood, Scott; Stewart, Barbara; Rodriguez-Carreno, Maria P; Mothe, Bianca; Whitton, J Lindsay; Sette, Alessandro; Buchmeier, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Recovery from Lassa virus (LASV) infection usually precedes the appearance of neutralizing antibodies, indicating that cellular immunity plays a primary role in viral clearance. To date, the role of LASV-specific CD8(+) T cells has not been evaluated in humans. To facilitate such studies, we utilized a predictive algorithm to identify candidate HLA-A2 supertype epitopes from the LASV nucleoprotein and glycoprotein precursor (GPC) genes. We identified three peptides (GPC(42-50), GLVGLVTFL; GPC(60-68), SLYKGVYEL; and GPC(441-449), YLISIFLHL) that displayed high-affinity binding (< or =98 nM) to HLA-A*0201, induced CD8(+) T-cell responses of high functional avidity in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice, and were naturally processed from native LASV GPC in human HLA-A*0201-positive target cells. HLA-A*0201 mice immunized with either GPC(42-50) or GPC(60-68) were protected against challenge with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed LASV GPC. The epitopes identified in this study represent potential diagnostic reagents and candidates for inclusion in epitope-based vaccine constructs. Our approach is applicable to any pathogen with existing sequence data, does not require manipulation of the actual pathogen or access to immune human donors, and should therefore be generally applicable to category A through C agents and other emerging pathogens.

  10. Preparation and use of erythrocyte-globulin conjugates to Lassa virus in reversed passive hemagglutination and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Goldwasser, R A; Elliott, L H; Johnson, K M

    1980-01-01

    Conditions were defined for functional covalent coupling of anti-Lassa virus globulins to glutaraldehyde-fixed chicken erythrocytes. Tolylene-2,4-diisocyanate in a reaction mixture containing not more than 0.01 M NaCl produced uniformly good conjugates which were used in reversed passive hemagglutination (RPH) and reversed passive hemagglutination inhibition (RPHI) tests to detect Lassa virus antigens in infected cell cultures and specific antigens in Vero cell cultures. Identical results were obtained with this method and with immunofluorescent-antibody (IFA) staining in the detection and identification of Lassa virus isolated from human and rodent specimens from West Africa. The RPHI method was equal to IFA for serological diagnosis of acute human Lassa virus infection and superior to IFA, complement fixation, and a radioimmunoassay procedure for detection of Lassa virus antibodies in a human population where this infection is endemic. PMID:7000810

  11. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Lassa fever , a new virus disease of man from West Africa . Clinical... Lassa fever in missionaries stationed in West Africa . Bull. W.H.O. 52: 593-598 (1975). 5. Clayton, A.J. Lassa immune serum. Bull. W.H.O. 55: 435-439...1977). 6. Leifer, E., Gocke, D.J., & Bourne, H. Lassa fever , a new virus disease of man from West Africa . II. Report of a laboratory acquired

  12. Towards a human Lassa fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, S P; McCormick, J B

    2001-01-01

    Arenaviruses, such as Lassa fever, establish chronic infections in rodents, leading to incidental transmission to humans. Lassa fever is a clinically severe disease, yet the absence of second attacks implies life-long immunity. The aim of this review is to consider whether such immunity could be provided by vaccines. The South American arenaviruses are controlled by neutralising antibody and a clinical trial of live, attenuated vaccine for Argentinian haemorrhagic fever provided 84% protection. In contrast, there is no evidence for protective humoral immunity against Old World arenaviruses which are controlled by cell-mediated immune responses. Nevertheless, vaccination with Lassa glycoproteins can protect monkeys from disease, implying that protection may be achievable, even though the immunological mechanisms are distinct. Recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing various forms of Lassa glycoproteins can protect both guinea-pigs and primates, while additional protective responses can be mounted against nucleocapsid genes. However, vaccines based upon vaccinia constructs are no longer tenable for African populations with a high seroprevalence of HIV infection. The scientific challenge now remains to find alternative methods of delivering T-cell immunity against glycoproteins from Lassa virus in ways which can overcome the local economic and political hurdles to vaccine development.

  13. Evaluating the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding Lassa virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Carreno, Maria P; Nelson, Michael S; Botten, Jason; Smith-Nixon, Kim; Buchmeier, Michael J; Whitton, J Lindsay

    2005-04-25

    Several viruses in the Arenavirus genus of the family Arenaviridae cause severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever. One such virus, Lassa virus (LV), is a frequent cause of disease in Africa, and survivors often are left with substantial neurological impairment. The feasibility of protective immunization against LV infection, and the associated disease, has been demonstrated in animal models, using recombinant vaccinia viruses to deliver Lassa proteins. Circumstantial evidence implicates cellular immunity in this Lassa-induced protection, but this has not been confirmed. Here, we describe DNA vaccines that encode LV proteins. A single inoculation of a plasmid encoding full-length Lassa nucleoprotein (LNP) can induce CD8(+) T cell responses in mice and can protect against challenge with two arenaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Pichinde virus (PV). A DNA minigene vaccine encoding a 9 amino acid sequence from LNP also induces CD8(+) T cells and protects against arenavirus challenge, thus confirming prior speculation that protective cellular immunity is induced by LV proteins.

  14. Genomic profiling of host responses to Lassa virus: therapeutic potential from primate to man

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C; Salvato, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    Lassa virus infection elicits distinctive changes in host gene expression and metabolism. We focus on changes in host gene expression that may be biomarkers that discriminate individual pathogens or may help to provide a prognosis for disease. In addition to assessing mRNA changes, functional studies are also needed to discriminate causes of disease from mechanisms of host resistance. Host responses that drive pathogenesis are likely to be targets for prevention or therapy. Host responses to Lassa or its related arenaviruses have been monitored in cell culture, in animal models of hemorrhagic fever, in Lassa-infected nonhuman primates and, to a limited extent, in infected human beings. Here, we describe results from those studies and discuss potential targets for reducing virus replication and mitigating disease. PMID:25844088

  15. Genomic profiling of host responses to Lassa virus: therapeutic potential from primate to man.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan C; Salvato, Maria S

    2015-03-13

    Lassa virus infection elicits distinctive changes in host gene expression and metabolism. We focus on changes in host gene expression that may be biomarkers that discriminate individual pathogens or may help to provide a prognosis for disease. In addition to assessing mRNA changes, functional studies are also needed to discriminate causes of disease from mechanisms of host resistance. Host responses that drive pathogenesis are likely to be targets for prevention or therapy. Host responses to Lassa or its related arenaviruses have been monitored in cell culture, in animal models of hemorrhagic fever, in Lassa-infected nonhuman primates and, to a limited extent, in infected human beings. Here, we describe results from those studies and discuss potential targets for reducing virus replication and mitigating disease.

  16. A survey for antibodies to Lassa virus among health workers in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bajani, M D; Tomori, O; Rollin, P E; Harry, T O; Bukbuk, N D; Wilson, L; Childs, J E; Peters, C J; Ksiazek, T G

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted among 552 health workers at 6 health facilities in Nigeria. Lassa virus immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibody was detected in 12.3%, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody prevalence in the 6 health centres ranged from 1.2% to 27.3%. Prevalences were higher in primary and secondary health facilities than in tertiary centres. Seroprevalences ranged from 1.7% to 23.7% among different occupational groups of health workers; the highest observed antibody prevalence was among ward aids. Lassa virus IgM antibody, indicating recent infection, was present in 6 of the health workers, 5 of whom were ward aids and one was a nurse. All of the health workers with specific IgM came from a single facility in Lafia, sampled during an outbreak of Lassa fever.

  17. [Detection and antigenic characteristics of the recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of Lassa and Marburg viruses].

    PubMed

    Vladyko, A S; Scheslenok, E P; Fomina, E G; Semizhon, P A; Ignat'ev, G M; Shkolina, T V; Kras'ko, A G; Semenov, S F; Vinokurov, N V

    2012-01-01

    Two plasmid vectors, which allow the recombinant polypeptides of Lassa and Marburg viruses to be expressed in prokaryotic cells E. coli strain BL21 (DE3), were produced. The two recombinant polypeptides are able to bind specific antibodies. This provides an opportunity to use them as antigenic components of immunoassay diagnostic test kits.

  18. Gairo virus, a novel arenavirus of the widespread Mastomys natalensis: Genetically divergent, but ecologically similar to Lassa and Morogoro viruses.

    PubMed

    Gryseels, Sophie; Rieger, Toni; Oestereich, Lisa; Cuypers, Bart; Borremans, Benny; Makundi, Rhodes; Leirs, Herwig; Günther, Stephan; Goüy de Bellocq, Joëlle

    2015-02-01

    Despite its near pan-African range, the Natal multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis, carries the human pathogen Lassa virus only in West Africa, while the seemingly non-pathogenic arenaviruses Mopeia, Morogoro, and Luna have been detected in this semi-commensal rodent in Mozambique/Zimbabwe, Tanzania and Zambia, respectively. Here, we describe a novel arenavirus in M. natalensis from Gairo district of central Tanzania, for which we propose the name "Gairo virus". Surprisingly, the virus is not closely related with Morogoro virus that infects M. natalensis only 90km south of Gairo, but clusters phylogenetically with Mobala-like viruses that infect non-M. natalensis host species in Central African Republic and Ethiopia. Despite the evolutionary distance, Gairo virus shares basic ecological features with the other M. natalensis-borne viruses Lassa and Morogoro. Our data show that M. natalensis, carrying distantly related viruses even in the same geographical area, is a potent reservoir host for a variety of arenaviruses.

  19. Kinetic study of platelets and fibrinogen in Lassa virus-infected monkeys and early pathologic events in Mopeia virus-infected monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lange, J V; Mitchell, S W; McCormick, J B; Walker, D H; Evatt, B L; Ramsey, R R

    1985-09-01

    The rhesus monkey, an established model of Lassa fever, was used to study hematologic and hemostatic aspects of Lassa fever and whether Mopeia (also known as Mozambique) virus induces any cellular damage in this model. Six days after subcutaneous injection of 10(3.48) plaque forming units (PFU) of Lassa virus (Josiah strain) one group of monkeys received an intravenous injection of 111In-labeled allogeneic platelets and another group received 125I-labeled alogeneic fibrinogen. Lassa virus-infected monkeys developed a severe clinical illness with high viremia and typical pathology. Lassa antigen was found in most tissues using a Lassa nucleocapsid-specific monoclonal antibody. Platelet counts remained within normal limits. Platelet and fibrinogen kinetics were similar in infected and control animals. Hematologic and hemostatic changes indicate that disseminated intravascular coagulation plays no role in this model of Lassa fever. Levels of plasma fibronectin were reduced in Lassa-infected monkeys. Mopeia virus-infected monkeys were normothemic, aviremic, and there was no detection of Mopeia antigen in any tissues using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies. Mopeia virus was recovered from the spleen of one monkey. Mopeia virus was associated with hepatocellular and renal tubular damage.

  20. Progress in recombinant DNA-derived vaccines for Lassa virus and filoviruses.

    PubMed

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2011-12-01

    Developing vaccines for highly pathogenic viruses such as those causing Lassa, Ebola, and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers is a daunting task due to both scientific and logistical constraints. Scientific hurdles to overcome include poorly defined relationships between pathogenicity and protective immune responses, genetic diversity of viruses, and safety in a target population that includes a large number of individuals with compromised immune systems. Logistical obstacles include the requirement for biosafety level-4 containment to study the authentic viruses, the poor public health infrastructure of the endemic disease areas, and the cost of developing these vaccines for use in non-lucrative markets. Recombinant DNA-based vaccine approaches offer promise of overcoming some of these issues. In this review, we consider the status of various recombinant DNA candidate vaccines against Lassa virus and filoviruses which have been tested in animals.

  1. Lassa Virus Cell Entry via Dystroglycan Involves an Unusual Pathway of Macropinocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Oppliger, Joel; Torriani, Giulia; Herrador, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with a high rate of mortality in humans. Several LASV receptors, including dystroglycan (DG), TAM receptor tyrosine kinases, and C-type lectins, have been identified, suggesting complex receptor use. Upon receptor binding, LASV enters the host cell via an unknown clathrin- and dynamin-independent pathway that delivers the virus to late endosomes, where fusion occurs. Here we investigated the mechanisms underlying LASV endocytosis in human cells in the context of productive arenavirus infection, using recombinant lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (rLCMV) expressing the LASV glycoprotein (rLCMV-LASVGP). We found that rLCMV-LASVGP entered human epithelial cells via DG using a macropinocytosis-related pathway independently of alternative receptors. Dystroglycan-mediated entry of rLCMV-LASVGP required sodium hydrogen exchangers, actin, and the GTPase Cdc42 and its downstream targets, p21-activating kinase-1 (PAK1) and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-Wasp). Unlike other viruses that enter cells via macropinocytosis, rLCMV-LASVGP entry did not induce overt changes in cellular morphology and hardly affected actin dynamics or fluid uptake. Screening of kinase inhibitors identified protein kinase C, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and the receptor tyrosine kinase human hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR) to be regulators of rLCMV-LASVGP entry. The HGFR inhibitor EMD 1214063, a candidate anticancer drug, showed antiviral activity against rLCMV-LASVGP at the level of entry. When combined with ribavirin, which is currently used to treat human arenavirus infection, EMD 1214063 showed additive antiviral effects. In sum, our study reveals that DG can link LASV to an unusual pathway of macropinocytosis that causes only minimal perturbation of the host cell and identifies cellular kinases to be possible novel targets for therapeutic intervention. IMPORTANCE Lassa virus (LASV

  2. RT-PCR assay for detection of Lassa virus and related Old World arenaviruses targeting the L gene.

    PubMed

    Vieth, Simon; Drosten, Christian; Lenz, Oliver; Vincent, Martin; Omilabu, Sunday; Hass, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; ter Meulen, Jan; Nichol, Stuart T; Schmitz, Herbert; Günther, Stephan

    2007-12-01

    This study describes an RT-PCR assay targeting the L RNA segment of arenaviruses. Conserved regions were identified in the polymerase domain of the L gene on the basis of published sequences for Lassa virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), Pichinde virus and Tacaribe virus, as well as 15 novel sequences for Lassa virus, LCMV, Ippy virus, Mobala virus and Mopeia virus determined in this study. Using these regions as target sites, a PCR assay for detection of all known Old World arenaviruses was developed and optimized. The concentration that yields 95% positive results in a set of replicate tests (95% detection limit) was determined to be 4290 copies of Lassa virus L RNA per ml of serum, corresponding to 30 copies per reaction. The ability of the assay to detect various Old World arenaviruses was demonstrated with in vitro transcribed RNA, material from infected cell cultures and samples from patients with Lassa fever and monkeys with LCMV-associated callitrichid hepatitis. The L gene PCR assay may be applicable: (i) as a complementary diagnostic test for Lassa virus and LCMV; (ii) to identify unknown Old World arenaviruses suspected as aetiological agents of disease; and (iii) for screening of potential reservoir hosts for unknown Old World arenaviruses.

  3. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-09

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  4. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Walker, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  5. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan C; Pauza, C David; Djavani, Mahmoud M; Rodas, Juan D; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2011-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets.

  6. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  7. Sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation of Lassa, vaccinia, and Ebola viruses dried on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, Jose-Luis; Lytle, C David

    2011-03-01

    Germicidal UV (also known as UVC) provides a means to decontaminate infected environments as well as a measure of viral sensitivity to sunlight. The present study determined UVC inactivation slopes (and derived D(37) values) of viruses dried onto nonporous (glass) surfaces. The data obtained indicate that the UV resistance of Lassa virus is higher than that of Ebola virus. The UV sensitivity of vaccinia virus (a surrogate for variola virus) appeared intermediate between that of the two virulent viruses studied. In addition, the three viruses dried on surfaces showed a relatively small but significant population of virions (from 3 to 10 % of virus in the inoculum) that appeared substantially more protected by their environment from the effect of UV than the majority of virions tested. The findings reported in this study should assist in estimating the threat posed by the persistence of virus in environments contaminated during epidemics or after an accidental or intentional release.

  8. Fluctuation of abundance and Lassa virus prevalence in Mastomys natalensis in Guinea, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Lecompte, Emilie; Koivogui, Lamine; Soropogui, Barré; Doré, Amadou; Kourouma, Fodé; Sylla, Oumar; Daffis, Stéphane; Koulémou, Kékoura; Ter Meulen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Based on empiric surveillance data, the incidence of human Lassa fever (LF) cases in Guinea and other West African countries has been reported to increase during the dry season compared to the rainy season. To investigate possible links with the ecology of the rodent reservoir of the virus, we conducted a 2-year longitudinal survey of Mastomys natalensis in a region of high human Lassa virus (LASV) seropositivity in Guinea. Standardized rodent trapping with similar trapping efforts between seasons was performed in three villages and 53.5% (601/1123) of the animals were identified as M. natalensis using morphometric and molecular criteria. Mean trapping success (TS) of M. natalensis was always higher inside houses than in proximal cultivations. In the dry season, mean TS increased 2-fold inside houses and decreased up to 10-fold outside (p < 0.0001), suggesting aggregation of rodents inside houses due to restricted food supply. 14.5% (80/553) of M. natalensis were tested positive for Lassa virus by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; range, 5%-30%) and prevalence of the virus was two to three times higher in rodents captured in the rainy season than in the dry season (p < 0.05). Inside houses, however, the LASV prevalence fluctuated nonsignificantly with season. These data suggest that in Guinea the risk of LASV transmission from rodents to humans is present both in the rainy and the dry season, reflected by the occurrence of LF cases throughout the year. In the dry season, however, the increased risk of humans encountering Mastomys and their excreta inside of houses may result in an increase of human Lassa fever cases.

  9. Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric Form of Lassa Virus Matrix Protein Z

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Kathryn M.; Zandonatti, Michelle; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus matrix protein Z is highly multifunctional and occurs in both monomeric and oligomeric forms. The crystal structure of a dodecamer of Z from Lassa virus, presented here, illustrates a ring-like structure with a highly basic center. Mutagenesis demonstrates that the dimeric interface within the dodecamer and a Lys-Trp-Lys triad at the center of the ring are important for oligomerization. This structure provides an additional template to explore the many functions of Z. IMPORTANCE The arenavirus Lassa virus causes hundreds of thousands of infections each year, many of which develop into fatal hemorrhagic fever. The arenavirus matrix protein Z is multifunctional, with at least four distinct roles. Z exists in both monomeric and oligomeric forms, each of which likely serves a specific function in the viral life cycle. Here we present the dodecameric form of Lassa virus Z and demonstrate that Z forms a “wreath” with a highly basic center. This structure and that of monomeric Z now provide a pair of critical templates by which the multiple roles of Z in the viral life cycle may be interpreted. PMID:26912609

  10. Lassa and Ebola virus inhibitors identified using minigenome and recombinant virus reporter systems.

    PubMed

    Welch, Stephen R; Guerrero, Lisa Wiggleton; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; McMullan, Laura K; Flint, Mike; Bluemling, Gregory R; Painter, George R; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Albariño, César G

    2016-12-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) and Ebola virus (EBOV) infections are important global health issues resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. While several promising drug and vaccine trials for EBOV are ongoing, options for LASV infection are currently limited to ribavirin treatment. A major factor impeding the development of antiviral compounds to treat these infections is the need to manipulate the virus under BSL-4 containment, limiting research to a few institutes worldwide. Here we describe the development of a novel LASV minigenome assay based on the ambisense LASV S segment genome, with authentic terminal untranslated regions flanking a ZsGreen (ZsG) fluorescent reporter protein and a Gaussia princeps luciferase (gLuc) reporter gene. This assay, along with a similar previously established EBOV minigenome, was optimized for high-throughput screening (HTS) of potential antiviral compounds under BSL-2 containment. In addition, we rescued a recombinant LASV expressing ZsG, which, in conjunction with a recombinant EBOV reporter virus, was used to confirm any potential antiviral hits in vitro. Combining an initial screen to identify potential antiviral compounds at BSL-2 containment before progressing to HTS with infectious virus will reduce the amount of expensive and technically challenging BSL-4 containment research. Using these assays, we identified 6-azauridine as having anti-LASV activity, and demonstrated its anti-EBOV activity in human cells. We further identified 2'-deoxy-2'-fluorocytidine as having potent anti-LASV activity, with an EC50 value 10 times lower than that of ribavirin.

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exposed to Lassa Virus and to the Attenuated Mopeia/Lassa Reassortant 29 (ML29), a Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan Carlos; Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L.; Crasta, Oswald; Zhang, Yan; Mani, Sachin; Jett, Marti; Poonia, Bhawna; Djavani, Mahmoud; White, David M.; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa Fever and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually in West Africa. LASV and the non-pathogenic Mopeia virus (MOPV) are both rodent-borne African arenaviruses. A live attenuated reassortant of MOPV and LASV, designated ML29, protects rodents and primates from LASV challenge and appears to be more attenuated than MOPV. To gain better insight into LASV-induced pathology and mechanism of attenuation we performed gene expression profiling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to LASV and the vaccine candidate ML29. PBMC from healthy human subjects were exposed to either LASV or ML29. Although most PBMC are non-permissive for virus replication, they remain susceptible to signal transduction by virus particles. Total RNA was extracted and global gene expression was evaluated during the first 24 hours using high-density microarrays. Results were validated using RT-PCR, flow cytometry and ELISA. LASV and ML29 elicited differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG), as well as genes involved in apoptosis, NF-kB signaling and the coagulation pathways. These genes could eventually serve as biomarkers to predict disease outcomes. The remarkable differential expression of thrombomodulin, a key regulator of inflammation and coagulation, suggests its involvement with vascular abnormalities and mortality in Lassa fever disease. PMID:24069471

  12. Transcriptome analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to Lassa virus and to the attenuated Mopeia/Lassa reassortant 29 (ML29), a vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan Carlos; Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L; Crasta, Oswald; Zhang, Yan; Mani, Sachin; Jett, Marti; Poonia, Bhawna; Djavani, Mahmoud; White, David M; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa Fever and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually in West Africa. LASV and the non-pathogenic Mopeia virus (MOPV) are both rodent-borne African arenaviruses. A live attenuated reassortant of MOPV and LASV, designated ML29, protects rodents and primates from LASV challenge and appears to be more attenuated than MOPV. To gain better insight into LASV-induced pathology and mechanism of attenuation we performed gene expression profiling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to LASV and the vaccine candidate ML29. PBMC from healthy human subjects were exposed to either LASV or ML29. Although most PBMC are non-permissive for virus replication, they remain susceptible to signal transduction by virus particles. Total RNA was extracted and global gene expression was evaluated during the first 24 hours using high-density microarrays. Results were validated using RT-PCR, flow cytometry and ELISA. LASV and ML29 elicited differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG), as well as genes involved in apoptosis, NF-kB signaling and the coagulation pathways. These genes could eventually serve as biomarkers to predict disease outcomes. The remarkable differential expression of thrombomodulin, a key regulator of inflammation and coagulation, suggests its involvement with vascular abnormalities and mortality in Lassa fever disease.

  13. A recently isolated Lassa virus from Mali demonstrates atypical clinical disease manifestations and decreased virulence in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Strong, James E; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Sogoba, Nafomon; Brining, Douglas; Geisbert, Thomas W; Scott, Dana P; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-04-15

    The virulence of Soromba-R, a Lassa virus strain recently isolated from southern Mali, was assessed in 2 animal models of Lassa fever: inbred strain 13 guinea pigs and cynomolgus macaques. In both models, the Malian isolate demonstrated tissue tropism and viral titers similar to those of historical Lassa virus isolates from Sierra Leone (Josiah) and Liberia (Z-132); however, the Soromba-R isolate was found to be less pathogenic, as determined by decreased mortality and prolonged time to euthanasia in macaques. Interestingly, in addition to the classic indicators of Lassa fever, Soromba-R infection presented with moderate to severe pulmonary manifestations in the macaque model. Analysis of host responses demonstrated increased immune activation in Soromba-R-infected macaques, particularly in neutrophil-activating or -potentiating proinflammatory cytokines or growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, interleukin 1β, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, as well as interleukin 5, which may be responsible for the decreased lethality and uncharacteristic clinical presentation. These results suggest that the strain of Lassa virus circulating in Mali might be less pathogenic than strains circulating in the historical region of endemicity and may result in an atypical presentation for Lassa fever, which could complicate clinical diagnosis.

  14. Structural basis for the dsRNA specificity of the Lassa virus NP exonuclease.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Kathryn M; King, Liam B; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic fever characterized by immunosuppression. The nucleoprotein of Lassa virus, termed NP, binds the viral genome. It also has an additional enzymatic activity as an exonuclease that specifically digests double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). dsRNA is a strong signal to the innate immune system of viral infection. Digestion of dsRNA by the NP exonuclease activity appears to cause suppression of innate immune signaling in the infected cell. Although the fold of the NP enzyme is conserved and the active site completely conserved with other exonucleases in its DEDDh family, NP is atypical among exonucleases in its preference for dsRNA and its strict specificity for one substrate. Here, we present the crystal structure of Lassa virus NP in complex with dsRNA. We find that unlike the exonuclease in Klenow fragment, the double-stranded nucleic acid in complex with Lassa NP remains base-paired instead of splitting, and that binding of the paired complementary strand is achieved by "relocation" of a basic loop motif from its typical exonuclease position. Further, we find that just one single glycine that contacts the substrate strand and one single tyrosine that stacks with a base of the complementary, non-substrate strand are responsible for the unique substrate specificity. This work thus provides templates for development of antiviral drugs that would be specific for viral, rather than host exonucleases of similar fold and active site, and illustrates how a very few amino acid changes confer alternate specificity and biological phenotype to an enzyme.

  15. Depletion of GTP pool is not the predominant mechanism by which ribavirin exerts its antiviral effect on Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Ölschläger, Stephan; Neyts, Johan; Günther, Stephan

    2011-08-01

    Ribavirin (1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide) is the standard treatment for Lassa fever, though its mode of action is unknown. One possibility is depletion of the intracellular GTP pool via inhibition of the cellular enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). This study compared the anti-arenaviral effect of ribavirin with that of two other IMPDH inhibitors, mycophenolic acid (MPA) and 5-ethynyl-1-β-d-ribofuranosylimidazole-4-carboxamide (EICAR). All three compounds were able to inhibit Lassa virus replication by ≥2 log units in cell culture. Restoring the intracellular GTP pool by exogenous addition of guanosine reversed the inhibitory effects of MPA and EICAR, while ribavirin remained fully active. Analogous experiments performed with Zaire Ebola virus showed that IMPDH inhibitors are also active against this virus, although to a lesser extent than against Lassa virus. In conclusion, the experiments with MPA and EICAR indicate that replication of Lassa and Ebola virus is sensitive to depletion of the GTP pool mediated via inhibition of IMPDH. However, this is not the predominant mechanism by which ribavirin exerts its in-vitro antiviral effect on Lassa virus.

  16. Characterization of virulence-associated determinants in the envelope glycoprotein of Pichinde virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Wang, Jialong; Lan, Shuiyun; Danzy, Shamika; McLay Schelde, Lisa; Seladi-Schulman, Jill; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying

    2012-11-10

    We use a small animal model, based on guinea pigs infected with a non-pathogenic Pichinde virus (PICV), to understand the virulence mechanisms of arenavirus infections in the hosts. PICV P2 strain causes a mild febrile reaction in guinea pigs, while P18 causes severe disease with clinical and pathological features reminiscent of Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans. The envelope glycoproteins (GPC) of P2 and P18 viruses differ at positions 119, 140, and 164, all localized to the receptor-binding G1 subunit. We found that lentiviral pseudotyped virions (VLPs) bearing P18 GPC show more efficient cell entry than those with P2 GPC, and that the E140 residue plays a critical role in this process. Infection of guinea pigs with the recombinant viruses containing the E140K change demonstrated that E140 of GPC is a necessary virulence determinant of P18 infections, possibly by enhancing the ability of virus to enter target cells.

  17. [Characterization of contacts of the population of Guinea with synanthropic rodents as Lassa fever virus carriers].

    PubMed

    Inapogui, A P; Konstantinov, O K; Lapshov, V N; Comara, S K

    2007-01-01

    Questionnaire surveys made in 17 villages from 3 ecological zones of Guinea have provided evidence for the population's contact with synanthropic rodents as Lassa fever virus carriers. Over 100 rodents are quarterly captured in the houses of the traditional type in the villages located in the savanna woodland. Less than 10 specimens are captured at the food warehouses. There are more than 100 rodents in the majority of houses of the traditional type in the villages located in the secondary forest. In the villages of rainy tropical forests, the capture rate is low--10 to 100 rodents. The main rodent capturers are boys and young men (aged 7 to 20 years) who are principal rodent meat eaters; although almost the whole population, particularly in rural areas, consumes this meat in varying degrees. The proportion of captured rats of the genus Mastomys (the carrier of Lassa fever virus) in the town of Kindia is 11%. In the rural area, it is much higher (as high as 94%) in the villages located in the rainy tropical forests. It is estimated that one trapper quarterly catches 0.2 (in the savanna woodland) to 6.9 (in the secondary forests) infected rats, which agrees with the data of a serological survey of Guinea's population. By and large, the majority of the Guinean population may be referred to as a group at risk for Lassa fever due to their permanent contacts with rodents.

  18. Clinical laboratory, virologic, and pathologic changes in hamsters experimentally infected with Pirital virus (Arenaviridae): a rodent model of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Sbrana, Elena; Mateo, Rosa I; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Popov, Vsevolod L; Newman, Patrick C; Tesh, Robert B

    2006-06-01

    The clinical laboratory, virologic, and pathologic changes occurring in hamsters after infection with Pirital virus (Arenaviridae) are described. Pirital virus infection in the hamsters was characterized by high titered viremia, leukocytosis, coagulopathy, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, hepatocellular and splenic necrosis, and marked elevation of serum transaminase levels. All of the animals died within 9 days. The clinical and histopathological findings in the Pirital virus-infected hamsters were very similar to those reported in severe human cases of Lassa fever, suggesting that this new animal model could serve as a low-cost and relatively safe alternative for studying the pathogenesis and therapy of Lassa fever.

  19. Haemorrhagic fever in Gabon. I. Incidence of Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses in Haut-Ogooué.

    PubMed

    Ivanoff, B; Duquesnoy, P; Languillat, G; Saluzzo, J F; Georges, A; Gonzalez, J P; McCormick, J

    1982-01-01

    A serological enquiry aimed at determining the incidence of infection with Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses was conducted on the human population of the region of Haut-Ogooué (Gabon) and on primates. The results, obtained by the indirect immunofluorescence technique, showed that more than 6% of the human population had had contact with Ebola virus but no antibodies against Marburg or Lassa viruses were found. Most sera reacted to an Ebola antigen from a Zairian strain, but showed little or no reaction to an antigen from a Sudanese strain.

  20. An attenuated Lassa vaccine in SIV-infected rhesus macaques does not persist or cause arenavirus disease but does elicit Lassa virus-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lassa hemorrhagic fever (LHF) is a rodent-borne viral disease that can be fatal for human beings. In this study, an attenuated Lassa vaccine candidate, ML29, was tested in SIV-infected rhesus macaques for its ability to elicit immune responses without instigating signs pathognomonic for arenavirus disease. ML29 is a reassortant between Lassa and Mopeia viruses that causes a transient infection in non-human primates and confers sterilizing protection from lethal Lassa viral challenge. However, since the LHF endemic area of West Africa also has high HIV seroprevalence, it is important to determine whether vaccination could be safe in the context of HIV infection. Results SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques were vaccinated with the ML29 virus and monitored for specific humoral and cellular immune responses, as well as for classical and non-classical signs of arenavirus disease. Classical disease signs included viremia, rash, respiratory distress, malaise, high liver enzyme levels, and virus invasion of the central nervous system. Non-classical signs, derived from profiling the blood transcriptome of virulent and non-virulent arenavirus infections, included increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) and decreased expression of COX2, IL-1β, coagulation intermediates and nuclear receptors needed for stress signaling. All vaccinated monkeys showed ML29-specific antibody responses and ML29-specific cell-mediated immunity. Conclusion SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques responded similarly to ML29 vaccination, and none developed chronic arenavirus infection. Importantly, none of the macaques developed signs, classical or non-classical, of arenavirus disease. PMID:23402317

  1. Inhibition of Lassa virus and Ebola virus infection in host cells treated with the kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin.

    PubMed

    Kolokoltsov, Andrey A; Adhikary, Shramika; Garver, Jennifer; Johnson, Lela; Davey, Robert A; Vela, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Arenaviruses and filoviruses are capable of causing hemorrhagic fever syndrome in humans. Limited therapeutic and/or prophylactic options are available for humans suffering from viral hemorrhagic fever. In this report, we demonstrate that pre-treatment of host cells with the kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin AG1478 leads to inhibition of infection or transduction in cells infected with Ebola virus, Marburg virus, and Lassa virus. In all, the results demonstrate that a kinase inhibitor cocktail consisting of genistein and tyrphostin AG1478 is a broad-spectrum antiviral that may be used as a therapeutic or prophylactic against arenavirus and filovirus hemorrhagic fever.

  2. Lassa virus infection of rhesus monkeys: pathogenesis and treatment with ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Jahrling, P B; Hesse, R A; Eddy, G A; Johnson, K M; Callis, R T; Stephen, E L

    1980-05-01

    Rhesus monkeys were experimentally infected with Lassa virus to establish their suitability as a nonhuman primate model for the human disease and to test the protective efficacy of ribavirin, an antiviral drug. Six of 10 untreated control monkeys died after subcutaneous inoculation of 10(6.1) plaque-forming units of Lassa virus (strain Josiah). Infectivity titrations of tissue homogenates from the six dead monkeys indicated significant replication in all tissues tested except the central nervous system. This distribution of virus was confirmed by direct immunofluorescence examination of cryostat-sectioned tissues. Ribavirin was beneficial in the treatment of two groups of infected monkeys. Four monkeys first treated on the day of viral inoculation experienced only mild clinical disease; four monkeys first treated five days later experienced a more severe illness. None of the eight monkeys treated with ribavirin died. Viremia titers and elevations of levels of serum transaminases in treated monkeys were significantly lower than in controls. Ribavirin may be beneficial in the treatment of humans exposed to this life-threatening virus.

  3. Enhanced methods for unbiased deep sequencing of Lassa and Ebola RNA viruses from clinical and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Matranga, Christian B; Andersen, Kristian G; Winnicki, Sarah; Busby, Michele; Gladden, Adrianne D; Tewhey, Ryan; Stremlau, Matthew; Berlin, Aaron; Gire, Stephen K; England, Eleina; Moses, Lina M; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E; Folarin, Onikepe; Goba, Augustine; Kahn, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Honko, Anna; Hensley, Lisa; Happi, Christian; Garry, Robert F; Malboeuf, Christine M; Birren, Bruce W; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a robust RNA sequencing method for generating complete de novo assemblies with intra-host variant calls of Lassa and Ebola virus genomes in clinical and biological samples. Our method uses targeted RNase H-based digestion to remove contaminating poly(rA) carrier and ribosomal RNA. This depletion step improves both the quality of data and quantity of informative reads in unbiased total RNA sequencing libraries. We have also developed a hybrid-selection protocol to further enrich the viral content of sequencing libraries. These protocols have enabled rapid deep sequencing of both Lassa and Ebola virus and are broadly applicable to other viral genomics studies.

  4. Physicochemical inactivation of Lassa, Ebola, and Marburg viruses and effect on clinical laboratory analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.W.; McCormick, J.B.

    1984-09-01

    Clinical specimens from patients infected with Lassa, Ebola, or Marburg virus may present a serious biohazard to laboratory workers. The authors have examined the effects of heat, alteration of pH, and gamma radiation on these viruses in human blood and on the electrolytes, enzymes, and coagulation factors measured in laboratory tests that are important in the care of an infected patient. Heating serum at 60 degrees C for 1 h reduced high titers of these viruses to noninfectious levels without altering the serum levels of glucose, blood urea nitrogen, and electrolytes. Dilution of blood in 3% acetic acid, diluent for a leukocyte count, inactivated all of these viruses. All of the methods tested for viral inactivation markedly altered certain serum proteins, making these methods unsuitable for samples that are to be tested for certain enzyme levels and coagulation factors.

  5. Role of the C terminus of Lassa virus L protein in viral mRNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Maria; Pahlmann, Meike; Jérôme, Hanna; Busch, Carola; Lelke, Michaela; Günther, Stephan

    2014-08-01

    The N terminus of arenavirus L protein contains an endonuclease presumably involved in "cap snatching." Here, we employed the Lassa virus replicon system to map other L protein sites that might be involved in this mechanism. Residues Phe-1979, Arg-2018, Phe-2071, Asp-2106, Trp-2173, Tyr-2179, Arg-2200, and Arg-2204 were important for viral mRNA synthesis but dispensable for genome replication. Thus, the C terminus of L protein is involved in the mRNA synthesis process, potentially by mediating cap binding.

  6. Reproductive characteristics of Mastomys natalensis and Lassa virus prevalence in Guinea, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Lecompte, Emilie; Koivogui, Lamine; Daffis, Stéphane; ter Meulen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    We recently reported increased prevalence of Lassa virus (LASV) infection in Mastomys natalensis during the rainy season in Guinea, West Africa. Here, the association of LASV prevalence with fecundity, fertility, and the age structure of the rodent population was analyzed using data from the previous study. The animals reproduced throughout the year, but highest fecundity was observed during the rainy season. Accordingly, the rodent population was aged at the beginning and young at the end of the rainy season. Lassa virus infection was observed in all age groups, including the very young, which is compatible with vertical transmission. However, since the prevalence of infection showed a trend with increasing age in the younger age groups, horizontal transmission by yet unknown mechanisms may also play a role in LASV transmission. Multivariate analysis did not show an association of LASV prevalence with any demographic variable studied. Rodent behavior influencing virus transmissibility and contaminated environment may therefore be responsible for spatial and seasonal variations in LASV prevalence in M. natalensis.

  7. Deciphering the glycosylome of dystroglycanopathies using haploid screens for lassa virus entry.

    PubMed

    Jae, Lucas T; Raaben, Matthijs; Riemersma, Moniek; van Beusekom, Ellen; Blomen, Vincent A; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M; Carette, Jan E; Topaloglu, Haluk; Meinecke, Peter; Wessels, Marja W; Lefeber, Dirk J; Whelan, Sean P; van Bokhoven, Hans; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2013-04-26

    Glycosylated α-dystroglycan (α-DG) serves as cellular entry receptor for multiple pathogens, and defects in its glycosylation cause hereditary Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS). At least eight proteins are critical to glycosylate α-DG, but many genes mutated in WWS remain unknown. To identify modifiers of α-DG, we performed a haploid screen for Lassa virus entry, a hemorrhagic fever virus causing thousands of deaths annually that hijacks glycosylated α-DG to enter cells. In complementary screens, we profiled cells for absence of α-DG carbohydrate chains or biochemically related glycans. This revealed virus host factors and a suite of glycosylation units, including all known Walker-Warburg genes and five additional factors critical for the modification of α-DG. Our findings accentuate the complexity of this posttranslational feature and point out genes defective in dystroglycanopathies.

  8. Rapid and specific detection of Lassa virus by reverse transcription-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide array hybridization.

    PubMed

    Olschläger, Stephan; Günther, Stephan

    2012-07-01

    To facilitate sequence-specific detection of DNA amplified in a diagnostic reverse transcription (RT)-PCR for Lassa virus, we developed an array featuring 47 oligonucleotide probes for post-PCR hybridization of the amplicons. The array procedure may be performed with low-tech equipment and does not take longer than agarose gel detection.

  9. Evaluation of Lassa virus vaccine immunogenicity in a CBA/J-ML29 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Goicochea, Marco A; Zapata, Juan C; Bryant, Joseph; Davis, Harry; Salvato, Maria S; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-02-14

    Lassa fever (LF) is one of the most prevalent viral hemorrhagic fevers in West Africa responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The BSL-4 containment requirement and lack of small animal model to evaluate Lassa virus (LASV)-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) complicate development of effective LF vaccines. Here we have described a CBA/J-ML29 model allowing evaluation of LASV-specific CMI responses in mice. This model is based on Mopeia virus reassortant clone ML29, an attractive immunogenic surrogate for LASV. A single intraperitoneal (i.p.) immunization of CBA/J mice with ML29 protected animals against a lethal homologous intracerebral (i.c.) challenge with 588 LD(50). The ML29-immunized mice displayed negligible levels of LASV-specific antibody titers, but LASV-specific CMI responses were detectable early and peaked on day 8-10 after immunization. A T cell cytotoxicity assay in vivo showed a correlation between LASV-specific cytotoxicity and the timing of protection induced by the ML29 immunization. Notably, CBA/J mice that received CD8+ T cell-depleted splenocytes from ML29-immunized donors all succumbed to a lethal i.c. challenge, demonstrating that CD8+ T cells are critical in protection. The CBA/J-ML29 model can be useful immunological tool for the preliminary evaluation of immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccine candidates against LASV outside of BSL-4 containment facilities.

  10. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B

    2015-10-12

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs.

  11. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B.; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs. PMID:26456301

  12. Lassa virus-infected rodents in refugee camps in Guinea: a looming threat to public health in a politically unstable region.

    PubMed

    Fair, Joseph; Jentes, Emily; Inapogui, Alphonse; Kourouma, Kerfella; Goba, Agustine; Bah, Alpha; Tounkara, Michel; Coulibaly, Mamadi; Garry, Robert F; Bausch, Daniel G

    2007-01-01

    Rodent-borne and other communicable diseases are of particular concern to vulnerable populations in complex humanitarian emergencies. We assessed the risk of Lassa fever to refugees and humanitarian aid workers in the Forest Region of Guinea by trapping rodents and testing them for the presence of Lassa virus infection. Our study provides a point prevalence of Lassa virus-infected rodents in various refugee camps in Guinea, suggesting that the risk of disease may be highest in camps further south toward the border with Liberia. The methodology used represents a potential model for rapid public health assessments in the setting of complex humanitarian emergencies.

  13. Lassa virus isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast represent an emerging fifth lineage

    PubMed Central

    Manning, John T.; Forrester, Naomi; Paessler, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Previous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus (LASV) among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for LF is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each LASV isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200–300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa. PMID:26483768

  14. Lassa virus isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast represent an emerging fifth lineage.

    PubMed

    Manning, John T; Forrester, Naomi; Paessler, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Previous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus (LASV) among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for LF is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each LASV isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200-300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa.

  15. Efficient rescue of recombinant Lassa virus reveals the influence of S segment noncoding regions on virus replication and virulence.

    PubMed

    Albariño, César G; Bird, Brian H; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Dodd, Kimberly A; Erickson, Bobbie Rae; Nichol, Stuart T

    2011-04-01

    Lassa virus (LASV), is a significant cause of severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever in humans throughout western Africa, with an estimated 100,000 infections each year. No vaccines are commercially available. We report the development of an efficient reverse genetics system to rescue recombinant LASV and to investigate the contributions of the long 5' and 3' noncoding regions (NCRs) of the S genomic segment to in vitro growth and in vivo virulence. This work demonstrates that deletions of large portions of these NCRs confer an attenuated phenotype and are a first step toward further insights into the high virulence of LASV.

  16. Spatial and temporal evolution of Lassa virus in the natural host population in Upper Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Ölschläger, Stephan; Strecker, Thomas; Koivogui, Lamine; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Camara, Amara Bongo; Soropogui, Barré; Magassouba, N’Faly; Günther, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at reconstructing the spatial and temporal evolution of Lassa virus (LASV) in the natural host population. To this end, we generated 132 partial nucleoprotein sequences of LASV from M. natalensis trapped in 12 villages around Faranah, Upper Guinea, over a period of 12 years. This study reveals two main features of LASV evolution in M. natalensis. First, the virus evolves in the reservoir with a molecular clock rate of 9 (7–11) × 10–4 position–1 year–1 implying that contemporary LASV lineages circulate in the Faranah area since less than 100 years. Second, viruses circulating in a specific village are diverse and polyphyletic. We observed, however, there are monophyletic clusters at village and sub-village level at specific points in time. In conclusion, our data indicate that the temporal and spatial pattern of LASV evolution in the natural reservoir is characterized by a combination of stationary circulation within a village and virus movement between villages. The latter feature is relevant for rodent control strategies, as it implies that recurrence of the virus from neighbouring villages may occur in villages where the virus has previously been eradicated. PMID:26911443

  17. Spatial and temporal evolution of Lassa virus in the natural host population in Upper Guinea.

    PubMed

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Ölschläger, Stephan; Strecker, Thomas; Koivogui, Lamine; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Camara, Amara Bongo; Soropogui, Barré; Magassouba, N'Faly; Günther, Stephan

    2016-02-25

    This study aimed at reconstructing the spatial and temporal evolution of Lassa virus (LASV) in the natural host population. To this end, we generated 132 partial nucleoprotein sequences of LASV from M. natalensis trapped in 12 villages around Faranah, Upper Guinea, over a period of 12 years. This study reveals two main features of LASV evolution in M. natalensis. First, the virus evolves in the reservoir with a molecular clock rate of 9 (7-11) × 10(-4) position(-1) year(-1) implying that contemporary LASV lineages circulate in the Faranah area since less than 100 years. Second, viruses circulating in a specific village are diverse and polyphyletic. We observed, however, there are monophyletic clusters at village and sub-village level at specific points in time. In conclusion, our data indicate that the temporal and spatial pattern of LASV evolution in the natural reservoir is characterized by a combination of stationary circulation within a village and virus movement between villages. The latter feature is relevant for rodent control strategies, as it implies that recurrence of the virus from neighbouring villages may occur in villages where the virus has previously been eradicated.

  18. Animal Model of Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated with Lassa Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Ronca, Shannon; Tamura, Atsushi; Koma, Takaaki; Seregin, Alexey V.; Dineley, Kelly T.; Miller, Milagros; Cook, Rebecca; Shimizu, Naoki; Walker, Aida G.; Smith, Jeanon N.; Fair, Joseph N.; Wauquier, Nadia; Bockarie, Bayon; Khan, Sheik Humarr

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Approximately one-third of Lassa virus (LASV)-infected patients develop sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in the late stages of acute disease or in early convalescence. With 500,000 annual cases of Lassa fever (LF), LASV is a major cause of hearing loss in regions of West Africa where LF is endemic. To date, no animal models exist that depict the human pathology of LF with associated hearing loss. Here, we aimed to develop an animal model to study LASV-induced hearing loss using human isolates from a 2012 Sierra Leone outbreak. We have recently established a murine model for LF that closely mimics many features of human disease. In this model, LASV isolated from a lethal human case was highly virulent, while the virus isolated from a nonlethal case elicited mostly mild disease with moderate mortality. More importantly, both viruses were able to induce SNHL in surviving animals. However, utilization of the nonlethal, human LASV isolate allowed us to consistently produce large numbers of survivors with hearing loss. Surviving mice developed permanent hearing loss associated with mild damage to the cochlear hair cells and, strikingly, significant degeneration of the spiral ganglion cells of the auditory nerve. Therefore, the pathological changes in the inner ear of the mice with SNHL supported the phenotypic loss of hearing and provided further insights into the mechanistic cause of LF-associated hearing loss. IMPORTANCE Sensorineural hearing loss is a major complication for LF survivors. The development of a small-animal model of LASV infection that replicates hearing loss and the clinical and pathological features of LF will significantly increase knowledge of pathogenesis and vaccine studies. In addition, such a model will permit detailed characterization of the hearing loss mechanism and allow for the development of appropriate diagnostic approaches and medical care for LF patients with hearing impairment. PMID:26719273

  19. The Impact of Human Conflict on the Genetics of Mastomys natalensis and Lassa Virus in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Denys, Christiane; ter Meulen, Jan; Wirth, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Environmental changes have been shown to play an important role in the emergence of new human diseases of zoonotic origin. The contribution of social factors to their spread, especially conflicts followed by mass movement of populations, has not been extensively investigated. Here we reveal the effects of civil war on the phylogeography of a zoonotic emerging infectious disease by concomitantly studying the population structure, evolution and demography of Lassa virus and its natural reservoir, the rodent Mastomys natalensis, in Guinea, West Africa. Analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences enabled us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of Lassa virus, which appeared 750 to 900 years ago in Nigeria and only recently spread across western Africa (170 years ago). Bayesian demographic inferences revealed that both the host and the virus populations have gone recently through severe genetic bottlenecks. The timing of these events matches civil war-related mass movements of refugees and accompanying environmental degradation. Forest and habitat destruction and human predation of the natural reservoir are likely explanations for the sharp decline observed in the rodent populations, the consequent virus population decline, and the coincident increased incidence of Lassa fever in these regions. Interestingly, we were also able to detect a similar pattern in Nigeria coinciding with the Biafra war. Our findings show that anthropogenic factors may profoundly impact the population genetics of a virus and its reservoir within the context of an emerging infectious disease. PMID:22615894

  20. The impact of human conflict on the genetics of Mastomys natalensis and Lassa virus in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Lalis, Aude; Leblois, Raphaël; Lecompte, Emilie; Denys, Christiane; Ter Meulen, Jan; Wirth, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Environmental changes have been shown to play an important role in the emergence of new human diseases of zoonotic origin. The contribution of social factors to their spread, especially conflicts followed by mass movement of populations, has not been extensively investigated. Here we reveal the effects of civil war on the phylogeography of a zoonotic emerging infectious disease by concomitantly studying the population structure, evolution and demography of Lassa virus and its natural reservoir, the rodent Mastomys natalensis, in Guinea, West Africa. Analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences enabled us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of Lassa virus, which appeared 750 to 900 years ago in Nigeria and only recently spread across western Africa (170 years ago). Bayesian demographic inferences revealed that both the host and the virus populations have gone recently through severe genetic bottlenecks. The timing of these events matches civil war-related mass movements of refugees and accompanying environmental degradation. Forest and habitat destruction and human predation of the natural reservoir are likely explanations for the sharp decline observed in the rodent populations, the consequent virus population decline, and the coincident increased incidence of Lassa fever in these regions. Interestingly, we were also able to detect a similar pattern in Nigeria coinciding with the Biafra war. Our findings show that anthropogenic factors may profoundly impact the population genetics of a virus and its reservoir within the context of an emerging infectious disease.

  1. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    extension. *References 1. Frame, J.D., Baldwin, J.M., Jr., Gocke, J. and Troup, J.M. Lassa * fever , a new virus disease of man from West Africa . 1...missionaries stationed In West Africa . Bull. WHO 52: 593-598, 1975. 6. Monath, T.P. Lassa fever : review of epidemiology. Bull. WHO S2: 577-592, 1975. 7...A .2~ .!. . .~ *~ - ~ ~-~**~ 7 -7 - M~L - . Statement of the Problem: Investigations of Lassa fever , a recently discovered viral disease of West

  2. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-31

    5. Frame, JD. Surveillance of Lassa fever in missionaries stationed in West Africa . Bull. W. H. 0. 52: 593-598 (1979). 6. Leifer, E, Gocke, D J...man from Africa . I. Clinical description and pathological findings. Am. J. TroD. Med. Hva. 19: 670-675. 2. White, HA Lassa fever . A study of 23...Bourne, H. Lassa fever , a new virus disease of man from Africa . II. Report of a laboratory acquired infection treated with plasma from a person recently

  3. Detection of Lassa virus antinucleoprotein immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies by a simple recombinant immunoblot assay for field use.

    PubMed

    Ter Meulen, J; Koulemou, K; Wittekindt, T; Windisch, K; Strigl, S; Conde, S; Schmitz, H

    1998-11-01

    The nucleoprotein of Lassa virus, strain Josiah, was expressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminally truncated, histidine-tagged recombinant protein. Following affinity purification the protein was completely denatured and spotted onto nitrocellulose membrane. A total of 1 microgram of protein was applied for detection of Lassa virus antibodies (LVA) in a simple immunoblot assay. Specific anti-Lassa immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies could be detected by increasing the amount of protein to 5 microgram. A panel of 913 serum specimens from regions in which Lassa virus was endemic and from regions in which Lassa virus was not endemic was used for evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of the LVA immunoblot in comparison to those of an indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay. The sera originated from field studies conducted in the Republic of Guinea (570 serum samples) and Liberia (99 serum samples), from inpatients of the clinical department of the Bernhard-Nocht-Institute, Hamburg, Germany (94 serum samples), and from healthy German blood donors (150 serum samples). In comparison to the IIF assay the LVA immunoblot assay had a specificity of 90.0 to 99.3%, depending on the origin of the specimens. The sensitivity was found to be highest for the Guinean samples (90.7%) and was lower for the Liberian samples (75%). Acute Lassa fever was diagnosed by PCR in 12 of 59 (20.3%) patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO) from the Republic of Guinea. On admission to the hospital, nine Lassa fever patients (75%) were reactive by the IgM immunoblot assay. One of the patients was infected with a new Lassa variant, which showed 10.4% variation on the amino acid level in comparison to the prototype strain of Lassa virus, Josiah. Seven PCR-negative patients were reactive by immunoblotting. The positive and negative predictive values of a single IgM immunoblot result for acute, PCR-confirmed Lassa fever were therefore 53.6 and 93.0%, respectively. Because of its high negative

  4. Shedding dynamics of Morogoro virus, an African arenavirus closely related to Lassa virus, in its natural reservoir host Mastomys natalensis.

    PubMed

    Borremans, Benny; Vossen, Raphaël; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Gryseels, Sophie; Hughes, Nelika; Van Gestel, Mats; Van Houtte, Natalie; Günther, Stephan; Leirs, Herwig

    2015-05-29

    Arenaviruses can cause mild to severe hemorrhagic fevers. Humans mainly get infected through contact with infected rodents or their excretions, yet little is known about transmission dynamics within rodent populations. Morogoro virus (MORV) is an Old World arenavirus closely related to Lassa virus with which it shares the same host species Mastomys natalensis. We injected MORV in its host, and sampled blood and excretions at frequent intervals. Infection in adults was acute; viral RNA disappeared from blood after 18 days post infection (dpi) and from excretions after 39 dpi. Antibodies were present from 7 dpi and never disappeared. Neonatally infected animals acquired a chronic infection with RNA and antibodies in blood for at least 3 months. The quantified excretion and antibody patterns can be used to inform mathematical transmission models, and are essential for understanding and controlling transmission in the natural rodent host populations.

  5. Shedding dynamics of Morogoro virus, an African arenavirus closely related to Lassa virus, in its natural reservoir host Mastomys natalensis

    PubMed Central

    Borremans, Benny; Vossen, Raphaël; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Gryseels, Sophie; Hughes, Nelika; Van Gestel, Mats; Van Houtte, Natalie; Günther, Stephan; Leirs, Herwig

    2015-01-01

    Arenaviruses can cause mild to severe hemorrhagic fevers. Humans mainly get infected through contact with infected rodents or their excretions, yet little is known about transmission dynamics within rodent populations. Morogoro virus (MORV) is an Old World arenavirus closely related to Lassa virus with which it shares the same host species Mastomys natalensis. We injected MORV in its host, and sampled blood and excretions at frequent intervals. Infection in adults was acute; viral RNA disappeared from blood after 18 days post infection (dpi) and from excretions after 39 dpi. Antibodies were present from 7 dpi and never disappeared. Neonatally infected animals acquired a chronic infection with RNA and antibodies in blood for at least 3 months. The quantified excretion and antibody patterns can be used to inform mathematical transmission models, and are essential for understanding and controlling transmission in the natural rodent host populations. PMID:26022445

  6. Diagnosis and clinical virology of Lassa fever as evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, indirect fluorescent-antibody test, and virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Bausch, D G; Rollin, P E; Demby, A H; Coulibaly, M; Kanu, J; Conteh, A S; Wagoner, K D; McMullan, L K; Bowen, M D; Peters, C J; Ksiazek, T G

    2000-07-01

    The Lassa virus (an arenavirus) is found in West Africa, where it sometimes causes a severe hemorrhagic illness called Lassa fever. Laboratory diagnosis has traditionally been by the indirect fluorescent-antibody (IFA) test. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for Lassa virus antigen and immunoglobulin M (IgM) and G (IgG) antibodies have been developed that are thought to be more sensitive and specific. We compared ELISA and IFA testing on sera from 305 suspected cases of Lassa fever by using virus isolation with a positive reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) test as the "gold standard." Virus isolation and RT-PCR were positive on 50 (16%) of the 305 suspected cases. Taken together, Lassa virus antigen and IgM ELISAs were 88% (95% confidence interval [CI], 77 to 95%) sensitive and 90% (95% CI, 88 to 91%) specific for acute infection. Due to the stringent gold standard used, these likely represent underestimates. Diagnosis could often be made on a single serum specimen. Antigen detection was particularly useful in providing early diagnosis as well as prognostic information. Level of antigenemia varied inversely with survival. Detection by ELISA of IgG antibody early in the course of illness helped rule out acute Lassa virus infection. The presence of IFA during both acute and convalescent stages of infection, as well as significant interobserver variation in reading the slides, made interpretation difficult. However, the assay provided useful prognostic information, the presence of IFA early in the course of illness correlating with death. The high sensitivity and specificity, capability for early diagnosis, and prognostic value of the ELISAs make them the diagnostic tests of choice for the detection of Lassa fever.

  7. International external quality assessment study for molecular detection of Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Nikisins, Sergejs; Rieger, Toni; Patel, Pranav; Müller, Rolf; Günther, Stephan; Niedrig, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever in West Africa. In recent years, it has been imported several times to Europe and North America. The method of choice for early detection of LASV in blood is RT-PCR. Therefore, the European Network for Diagnostics of 'Imported' Viral Diseases (ENIVD) performed an external quality assessment (EQA) study for molecular detection of LASV. A proficiency panel of 13 samples containing various concentrations of inactivated LASV strains Josiah, Lib-1580/121, CSF, or AV was prepared. Samples containing the LASV-related lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and negative sera were included as specificity controls. Twenty-four laboratories from 17 countries (13 European, one African, one Asian, two American countries) participated in the study. Thirteen laboratories (54%) reported correct results, 4 (17%) laboratories reported 1 to 2 false-negative results, and 7 (29%) laboratories reported 3 to 5 false-negative results. This EQA study indicates that most participating laboratories have a good or acceptable performance in molecular detection of LASV. However, several laboratories need to review and improve their diagnostic procedures.

  8. Inhibitors of cellular kinases with broad-spectrum antiviral activity for hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Emma L; McMullan, Laura K; Lo, Michael K; Spengler, Jessica R; Bergeron, Éric; Albariño, César G; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Chiang, Cheng-Feng; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Flint, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Host cell kinases are important for the replication of a number of hemorrhagic fever viruses. We tested a panel of kinase inhibitors for their ability to block the replication of multiple hemorrhagic fever viruses. OSU-03012 inhibited the replication of Lassa, Ebola, Marburg and Nipah viruses, whereas BIBX 1382 dihydrochloride inhibited Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses. BIBX 1382 blocked both Lassa and Ebola virus glycoprotein-dependent cell entry. These compounds may be used as tools to understand conserved virus-host interactions, and implicate host cell kinases that may be targets for broad spectrum therapeutic intervention.

  9. Conserved residues in Lassa fever virus Z protein modulate viral infectivity at the level of the ribonucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Capul, Althea A; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Buchmeier, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Arenaviruses are negative-strand RNA viruses that cause human diseases such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, and Lassa hemorrhagic fever. No licensed vaccines exist, and current treatment is limited to ribavirin. The prototypic arenavirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), is a model for dissecting virus-host interactions in persistent and acute disease. The RING finger protein Z has been identified as the driving force of arenaviral budding and acts as the viral matrix protein. While residues in Z required for viral budding have been described, residues that govern the Z matrix function(s) have yet to be fully elucidated. Because this matrix function is integral to viral assembly, we reasoned that this would be reflected in sequence conservation. Using sequence alignment, we identified several conserved residues in Z outside the RING and late domains. Nine residues were each mutated to alanine in Lassa fever virus Z. All of the mutations affected the expression of an LCMV minigenome and the infectivity of virus-like particles, but to greatly varying degrees. Interestingly, no mutations appeared to affect Z-mediated budding or association with viral GP. Our findings provide direct experimental evidence supporting a role for Z in the modulation of the activity of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex and its packaging into mature infectious viral particles.

  10. Imported Lassa Fever - Reexamining the Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-18

    result of aerosol trans- mission to patients and family members on an open ward from a patient with pneumonia and th, protean manifestations of Lassa ...tems, equipment, and procedures to protect against aerosol transmission of the disease. Aerosols contain- ing the virus proved infectious in animals...have dealt with cases of both en- demic and imported Lassa fever have shed light on the TWENTY years ago the arenavirus Lassa fever virus features of

  11. Transcriptional Profiling of the Circulating Immune Response to Lassa Virus in an Aerosol Model of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Honko, Anna N.; Garamszegi, Sara; Caballero, Ignacio S.; Johnson, Joshua C.; Mucker, Eric M.; Trefry, John C.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Connor, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a significant human pathogen that is endemic to several countries in West Africa. Infection with LASV leads to the development of hemorrhagic fever in a significant number of cases, and it is estimated that thousands die each year from the disease. Little is known about the complex immune mechanisms governing the response to LASV or the genetic determinants of susceptibility and resistance to infection. In the study presented here, we have used a whole-genome, microarray-based approach to determine the temporal host response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of non-human primates (NHP) following aerosol exposure to LASV. Sequential sampling over the entire disease course showed that there are strong transcriptional changes of the immune response to LASV exposure, including the early induction of interferon-responsive genes and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. However, this increase in early innate responses was coupled with a lack of pro-inflammatory cytokine response in LASV exposed NHPs. There was a distinct lack of cytokines such as IL1β and IL23α, while immunosuppressive cytokines such as IL27 and IL6 were upregulated. Comparison of IRF/STAT1-stimulated gene expression with the viral load in LASV exposed NHPs suggests that mRNA expression significantly precedes viremia, and thus might be used for early diagnostics of the disease. Our results provide a transcriptomic survey of the circulating immune response to hemorrhagic LASV exposure and provide a foundation for biomarker identification to allow clinical diagnosis of LASV infection through analysis of the host response. PMID:23638192

  12. Transcriptional profiling of the circulating immune response to lassa virus in an aerosol model of exposure.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Shikha; Yen, Judy Y; Honko, Anna N; Garamszegi, Sara; Caballero, Ignacio S; Johnson, Joshua C; Mucker, Eric M; Trefry, John C; Hensley, Lisa E; Connor, John H

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a significant human pathogen that is endemic to several countries in West Africa. Infection with LASV leads to the development of hemorrhagic fever in a significant number of cases, and it is estimated that thousands die each year from the disease. Little is known about the complex immune mechanisms governing the response to LASV or the genetic determinants of susceptibility and resistance to infection. In the study presented here, we have used a whole-genome, microarray-based approach to determine the temporal host response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of non-human primates (NHP) following aerosol exposure to LASV. Sequential sampling over the entire disease course showed that there are strong transcriptional changes of the immune response to LASV exposure, including the early induction of interferon-responsive genes and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. However, this increase in early innate responses was coupled with a lack of pro-inflammatory cytokine response in LASV exposed NHPs. There was a distinct lack of cytokines such as IL1β and IL23α, while immunosuppressive cytokines such as IL27 and IL6 were upregulated. Comparison of IRF/STAT1-stimulated gene expression with the viral load in LASV exposed NHPs suggests that mRNA expression significantly precedes viremia, and thus might be used for early diagnostics of the disease. Our results provide a transcriptomic survey of the circulating immune response to hemorrhagic LASV exposure and provide a foundation for biomarker identification to allow clinical diagnosis of LASV infection through analysis of the host response.

  13. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-31

    10606 Lassa fever nfi 1 6 1 1 Lassa virus I9.AU TRACT (C *ont~u 0’mYO er~~~n of aeguM*# 4wvv &I muinw) Plasmapheresis was conducted at Curran Lutheran...Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRTID), and ultimately, therapeutic trials of the plasma and comparison of its...effectiveness with ribavirin, an antiviral agent. Plasmapheresis was conducted at Curran Lutheran Hospital (CLH), and increasingly at Phebe Hospital (PH) with 255

  14. Mastomys natalensis and Lassa fever, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Lecompte, Emilie; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Daffis, Stéphane; Koulémou, Kékoura; Sylla, Oumar; Kourouma, Fodé; Doré, Amadou; Soropogui, Barré; Aniskin, Vladimir; Allali, Bernard; Kouassi Kan, Stéphane; Lalis, Aude; Koivogui, Lamine; Günther, Stephan; Denys, Christiane; ter Meulen, Jan

    2006-12-01

    PCR screening of 1,482 murid rodents from 13 genera caught in 18 different localities of Guinea, West Africa, showed Lassa virus infection only in molecularly typed Mastomys natalensis. Distribution of this rodent and relative abundance compared with M. erythroleucus correlates geographically with Lassa virus seroprevalence in humans.

  15. A ML29 reassortant virus protects guinea pigs against a distantly related Nigerian strain of Lassa virus and can provide sterilizing immunity.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L; Johnson, Curtis; Gonzales, Monica; Moreira, Carmen R; Ticer, Anysha; Brasky, Kathleen; Hubbard, Gene B; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Zapata, Juan; Salvato, Maria S; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2007-05-16

    Lassa virus (LASV) is responsible for the deaths of thousands of people in West Africa annually. Genetic diversity among LASV strains is the highest among the Arenaviridae and represents a great challenge for vaccine development. Guinea pigs vaccinated with a ML29 reassortant vaccine experienced sterilizing immunity and complete protection when challenged on day 30 either with homologous virus or with the distantly related Nigerian isolate. Simultaneous vaccination-challenge or challenge on day 2 after vaccination also protected 60-100% of the animals against both strains, but without sterilizing immunity. These results indicate that simultaneous replication of ML29 and LASV attenuates the virulence of LASV infection.

  16. A ML29 Reassortant Virus Protects Guinea Pigs Against a Distantly-Related Nigerian Strain of Lassa Virus and can Provide Sterilizing Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L.; Johnson, Curtis; Gonzales, Monica; Moreira, Carmen R.; Ticer, Anysha; Brasky, Kathleen; Hubbard, Gene B.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Zapata, Juan; Salvato, Maria S.; Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2007-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is responsible for the deaths of thousands of people in West Africa annually. Genetic diversity among LASV strains is the highest among the Arenaviridae and represents a great challenge for vaccine development. Guinea pigs vaccinated with a ML29 reassortant vaccine experienced sterilizing immunity and complete protection when challenged on day 30 either with homologous virus or with the distantly-related Nigerian isolate. Simultaneous vaccination-challenge or challenge on day 2 after vaccination also protected 60-100% of the animals against both strains, but without sterilizing immunity. These results indicate that simultaneous replication of ML29 and LASV attenuates the virulence of LASV infection. PMID:17360080

  17. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Pannetier, Delphine; Reynard, Stéphanie; Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome.

  18. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  19. Imported Lassa fever--New Jersey, 2004.

    PubMed

    2004-10-01

    Lassa fever is an acute viral illness caused by Lassa virus, which is hosted by rodents in the Mastomys natalensis species complex and rarely imported to countries outside of those areas in Africa where the disease is endemic. Lassa fever is characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, and chest and abdominal pain. Approximately 15%-20% of patients hospitalized for Lassa fever die from the illness; however, approximately 80% of human infections with Lassa virus are mild or asymptomatic, and 1% of infections overall result in death. On August 28, 2004, a man aged 38 years residing in New Jersey died from Lassa fever after returning from travel to West Africa. This report summarizes the clinical and epidemiologic investigations conducted by federal, state, and local public health agencies. The findings illustrate the need for clinicians and public health officials to remain alert to emerging infectious diseases and to institute appropriate measures to promptly identify and limit spread of unusual pathogens.

  20. Lassa Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... an acute viral illness that occurs in west Africa. The illness was discovered in 1969 when two ... Lassa fever is endemic in parts of west Africa including Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria; however, ...

  1. Foreign Glycoproteins Can Be Actively Recruited to Virus Assembly Sites during Pseudotyping▿

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Rebecca L.; Vogt, Volker M.; Johnson, Marc C.

    2009-01-01

    Retroviruses like human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), as well as many other enveloped viruses, can efficiently produce infectious virus in the absence of their own surface glycoprotein if a suitable glycoprotein from a foreign virus is expressed in the same cell. This process of complementation, known as pseudotyping, often can occur even when the glycoprotein is from an unrelated virus. Although pseudotyping is widely used for engineering chimeric viruses, it has remained unknown whether a virus can actively recruit foreign glycoproteins to budding sites or, alternatively, if a virus obtains the glycoproteins through a passive mechanism. We have studied the specificity of glycoprotein recruitment by immunogold labeling viral glycoproteins and imaging their distribution on the host plasma membrane using scanning electron microscopy. Expressed alone, all tested viral glycoproteins were relatively randomly distributed on the plasma membrane. However, in the presence of budding HIV-1 or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) particles, some glycoproteins, such as those encoded by murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, were dramatically redistributed to viral budding sites. In contrast, the RSV Env glycoprotein was robustly recruited only to the homologous RSV budding sites. These data demonstrate that viral glycoproteins are not in preformed membrane patches prior to viral assembly but rather that glycoproteins are actively recruited to certain viral assembly sites. PMID:19224995

  2. Reversible conformational changes and fusion activity of rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Y; Tuffereau, C; Segretain, D; Knossow, M; Flamand, A

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the implication of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G) in the first steps of the viral cycle, we studied the pH dependence of virus-induced fusion and hemagglutination, as well as modifications of the structure and properties of the viral glycoprotein following pH acidification. Our results suggest that the G protein adopts at least three distinct configurations, each associated with different properties. At neutral pH, G did not fuse membranes or hemagglutinate erythrocytes. It was insensitive to digestion with bromelain and trypsin. At pH 6.4, the glycoprotein became sensitive to proteases. Hemagglutination was at its maximum and then sharply decreased with the pH. No fusion was detected. Aggregation of virus was also observed. The third configuration, at below pH 6.1, was associated with the appearance of fusion. Some neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were able to differentiate these three configurations. Preincubation of the virus at below pH 6 inhibited fusion, but this inhibition, like the structural modifications of the glycoprotein, was reversible when G was reincubated at neutral pH. Images PMID:1870204

  3. Intracellular processing of the Newcastle disease virus fusion glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, T.; Ward, L.J.; Semerjian, A.

    1985-03-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (Fo) of Newcastle disease virus is cleaved at an intracellular site into F1 and F2. This result was confirmed by comparing the transit time of the fusion protein to the cell surface with the time course of cleavage of Fo. The time required for cleavage of half of the pulse-labeled Fo protein is ca. 40 min faster than the half time of the transit of the fusion protein to the cell surface. To determine the cell compartment in which cleavage occurs, use was made of inhibitors which block glycoprotein migration at specific points and posttranslational modifications known to occur in specific cell membranes. Cleavage of Fo is inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; thus, cleavage does not occur in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Monensin blocks the incorporation of Newcastle disease virus glycoproteins into virions and blocks the cleavage of the fusion glycoprotein. However, Fo cannot be radioactively labeled with (/sup 3/H) fucose, whereas F1 is readily labeled. These results argue that cleavage occurs in the trans Golgi membranes or in a cell compartment occupied by glycoproteins quite soon after their transit through the trans Golgi membranes. The implications of the results presented for the transit times of the fusion protein between subcellular organelles are discussed.

  4. Lassa fever: another threat from West Africa.

    PubMed

    Brosh-Nissimov, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever, a zoonotic viral infection, is endemic in West Africa. The disease causes annual wide spread morbidity and mortality in Africa, and can be imported by travelers. Possible importation of Lassa fever and the potential for the use of Lassa virus as an agent of bioterrorism mandate clinicians in Israel and other countries to be vigilant and familiar with the basic characteristics of this disease. The article reviews the basis of this infection and the clinical management of patients with Lassa fever. Special emphasis is given to antiviral treatment and infection control.

  5. Characterization and mapping of a nonessential pseudorabies virus glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, M.W.; Wathen, L.M.K.

    1986-04-01

    Antigenic variants of pseudorabies virus (PRV) containing mutations in a viral glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 82,000 (gIII) were isolated by selecting for resistance to a complement-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MCA82-2) directed against gIII. These mutants were completely resistant to neutralization with MCA82-2 in the presence of complement. Two mutants selected for further studies either did not express gIII or expressed an improperly processed form of the glycoproteins. The mutations were also associated with an altered plaque morphology (syncytium formation). The gIII gene was mapped by the marker rescue of a gIII/sup -/ mutant with cloned restriction enzyme fragments to the long unique region of the PRV genome between 0.376 and 0.383 map units. This corresponds to the map location of a glycoprotein described by Robbins et al. Since gIII is nonessential for viral replication in cell culture and has several other characteristics in common with the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC, gIII may represent the PRV equivalent to herpes simplex virus gC.

  6. Cross-reactivity between herpes simplex virus glycoprotein B and a 63,000-dalton varicella-zoster virus envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Edson, C M; Hosler, B A; Respess, R A; Waters, D J; Thorley-Lawson, D A

    1985-01-01

    Cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies recognizing both herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B and a major 63,000-dalton varicella-zoster virus (VZV) envelope glycoprotein were isolated and found to neutralize VZV infection in vitro. None of the other VZV glycoproteins was recognized by any polyclonal anti-HSV serum tested. These results demonstrate that HSV glycoprotein B and the 63,000-dalton VZV glycoprotein share antigenic epitopes and raise the possibility that these two proteins have a similar function in infection. Images PMID:2993665

  7. Pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Gert; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Halbherr, Stefan J

    2014-08-01

    Pseudotype viruses are useful for studying the envelope proteins of harmful viruses. This work describes the pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. VSV lacking the homotypic glycoprotein (G) gene (VSVΔG) was used to express haemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) or the combination of both. Propagation-competent pseudotype viruses were only obtained when HA and NA were expressed from the same vector genome. Pseudotype viruses containing HA from different H5 clades were neutralized specifically by immune sera directed against the corresponding clade. Fast and sensitive reading of test results was achieved by vector-mediated expression of GFP. Pseudotype viruses expressing a mutant VSV matrix protein showed restricted spread in IFN-competent cells. This pseudotype system will facilitate the detection of neutralizing antibodies against virulent influenza viruses, circumventing the need for high-level biosafety containment.

  8. The microtubule motor protein KIF13A is involved in intracellular trafficking of the Lassa virus matrix protein Z.

    PubMed

    Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Noda, Takeshi; Maisner, Andrea; Lamp, Boris; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang; Strecker, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    The small matrix protein Z of arenaviruses has been identified as the main driving force to promote viral particle production at the plasma membrane. Although multiple functions of Z in the arenaviral life cycle have been uncovered, the mechanism of intracellular transport of Z to the site of virus budding is poorly understood and cellular motor proteins that mediate Z trafficking remain to be identified. In the present study, we report that the Z protein of the Old World arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) interacts with the kinesin family member 13A (KIF13A), a plus-end-directed microtubule-dependent motor protein. Plasmid-driven overexpression of KIF13A results in relocalization of Z to the cell periphery, while functional blockage of endogenous KIF13A by overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant or KIF13A-specific siRNA causes a perinuclearaccumulation and decreased production of both Z-induced virus-like particles and infectious LASV. The interaction of KIF13A with Z proteins from both Old and New World arenaviruses suggests a conserved intracellular transport mechanism. In contrast, the intracellular distribution of the matrix proteins of prototypic members of the paramyxo- and rhabdovirus family is independent of KIF13A. In summary, our studies identify for the first time a molecular motor protein as a critical mediator for intracellular microtubule-dependent transport of arenavirus matrix proteins.

  9. A new Ebola virus nonstructural glycoprotein expressed through RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Mehedi, Masfique; Falzarano, Darryl; Seebach, Jochen; Hu, Xiaojie; Carpenter, Michael S; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-06-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), an enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The EBOV glycoprotein (GP) gene encodes the nonstructural soluble glycoprotein (sGP) but also produces the transmembrane glycoprotein (GP₁,₂) through transcriptional editing. A third GP gene product, a small soluble glycoprotein (ssGP), has long been postulated to be produced also as a result of transcriptional editing. To identify and characterize the expression of this new EBOV protein, we first analyzed the relative ratio of GP gene-derived transcripts produced during infection in vitro (in Vero E6 cells or Huh7 cells) and in vivo (in mice). The average percentages of transcripts encoding sGP, GP₁,₂, and ssGP were approximately 70, 25, and 5%, respectively, indicating that ssGP transcripts are indeed produced via transcriptional editing. N-terminal sequence similarity with sGP, the absence of distinguishing antibodies, and the abundance of sGP made it difficult to identify ssGP through conventional methodology. Optimized 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis analyses finally verified the expression and secretion of ssGP in tissue culture during EBOV infection. Biochemical analysis of recombinant ssGP characterized this protein as a disulfide-linked homodimer that was exclusively N glycosylated. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized a new EBOV nonstructural glycoprotein, which is expressed as a result of transcriptional editing of the GP gene. While ssGP appears to share similar structural properties with sGP, it does not appear to have the same anti-inflammatory function on endothelial cells as sGP.

  10. Inactivated Recombinant Rabies Viruses Displaying Canine Distemper Virus Glycoproteins Induce Protective Immunity against Both Pathogens.

    PubMed

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; Hudacek, Andrew; Sawatsky, Bevan; Krämer, Beate; Yin, Xiangping; Schnell, Matthias J; von Messling, Veronika

    2017-04-15

    The development of multivalent vaccines is an attractive methodology for the simultaneous prevention of several infectious diseases in vulnerable populations. Both canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RABV) cause lethal disease in wild and domestic carnivores. While RABV vaccines are inactivated, the live-attenuated CDV vaccines retain residual virulence for highly susceptible wildlife species. In this study, we developed recombinant bivalent vaccine candidates based on recombinant vaccine strain rabies virus particles, which concurrently display the protective CDV and RABV glycoprotein antigens. The recombinant viruses replicated to near-wild-type titers, and the heterologous glycoproteins were efficiently expressed and incorporated in the viral particles. Immunization of ferrets with beta-propiolactone-inactivated recombinant virus particles elicited protective RABV antibody titers, and animals immunized with a combination of CDV attachment protein- and fusion protein-expressing recombinant viruses were protected from lethal CDV challenge. However, animals that were immunized with only a RABV expressing the attachment protein of CDV vaccine strain Onderstepoort succumbed to infection with a more recent wild-type strain, indicating that immune responses to the more conserved fusion protein contribute to protection against heterologous CDV strains.IMPORTANCE Rabies virus and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause high mortality rates and death in many carnivores. While rabies vaccines are inactivated and thus have an excellent safety profile and high stability, live-attenuated CDV vaccines can retain residual virulence in highly susceptible species. Here we generated recombinant inactivated rabies viruses that carry one of the CDV glycoproteins on their surface. Ferrets immunized twice with a mix of recombinant rabies viruses carrying the CDV fusion and attachment glycoproteins were protected from lethal CDV challenge, whereas all animals that received

  11. [Development and study of properties of immunoglobulins against Lassa fever].

    PubMed

    Krasnianskiĭ, V P; Gradoboev, V N; Borisevich, I V; Potryvaeva, N V; Lebedinskaia, E V; Chernikova, N K; Timan'kova, G D

    1997-01-01

    A horse may serve the producer of immune antiserum to Lassa virus. Specific immunoglobulin with at least 1:512 titer of virus-neutralizing antibodies to Lassa fever was obtained by alcohol sedimentation after Cohn from the blood serum of immunized horses. The preparation does not differ from heterologous commercial immunoglobulins. Preclinical studies of immunoglobulin to Lassa fever demonstrated its safety and a high specific activity. The agent can be injected both alone and in combination with virasole.

  12. Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein L is necessary for virus infectivity but dispensable for virion localization of glycoprotein H.

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, B G; Fuchs, W; Weiland, E; Mettenleiter, T C

    1997-01-01

    Herpesviruses contain a number of envelope glycoproteins which play important roles in the interaction between virions and target cells. Although several glycoproteins are not present in all herpesviruses, others, including glycoproteins H and L (gH and gL), are conserved throughout the Herpesviridae. To elucidate common properties and differences in herpesvirus glycoprotein function, corresponding virus mutants must be constructed and analyzed in different herpesvirus backgrounds. Analysis of gH- mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PrV) showed that in both viruses gH is essential for penetration and cell-to-cell spread and that its presence is required for virion localization of gL. Since gH homologs are found complexed with gL, it was of interest to assess the phenotype of gL- mutant viruses. By using this approach, HSV-1 gL has been shown to be required for entry and for virion localization of gH (C. Roop, L. Hutchinson, and D. Johnson, J. Virol. 67:2285-2297, 1993). To examine whether a similar phenotype is associated with lack of gL in another alphaherpesvirus, PrV, we constructed two independent gL- PrV mutants by insertion and deletion-insertion mutagenesis. The salient findings are as follows: (i) PrV gL is required for penetration of virions and cell-to-cell spread; (ii) unlike HSV-1, PrV gH is incorporated into the virion in the absence of gL; (iii) virion localization of gH in the absence of gL is not sufficient for infectivity; (iv) in the absence of gL, N-glycans on PrV gH are processed to a greater extent than in the presence of gL, indicating masking of N-glycans by association with gL; and (v) an anti-gL polyclonal antiserum is able to neutralize virion infectivity but did not inhibit cell-to-cell spread. Thus, whereas PrV gL is essential for virus replication, as is HSV-1 gL, gL- PrV mutants exhibit properties strikingly different from those of HSV-1. In conclusion, our data show an important functional role for

  13. An N-terminal region of Lassa virus L protein plays a critical role in transcription but not replication of the virus genome.

    PubMed

    Lelke, Michaela; Brunotte, Linda; Busch, Carola; Günther, Stephan

    2010-02-01

    The central domain of the 200-kDa Lassa virus L protein is a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. N- and C-terminal domains may harbor enzymatic functions important for viral mRNA synthesis, including capping enzymes or cap-snatching endoribonucleases. In the present study, we have employed a large-scale mutagenesis approach to map functionally relevant residues in these regions. The main targets were acidic (Asp and Glu) and basic residues (Lys and Arg) known to form catalytic and binding sites of capping enzymes and endoribonucleases. A total of 149 different mutants were generated and tested in the Lassa virus replicon system. Nearly 25% of evolutionarily highly conserved acidic and basic side chains were dispensable for function of L protein in the replicon context. The vast majority of the remaining mutants had defects in both transcription and replication. Seven residues (Asp-89, Glu-102, Asp-119, Lys-122, Asp-129, Glu-180, and Arg-185) were selectively important for mRNA synthesis. The phenotype was particularly pronounced for Asp-89, Glu-102, and Asp-129, which were indispensable for transcription but could be replaced by a variety of amino acid residues without affecting genome replication. Bioinformatics disclosed the remote similarity of this region to type IIs endonucleases. The mutagenesis was complemented by experiments with the RNA polymerase II inhibitor alpha-amanitin, demonstrating dependence of viral transcription from the cellular mRNA pool. In conclusion, this paper describes an N-terminal region in L protein being important for mRNA, but not genome synthesis. Bioinformatics and cell biological experiments lend support to the hypothesis that this region could be part of a cap-snatching enzyme.

  14. A seven-segmented influenza A virus expressing the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qinshan; Brydon, Edward W A; Palese, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Influenza viruses are classified into three types: A, B, and C. The genomes of A- and B-type influenza viruses consist of eight RNA segments, whereas influenza C viruses only have seven RNAs. Both A and B influenza viruses contain two major surface glycoproteins: the hemagglutinin (HA) and the neuraminidase (NA). Influenza C viruses have only one major surface glycoprotein, HEF (hemagglutinin-esterase fusion). By using reverse genetics, we generated two seven-segmented chimeric influenza viruses. Each possesses six RNA segments from influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, and NS); the seventh RNA segment encodes either the influenza virus C/Johannesburg/1/66 HEF full-length protein or a chimeric protein HEF-Ecto, which consists of the HEF ectodomain and the HA transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. To facilitate packaging of the heterologous segment, both the HEF and HEF-Ecto coding regions are flanked by HA packaging sequences. When introduced as an eighth segment with the NA packaging sequences, both viruses are able to stably express a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, indicating a potential use for these viruses as vaccine vectors to carry foreign antigens. Finally, we show that incorporation of a GFP RNA segment enhances the growth of seven-segmented viruses, indicating that efficient influenza A viral RNA packaging requires the presence of eight RNA segments. These results support a selective mechanism of viral RNA recruitment to the budding site.

  15. Early and strong immune responses are associated with control of viral replication and recovery in lassa virus-infected cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Baize, Sylvain; Marianneau, Philippe; Loth, Philippe; Reynard, Stéphanie; Journeaux, Alexandra; Chevallier, Michèle; Tordo, Noël; Deubel, Vincent; Contamin, Hugues

    2009-06-01

    Lassa virus causes a hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. The pathogenesis and the immune responses associated with the disease are poorly understood, and no vaccine is available. We followed virological, pathological, and immunological markers associated with fatal and nonfatal Lassa virus infection of cynomolgus monkeys. The clinical picture was characterized by fever, weight loss, depression, and acute respiratory syndrome. Transient thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, infiltration of mononuclear cells, and alterations of the liver, lungs, and endothelia were observed. Survivors exhibited fewer lesions and a lower viral load than nonsurvivors. Although all animals developed strong humoral responses, antibodies appeared more rapidly in survivors and were directed against GP(1), GP(2), and NP. Type I interferons were detected early after infection in survivors but only during the terminal stages in fatalities. The mRNAs for CXCL10 (IP-10) and CXCL11 (I-TAC) were abundant in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and lymph nodes from infected animals, but plasma interleukin-6 was detected only in fatalities. In survivors, high activated-monocyte counts were followed by a rise in the total number of circulating monocytes. Activated T lymphocytes circulated in survivors, whereas T-cell activation was low and delayed in fatalities. In vitro stimulation with inactivated Lassa virus induced activation of T lymphocytes from all infected monkeys, but only lymphocytes from survivors proliferated. Thus, early and strong immune responses and control of viral replication were associated with recovery, whereas fatal infection was characterized by major alterations of the blood formula and, in organs, weak immune responses and uncontrolled viral replication.

  16. A recombinant canine distemper virus expressing a modified rabies virus glycoprotein induces immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Jiazeng; Yi, Bao; Hou, Qiang; Mao, Yaping; Liu, Weiquan

    2015-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RV) are two important pathogens of the dog. CDV, a member of the morbillivirus genus, has shown promise as an expression vector. The glycoprotein from RV is a main contributor to protective immunity and capable of eliciting the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we recovered an attenuated strain of canine distemper virus and constructed a recombinant virus, rCDV-RV-G, expressing a modified (R333Q) rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) of RV Flury strain LEP. RV-G expression by the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Furthermore, G was proved to be incorporated into the surface of CDV particles. While replication of the recombinant virus was slightly reduced compared with the parental CDV, it stably expressed the RV-G over ten serial passages. Inoculation of mice induced specific neutralizing antibodies against both RV-G and CDV. Therefore, the rCDV-RV-G has the potential as a vaccine that may be used to control rabies virus infection in dogs and other animals.

  17. NK cells are strongly activated by Lassa and Mopeia virus-infected human macrophages in vitro but do not mediate virus suppression.

    PubMed

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Tordo, Noël; Baize, Sylvain

    2012-07-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) and Mopeia virus (MOPV) are closely related Arenaviruses. LASV causes hemorrhagic fever, whereas MOPV is not pathogenic. Both viruses display tropism for APCs such as DCs and macrophages. During viral infections, NK cells are involved in the clearance of infected cells and promote optimal immune responses by interacting with APCs. We used an in vitro model of human NK and APC coculture to study the role of NK cells and to characterize their interactions with APCs during LASV and MOPV infections. As expected, NK cells alone were neither infected nor activated by LASV and MOPV, and infected DCs did not activate NK cells. By contrast, LASV- and MOPV-infected macrophages activated NK cells, as shown by the upregulation of CD69, NKp30, and NKp44, the downregulation of CXCR3, and an increase in NK-cell proliferation. NK cells acquired enhanced cytotoxicity, as illustrated by the increase in granzyme B (GrzB) expression and killing of K562 targets, but did not produce IFN-γ. Contact between NK cells and infected macrophages and type I IFNs were essential for activation; however, NK cells could not kill infected cells and control infection. Overall, these findings show that MOPV- as well as pathogenic LASV-infected macrophages mediate NK-cell activation.

  18. Exonuclease domain of the Lassa virus nucleoprotein is critical to avoid RIG-I signaling and to inhibit the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Reynard, Stéphanie; Russier, Marion; Fizet, Alexandra; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-12-01

    Lassa virus (LASV), which causes a viral hemorrhagic fever, inhibits the innate immune response. The exonuclease (ExoN) domain of its nucleoprotein (NP) is implicated in the suppression of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling. We show here that a LASV in which ExoN function has been abolished strongly activates innate immunity and that this effect is dependent on RIG-I signaling. These results highlight the key role of NP ExoN function in the immune evasion that occurs during LASV infection.

  19. Amino acid sequence similarity between rabies virus glycoprotein and snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Wilson, P T; Hawrot, E; Speicher, D W

    1984-11-16

    Evidence was presented earlier that a host-cell receptor for the highly neurotropic rabies virus might be the acetylcholine receptor. The amino acid sequence of the glycoprotein of rabies virus was compared by computer analysis with that of snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins, potent ligands of the acetylcholine receptor. A statistically significant sequence relation was found between a segment of the rabies glycoprotein and the entire sequence of long neurotoxins. The greatest identity occurs with residues considered most important in neurotoxicity, including those interacting with the acetylcholine binding site of the acetylcholine receptor. Because of the similarity between the glycoprotein and the receptor-binding region of the neurotoxins, this region of the viral glycoprotein may function as a recognition site for the acetylcholine receptor. Direct binding of the rabies virus glycoprotein to the acetylcholine receptor could contribute to the neurotropism of this virus.

  20. Use of influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF for generation of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes.

    PubMed

    Hanika, Andrea; Larisch, Birthe; Steinmann, Eike; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Herrler, Georg; Zimmer, Gert

    2005-05-01

    Influenza C virus contains two envelope glycoproteins: CM2, a putative ion channel protein; and HEF, a unique multifunctional protein that performs receptor-binding, receptor-destroying and fusion activities. Here, it is demonstrated that expression of HEF is sufficient to pseudotype replication-incompetent vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) that lacks the VSV glycoprotein (G) gene. The pseudotyped virus showed characteristic features of influenza C virus with respect to proteolytic activation, receptor usage and cell tropism. Chimeric glycoproteins composed of HEF ectodomain and VSV-G C-terminal domains were efficiently incorporated into VSV particles and showed receptor-binding and receptor-destroying activities but, unlike authentic HEF, did not mediate efficient infection, probably because of impaired fusion activity. HEF-pseudotyped VSV efficiently infected polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells via the apical plasma membrane, whereas entry of VSV-G-complemented virus was restricted to the basolateral membrane. These findings suggest that pseudotyping of viral vectors with HEF might be useful for efficient apical gene transfer into polarized epithelial cells and for targeting cells that express 9-O-acetylated sialic acids.

  1. In silico-based vaccine design against Ebola virus glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Raju; Das, Rasel; Junaid, Md; Akash, Md Forhad Chowdhury; Islam, Ashekul; Hosen, SM Zahid

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is one of the lethal viruses, causing more than 24 epidemic outbreaks to date. Despite having available molecular knowledge of this virus, no definite vaccine or other remedial agents have been developed yet for the management and avoidance of EBOV infections in humans. Disclosing this, the present study described an epitope-based peptide vaccine against EBOV, using a combination of B-cell and T-cell epitope predictions, followed by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation approach. Here, protein sequences of all glycoproteins of EBOV were collected and examined via in silico methods to determine the most immunogenic protein. From the identified antigenic protein, the peptide region ranging from 186 to 220 and the sequence HKEGAFFLY from the positions of 154–162 were considered the most potential B-cell and T-cell epitopes, correspondingly. Moreover, this peptide (HKEGAFFLY) interacted with HLA-A*32:15 with the highest binding energy and stability, and also a good conservancy of 83.85% with maximum population coverage. The results imply that the designed epitopes could manifest vigorous enduring defensive immunity against EBOV. PMID:28356762

  2. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Envelope Glycoprotein Core Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Nieusma, Travis; Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Cogburn, Kristin E.; Hua, Yuanzi; Dai, Xiaoping; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun

    2014-08-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a Hepacivirus, is a major cause of viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 mediate fusion and entry into host cells and are the primary targets of the humoral immune response. The crystal structure of the E2 core bound to broadly neutralizing antibody AR3C at 2.65 angstroms reveals a compact architecture composed of a central immunoglobulin-fold β sandwich flanked by two additional protein layers. The CD81 receptor binding site was identified by electron microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis and overlaps with the AR3C epitope. The x-ray and electron microscopy E2 structures differ markedly from predictions of an extended, three-domain, class II fusion protein fold and therefore provide valuable information for HCV drug and vaccine design.

  3. Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Expressing Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Prevents Latent Herpes in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Kenneth J.; Mackett, Michael; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis; Moss, Bernard

    1985-05-01

    In humans, herpes simplex virus causes a primary infection and then often a latent ganglionic infection that persists for life. Because these latent infections can recur periodically, vaccines are needed that can protect against both primary and latent herpes simplex infections. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that contain the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D gene under control of defined early or late vaccinia virus promoters were constructed. Tissue culture cells infected with these recombinant viruses synthesized a glycosylated protein that had the same mass (60,000 daltons) as the glycoprotein D produced by HSV-1. Immunization of mice with one of these recombinant viruses by intradermal, subcutaneous, or intraperitoneal routes resulted in the production of antibodies that neutralized HSV-1 and protected the mice against subsequent lethal challenge with HSV-1 or HSV-2. Immunization with the recombinant virus also protected the majority of the mice against the development of a latent HSV-1 infection of the trigeminal ganglia. This is the first demonstration that a genetically engineered vaccine can prevent the development of latency.

  4. Lassa fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B

    2004-04-01

    Lassa fever remains a serious challenge to public health in West Africa threatening both local residents in rural areas and those who serve them, particularly medical care providers. Given the ecology of the rodent host and conditions in the endemic area, a vaccine is mandatory for control. The challenge is to overcome the scientific, political and economic obstacles to producing a human use vaccine candidate. There are some scientific issues to resolve. It is known that the G-protein confers protection but we do not know its duration. If the N-protein is also included there may be a better duration of protection but it is unclear whether the N-protein as a vaccine may possibly enhance the infection. The original vaccinia vector must be replaced by new vectors, chimeras or by delivering DNA in some format. A live vaccine is attractive because it can confer protection in a single shot. A killed vaccine is more stable, particularly for distribution in the tropics but usually requires repeated shots. For practical reasons a live vaccine format should probably be pursued, which could then be combined with a yellow fever vaccine, using the same cold chains, since this disease occupies the same endemic areas in West Africa. Lassa vaccine initiatives have suffered from a lack of funding in the past but bioterrorism has brought new resources to Lassa virus science. Adequate funding and applications of new vaccine technologies give hope that we may soon see a vaccine in clinical trials. However, the difficulty of conducting trials in endemic areas and lack of political stability remain serious problems.

  5. Lassa fever in West Africa: evidence for an expanded region of endemicity.

    PubMed

    Sogoba, N; Feldmann, H; Safronetz, D

    2012-09-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia (known as the Mano River region) and Nigeria and Lassa fever cases from these countries are being reported annually. Recent investigations have found evidence for an expanded endemicity zone between the two known Lassa endemic regions indicating that LASV is more widely distributed throughout the Tropical Wooded Savanna ecozone in West Africa.

  6. Development of Recombinant Newcastle Disease Viruses Expressing the Glycoprotein (G) of Avian Metapneumovirus as Bivalent Vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using reverse genetics technology, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota strain-based recombinant viruses were engineered to express the glycoprotein (G) of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), subtype A, B or C, as bivalent vaccines. These recombinant viruses were slightly attenuated in vivo, yet maintaine...

  7. A fatal case of Lassa fever in London, January 2009.

    PubMed

    Kitching, A; Addiman, S; Cathcart, S; Bischop, L; Krahé, D; Nicholas, M; Coakley, J; Lloyd, G; Brooks, T; Morgan, D; Turbitt, D

    2009-02-12

    In January 2009, the eleventh [corrected] case of Lassa fever imported to the United Kingdom was diagnosed in London. Risk assessment of 328 healthcare contacts with potential direct exposure to Lassa virus - through contact with the case or exposure to bodily fluids - was undertaken. No contacts were assessed to be at high risk of infection and no secondary clinical cases identified.

  8. [Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity analysis of glycoprotein from infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-ming; Liu, Hong-bai; Yin, Jia-sheng; Lu, Tong-yan

    2013-09-01

    In order to detect Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus with immunological methods, the surface glycoprotein of a recent IHNV-Sn isolated from farmed rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) in China was amplified and cloned into pET27b(+) vector (designated as pET27b-G ). The expression of recombinant plasmid pET27b-G in E. coli BL21(DE3) was induced and determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The predicted molecular weight of glycoprotein protein was approximately 55 kD and was confirmed in this study. The inclusion body of glycoprotein was treated with urea at different urea concentrations, and dialyzed into PBS buffer. Purified glycoprotein with high concentration was obtained after dialyzed in the PBS buffer. Antisera against glycoprotein were produced from immunized rabbits. The prepared antisera could react specifically with both the recombinant glycoprotein and natural glycoprotein of the IHNV-Sn isolated in the test of indirect ELISA, and the titer against the recombinant glycoprotein was 1:20,000. IFA showed that the antisera can recognize the glycoprotein located on the surface of IHNV-Sn and IHNV reference strain. These results indicated that the expressed glycoprotein was immunogenical and antigenical and could be functional as the natural IHNV glycoprotein. These results established a foundation for further study on vaccine and rapid diagnosis of IHNV.

  9. Complement inhibition enables tumor delivery of LCMV glycoprotein pseudotyped viruses in the presence of antiviral antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Evgin, Laura; Ilkow, Carolina S; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; de Souza, Christiano Tanese; Stubbert, Lawton; Huh, Michael S; Jennings, Victoria A; Marguerie, Monique; Acuna, Sergio A; Keller, Brian A; Lefebvre, Charles; Falls, Theresa; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Auer, Rebecca A; Lambris, John D; McCart, J Andrea; Stojdl, David F; Bell, John C

    2016-01-01

    The systemic delivery of therapeutic viruses, such as oncolytic viruses or vaccines, is limited by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. While pseudotyping of rhabdoviruses with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein has previously allowed for multiple rounds of delivery in mice, this strategy has not translated to other animal models. For the first time, we provide experimental evidence that antibodies generated against the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein mediate robust complement-dependent viral neutralization via activation of the classical pathway. We show that this phenotype can be capitalized upon to deliver maraba virus pseudotyped with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein in a Fischer rat model in the face of neutralizing antibody through the use of complement modulators. This finding changes the understanding of the humoral immune response to arenaviruses, and also describes methodology to deliver viral vectors to their therapeutic sites of action without the interference of neutralizing antibody. PMID:27909702

  10. Peptide mimotopes of rabies virus glycoprotein with immunogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Houimel, Mehdi; Dellagi, Koussay

    2009-07-23

    A random constrained hexapeptide phage display library (Cys-6aa-Cys) was screened with purified neutralizing human anti-rabies virus IgG antibodies (hRABVIgG) to identify peptides that correspond to or mimic natural epitopes on rabies virus glycoprotein (RABVG) and to investigate their immunogenicities in vivo. After four rounds of biopanning, 20 phage clones randomly selected for their specificity to hRABVIgG, effectively blocked the binding of the inactive rabies virus (RABV) to hRABVIgG. The phage clones were sequenced and the deduced amino acid sequences were derived (C-KRDSTW-C; C-KYLWSK-C; C-KYWLSR-C; C-KYWWSK-C; C-KYAWSR-C; C-KYSMSK-C). Alignments to the amino acid sequence of RABVG showed good match with the antigenic site III (at 330-338 aa), indicating that the hRABVIgG antibodies most likely recognize preferentially this antigenic site. The selected mimotopes were able to inhibit the interactions of the hRABVIgG antibodies with RABV in a dose-dependent manner. Subcutaneous administration of phageKRDSTW expressing the RABVG site III mimotope induced an RABVG-specific IgG response in BALB/c mice. The results indicated that peptide mimotopes when displayed on phages, are accessible to the mice immune system to trigger a humoral response and to induce IgG production. The RABVG site III mimotope (C-KRDSTW-C) would provide a new and promising concept for the development of rabies vaccine.

  11. High-resolution structure of the N-terminal endonuclease domain of the Lassa virus L polymerase in complex with magnesium ions.

    PubMed

    Wallat, Gregor D; Huang, Qinfeng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Haohao; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes deadly hemorrhagic fever disease for which there are no vaccines and limited treatments. LASV-encoded L polymerase is required for viral RNA replication and transcription. The functional domains of L-a large protein of 2218 amino acid residues-are largely undefined, except for the centrally located RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) motif. Recent structural and functional analyses of the N-terminal region of the L protein from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), which is in the same Arenaviridae family as LASV, have identified an endonuclease domain that presumably cleaves the cap structures of host mRNAs in order to initiate viral transcription. Here we present a high-resolution crystal structure of the N-terminal 173-aa region of the LASV L protein (LASV L173) in complex with magnesium ions at 1.72 Å. The structure is highly homologous to other known viral endonucleases of arena- (LCMV NL1), orthomyxo- (influenza virus PA), and bunyaviruses (La Crosse virus NL1). Although the catalytic residues (D89, E102 and K122) are highly conserved among the known viral endonucleases, LASV L endonuclease structure shows some notable differences. Our data collected from in vitro endonuclease assays and a reporter-based LASV minigenome transcriptional assay in mammalian cells confirm structural prediction of LASV L173 as an active endonuclease. The high-resolution structure of the LASV L endonuclease domain in complex with magnesium ions should aid the development of antivirals against lethal Lassa hemorrhagic fever.

  12. A vesicular stomatitis pseudovirus expressing the surface glycoproteins of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Cheresiz, S V; Kononova, A A; Razumova, Yu V; Dubich, T S; Chepurnov, A A; Kushch, A A; Davey, R; Pokrovsky, A G

    2014-10-01

    Pseudotyped viruses bearing the glycoprotein(s) of a donor virus over the nucleocapsid core of a surrogate virus are widely used as safe substitutes for infectious virus in virology studies. Retroviral particles pseudotyped with influenza A virus glycoproteins have been used recently for the study of influenza hemagglutinin and neuraminidase-dependent processes. Here, we report the development of vesicular-stomatitis-virus-based pseudotypes bearing the glycoproteins of influenza A virus. We show that pseudotypes bearing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of H5N1 influenza A virus mimic the wild-type virus in neutralization assays and sensitivity to entry inhibitors. We demonstrate the requirement of NA for the infectivity of pseudotypes and show that viruses obtained with different NA proteins are significantly different in their transduction activities. Inhibition studies with oseltamivir carboxylate show that neuraminidase activity is required for pseudovirus production, but not for the infection of target cells with H5N1-VSV pseudovirus. The HA-NA-VSV pseudoviruses have high transduction titers and better stability than the previously reported retroviral pseudotypes and can replace live influenza virus in the development of neutralization assays, screening of potential antivirals, and the study of different HA/NA reassortants.

  13. Use of lambdagt11 to isolate genes for two pseudorabies virus glycoproteins with homology to herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovskis, E.A.; Timmins, J.G.; Post, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    A library of pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA fragments was constructed in the expression cloning vector lambdagt11. The library was screened with antisera which reacted with mixtures of PRV proteins to isolate recombinant bacteriophages expressing PRV proteins. By the nature of the lambdagt11 vector, the cloned proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli as ..beta..-galactosidase fusion proteins. The fusion proteins from 35 of these phages were purified and injected into mice to raise antisera. The antisera were screened by several different assays, including immunoprecipitation of (/sup 14/C)glucosamine-labeled PRV proteins. This method identified phages expressing three different PRV glycoproteins: the secreted glycoprotein, gX; gI; and a glycoprotein that had not been previously identified, which we designate gp63. The gp63 and gI genes map adjacent to each other in the small unique region of the PRV genome. The DNA sequence was determined for the region of the genome encoding gp63 and gI. It was found that gp63 has a region of homology with a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) protein, encoded by US7, and also with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gpIV. The gI protein sequence has a region of homology with HSV-1 gE and VZV gpI. It is concluded that PRV, HSV, and VZV all have a cluster of homologous glycoprotein genes in the small unique components of their genomes and that the organization of these genes is conserved.

  14. Vesicular stomatitis virus with the rabies virus glycoprotein directs retrograde transsynaptic transport among neurons in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Kevin T.; Saunders, Arpiar B.; Oldenburg, Ian A.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.; Cepko, Constance L.

    2012-01-01

    Defining the connections among neurons is critical to our understanding of the structure and function of the nervous system. Recombinant viruses engineered to transmit across synapses provide a powerful approach for the dissection of neuronal circuitry in vivo. We recently demonstrated that recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) can be endowed with anterograde or retrograde transsynaptic tracing ability by providing the virus with different glycoproteins. Here we extend the characterization of the transmission and gene expression of recombinant VSV (rVSV) with the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G), and provide examples of its activity relative to the anterograde transsynaptic tracer form of rVSV. rVSV with RABV-G was found to drive strong expression of transgenes and to spread rapidly from neuron to neuron in only a retrograde manner. Depending upon how the RABV-G was delivered, VSV served as a polysynaptic or monosynaptic tracer, or was able to define projections through axonal uptake and retrograde transport. In animals co-infected with rVSV in its anterograde form, rVSV with RABV-G could be used to begin to characterize the similarities and differences in connections to different areas. rVSV with RABV-G provides a flexible, rapid, and versatile tracing tool that complements the previously described VSV-based anterograde transsynaptic tracer. PMID:23403489

  15. Toremifene interacts with and destabilizes the Ebola virus glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Harlos, Karl; Jones, Daniel M.; Zeltina, Antra; Bowden, Thomas A.; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Ebola viruses (EBOVs) are responsible for repeated outbreaks of fatal infections, including the recent deadly epidemic in West Africa. There are currently no approved therapeutic drugs or vaccines for the disease. EBOV has a membrane envelope decorated by trimers of a glycoprotein (GP, cleaved by furin to form GP1 and GP2 subunits) which is solely responsible for host cell attachment, endosomal entry and membrane fusion1–7. GP is thus a primary target for the development of antiviral drugs. Here we report the first unliganded structure of EBOV GP, and complexes with an anticancer drug toremifene and the painkiller ibuprofen. The high-resolution apo structure gives a more complete and accurate picture of the molecule, and allows conformational changes introduced by antibody and receptor binding to be deciphered8–10. Unexpectedly both toremifene and ibuprofen bind in a cavity between the attachment (GP1) and fusion (GP2) subunits at the entrance to a large tunnel that links with equivalent tunnels from the other monomers of the trimer at the 3-fold axis. Protein-drug interactions, with both GP1 and GP2, are predominately hydrophobic. Residues lining the binding site are highly conserved amongst filoviruses except Marburg virus (MARV), suggesting that MARV may not bind these drugs. Thermal shift assays show up to a 14 °C decrease in protein melting temperature upon toremifene binding, while ibuprofen has only a marginal effect and is a less potent inhibitor. The results suggest that inhibitor binding destabilizes GP and triggers premature release of GP2, therefore preventing fusion between the viral and endosome membranes. Thus these complex structures reveal the mechanism of inhibition and may guide the development of more powerful anti-EBOV drugs. PMID:27362232

  16. Purification and structural characterization of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, G.E.; Baker, S.A.; Merajver, S.D.; Coligan, J.E.; Levine, M.; Glorioso, J.C.; Nairn, R.

    1987-01-27

    Purification of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C (gC) in microgram amounts yielded sufficient material for an analysis of its secondary structure. Purification was facilitated by using the mutant virus gC-3, which bears a point mutation that interrupts the putative hydrophobic membrane anchor sequence, causing the secretion of gC-3 protein into the cell culture medium. gC-3 protein was purified by size fractionation of concentrated culture medium from infected cells on a gel filtration column of Sephacryl S-200, followed by immunoaffinity chromatography on a column constructed of gC-specific monoclonal antibodies cross-linked to a protein A-Sepharose CL-4B matrix. Purified gC-3 had a molecular weight of 130,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the size expected for gC, was reactive with gC-specific monoclonal antibodies in protein immunoblots, and contained amino acid sequences characteristic of gC as determined by radiochemical amino acid microsequence analyses. Polyclonal antisera obtained from a rabbit immunized with gC-3 reacted with wild-type gC in immunoprecipitation, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoelectroblot (western blot) assays. Deglycosylation by treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid reduced the molecular weight of gC-3 by approximately 35%. Analyses of both native and deglycosylated gC-3 by Raman spectroscopy showed that the native molecule consists of about 17%..cap alpha..-helix, 24% ..beta..-sheet, and 60% disordered secondary structures, whereas deglycosylated gC-3 consists of about 8% ..cap alpha..-helix, 10% ..beta..-sheet, 81% disordered structures. These data were in good agreement with the 11% ..cap alpha..-helix, 18% ..beta..-sheet, 61% ..beta..-turn, and 9% disordered structures calculated from Chou-Fasman analysis of the primary sequence of gC-3.

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus envelope glycoprotein (G) has a novel structure.

    PubMed Central

    Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Elango, N; Norrby, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    Amino acid sequence of human respiratory syncytial virus envelope glycoprotein (G) was deduced from the DNA sequence of a recombinant plasmid and confirmed by limited amino acid microsequencing of purified 90K G protein. The calculated molecular mass of the protein encoded by the only long open reading frame of 298 amino acids was 32,588 daltons and was somewhat smaller than the 36K polypeptide translated in vitro from mRNA selected by this plasmid. Inspection of the sequence revealed a single hydrophobic domain of 23 amino acids capable of membrane insertion at 41 residues from the N-terminus. There was no N-terminal signal sequence and the hydrophilic N-terminal 20 residues probably represent the cytoplasmic tail of the protein. The N-terminally oriented membrane insertion was somewhat analogous to paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and influenza neuraminidase (NA). The protein was moderately hydrophilic and rich in hydroxy-amino acids. It was both N- and O-glycosylated with the latter contributing significantly to the net molecular mass 90K. Images PMID:4069997

  18. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mary Ellen; Koser, Martin; Xiao Sa; Siler, Catherine; McGettigan, James P.; Calkins, Catherine; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J. . E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu

    2006-09-30

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems.

  19. Molecular Docking Studies with Rabies Virus Glycoprotein to Design Viral Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, N. R.; Singh, V.; Marla, S. S.; Chandra, R.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.

    2010-01-01

    The genome of rabies virus encodes five proteins; the nucleoprotein, the phosphoprotein, the matrix protein, the glycoprotein, and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Among these, the glycoprotein is the most important as it is the major contributor to pathogenicity and virus neutralizing antibody response. Keeping in mind that glycoprotein is the only protein exposed on the surface of virus and is thought to be responsible for the interaction with the cell membrane, it was attempted to target glycoprotein by a ligand polyethylene glycol 4000, which blocks its active site, as seen by molecular operating environment software, so that it may be possible to prevent the spread of virus into the host. The ligand polyethylene glycol 4000 was retrieved from Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics protein data bank by providing the glycoprotein sequence to the databank. In this study it was observed that the ligand was successfully docked on a major portion of antigenic site II of glycoprotein by mimicking the virus neutralizing antibodies. This knowledge may be important for the development of novel therapies for the treatment of rabies and other viral diseases in the future. PMID:21218060

  20. Palmitoylation of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Transmembrane Glycoprotein Is Required for Protein Stability and Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Miller, David C.; Roberts, Charles R.; Rhee, Sung S.; Hunter, Eric

    2001-01-01

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) transmembrane (TM) glycoprotein is modified by the addition of palmitic acid. To identify whether conserved cysteines within the hydrophobic anchor region are the site(s) of palmitoylation, and to determine the role of acylation in glycoprotein function, cysteines at residues 164 and 167 of the TM protein were mutated to glycine (C164G, C167G, and C164G/C167G). In CV-1 cells, palmitate was added to env gene products containing single mutations but was absent in the double-mutant Env. Although mutant Pr95 Env precursors were synthesized with wild-type kinetics, the phenotypes of the mutants differed markedly. Env-C164G had properties similar to those of the wild type, while Env-C167G was degraded faster, and Env containing the double mutant C164G/C167G was very rapidly degraded. Degradation occurred after transient plasma membrane expression. The decrease in steady-state surface expression and increased rate of internalization into endosomes and lysosomes paralleled the decrease in palmitoylation observed for the mutants. The phenotypes of mutant viruses were assessed in avian cells in the context of the pATV8R proviral genome. Virus containing the C164G mutation replicated with wild-type kinetics but exhibited reduced peak reverse transcriptase levels. In contrast, viruses containing either the C167G or the C164G/C167G mutation were poorly infectious or noninfectious, respectively. These phenotypes correlated with different degrees of glycoprotein incorporation into virions. Infectious revertants of the double mutant demonstrated the importance of cysteine-167 for efficient plasma membrane expression and Env incorporation. The observation that both cysteines within the membrane-spanning domain are accessible for acylation has implications for the topology of this region, and a model is proposed. PMID:11689636

  1. Lassa virus nucleoprotein mutants generated by reverse genetics induce a robust type I interferon response in human dendritic cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain; Reynard, Stéphanie; Diancourt, Laure; Caro, Valérie; Tordo, Noel; Bouloy, Michèle

    2011-11-01

    Lassa virus (LASV; Arenaviridae) is responsible for severe hemorrhagic fevers in Africa. LASV nucleoprotein (NP) plays important roles in regulating viral transcription and replication and in inhibiting type I interferon (IFN) production. The NP C-terminal domain contains a 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity involved in suppressing IFN induction. We have established a murine polymerase (Pol) I reverse genetics system for LASV, showing that residues D389 and G392 of NP were critical for LASV viability, while the D389A/G392A and D389T/392A double mutants were severely altered in the ability to suppress IFN in macrophages and dendritic cells. Assessing their attenuation in vivo may open new perspectives in vaccinology.

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies for Dengue Virus prM Glycoprotein Protect Mice against Lethal Dengue Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-15

    Nile virus and a prelysozomal endosome prM glycoprotein of dengue virus can also be required for viral replication . PrM Mabs 2H2 protective against...tech- bodies can prevent lethal alphavirus encepha- niques to preserve immunogenicity, to deter- litis. Nature 297: 70-72. UI:82173237 mine whether

  3. Identification of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein variant resistant to cold inactivation.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Aemro; Finzi, Andrés; Pancera, Marie; Courter, Joel R; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein trimer consists of gp120 and gp41 subunits and undergoes a series of conformational changes upon binding to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4, that promote virus entry. Surprisingly, we found that the envelope glycoproteins of some HIV-1 strains are functionally inactivated by prolonged incubation on ice. Serial exposure of HIV-1 to extremes of temperature, followed by expansion of replication-competent viruses, allowed selection of a temperature-resistant virus. The envelope glycoproteins of this virus resisted cold inactivation due to a single passage-associated change, H66N, in the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. Histidine 66 is located within the gp41-interactive inner domain of gp120 and, in other studies, has been shown to decrease the sampling of the CD4-bound conformation by unliganded gp120. Substituting asparagine or other amino acid residues for histidine 66 in cold-sensitive HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins resulted in cold-stable phenotypes. Cold inactivation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins occurred even at high pH, indicating that protonation of histidine 66 is not necessary for this process. Increased exposure of epitopes in the ectodomain of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein accompanied cold inactivation, but shedding of gp120 did not. An amino acid change in gp120 (S375W) that promotes the CD4-bound state or treatment with soluble CD4 or a small-molecule CD4 mimic resulted in increased cold sensitivity. These results indicate that the CD4-bound intermediate of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins is cold labile; avoiding the CD4-bound state increases temperature stability.

  4. Pseudorabies virus glycoproteins gII and gp50 are essential for virus penetration.

    PubMed Central

    Rauh, I; Mettenleiter, T C

    1991-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PrV) glycoproteins gII and gp50 are major constituents of the viral envelope and targets of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Both are homologs of essential glycoproteins found in herpes simplex virus, gB (gII) and gD (gp50). We recently isolated a gII-negative PrV deletion mutant on complementing cell lines and established the essential character of gII for PrV replication (I. Rauh, F. Weiland, F. Fehler, G. Keil, and T.C. Mettenleiter, J. Virol. 65: 621-631, 1991). In this report, we describe the isolation of a gp50-negative PrV mutant after constructing cell lines that constitutively express gp50 and phenotypically complement the gp50 defect. Analysis of the gp50- mutant proved that gp50 is essential for PrV replication. Further studies showed that both gII and gp50 are required for viral penetration into target cells. The penetration defect in the gII and gp50 deletion mutants could be overcome by experimental polyethylene glycol-induced membrane fusion. Surprisingly, whereas gII proved to be essential for both penetration and cell-cell spread of the virus, gp50 was required only for penetration and appeared dispensable for direct cell-cell spread. Images PMID:1654444

  5. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    1974. 5. Frame, J. D. Surveillance of Lassa Fever amohg missionaries stationed in West Africa . Bull. WVHO 52: 593-59a, 1975 6. Monath, T.- P. Lassa ...A883 049 COLUMBIA UNIV NEW YORK DIV OF TROPIAL MEDIC.NE F/S 6/5 LASSA FEVER IMMUNE PLASMA U) AUG 79 J D FRAME DAMD17-79-C-9024 UNCLASSIFIED...NL’mmmEmmEmmEE.inuuuuwi LLVIL j~~AD’ LEVEL REPORT NO. 1I 0) LASSA FEVER IMMUNE PLASMA Annual Summary Report John 0. Frame, M.D. i Division of Tropical

  6. Lassa fever in Onitsha, East Central State, Nigeria in 1974.

    PubMed

    Bowen, G S; Tomori, O; Wulff, H; Casals, J; Noonan, A; Downs, W G

    1975-01-01

    Three cases of Lassa fever occurred in Onitsha, East Central State, Nigeria, in January and February 1974. The first case was a 19-year-old Nigerian; the other 2 cases were German missionary physicians at St Charles Borromeo Hospital, Onitsha, one of whom cared for the patient who was the first case. Thus, 2 of the 3 cases were hospital acquired. Investigations failed to discover a village outbreak or the source of virus for the first case. A serosurvey of 258 hospital staff members and contacts of the 3 cases showed no other persons with antibody to Lassa virus. The absence of Lassa virus antibody in a high-risk group indicates a low or nonexistent level of past Lassa virus activity in southeastern Nigeria.

  7. HSV-1 Glycoproteins Are Delivered to Virus Assembly Sites Through Dynamin-Dependent Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Albecka, Anna; Laine, Romain F; Janssen, Anne F J; Kaminski, Clemens F; Crump, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is a large enveloped DNA virus that belongs to the family of Herpesviridae. It has been recently shown that the cytoplasmic membranes that wrap the newly assembled capsids are endocytic compartments derived from the plasma membrane. Here, we show that dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a major role in this process. Dominant-negative dynamin and clathrin adaptor AP180 significantly decrease virus production. Moreover, inhibitors targeting dynamin and clathrin lead to a decreased transport of glycoproteins to cytoplasmic capsids, confirming that glycoproteins are delivered to assembly sites via endocytosis. We also show that certain combinations of glycoproteins colocalize with each other and with the components of clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytosis pathways. Importantly, we demonstrate that the uptake of neutralizing antibodies that bind to glycoproteins when they become exposed on the cell surface during virus particle assembly leads to the production of non-infectious HSV-1. Our results demonstrate that transport of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane prior to endocytosis is the major route by which these proteins are localized to the cytoplasmic virus assembly compartments. This highlights the importance of endocytosis as a major protein-sorting event during HSV-1 envelopment.

  8. Lassa fever in Guinea: I. Epidemiology of human disease and clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Bausch, D G; Demby, A H; Coulibaly, M; Kanu, J; Goba, A; Bah, A; Condé, N; Wurtzel, H L; Cavallaro, K F; Lloyd, E; Baldet, F B; Cissé, S D; Fofona, D; Savané, I K; Tolno, R T; Mahy, B; Wagoner, K D; Ksiazek, T G; Peters, C J; Rollin, P E

    2001-01-01

    The arenavirus Lassa is found in West Africa, where it sometimes causes a severe illness called Lassa fever. Lassa fever has been seldom investigated outside of a few hyperendemic regions, where the described epidemiology may differ from that in areas of low or moderate incidence of disease. Through a prospective cohort study, we investigated the epidemiology and clinical presentation of Lassa fever in Guinea, where the disease has been infrequently recognized. A surveillance system was established, and suspected cases were enrolled at five Guinean hospitals. Clinical observations were made, and blood was taken for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing and isolation of Lassa virus. Lassa fever was confirmed in 22 (7%) of 311 suspected cases. Another 43 (14%) had Lassa IgG antibodies, indicating past exposure. Both sexes and a wide variety of age and ethnic groups were affected. The disease was more frequently found, and the IgG seroprevalence generally higher, in the southeastern forest region. In some areas, there were significant discrepancies between the incidence of Lassa fever and the prevalence of antibody. Clinical presentations between those with Lassa fever and other febrile illnesses were essentially indistinguishable. Clinical predictors of a poor outcome were noted, but again were not specific for Lassa fever. Case-fatality rates for those with Lassa fever and non-Lassa febrile illnesses were 18% and 15%, respectively. Seasonal fluctuation in the incidence of Lassa fever was noted, but occurred similarly with non-Lassa febrile illnesses. Our results, perhaps typical of the scenario throughout much of West Africa, indicate Lassa virus infection to be widespread in certain areas of Guinea, but difficult to distinguish clinically.

  9. [Use of guinea pigs for assessing the efficacy of vaccines against Lassa fever].

    PubMed

    Firsova, I V; Shatokhina, I V; Borisevich, I V; Evseev, A A; Maksimov, V A; Pantiukhov, V B; Khmelev, A L

    2003-01-01

    The use of guinea pigs as a laboratory model was proven to be appropriate in investigating the vaccines developed against Lassa fever at the preclinical study stage. An adapted variant of Lassa virus was cultivated, which caused death of guinea pigs with respect for an agent's dose. Finally, it was shown to be possible to investigate the immunogenic and protective properties of the inactivated antigen of Lassa virus in experiments with guinea pigs.

  10. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein B by a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus and Protection of Mice against Lethal Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantin, Edouard M.; Eberle, Richard; Baldick, Joseph L.; Moss, Bernard; Willey, Dru E.; Notkins, Abner L.; Openshaw, Harry

    1987-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strain F gene encoding glycoprotein gB was isolated and modified at the 5' end by in vitro oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The modified gB gene was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome and expressed under the control of a vaccinia virus promoter. The mature gB glycoprotein produced by the vaccinia virus recombinant was glycosylated, was expressed at the cell surface, and was indistinguishable from authentic HSV-1 gB in terms of electrophoretic mobility. Mice immunized intradermally with the recombinant vaccinia virus produced gB-specific neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to a lethal HSV-1 challenge.

  11. Kunjin virus replicon-based vaccines expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein GP protect the guinea pig against lethal Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Reynard, O; Mokhonov, V; Mokhonova, E; Leung, J; Page, A; Mateo, M; Pyankova, O; Georges-Courbot, M C; Raoul, H; Khromykh, A A; Volchkov, V E

    2011-11-01

    Pre- or postexposure treatments against the filoviral hemorrhagic fevers are currently not available for human use. We evaluated, in a guinea pig model, the immunogenic potential of Kunjin virus (KUN)-derived replicons as a vaccine candidate against Ebola virus (EBOV). Virus like particles (VLPs) containing KUN replicons expressing EBOV wild-type glycoprotein GP, membrane anchor-truncated GP (GP/Ctr), and mutated GP (D637L) with enhanced shedding capacity were generated and assayed for their protective efficacy. Immunization with KUN VLPs expressing full-length wild-type and D637L-mutated GPs but not membrane anchor-truncated GP induced dose-dependent protection against a challenge of a lethal dose of recombinant guinea pig-adapted EBOV. The surviving animals showed complete clearance of the virus. Our results demonstrate the potential for KUN replicon vectors as vaccine candidates against EBOV infection.

  12. Recovery of a Lassa-related arenavirus in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K M; Taylor, P; Elliott, L H; Tomori, O

    1981-11-01

    Immunofluorescent antibodies to "Mozambique" virus, a close relative of Lassa virus, were found in 11 of 55 Mastomys natalensis and 1 of 13 Aethomys chrysophilus rodents captured near Que Que and Chiredzi, Zimbabwe. Six strains of Mozambique virus, identified by use of specific monoclonal antibodies to the agent, were recovered from visceral tissues of M. natalensis rodents. All Mastomys having virus or antibodies to this agent were of the chromosomal form 2N = 32 (M. natalensis). These data extend the area of geographic occurrence of this virus, which was initially recognized in Mozambique and which may represent a naturally attenuated antigenic variant of human pathogenic West African Lassa virus.

  13. Rodent host cell/Lassa virus interactions: evolution and expression of α-Dystroglycan, LARGE-1 and LARGE-2 genes, with special emphasis on the Mastomys genus.

    PubMed

    Tayeh, Ashraf; Tatard, Caroline; Kako-Ouraga, Sandrine; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Dobigny, Gauthier

    2010-12-01

    Arenaviruses are usually rodent-borne viruses that constitute a major threat for human health. Among them, Lassa Fever Virus (LFV) occurs in Western Africa where it infects hundreds of thousands of people annually. According to the most recent surveys, LFV is hosted by one of the multimammate rats, Mastomys natalensis, but has never been detected in its sibling and sometimes sympatric species Mastomys erythroleucus. This pattern suggests that intrinsic, i.e. genetic properties underlie such a drastic epidemiological difference (M. natalensis as a reservoir vs. M. erythroleucus as a non-reservoir species). Here we investigate genomic differences between these two closely related rodent species by focusing on three genes that have recently been described as pivotal for LFV/human cell interactions: Dystroglycan (the LFV cellular receptor), LARGE-1 and LARGE-2 (two enzymes that are essential to Dystroglycan functioning). For all three genes, sequence analyses showed that amino-acid chains undergo extremely strong purifying selective pressures, and indicated that no nucleotide (therefore no tertiary structure) change can be advocated to explain species-specific differences in LFV-cellular mediation. Nevertheless, preliminary studies of kidney-specific expression profiles suggested that important species-specific differences exist between Mastomys species. Taking into account current knowledge about LFV-human cell interactions, our results may point towards a possible role for LARGE-1 and LARGE-2 enzymes at the intracellular replication level of the virus, rather than at the LFV-host cell receptor binding step.

  14. HPLC immunoaffinity purification of rabies virus glycoprotein using immobilized antipeptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Santucci, A; Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Soldani, P; Neri, P

    1990-02-20

    It has been reported that the acetylcholine receptor may be used by the rabies virus to concentrate at sites in proximal to peripheral nerves. It has also been reported that the binding site for the receptor is located within the 190-203 region of the virus glycoprotein on the basis of its structural homology with the toxic center of snake neurotoxins, which are well known cholinergic ligands. We prepared monoclonal antibodies against the synthetic tetradecapeptide having the same sequence as the putative binding site of the rabies virus. One of three antibodies (clone 2PV 36-74) was able to recognize both the whole virus and its peplomeric glycoprotein and could bind acetylcholine. It was also able to inhibit the binding both of alpha-bungarotoxin and rabies virus glycoprotein to the acetylcholine receptor. We have covalently bound 2PV 36-74 to an HPLC affinity column and utilized it for specific purification of rabies virus glycoprotein. The immunoaffinity chromatographic method we describe is very sensitive and highly specific. Moreover this procedure does not denature the sample and is vary rapid and efficient.

  15. Defining the antibody cross-reactome directed against the influenza virus surface glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Choi, Angela; Hirsh, Ariana; Margine, Irina; Iida, Sayaka; Barrera, Aldo; Ferres, Marcela; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bouvier, Nicole M; Ito, Kimihito; Medina, Rafael A; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Infection with influenza virus induces antibodies to the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, and these responses can be broadly protective. To assess the breadth and magnitude of antibody responses, we sequentially infected mice, guinea pigs and ferrets with divergent H1N1 or H3N2 subtypes of influenza virus. We measured antibody responses by ELISA of an extensive panel of recombinant glycoproteins representing the viral diversity in nature. Guinea pigs developed high titers of broadly cross-reactive antibodies; mice and ferrets exhibited narrower humoral responses. Then, we compared antibody responses after infection of humans with influenza virus H1N1 or H3N2 and found markedly broad responses and cogent evidence for 'original antigenic sin'. This work will inform the design of universal vaccines against influenza virus and can guide pandemic-preparedness efforts directed against emerging influenza viruses.

  16. Early Activation of Primary Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Nipah Virus Glycoprotein-Containing Particles

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Tanja C.

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus that causes pronounced infection of brain endothelia and central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Using primary porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells, we showed that upregulation of E-selectin precedes cytokine induction and is induced not only by infectious NiV but also by NiV-glycoprotein-containing virus-like particles. This demonstrates that very early events in NiV brain endothelial infection do not depend on NiV replication but can be triggered by the NiV glycoproteins alone. PMID:26676791

  17. A replication-deficient rabies virus vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein is highly attenuated for neurovirulence

    SciTech Connect

    Papaneri, Amy B.; Wirblich, Christoph; Cann, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Blaney, Joseph E.

    2012-12-05

    We are developing inactivated and live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein for use in humans and endangered wildlife, respectively. Here, we further characterize the pathogenesis of the live-attenuated RABV/EBOV vaccine candidates in mice in an effort to define their growth properties and potential for safety. RABV vaccines expressing GP (RV-GP) or a replication-deficient derivative with a deletion of the RABV G gene (RV{Delta}G-GP) are both avirulent after intracerebral inoculation of adult mice. Furthermore, RV{Delta}G-GP is completely avirulent upon intracerebral inoculation of suckling mice unlike parental RABV vaccine or RV-GP. Analysis of RV{Delta}G-GP in the brain by quantitative PCR, determination of virus titer, and immunohistochemistry indicated greatly restricted virus replication. In summary, our findings indicate that RV-GP retains the attenuation phenotype of the live-attenuated RABV vaccine, and RV{Delta}G-GP would appear to be an even safer alternative for use in wildlife or consideration for human use.

  18. A new rabies vaccine based on a recombinant ORF virus (parapoxvirus) expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Amann, Ralf; Rohde, Jörg; Wulle, Ulrich; Conlee, Douglas; Raue, Rudiger; Martinon, Olivier; Rziha, Hanns-Joachim

    2013-02-01

    The present study describes the generation of a new Orf virus (ORFV) recombinant, D1701-V-RabG, expressing the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein that is correctly presented on the surface of infected cells without the need of replication or production of infectious recombinant virus. One single immunization with recombinant ORFV can stimulate high RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers in mice, cats, and dogs, representing all nonpermissive hosts for the ORFV vector. The protective immune response against severe lethal challenge infection was analyzed in detail in mice using different dosages, numbers, and routes for immunization with the ORFV recombinant. Long-term levels of VNA could be elicited that remained greater than 0.5 IU per ml serum, indicative for the protective status. Single applications of higher doses (10(7) PFU) can be sufficient to confer complete protection against intracranial (i.c.) challenge, whereas booster immunization was needed for protection by the application of lower dosages. Anamnestic immune responses were achieved by each of the seven tested routes of inoculation, including oral application. Finally, in vivo antibody-mediated depletion of CD4-positive and/or CD8-posititve T cell subpopulations during immunization and/or challenge infection attested the importance of CD4 T cells for the induction of protective immunity by D1701-V-RabG. This report demonstrates another example of the potential of the ORFV vector and also indicates the capability of the new recombinant for vaccination of animals.

  19. A New Rabies Vaccine Based on a Recombinant Orf Virus (Parapoxvirus) Expressing the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Ralf; Rohde, Jörg; Wulle, Ulrich; Conlee, Douglas; Raue, Rudiger; Martinon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the generation of a new Orf virus (ORFV) recombinant, D1701-V-RabG, expressing the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein that is correctly presented on the surface of infected cells without the need of replication or production of infectious recombinant virus. One single immunization with recombinant ORFV can stimulate high RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers in mice, cats, and dogs, representing all nonpermissive hosts for the ORFV vector. The protective immune response against severe lethal challenge infection was analyzed in detail in mice using different dosages, numbers, and routes for immunization with the ORFV recombinant. Long-term levels of VNA could be elicited that remained greater than 0.5 IU per ml serum, indicative for the protective status. Single applications of higher doses (107 PFU) can be sufficient to confer complete protection against intracranial (i.c.) challenge, whereas booster immunization was needed for protection by the application of lower dosages. Anamnestic immune responses were achieved by each of the seven tested routes of inoculation, including oral application. Finally, in vivo antibody-mediated depletion of CD4-positive and/or CD8-posititve T cell subpopulations during immunization and/or challenge infection attested the importance of CD4 T cells for the induction of protective immunity by D1701-V-RabG. This report demonstrates another example of the potential of the ORFV vector and also indicates the capability of the new recombinant for vaccination of animals. PMID:23175365

  20. Reduced yield of infectious pseudorabies virus and herpes simplex virus from cell lines producing viral glycoprotein gp50.

    PubMed Central

    Petrovskis, E A; Meyer, A L; Post, L E

    1988-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoprotein gp50 is the homolog of herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein D. Several cell lines that constitutively synthesize gp50 were constructed. Vero cells, HeLa cells, and pig kidney (MVPK) cells that produce gp50 all gave reduced yields of PRV and HSV progeny viruses when compared with the parent cell line or the same cell line transfected to produce a different protein. The reduction in virus yield was greatest at low multiplicities of infection. The Vero and HeLa cells that produce gp50 showed an even greater reduction in HSV yield than in PRV yield. This phenomenon may be an example in a herpesvirus of the interference observed in retroviruses or cross-protection in plant virus systems. PMID:2835521

  1. [Recent Lassa, Marbourg and Ebola viruses in African tropical viruses. I. Semiology--physiopathology--diagnosis--treatment (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Brès, P

    1978-09-30

    Three new viruses have been identified in Africa during the present decade. They may cause sporadic cases or limited outbreaks, and they are probably endemic in areas which are still ill-defined. Severe forms of infection lead to the haemorrhagic syndrome or to hypovolemic shock, the physiopathology of which is being studied. The case-fatality ratio of severe cases is between 30 and 85 per cent. Nosocomial outbreaks have been observed, but they can be avoided if appropriate barrier nursing measures are carried out for the treatment of patients or adequate protection measures for sampling and examination of laboratory specimens. As such cases may be transferred outside the endemic zone, this implies that countries receiving travellers from Africa should have hospitals with specialized units for strict isolation and treatment of these patients.

  2. Structural and conformational similarity between synthetic peptides of curaremimetic neurotoxins and rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Donnelly-Roberts, D L; Lentz, T L

    1991-09-01

    Antibodies were raised in rabbits against synthetic peptides corresponding to loop 2, the 'toxic' loop reacting with the acetylcholine-binding site on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, of curaremimetic neurotoxins and the structurally similar segment of the rabies virus glycoprotein. Some of the antibodies cross-reacted with the corresponding peptides confirming the structural similarity between the neurotoxin and glycoprotein peptides. A polyclonal antibody raised against a 29 residue glycoprotein peptide (175-203) in the presence of 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate reacted with native alpha-bungarotoxin and rabies virus. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of the 29 residue glycoprotein peptide and a 20 residue king cobra loop 2 peptide (25-44) revealed these peptides to be conformationally similar and composed predominantly of beta sheet structure. These results show the rabies glycoprotein segment is structurally and conformationally similar to neurotoxin loop 2. This similarity may confer on the glycoprotein the capability of interacting with the neurotoxin-binding site on the acetylcholine receptor.

  3. Factors affecting recombinant Western equine encephalitis virus glycoprotein production in the baculovirus system.

    PubMed

    Toth, Ann M; Geisler, Christoph; Aumiller, Jared J; Jarvis, Donald L

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to produce processed, soluble Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) glycoproteins for subunit therapeutic vaccine studies, we isolated twelve recombinant baculoviruses designed to express four different WEEV glycoprotein constructs under the transcriptional control of three temporally distinct baculovirus promoters. The WEEV glycoprotein constructs encoded full-length E1, the E1 ectodomain, an E26KE1 polyprotein precursor, and an artificial, secretable E2E1 chimera. The three different promoters induced gene expression during the immediate early (ie1), late (p6.9), and very late (polh) phases of baculovirus infection. Protein expression studies showed that the nature of the WEEV construct and the timing of expression both influenced the quantity and quality of recombinant glycoprotein produced. The full-length E1 product was insoluble, irrespective of the timing of expression. Each of the other three constructs yielded soluble products and, in these cases, the timing of expression was important, as higher protein processing efficiencies were generally obtained at earlier times of infection. However, immediate early expression did not yield detectable levels of every WEEV product, and expression during the late (p6.9) or very late (polh) phases of infection provided equal or higher amounts of processed, soluble product. Thus, while earlier foreign gene expression can provide higher recombinant glycoprotein processing efficiencies in the baculovirus system, in the case of the WEEV glycoproteins, earlier expression did not provide larger amounts of high quality, soluble recombinant glycoprotein product.

  4. Cryo-electron Microscopy Structure of the Native Prototype Foamy Virus Glycoprotein and Virus Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Effantin, Grégory; Estrozi, Leandro F.; Aschman, Nick; Renesto, Patricia; Stanke, Nicole; Lindemann, Dirk; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FV) belong to the genus Spumavirus, which forms a distinct lineage in the Retroviridae family. Although the infection in natural hosts and zoonotic transmission to humans is asymptomatic, FVs can replicate well in human cells making it an attractive gene therapy vector candidate. Here we present cryo-electron microscopy and (cryo-)electron tomography ultrastructural data on purified prototype FV (PFV) and PFV infected cells. Mature PFV particles have a distinct morphology with a capsid of constant dimension as well as a less ordered shell of density between the capsid and the membrane likely formed by the Gag N-terminal domain and the cytoplasmic part of the Env leader peptide gp18LP. The viral membrane contains trimeric Env glycoproteins partly arranged in interlocked hexagonal assemblies. In situ 3D reconstruction by subtomogram averaging of wild type Env and of a Env gp48TM- gp80SU cleavage site mutant showed a similar spike architecture as well as stabilization of the hexagonal lattice by clear connections between lower densities of neighboring trimers. Cryo-EM was employed to obtain a 9 Å resolution map of the glycoprotein in its pre-fusion state, which revealed extensive trimer interactions by the receptor binding subunit gp80SU at the top of the spike and three central helices derived from the fusion protein subunit gp48TM. The lower part of Env, presumably composed of interlaced parts of gp48TM, gp80SU and gp18LP anchors the spike at the membrane. We propose that the gp48TM density continues into three central transmembrane helices, which interact with three outer transmembrane helices derived from gp18LP. Our ultrastructural data and 9 Å resolution glycoprotein structure provide important new insights into the molecular architecture of PFV and its distinct evolutionary relationship with other members of the Retroviridae. PMID:27399201

  5. Expression and antigenicity of recombinant human respiratory syncytial virus glycoproteins having different affinity tags.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Saem; Kim, A-Reum; Kim, Kisoon; Lee, Wan-Ji; Kim, Sung Soon; Kim, You-Jin

    2016-12-29

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a main cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and the elderly. Glycoprotein (G) is major antigen on the viral surface, and plays a key role for virus entry. Therefore, purification of the glycoprotein of HRSV is critical for the development of HRSV vaccine and serological diagnosis. In this study, we report the design and characterization of glycoprotein engineered rationally to enhance the protein solubility and to facilitate efficient purification. We permuted HRSV glycoproteins with two tags: (i) an immunoglobulin (Ig) M signal peptide and a protein A B domain tag to render HRSV glycoprotein secret into the culture media and (ii) a foldon and 6 × histidine tag with or without transmembrane domain. Three recombinant baculoviruses were constructed: (i) transmembrane-truncated HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 66-298) inserted with the N-terminal IgM signal peptide and protein A B domain (MG-GΔTM), (ii) truncated HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 66-298) fused with a C-terminal foldon and 6 × histidine tag (GΔTM-FH), and (iii) full-length HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 1-298) fused with a C-terminal foldon and 6 × histidine tag (G-FH). Highly soluble recombinant MG-GΔTM protein was clearly purified using one-step affinity chromatography with IgG-sepharose resin, whereas the recombinant G-FH protein and truncated GΔTM-FH were purified partially using nickel-resin. Although, the antigenicity of GΔTM-FH was stronger than highly mannose-rich MG-GΔTM protein, MG-GΔTM induced neutralizing antibodies efficiently in the mice to protect from infectious HRSV.

  6. Structure of a trimeric variant of the Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B

    SciTech Connect

    Backovic, Marija; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2009-03-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus that is associated with development of malignancies of lymphoid tissue. EBV infections are life-long and occur in >90% of the population. Herpesviruses enter host cells in a process that involves fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The fusion apparatus is comprised of envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and a heterodimeric complex made of glycoproteins H and L. Glycoprotein B is the most conserved envelope glycoprotein in human herpesviruses, and the structure of gB from Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is available. Here, we report the crystal structure of the secreted EBV gB ectodomain, which forms 16-nm long spike-like trimers, structurally homologous to the postfusion trimers of the fusion protein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Comparative structural analyses of EBV gB and VSV G, which has been solved in its pre and postfusion states, shed light on gB residues that may be involved in conformational changes and membrane fusion. Also, the EBV gB structure reveals that, despite the high sequence conservation of gB in herpesviruses, the relative orientations of individual domains, the surface charge distributions, and the structural details of EBV gB differ from the HSV-1 protein, indicating regions and residues that may have important roles in virus-specific entry.

  7. Stoichiometry of Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers in the Entry of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinzhen; Kurteva, Svetla; Ren, Xinping; Lee, Sandra; Sodroski, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Envs) function as a trimer, mediating virus entry by promoting the fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. HIV-1 Env trimers induce membrane fusion through a pH-independent pathway driven by the interaction between an Env trimer and its cellular receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. We studied viruses with mixed heterotrimers of wild-type and dominant-negative Envs to determine the number (T) of Env trimers required for HIV-1 entry. To our surprise, we found that a single Env trimer is capable of supporting HIV-1 entry; i.e., T = 1. A similar approach was applied to investigate the entry stoichiometry of envelope glycoproteins from amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV), avian sarcoma/leukosis virus type A (ASLV-A), and influenza A virus. When pseudotyped on HIV-1 virions, the A-MLV and ASLV-A Envs also exhibit a T = 1 entry stoichiometry. In contrast, eight to nine influenza A virus hemagglutinin trimers function cooperatively to achieve membrane fusion and virus entry, using a pH-dependent pathway. The different entry requirements for cooperativity among Env trimers for retroviruses and influenza A virus may influence viral strategies for replication and evasion of the immune system. PMID:16160141

  8. Early diagnosis of Lassa fever by reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Demby, A H; Chamberlain, J; Brown, D W; Clegg, C S

    1994-12-01

    We developed a method based on a coupled reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for the detection of Lassa virus using primers specific for regions of the S RNA segment which are well conserved between isolates from Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria. The specificity of the assay was confirmed by Southern blotting with a chemiluminescent probe. The assay was able to detect 1 to 10 copies of a plasmid or an RNA transcript containing the target sequence. There was complete concordance between RT-PCR and virus culture for the detection of Lassa virus in a set of 29 positive and 32 negative serum samples obtained on admission to the hospital from patients suspected of having Lassa fever in Sierra Leone. Specificity was confirmed by the failure of amplification of specific products from serum samples collected from 129 healthy blood donors in Sierra Leone or from tissue culture supernatants from cells infected with related arenaviruses (Mopeia, lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Tacaribe, and Pichinde viruses). Sequential serum samples from 29 hospitalized patients confirmed to have Lassa fever were tested by RT-PCR and for Lassa virus-specific antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence (IF). RT-PCR detected virus RNA in 79% of the patients at the time of admission, comparing favorably with IF, which detected antibodies in only 21% of the patients. Lassa virus RNA was detected by RT-PCR in all 29 patients by the third day of admission, whereas antibody was detectable by IF in only 52% of the patients. These results point to an important role for RT-PCR in the management of suspected cases of Lassa fever.

  9. Functional Interplay Between Murine Leukemia Virus Glycogag, Serinc5, and Surface Glycoprotein Governs Virus Entry, with Opposite Effects on Gammaretroviral and Ebolavirus Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Zhang, Shu; Thappeta, Yashna; Denman, Audrey; Feizpour, Amin; Reinhard, Bjoern; Muriaux, Delphine; Fivash, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs), encode, in addition to the canonical Gag, Pol, and Env proteins that will form progeny virus particles, a protein called “glycogag” (glycosylated Gag). MLV glycogag contains the entire Gag sequence plus an 88-residue N-terminal extension. It has recently been reported that glycogag, like the Nef protein of HIV-1, counteracts the antiviral effects of the cellular protein Serinc5. We have found, in agreement with prior work, that glycogag strongly enhances the infectivity of MLVs with some Env proteins but not those with others. In contrast, however, glycogag was detrimental to MLVs carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. Glycogag could be replaced, with respect to viral infectivity, by the unrelated S2 protein of equine infectious anemia virus. We devised an assay for viral entry in which virus particles deliver the Cre recombinase into cells, leading to the expression of a reporter. Data from this assay showed that both the positive and the negative effects of glycogag and S2 upon MLV infectivity are exerted at the level of virus entry. Moreover, transfection of the virus-producing cells with a Serinc5 expression plasmid reduced the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying xenotropic MLV Env, particularly in the absence of glycogag. Conversely, Serinc5 expression abrogated the negative effects of glycogag upon the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. As Serinc5 may influence cellular phospholipid metabolism, it seems possible that all of these effects on virus entry derive from changes in the lipid composition of viral membranes. PMID:27879338

  10. Functional Interplay Between Murine Leukemia Virus Glycogag, Serinc5, and Surface Glycoprotein Governs Virus Entry, with Opposite Effects on Gammaretroviral and Ebolavirus Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ahi, Yadvinder S; Zhang, Shu; Thappeta, Yashna; Denman, Audrey; Feizpour, Amin; Gummuluru, Suryaram; Reinhard, Bjoern; Muriaux, Delphine; Fivash, Matthew J; Rein, Alan

    2016-11-22

    Gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs), encode, in addition to the canonical Gag, Pol, and Env proteins that will form progeny virus particles, a protein called "glycogag" (glycosylated Gag). MLV glycogag contains the entire Gag sequence plus an 88-residue N-terminal extension. It has recently been reported that glycogag, like the Nef protein of HIV-1, counteracts the antiviral effects of the cellular protein Serinc5. We have found, in agreement with prior work, that glycogag strongly enhances the infectivity of MLVs with some Env proteins but not those with others. In contrast, however, glycogag was detrimental to MLVs carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. Glycogag could be replaced, with respect to viral infectivity, by the unrelated S2 protein of equine infectious anemia virus. We devised an assay for viral entry in which virus particles deliver the Cre recombinase into cells, leading to the expression of a reporter. Data from this assay showed that both the positive and the negative effects of glycogag and S2 upon MLV infectivity are exerted at the level of virus entry. Moreover, transfection of the virus-producing cells with a Serinc5 expression plasmid reduced the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying xenotropic MLV Env, particularly in the absence of glycogag. Conversely, Serinc5 expression abrogated the negative effects of glycogag upon the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. As Serinc5 may influence cellular phospholipid metabolism, it seems possible that all of these effects on virus entry derive from changes in the lipid composition of viral membranes.

  11. A replication-incompetent influenza virus bearing the HN glycoprotein of human parainfluenza virus as a bivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Kiso, Maki; Uraki, Ryuta; Ichiko, Yurie; Takimoto, Toru; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-12-16

    Influenza virus and human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) are major etiologic agents of acute respiratory illness in young children. Inactivated and live attenuated influenza vaccines are approved in several countries, yet no vaccine is licensed for HPIV. We previously showed that a replication-incompetent PB2-knockout (PB2-KO) virus that possesses a reporter gene in the coding region of the PB2 segment can serve as a platform for a bivalent vaccine. To develop a bivalent vaccine against influenza and parainfluenza virus, here, we generated a PB2-KO virus possessing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of HPIV type 3 (HPIV3), a major surface antigen of HPIV, in its PB2 segment. We confirmed that this virus replicated only in PB2-expressing cells and expressed HN. We then examined the efficacy of this virus as a bivalent vaccine in a hamster model. High levels of virus-specific IgG antibodies in sera and IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids against both influenza virus and HPIV3 were detected from hamsters immunized with this virus. The neutralizing capability of these serum antibodies was also confirmed. Moreover, the immunized hamsters were completely protected from virus challenge with influenza virus or HPIV3. These results indicate that PB2-KO virus expressing the HN of HPIV3 has the potential to be a novel bivalent vaccine against influenza and human parainfluenza viruses.

  12. Structure of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in the Postfusion Conformation Reveals Preservation of Neutralizing Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-09-16

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) invades host cells via a type I fusion (F) glycoprotein that undergoes dramatic structural rearrangements during the fusion process. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, such as 101F, palivizumab, and motavizumab, target two major antigenic sites on the RSV F glycoprotein. The structures of these sites as peptide complexes with motavizumab and 101F have been previously determined, but a structure for the trimeric RSV F glycoprotein ectodomain has remained elusive. To address this issue, we undertook structural and biophysical studies on stable ectodomain constructs. Here, we present the 2.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of the trimeric RSV F ectodomain in its postfusion conformation. The structure revealed that the 101F and motavizumab epitopes are present in the postfusion state and that their conformations are similar to those observed in the antibody-bound peptide structures. Both antibodies bound the postfusion F glycoprotein with high affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Modeling of the antibodies bound to the F glycoprotein predicts that the 101F epitope is larger than the linear peptide and restricted to a single protomer in the trimer, whereas motavizumab likely contacts residues on two protomers, indicating a quaternary epitope. Mechanistically, these results suggest that 101F and motavizumab can bind to multiple conformations of the fusion glycoprotein and can neutralize late in the entry process. The structural preservation of neutralizing epitopes in the postfusion state suggests that this conformation can elicit neutralizing antibodies and serve as a useful vaccine antigen.

  13. Requirements for cell rounding and surface protein down-regulation by Ebola virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Francica, Joseph R; Matukonis, Meghan K; Bates, Paul

    2009-01-20

    Ebola virus causes an acute hemorrhagic fever that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The viral glycoprotein is thought to contribute to pathogenesis, though precise mechanisms are unknown. Cellular pathogenesis can be modeled in vitro by expression of the Ebola viral glycoprotein (GP) in cells, which causes dramatic morphological changes, including cell rounding and surface protein down-regulation. These effects are known to be dependent on the presence of a highly glycosylated region of the glycoprotein, the mucin domain. Here we show that the mucin domain from the highly pathogenic Zaire subtype of Ebola virus is sufficient to cause characteristic cytopathology when expressed in the context of a foreign glycoprotein. Similarly to full length Ebola GP, expression of the mucin domain causes rounding, detachment from the extracellular matrix, and the down-regulation of cell surface levels of beta1 integrin and major histocompatibility complex class 1. These effects were not seen when the mucin domain was expressed in the context of a glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored isoform of the foreign glycoprotein. In contrast to earlier analysis of full length Ebola glycoproteins, chimeras carrying the mucin domains from the Zaire and Reston strains appear to cause similar levels of down-modulation and cell detachment. Cytopathology associated with Ebola glycoprotein expression does not occur when GP expression is restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast to a previously published report, our results demonstrate that GP-induced surface protein down-regulation is not mediated through a dynamin-dependent pathway. Overall, these results support a model in which the mucin domain of Ebola GP acts at the cell surface to induce protein down modulation and cytopathic effects.

  14. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    the period 246 Lassa Fever Immune Plasma (LFIP) units were obtained by plasmapheresis , 106 were forwarded to USAMRIID. During the whole life of the...Fever in Plasmapheresis #20 - the inception of the Contract LV has been isolated from 139 of 213 LF patients and another 71 presumptive LF cases have...During the year plasmapheresis at Curran Lutheran Hospital (CLH) and Phebe Hospital (PH) resulted in the collection of 246 units of Lassa Fever

  15. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-31

    E. Yalley-Ogunro, was engaged in visits to the field stations at CLH and PH for plasmapheresis , in testing patients for indirect fluorescent... Plasmapheresis yielded 358 plasma units, of which 180 were forwarded to USAMRIID. They are to be tested there for the concentratrion of neutralizing...Activities 5 Plasmapheresis 6 Lassa fever cases 6 Passive immunotherapy 7 Conclusion 8 References 9 Map - Northern Liberia 10 Appendix - Tables 1. Lassa

  16. Lassa fever in West African sub-region: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ogbu, O; Ajuluchukwu, E; Uneke, C J

    2007-03-01

    Lassa fever is an acute viral zoonotic illness caused by Lassa virus, an arenavirus known to be responsible for a severe haemorrhagic fever characterised by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and, chest and abdominal pain. The virus exhibits persistent, asymptomatic infection with profuse urinary virus excretion in the ubiquitous rodent vector, Mastomys natalensis. Lassa fever is endemic in West Africa and has been reported from Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia, and Nigeria. Some studies indicate that 300,000 to 500,000 cases of Lassa fever and 5000 deaths occur yearly across West Africa. Studies reported in English, that investigated Lassa fever with reference to West Africa were identified using the Medline Entrez-PubMed search and were used for this review. The scarcity of resources available for health care delivery system and the political instability that characterise the West African countries would continue to impede efforts for the control of Lassa fever in the sub-region. There is need for adequate training of health care workers regarding diagnostics, intensive care of patients under isolation, contact tracing, adequate precautionary measures in handling infectious laboratory specimens, control of the vector as well as care and disposal of infectious waste.

  17. Glycosylation of dengue virus glycoproteins and their interactions with carbohydrate receptors: possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Idris, Fakhriedzwan; Muharram, Siti Hanna; Diah, Suwarni

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus, an RNA virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, affects 50 million individuals annually, and approximately 500,000-1,000,000 of these infections lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. With no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatments available to prevent dengue infection, dengue is considered a major public health problem in subtropical and tropical regions. The virus, like other enveloped viruses, uses the host's cellular enzymes to synthesize its structural (C, E, and prM/M) and nonstructural proteins (NS1-5) and, subsequently, to glycosylate these proteins to produce complete and functional glycoproteins. The structural glycoproteins, specifically the E protein, are known to interact with the host's carbohydrate receptors through the viral proteins' N-glycosylation sites and thus mediate the viral invasion of cells. This review focuses on the involvement of dengue glycoproteins in the course of infection and the virus' exploitation of the host's glycans, especially the interactions between host receptors and carbohydrate moieties. We also discuss the recent developments in antiviral therapies that target these processes and interactions, focusing specifically on the use of carbohydrate-binding agents derived from plants, commonly known as lectins, to inhibit the progression of infection.

  18. Lassa serology in natural populations of rodents and horizontal transmission.

    PubMed

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Koivogui, Lamine; Günther, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic fever in West Africa. Previously, we demonstrated by PCR screening that only the multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis, hosts Lassa virus in Guinea. In the present study, we used the same specimen collection from 17 villages in Coastal, Upper, and Forest Guinea to investigate the Lassa virus serology in the rodent population. The aim was to determine the dynamics of antibody development in M. natalensis and to detect potential spillover infections in other rodent species. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody screening was performed using the indirect immunofluorescence assay with the Guinean Lassa virus strain Bantou 289 as antigen. The overall seroprevalence was 8% (129/1551) with the following rodents testing positive: 109 M. natalensis, seven Mastomys erythroleucus, four Lemniscomys striatus, four Praomys daltoni, three Mus minutoides, and two Praomys rostratus. Nearly all of them (122/129) originated from Bantou, Tanganya, and Gbetaya, where Lassa virus is highly endemic in M. natalensis. The antibody seroprevalence in M. natalensis from this high-endemic area (27%; 108/396) depended on the village, habitat, host age, and host abundance. A main positive factor was age; the maximum seroprevalence reached 50% in older animals. Our data fit with a model implicating that most M. natalensis rodents become horizontally infected, clear the virus within a period significantly shorter than their life span, and develop antibodies. In addition, the detection of antibodies in other species trapped in the habitats of M. natalensis suggests spillover infections.

  19. Binding of a neutralizing antibody to dengue virus alters the arrangement of surface glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lok, Shee-Mei; Kostyuchenko, Victor; Nybakken, Grant E.; Holdaway, Heather A.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Sedlak, Dagmar; Fremont, Daved H.; Chipman, Paul R.; Roehrig, John T.; Diamond, Michael S.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-04-02

    The monoclonal antibody 1A1D-2 has been shown to strongly neutralize dengue virus serotypes 1, 2 and 3, primarily by inhibiting attachment to host cells. A crystal structure of its antigen binding fragment (Fab) complexed with domain III of the viral envelope glycoprotein, E, showed that the epitope would be partially occluded in the known structure of the mature dengue virus. Nevertheless, antibody could bind to the virus at 37 degrees C, suggesting that the virus is in dynamic motion making hidden epitopes briefly available. A cryo-electron microscope image reconstruction of the virus:Fab complex showed large changes in the organization of the E protein that exposed the epitopes on two of the three E molecules in each of the 60 icosahedral asymmetric units of the virus. The changes in the structure of the viral surface are presumably responsible for inhibiting attachment to cells.

  20. Genotyping of Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) based on the glycoprotein gene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, W.-S.; Oh, M.-J.; Nishizawa, T.; Park, J.-W.; Kurath, G.; Yoshimizu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein (G) gene nucleotide sequences of four Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) were analyzed to evaluate their genetic relatedness to worldwide isolates. All Korean isolates were closely related to Japanese isolates of genogroup JRt rather than to those of North American and European genogroups. It is believed that Korean IHNV has been most likely introduced from Japan to Korea by the movement of contaminated fish eggs. Among the Korean isolates, phylogenetically distinct virus types were obtained from sites north and south of a large mountain range, suggesting the possibility of more than one introduction of virus from Japan. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Genotyping of Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) based on the glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, W-S; Oh, M-J; Nishizawa, T; Park, J-W; Kurath, G; Yoshimizu, M

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein (G) gene nucleotide sequences of four Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) were analyzed to evaluate their genetic relatedness to worldwide isolates. All Korean isolates were closely related to Japanese isolates of genogroup JRt rather than to those of North American and European genogroups. It is believed that Korean IHNV has been most likely introduced from Japan to Korea by the movement of contaminated fish eggs. Among the Korean isolates, phylogenetically distinct virus types were obtained from sites north and south of a large mountain range, suggesting the possibility of more than one introduction of virus from Japan.

  2. Humoral immune response to the entire human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein made in insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rusche, J.R.; Lynn, D.L.; Robert-Guroff, M.; Langlois, A.J.; Lyerly, H.K.; Carson, H.; Krohn, K.; Ranki, A.; Gallo, R.C.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Putney, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope gene was expressed in insect cells by using a Baculovirus expression vector. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa, appears on the surface of infected insect cells, and does not appear to be cleaved to glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Goats immunized with the 160-kDa protein have high titers of antibody that neutralizes virus infection as measured by viral gene expression or cell cytolysis. In addition, immune sera can block fusion of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in culture. Both neutralization and fusion-blocking activities are bound to and eluted from immobilized gp120.

  3. Utilization of C-C chemokine receptor 5 by the envelope glycoproteins of a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac239.

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, L; Choe, H; Martin, K A; Farzan, M; Ponath, P D; Wu, L; Newman, W; Gerard, N; Gerard, C; Sodroski, J

    1997-01-01

    We examined chemokine receptors for the ability to facilitate the infection of CD4-expressing cells by viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac239. Expression of either human or simian C-C chemokine receptor CCR5 allowed the SIVmac239 envelope glycoproteins to mediate virus entry and cell-to-cell fusion. Thus, distantly related immunodeficiency viruses such as SIV and the primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates can utilize CCR5 as an entry cofactor. PMID:9032394

  4. A Novel Rabies Vaccine Based on a Recombinant Parainfluenza Virus 5 Expressing Rabies Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenhai; Zhou, Ming; Gao, Xiudan; Zhang, Guoqing; Ren, Guiping; Gnanadurai, Clement W.

    2013-01-01

    Untreated rabies virus (RABV) infection leads to death. Vaccine and postexposure treatment have been effective in preventing RABV infection. However, due to cost, rabies vaccination and treatment have not been widely used in developing countries. There are 55,000 human death caused by rabies annually. An efficacious and cost-effective rabies vaccine is needed. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is thought to contribute to kennel cough, and kennel cough vaccines containing live PIV5 have been used in dogs for many years. In this work, a PIV5-vectored rabies vaccine was tested in mice. A recombinant PIV5 encoding RABV glycoprotein (G) (rPIV5-RV-G) was administered to mice via intranasal (i.n.), intramuscular (i.m.), and oral inoculation. The vaccinated mice were challenged with a 50% lethal challenge dose (LD50) of RABV challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24) intracerebrally. A single dose of 106 PFU of rPIV5-RV-G was sufficient for 100% protection when administered via the i.n. route. The mice vaccinated with a single dose of 108 PFU of rPIV5-RV-G via the i.m. route showed very robust protection (90% to 100%). Intriguingly, the mice vaccinated orally with a single dose of 108 PFU of rPIV5-RV-G showed a 50% survival rate, which is comparable to the 60% survival rate among mice inoculated with an attenuated rabies vaccine strain, recombinant LBNSE. This is first report of an orally effective rabies vaccine candidate in animals based on PIV5 as a vector. These results indicate that rPIV5-RV-G is an excellent candidate for a new generation of recombinant rabies vaccine for humans and animals and PIV5 is a potential vector for oral vaccines. PMID:23269806

  5. A novel rabies vaccine based on a recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 expressing rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhai; Zhou, Ming; Gao, Xiudan; Zhang, Guoqing; Ren, Guiping; Gnanadurai, Clement W; Fu, Zhen F; He, Biao

    2013-03-01

    Untreated rabies virus (RABV) infection leads to death. Vaccine and postexposure treatment have been effective in preventing RABV infection. However, due to cost, rabies vaccination and treatment have not been widely used in developing countries. There are 55,000 human death caused by rabies annually. An efficacious and cost-effective rabies vaccine is needed. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is thought to contribute to kennel cough, and kennel cough vaccines containing live PIV5 have been used in dogs for many years. In this work, a PIV5-vectored rabies vaccine was tested in mice. A recombinant PIV5 encoding RABV glycoprotein (G) (rPIV5-RV-G) was administered to mice via intranasal (i.n.), intramuscular (i.m.), and oral inoculation. The vaccinated mice were challenged with a 50% lethal challenge dose (LD(50)) of RABV challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24) intracerebrally. A single dose of 10(6) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G was sufficient for 100% protection when administered via the i.n. route. The mice vaccinated with a single dose of 10(8) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G via the i.m. route showed very robust protection (90% to 100%). Intriguingly, the mice vaccinated orally with a single dose of 10(8) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G showed a 50% survival rate, which is comparable to the 60% survival rate among mice inoculated with an attenuated rabies vaccine strain, recombinant LBNSE. This is first report of an orally effective rabies vaccine candidate in animals based on PIV5 as a vector. These results indicate that rPIV5-RV-G is an excellent candidate for a new generation of recombinant rabies vaccine for humans and animals and PIV5 is a potential vector for oral vaccines.

  6. Monoclonal antibody mapping of the envelope glycoprotein of the dengue 2 virus, Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Roehrig, J T; Bolin, R A; Kelly, R G

    1998-07-05

    Although dengue (DEN) virus is the etiologic agent of dengue fever, the most prevalent vector-borne viral disease in the world, precise information on the antigenic structure of the dengue virion is limited. We have prepared a set of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the envelope (E) glycoprotein of DEN 2 virus and used these antibodies in a comprehensive biological and biochemical analysis to identify 16 epitopes. Following domain nomenclature developed for the related flavivirus, tick-borne encephalitis, three functional domains were identified. Five epitopes associated with domain A were arranged in three spatially independent regions. These A-domain epitopes were destroyed by reduction, and antibodies reactive with these epitopes were able to block virus hemagglutination, neutralize virus infectivity, and block virus-mediated cell membrane fusion. Domain-A epitopes were present on the full-length E glycoprotein, a 45-kDa tryptic peptide representing its first 400 amino acids (aa) and a 22-kDa tryptic peptide representing at least aa 1-120. Four epitopes mapped into domain B, as determined by their partial resistance to reduction and the localization of these epitopes on a 9-kDa tryptic or chymotryptic peptide fragment (aa 300-400). One domain-B-reactive MAb was also capable of binding to a DEN 2 synthetic peptide corresponding to aa 333-351 of the E glycoprotein, confirming the location of this domain. Domain-B epitopes elicited MAbs that were potent neutralizers of virus infectivity and blocked hemagglutination, but they did not block virus-mediated cell-membrane fusion. Domains A and B were spatially associated. As with tick-borne encephalitis virus, determination of domain C was more problematic; however, at least four epitopes had biochemical characteristics consistent with C-domain epitopes.

  7. Structural, antigenic and immunogenic features of respiratory syncytial virus glycoproteins relevant for vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Melero, José A.; Mas, Vicente; McLellan, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Extraordinary progress in the structure and immunobiology of the human respiratory syncytial virus glycoproteins has been accomplished during the last few years. Determination of the fusion (F) glycoprotein structure folded in either the prefusion or the postfusion conformation was an inspiring breakthrough not only to understand the structural changes associated with the membrane fusion process but additionally to appreciate the antigenic intricacies of the F molecule. Furthermore, these developments have opened new avenues for structure-based designs of promising hRSV vaccine candidates. Finally, recent advances in our knowledge of the attachment (G) glycoprotein and its interaction with cell-surface receptors have revitalized interest in this molecule as a vaccine, as well as its role in hRSV immunobiology. PMID:27692522

  8. Functional Relevance of the N-Terminal Domain of Pseudorabies Virus Envelope Glycoprotein H and Its Interaction with Glycoprotein L.

    PubMed

    Vallbracht, Melina; Rehwaldt, Sascha; Klupp, Barbara G; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2017-05-01

    Several envelope glycoproteins are involved in herpesvirus entry into cells, direct cell-to-cell spread, and induction of cell fusion. The membrane fusion protein glycoprotein B (gB) and the presumably gB-activating heterodimer gH/gL are essential for these processes and conserved throughout the Herpesviridae However, after extended cell culture passage of gL-negative mutants of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PrV), phenotypic revertants could be isolated which had acquired spontaneous mutations affecting the gL-interacting N-terminal part of the gH ectodomain (gDH and gH(B4.1)) (B. G. Klupp and T. C. Mettenleiter, J Virol 73:3014-3022, 1999; C. Schröter, M. Vallbracht, J. Altenschmidt, S. Kargoll, W. Fuchs, B. G. Klupp, and T. C. Mettenleiter, J Virol 90:2264-2272, 2016). To investigate the functional relevance of this part of gH in more detail, we introduced an in-frame deletion of 66 codons at the 5' end of the plasmid-cloned gH gene (gH(32/98)). The N-terminal signal peptide was retained, and the deletion did not affect expression or processing of gH but abrogated its function in in vitro fusion assays. Insertion of the engineered gH gene into the PrV genome resulted in a defective mutant (pPrV-gH(32/98)K), which was incapable of entry and spread. Interestingly, in vitro activity of mutated gH(32/98) was restored when it was coexpressed with hyperfusogenic gB(B4.1), obtained from a passaged gL deletion mutant of PrV. Moreover, the entry and spread defects of pPrV-gH(32/98)K were compensated by the mutations in gB(B4.1) in cis, as well as in trans, independent of gL. Thus, PrV gL and the gL-interacting domain of gH are not strictly required for function.IMPORTANCE Membrane fusion is crucial for infectious entry and spread of enveloped viruses. While many enveloped viruses require only one or two proteins for receptor binding and membrane fusion, herpesvirus infection depends on several envelope glycoproteins. Besides subfamily-specific receptor binding

  9. Molecular Docking Studies to Explore Potential Binding Pockets and Inhibitors for Chikungunya Virus Envelope Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong T V; Yu, Haibo; Keller, Paul A

    2017-03-11

    The chikungunya virus (CHIKV) envelope glycoproteins are considered important potential targets for anti-CHIKV drug discovery due to their crucial roles in virus attachment and virus entry. In this study, using two available crystal structures of the immature and mature forms of envelope glycoproteins, virtual screenings based on blind dockings and focused dockings were carried out to identify potential binding pockets and hit compounds for the virus. The chemical library database of compounds, NCI Diversity Set II, was used in these docking studies. In addition to reproducing previously reported examples, new binding pockets were identified, e.g., Pocket 2 in the 3N40, and Pocket 2 and Pocket 3 in the 3N42. Convergences in conformational sampling in docking using AutoDock Vina were evaluated. An analysis of docking results was carried out to understand interactions of the envelope glycoproteins complexes. Some key residues for interactions, for example Gly91 and His230, are identified as possessing important roles in the fusion process.

  10. Sendai virus assembly: M protein binds to viral glycoproteins in transit through the secretory pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, C M; McQueen, N L; Nayak, D P

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the relative ability of Sendai virus M (matrix) protein to associate with membranes containing viral glycoproteins at three distinct stages of the exocytic pathway prior to cell surface appearance. By the use of selective low-temperature incubations or the ionophore monensin, the transport of newly synthesized viral glycoproteins was restricted to either the pre-Golgi intermediate compartment (by incubation at 15 degrees C), the medial Golgi (in the presence of monensin), or the trans-Golgi network (by incubation at 20 degrees C). All three of these treatments resulted in a marked accumulation of the M protein on perinuclear Golgi-like membranes which in each case directly reflected the distribution of the viral F protein. Subsequent redistribution of the F protein to the plasma membrane by removal of the low-temperature (20 degrees C) block resulted in a concomitant redistribution of the M protein, thus implying association of the two components during intracellular transit. The extent of M protein-glycoprotein association was further examined by cell fractionation studies performed under each of the three restrictive conditions. Following equilibrium sedimentation of membranes derived from monensin-treated cells, approximately 40% of the recovered M protein was found to cofractionate with membranes containing the viral glycoproteins. Also, by flotation analyses, a comparable subpopulation of M protein was found to be membrane associated whether viral glycoproteins were restricted to the trans-Golgi network, the medial Golgi, or the pre-Golgi intermediate compartment. Additionally, transient expression of M protein alone from cloned cDNA showed that neither membrane association nor Golgi localization occurs in the absence of Sendai virus glycoproteins. Images PMID:8380460

  11. Envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: profound influences on immune functions.

    PubMed Central

    Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S

    1996-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) leads to progressive destruction of the CD4+ T-cell subset, resulting in immune deficiency and AIDS. The specific binding of the viral external envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1, gp120, to the CD4 molecules initiates viral entry. In the past few years, several studies have indicated that the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein with cells and molecules of the immune system leads to pleiotropic biological effects on immune functions, which include effects on differentiation of CD34+ lymphoid progenitor cells and thymocytes, aberrant activation and cytokine secretion patterns of mature T cells, induction of apoptosis, B-cell hyperactivity, inhibition of T-cell dependent B-cell differentiation, modulation of macrophage functions, interactions with components of complement, and effects on neuronal cells. The amino acid sequence homologies of the envelope glycoproteins with several cellular proteins have suggested that molecular mimicry may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. This review summarizes work done by several investigators demonstrating the profound biological effects of envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1 on immune system cells. Extensive studies have also been done on interactions of the viral envelope proteins with components of the immune system which may be important for eliciting a "protective immune response." Understanding the influences of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins on the immune system may provide valuable insights into HIV-1 disease pathogenesis and carries implications for the trials of HIV-1 envelope protein vaccines and immunotherapeutics. PMID:8801439

  12. Hantavirus Gn and Gc glycoproteins self-assemble into virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Rodrigo; Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Márquez, Chantal L; Bulling, Manuela; Klingström, Jonas; Mancini, Roberta; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2014-02-01

    How hantaviruses assemble and exit infected cells remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of Andes (ANDV) and Puumala (PUUV) hantavirus Gn and Gc envelope glycoproteins lead to their self-assembly into virus-like particles (VLPs) which were released to cell supernatants. The viral nucleoprotein was not required for particle formation. Further, a Gc endodomain deletion mutant did not abrogate VLP formation. The VLPs were pleomorphic, exposed protrusions and reacted with patient sera.

  13. Hantavirus Gn and Gc Glycoproteins Self-Assemble into Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Rodrigo; Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Márquez, Chantal L.; Bulling, Manuela; Klingström, Jonas; Mancini, Roberta; Lozach, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    How hantaviruses assemble and exit infected cells remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of Andes (ANDV) and Puumala (PUUV) hantavirus Gn and Gc envelope glycoproteins lead to their self-assembly into virus-like particles (VLPs) which were released to cell supernatants. The viral nucleoprotein was not required for particle formation. Further, a Gc endodomain deletion mutant did not abrogate VLP formation. The VLPs were pleomorphic, exposed protrusions and reacted with patient sera. PMID:24335294

  14. Antibody Binding in Proximity to the Receptor/Glycoprotein Complex Leads to a Basal Level of Virus Neutralization▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinzhen; Lipchina, Inna; Lifton, Michelle; Wang, Liping; Sodroski, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Hypothetically, antibodies may neutralize enveloped viruses by diverse mechanisms, such as disruption of receptor binding, interference with conformational changes required for virus entry, steric hindrance, or virus aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that retroviral infection mediated by the avian sarcoma-leukosis virus (ASLV-A) envelope glycoproteins can be neutralized by an antibody directed against a functionally unimportant component of a chimeric receptor protein. Thus, the binding of an antibody in proximity to the retroviral envelope glycoprotein-receptor complex, without binding to the entry machinery itself, results in neutralization. This finding provides additional support for the hypothesis that steric hindrance is sufficient for antibody-mediated neutralization of retroviruses. PMID:17537847

  15. Conservation of hydrophobicity within viral envelope glycoproteins reveals a putative hepatitis C virus fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; O'Leary, J M; Pollock, S; Zitzmann, N

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters and infects cells remains unknown. Identifying the HCV fusion peptide(s) and understanding the early stages of infection may provide new opportunities for improved antiviral therapy. The HCV envelope glycoprotein E2 is thought to be a class II fusion protein. Class II fusion proteins are exemplified by the E protein of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and the E1 protein of the Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Analysis of the hydrophobicity profiles of four HCV E2 envelope glycoproteins revealed a region with a conserved three-pronged pattern of hydrophobicity, termed the tridentate (TD) region. The primary sequence of the TD region is highly conserved in all 490 HCV strains currently reported. The known fusion peptide loops of TBEV and SFV share the characteristic TD region hydrophobicity profile and significant sequence conservation in the TD region was identified in the E and E1 glycoproteins of members of the Flaviviridae and Togaviridae families, respectively. The HCV TD region peptides have membranotropic activity; in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the HCV TD region peptides insert into in a biomimetic bilayer in a similar manner to the TBEV fusion peptide and the peptides induce effective mixing of lipid membranes in a liposome fusion assay. Together these results indicate that the highly conserved TD region of the HCV E2 protein is a fusion peptide candidate and may be an important factor in the class II fusion mechanism.

  16. Protective Efficacy of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Delivering Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Volz, Asisa; Kupke, Alexandra; Song, Fei; Jany, Sylvia; Fux, Robert; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Schmidt, Jörg; Becker, Christin; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan; Sutter, Gerd

    2015-08-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe respiratory disease in humans. We tested a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vaccine expressing full-length MERS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein by immunizing BALB/c mice with either intramuscular or subcutaneous regimens. In all cases, MVA-MERS-S induced MERS-CoV-specific CD8(+) T cells and virus-neutralizing antibodies. Vaccinated mice were protected against MERS-CoV challenge infection after transduction with the human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 receptor. This MERS-CoV infection model demonstrates the safety and efficacy of the candidate vaccine.

  17. A second envelope glycoprotein mediates neutralization of a pestivirus, hog cholera virus.

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, E; Ahl, R; Stark, R; Weiland, F; Thiel, H J

    1992-01-01

    Several monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against hog cholera virus (HCV) reacted with the HCV structural glycoprotein gp44/48 and neutralized the virus. The presence of HCV gp44/48 on the viral surface was directly demonstrated by immunogold electron microscopy. Eight anti-HCV gp44/48 MAbs were tested by immunoperoxidase assay against a panel of pestivirus strains. Each MAb showed a distinct pattern of reactivity with HCV strains. It is suggested that the MAbs are well suited for epidemiological investigations of HCV outbreaks. Images PMID:1583727

  18. Role of pseudorabies virus glycoprotein II in protection from lethal infection.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Ihara, T; Nunoya, T; Kuwahara, H; Ishihama, A; Ueda, S

    1993-07-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb), named 1.21, with complement-dependent neutralizing activity was produced against glycoprotein II (gII) of pseudorabies virus (PRV). By immunoaffinity chromatography using a mAB 1.21 column, gII was purified from Nonidet P40-lysates of PRV infected BHK21/13 cells. When mice and pigs were immunized with purified gII, complement-dependent virus-neutralizing antibodies were produced. The immunized animals survived potentially lethal challenge with PRV. These results indicate that an immunological response against gII plays an important role in the protection from PRV infection.

  19. A scalable method to concentrate lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with measles virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Marino, M P; Panigaj, M; Ou, W; Manirarora, J; Wei, C-H; Reiser, J

    2015-03-01

    Lentiviral (LV) vectors have emerged as powerful tools for basic research and clinical applications because of their ability to stably transduce both dividing and nondividing cells. A wide range of viral envelope (Env) glycoproteins have the ability to associate with the membrane of LV vectors, a process that is referred to as pseudotyping. Pseudotyped vectors have the capacity to transduce specific cell types for specific applications. For example, LV vectors pseudotyped with the measles virus (MV)-derived hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins have the ability to transduce quiescent lymphocytes. In addition, the MV H glycoprotein can be engineered allowing cell-specific targeting of LV vectors. One problem with MV glycoprotein-pseudotyped LV vectors is low titer during vector production. This results in the need to manufacture large volumes of the vectors and to concentrate them to appropriate titers. The commonly used centrifugation-based concentration techniques for LV vectors are not practical for large-scale vector manufacturing. Thus, there is a need for improved methods to concentrate LV vectors. In this study, we adapted an anion-exchange membrane chromatography method that we previously used in the context of LV vectors pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein to concentate MV glycoprotein-pseudotyped LV vectors. Up to 60% of the input vectors with an up to 5300-fold reduction in volume was achieved using this anion-exchange chromatography method in conjunction with a desalting/concentration step involving centrifugal filter units. This technique provides a rapid and scalable approach for concentrating MV-pseudotyped LV vectors that does not require an elaborate setup.

  20. Structure of the Lassa virus nucleoprotein revealed by X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brunotte, Linda; Kerber, Romy; Shang, Weifeng; Hauer, Florian; Hass, Meike; Gabriel, Martin; Lelke, Michaela; Busch, Carola; Stark, Holger; Svergun, Dmitri I; Betzel, Christian; Perbandt, Markus; Günther, Stephan

    2011-11-04

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Lassa virus (LASV) strain AV was expressed in a recombinant baculovirus system. The crystal structure of full-length NP was solved at a resolution of 2.45 Å. The overall fold corresponds to that of NP of LASV strain Josiah (Qi, X., Lan, S., Wang, W., Schelde, L. M., Dong, H., Wallat, G. D., Ly, H., Liang, Y., and Dong, C. (2010) Nature 468, 779-783) with a root mean square deviation of 0.67 Å for all atoms (6.3% difference in primary sequence). As the packing in the crystal offers two different trimer architectures for the biological assembly, the quaternary structure of NP in solution was determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and EM. After classification and averaging of >6000 EM raw images, trimeric centrosymmetric structures were obtained, which correspond in size and shape to one trimer in the crystal structure formed around a crystallographic 3-fold rotation axis (symmetric trimer). The symmetric trimer is also a good model for the small-angle x-ray scattering data and could be well embedded into the ab initio model. The N-terminal domain of NP contains a deep nucleotide-binding cavity that has been proposed to bind cellular cap structures for priming viral mRNA synthesis. All residues implicated in m(7)GpppN binding were exchanged, and the transcription/replication phenotype of the NP mutant was tested using a LASV replicon system. None of the mutants showed a specific defect in mRNA expression; most were globally defective in RNA synthesis. In conclusion, we describe the full-length crystal structure and the quaternary structure in solution of LASV NP. The nucleotide-binding pocket of NP could not be assigned a specific role in viral mRNA synthesis.

  1. Genetic Changes at the Glycoprotein Editing Site Associated With Serial Passage of Sudan Virus.

    PubMed

    Alfson, Kendra J; Avena, Laura E; Beadles, Michael W; Menzie, Heather; Patterson, Jean L; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony

    2015-10-01

    Sudan virus (SUDV), like the closely related Ebola virus (EBOV), is a filovirus that causes severe hemorrhagic disease. They both contain an RNA editing site in the glycoprotein gene that controls expression of soluble and full-length protein. We tested the consequences of cell culture passage on the genome sequence at the SUDV editing site locus and determined whether this affected virulence. Passage resulted in expansion of the SUDV editing site, similar to that observed with EBOV. We compared viruses possessing either the wild-type or expanded editing site, using a nonhuman primate model of disease. Despite differences in virus serum titer at one time point, there were no significant differences in time to death or any other measured parameter. These data imply that changes at this locus were not important for SUDV lethality.

  2. Characterization of soluble glycoprotein D-mediated herpes simplex virus type 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvitov, Marianna; Frampton, Arthur R.; Shah, Waris A.; Wendell, Steven K.; Ozuer, Ali; Kapacee, Zoher; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C. . E-mail: glorioso@pitt.edu

    2007-04-10

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry into permissive cells involves attachment to cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and fusion of the virus envelope with the cell membrane triggered by the binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to cognate receptors. In this study, we characterized the observation that soluble forms of the gD ectodomain (sgD) can mediate entry of gD-deficient HSV-1. We examined the efficiency and receptor specificity of this activity and used sequential incubation protocols to determine the order and stability of the initial interactions required for entry. Surprisingly, virus binding to GAGs did not increase the efficiency of sgD-mediated entry and gD-deficient virus was capable of attaching to GAG-deficient cells in the absence of sgD. These observations suggested a novel binding interaction that may play a role in normal HSV infection.

  3. Diagnosis of Lassa fever and the isolation and management of patients.

    PubMed

    Monath, T P; Casals, J

    1975-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of Lassa fever is described and discussed in terms of the possible pathophysiological events involved. Early diagnosis is essential to permit prompt isolation of the potentially infectious patient. Lassa fever may be suspected on clinical grounds, but specific early diagnosis depends upon isolation of the virus. Virus isolation is best accomplished from serum obtained during the first 2 weeks of illness. The patterns of viraemia and virus excretion described in this paper are useful guidelines for determining the duration of patient isolation. Problems encountered in the isolation, management, and transport of the patient with Lassa fever are discussed.

  4. Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Sindbis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Allows Single Particle Analysis of Virus Budding from Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Joyce; Tang, Jinghua; Taylor, Aaron B.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne alphavirus. Here we generated and characterized a fluorescent protein-tagged (FP-tagged) SINV and found that the presence of the FP-tag (mCherry) affected glycoprotein transport to the plasma membrane whereas the specific infectivity of the virus was not affected. We examined the virions by transmission electron cryo-microscopy and determined the arrangement of the FP-tag on the surface of the virion. The fluorescent proteins are arranged icosahedrally on the virus surface in a stable manner that did not adversely affect receptor binding or fusion functions of E2 and E1, respectively. The delay in surface expression of the viral glycoproteins, as demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis, contributed to a 10-fold reduction in mCherry-E2 virus titer. There is a 1:1 ratio of mCherry to E2 incorporated into the virion, which leads to a strong fluorescence signal and thus facilitates single-particle tracking experiments. We used the FP-tagged virus for high-resolution live-cell imaging to study the spatial and temporal aspects of alphavirus assembly and budding from mammalian cells. These processes were further analyzed by thin section microscopy. The results demonstrate that SINV buds from the plasma membrane of infected cells and is dispersed into the surrounding media or spread to neighboring cells facilitated by its close association with filopodial extensions. PMID:26633461

  5. Immunogenic glycoproteins of laboratory and vaccine strains of Varicella-Zoster virus.

    PubMed Central

    Grose, C; Edmond, B J; Friedrichs, W E

    1981-01-01

    High-titered antisera were prepared in guinea pigs and rabbits against two strains of varicella-zoster virus (VZV): VZV-32, a low-passage laboratory strain, and VZV-Oka, a vaccine strain attenuated by passage in both human and guinea pig embryo cells. When the animal VZV-immune sera, as well as a human zoster serum, were used to precipitate radiolabeled glycoproteins from VZV-infected cells and the immune precipitates were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography, it was observed that cell cultures infected with either strain had similar electrophoretic profiles containing major glycoproteins of approximate molecular weights 62,000, 98,000, and 118,000. A prominent high-molecular-weight (approximately 150,000) nonglycosylated polypeptide was identified in both strains also. These determinants were demonstrable by both indirect (staphylococcal protein A-antibody adsorbent) and direct immunoprecipitation, as long as VZV-immune sera with an antibody titer greater than or equal to 1:128 were used. Further analysis of individual caviid VZV antisera demonstrated some heterogeneity which appeared to be related to the method of immunization rather than the level of virus-specific antibody. VZV extracts emulsified with complete Freund adjuvant elicited an antibody response to all major immunogenic viral glycoproteins, whereas guinea pigs inoculated with virus alone during the primary immunization initially produced VZV antibody which failed to precipitate the highest-molecular-weight glycoprotein (gp118). Thus, Freund-type adjuvants promoted the maturation of the humoral immune response after VZV immunization in outbred guinea pigs. Images PMID:6262245

  6. Mapping the neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, C.; Chien, M.S.; Landolt, M.L.; Batts, W.; Winton, J.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the fish rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), were used to select 20 MAb escape mutants. The nucleotide sequence of the entire glycoprotein (G) gene was determined for six mutants representing differing cross-neutralization patterns and each had a single nucleotide change leading to a single amino acid substitution within one of three regions of the protein. These data were used to design nested PCR primers to amplify portions of the G gene of the 14 remaining mutants. When the PCR products from these mutants were sequenced, they also had single nucleotide substitutions coding for amino acid substitutions at the same, or nearby, locations. Of the 20 mutants for which all or part of the glycoprotein gene was sequenced, two MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 230-231 (antigenic site I) and the remaining MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 272-276 (antigenic site II). Two MAbs that selected mutants mapping to amino acids 272-276, selected other mutants that mapped to amino acids 78-81, raising the possibility that this portion of the N terminus of the protein was part of a discontinuous epitope defining antigenic site II. CLUSTAL alignment of the glycoproteins of rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and IHNV revealed similarities in the location of the neutralizing epitopes and a high degree of conservation among cysteine residues, indicating that the glycoproteins of three different genera of animal rhabdoviruses may share a similar three-dimensional structure in spite of extensive sequence divergence.

  7. Imported Lassa fever in Germany: surveillance and management of contact persons.

    PubMed

    Haas, Walter H; Breuer, Thomas; Pfaff, Günter; Schmitz, Herbert; Köhler, Päivi; Asper, Marcel; Emmerich, Petra; Drosten, Christian; Gölnitz, Uta; Fleischer, Klaus; Günther, Stephan

    2003-05-15

    This study sought to assess the risk of secondary transmission after import of Lassa fever into Europe. A total of 232 persons exposed to a case of Lassa fever imported into Germany were identified. The level of exposure was determined for 157 persons (68%), and 149 (64%) were tested serologically. High-risk or close contact was reported by 30 (19%) of 157 persons. No symptomatic secondary infections were observed. However, Lassa virus-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies were detected in a serum sample obtained from a physician who examined the index patient on day 9 of illness. The physician received ribavirin prophylaxis and did not develop symptoms of Lassa fever. On the basis of these data, the contact was classified as having a probable secondary infection. The study indicates a low risk of transmission during the initial phase of symptomatic Lassa fever, even with high-risk exposures. The risk may increase with progression of disease and increasing virus load.

  8. B Virus (Macacine Herpesvirus 1) Divergence: Variations in Glycoprotein D from Clinical and Laboratory Isolates Diversify Virus Entry Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Patrusheva, Irina; Perelygina, Ludmila; Torshin, Ivan; LeCher, Julia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT B virus (Macacine herpesvirus 1) can cause deadly zoonotic disease in humans. Molecular mechanisms of B virus cell entry are poorly understood for both macaques and humans. Here we investigated the abilities of clinical B virus isolates to use entry receptors of herpes simplex viruses (HSV). We showed that resistant B78H1 cells became susceptible to B virus clinical strains upon expression of either human nectin-2 or nectin-1. Antibody against glycoprotein D (gD) protected these nectin-bearing cells from B virus infection, and a gD-negative recombinant B virus failed to enter these cells, indicating that the nectin-mediated B virus entry depends on gD. We observed that the infectivity of B virus isolates with a single amino acid substitution (D122N) in the IgV-core of the gD ectodomain was impaired on nectin-1-bearing cells. Computational homology-based modeling of the B virus gD–nectin-1 complex revealed conformational differences between the structures of the gD-122N and gD-122D variants that affected the gD–nectin-1 protein-protein interface and binding affinity. Unlike HSV, B virus clinical strains were unable to use herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) as a receptor, regardless of conservation of the gD amino acid residues essential for HSV-1 entry via HVEM. Based on the model of the B virus gD-HVEM interface, we predict that residues R7, R11, and G15 are largely responsible for the inability of B virus to utilize HVEM for entry. The ability of B virus to enter cells of a human host by using a combination of receptors distinct from those for HSV-1 or HSV-2 suggests a possible mechanism of enhanced neuropathogenicity associated with zoonotic infections. IMPORTANCE B virus causes brainstem destruction in infected humans in the absence of timely diagnosis and intervention. Nectins are cell adhesion molecules that are widely expressed in human tissues, including neurons and neuronal synapses. Here we report that human nectin-2 is a target receptor for B

  9. Characterization of the 92,000-dalton glycoprotein induced by herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Marsden, H S; Buckmaster, A; Palfreyman, J W; Hope, R G; Minson, A C

    1984-05-01

    Evidence is presented showing that the 92,000-dalton glycoprotein (g92K) induced by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 has properties distinct from those assigned to any other HSV glycoprotein. First, the carbohydrate composition and extent of sulfation differ from those of glycoproteins D and E. Second, two clonally unrelated monoclonal antibodies, AP1 and LP5, shown in this paper to specifically immunoprecipitate g92K, do not react with any of the known processed forms of glycoproteins B, C, D, and E. Third, by using HSV type 1/HSV type 2 intertypic recombinants and a simple radioimmunoassay, the target antigen of the two monoclonal antibodies was shown to map in the same region as g92K (0.846 to 0.924). Fourth, the intertypic recombinant R12-3 was shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of infected cells to induce the HSV type 2 g92K and HSV type 1 gD and GE, whereas R12-1, which did not induce g92K, induced HSV-2 gE and an altered gD, providing genetic evidence that g92K is encoded, at least in part, by a different region of the genome from that encoding gD and gE.

  10. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotyped with Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Serves as a Highly Protective, Non-infectious Vaccine Against Ebola Virus Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    EBOV vaccine composed of non-25 infectious vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudovirions bearing EBOV glycoprotein (GP). A 26 prime/boost...antibodies (1, 2, 8, 19, 39, 41). For example, antibodies 81 raised against influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA), bearing truncated glycans, have...species has been previously reported (15, 26). These studies provided an initial 224 indication that our VSV pseudovirions bearing EBOV GP offers

  11. A historical look at the first reported cases of Lassa fever: IgG antibodies 40 years after acute infection.

    PubMed

    Bond, Nell; Schieffelin, John S; Moses, Lina M; Bennett, Andrew J; Bausch, Daniel G

    2013-02-01

    Lassa fever is an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. One important question regarding Lassa fever is the duration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody after infection. We were able to locate three persons who worked in Nigeria dating back to the 1940s, two of whom were integrally involved in the early outbreaks and investigations of Lassa fever in the late 1960s, including the person from whom Lassa virus was first isolated. Two persons had high titers of Lassa virus-specific IgG antibody over 40 years after infection, indicating the potential for long-term duration of these antibodies. One person was likely infected in 1952, 17 years before the first recognized outbreak. We briefly recount the fascinating stories of these three pioneers and their important contribution to our understanding of Lassa fever.

  12. A Historical Look at the First Reported Cases of Lassa Fever: IgG Antibodies 40 Years After Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Bond, Nell; Schieffelin, John S; Moses, Lina M; Bennett, Andrew J; Bausch, Daniel G

    2012-12-31

    Lassa fever is an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. One important question regarding Lassa fever is the duration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody after infection. We were able to locate three persons who worked in Nigeria dating back to the 1940s, two of whom were integrally involved in the early outbreaks and investigations of Lassa fever in the late 1960s, including the person from whom Lassa virus was first isolated. Two persons had high titers of Lassa virus-specific IgG antibody over 40 years after infection, indicating the potential for long-term duration of these antibodies. One person was likely infected in 1952, 17 years before the first recognized outbreak. We briefly recount the fascinating stories of these three pioneers and their important contribution to our understanding of Lassa fever.

  13. Predicted 3D Model of the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Trimer.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Bastida-González; Yersin, Celaya-Trejo; José, Correa-Basurto; Paola, Zárate-Segura

    2016-01-01

    The RABVG ectodomain is a homotrimer, and trimers are often called spikes. They are responsible for the attachment of the virus through the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). This makes them relevant in viral pathogenesis. The antigenic structure differs significantly between the trimers and monomers. Surfaces rich in hydrophobic amino acids are important for trimer stabilization in which the C-terminal of the ectodomain plays an important role; to understand these interactions between the G proteins, a mechanistic study of their functions was performed with a molecular model of G protein in its trimeric form. This verified its 3D conformation. The molecular modeling of G protein was performed by a I-TASSER server and was evaluated via a Rachamandran plot and ERRAT program obtained 84.64% and 89.9% of the residues in the favorable regions and overall quality factor, respectively. The molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on RABVG trimer at 310 K. From these theoretical studies, we retrieved the RMSD values from Cα atoms to assess stability. Preliminary model of G protein of rabies virus stable at 12 ns with molecular dynamics was obtained.

  14. Predicted 3D Model of the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Bastida-González; Yersin, Celaya-Trejo; José, Correa-Basurto; Paola, Zárate-Segura

    2016-01-01

    The RABVG ectodomain is a homotrimer, and trimers are often called spikes. They are responsible for the attachment of the virus through the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). This makes them relevant in viral pathogenesis. The antigenic structure differs significantly between the trimers and monomers. Surfaces rich in hydrophobic amino acids are important for trimer stabilization in which the C-terminal of the ectodomain plays an important role; to understand these interactions between the G proteins, a mechanistic study of their functions was performed with a molecular model of G protein in its trimeric form. This verified its 3D conformation. The molecular modeling of G protein was performed by a I-TASSER server and was evaluated via a Rachamandran plot and ERRAT program obtained 84.64% and 89.9% of the residues in the favorable regions and overall quality factor, respectively. The molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on RABVG trimer at 310 K. From these theoretical studies, we retrieved the RMSD values from Cα atoms to assess stability. Preliminary model of G protein of rabies virus stable at 12 ns with molecular dynamics was obtained. PMID:27294109

  15. Posttranslational modifications of Sindbis virus glycoproteins: electrophoretic analysis of pulse-chase-labeled infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bonatti, S; Cancedda, F D

    1982-01-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from Sindbis virus-infected chicken embryo fibroblasts pulse-chase-labeled with [35S]methionine 6 h postinfection were analyzed on a highly resolving sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel either directly or after various treatments. The results we obtained suggest that (i) the proteolytic cleavage which converts PE2 to E2 glycoprotein takes place intracellularly, before or at least during the formation of complex-type oligosaccharide side chains; and (ii) E1 glycoprotein undergoes a complex maturation pattern. Newly synthesized E1 has a molecular weight of 53,000: shortly thereafter, this 53,000 (53K) form was converted to a 50K form. Subsequently, the 50K form decreased its apparent molecular weight progressively and eventually comigrated with E1 glycoprotein present in the extracellular virus, which displays a molecular weight of 51,000 to 52,000. The conversion of the 53K to the 50K form was not the result of a proteolytic processing and did not depend on glycosylation or disulfide bridge formation and exchange. The possible mechanisms of this conversion are discussed. The second conversion step (from the 50K to the 51-52K form) was due to the formation of complex-type oligosaccharide and was reversed by incubating the cellular extracts with neuraminidase before electrophoretic analysis. Images PMID:7045394

  16. In vitro enhancement of human natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity by purified influenza virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Arora, D J; Houde, M; Justewicz, D M; Mandeville, R

    1984-01-01

    The role of the glycoproteins of influenza virus, hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) in the in vitro stimulation of natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) or natural killer activity of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated with radiolabeled K562 cells as target cells in an overnight chromium release assay. Three different approaches were used. (i) Purified viral proteins were obtained by extraction with Nonidet P-40, separation on a sucrose gradient, and further purification by affinity chromatography. Ficoll-Hypaque-purified peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to HA or NA individually or to a mixture of both significantly increased NCMC (32 to 50%). (ii) Treatment of HA and NA with their respective homologous antisera or F(ab')2 antibody abrogated the stimulation of NCMC by these glycoproteins. (iii) Virions treated with proteolytic enzymes resulted in viral cores lacking either HA or NA or both activities. Compared to whole virions, viral cores devoid of HA activity only induced a 50% increase in NCMC, whereas viral cores lacking HA activity and with traces of NA activity stimulated only 10% of the NCMC. These results suggest that influenza virus-induced cell-mediated cytotoxicity is largely due to its glycoproteins. PMID:6387178

  17. Preferential immune response to virion surface glycoproteins by caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus-infected goats.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G C; Barbet, A F; Klevjer-Anderson, P; McGuire, T C

    1983-01-01

    Six months after inoculation with caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus, the serum and synovial fluid of virus-infected goats had antibodies to [35S]methionine-labeled viral proteins with apparent molecular weights of 125,000, 90,000, 28,000, and 15,000. The 125,000-, 90,000-, and 15,000-molecular-weight methionine-labeled proteins were identified as virion surface glycoproteins by lactoperoxidase iodination and galactose oxidase-boro[3H]hydride reduction labeling techniques. Radioimmunoassay antibody titers to purified p28, the most abundant viral structural protein, averaged 1:182 in synovial fluid and 1:67 in serum 6 months after inoculation. High dilutions of serum and synovial fluid reacted with gp90 and gp125 electroblotted onto nitrocellulose paper from polyacrylamide gels. Anti-gp90 activity was detected at dilutions with an immunoglobulin G content of 0.02 to 11 micrograms, whereas antibody to p28, when detectable on Western blots, was present in samples with an immunoglobulin G content of 0.1 to 2 mg, representing 100- to 1,000-fold-greater titers of antibody to the surface glycoprotein. Synovial fluids often contained more anti-gp90 antibody than did sera. Immunoprecipitation of lactoperoxidase-iodinated virus confirmed the presence of high antibody titers to the two virion surface glycoproteins. Because antiviral gp90 and gp125 antibody is abundant in the synovial fluid of infected goats, it probably contributes to the high immunoglobulin G1 concentrations seen at this site 6 months after caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus infection. Images PMID:6307878

  18. Resistance to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection Induced by Immunization of Cotton Rats with a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Expressing the RSV G Glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, Narayanasamy; Prince, Gregory A.; Murphy, Brian R.; Venkatesan, Sundararajan; Chanock, Robert M.; Moss, Bernard

    1986-03-01

    A cDNA copy of the G glycoprotein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was placed under control of a vaccinia virus promoter and inserted into the thymidine kinase locus of the vaccinia virus genome. The recombinant vaccinia virus retained infectivity and expressed a 93-kDa protein that migrated with the authentic RSV G glycoprotein upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Glycosylation of the expressed protein and transport to the cell surface were demonstrated in the absence of other RSV proteins. Cotton rats that were inoculated intradermally with the infectious recombinant virus produced serum antibody to the G glycoprotein that neutralized RSV in vitro. Furthermore, the vaccinated animals were resistant to lower respiratory tract infection upon intranasal inoculation with RSV and had reduced titers of RSV in the nose.

  19. Crystal Structure of West Nile Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Reveals Viral Surface Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai,R.; Kar, K.; Anthony, K.; Gould, L.; Ledizet, M.; Fikrig, E.; Marasco, W.; Koski, R.; Modis, Y.

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics.

  20. Crystal Structure of West Nile Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Reveals Viral Surface Epitopes▿

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Ryuta; Kar, Kalipada; Anthony, Karen; Gould, L. Hannah; Ledizet, Michel; Fikrig, Erol; Marasco, Wayne A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Modis, Yorgo

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:16943291

  1. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein- and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-derived glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentivirus vectors differentially transduce corneal endothelium, trabecular meshwork, and human photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Barnard, Alun R; Charbel Issa, Peter; Singh, Mandeep S; De Silva, Samantha R; Trabalza, Antonio; Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Ellison, Stuart M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; MacLaren, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    The ability to deliver a large transgene efficiently to photoreceptors using viral vectors remains problematic and yet is critical for the future therapy of inherited retinal diseases such as Stargardt's and Usher's 1B. Herein, we examine the ocular tropism of a HIV-1-based lentivirus vector pseudotyped with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-derived glycoprotein (VEEV-G) after intraocular delivery to the posterior and anterior chambers of C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Reporter gene (EGFP) expression was evaluated using in vivo fluorescence imaging followed by postmortem immunohistochemistry and retinal function assessed by electroretinography. Intracameral administration of VEEV-G and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped vectors resulted in robust transgene expression in the corneal endothelium and trabecular meshwork. After subretinal administration, onset of transgene expression was observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) 1 day postinjection with both VEEV-G and control VSV-G pseudotypes, but no significant photoreceptor transduction was apparent. Substantial degeneration of the outer nuclear layer was observed with VEEV-G-pseudotyped vector, which corresponded to ablation of retinal function. Subretinal administration of VSV-G was observed to result in significant suppression of electrophysiological function compared with buffer-injected and uninjected control eyes. Suppression of the c-wave amplitude, in addition to reduced RPE65 expression, indicated potential RPE dysfunction. Ex vivo tropism of VSV-G was assessed using organotypic culture of explanted retina harvested from wild-type mice and human patients undergoing retinal detachment surgery to examine the prevention of transduction by physical barriers and species differences in tropism.

  2. Development of a selective biopharmaceutical from Herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins E and I for blocking antibody mediated neutralization of oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Bucurescu, Septimiu

    2010-12-01

    Future cancer therapies will be molecular cures. They will correct, block or destroy cancer cells by targeting molecular changes that lead to carcinogenesis. Destroying cancer cells can be done using oncolytic viruses. By blocking antibody mediated neutralization of oncolytic viruses, Herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins E and I could be used in the adjuvant treatment of cancer for improving the chances of oncolytic viruses to kill cancer cells in vivo.

  3. Chemoenzymatic Site-Specific Labeling of Influenza Glycoproteins as a Tool to Observe Virus Budding in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2012-01-01

    The influenza virus uses the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) glycoproteins to interact with and infect host cells. While biochemical and microscopic methods allow examination of the early steps in flu infection, the genesis of progeny virions has been more difficult to follow, mainly because of difficulties inherent in fluorescent labeling of flu proteins in a manner compatible with live cell imaging. We here apply sortagging as a chemoenzymatic approach to label genetically modified but infectious flu and track the flu glycoproteins during the course of infection. This method cleanly distinguishes influenza glycoproteins from host glycoproteins and so can be used to assess the behavior of HA or NA biochemically and to observe the flu glycoproteins directly by live cell imaging. PMID:22457626

  4. Glycoproteins E2 of the Venezuelan and eastern equine encephalomyelitis viruses contain multiple cross-reactive epitopes.

    PubMed

    Pereboev, A V; Razumov, I A; Svyatchenko, V A; Loktev, V B

    1996-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with sixty types of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was used to study cross-reactive epitopes on the attenuated and virulent strains of the Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) and Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis (VEE) viruses. All three structural proteins of the EEE and VEE viruses were demonstrated to have both cross-reactive and specific antigenic determinants. The glycoprotein E1 of EEE and VEE viruses possesses three cross-reactive epitopes for binding to MAbs. The glycoprotein E2 has a cluster of epitopes for 20 cross-reacting MAbs produced to EEE and VEE viruses. Cross-reactive epitopes were localised within five different sites of glycoprotein E2 of VEE virus and within four sites of that of the EEE virus. There are no cross-neutralising MAbs to the VEE and EEE viruses. Only one type of the protective Mabs was able to cross-protect mice against lethal infection by the virulent strains of the VEE and EEE viruses. Eight MAbs blocked the hemagglutination activity (HA) of both viruses. Antigenic alterations of neutralising and protective sites were revealed for all attenuated strains of the VEE and EEE viruses. Comparative studies of the E2 proteins amino acid sequences show that the antigenic modifications observed with the attenuated strains of the VEE virus may be caused by multiple amino acid changes in positions 7, 62, 120, 192 and 209-213. The escape-variants of the VEE virus obtained with cross-reactive MAbs 7D1, 2D4 and 7A6 have mutations of the E2 protein at positions 59, 212-213 and 232, respectively. Amino acid sequences in these regions of the VEE and EEE viruses are not homologous. These observations indicate that cross-reactive MAbs are capable of recognising discontinuous epitopes on the E2 glycoprotein.

  5. Effect of ammonium chloride and tunicamycin on the glycoprotein content and infectivity of herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kousoulas, K.G.; Bzik, D.J.; DeLuca, N.; Person, S.

    1983-01-01

    Infectious virions of MP, a syncytial strain of herpes simplex virus type 1, are formed in the presence of 50 mM NH/sub 4/Cl. Underglycosylated virion glycoproteins are synthesized in infected cells and are incorporated into virions in the presence of the same concentration of NH/sub 4/Cl. We conclude that fully glycosylated glycoproteins are not required for viral infectivity. Virus particles, deficient in glycosylated glycoproteins, are assembled in the presence of tunicamycin but they are not infectious. The decrease in infectivity could be due to the decreased amount of the gB or possibly other peptides and/or to the lack of the high-mannose saccharides of precursor glycoproteins. 32 references, 4 figures.

  6. Antipeptide monoclonal antibodies inhibit the binding of rabies virus glycoprotein and alpha-bungarotoxin to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Bracci, L; Antoni, G; Cusi, M G; Lozzi, L; Niccolai, N; Petreni, S; Rustici, M; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Valensin, P E

    1988-09-01

    It has been reported that binding to muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the post-synaptic membrane is an important event of the rabies virus neurotropism. The binding site can be located within the 190-203 region of the virus glycoprotein sharing a high degree of homology with the "toxic loop" of the curare-mimetic snake neurotoxins. We have synthesized a tetradecapeptide corresponding to this glycoprotein region and used it, following conjugation with an immunogenic carrier to raise MAbs. We found that some MAbs raised against the peptide were able to recognize both the virus glycoprotein and the snake neurotoxin alpha-bungarotoxin; moreover, they can inhibit the binding of rabies virus glycoprotein and alpha-bungarotoxin to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor extracted from the electric organs of Torpedo marmorata. On the basis of this cross-reactivity, we suggest that rabies virus glycoprotein and curare-mimetic snake neurotoxins share three-dimensionally similar structures in order to bind to the nicotinic cholinergic receptor. The potential use of the immunogenic properties of the peptide for the rational design of a synthetic vaccine against rabies is proposed.

  7. Human broadly neutralizing antibodies to the envelope glycoprotein complex of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Giang, Erick; Dorner, Marcus; Prentoe, Jannick C; Dreux, Marlène; Evans, Matthew J; Bukh, Jens; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander; Burton, Dennis R; Law, Mansun

    2012-04-17

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects ∼2% of the world's population. It is estimated that there are more than 500,000 new infections annually in Egypt, the country with the highest HCV prevalence. An effective vaccine would help control this expanding global health burden. HCV is highly variable, and an effective vaccine should target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Conserved B-cell epitopes overlapping the CD81 receptor-binding site (CD81bs) on the E2 viral envelope glycoprotein have been reported previously and provide promising vaccine targets. In this study, we isolated 73 human mAbs recognizing five distinct antigenic regions on the virus envelope glycoprotein complex E1E2 from an HCV-immune phage-display antibody library by using an exhaustive-panning strategy. Many of these mAbs were broadly neutralizing. In particular, the mAb AR4A, recognizing a discontinuous epitope outside the CD81bs on the E1E2 complex, has an exceptionally broad neutralizing activity toward diverse HCV genotypes and protects against heterologous HCV challenge in a small animal model. The mAb panel will be useful for the design and development of vaccine candidates to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies to HCV.

  8. Persistent influenza C virus possesses distinct functional properties due to a modified HEF glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Marschall, M; Herrler, G; Böswald, C; Foerst, G; Meier-Ewert, H

    1994-09-01

    A model of long term viral persistence has been established by selecting a spontaneous mutant strain of influenza C/Ann Arbor/1/50 virus in a permanent carrier culture of MDCK cells. Infectivity and cell tropism are mainly determined by the multifunctional viral membrane glycoprotein (HEF). HEF analysis was aimed at identifying a putative correlation between sequence and function, i.e. receptor binding, enzymatic activity, antigenicity and rate of infection. The current experimental picture is summarized by the following findings: (i) C/Ann Arbor/1/50 persistent virus carries a modified receptor-binding sequence, (ii) receptor-binding activity is altered, as indicated by a higher efficiency in recognizing low amounts of the receptor determinant N-acetyl-9-O-acetylneuraminic acid, (iii) direct attachment to cell surfaces differs from that of wild-type virus, as measured by slower kinetics of viral elution, (iv) receptor-destroying enzymatic activity is diminished, (v) characteristic features of virion surface morphology are altered or unstable, (vi) persistent-type HEF epitopes are distinguishable by monoclonal antibodies from wild-type and (vii) viral infectivity is intensified for cells bearing a low number of receptors. The sum of these changes highlights a structurally and functionally modified HEF glycoprotein that allows long term viral persistence. In order to clarify which of the described points are required for the persistent viral phenotype, a working concept is presented.

  9. Functional characterization of the Sindbis virus E2 glycoprotein by transposon linker-insertion mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Navaratnarajah, Chanakha K.; Kuhn, Richard J. . E-mail: kuhnr@purdue.edu

    2007-06-20

    The glycoprotein envelope of alphaviruses consists of two proteins, E1 and E2. E1 is responsible for fusion and E2 is responsible for receptor binding. An atomic structure is available for E1, but one for E2 has not been reported. In this study, transposon linker-insertion mutagenesis was used to probe the function of different domains of E2. A library of mutants, containing 19 amino acid insertions in the E2 glycoprotein sequence of the prototype alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV), was generated. Fifty-seven independent E2 insertions were characterized, of which more than half (67%) gave rise to viable virus. The wild-type-like mutants identify regions that accommodate insertions without perturbing virus production and can be used to insert targeting moieties to direct SINV to specific receptors. The defective and lethal mutants give insight into regions of E2 important for protein stability, transport to the cell membrane, E1-E2 contacts, and receptor binding.

  10. Cell surface expression of biologically active influenza C virus HEF glycoprotein expressed from cDNA.

    PubMed

    Pekosz, A; Lamb, R A

    1999-10-01

    The hemagglutinin, esterase, and fusion (HEF) glycoprotein of influenza C virus possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying, and membrane fusion activities. The HEF cDNAs from influenza C/Ann Arbor/1/50 (HEF-AA) and influenza C/Taylor/1223/47 (HEF-Tay) viruses were cloned and expressed, and transport of HEF to the cell surface was monitored by susceptibility to cleavage by exogenous trypsin, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Previously it has been found in studies with the C/Johannesburg/1/66 strain of influenza C virus (HEF-JHB) that transport of HEF to the cell surface is severely inhibited, and it is thought that the short cytoplasmic tail, Arg-Thr-Lys, is involved in blocking HEF cell surface expression (F. Oeffner, H.-D. Klenk, and G. Herrler, J. Gen. Virol. 80:363-369, 1999). As the cytoplasmic tail amino acid sequences of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay are identical to that of HEF-JHB, the data indicate that cell surface expression of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay is not inhibited by this amino acid sequence. Furthermore, the abundant cell surface transport of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay indicates that their cell surface expression does not require coexpression of another viral protein. The HEF-AA and HEF-Tay HEF glycoproteins bound human erythrocytes, promoted membrane fusion in a low-pH and trypsin-dependent manner, and displayed esterase activity, indicating that the HEF glycoprotein alone mediates all three known functions at the cell surface.

  11. Cross-protection conferred by filovirus virus-like particles containing trimeric hybrid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Martins, Karen; Carra, John H; Cooper, Christopher L; Kwilas, Steven A; Robinson, Camenzind G; Shurtleff, Amy C; Schokman, Rowena D; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Wells, Jay B; Steffens, Jesse T; van Tongeren, Sean A; Hooper, Jay W; Bavari, Sina

    2015-02-01

    Filoviruses are causative agents of hemorrhagic fever, and to date no effective vaccine or therapeutic has been approved to combat infection. Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) is the critical immunogenic component of filovirus vaccines, eliciting high levels of antibody after successful vaccination. Previous work has shown that protection against both Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) can be achieved by vaccinating with a mixture of virus-like particles (VLPs) expressing either EBOV GP or MARV GP. In this study, the potential for eliciting effective immune responses against EBOV, Sudan virus, and MARV with a single GP construct was tested. Trimeric hybrid GPs were produced that expressed the sequence of Marburg GP2 in conjunction with a hybrid GP1 composed EBOV and Sudan virus GP sequences. VLPs expressing these constructs, along with EBOV VP40, provided comparable protection against MARV challenge, resulting in 75 or 100% protection. Protection from EBOV challenge differed depending upon the hybrid used, however, with one conferring 75% protection and one conferring no protection. By comparing the overall antibody titers and the neutralizing antibody titers specific for each virus, it is shown that higher antibody responses were elicited by the C terminal region of GP1 than by the N terminal region, and this correlated with protection. These data collectively suggest that GP2 and the C terminal region of GP1 are highly immunogenic, and they advance progress toward the development of a pan-filovirus vaccine.

  12. Resting lymphocyte transduction with measles virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors relies on CD46 and SLAM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qi; Schneider, Irene C.; Gallet, Manuela; Kneissl, Sabrina; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-05-10

    The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) were recently shown to mediate transduction of resting lymphocytes by lentiviral vectors. MV vaccine strains use CD46 or signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as receptor for cell entry. A panel of H protein mutants derived from vaccine strain or wild-type MVs that lost or gained CD46 or SLAM receptor usage were investigated for their ability to mediate gene transfer into unstimulated T lymphocytes. The results demonstrate that CD46 is sufficient for efficient vector particle association with unstimulated lymphocytes. For stable gene transfer into these cells, however, both MV receptors were found to be essential.

  13. Immune response to synthetic peptides representing antigenic sites on the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Huang, C.; LaPatra, S.; Winton, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Summary ― Monoclonal antibodies against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus have been used to react with recombinant expression products in immunoblots and to select neutralization-resistant mutants for sequence analysis. These strategies identified neutralizing and non-neutralizing antigenic sites on the viral glycoprotein. Synthetic peptides based upon the amino acid sequences of these antigenic sites were synthesized and were injected together with an adjuvant into rainbow trout. The constructs generally failed to stimulate neutralizing antibodies in the fish. These results indicate that we need to understand more about the ability of peptide antigens to stimulate fish immune systems.

  14. Herpes simplex virus type 1-induced hemagglutination: glycoprotein C mediates virus binding to erythrocyte surface heparan sulfate.

    PubMed Central

    Trybala, E; Svennerholm, B; Bergström, T; Olofsson, S; Jeansson, S; Goodman, J L

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can cause agglutination of murine erythrocytes (E. Trybala, Z. Larski, and J. Wisniewski, Arch. Virol. 113:89-94, 1990). We now demonstrate that the mechanism of this hemagglutination is glycoprotein C-mediated binding of virus to heparan sulfate moieties at the surface of erythrocytes. Hemagglutination was found to be a common property of all gC-expressing laboratory strains and clinical isolates of HSV-1 tested. Mutants of HSV-1 deficient in glycoprotein C caused no specific hemagglutination, whereas their derivatives transfected with a functional gC-1 gene, thus reconstituting gC expression, regained full hemagglutinating activity. Hemagglutination activity was inhibited by antibodies against gC-1 but not by antibodies with specificity for glycoproteins gB, gD, or gE or by murine antiserum raised against the MP strain of HSV-1, which is gC deficient. Finally, purified gC-1 protein, like whole HSV-1 virions, showed high hemagglutinating activity which was inhibited by heparan sulfate and/or heparin and was completely prevented by pretreatment of erythrocytes with heparitinase, providing evidence that gC-1 mediates hemagglutination by binding to heparan sulfate at the cell surface. Thus, HSV-1-induced hemagglutination is gC-1 dependent and resembles the recently proposed mechanism by which HSV-1 attaches to surface heparans on susceptible cells, providing a simple model for initial events in the virus-cell interaction. Images PMID:8382294

  15. Effect of retroviral proteinase inhibitors on Mason-Pfizer monkey virus maturation and transmembrane glycoprotein cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, M A; Petteway, S R; Dreyer, G B; Hunter, E

    1992-01-01

    Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) is the prototype type D retrovirus which preassembles immature intracytoplasmic type A particles within the infected cell cytoplasm. Intracytoplasmic type A particles are composed of uncleaved polyprotein precursors which upon release are cleaved by the viral proteinase to their constituent mature proteins. This results in a morphological change in the virion described as maturation. We have investigated the role of the viral proteinase in virus maturation and infectivity by inhibiting the function of the enzyme through mutagenesis of the proteinase gene and by using peptide inhibitors originally designed to block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase activity. Mutation of the active-site aspartic acid, Asp-26, to asparagine abrogated the activity of the M-PMV proteinase but did not affect the assembly of noninfectious, immature virus particles. In mutant virions, the transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) of M-PMV, initially synthesized as a cell-associated gp22, is not cleaved to gp20, as is observed with wild-type virions. This demonstrates that the viral proteinase is responsible for this cleavage event. Hydroxyethylene isostere human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase inhibitors were shown to block M-PMV proteinase cleavage of the TM glycoprotein and Gag-containing precursors in a dose-dependent manner. The TM cleavage event was more sensitive than cleavage of the Gag precursors to inhibition. The infectivity of treated particles was reduced significantly, but experiments showed that inhibition of precursor and TM cleavage may be at least partially reversible. These results demonstrate that the M-PMV aspartyl proteinase is activated in released virions and that the hydroxyethylene isostere proteinase inhibitors used in this study exhibit a broad spectrum of antiretroviral activity. Images PMID:1602542

  16. Lassa fever: review of epidemiology and epizootiology.

    PubMed

    Monath, T P

    1975-01-01

    The basic ecology of Lassa fever appears to involve enzootic transmission of virus in commensal populations of a single murine species, Mastomys natalensis. Virus may spill over from the rodent cycle to man by various routes. Secondary spread between humans may occur within domiciliary groups, and persons infected within the community who develop clinical disease may introduce the virus into hospital and begin a cycle of nosocomial infection.Between 1969, when Lassa fever was first described, and June 1975, the disease was recognized on 9 discrete occasions, affecting 114 persons. Over one-third of these infections were acquired by person-to-person spread within hospitals. In only one outbreak (in Sierra Leone) were the majority of cases acquired in the community. Recent observations have indicated hyperendemic disease in eastern Sierra Leone. Cases have occurred in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, and serological evidence exists for activity of the virus elsewhere in West and Central Africa. Seasonal factors appear to play a role in the appearance of human cases. Attack rates have been higher in adults than in children. The source of infection and potential routes of virus transmission in the various epidemics are discussed, and perspectives for future epidemiological research are presented.

  17. Lassa fever: review of epidemiology and epizootiology

    PubMed Central

    Monath, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    The basic ecology of Lassa fever appears to involve enzootic transmission of virus in commensal populations of a single murine species, Mastomys natalensis. Virus may spill over from the rodent cycle to man by various routes. Secondary spread between humans may occur within domiciliary groups, and persons infected within the community who develop clinical disease may introduce the virus into hospital and begin a cycle of nosocomial infection. Between 1969, when Lassa fever was first described, and June 1975, the disease was recognized on 9 discrete occasions, affecting 114 persons. Over one-third of these infections were acquired by person-to-person spread within hospitals. In only one outbreak (in Sierra Leone) were the majority of cases acquired in the community. Recent observations have indicated hyperendemic disease in eastern Sierra Leone. Cases have occurred in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, and serological evidence exists for activity of the virus elsewhere in West and Central Africa. Seasonal factors appear to play a role in the appearance of human cases. Attack rates have been higher in adults than in children. The source of infection and potential routes of virus transmission in the various epidemics are discussed, and perspectives for future epidemiological research are presented. PMID:782738

  18. Interaction of E2 Glycoprotein with Heparan Sulfate Is Crucial for Cellular Infection of Sindbis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yiliang; Jia, Juan; Fu, Shihong; Feng, Yun; He, Ying; Li, Jin-Ping; Liang, Guodong

    2010-01-01

    Cell culture-adapted strains of Sindbis virus (SINV) initially attach to cells by the ability to interact with heparan sulfate (HS) through selective mutation for positively charged amino acid (aa) scattered in E2 glycoprotein (W. B. Klimstra, K. D. Ryman, and R. E. Johnston, J. Virol. 72: 7357–7366, 1998). Here we have further confirmed that interaction of E2 protein with HS is crucial for cellular infection of SINV based on the reverse genetic system of XJ-160 virus, a Sindbis-like virus (SINLV). Both SINV YN87448 and SINLV XJ-160 displayed similar infectivity on BHK-21, Vero, or C6/36 cells, but XJ-160 failed to infect mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. The molecular mechanisms underlying the selective infectivity of XJ-160 were approached by substituting the E1, E2, or both genes of XJ-160 with that of YN87448, and the chimeric virus was denominated as XJ-160/E1, XJ-160/E2, or XJ-160/E1E2, respectively. In contrast to the parental XJ-160, all chimeric viruses became infectious to wild-type MEF cells (MEF-wt). While MEF-Ext−/− cells, producing shortened HS chains, were resistant not only to XJ-160, but also to YN87448 as well as the chimeric viruses, indicating that the inability of XJ-160 to infect MEF-wt cells likely due to its incompetent discrimination of cellular HS. Treatment with heparin or HS-degrading enzyme resulted in a substantial decrease in plaque formation by YN87448, XJ-160/E2, and XJ-160/E1E2, but had marginal effect on XJ-160 and XJ-160/E1, suggesting that E2 glycoprotein from YN87448 plays a more important role than does E1 in mediating cellular HS-related cell infection. In addition, the peptide containing 145–150 aa from E2 gene of YN87448 specifically bound to heparin, while the corresponding peptide from the E2 gene of XJ-160 essentially showed no binding to heparin. As a new dataset, these results clearly confirm an essential role of E2 glycoprotein, especially the domain of 145–150 aa, in SINV cellular infection through

  19. B Virus (Macacine herpesvirus 1) Glycoprotein D Is Functional but Dispensable for Virus Entry into Macaque and Human Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perelygina, Ludmila; Patrusheva, Irina; Vasireddi, Mugdha; Brock, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycoprotein D (gD) plays an essential role in cell entry of many simplexviruses. B virus (Macacine herpesvirus 1) is closely related to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and encodes gD, which shares more than 70% amino acid similarity with HSV-1 gD. Previously, we have demonstrated that B virus gD polyclonal antibodies were unable to neutralize B virus infectivity on epithelial cell lines, suggesting gD is not required for B virus entry into these cells. In the present study, we confirmed this finding by producing a B virus mutant, BV-ΔgDZ, in which the gD gene was replaced with a lacZ expression cassette. Recombinant plaques were selected on complementing VD60 cells expressing HSV-1 gD. Virions lacking gD were produced in Vero cells infected with BV-ΔgDZ. In contrast to HSV-1, B virus lacking gD was able to infect and form plaques on noncomplementing cell lines, including Vero, HEp-2, LLC-MK2, primary human and macaque dermal fibroblasts, and U373 human glioblastoma cells. The gD-negative BV-ΔgDZ also failed to enter entry-resistant murine B78H1 cells bearing a single gD receptor, human nectin-1, but gained the ability to enter when phenotypically supplemented with HSV-1 gD. Cell attachment and penetration rates, as well as the replication characteristics of BV-ΔgDZ in Vero cells, were almost identical to those of wild-type (wt) B virus. These observations indicate that B virus can utilize gD-independent cell entry and transmission mechanisms, in addition to generally used gD-dependent mechanisms. IMPORTANCE B virus is the only known simplexvirus that causes zoonotic infection, resulting in approximately 80% mortality in untreated humans or in lifelong persistence with the constant threat of reactivation in survivors. Here, we report that B virus lacking the gD envelope glycoprotein infects both human and monkey cells as efficiently as wild-type B virus. These data provide evidence for a novel mechanism(s) utilized by B virus to gain access to target

  20. Alteration of a second putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 of Classical Swine Fever Virus alters virus replication and virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2, the major envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), is involved in several critical virus functions including cell attachment, host range susceptibility, and virulence in natural hosts. Functional structural analysis of E2 based on Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity dis...

  1. Opposite polarity of virus budding and of viral envelope glycoprotein distribution in epithelial cells derived from different tissues

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We compared the surface envelope glycoprotein distribution and the budding polarity of four RNA viruses in Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cells and in CaCo-2 cells derived from a human colon carcinoma. Whereas both FRT and CaCo-2 cells sort similarly influenza hemagglutinin and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein, respectively, to apical and basolateral membrane domains, they differ in their handling of two togaviruses, Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus (SFV). By conventional EM Sindbis virus and SFV were shown to bud apically in FRT cells and basolaterally in CaCo-2 cells. Consistent with this finding, the distribution of the p62/E2 envelope glycoprotein of SFV, assayed by immunoelectronmicroscopy and by domain-selective surface biotinylation was predominantly apical on FRT cells and basolateral on CaCo-2 cells. We conclude that a given virus and its envelope glycoprotein can be delivered to opposite membrane domains in epithelial cells derived from different tissues. The tissue specificity in the polarity of virus budding and viral envelope glycoprotein distribution indicate that the sorting machinery varies considerably between different epithelial cell types. PMID:1572895

  2. Pathogenesis of lassa fever in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lassa virus (LASV) infection causes an acute and sometimes fatal hemorrhagic disease in humans and nonhuman primates; however, little is known about the development of Lassa fever. Here, we performed a pilot study to begin to understand the progression of LASV infection in nonhuman primates. Methods Six cynomolgus monkeys were experimentally infected with LASV. Tissues from three animals were examined at an early- to mid-stage of disease and compared with tissues from three animals collected at terminal stages of disease. Results Dendritic cells were identified as a prominent target of LASV infection in a variety of tissues in all animals at day 7 while Kupffer cells, hepatocytes, adrenal cortical cells, and endothelial cells were more frequently infected with LASV in tissues of terminal animals (days 13.5-17). Meningoencephalitis and neuronal necrosis were noteworthy findings in terminal animals. Evidence of coagulopathy was noted; however, the degree of fibrin deposition in tissues was less prominent than has been reported in other viral hemorrhagic fevers. Conclusion The sequence of pathogenic events identified in this study begins to shed light on the development of disease processes during Lassa fever and also may provide new targets for rational prophylactic and chemotherapeutic interventions. PMID:21548931

  3. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    to perform the indirect fluorescent antibody test. He is also able to conduct surveys, and to supervise plasmapheresis . Recently a Clinical...Miscellaneous 44 Total 3,902 2. Plasmapheresis The primary objective of the program was the collection of units of plasma from convalescents from...Lassa fever. Details regarding the criteria means and results of plasmapheresis are given in Chapter 2. One hundred twenty two plasma units were collected

  4. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-31

    both plasmapheresis and serodiagnosis were limited. 153Plasmapheresis at the Curran Lutheran Hospital (CLH) and Phebe Hospital (PH) yielded 153 plasma...Page Summary 1 Foreward 2 Narrative 4 Introduction 4 Activities 5 Plasmapheresis 6 Lassa fever cases 6 Passive immunotherapy 7 Conclusion 8 References 8...education of the Field Investigator, Mr. J.E. Yalley- Ogunro, in diagnostic techniques which will be used in therapeutic investigations, continued

  5. Importance of the short cytoplasmic domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein for fusion activity and envelope glycoprotein incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Celma, Cristina C.P.; Paladino, Monica G.; Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2007-09-30

    The mature form of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of lentiviruses is a heterodimer composed of the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) possesses a TM glycoprotein with a cytoplasmic tail of approximately 53 amino acids which is unusually short compared with that of the other lentiviral glycoproteins (more than 100 residues). To investigate the relevance of the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain to Env-mediated viral functions, we characterized the biological properties of a series of Env glycoproteins progressively shortened from the carboxyl terminus. All the mutant Env proteins were efficiently expressed in feline cells and processed into the SU and TM subunits. Deletion of 5 or 11 amino acids from the TM C-terminus did not significantly affect Env surface expression, fusogenic activity or Env incorporation into virions, whereas removal of 17 or 23 residues impaired Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Further truncation of the FIV TM by 29 residues resulted in an Env glycoprotein that was poorly expressed at the cell surface, exhibited only 20% of the wild-type Env fusogenic capacity and was inefficiently incorporated into virions. Remarkably, deletion of the TM C-terminal 35 or 41 amino acids restored or even enhanced Env biological functions. Indeed, these mutant Env glycoproteins bearing cytoplasmic domains of 18 or 12 amino acids were found to be significantly more fusogenic than the wild-type Env and were efficiently incorporated into virions. Interestingly, truncation of the TM cytoplasmic domain to only 6 amino acids did not affect Env incorporation into virions but abrogated Env fusogenicity. Finally, removal of the entire TM cytoplasmic tail or deletion of as many as 6 amino acids into the membrane-spanning domain led to a complete loss of Env functions. Our results demonstrate that despite its relatively short length, the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain plays an important role in modulating Env-mediated viral functions.

  6. Ubiquitination of the Prototype Foamy Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Leader Peptide Regulates Subviral Particle Release

    PubMed Central

    Stanke, Nicole; Stange, Annett; Lüftenegger, Daniel; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Lindemann, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    Foamy virus (FV) particle egress is unique among retroviruses because of its essential requirement for Gag and Env coexpression for budding and particle release. The FV glycoprotein undergoes a highly unusual biosynthesis resulting in the generation of three particle-associated, mature subunits, leader peptide (LP), surface (SU), and transmembrane (TM), derived from a precursor protein by posttranslational proteolysis mediated by furin or furinlike proteases. Previously at least three LP products of different molecular weights were detected in purified FV particles. Here we demonstrate that the higher-molecular-weight forms gp28LP and gp38LP are ubiquitinated variants of the major gp18LP cleavage product, which has a type II membrane topology. Furthermore, we show that all five lysine residues located within the N-terminal 60-amino-acid cytoplasmic domain of gp18LP can potentially be ubiquitinated, however, there seems to be a preference for using the first three. Inactivation of ubiquitination sites individually resulted in no obvious phenotype. However, simultaneous inactivation of the first three or all five ubiquitination sites in gp18LP led to a massive increase in subviral particles released by these mutant glycoproteins that were readily detectable by electron microscopy analysis upon expression of the ubiquitination-deficient glycoprotein by itself or in a proviral context. Surprisingly, only the quintuple ubiquitination mutant showed a two- to threefold increase in single-cycle infectivity assays, whereas all other mutants displayed infectivities similar to that of the wild type. Taken together, these data suggest that the balance between viral and subviral particle release of FVs is regulated by ubiquitination of the glycoprotein LP. PMID:16306578

  7. Clinical observations in 42 patients with Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, J; McCormick, J B; Webb, P A; Dietrich, M; Schumacher, H H; Dennis, E

    1980-12-01

    Under continuous observation of several months, 42 patients from the eastern province of Sierra Leone, Liberia (Lofa County), and neighbouring Guinea were identified as Lassa fever cases by indirect immunofluorescent antibody technique, indicating that the disease is endemic in these areas. The clinical course varied from mild disease to severe illness with haemorrhagic disorders. The fatality rate was 14%. The occurrence of only two possible secondary cases suggests that person-to-person spread of the disease is unimportant epidemiologically. There was a wide range of patients' ages, tribes, and occupations, including a 2 months old baby and a white US citizen. Clinical, laboratory, and histopathological investigations demonstrated the panorganotropism of Lassa virus. Haematological tests in few selected haemorrhagic cases with Lassa fever did not support coagulation disorders or thrombocytopenia as causing the bleeding tendency. The histopathologic changes bear resemblance to those observed in Argentinian and Bolivian haemorrhagic fever, both being caused by viruses of the Arena group. However, Lassa virus hepatitis may be differentiated from liver lesions occurring in yellow fever, Marburg virus disease, and Ebola (Maridi) haemorrhagic fever.

  8. The Ebola virus glycoprotein mediates entry via a non-classical dynamin-dependent macropinocytic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Mulherkar, Nirupama; Raaben, Matthijs; Torre, Juan Carlos de la; Whelan, Sean P.; Chandran, Kartik

    2011-10-25

    Ebola virus (EBOV) has been reported to enter cultured cell lines via a dynamin-2-independent macropinocytic pathway or clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The route(s) of productive EBOV internalization into physiologically relevant cell types remain unexplored, and viral-host requirements for this process are incompletely understood. Here, we use electron microscopy and complementary chemical and genetic approaches to demonstrate that the viral glycoprotein, GP, induces macropinocytic uptake of viral particles into cells. GP's highly-glycosylated mucin domain is dispensable for virus-induced macropinocytosis, arguing that interactions between other sequences in GP and the host cell surface are responsible. Unexpectedly, we also found a requirement for the large GTPase dynamin-2, which is proposed to be dispensable for several types of macropinocytosis. Our results provide evidence that EBOV uses an atypical dynamin-dependent macropinocytosis-like entry pathway to enter Vero cells, adherent human peripheral blood-derived monocytes, and a mouse dendritic cell line.

  9. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Antagonize Tetherin through a Distinctive Mechanism That Requires Virion Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Rebekah B.; Marcano, Adriana C.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Fadel, Hind J.; Rogstad, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT BST2/tetherin inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from cells. Primate lentiviruses have evolved specific antagonists (Vpu, Nef, and Env). Here we characterized tetherin proteins of species representing both branches of the order Carnivora. Comparison of tiger and cat (Feliformia) to dog and ferret (Caniformia) genes demonstrated that the tiger and cat share a start codon mutation that truncated most of the tetherin cytoplasmic tail early in the Feliformia lineage (19 of 27 amino acids, including the dual tyrosine motif). Alpha interferon (IFN-α) induced tetherin and blocked feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication in lymphoid and nonlymphoid feline cells. Budding of bald FIV and HIV particles was blocked by carnivore tetherins. However, infectious FIV particles were resistant, and spreading FIV replication was uninhibited. Antagonism mapped to the envelope glycoprotein (Env), which rescued FIV from carnivore tetherin restriction when expressed in trans but, in contrast to known antagonists, did not rescue noncognate particles. Also unlike the primate lentiviral antagonists, but similar to the Ebola virus glycoprotein, FIV Env did not reduce intracellular or cell surface tetherin levels. Furthermore, FIV-enveloped FIV particles actually required tetherin for optimal release from cells. The results show that FIV Envs mediate a distinctive tetherin evasion. Well adapted to a phylogenetically ancient tetherin tail truncation in the Felidae, it requires functional virion incorporation of Env, and it shields the budding particle without downregulating plasma membrane tetherin. Moreover, FIV has evolved dependence on this protein: particles containing FIV Env need tetherin for optimal release from the cell, while Env− particles do not. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 antagonizes the restriction factor tetherin with the accessory protein Vpu, while HIV-2 and the filovirus Ebola use their envelope (Env) glycoproteins for this purpose. It turns out that the FIV

  10. [Detection of anti-Lassa antibodies in the Western Forest area of the Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Akoua-Koffi, C; Ter Meulen, J; Legros, D; Akran, V; Aïdara, M; Nahounou, N; Dogbo, P; Ehouman, A

    2006-10-01

    Lassa fever is an African viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) known to be endemic in a number of West African countries including Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea. Despite having common borders with Liberia and Guinea, Côte d'Ivoire has never reported any cases of Lassa fever. In March 2000, as part of a research project on VHF--mainly yellow fever, Lassa fever and Ebola fever--in Guinea and Cote d'Ivoire, an exploratory survey was conducted to assess knowledge about VHF and immunological status against Lassa virus among forest workers in the Duekoue and Guiglo regions. One hundred and sixty-three male forest workers were interviewed using a questionnaire designed to assess risk factors for VHF exposure and personal medical history over the last 12 months. Detection of IgG antibodies against Lassa virus was performed by immunofluorescence assay with Lassa virus antigens from the Josiah and Las/AV strains. The overall prevalence of IgG antibodies was 26% (42/161). Among the Lassa IgG positive subjects, 38.5% were loggers including 20% that were positive at a serum dilution of 1/40 and 46.7% were national park workers or forest rangers including 69% that were positive at a dilution of 1/40 and more. Forty-one percent of subjects had heard of VHF including 14% who attributed it to animals and 2% who attributed it to plants. Contact with rodents was frequent and more than 50% of subjects had either eaten or skinned rodents. Although the prevalence of anti-Lassa IgG antibodies seemed high in the study population, no conclusion can be about level of exposure to Lassa virus.

  11. Molecular Diagnostics for Lassa Fever at Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Nigeria: Lessons Learnt from Two Years of Laboratory Operation

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Meike; Gabriel, Martin; Ölschläger, Stephan; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Folarin, Onikepe; Phelan, Eric; Ehiane, Philomena E.; Ifeh, Veritas E.; Uyigue, Eghosasere A.; Oladapo, Yemisi T.; Muoebonam, Ekene B.; Osunde, Osagie; Dongo, Andrew; Okokhere, Peter O.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Momoh, Mojeed; Alikah, Sylvester O.; Akhuemokhan, Odigie C.; Imomeh, Peter; Odike, Maxy A. C.; Gire, Stephen; Andersen, Kristian; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Happi, Christian T.; Akpede, George O.; Günther, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. However, none of the hospitals in the endemic areas of Nigeria has the capacity to perform Lassa virus diagnostics. Case identification and management solely relies on non-specific clinical criteria. The Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH) in the central senatorial district of Edo State struggled with this challenge for many years. Methodology/Principal Findings A laboratory for molecular diagnosis of Lassa fever, complying with basic standards of diagnostic PCR facilities, was established at ISTH in 2008. During 2009 through 2010, samples of 1,650 suspected cases were processed, of which 198 (12%) tested positive by Lassa virus RT-PCR. No remarkable demographic differences were observed between PCR-positive and negative patients. The case fatality rate for Lassa fever was 31%. Nearly two thirds of confirmed cases attended the emergency departments of ISTH. The time window for therapeutic intervention was extremely short, as 50% of the fatal cases died within 2 days of hospitalization—often before ribavirin treatment could be commenced. Fatal Lassa fever cases were older (p = 0.005), had lower body temperature (p<0.0001), and had higher creatinine (p<0.0001) and blood urea levels (p<0.0001) than survivors. Lassa fever incidence in the hospital followed a seasonal pattern with a peak between November and March. Lassa virus sequences obtained from the patients originating from Edo State formed—within lineage II—a separate clade that could be further subdivided into three clusters. Conclusions/Significance Lassa fever case management was improved at a tertiary health institution in Nigeria through establishment of a laboratory for routine diagnostics of Lassa virus. Data collected in two years of operation demonstrate that Lassa fever is a serious public health problem in Edo State and reveal new insights into the disease in hospitalized patients. PMID:23029594

  12. A Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Elicits a Strong Rift Valley Fever Virus Neutralizing Antibody Response in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Maxim; McVey, D. Scott; Wilson, William; Morozov, Igor; Young, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Bunyaviridae family, is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen that causes serious morbidity and mortality in livestock and humans. The recent spread of the virus beyond its traditional endemic boundaries in Africa to the Arabian Peninsula coupled with the presence of susceptible vectors in nonendemic countries has created increased interest in RVF vaccines. Subunit vaccines composed of specific virus proteins expressed in eukaryotic or prokaryotic expression systems are shown to elicit neutralizing antibodies in susceptible hosts. RVFV structural proteins, amino-terminus glycoprotein (Gn), and carboxyl-terminus glycoprotein (Gc), were expressed using a recombinant baculovirus expression system. The recombinant proteins were reconstituted as a GnGc subunit vaccine formulation and evaluated for immunogenicity in a target species, sheep. Six sheep were each immunized with a primary dose of 50 μg of each vaccine immunogen with the adjuvant montanide ISA25; at day 21, postvaccination, each animal received a second dose of the same vaccine. The vaccine induced a strong antibody response in all animals as determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT80) showed the primary dose of the vaccine was sufficient to elicit potentially protective virus neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 40 to 160, and the second vaccine dose boosted the titer to more than 1280. Furthermore, all animals tested positive for neutralizing antibodies at day 328 postvaccination. ELISA analysis using the recombinant nucleocapsid protein as a negative marker antigen indicated that the vaccine candidate is DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals) compatible and represents a promising vaccine platform for RVFV infection in susceptible species. PMID:25325319

  13. A glycoprotein subunit vaccine elicits a strong Rift Valley fever virus neutralizing antibody response in sheep.

    PubMed

    Faburay, Bonto; Lebedev, Maxim; McVey, D Scott; Wilson, William; Morozov, Igor; Young, Alan; Richt, Juergen A

    2014-10-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Bunyaviridae family, is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen that causes serious morbidity and mortality in livestock and humans. The recent spread of the virus beyond its traditional endemic boundaries in Africa to the Arabian Peninsula coupled with the presence of susceptible vectors in nonendemic countries has created increased interest in RVF vaccines. Subunit vaccines composed of specific virus proteins expressed in eukaryotic or prokaryotic expression systems are shown to elicit neutralizing antibodies in susceptible hosts. RVFV structural proteins, amino-terminus glycoprotein (Gn), and carboxyl-terminus glycoprotein (Gc), were expressed using a recombinant baculovirus expression system. The recombinant proteins were reconstituted as a GnGc subunit vaccine formulation and evaluated for immunogenicity in a target species, sheep. Six sheep were each immunized with a primary dose of 50 μg of each vaccine immunogen with the adjuvant montanide ISA25; at day 21, postvaccination, each animal received a second dose of the same vaccine. The vaccine induced a strong antibody response in all animals as determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT80) showed the primary dose of the vaccine was sufficient to elicit potentially protective virus neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 40 to 160, and the second vaccine dose boosted the titer to more than 1280. Furthermore, all animals tested positive for neutralizing antibodies at day 328 postvaccination. ELISA analysis using the recombinant nucleocapsid protein as a negative marker antigen indicated that the vaccine candidate is DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals) compatible and represents a promising vaccine platform for RVFV infection in susceptible species.

  14. Exchange transfusion of a patient with fulminant Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D; Bennett, D; Machin, S J

    1991-02-01

    We report a patient with fulminant Lassa fever who responded dramatically to a 2.5-litre exchange transfusion of whole blood. On admission he was semicomatose with facial oedema and oral haemorrhage; his platelets showed markedly depressed aggregation to ADP; and his plasma inhibited the aggregation responses of normal platelets in vitro. Exchange transfusion resulted in rapid clinical improvement, recovery of platelet function, and disappearance of platelet-inhibitory activity in plasma. The patient died 2 weeks later from an acute encephalopathy. His initial response was sufficiently impressive to suggest that further evaluation of this therapeutic approach is justified in selected patients with overwhelming Lassa virus infection.

  15. Immunogenicity of a recombinant lumpy skin disease virus (neethling vaccine strain) expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein in cattle.

    PubMed

    Aspden, Kate; van Dijk, Alberdina A; Bingham, John; Cox, Dermot; Passmore, Jo-Ann; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2002-06-21

    Rabies virus (RV) readily infects cattle and causes a fatal neurological disease. A stable vaccine, which does not require the maintenance of a cold chain and that is administered once to elicit lifelong immunity to rabies would be advantageous. The present study describes the construction of a live recombinant lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) vaccine, expressing the glycoprotein of rabies virus (RG) and assessment of its ability to generate a humoral and cellular immune response against rabies virus in cattle. Cattle inoculated with the recombinant virus (rLSDV-RG) developed humoral immunity that was demonstrated in ELISA and neutralisation assays to RV. High titres of up to 1513IU/ml of RV neutralising antibodies were induced. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from rLSDV-RG-immunised animals demonstrated the ability to proliferate in response to stimulation with inactivated RV, whereas the animal vaccinated with wild type LSDV did not. This recombinant vaccine candidate thus has the potential to be used in ruminants as a cost-effective vaccine against both lumpy skin disease (LSD) and rabies.

  16. Characterization of the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus using neutralizing monoclonal antibodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Chienjin; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Landolt, Marsha; Winton, James

    1994-01-01

    To study the antigenic nature of the glycoprotein (G protein) of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), 31 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against a reference isolate of the virus. The MAbs were compared using a neutralization assay, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and by immunoblotting of the G protein in the native, reduced, and deglycosylated forms. Hybridoma culture fluids of the various MAbs could be diluted from 1:2 to 1:512 and still completely neutralize 1 X 104 plaque-forming units of IHNV. Similarly, the end point dilutions that produced optical density readings of 0.1 or greater in the ELISA were 1:40 to 1:10240. Western blotting showed that all of the MAbs reacted with the G protein in the unreduced (i.e. native) conformation; however, only 9 nine of the MAbs were able to react with the G protein following reduction by 2-mercaptoethanol. Deglycosylation of the protein did not influence the binding ability of any of the MAbs. These data indicate that all the MAbs recognized amino acid sequences on the protein itself and that the IHNV glycoprotein contains linear as well as conformation-dependent neutralizing epitopes. When rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fingerlings were passively immunized with MAbs against either a linear or a conformation-dependent epitope, the fish were protected against challenge with wild-type IHNV.

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 challenge of chimpanzees immunized with recombinant envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P W; Groopman, J E; Gregory, T; Clapham, P R; Weiss, R A; Ferriani, R; Riddle, L; Shimasaki, C; Lucas, C; Lasky, L A

    1988-01-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein, gp120, of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was purified from a Chinese hamster ovary cell line transfected with a truncated form of the HIV-1 env gene. The recombinant glycoprotein (rgp120) was formulated with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant and was used to immunize chimpanzees. The recombinant preparation was effective in eliciting cellular and humoral immunity as well as immunologic memory. Anti-rgp 120 antibodies reacted with authentic viral gp120 in immunological blot assays and were able to neutralize HIV-1 infectivity in vitro. Sera from the rgp120-immunized animals were able to neutralize HIV-1 pseudotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus prepared from the IIIB isolate, from which the gene encoding rgp120 was derived, as well as two heterologous isolates, ARV-2 and RF. The immune response elicited against the rgp120 was not effective in preventing viral infection after intravenous challenge with HIV-1. The implications of these results on HIV-1 vaccine development are discussed. Images PMID:2455898

  18. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.; Bess, J.W. Jr.; Gonda, M.A.; Kelliher, J.C.; Gilden, R.V.; Robey, W.G.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Gallo, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4/sup +/ and T8/sup +/ cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4/sup +/ cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo.

  19. Improving immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines for genital herpes containing herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Shaw, Carolyn; Friedman, Harvey

    2014-12-01

    No vaccines are approved for prevention or treatment of genital herpes. The focus of genital herpes vaccine trials has been on prevention using herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2) alone or combined with glycoprotein B. These prevention trials did not achieve their primary end points. However, subset analyses reported some positive outcomes in each study. The most recent trial was the Herpevac Trial for Women that used gD2 with monophosphoryl lipid A and alum as adjuvants in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 seronegative women. Unexpectedly, the vaccine prevented genital disease by HSV-1 but not HSV-2. Currently, HSV-1 causes more first episodes of genital herpes than HSV-2, highlighting the importance of protecting against HSV-1. The scientific community is conflicted between abandoning vaccine efforts that include gD2 and building upon the partial successes of previous trials. We favor building upon success and present approaches to improve outcomes of gD2-based subunit antigen vaccines.

  20. Prediction and identification of mouse cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in Ebola virus glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ebola viruses (EBOVs) cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate. At present, there are no licensed vaccines or efficient therapies to combat EBOV infection. Previous studies have shown that both humoral and cellular immune responses are crucial for controlling Ebola infection. CD8+ T cells play an important role in mediating vaccine-induced protective immunity. The objective of this study was to identify H-2d-specific T cell epitopes in EBOV glycoproteins (GPs). Results Computer-assisted algorithms were used to predict H-2d-specific T cell epitopes in two species of EBOV (Sudan and Zaire) GP. The predicted peptides were synthesized and identified in BALB/c mice immunized with replication-deficient adenovirus vectors expressing the EBOV GP. Enzyme-linked immunospot assays and intracellular cytokine staining showed that the peptides RPHTPQFLF (Sudan EBOV), GPCAGDFAF and LYDRLASTV (Zaire EBOV) could stimulate splenoctyes in immunized mice to produce large amounts of interferon-gamma. Conclusion Three peptides within the GPs of two EBOV strains were identified as T cell epitopes. The identification of these epitopes should facilitate the evaluation of vaccines based on the Ebola virus glycoprotein in a BALB/c mouse model. PMID:22695180

  1. An Optimized Hepatitis C Virus E2 Glycoprotein Core Adopts a Functional Homodimer That Efficiently Blocks Virus Entry.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Kathleen; Boo, Irene; Owczarek, Catherine M; Hardy, Matthew P; Perugini, Matthew A; Fabri, Louis; Scotney, Pierre; Poumbourios, Pantelis; Drummer, Heidi E

    2017-03-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2 is the major target of broadly neutralizing antibodies in vivo and is the focus of efforts in the rational design of a universal B cell vaccine against HCV. The E2 glycoprotein exhibits a high degree of amino acid variability which localizes to three discrete regions: hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), hypervariable region 2 (HVR2), and the intergenotypic variable region (igVR). All three variable regions contribute to immune evasion and/or isolate-specific structural variations, both important considerations for vaccine design. A high-resolution structural definition of the intact HCV envelope glycoprotein complex containing E1 and E2 remains to be elucidated, while crystallographic structures of a recombinant E2 ectodomain failed to resolve HVR1, HVR2, and a major neutralization determinant adjacent to HVR1. To obtain further information on E2, we characterized the role of all three variable regions in E2 ectodomain folding and function in the context of a recombinant ectodomain fragment (rE2). We report that removal of the variable regions accelerates binding to the major host cell receptor CD81 and that simultaneous deletion of HVR2 and the igVR is required to maintain wild-type CD81-binding characteristics. The removal of the variable regions also rescued the ability of rE2 to form a functional homodimer. We propose that the rE2 core provides novel insights into the role of the variable motifs in the higher-order assembly of the E2 ectodomain and may have implications for E1E2 structure on the virion surface. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects ∼2% of the population globally, and no vaccine is available. HCV is a highly variable virus, and understanding the presentation of key antigenic sites at the virion surface is important for the design of a universal vaccine. This study investigates the role of three surface-exposed variable regions in E2 glycoprotein folding and function in the context

  2. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  3. Sensitivity analysis in a Lassa fever deterministic mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Doko, Umar Chado; Mamuda, Mamman

    2015-05-01

    Lassa virus that causes the Lassa fever is on the list of potential bio-weapons agents. It was recently imported into Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States as a consequence of the rapid growth of international traffic. A model with five mutually exclusive compartments related to Lassa fever is presented and the basic reproduction number analyzed. A sensitivity analysis of the deterministic model is performed. This is done in order to determine the relative importance of the model parameters to the disease transmission. The result of the sensitivity analysis shows that the most sensitive parameter is the human immigration, followed by human recovery rate, then person to person contact. This suggests that control strategies should target human immigration, effective drugs for treatment and education to reduced person to person contact.

  4. Vaccine potential of a herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant with an essential glycoprotein deleted.

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, H E; McLean, C S; Harley, C; Efstathiou, S; Inglis, S; Minson, A C

    1994-01-01

    Several approaches to the production of vaccines to human herpesviruses have been proposed. Subunit vaccines, subunits delivered by live vectors, and rationally attenuated vaccines have all been shown to be efficacious in animal models but suffer from uncertainties as to the roles of individual genes involved in pathogenesis and the most relevant components of the immune response required for protection in humans and the target antigens involved. With these problems in mind, we examined the vaccine potential of a fully disabled herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant that is capable of only a single round of replication, since a virus of this type should induce the full spectrum of immune responses but has no pathogenic potential. A virus has been described which lacks essential glycoprotein H (gH) and can be propagated in a cell line which supplies gH in trans (A. Forrester, H. Farrell, G. Wilkinson, J. Kaye, N. Davis-Poynter, and T. Minson, J. Virol. 66:341-348, 1992). Infection of normal cells with this mutant is indistinguishable from a wild-type infection, except that the resulting progeny are gH negative and noninfectious: the virus is self-limiting. Infection of mice by the ear pinna route was similarly self-limiting in that input infectivity decreased rapidly at the inoculation site and no infectivity was detected in sensory ganglia. Animals given a wide range of doses of the gH-negative mutant produced both humoral and T-cell responses to herpes simplex virus type 1 and proved solidly resistant to challenge with a high dose of wild-type virus. The gH-negative mutant is presumably capable of establishing a latent infection, but since no infectious virus was detected in numerous attempts to reactivate the mutant, the risk of a pathogenic outcome is minimal. Images PMID:8289395

  5. Crystal Structure of the Pre-fusion Nipah Virus Fusion Glycoprotein Reveals a Novel Hexamer-of-Trimers Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Somnath; Yan, Lianying; Feng, YanRu; Wang, Lin-Fa; Skiniotis, Georgios; Lee, Benhur; Zhou, Z. Hong; Broder, Christopher C.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a paramyxovirus that infects host cells through the coordinated efforts of two envelope glycoproteins. The G glycoprotein attaches to cell receptors, triggering the fusion (F) glycoprotein to execute membrane fusion. Here we report the first crystal structure of the pre-fusion form of the NiV-F glycoprotein ectodomain. Interestingly this structure also revealed a hexamer-of-trimers encircling a central axis. Electron tomography of Nipah virus-like particles supported the hexameric pre-fusion model, and biochemical analyses supported the hexamer-of-trimers F assembly in solution. Importantly, structure-assisted site-directed mutagenesis of the interfaces between F trimers highlighted the functional relevance of the hexameric assembly. Shown here, in both cell-cell fusion and virus-cell fusion systems, our results suggested that this hexamer-of-trimers assembly was important during fusion pore formation. We propose that this assembly would stabilize the pre-fusion F conformation prior to cell attachment and facilitate the coordinated transition to a post-fusion conformation of all six F trimers upon triggering of a single trimer. Together, our data reveal a novel and functional pre-fusion architecture of a paramyxoviral fusion glycoprotein. PMID:26646856

  6. Positive evolution of the glycoprotein (GP) gene is related to transmission of the Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Jing, Y X; Wang, L N; Wu, X M; Song, C X

    2016-03-28

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a fatal disease caused by the negative-strand RNA of the Ebola virus. A high-intensity outbreak of this fever was reported in West Africa last year; however, there is currently no definitive treatment strategy available for this disease. In this study, we analyzed the molecular evolutionary history and attempted to determine the positive selection sites in the Ebola genes using multiple-genomic sequences of the various Ebola virus subtypes, in order to gain greater clarity into the evolution of the virus and its various subtypes. Only the glycoprotein (GP) gene was positively selected among the 8 Ebola genes, with the other genes remaining in the purification stage. The positive selection sites in the GP gene were identified by a random-site model; these sites were found to be located in the mucin-like region, which is associated with transmembrane protein binding. Additionally, different branches of the phylogenetic tree displayed different positive sites, which in turn was responsible for differences in the cell adhesion ability of the virus. In conclusion, the pattern of positive sites in the GP gene is associated with the epidemiology and prevalence of Ebola in different areas.

  7. Amino-terminal sequence of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.J.; Long, D.; Hogue-Angeletti, R.; Cohen, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus is a structural component of the virion envelope which stimulates production of high titers of herpes simplex virus type-common neutralizing antibody. The authors caried out automated N-terminal amino acid sequencing studies on radiolabeled preparations of gD-1 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 1) and gD-2 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 2). Although some differences were noted, particularly in the methionine and alanine profiles for gD-1 and gD-2, the amino acid sequence of a number of the first 30 residues of the amino terminus of gD-1 and gD-2 appears to be quite similar. For both proteins, the first residue is a lysine. When we compared out sequence data for gD-1 with those predicted by nucleic acid sequencing, the two sequences could be aligned (with one exception) starting at residue 26 (lysine) of the predicted sequence. Thus, the first 25 amino acids of the predicted sequence are absent from the polypeptides isolated from infected cells.

  8. Molecular mimicry between the rabies virus glycoprotein and human immunodeficiency virus-1 GP120: cross-reacting antibodies induced by rabies vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bracci, L; Ballas, S K; Spreafico, A; Neri, P

    1997-11-01

    The 160-170 sequence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 gp120 mimics a nicotinic receptor-binding motif of rabies virus glycoprotein and snake neurotoxins. This sequence has been proposed to be involved in the binding of HIV-1 gp120 to the acetylcholine binding sites of nicotinic receptors. By using biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) technology we have found that HIV-1 gp120 can bind to detergent-extracted nicotinic receptor from fetal calf muscle. The binding is inhibited by nicotine and by a synthetic peptide reproducing the gp120 160-170 sequence. The molecular mimicry between gp120 and rabies virus glycoprotein is confirmed by cross-reacting antibodies. We have found that vaccination against rabies can induce the production of anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibodies in humans. The cross-reacting antibodies are directed to the gp120 sequence involved in the mimicry with the rabies virus glycoprotein. The cross-reactivity between the rabies virus and HIV-1 has important implications in transfusion medicine. Moreover, the presence of cross-reacting antibodies between the nicotinic receptor binding site of rabies virus glycoprotein and a fragment of HIV-1 gp120 strengthens the hypothesis about the possible role of nicotinic receptors as potential receptors for HIV-1 in the central nervous system.

  9. Lassa fever or lassa hemorrhagic fever risk to humans from rodent-borne zoonoses.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Abdalla Saleh, Hala Ahmed; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound hemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. Lassa fever, an acute hemorrhagic fever characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and chest and abdominal pain. Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne zoonosis worldwide. Transmission rodents to humans occur by aerosol spread, either from the genus Mastomys rodents' excreta (multimammate rat) or through the close contact with infected patients (nosocomial infection). Other rodents of the genera Rattus, Mus, Lemniscomys, and Praomys are incriminated rodents hosts. Now one may ask do the rodents' ectoparasites play a role in Lassa virus zoonotic transmission. This paper summarized the update knowledge on LHV; hopping it might be useful to the clinicians, nursing staff, laboratories' personals as well as those concerned zoonoses from rodents and rodent control.

  10. The role of stearate attachment to the hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein HEF of influenza C virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyang; Ludwig, Kai; Böttcher, Christoph; Veit, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The only spike of influenza C virus, the hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF) combines receptor binding, receptor hydrolysis and membrane fusion activities. Like other hemagglutinating glycoproteins of influenza viruses HEF is S-acylated, but only with stearic acid at a single cysteine located at the cytosol-facing end of the transmembrane region. Previous studies established the essential role of S-acylation of hemagglutinin for replication of influenza A and B virus by affecting budding and/or membrane fusion, but the function of acylation of HEF was hitherto not investigated. Using reverse genetics we rescued a virus containing non-stearoylated HEF, which was stable during serial passage and showed no competitive fitness defect, but the growth rate of the mutant virus was reduced by one log. Deacylation of HEF does neither affect the kinetics of its plasma membrane transport nor the protein composition of virus particles. Cryo-electron microscopy showed that the shape of viral particles and the hexagonal array of spikes typical for influenza C virus were not influenced by this mutation indicating that virus budding was not disturbed. However, the extent and kinetics of haemolysis were reduced in mutant virus at 37°C, but not at 33°C, the optimal temperature for virus growth, suggesting that non-acylated HEF has a defect in membrane fusion under suboptimal conditions.

  11. Characterization of epitopes on the rabies virus glycoprotein by selection and analysis of escape mutants.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Firouzeh; Wandeler, Alexander I; Nadin-Davis, Susan A

    2016-07-15

    The glycoprotein (G) is the only surface protein of the lyssavirus particle and the only viral product known to be capable of eliciting the production of neutralizing antibodies. In this study, the isolation of escape mutants resistant to monoclonal antibody (Mab) neutralization was attempted by a selection strategy employing four distinct rabies virus strains: the extensively passaged Evelyn Rokitnicki Abelseth (ERA) strain and three field isolates representing two bat-associated variants and the Western Canada skunk variant (WSKV). No escape mutants were generated from either of the bat-associated viral variants but two neutralization mutants were derived from the WSKV isolate. Seven independent ERA mutants were recovered using Mabs directed against antigenic sites I (four mutants) and IIIa (three mutants) of the glycoprotein. The cross-neutralization patterns of these viral mutants were used to determine the precise location and nature of the G protein epitopes recognized by these Mabs. Nucleotide sequencing of the G gene indicated that those mutants derived using Mabs directed to antigenic site (AS) III all contained amino acid substitutions in this site. However, of the four mutants selected with AS I Mabs, two bore mutations within AS I as expected while the remaining two carried mutations in AS II. WSKV mutants exhibited mutations at the sites appropriate for the Mabs used in their selection. All ERA mutant preparations were more cytopathogenic than the parental virus when propagated in cell culture; when in vivo pathogenicity in mice was examined, three of these mutants exhibited reduced pathogenicity while the remaining four mutants exhibited comparable pathogenic properties to those of the parent virus.

  12. A monoclonal antibody to a synthetic fragment of rabies virus glycoprotein binds ligands of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Santucci, A; Lozzi, L; Petreni, S; Spreafico, A; Neri, P; Bracci, L; Soldani, P

    1989-09-01

    Rabies virus glycoprotein and snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins share a region of high homology (30-45 for neurotoxins and 190-203 for the glycoprotein) in the regions that are believed to be responsible for binding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Monoclonal antibodies raised to the 190-203 synthetic fragment of rabies virus glycoprotein were immobilized on a high performance affinity chromatography column and were able to bind neurotoxins. Toxins were displaced from the affinity column by elution at acidic pH and by affinity competition with acetylcholine at neutral pH. Furthermore, the affinity column proved to be useful for the purification of cholinergic ligands. Overall, these results indicate that the paratope of our monoclonal antibodies could behave as an 'internal image' of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor acetylcholine binding site.

  13. Efficient generation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotypes bearing morbilliviral glycoproteins and their use in quantifying virus neutralising antibodies.

    PubMed

    Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Drew, Angharad A; Takahashi, Emi; McDonald, Michael; Baron, Michael D; Gilbert, Martin; Cleaveland, Sarah; Haydon, Daniel T; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-02-03

    Morbillivirus neutralising antibodies are traditionally measured using either plaque reduction neutralisation tests (PRNTs) or live virus microneutralisation tests (micro-NTs). While both test formats provide a reliable assessment of the strength and specificity of the humoral response, they are restricted by the limited number of viral strains that can be studied and often present significant biological safety concerns to the operator. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of morbillivirus neutralising antibodies. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of canine distemper virus (CDV) on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Further, by exchanging the glycoprotein expression construct, responses against distinct viral strains or species may be measured. Using this technique, we demonstrate cross neutralisation between CDV and peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). As an example of the value of the technique, we demonstrate that UK dogs vary in the breadth of immunity induced by CDV vaccination; in some dogs the neutralising response is CDV-specific while, in others, the neutralising response extends to the ruminant morbillivirus PPRV. This technique will facilitate a comprehensive comparison of cross-neutralisation to be conducted across the morbilliviruses.

  14. Efficient generation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotypes bearing morbilliviral glycoproteins and their use in quantifying virus neutralising antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Drew, Angharad A.; Takahashi, Emi; McDonald, Michael; Baron, Michael D.; Gilbert, Martin; Cleaveland, Sarah; Haydon, Daniel T.; Hosie, Margaret J.; Willett, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Morbillivirus neutralising antibodies are traditionally measured using either plaque reduction neutralisation tests (PRNTs) or live virus microneutralisation tests (micro-NTs). While both test formats provide a reliable assessment of the strength and specificity of the humoral response, they are restricted by the limited number of viral strains that can be studied and often present significant biological safety concerns to the operator. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of morbillivirus neutralising antibodies. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of canine distemper virus (CDV) on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Further, by exchanging the glycoprotein expression construct, responses against distinct viral strains or species may be measured. Using this technique, we demonstrate cross neutralisation between CDV and peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). As an example of the value of the technique, we demonstrate that UK dogs vary in the breadth of immunity induced by CDV vaccination; in some dogs the neutralising response is CDV-specific while, in others, the neutralising response extends to the ruminant morbillivirus PPRV. This technique will facilitate a comprehensive comparison of cross-neutralisation to be conducted across the morbilliviruses. PMID:26706278

  15. N-linked Glycosylation of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia Erns Glycoprotein Alters Virulence in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erns is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). We recently reported the influence of glycosylation of E2 in the virulence of CSFV strain Brescia. Here, we studied the effect of Erns N-linked glycosylation pattern on virulence of CSFV strain Brescia in swine. ...

  16. Characterization of an equine herpesvirus type 1 gene encoding a glycoprotein (gp13) with homology to herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C.

    PubMed

    Allen, G P; Coogle, L D

    1988-08-01

    The molecular structure of the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) gene encoding glycoprotein 13 (gp13) was analyzed. The gene is contained within a 1.8-kilobase AccI-EcoRI restriction fragment mapping at map coordinates 0.136 to 0.148 in the UL region of the EHV-1 genome and is transcribed from right to left. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the DNA fragment revealed a complete transcriptional unit composed of typical regulatory promoter elements upstream to a long open reading frame (1,404 base pairs) that encoded a 468-amino-acid primary translation product of 51 kilodaltons. The predicted protein has the characteristic features of a membrane-spanning protein: an N-terminal signal sequence, a hydrophobic membrane anchor region, a charged C-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and an exterior domain with nine potential N-glycosylation sites. The EHV-1 DNA sequences expressed in lambda gt11 as gp13 epitopes were present in the open reading frame. Amino acid sequences composing a major antigenic site, recognized by 35% of a panel of 42 anti-gp13 monoclonal antibodies, were identified in the N-terminal surface domain of the deduced gp13 molecule. Comparison of the EHV-1 gp13 DNA sequence with that encoding glycoproteins of other alphaherpesviruses revealed no detectable homology. However, a search for homology at the amino acid level showed regions of significant sequence similarity between the amino acids of the carboxy half of EHV-1 gp13 and those of the same region of gC-like glycoproteins of herpes simplex virus (gC-1 and gC-2), pseudorabies herpesvirus (gIII), and varicella-zoster virus (gp66). The sequences of the N-terminal portion of gp13, by contrast, were much less conserved. The results of these studies indicate that EHV-1 gp13 is the structural homolog of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C and further suggest that the epitope-containing N-terminal amino acid sequences of the herpesvirus gC-like glycoproteins have undergone more extensive evolutionary

  17. Herpes simplex viruses lacking glycoprotein D are unable to inhibit virus penetration: quantitative evidence for virus-specific cell surface receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.C.; Ligas, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein D (gD) plays an essential role in the entry of virus into cells. HSV mutants unable to express gD were constructed. The mutants can be propagated on VD60 cells, which supply the viruses with gD; however, virus particles lacking gD were produced in mutant-infected Vero cells. Virus particles with or without gD adsorbed to a large number of sites on the cell surface; however, virions lacking gD did not enter cells. Cells pretreated with UV-inactivated virions containing gD were resistant to infection with HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. In contrast, cell pretreated with UV-inactivated virions lacking gD could be infected with HSV-1 and HSV-2. If infectious HSV-1 was added prior to UV-inactivated virus particles containing gD, the infectious virus entered cells and replicated. Therefore, virus particles containing gD appear to block specific cell surface receptors which are very limited in number. Particles lacking gD are presumably unable to interact with these receptors, suggesting that gD is an essential receptor-binding polypeptide.

  18. Influence of Respiratory Syncytial Virus F Glycoprotein Conformation on Induction of Protective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Thom, Michelle; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Terrón, María C.; Luque, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) vaccine development has received new impetus from structure-based studies of its main protective antigen, the fusion (F) glycoprotein. Three soluble forms of F have been described: monomeric, trimeric prefusion, and trimeric postfusion. Most human neutralizing antibodies recognize epitopes found exclusively in prefusion F. Although prefusion F induces higher levels of neutralizing antibodies than does postfusion F, postfusion F can also induce protection against virus challenge in animals. However, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the three forms of F have not hitherto been directly compared. Hence, BALB/c mice were immunized with a single dose of the three proteins adjuvanted with CpG and challenged 4 weeks later with virus. Serum antibodies, lung virus titers, weight loss, and pulmonary pathology were evaluated after challenge. Whereas small amounts of postfusion F were sufficient to protect mice, larger amounts of monomeric and prefusion F proteins were required for protection. However, postfusion and monomeric F proteins were associated with more pathology after challenge than was prefusion F. Antibodies induced by all doses of prefusion F, in contrast to other F protein forms, reacted predominantly with the prefusion F conformation. At high doses, prefusion F also induced the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies, and all mice were protected, yet at low doses of the immunogen, these antibodies neutralized virus poorly, and mice were not protected. These findings should be considered when developing new hRSV vaccine candidates. IMPORTANCE Protection against hRSV infection is afforded mainly by neutralizing antibodies, which recognize mostly epitopes found exclusively in the viral fusion (F) glycoprotein trimer, folded in its prefusion conformation, i.e., before activation for membrane fusion. Although prefusion F is able to induce high levels of neutralizing antibodies, highly stable postfusion

  19. A recombinant chimeric La Crosse virus expressing the surface glycoproteins of Jamestown Canyon virus is immunogenic and protective against challenge with either parental virus in mice or monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bennett, R S; Gresko, A K; Nelson, J T; Murphy, B R; Whitehead, S S

    2012-01-01

    La Crosse virus (LACV) and Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV), family Bunyaviridae, are mosquito-borne viruses that are endemic in North America and recognized as etiologic agents of encephalitis in humans. Both viruses belong to the California encephalitis virus serogroup, which causes 70 to 100 cases of encephalitis a year. As a first step in creating live attenuated viral vaccine candidates for this serogroup, we have generated a recombinant LACV expressing the attachment/fusion glycoproteins of JCV. The JCV/LACV chimeric virus contains full-length S and L segments derived from LACV. For the M segment, the open reading frame (ORF) of LACV is replaced with that derived from JCV and is flanked by the untranslated regions of LACV. The resulting chimeric virus retained the same robust growth kinetics in tissue culture as observed for either parent virus, and the virus remains highly infectious and immunogenic in mice. Although both LACV and JCV are highly neurovirulent in 21 day-old mice, with 50% lethal dose (LD₅₀) values of 0.1 and 0.5 log₁₀ PFU, respectively, chimeric JCV/LACV is highly attenuated and does not cause disease even after intracerebral inoculation of 10³ PFU. Parenteral vaccination of mice with 10¹ or 10³ PFU of JCV/LACV protected against lethal challenge with LACV, JCV, and Tahyna virus (TAHV). The chimeric virus was infectious and immunogenic in rhesus monkeys and induced neutralizing antibodies to JCV, LACV, and TAHV. When vaccinated monkeys were challenged with JCV, they were protected against the development of viremia. Generation of highly attenuated yet immunogenic chimeric bunyaviruses could be an efficient general method for development of vaccines effective against these pathogenic viruses.

  20. Generation and characterization of neutralizing human recombinant antibodies against antigenic site II of rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Chen, Zhe; Yu, Li; Wei, Jingshuang; Li, Chuan; Jin, Jing; Shen, Xinxin; Lv, Xinjun; Tang, Qing; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2012-10-01

    The currently recommended treatment for individuals exposed to rabies virus (RV) is post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) through the combined administration of rabies vaccine and rabies immune globulin (RIG). Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize RV offer an opportunity to replace RIG for rabies PEP. Here, a combinatorial human Fab library was constructed using antibody genes derived from the blood of RV-vaccinated donors. Selections of this library against purified RV virions resulted in the identification of 11 unique Fab antibodies specific for RV glycoprotein. Of the Fab antibodies, five were converted to full human IgG1 format. The human IgG antibodies revealed high binding affinity and neutralizing activities against RV fixed strains through a rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test in vitro as well as the early stage protective function after exposure to RV infection in vivo. Furthermore, epitope mapping and binding competition analysis showed that all of obtained human neutralizing and protective antibodies were directed to the antigenic site II of RV glycoprotein. Our results provide not only important insight into the protective immune response to RV in humans, but also more candidates eligible for use in a mAb cocktail aimed at replacing RIG for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.

  1. Immunogenicity and functional characterization of Leishmania-derived hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Czarnota, Anna; Brzozowska, Agnieszka; Cieślik, Anna; Rąbalski, Łukasz; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are the main inducers of a cross-neutralizing antibody response which plays an important role in the early phase of viral infection. Correctly folded and immunologically active E1E2 complex can be expressed in mammalian cells, though the production process might still prove restrictive, even if the immunological response of a vaccine candidate is positive. Here, we report a characterization and immunogenicity study of a full-length (fE1E2) and soluble version of the E1E2 complex (tE1E2) from genotype 1a, successfully expressed in the cells of Leishmania tarentolae. In a functional study, we confirmed the binding of both Leishmania-derived E1E2 complexes to the CD-81 receptor and the presence of the major epitopes participating in a neutralizing antibody response. Both complexes were proved to be highly immunogenic in mice and elicited neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, cross-reactivity of the mouse sera was detected for all tested HCV genotypes with the highest signal intensity observed for genotypes 1a, 1b, 5 and 6. Since the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HCV is still needed to control the global infection, our Leishmania-derived E1E2 glycoproteins could be considered a potential cost-effective vaccine candidate. PMID:27481352

  2. Rabies virus envelope glycoprotein targets lentiviral vectors to the axonal retrograde pathway in motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Hislop, James N; Islam, Tarin A; Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Carpentier, David C J; Trabalza, Antonio; Parkinson, Michael; Schiavo, Giampietro; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2014-06-06

    Rabies pseudotyped lentiviral vectors have great potential in gene therapy, not least because of their ability to transduce neurons following their distal axonal application. However, very little is known about the molecular processes that underlie their retrograde transport and cell transduction. Using multiple labeling techniques and confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that pseudotyping with rabies virus envelope glycoprotein (RV-G) enabled the axonal retrograde transport of two distinct subtypes of lentiviral vector in motor neuron cultures. Analysis of this process revealed that these vectors trafficked through Rab5-positive endosomes and accumulated within a non-acidic Rab7 compartment. RV-G pseudotyped vectors were co-transported with both the tetanus neurotoxin-binding fragment and the membrane proteins thought to mediate rabies virus endocytosis (neural cell adhesion molecule, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and p75 neurotrophin receptor), thus demonstrating that pseudotyping with RV-G targets lentiviral vectors for transport along the same pathway exploited by several toxins and viruses. Using motor neurons cultured in compartmentalized chambers, we demonstrated that axonal retrograde transport of these vectors was rapid and efficient; however, it was not able to transduce the targeted neurons efficiently, suggesting that impairment in processes occurring after arrival of the viral vector in the soma is responsible for the low transduction efficiency seen in vivo, which suggests a novel area for improvement of gene therapy vectors.

  3. Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein C attachment-proficient revertants isolated through a simple, targeted mutagenesis scheme.

    PubMed

    Rue, Cary A; Ryan, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoprotein C (gC) initiates virus attachment to cells by binding to heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans. The gC:HS interaction is not essential since gC null mutants still infect; however, they are more easily removed from cells during the initial stages of infection. The expendability of gC has facilitated a genetic mapping of the HS-binding domain, which is composed of three independent heparin-binding domains (HBDs) of six to eight amino acids each. Previous results suggested that at least one of the HBDs (HBD 1) functioned in a context-dependent manner. To define the context better, a reversion analysis was performed in which a defective gC containing a nonfunctional but intact HBD 1 regained HS-binding ability. To increase the reversion frequency, an efficient method for targeted, yet random mutagenesis of the gC gene was developed. The method involves random mutagenesis of a plasmid-borne copy of gC, and highly efficient recombination of the plasmid-borne genes into the virus genome at the site of a double-strand break in the viral gC locus. Revertants were recovered readily, and their gC alleles suggested that HS-binding could be restored by several different amino acid substitutions. This approach should be applicable to targeted mutagenesis of other herpesvirus genes.

  4. Mutations in the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus affect cytopathogenicity: potential for oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Janelle, Valérie; Brassard, Frédérick; Lapierre, Pascal; Lamarre, Alain; Poliquin, Laurent

    2011-07-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been widely used to characterize cellular processes, viral resistance, and cytopathogenicity. Recently, VSV has also been used for oncolytic virotherapy due to its capacity to selectively lyse tumor cells. Mutants of the matrix (M) protein of VSV have generally been preferred to the wild-type virus for oncolysis because of their ability to induce type I interferon (IFN) despite causing weaker cytopathic effects. However, due to the large variability of tumor types, it is quite clear that various approaches and combinations of multiple oncolytic viruses will be needed to effectively treat most cancers. With this in mind, our work focused on characterizing the cytopathogenic profiles of four replicative envelope glycoprotein (G) VSV mutants. In contrast to the prototypic M mutant, VSV G mutants are as efficient as wild-type virus at inhibiting cellular transcription and host protein translation. Despite being highly cytopathic, the mutant G(6R) triggers type I interferon secretion as efficiently as the M mutant. Importantly, most VSV G mutants are more effective at killing B16 and MC57 tumor cells in vitro than the M mutant or wild-type virus through apoptosis induction. Taken together, our results demonstrate that VSV G mutants retain the high cytopathogenicity of wild-type VSV, with G(6R) inducing type I IFN secretion at levels similar to that of the M mutant. VSV G protein mutants could therefore prove to be highly valuable for the development of novel oncolytic virotherapy strategies that are both safe and efficient for the treatment of various types of cancer.

  5. Novel mutations in Marburg virus glycoprotein associated with viral evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Masahiro; Nakayama, Eri; Marzi, Andrea; Igarashi, Manabu; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2013-04-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus, members of the family Filoviridae, cause lethal haemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. Although the outbreaks are concentrated mainly in Central Africa, these viruses are potential agents of imported infectious diseases and bioterrorism in non-African countries. Recent studies demonstrated that non-human primates passively immunized with virus-specific antibodies were successfully protected against fatal filovirus infection, highlighting the important role of antibodies in protective immunity for this disease. However, the mechanisms underlying potential evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure are not well understood. To analyse possible mutations involved in immune evasion in the MARV envelope glycoprotein (GP) which is the major target of protective antibodies, we selected escape mutants of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) expressing MARV GP (rVSVΔG/MARVGP) by using two GP-specific mAbs, AGP127-8 and MGP72-17, which have been previously shown to inhibit MARV budding. Interestingly, several rVSVΔG/MARVGP variants escaping from the mAb pressure-acquired amino acid substitutions in the furin-cleavage site rather than in the mAb-specific epitopes, suggesting that these epitopes are recessed, not exposed on the uncleaved GP molecule, and therefore inaccessible to the mAbs. More surprisingly, some variants escaping mAb MGP72-17 lacked a large proportion of the mucin-like region of GP, indicating that these mutants efficiently escaped the selective pressure by deleting the mucin-like region including the mAb-specific epitope. Our data demonstrate that MARV GP possesses the potential to evade antibody mediated immune pressure due to extraordinary structural flexibility and variability.

  6. A recombinant Hendra virus G glycoprotein-based subunit vaccine protects ferrets from lethal Hendra virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Pallister, Jackie; Middleton, Deborah; Wang, Lin-Fa; Klein, Reuben; Haining, Jessica; Robinson, Rachel; Yamada, Manabu; White, John; Payne, Jean; Feng, Yan-Ru; Chan, Yee-Peng; Broder, Christopher C

    2011-08-05

    The henipaviruses, Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV), are two deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics have yet been approved for human or livestock use. In 14 outbreaks since 1994 HeV has been responsible for multiple fatalities in horses and humans, with all known human infections resulting from close contact with infected horses. A vaccine that prevents virus shedding in infected horses could interrupt the chain of transmission to humans and therefore prevent HeV disease in both. Here we characterise HeV infection in a ferret model and show that it closely mirrors the disease seen in humans and horses with induction of systemic vasculitis, including involvement of the pulmonary and central nervous systems. This model of HeV infection in the ferret was used to assess the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a subunit vaccine based on a recombinant soluble version of the HeV attachment glycoprotein G (HeVsG), adjuvanted with CpG. We report that ferrets vaccinated with a 100 μg, 20 μg or 4 μg dose of HeVsG remained free of clinical signs of HeV infection following a challenge with 5000 TCID₅₀ of HeV. In addition, and of considerable importance, no evidence of virus or viral genome was detected in any tissues or body fluids in any ferret in the 100 and 20 μg groups, while genome was detected in the nasal washes only of one animal in the 4 μg group. Together, our findings indicate that 100 μg or 20 μg doses of HeVsG vaccine can completely prevent a productive HeV infection in the ferret, suggesting that vaccination to prevent the infection and shedding of HeV is possible.

  7. Generation of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) Recombinants Expressing the Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus (ILTV) Glycoprotein gB or gD as Dual Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Spatz, Stephen; Zsak, Laszlo; Yu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by infection with infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), a member of the family Herpesviridae. The current commercial ILT vaccines are either unsafe or ineffective. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop safer and more efficacious vaccines. Newcastle disease (ND), caused by infection with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, is one of the most serious infectious diseases of poultry. The NDV LaSota strain, a naturally occurring low-virulence NDV strain, has been routinely used as a live vaccine throughout the world. This chapter describes the generation of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota vaccine strain-based recombinant viruses expressing glycoprotein B (gB) or glycoprotein D (gD) of ILTV as dual vaccines against ND and ILT using reverse genetics technology.

  8. Envelope glycoprotein and CD4 independence of vpu-facilitated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid export.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, X J; Göttlinger, H; Haseltine, W A; Cohen, E A

    1992-01-01

    The effect of vpu on the release of human immunodeficiency type 1 capsid proteins was examined in the presence or absence of virus-encoded envelope glycoproteins as well as in cells which constitutively express either the CD4 or CD8 protein. The results show that vpu-mediated facilitated export of capsid proteins from HeLa cells does not require expression of the envelope glycoprotein. The experiments also show that export of virus capsid proteins from HeLa cells facilitated by vpu is not affected by coexpression of either the CD4 or CD8 protein. The vpu protein acts in trans to facilitate export of virus capsid proteins from HeLa cells. Images PMID:1629967

  9. Basic Residues in Hypervariable Region 1 of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E2 Contribute to Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Callens, Nathalie; Ciczora, Yann; Bartosch, Birke; Vu-Dac, Ngoc; Cosset, François-Loïc; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Penin, François; Dubuisson, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The N terminus of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2 contains a hypervariable region (HVR1) which has been proposed to play a role in viral entry. Despite strong amino acid variability, HVR1 is globally basic, with basic residues located at specific sequence positions. Here we show by analyzing a large number of HVR1 sequences that the frequency of basic residues at each position is genotype dependent. We also used retroviral pseudotyped particles (HCVpp) harboring genotype 1a envelope glycoproteins to study the role of HVR1 basic residues in entry. Interestingly, HCVpp infectivity globally increased with the number of basic residues in HVR1. However, a shift in position of some charged residues also modulated HCVpp infectivity. In the absence of basic residues, infectivity was reduced to the same level as that of a mutant deleted of HVR1. We also analyzed the effect of these mutations on interactions with some potential HCV receptors. Recognition of CD81 was not affected by changes in the number of charged residues, and we did not find a role for heparan sulfates in HCVpp entry. The involvement of the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) was indirectly analyzed by measuring the enhancement of infectivity of the mutants in the presence of the natural ligand of SR-BI, high-density lipoproteins (HDL). However, no correlation between the number of basic residues within HVR1 and HDL enhancement effect was observed. Despite the lack of evidence of the involvement of known potential receptors, our results demonstrate that the presence of basic residues in HVR1 facilitates virus entry. PMID:16306604

  10. Chimeric human parainfluenza virus bearing the Ebola virus glycoprotein as the sole surface protein is immunogenic and highly protective against Ebola virus challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Bukreyev, Alexander Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Zhang Liqun; Dorward, David W.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Feldmann, Heinz; Collins, Peter L.

    2009-01-20

    We generated a new live-attenuated vaccine against Ebola virus (EBOV) based on a chimeric virus HPIV3/{delta}F-HN/EboGP that contains the EBOV glycoprotein (GP) as the sole transmembrane envelope protein combined with the internal proteins of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3). Electron microscopy analysis of the virus particles showed that they have an envelope and surface spikes resembling those of EBOV and a particle size and shape resembling those of HPIV3. When HPIV3/{delta}F-HN/EboGP was inoculated via apical surface of an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium, the virus was released from the apical surface; when applied to basolateral surface, the virus infected basolateral cells but did not spread through the tissue. Following intranasal (IN) inoculation of guinea pigs, scattered infected cells were detected in the lungs by immunohistochemistry, but infectious HPIV3/{delta}F-HN/EboGP could not be recovered from the lungs, blood, or other tissues. Despite the attenuation, the virus was highly immunogenic, and a single IN dose completely protected the animals against a highly lethal intraperitoneal challenge of guinea pig-adapted EBOV.

  11. High-throughput screening of viral entry inhibitors using pseudotyped virus.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arnab; Mills, Debra M; Bowlin, Terry L

    2010-12-01

    Virus entry into a host cell is an attractive target for therapy because propagation of virus can be blocked at an early stage, minimizing chances for the virus to acquire drug resistance. Anti-infective drug discovery for BSL-4 viruses like Ebola or Lassa hemorrhagic fever virus presents challenges due to the requirement for a BSL-4 laboratory containment facility. Pseudotyped viruses provide a surrogate model in which the native envelope glycoprotein of a BSL-2 level virus (e.g., vesicular stomatitis virus) is replaced with envelope glycoprotein of a foreign BSL-4 virus (e.g., Ebola virus). Because the envelope glycoprotein determines interaction of virus with its cellular receptors, pseudotyped viruses can mimic the viral entry process of the original virus. Moreover, they are competent for only a single cycle of infection, and therefore can be used in BSL-2 facilities. Pseudotyped viruses have been used in high-throughput screening of entry inhibitors for a number of BSL-4 level viruses. This unit includes protocols for preparing pseudotyped viruses using lentiviral vectors and use of pseudotyped viruses for high-throughput screening of viral entry inhibitors.

  12. Expression of bovine viral diarrhea virus glycoprotein E2 as a soluble secreted form in a Mammalian cell line.

    PubMed

    Donofrio, Gaetano; Bottarelli, Ezio; Sandro, Cavirani; Flammini, Cesidio Filippo

    2006-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) membrane-anchored type I glycoprotein E2 is an approximately 53-kDa immunodominant glycoprotein inducing the production of neutralizing antibodies in the animal host after natural infection or following immunization with live or killed vaccines. The E2 coding region lacking the transmembrane domain was constructed in a soluble secreted form (secE2) and expressed in the medium of a transiently transfected human cell line. The crude conditioned medium containing secE2 can be potentially employed to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antigen for the diagnosis of BVDV infection or for vaccine purposes.

  13. Hematologic dysfunction in Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, S; McCormick, J B; Sasso, D; Craven, R B

    1988-10-01

    Lassa fever is widespread in West Africa, where the case fatality is about 16% in hospitalized adult patients. The clinical course is highly variable, with a few patients developing severe disease with bleeding, adult respiratory distress syndrome, encephalopathy and hypovolemic shock. We studied 70 patients admitted with suspected Lassa fever to a hospital in Sierra Leone, West Africa. Fourteen patients classified as having severe Lassa fever on the basis of serum aspartate amino transferase (AST) greater than 150 IU/L or viremia of greater than 10(3.6) tissue culture infective dose (TCID) 50/ml were found to have statistically significantly depressed lymphocyte counts when compared with patients with mild Lassa fever (AST less than 150 IU/L or viremia, less than 10(3.6)TCID50/ml), (P less than 0.0001) and with febrile control patients, in whom Lassa infection had been excluded by laboratory criteria (P less than 0.0008). Maximum depression occurred a mean of 10.9 days post onset. Patients with severe Lassa fever also had moderate thrombocytopenia, which was statistically significant when compared with febrile control patients (P less than 0.0003) and this occurred a mean of 10.8 days postonset. The most significant changes were in platelet function, which was markedly depressed in patients with severe Lassa fever (P less than 0.0035 in response to ADP and P = 0.0081 for collagen) when compared with patients with mild Lassa fever, and when compared with febrile controls, (P = 0.0013 for ADP and P less than 0.00001 for collagen). This abnormality was usually maximal on admission to hospital, and probably is an early event, preceding hospitalization in these patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Advanced vaccine candidates for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-10-29

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered.

  15. Advanced Vaccine Candidates for Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered. PMID:23202493

  16. A weakly pathogenic Rauscher spleen focus-forming virus mutant that lacks the carboxyl-terminal membrane anchor of its envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Machida, C A; Bestwick, R K; Kabat, D

    1985-01-01

    A mutant Rauscher spleen focus-forming virus (mutant 4-3) that causes mild splenic erythroblastosis in mice has a 44-base-pair deletion in the 3' region of its envelope glycoprotein (env) gene. The encoded glycoprotein terminates prematurely, lacks a hydrophobic membrane anchor, and has a shortened intracellular lifespan. An active site for causing erythroblast proliferation may occur in the undamaged amino-terminal domain of the env glycoprotein. Images PMID:3973973

  17. Characterization of Glycoprotein-Mediated Entry of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Hideki; Shimojima, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Fukuma, Aiko; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging hemorrhagic fever with a high case fatality rate caused by SFTS virus (SFTSV). Effective vaccines and specific therapies for SFTS are urgently sought, and investigation into virus-host cell interactions is expected to contribute to the development of antiviral strategies. In this study, we have developed a pseudotype vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) bearing the unmodified Gn/Gc glycoproteins (GPs) of SFTSV (SFTSVpv). We have analyzed the host cell entry of this pseudotype virus and native SFTSV. Both SFTSVpv and SFTSV exhibited high infectivity in various mammalian cell lines. The use of lysosomotropic agents indicated that virus entry occurred via pH-dependent endocytosis. SFTSVpv and SFTSV infectivity was neutralized by serial dilutions of convalescent-phase patient sera. Entry of SFTSVpv and growth of SFTSV were increased in Raji cells expressing not only the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) but also DC-SIGN-related (DC-SIGNR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin (LSECtin). 25-Hydroxycholesterol (25HC), a soluble oxysterol metabolite, inhibited the cell entry of SFTSVpv and the membrane fusion of SFTSV. These results indicate that pH-dependent endocytosis of SFTSVpv and SFTSV is enhanced by attachment to certain C-type lectins. SFTSVpv is an appropriate model for the investigation of SFTSV-GP-mediated cell entry and virus neutralization at lower biosafety levels. Furthermore, 25HC may represent a potential antiviral agent against SFTS. IMPORTANCE SFTSV is a recently discovered bunyavirus associated with SFTS, a viral hemorrhagic fever with a high case fatality rate endemic to China, South Korea, and Japan. Because little is known about the characteristics of the envelope protein and entry mechanisms of SFTSV, further studies will be required for the development of a vaccine or effective

  18. First North American field release of a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, C A; Niezgoda, M; Hamir, A N; Schumacher, C; Koprowski, H; Rupprecht, C E

    1998-04-01

    Following nearly 10 yr of extensive laboratory evaluation, a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein (V-RG) vaccine was the first recombinant virus to undergo limited North American field release on 20 August 1990. The free-ranging raccoon population on Parramore Island (Virginia, USA) was exposed to a high density (10 baits/ha) of vaccine-laden baits distributed on a 300 ha vaccination area. An annual total of 887 raccoons were live-trapped for sedation, physical examination and blood collection for rabies antibody determination; there was no evidence of adverse effects or lesions due to the vaccine. Age and sex distributions, mean body weights, and live-capture histories of raccoons from the vaccination and non-baited control areas were compared. There were no statistically significant differences in survivorship between the baited and non-baited areas, nor between rabies antibody-positive and antibody-negative raccoons from the vaccination area. There was no trend in field mortality that suggested an association with either tetracycline or sulfadimethoxine, used as biomakers, or with vaccine contact determined by antibody status. No gross or histopathologic lesions due to the vaccine were demonstrated among a subsample of live-trapped raccoons collected for gross necropsy, biomarker analysis, histopathologic examination, and V-RG virus isolation attempts. Recovery of V-RG virus was limited to the tonsils of two biomarker-positive, clinically healthy raccoons collected from the vaccination area for postmortem examination on days 2 and 4 following bait distribution. These data reinforce the extensive body of safety data on the V-RG virus and extend it to include field evaluation where vaccine is offered free-choice in abundance, in baits designed to attract free-ranging raccoons, in a relatively simple ecosystem.

  19. Generation and evaluation of avian leukosis virus subgroup J envelope glycoprotein recombinant pseudovirions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenjie; Cui, Lina; Wang, Liang; Yang, Zhikun; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Weishan

    2014-06-01

    Retroviral and lentiviral vector pseudotypes (based on human immunodeficiency virus type 1, HIV-1) have been used for stable and safe gene transfer because of their broad host ranges and high mechanical strength. In the present study, a recombinant avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) polypeptide pseudotyped with lentivirus membrane glycoproteins gp85 and gp37, HIV/env-ALV, was generated, characterized in vitro and evaluated for its ability to infect natural host cells. We optimized the newly developed micro-neutralization (MN) assay using recombinant pseudovirion HIV/env-ALV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein and well-characterized sera from chickens with confirmed ALV-J disease or virus-free controls. HIV/env-ALV could infect CEF and DF-1 but not pk15, 293FT, MDCK or VERO E6 cells, therefore demonstrating a cellular tropism similar to the wild-type ALV-J. The MN assay indicated that the IC50 values of positive sera offered a considerable advantage in both speed and accuracy. These results suggest that this pseudotyped lentivirus is a good model for studying the functions of ALV-J env and that the MN assay is a reliable serological method for assessing antibody levels in investigating the actual status of the current ALV-J epidemic. These recombinant pseudovirions may prove to be useful for studying ALV-J biology in lower biosafety level laboratory environments, and also for the detection and quantification of neutralizing antibodies to ALV-J in a manner akin to ELISA assays, but that would also be applicable to other viruses.

  20. Structural characterization of the glycoprotein GP2 core domain from the CAS virus, a novel arenavirus-like species.

    PubMed

    Koellhoffer, Jayne F; Dai, Zhou; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Stenglein, Mark D; Liu, Yanyun; Toro, Rafael; S Harrison, Joseph; Chandran, Kartik; DeRisi, Joseph L; Almo, Steven C; Lai, Jonathan R

    2014-04-03

    Fusion of the viral and host cell membranes is a necessary first step for infection by enveloped viruses and is mediated by the envelope glycoprotein. The transmembrane subunits from the structurally defined "class I" glycoproteins adopt an α-helical "trimer-of-hairpins" conformation during the fusion pathway. Here, we present our studies on the envelope glycoprotein transmembrane subunit, GP2, of the CAS virus (CASV). CASV was recently identified from annulated tree boas (Corallus annulatus) with inclusion body disease and is implicated in the disease etiology. We have generated and characterized two protein constructs consisting of the predicted CASV GP2 core domain. The crystal structure of the CASV GP2 post-fusion conformation indicates a trimeric α-helical bundle that is highly similar to those of Ebola virus and Marburg virus GP2 despite CASV genome homology to arenaviruses. Denaturation studies demonstrate that the stability of CASV GP2 is pH dependent with higher stability at lower pH; we propose that this behavior is due to a network of interactions among acidic residues that would destabilize the α-helical bundle under conditions where the side chains are deprotonated. The pH-dependent stability of the post-fusion structure has been observed in Ebola virus and Marburg virus GP2, as well as other viruses that enter via the endosome. Infection experiments with CASV and the related Golden Gate virus support a mechanism of entry that requires endosomal acidification. Our results suggest that, despite being primarily arenavirus like, the transmembrane subunit of CASV is extremely similar to the filoviruses.

  1. A single point mutation of the influenza C virus glycoprotein (HEF) changes the viral receptor-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Szepanski, S; Gross, H J; Brossmer, R; Klenk, H D; Herrler, G

    1992-05-01

    From strain JHB/1/66 of influenza C virus a mutant was derived with a change in the cell tropism. The mutant was able to grow in a subline of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK II) which is resistant to infection by the parent virus due to a lack of receptors. Inactivation of cellular receptors by either neuraminidase or acetylesterase and generation of receptors by resialylation of cells with N-acetyl-9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2) indicated that 9-O-acetylated sialic acid is a receptor determinant for both parent and mutant virus. However, the mutant required less Neu5,9Ac2 on the cell surface for virus attachment than the parent virus. The increased binding efficiency enabled the mutant to infect cells with a low content of 9-O-acetylated sialic acid which were resistant to the parent virus. By comparing the nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein (HEF) genes of the parent and the mutant virus only a single point mutation could be identified on the mutant gene. This mutation at nucleotide position 872 causes an amino acid exchange from threonine to isoleucine at position 284 on the amino acid sequence. Sequence similarity with a stretch of amino acids involved in the receptor-binding pocket of the influenza A hemagglutinin suggests that the mutation site on the influenza C glycoprotein (HEF) is part of the receptor-binding site.

  2. Role of the cytosolic tails of Rift Valley fever virus envelope glycoproteins in viral morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carnec, Xavier; Ermonval, Myriam; Kreher, Felix; Flamand, Marie; Bouloy, Michèle

    2014-01-05

    The correct folding, heterodimerization and trafficking of Gn/Gc envelope glycoproteins of Rift Valley fever virus, RVFV (Bunyaviridae and Phlebovirus genus) are essential for Golgi assembly and budding of viral particles. The Gn and Gc carboxy-terminus contain a Golgi targeting and an ER-retrieval signal, respectively. We generated RVFV-like particles with mutations in the cytosolic tails of Gn or Gc and identified regions important for release of infectious particles. The role of specific amino-acids in these regions was further investigated by creating recombinant mutant viruses by reverse-genetics. Residues outside the suspected Golgi targeting motif, i.e. the di-lysine K29-K30 motif and the N43, R44 and I46 residues of the Gn cytosolic domain, appeared important for Golgi localization and RNP packaging. Concerning the Gc tail, replacement of K2 or K3 in the di-lysine motif, had a drastic impact on Gn trafficking and induced an important organelle redistribution and cell remodeling, greatly affecting particle formation and release.

  3. Herpes simplex type 2 virus deleted in glycoprotein D protects against vaginal, skin and neural disease

    PubMed Central

    Petro, Christopher; González, Pablo A; Cheshenko, Natalia; Jandl, Thomas; Khajoueinejad, Nazanin; Bénard, Angèle; Sengupta, Mayami; Herold, Betsy C; Jacobs, William R

    2015-01-01

    Subunit vaccines comprised of glycoprotein D (gD-2) failed to prevent HSV-2 highlighting need for novel strategies. To test the hypothesis that deletion of gD-2 unmasks protective antigens, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of an HSV-2 virus deleted in gD-2 and complemented allowing a single round of replication on cells expressing HSV-1 gD (ΔgD−/+gD−1). Subcutaneous immunization of C57BL/6 or BALB/c mice with ΔgD−/+gD1 provided 100% protection against lethal intravaginal or skin challenges and prevented latency. ΔgD−/+gD1 elicited no disease in SCID mice, whereas 1000-fold lower doses of wild-type virus were lethal. HSV-specific antibodies were detected in serum (titer 1:800,000) following immunization and in vaginal washes after intravaginal challenge. The antibodies elicited cell-mediated cytotoxicity, but little neutralizing activity. Passive transfer of immune serum completely protected wild-type, but not Fcγ-receptor or neonatal Fc-receptor knock-out mice. These studies demonstrate that non-neutralizing Fc-mediated humoral responses confer protection and support advancement of this attenuated vaccine. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06054.001 PMID:25756612

  4. Glycoprotein D actively induces rapid internalization of two nectin-1 isoforms during herpes simplex virus entry

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, Katie M.; Krummenacher, Claude

    2010-03-30

    Entry of herpes simplex virus (HSV) occurs either by fusion at the plasma membrane or by endocytosis and fusion with an endosome. Binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to a receptor such as nectin-1 is essential in both cases. We show that virion gD triggered the rapid down-regulation of nectin-1 with kinetics similar to those of virus entry. In contrast, nectin-1 was not constitutively recycled from the surface of uninfected cells. Both the nectin-1alpha and beta isoforms were internalized in response to gD despite having different cytoplasmic tails. However, deletion of the nectin-1 cytoplasmic tail slowed down-regulation of nectin-1 and internalization of virions. These data suggest that nectin-1 interaction with a cytoplasmic protein is not required for its down-regulation. Overall, this study shows that gD binding actively induces the rapid internalization of various forms of nectin-1. We suggest that HSV activates a nectin-1 internalization pathway to use for endocytic entry.

  5. Characterization of chimpanzee/human monoclonal antibodies to vaccinia virus A33 glycoprotein and its variola virus homolog in vitro and in a vaccinia virus mouse protection model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaochun; Earl, Patricia; Americo, Jeffrey; Damon, Inger; Smith, Scott K; Yu, Fujuan; Sebrell, Andrew; Emerson, Suzanne; Cohen, Gary; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Gorshkova, Inna; Schuck, Peter; Satterfield, William; Moss, Bernard; Purcell, Robert

    2007-09-01

    Three distinct chimpanzee Fabs against the A33 envelope glycoprotein of vaccinia virus were isolated and converted into complete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with human gamma 1 heavy-chain constant regions. The three MAbs (6C, 12C, and 12F) displayed high binding affinities to A33 (K(d) of 0.14 nM to 20 nM) and may recognize the same epitope, which was determined to be conformational and located within amino acid residues 99 to 185 at the C terminus of A33. One or more of the MAbs were shown to reduce the spread of vaccinia virus as well as variola virus (the causative agent of smallpox) in vitro and to more effectively protect mice when administered before or 2 days after intranasal challenge with virulent vaccinia virus than a previously isolated mouse anti-A33 MAb (1G10) or vaccinia virus immunoglobulin. The protective efficacy afforded by anti-A33 MAb was comparable to that of a previously isolated chimpanzee/human anti-B5 MAb. The combination of anti-A33 MAb and anti-B5 MAb did not synergize the protective efficacy. These chimpanzee/human anti-A33 MAbs may be useful in the prevention and treatment of vaccinia virus-induced complications of vaccination against smallpox and may also be effective in the immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy of smallpox and other orthopoxvirus diseases.

  6. In Vivo Analysis of Infectivity, Fusogenicity, and Incorporation of a Mutagenic Viral Glycoprotein Library Reveals Determinants for Virus Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Salamango, Daniel J.; Alam, Khalid K.; Burke, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enveloped viruses utilize transmembrane surface glycoproteins to gain entry into target cells. Glycoproteins from diverse viral families can be incorporated into nonnative viral particles in a process termed pseudotyping; however, the molecular mechanisms governing acquisition of these glycoproteins are poorly understood. For murine leukemia virus envelope (MLV Env) glycoprotein, incorporation into foreign viral particles has been shown to be an active process, but it does not appear to be caused by direct interactions among viral proteins. In this study, we coupled in vivo selection systems with Illumina next-generation sequencing (NGS) to test hundreds of thousands of MLV Env mutants for the ability to be enriched in viral particles and to perform other glycoprotein functions. NGS analyses on a subset of these mutants predicted that the residues important for incorporation are in the membrane-proximal external region (MPER), particularly W127 and W137, and the residues in the membrane-spanning domain (MSD) and also immediately flanking it (T140 to L163). These predictions were validated by directly measuring the impact of mutations in these regions on fusogenicity, infectivity, and incorporation. We suggest that these two regions dictate pseudotyping through interactions with specific lipid environments formed during viral assembly. IMPORTANCE Researchers from numerous fields routinely exploit the ability to manipulate viral tropism by swapping viral surface proteins. However, this process, termed pseudotyping, is poorly understood at the molecular level. For murine leukemia virus envelope (MLV Env) glycoprotein, incorporation into foreign viral particles is an active process, but it does not appear to occur through direct viral protein-protein interactions. In this study, we tested hundreds of thousands of MLV Env mutants for the ability to be enriched in viral particles as well as perform other glycoprotein functions. Our analyses on a subset of these

  7. Generation of recombinant newcastle disease viruses, expressing the glycoprotein (G) of avian metapneumovirus, subtype A, or B, for use as bivalent vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using reverse genetics technology, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota strain-based recombinant viruses were engineered to express the glycoprotein (G) of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), subtype A, or B, as bivalent vaccines. These recombinant viruses, rLS/aMPV-A G and rLS/aMPV-B G, were slightly att...

  8. Functional Characterization of Glycoprotein H Chimeras Composed of Conserved Domains of the Pseudorabies Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Sebastian W.; Backovic, Marija; Klupp, Barbara G.; Rey, Felix A.; Fuchs, Walter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Membrane fusion is indispensable for entry of enveloped viruses into host cells. The conserved core fusion machinery of the Herpesviridae consists of glycoprotein B (gB) and the gH/gL complex. Recently, crystal structures of gH/gL of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) and Epstein-Barr virus and of a core fragment of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gH identified four structurally conserved gH domains. To investigate functional conservation, chimeric genes encoding combinations of individual domains of PrV and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) gH were expressed in rabbit kidney cells, and their processing and transport to the cell surface, as well as activity in fusion assays including gB, gD, and gL of PrV or HSV-1, were analyzed. Chimeric gH containing domain I of HSV-1 and domains II to IV of PrV exhibited limited fusion activity in the presence of PrV gB and gD and HSV-1 gL, but not of PrV gL. More strikingly, chimeric gH consisting of PrV domains I to III and HSV-1 domain IV exhibited considerable fusion activity together with PrV gB, gD, and gL. Replacing PrV gB with the HSV-1 protein significantly enhanced this activity. A cell line stably expressing this chimeric gH supported replication of gH-deleted PrV. Our results confirm the specificity of domain I for gL binding, demonstrate functional conservation of domain IV in two alphaherpesviruses from different genera, and indicate species-specific interactions of this domain with gB. They also suggest that gH domains II and III might form a structural and functional unit which does not tolerate major substitutions. IMPORTANCE Envelope glycoprotein H (gH) is essential for herpesvirus-induced membrane fusion, which is required for host cell entry and viral spread. Although gH is structurally conserved within the Herpesviridae, its precise role and its interactions with other components of the viral fusion machinery are not fully understood. Chimeric proteins containing domains of gH proteins from different

  9. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W. ); Traugh, J.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when ({sup 32}P)GTP was substituted for ({sup 32}P)ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein.

  10. DIVA diagnostic of Aujeszky's disease using an insect-derived virus glycoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sebastián, S; Pérez-Filgueira, D M; Gómez-Casado, E; Nuñez, M C; Sánchez-Ramos, I; Tabarés, E; Escribano, J M

    2008-10-01

    Commercial vaccines against Aujeszky's disease are mainly formulated using deleted versions of attenuated or inactivated Pseudorabies virus (PRV) particles lacking of the structural glycoprotein E (gE). Complementary diagnostic assays used to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (DIVAs), are based on the detection of serum antibodies against gE. A recombinant version of the PRV gE protein was expressed in a baculovirus vector system in Trichoplusia ni insect larvae in order to obtain this diagnostic reagent for large scale diagnosis at reduced costs. A recombinant gE gene (gEr), lacking of signal peptide and transmembrane domains, was cloned into a modified baculovirus vector to allow glycosylation of the protein and its subsequent exportation to the extracellular space. Analysis by SDS-PAGE, Western-blotting and glycoprotein staining revealed that a glycosylated protein of the expected electrophoretic mobility was obtained in infected larvae. Time course experiments revealed that maximum expression levels were reached 72h post-infection using 10(4)pfu of the recombinant baculovirus (BACgEr) per inoculated larva. An indirect PRV gE-ELISA was developed using gEr as a coating antigen. A comparison between larvae-derived PRV gE-ELISA and two commercially available PRV diagnostic kits showed good correlation between assays and better sensitivity when testing certain sera pig samples using the gEr ELISA. More than 30,000 ELISA determinations could be performed from crude extracts obtained from a single larva infected with the recombinant baculovirus, indicating the feasibility of this strategy for inexpensive production of glycosylated antigens for PRV diagnosis.

  11. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-08-07

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection.

  12. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  13. Post-translational folding of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF: defective processing in cells expressing the cloned gene.

    PubMed

    Szepanski, S; Veit, M; Pleschka, S; Klenk, H D; Schmidt, M F; Herrler, G

    1994-05-01

    The post-translational processing of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF was analysed. In cells infected with influenza C virus, HEF protein is synthesized as a glycosylated 80K polypeptide. A post-translational conformational rearrangement involving the formation of intramolecular disulphide bonds results in a decrease in its electrophoretic mobility. Therefore, SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions suggests an Mr of about 100K, whereas under reducing conditions an 80K protein is observed which is in accordance with the sequence data. The 100K form was detected 10 min after synthesis of HEF, and transport to the cell surface took about 60 min. This result indicates that the conformational change presumably occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum. A difference in post-translational processing was observed when the HEF gene was expressed in the absence of other influenza C virus genes. In cells infected with recombinant simian virus 40, the 80K precursor was synthesized, but this protein was neither converted to the 100K form nor transported to the cell surface. Deletion of the short cytoplasmic tail of HEF (Arg-Thr-Lys) or replacement of the two basic amino acids by hydrophobic (Ile) or acidic residues (Glu) resulted in HEF protein which was partially converted to the 100K form. Influenza C virus glycoprotein obtained after transient expression of the HEF gene using the vaccinia virus system was completely converted to the 100K form. However, in neither expression system was HEF transported to the cell surface. The possibility is discussed that the interaction of HEF with another viral protein is required for the post-translational folding and transport of this glycoprotein. The M protein of influenza C virus is suggested as a candidate for the chaperone which might interact with the cytoplasmic tail of HEF.

  14. N-Linked Glycosylation Status of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia E2 Glycoprotein Influences Virulence in Swine▿

    PubMed Central

    Risatti, G. R.; Holinka, L. G.; Fernandez Sainz, I.; Carrillo, C.; Lu, Z.; Borca, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    E2 is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Previous studies indicate that E2 is involved in several functions, including virus attachment and entry to target cells, production of antibodies, induction of protective immune response in swine, and virulence. Here, we have investigated the role of E2 glycosylation of the highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia in infection of the natural host. Seven putative glycosylation sites in E2 were modified by site-directed mutagenesis of a CSFV Brescia infectious clone (BICv). A panel of virus mutants was obtained and used to investigate whether the removal of putative glycosylation sites in the E2 glycoprotein would affect viral virulence/pathogenesis in swine. We observed that rescue of viable virus was completely impaired by removal of all putative glycosylation sites in E2 but restored when mutation N185A reverted to wild-type asparagine produced viable virus that was attenuated in swine. Single mutations of each of the E2 glycosylation sites showed that amino acid N116 (N1v virus) was responsible for BICv attenuation. N1v efficiently protected swine from challenge with virulent BICv at 3 and 28 days postinfection, suggesting that glycosylation of E2 could be modified for development of classical swine fever live attenuated vaccines. PMID:17108025

  15. Live attenuated herpes simplex virus 2 glycoprotein E deletion mutant as a vaccine candidate defective in neuronal spread.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Zumbrun, Elizabeth E; Si, Huaxin; Wang, Fushan; Shaw, Carolyn E; Cai, Michael; Lubinski, John M; Barrett, Shana M; Balliet, John W; Flynn, Jessica A; Casimiro, Danilo R; Bryan, Janine T; Friedman, Harvey M

    2012-04-01

    A herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein E deletion mutant (gE2-del virus) was evaluated as a replication-competent, attenuated live virus vaccine candidate. The gE2-del virus is defective in epithelial cell-to-axon spread and in anterograde transport from the neuron cell body to the axon terminus. In BALB/c and SCID mice, the gE2-del virus caused no death or disease after vaginal, intravascular, or intramuscular inoculation and was 5 orders of magnitude less virulent than wild-type virus when inoculated directly into the brain. No infectious gE2-del virus was recovered from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after multiple routes of inoculation; however, gE2-del DNA was detected by PCR in lumbosacral DRG at a low copy number in some mice. Importantly, no recurrent vaginal shedding of gE2-del DNA was detected in immunized guinea pigs. Intramuscular immunization outperformed subcutaneous immunization in all parameters evaluated, although individual differences were not significant, and two intramuscular immunizations were more protective than one. Immunized animals had reduced vaginal disease, vaginal titers, DRG infection, recurrent genital lesions, and recurrent vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA; however, protection was incomplete. A combined modality immunization using live virus and HSV-2 glycoprotein C and D subunit antigens in guinea pigs did not totally eliminate recurrent lesions or recurrent vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA. The gE2-del virus used as an immunotherapeutic vaccine in previously HSV-2-infected guinea pigs greatly reduced the frequency of recurrent genital lesions. Therefore, the gE2-del virus is safe, other than when injected at high titer into the brain, and is efficacious as a prophylactic and immunotherapeutic vaccine.

  16. Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E1 Forms Trimers at the Surface of the Virion

    PubMed Central

    Falson, Pierre; Bartosch, Birke; Alsaleh, Khaled; Tews, Birke Andrea; Loquet, Antoine; Ciczora, Yann; Riva, Laura; Montigny, Cédric; Montpellier, Claire; Duverlie, Gilles; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; le Maire, Marc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected cells, the envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 assemble as a heterodimer. To investigate potential changes in the oligomerization of virion-associated envelope proteins, we performed SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions but without thermal denaturation. This revealed the presence of SDS-resistant trimers of E1 in the context of cell-cultured HCV (HCVcc) as well as in the context of HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp). The formation of E1 trimers was found to depend on the coexpression of E2. To further understand the origin of E1 trimer formation, we coexpressed in bacteria the transmembrane (TM) domains of E1 (TME1) and E2 (TME2) fused to reporter proteins and analyzed the fusion proteins by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. As expected for strongly interacting TM domains, TME1–TME2 heterodimers resistant to SDS were observed. These analyses also revealed homodimers and homotrimers of TME1, indicating that such complexes are stable species. The N-terminal segment of TME1 exhibits a highly conserved GxxxG sequence, a motif that is well documented to be involved in intramembrane protein-protein interactions. Single or double mutations of the glycine residues (Gly354 and Gly358) in this motif markedly decreased or abrogated the formation of TME1 homotrimers in bacteria, as well as homotrimers of E1 in both HCVpp and HCVcc systems. A concomitant loss of infectivity was observed, indicating that the trimeric form of E1 is essential for virus infectivity. Taken together, these results indicate that E1E2 heterodimers form trimers on HCV particles, and they support the hypothesis that E1 could be a fusion protein. IMPORTANCE HCV glycoproteins E1 and E2 play an essential role in virus entry into liver cells as well as in virion morphogenesis. In infected cells, these two proteins form a complex in which E2 interacts with cellular receptors, whereas the function of E1 remains poorly understood. However, recent structural data suggest that E1

  17. Lassa fever: the challenges of curtailing a deadly disease.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, Titus

    2012-01-01

    Today Lassa fever is mainly a disease of the developing world, however several imported cases have been reported in different parts of the world and there are growing concerns of the potentials of Lassa fever Virus as a biological weapon. Yet no tangible solution to this problem has been developed nearly half a decade after its identification. Hence, the paper is aimed at appraising the problems associated with LAF illness; the challenges in curbing the epidemic and recommendations on important focal points. A Review based on the documents from the EFAS conference 2011 and literature search on PubMed, Scopus and Science direct. The retrieval of relevant papers was via the University of British Columbia and University of Toronto Libraries. The two major search engines returned 61 and 920 articles respectively. Out of these, the final 26 articles that met the criteria were selected. Relevant information on epidemiology, burden of management and control were obtained. Prompt and effective containment of the Lassa fever disease in Lassa village four decades ago could have saved the West African sub-region and indeed the entire globe from the devastating effect and threats posed by this illness. That was a hard lesson calling for much more proactive measures towards the eradication of the illness at primary, secondary and tertiary levels of health care.

  18. Lassa fever: the challenges of curtailing a deadly disease

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, Titus

    2012-01-01

    Today Lassa fever is mainly a disease of the developing world, however several imported cases have been reported in different parts of the world and there are growing concerns of the potentials of Lassa fever Virus as a biological weapon. Yet no tangible solution to this problem has been developed nearly half a decade after its identification. Hence, the paper is aimed at appraising the problems associated with LAF illness; the challenges in curbing the epidemic and recommendations on important focal points. A Review based on the documents from the EFAS conference 2011 and literature search on PubMed, Scopus and Science direct. The retrieval of relevant papers was via the University of British Columbia and University of Toronto Libraries. The two major search engines returned 61 and 920 articles respectively. Out of these, the final 26 articles that met the criteria were selected. Relevant information on epidemiology, burden of management and control were obtained. Prompt and effective containment of the Lassa fever disease in Lassa village four decades ago could have saved the West African sub-region and indeed the entire globe from the devastating effect and threats posed by this illness. That was a hard lesson calling for much more proactive measures towards the eradication of the illness at primary, secondary and tertiary levels of health care. PMID:22593791

  19. The glycoprotein genes and gene junctions of the fish rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus and hirame rhabdovirus: Analysis of relationships with other rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjorklund, H.V.; Higman, K.H.; Kurath, G.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein genes and all of the internal gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) and hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) have been determined from cDNA clones generated from viral genomic RNA. The SVCV glycoprotein gene sequence is 1588 nucleotides (nt) long and encodes a 509 amino acid (aa) protein. The HIRRV glycoprotein gene sequence comprises 1612 nt, coding for a 508 aa protein. In sequence comparisons of 15 rhabdovirus glycoproteins, the SVCV glycoprotein gene showed the highest amino acid sequence identity (31.2-33.2%) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), Chandipura virus (CHPV) and vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSIV). The HIRRV glycoprotein gene showed a very high amino acid sequence identity (74.3%) with the glycoprotein gene of another fish pathogenic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), but no significant similarity with glycoproteins of VSIV or rabies virus (RABV). In phylogenetic analyses SVCV was grouped consistently with VSIV, VSNJV and CHPV in the Vesiculovirus genus of Rhabdoviridae. The fish rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) showed close relationships with each other, but only very distant relationships with mammalian rhabdoviruses. The gene junctions are highly conserved between SVCV and VSIV, well conserved between IHNV and HIRRV, but not conserved between HIRRV/IHNV and RABV. Based on the combined results we suggest that the fish lyssa-type rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and VHSV may be grouped in their own genus within the family Rhabdoviridae. Aquarhabdovirus has been proposed for the name of this new genus.

  20. The glycoprotein genes and gene junctions of the fish rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus and hirame rhabdovirus: Analysis of relationships with other rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjorklund, H.V.; Higman, K.H.; Kurath, G.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein genes and all of the internal gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) and hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) have been determined from cDNA clones generated from viral genomic RNA. The SVCV glycoprotein gene sequence is 1588 nucleotides (nt) long and encodes a 509 amino acid (aa) protein. The HIRRV glycoprotein gene sequence comprises 1612 nt, coding for a 508 aa protein. In sequence comparisons of 15 rhabdovirus glycoproteins, the SVCV glycoprotein gene showed the highest amino acid sequence identity (31.2–33.2%) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), Chandipura virus (CHPV) and vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSIV). The HIRRV glycoprotein gene showed a very high amino acid sequence identity (74.3%) with the glycoprotein gene of another fish pathogenic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), but no significant similarity with glycoproteins of VSIV or rabies virus (RABV). In phylogenetic analyses SVCV was grouped consistently with VSIV, VSNJV and CHPV in the Vesiculovirus genus of Rhabdoviridae. The fish rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) showed close relationships with each other, but only very distant relationships with mammalian rhabdoviruses. The gene junctions are highly conserved between SVCV and VSIV, well conserved between IHNV and HIRRV, but not conserved between HIRRV/IHNV and RABV. Based on the combined results we suggest that the fish lyssa-type rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and VHSV may be grouped in their own genus within the family Rhabdoviridae. Aquarhabdovirus has been proposed for the name of this new genus.

  1. Expression, purification and crystallization of the ectodomain of the envelope glycoprotein E2 from Bovine viral diarrhoea virus

    PubMed Central

    Iourin, Oleg; Harlos, Karl; El Omari, Kamel; Lu, Weixian; Kadlec, Jan; Iqbal, Munir; Meier, Christoph; Palmer, Andrew; Jones, Ian; Thomas, Carole; Brownlie, Joe; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Stuart, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important animal pathogen which is closely related to Hepatitis C virus. Of the structural proteins, the envelope glycoprotein E2 of BVDV is the major antigen which induces neutralizing antibodies; thus, BVDV E2 is considered as an ideal target for use in subunit vaccines. Here, the expression, purification of wild-type and mutant forms of the ectodomain of BVDV E2 and subsequent crystallization and data collection of two crystal forms grown at low and neutral pH are reported. Native and multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) data sets have been collected and structure determination is in progress. PMID:23295482

  2. A Single-Amino-Acid Polymorphism in Chikungunya Virus E2 Glycoprotein Influences Glycosaminoglycan Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Laurie A.; Khomandiak, Solomiia; Ashbrook, Alison W.; Weller, Romy; Heise, Mark T.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging arbovirus responsible for outbreaks of infection throughout Asia and Africa, causing an acute illness characterized by fever, rash, and polyarthralgia. Although CHIKV infects a broad range of host cells, little is known about how CHIKV binds and gains access to the target cell interior. In this study, we tested whether glycosaminoglycan (GAG) binding is required for efficient CHIKV replication using CHIKV vaccine strain 181/25 and clinical isolate SL15649. Preincubation of strain 181/25, but not SL15649, with soluble GAGs resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of infection. While parental Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are permissive for both strains, neither strain efficiently bound to or infected mutant CHO cells devoid of GAG expression. Although GAGs appear to be required for efficient binding of both strains, they exhibit differential requirements for GAGs, as SL15649 readily infected cells that express excess chondroitin sulfate but that are devoid of heparan sulfate, whereas 181/25 did not. We generated a panel of 181/25 and SL15649 variants containing reciprocal amino acid substitutions at positions 82 and 318 in the E2 glycoprotein. Reciprocal exchange at residue 82 resulted in a phenotype switch; Gly82 results in efficient infection of mutant CHO cells but a decrease in heparin binding, whereas Arg82 results in reduced infectivity of mutant cells and an increase in heparin binding. These results suggest that E2 residue 82 is a primary determinant of GAG utilization, which likely mediates attenuation of vaccine strain 181/25. IMPORTANCE Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection causes a debilitating rheumatic disease that can persist for months to years, and yet there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral therapies. Like other alphaviruses, CHIKV displays broad tissue tropism, which is thought to be influenced by virus-receptor interactions. In this study, we determined that cell-surface glycosaminoglycans are

  3. Two distinct trimeric conformations of natively membrane-anchored full-length herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Vasishtan, Daven; Hernández Durán, Anna; Vollmer, Benjamin; White, Paul; Prasad Pandurangan, Arun; Siebert, C. Alistair; Topf, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses are enveloped by a lipid bilayer acquired during assembly, which is typically studded with one or two types of glycoproteins. These viral surface proteins act as the primary interface between the virus and the host. Entry of enveloped viruses relies on specialized fusogen proteins to help merge the virus membrane with the host membrane. In the multicomponent herpesvirus fusion machinery, glycoprotein B (gB) acts as this fusogen. Although the structure of the gB ectodomain postfusion conformation has been determined, any other conformations (e.g., prefusion, intermediate conformations) have so far remained elusive, thus restricting efforts to develop antiviral treatments and prophylactic vaccines. Here, we have characterized the full-length herpes simplex virus 1 gB in a native membrane by displaying it on cell-derived vesicles and using electron cryotomography. Alongside the known postfusion conformation, a novel one was identified. Its structure, in the context of the membrane, was determined by subvolume averaging and found to be trimeric like the postfusion conformation, but appeared more condensed. Hierarchical constrained density-fitting of domains unexpectedly revealed the fusion loops in this conformation to be apart and pointing away from the anchoring membrane. This vital observation is a substantial step forward in understanding the complex herpesvirus fusion mechanism, and opens up new opportunities for more targeted intervention of herpesvirus entry. PMID:27035968

  4. Surface expression of influenza virus neuraminidase, an amino-terminally anchored viral membrane glycoprotein, in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L V; Compans, R W; Davis, A R; Bos, T J; Nayak, D P

    1985-01-01

    We have investigated the site of surface expression of the neuraminidase (NA) glycoprotein of influenza A virus, which, in contrast to the hemagglutinin, is bound to membranes by hydrophobic residues near the NH2-terminus. Madin-Darby canine kidney or primary African green monkey kidney cells infected with influenza A/WSN/33 virus and subsequently labeled with monoclonal antibody to the NA and then with a colloidal gold- or ferritin-conjugated second antibody exhibited specific labeling of apical surfaces. Using simian virus 40 late expression vectors, we also studied the surface expression of the complete NA gene (SNC) and a truncated NA gene (SN10) in either primary or a polarized continuous line (MA104) of African green monkey kidney cells. The polypeptides encoded by the cloned NA cDNAs were expressed on the surface of both cell types. Analysis of [3H]mannose-labeled polypeptides from recombinant virus-infected MA104 cells showed that the products of cloned NA cDNA comigrated with glycosylated NA from influenza virus-infected cells. Both the complete and the truncated glycoproteins were found to be preferentially expressed on apical plasma membranes, as detected by immunogold labeling. These results indicate that the NA polypeptide contains structural features capable of directing the transport of the protein to apical cell surfaces and the first 10 amino-terminal residues of the NA polypeptide are not involved in this process. Images PMID:3016520

  5. Lassa fever: implications of T-cell immunity for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    ter Meulen, J

    1999-08-20

    Lassa fever is a re-emerging viral hemorrhagic fever, which causes significant human morbidity in endemic regions of West Africa. Attempts to vaccinate against this virus in animal models including non-human primates have revealed that eliciting a strong cellular immune response protects from clinical disease, but not infection, in the absence of measurable neutralizing antibodies. As there is renewed interest in developing a vaccine against Lassa fever for use in humans, several questions should be addressed in view of the scarce knowledge of the mechanisms of natural immunity against this disease. MHC-dependency of a vaccine relying mainly on the induction of T-cell immunity and its ability to cross-protect against different Lassa virus strains will be important issues. Furthermore, the question whether the vaccine can prevent human-to-human transmission of the virus should be discussed and the possibility that vaccination could predispose to immunopathology should be excluded. We are addressing some of the above mentioned problems concerning natural immunity through field studies in the Republic of Guinea, West Africa, and are presently studying the CD4 cell responses of Lassa antibody positive subjects on the basis of T-cell proliferation assays using recombinant Lassa virus proteins.

  6. Oligomer formation of the gB glycoprotein of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Highlander, S L; Goins, W F; Person, S; Holland, T C; Levine, M; Glorioso, J C

    1991-01-01

    Oligomer formation of the gB glycoprotein of herpes simplex virus type 1 was studied by sedimentation analysis of radioactively labeled infected cell and virion lysates. Fractions from sucrose gradients were precipitated with a pool of gB-specific monoclonal antibodies and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Pulse-labeled gB from infected cell was synthesized as monomers and converted to oligomers posttranslationally. The oligomers from infected cells and from virions sedimented as dimers, and there was no evidence of higher-molecular-weight forms. To identify amino acid sequences of gB that contribute to oligomer formation, pairs of mutant plasmids were transfected into Vero cells and superinfected with a gB-null mutant virus to stimulate plasmid-specified gene expression. Radioactively labeled lysates were precipitated with antibodies and examined by SDS-PAGE. Polypeptides from cotransfections were precipitated with an antibody that recognized amino acid sequences present in only one of the two polypeptides. A coprecipitated polypeptide lacking the antibody target epitope was presumed to contain the sequences necessary for oligomer formation. Using this technique, two noncontiguous sites for oligomer formation were detected. An upstream site was localized between residues 93 and 282, and a downstream site was localized between residues 596 and 711. Oligomer formation resulted from molecular interactions between two upstream sites, between two downstream sites, and between an upstream and a downstream site. A schematic diagram of a gB oligomer is presented that is consistent with these data. Images PMID:1649330

  7. Structure-function analysis of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein B with fusion-from-without activity

    SciTech Connect

    Roller, Devin G.; Dollery, Stephen J.; Doyle, James L.; Nicola, Anthony V.

    2008-12-20

    Fusion-from-without (FFWO) is the rapid induction of cell fusion by virions in the absence of viral protein synthesis. The combination of two amino acid mutations in envelope glycoprotein B (gB), one in the ectodomain and one in the cytoplasmic tail, can confer FFWO activity to wild type herpes simplex virus (HSV). In this report, we analyzed the entry and cell fusion phenotypes of HSV that contains FFWO gB, with emphasis on the cellular receptors for HSV, nectin-1, nectin-2 and HVEM. The ability of an HSV strain with FFWO gB to efficiently mediate FFWO via a specific gD-receptor correlated with its ability to mediate viral entry by that receptor. A FFWO form of gB was not sufficient to switch the entry of HSV from a pH-dependent, endocytic pathway to a direct fusion, pH-independent pathway. The conformation of gB with FFWO activity was not globally altered relative to wild type. However, distinct monoclonal antibodies had reduced reactivity with FFWO gB, suggesting an altered antigenic structure relative to wild type. FFWO was blocked by preincubation of virions with neutralizing antibodies to gB or gD. Together with previous studies, the results indicate that the roles of gB in FFWO and in virus-cell fusion during entry are related but not identical. This study also suggests that the FFWO function of gB is not a specific determinant for the selection of HSV entry pathway and that antigenic differences in FFWO gB may reflect its enhanced fusion activity.

  8. INDUCTION OF NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODIES TO HENDRA AND NIPAH GLYCOPROTEINS USING A VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS IN VIVO EXPESSION SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Defang, Gabriel N.; Khetawat, Dimple; Broder, Christopher C.; Quinnan, Gerald V.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of Hendra Virus (HeV) and Nipah Virus (NiV) which can cause fatal infections in both animals and humans has triggered a search for an effective vaccine. Here, we have explored the potential for generating an effective humoral immune response to these zoonotic pathogens using an alphavirus-based vaccine platform. Groups of mice were immunized with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) encoding the attachment or fusion glycoproteins of either HeV or NiV. We demonstrate the induction of highly potent cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to both viruses using this approach. Preliminary study suggested early enhancement in the antibody response with use of a modified version of VRP. Overall, these data suggest that the use of an alphavirus-derived vaccine platform might serve as a viable approach for development of an effective vaccine against the henipaviruses. PMID:21050901

  9. Induction of long-term immunity against respiratory syncytial virus glycoprotein by an osmotic polymeric nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Firdous, Jannatul; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Park, Sung-Moo; Cheon, In-Su; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Yoon, Hyo-Shin; Song, Manki; Chang, Jun; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Park, Yeong-Min; Boraschi, Diana; Han, Seung-Hyun; Cho, Chong-Su; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2014-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most common causes of viral deaths in infants worldwide, yet no effective vaccines are available. Here, we report an osmotically active polysaccharide-based polysorbitol transporter (PST) prepared from sorbitol diacrylate and low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (PEI) showing a potent, yet safe, adjuvant activity and acting as an effective delivery tool for RSV glycoprotein (RGp) antigen. PST showed no toxicity in vitro or in vivo, unlike PEI and the well-known experimental mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT). PST formed nano-sized complexes with RGp by simple mixing, without affecting antigenic stability. The complexes exhibited negative surface charges that made them highly efficient in the selective activation of phagocytic cells and enhancement of phagocytic uptake. This resulted in an improved cytokine production and in the significant augmentation of RGp-specific antibody production, which persisted for over 200 days. Interestingly, PST/RGp enhanced phagocytic uptake owing to the osmotic property of PST and its negative zeta potential, suggesting that PST could selectively stimulate phagocytic cells, thereby facilitating a long-lived antigen-specific immune response, which was presumably further enhanced by the polysaccharide properties of PST.

  10. Mechanistic Understanding of N-Glycosylation in Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Maturation and Function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Yujie; Frabutt, Dylan A; Zhang, Xihe; Yao, Xiaoyu; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Zhuo; Liu, Chaonan; Zheng, Shimin; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Hui

    2017-02-14

    The Ebola virus (EBOV) trimeric envelope glycoprotein (GP) precursors are cleaved into the receptor-binding GP1 and the fusion-mediating GP2 subunits and incorporated into virions to initiate infection. GP1 and GP2 form heterodimers, which have 15 or 2 N-glycosylation sites (NGSs), respectively. Here, we investigated the mechanism of how N-glycosylation contributes to GP expression, maturation, and function. As reported before, we found that although GP1 NGSs are not critical, the two GP2 NGSs, N563 and N618, are essential to the GP function. Further analysis uncovered that N563 and N618 regulate GP processing, demannosylation, oligomerization, and conformation. Consequently, these two NGSs are required for GP incorporation into EBOV-like particles (E-VLP) and HIV-1 pseudovirions, and determine viral transduction efficiency. Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we knocked out the two classical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones calnexin (CNX) and/or calreticulin (CRT) and found that both CNX and CRT increase the GP expression. Nevertheless, NGSs are not required for the GP interaction with CNX or CRT. Together, we conclude that although N563 and N618 are not required for EBOV GP expression, they synergistically regulate its maturation, which determines its functionality.

  11. Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to An Antibody From a Human Survivor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.E.; Fusco, M.L.; Hessell, A.J.; Oswald, W.B.; Burton, D.R.; Saphire, E.O.

    2009-05-20

    Ebola virus (EBOV) entry requires the surface glycoprotein (GP) to initiate attachment and fusion of viral and host membranes. Here we report the crystal structure of EBOV GP in its trimeric, pre-fusion conformation (GP1+GP2) bound to a neutralizing antibody, KZ52, derived from a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit outbreak. Three GP1 viral attachment subunits assemble to form a chalice, cradled by the GP2 fusion subunits, while a novel glycan cap and projected mucin-like domain restrict access to the conserved receptor-binding site sequestered in the chalice bowl. The glycocalyx surrounding GP is likely central to immune evasion and may explain why survivors have insignificant neutralizing antibody titres. KZ52 recognizes a protein epitope at the chalice base where it clamps several regions of the pre-fusion GP2 to the amino terminus of GP1. This structure provides a template for unraveling the mechanism of EBOV GP-mediated fusion and for future immunotherapeutic development.

  12. Iterative structure-based improvement of a respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Li; Chen, Man; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Kong, Wing-Pui; Lai, Yen-Ting; Rundlet, Emily J.; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Yang, Yongping; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Guttman, Miklos; Lees, Christopher R.; Pancera, Marie; Sastry, Mallika; Soto, Cinque; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B.E.; Thomas, Paul V.; Van Galen, Joseph G.; Baxa, Ulrich; Lee, Kelly K.; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Structure-based design of vaccines has been a long-sought goal, especially the iterative optimization used so successfully with structure-based design of drugs. We previously developed a 1st-generation vaccine antigen called DS-Cav1, comprising a pre-fusion-stabilized form of the fusion (F) glycoprotein, which elicited high titers of protective responses against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in mice and macaques. Here we report the improvement of DS-Cav1 through iterative cycles of structure-based design that significantly increased the titer of RSV-protective responses. The resultant 2nd-generation “DS2”-stabilized immunogens have F subunits genetically linked, fusion peptide deleted, and interprotomer movements stabilized by an additional disulfide bond. These DS2-immunogens are promising vaccine candidates with superior attributes, such as the absence of a requirement for furin cleavage and increased antigenic stability to heat inactivation. The iterative structure-based improvement described here may have utility in the optimization of other vaccine antigens. PMID:27478931

  13. Synthetic glycoprotein D-related peptides protect mice against herpes simplex virus challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, R J; Cerini, C P; Heilman, C J; Joseph, A D; Dietzschold, B; Golub, E; Long, D; Ponce de Leon, M; Cohen, G H

    1985-01-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus (HSV) protects mice from a lethal challenge by either HSV type 1 (HSV-1; oral) or HSV-2 (genital). We evaluated whether synthetic peptides representing residues 1 through 23 of gD (mature protein) can be used as a potential synthetic herpesvirus vaccine. The immunogenicity of the peptides was demonstrated by the biological reactivity of antipeptide sera in immunoprecipitation and neutralization assays. All sera which immunoprecipitated gD had neutralizing against both HSV-1 and HSV-2. The highest titers were found in animals immunized with the longest peptides. The region of residues 1 through 23 was immunogenic regardless of whether the type 1 or type 2 sequence was presented to the animal. Immunization of mice with gD or synthetic peptides conferred solid protection against a footpad challenge with HSV-2. However, the peptides were not as effective as gD in protection against an intraperitoneal challenge. The results suggested that synthetic vaccines based on gD show promise and should be more rigorously tested in a variety of animal models. Images PMID:2999419

  14. The mouse mammary tumour virus long terminal repeat encodes a type II transmembrane glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Korman, A J; Bourgarel, P; Meo, T; Rieckhof, G E

    1992-01-01

    Superantigens are products of bacterial or viral origin which stimulate large numbers of T cells as a consequence of the interaction of particular V beta chains of the T cell receptor with class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and superantigen on the stimulating cell. The Minor lymphocyte stimulatory (Mls) antigens, originally discovered as strong lymphocyte stimulatory determinants in vitro and subsequently shown to delete T cells expressing specific V beta chains during development, have recently been shown to be genetically linked to endogenous mouse mammary tumour viruses (MTVs). This stimulation is effectuated by an unidentified product encoded by an open reading frame (orf) present in the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) of MTVs. Using in vitro translation in the presence of rough microsomal vesicles, we show that (i) the orf of MTV encodes a type II transmembrane glycoprotein (N-terminus intracellular, C-terminus extracytoplasmic), and (ii) a cotranslationally secreted orf protein is not produced. We have also isolated and sequenced several endogenous MTV orfs (MTV-1, MTV-6 and MTV-13) which are involved in the deletion of V beta-bearing T cells; each of these sequences are nearly identical to each other. These observations, together with sequence comparisons of several orf genes, lead to a model of action of viral superantigens. Images PMID:1316276

  15. Immunogenicity of synthetic peptides representing neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, E.; Landolt, M.; LaPatra, S.; Winton, J.

    1997-01-01

    Three peptides, P76, P226, and P268 representing 3 putative antigen~c determinants on the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), were synthesized and injected into rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to assess their immunogen~city. Antisera extracted from the immunized trout were analyzed uslng an enzyme linked imrnunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the presence of antibodies that could bind to the peptides or to intact virions of IHNV. The antisera were also tested for neutralizing activity against IHNV by a complement-mediated neutralization assay. In general, recognition of the peptides and IHNV was low and only a few antibody binding patterns were demonstrated. Antisera from fish injected with P76 constructs recognized the homologous peptide more than the heterologous peptides, whereas antisera from fish inoculated with either P226 or P268 constructs recognized P76 equally, or better, than the homologous peptide; however, there was a high degree of individual variation within each treatment group. Neutralization actlvlty was demonstrated by serum from a single flsh lnlected with one of the pept~des (P268) and from 7 of 10 positive control f~sh Infected with an attenuated strain of IHNV Possible explanations for the dichotomous immune responses are discussed. These results indicate we need to improve our overall understanding of the

  16. A recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus expressing the envelope glycoprotein of Hantaan virus induced protective immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hantaviruses cause acute hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Currently, several types of inactivated HFRS vaccines are widely used, however the limited ability of these immunogen to elicit neutralizing antibodies restricts vaccine efficacy. Development of an effective vaccine to overcome this weakness is must. Methods In the present study, a recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus bearing the hantaan virus (HTNV) envelope glycoproteins (GP), rLV-M, was constructed. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the rLV-M and a series of immunological assays were conducted to determine the immunogenicity of the recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus. The humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by rLV-M were compared with those of the inactivated HFRS vaccine. Results Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) showed the rLV-M expressed target proteins in HEK-293cells. In mice, the rLV-M efficiently induced GP-specific humoral responses and protection against HTNV infection. Furthermore, the rLV-M induced higher neutralizing antibody titers than the inactivated HFRS vaccine control. Conclusions The results indicated the potential of using a pseudotyped lentivirus as a delivery vector for a hantavirus vaccine immunogen. PMID:24093752

  17. C3d enhanced DNA vaccination induced humoral immune response to glycoprotein C of pseudorabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Tiezhu; Fan Huiying; Tan Yadi; Xiao Shaobo; Ling Jieyu; Chen Huanchun; Guo Aizhen . E-mail: aizhen@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2006-09-08

    Murine C3d were utilized to enhance immunogenicity of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gC DNA vaccination. Three copies of C3d and four copies of CR2-binding domain M28{sub 4} were fused, respectively, to truncated gC gene encoding soluble glycoprotein C (sgC) in pcDNA3.1. BALB/c mice were, respectively, immunized with recombinant plasmids, blank vector, and inactivated vaccine. The antibody ELISA titer for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA was 49-fold more than that for sgC DNA, and the neutralizing antibody obtained 8-fold rise. Protection of mice from death after lethal PrV (316 LD{sub 5}) challenge was augmented from 25% to 100%. Furthermore, C3d fusion increased Th2-biased immune response by inducing IL-4 production. The IL-4 level for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA immunization approached that for the inactivated vaccine. Compared to C3d, M28 enhanced sgC DNA immunogenicity to a lesser extent. In conclusion, we demonstrated that murine C3d fusion significantly enhanced gC DNA immunity by directing Th1-biased to a balanced and more effective Th1/Th2 response.

  18. Expression and immunohistochemical distribution of duck plague virus glycoprotein gE in infected ducks.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xiang, Jun; Xie, Wei; Shen, Fuxiao; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Luo, Qihui; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2011-03-01

    To determine the distribution of duck plague virus (DPV) gE protein in paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of experimentally DPV-infected ducks, an indirect immunoperoxidase assay was established to detect glycoprotein E (gE) protein for the first time. The rabbit anti-His-gE serum, raised against the recombinant His-gE fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), was prepared and purified. Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence analysis showed that the anti-His-gE serum had a high level of reactivity and specificity and could be used as the first antibody for further experiments to study the distribution of DPV gE protein in DPV-infected tissues. A number of DPV gE proteins were distributed in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen, liver, esophagus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and kidney of DPV-infected ducks and a few DPV gE were distributed in the Harders glands, myocardium, cerebrum, and lung, whereas the gE was not seen in the skin, muscle, and pancreas. Moreover, DPV gE was expressed abundantly in the cytoplasm of lymphocytes, reticulum cells, macrophages, epithelial cells, and hepatocytes. The present study may be useful not only for describing the characteristics of gE expression and distribution in infected ducks but also for understanding the pathogenesis of DPV.

  19. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells to hepatitis C virus recombinant envelope glycoprotein 2 protein exposure.

    PubMed

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Ribeiro, Lívia Carolina de Abreu; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Afonso, Ana; Nogueira, Camila Tita; Generoso, Wesley Cardoso; Alberice, Juliana Vieira; Rudnicki, Martina; Ferrer, Renila; Fonseca, Luiz Marcos da; Costa, Paulo Inácio da

    2014-09-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) encodes approximately 10 different structural and non-structural proteins, including the envelope glycoprotein 2 (E2). HCV proteins, especially the envelope proteins, bind to cell receptors and can damage tissues. Endothelial inflammation is the most important determinant of fibrosis progression and, consequently, cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the inflammatory response of endothelial cells to two recombinant forms of the HCV E2 protein produced in different expression systems (Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris). We observed the induction of cell death and the production of nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, interleukin-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor A in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) stimulated by the two recombinant E2 proteins. The E2-induced apoptosis of HUVECs was confirmed using the molecular marker PARP. The apoptosis rescue observed when the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was used suggests that reactive oxygen species are involved in E2-induced apoptosis. We propose that these proteins are involved in the chronic inflammation caused by HCV.

  20. Characterization of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complexes expressed by recombinant vaccinia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, R; Thudium, K; Berger, K; Kuo, C; Gervase, B; Hall, J; Selby, M; Kuo, G; Houghton, M; Choo, Q L

    1993-01-01

    We constructed recombinant vaccinia virus vectors for expression of the structural region of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Infection of mammalian cells with a vector (vv/HCV1-906) encoding C-E1-E2-NS2 generated major protein species of 22 kDa (C), 33 to 35 kDa (E1), and 70 to 72 kDa (E2), as observed previously with other mammalian expression systems. The bulk of the E1 and E2 expressed by vv/HCV1-906 was found integrated into endoplasmic reticulum membranes as core-glycosylated species, suggesting that these E1 and E2 species represent intracellular forms of the HCV envelope proteins. HCV E1 and E2 formed E1-E2 complexes which were precipitated by either anti-E1 or anti-E2 serum and which sedimented at approximately 15 S on glycerol density gradients. No evidence of intermolecular disulfide bonding between E1 and E2 was detected. E1 and E2 were copurified to approximately 90% purity by mild detergent extraction followed by chromatography on Galanthus nivalus lectin-agarose and DEAE-Fractogel. Immunization of chimpanzees with purified E1-E2 generated high titers of anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies. Further studies, to be reported separately, demonstrated that purified E1-E2 complexes were recognized at high frequency by HCV+ human sera (D. Y. Chien, Q.-L. Choo, R. Ralston, R. Spaete, M. Tong, M. Houghton, and G. Kuo, Lancet, in press) and generated protective immunity in chimpanzees (Q.-L. Choo, G. Kuo, R. Ralston, A. Weiner, D. Chien, G. Van Nest, J. Han, K. Berger, K. Thudium, J. Kansopon, J. McFarland, A. Tabrizi, K. Ching, B. Mass, L. B. Cummins, E. Muchmore, and M. Houghton, submitted for publication), suggesting that these purified HCV envelope proteins display native HCV epitopes. Images PMID:8411378

  1. Structure of Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein 42 Suggests a Mechanism for Triggering Receptor-Activated Virus Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, Austin N.; Sorem, Jessica; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2009-05-26

    Epstein-Barr virus requires glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42 to fuse its lipid envelope with B cells. Gp42 is a type II membrane protein consisting of a flexible N-terminal region, which binds gH/gL, and a C-terminal lectin-like domain that binds to the B-cell entry receptor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II. Gp42 triggers membrane fusion after HLA binding, a process that requires simultaneous binding to gH/gL and a functional hydrophobic pocket in the lectin domain adjacent to the HLA binding site. Here we present the structure of gp42 in its unbound form. Comparisons to the previously determined structure of a gp42:HLA complex reveals additional N-terminal residues forming part of the gH/gL binding site and structural changes in the receptor binding domain. Although the core of the lectin domain remains similar, significant shifts in two loops and an {alpha} helix bordering the essential hydrophobic pocket suggest a structural mechanism for triggering fusion.

  2. Induction of protective immunity in animals vaccinated with recombinant vaccinia viruses that express PreM and E glycoproteins of Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, A; Kimura-Kuroda, J; Ogimoto, M; Miyamoto, M; Sata, T; Sato, T; Takamura, C; Kurata, T; Kojima, A; Yasui, K

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone representing the genome of structural proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was inserted into the thymidine kinase gene of vaccinia virus strains LC16mO and WR under the control of a strong early-late promoter for the vaccinia virus 7.5-kilodalton polypeptide. Indirect immunofluorescence and fluorescence-activated flow cytometric analysis revealed that the recombinant vaccinia viruses expressed JEV E protein on the membrane surface, as well as in the cytoplasm, of recombinant-infected cells. In addition, the E protein expressed from the JEV recombinants reacted to nine different characteristic monoclonal antibodies, some of which have hemagglutination-inhibiting and JEV-neutralizing activities. Radioimmunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that two major proteins expressed in recombinant-infected cells were processed and glycosylated as the authentic PreM and E glycoproteins of JEV. Inoculation of rabbits with the infectious recombinant vaccinia virus resulted in rapid production of antiserum specific for the PreM and E glycoproteins of JEV. This antiserum had both hemagglutination-inhibiting and virus-neutralizing activities against JEV. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with the recombinant also produced JEV-neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to challenge with JEV. Images PMID:2159544

  3. Risk Maps of Lassa Fever in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Rogers, David John

    2009-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is caused by a viral haemorrhagic arenavirus that affects two to three million people in West Africa, causing a mortality of between 5,000 and 10,000 each year. The natural reservoir of Lassa virus is the multi-mammate rat Mastomys natalensis, which lives in houses and surrounding fields. With the aim of gaining more information to control this disease, we here carry out a spatial analysis of Lassa fever data from human cases and infected rodent hosts covering the period 1965–2007. Information on contemporary environmental conditions (temperature, rainfall, vegetation) was derived from NASA Terra MODIS satellite sensor data and other sources and for elevation from the GTOPO30 surface for the region from Senegal to the Congo. All multi-temporal data were analysed using temporal Fourier techniques to generate images of means, amplitudes and phases which were used as the predictor variables in the models. In addition, meteorological rainfall data collected between 1951 and 1989 were used to generate a synoptic rainfall surface for the same region. Methodology/Principal Findings Three different analyses (models) are presented, one superimposing Lassa fever outbreaks on the mean rainfall surface (Model 1) and the other two using non-linear discriminant analytical techniques. Model 2 selected variables in a step-wise inclusive fashion, and Model 3 used an information-theoretic approach in which many different random combinations of 10 variables were fitted to the Lassa fever data. Three combinations of absence∶presence clusters were used in each of Models 2 and 3, the 2 absence∶1 presence cluster combination giving what appeared to be the best result. Model 1 showed that the recorded outbreaks of Lassa fever in human populations occurred in zones receiving between 1,500 and 3,000 mm rainfall annually. Rainfall, and to a much lesser extent temperature variables, were most strongly selected in both Models 2 and 3, and neither vegetation nor

  4. Epstein–Barr virus glycoprotein gM can interact with the cellular protein p32 and knockdown of p32 impairs virus

    SciTech Connect

    Changotra, Harish; Turk, Susan M.; Artigues, Antonio; Thakur, Nagendra; Gore, Mindy; Muggeridge, Martin I.; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M.

    2016-02-15

    The Epstein–Barr virus glycoprotein complex gMgN has been implicated in assembly and release of fully enveloped virus, although the precise role that it plays has not been elucidated. We report here that the long predicted cytoplasmic tail of gM is not required for complex formation and that it interacts with the cellular protein p32, which has been reported to be involved in nuclear egress of human cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus. Although redistribution of p32 and colocalization with gM was not observed in virus infected cells, knockdown of p32 expression by siRNA or lentivirus-delivered shRNA recapitulated the phenotype of a virus lacking expression of gNgM. A proportion of virus released from cells sedimented with characteristics of virus lacking an intact envelope and there was an increase in virus trapped in nuclear condensed chromatin. The observations suggest the possibility that p32 may also be involved in nuclear egress of Epstein–Barr virus. - Highlights: • The predicted cytoplasmic tail of gM is not required to complex with gN. • Cellular p32 can interact with the predicted cytoplasmic tail of EBV gM. • Knockdown of p32 recapitulates the phenotype of virus lacking the gNgM complex.

  5. Comparative analyses of the 9 glycoprotein genes found in wild-type and vaccine strains of varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Storlie, Johnathan; Maresova, Lucie; Jackson, Wallen; Grose, Charles

    2008-03-01

    The complete DNA sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains of varicella-zoster virus have been published and listed in GenBank. In this comparative genomic analysis, the sequences of the 9 glycoprotein open reading frames (ORFs) were compared. They included gE (ORF68), gI (ORF 67), gC (ORF14), gH (ORF37), gL (ORF60), gB (ORF31), gK (ORF5), gM (ORF50), and gN (ORF8 or ORF9A). After realignment on the basis of newer data, the corrected gB sequence was lengthened to include 931 residues. The data showed that there were glycoprotein polymorphisms that differentiated North American/European strains from Japanese strains-for example, an additional ATG codon in the gL of all Oka strains. Also, there were a small number of coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms present only in glycoproteins of vaccine strains. Because these changes were highly conserved, the structure of the glycoprotein was unlikely to be altered.

  6. Emerging infectious diseases: Focus on infection control issues for novel coronaviruses (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-CoV and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-CoV), hemorrhagic fever viruses (Lassa and Ebola), and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, A(H5N1) and A(H7N9).

    PubMed

    Weber, David J; Rutala, William A; Fischer, William A; Kanamori, Hajime; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E

    2016-05-02

    Over the past several decades, we have witnessed the emergence of many new infectious agents, some of which are major public threats. New and emerging infectious diseases which are both transmissible from patient-to-patient and virulent with a high mortality include novel coronaviruses (SARS-CoV, MERS-CV), hemorrhagic fever viruses (Lassa, Ebola), and highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses, A(H5N1) and A(H7N9). All healthcare facilities need to have policies and plans in place for early identification of patients with a highly communicable diseases which are highly virulent, ability to immediately isolate such patients, and provide proper management (e.g., training and availability of personal protective equipment) to prevent transmission to healthcare personnel, other patients and visitors to the healthcare facility.

  7. Structure-Based Design of Head-Only Fusion Glycoprotein Immunogens for Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Man; Kong, Wing-Pui; Ngwuta, Joan O.; Thomas, Paul V.; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Ko, Kiyoon; Zhou, Tongqing; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a significant cause of severe respiratory illness worldwide, particularly in infants, young children, and the elderly. Although no licensed vaccine is currently available, an engineered version of the metastable RSV fusion (F) surface glycoprotein—stabilized in the pre-fusion (pre-F) conformation by “DS-Cav1” mutations—elicits high titer RSV-neutralizing responses. Moreover, pre-F-specific antibodies, often against the neutralization-sensitive antigenic site Ø in the membrane-distal head region of trimeric F glycoprotein, comprise a substantial portion of the human response to natural RSV infection. To focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø, we designed a series of RSV F immunogens that comprised the membrane-distal head of the F glycoprotein in its pre-F conformation. These “head-only” immunogens formed monomers, dimers, and trimers. Antigenic analysis revealed that a majority of the 70 engineered head-only immunogens displayed reactivity to site Ø-targeting antibodies, which was similar to that of the parent RSV F DS-Cav1 trimers, often with increased thermostability. We evaluated four of these head-only immunogens in detail, probing their recognition by antibodies, their physical stability, structure, and immunogenicity. When tested in naïve mice, a head-only trimer, half the size of the parent RSV F trimer, induced RSV titers, which were statistically comparable to those induced by DS-Cav1. When used to boost DS-Cav1-primed mice, two head-only RSV F immunogens, a dimer and a trimer, boosted RSV-neutralizing titers to levels that were comparable to those boosted by DS-Cav1, although with higher site Ø-directed responses. Our results provide proof-of-concept for the ability of the smaller head-only RSV F immunogens to focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø. Decent primary immunogenicity, enhanced physical stability, potential ease of manufacture, and potent immunogenicity

  8. Disulfide bond structure determination and biochemical analysis of glycoprotein C from herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rux, A H; Moore, W T; Lambris, J D; Abrams, W R; Peng, C; Friedman, H M; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1996-01-01

    A biochemical analysis of glycoprotein C (gC of herpes simplex virus was undertaken to further characterize the structure of the glycoprotein and to determine its disulfide bond arrangement. We used three recombinant forms of gC, gC1(457t), gC1(delta33-123t), and gC2(426t), each truncated prior to the transmembrane region. The proteins were expressed and secreted by using a baculovirus expression system and have been shown to bind to monoclonal antibodies which recognize discontinuous epitopes and to complement component C3b in a dose-dependent manner. We confirmed the N-terminal residues of each mature protein by Edman degradation and confirmed the internal deletion in gC1(delta33-123t). The molecular weight and extent of glycosylation of gC1 (457t), gC1(delta33-123t), and gC2(426t) were determined by treating each protein with endoglycosidases and then subjecting it to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometric analysis. The data indicate that eight to nine of the predicted N-linked oligosaccharide sites on gC1(457t) are occupied by glycans of approximately 1,000 Da. In addition, O-linked oligosaccharides are present on gC1(457t), primarily localized to the N-terminal region (amino acids [aa] 33 to 123) of the protein. gC2(426t) contains N-linked oligosaccharides, but no O-linked oligosaccharides were detected. To determine the disulfide bond arrangement of the eight cysteines of gC1(457t),the protein was cleaved with cyanogen bromide. SDS-PAGE analysis followed by Edman degradation identified three cysteine-containing fragments which are not connected by disulfide linkages. Chemical modification of cysteines combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry identified disulfide bonds between cysteine 1 (aa 127) and cysteine 2 (aa 144) and between cysteine 3 (aa 286) and cysteine 4 (aa 347). Further proteolysis of the cyanogen bromide-generated fragment containing cysteine 5 through

  9. A Recombinant Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Confers Full Protection against Rift Valley Fever Challenge in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Faburay, Bonto; Wilson, William C.; Gaudreault, Natasha N.; Davis, A. Sally; Shivanna, Vinay; Bawa, Bhupinder; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Ma, Wenjun; Drolet, Barbara S.; Morozov, Igor; McVey, D. Scott; Richt, Juergen A.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suitable for use in livestock or humans outside endemic areas. Here we report the evaluation of the efficacy of a recombinant subunit vaccine based on the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins. In a previous study, the vaccine elicited strong virus neutralizing antibody responses in sheep and was DIVA (differentiating naturally infected from vaccinated animals) compatible. In the current efficacy study, a group of sheep (n = 5) was vaccinated subcutaneously with the glycoprotein-based subunit vaccine candidate and then subjected to heterologous challenge with the virulent Kenya-128B-15 RVFV strain. The vaccine elicited high virus neutralizing antibody titers and conferred complete protection in all vaccinated sheep, as evidenced by prevention of viremia, fever and absence of RVFV-associated histopathological lesions. We conclude that the subunit vaccine platform represents a promising strategy for the prevention and control of RVFV infections in susceptible hosts. PMID:27296136

  10. A Recombinant Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Confers Full Protection against Rift Valley Fever Challenge in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Faburay, Bonto; Wilson, William C; Gaudreault, Natasha N; Davis, A Sally; Shivanna, Vinay; Bawa, Bhupinder; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Ma, Wenjun; Drolet, Barbara S; Morozov, Igor; McVey, D Scott; Richt, Juergen A

    2016-06-14

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suitable for use in livestock or humans outside endemic areas. Here we report the evaluation of the efficacy of a recombinant subunit vaccine based on the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins. In a previous study, the vaccine elicited strong virus neutralizing antibody responses in sheep and was DIVA (differentiating naturally infected from vaccinated animals) compatible. In the current efficacy study, a group of sheep (n = 5) was vaccinated subcutaneously with the glycoprotein-based subunit vaccine candidate and then subjected to heterologous challenge with the virulent Kenya-128B-15 RVFV strain. The vaccine elicited high virus neutralizing antibody titers and conferred complete protection in all vaccinated sheep, as evidenced by prevention of viremia, fever and absence of RVFV-associated histopathological lesions. We conclude that the subunit vaccine platform represents a promising strategy for the prevention and control of RVFV infections in susceptible hosts.

  11. Synthetic peptides of neurotoxins and rabies virus glycoprotein behave as antagonists in a functional assay for the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Donnelly-Roberts, D L; Lentz, T L

    1989-01-01

    Peptides of portions of loop 2 (the "toxic" loop) of snake venom curare-mimetic neurotoxins (alpha-bungarotoxin and king cobra toxin b) and of a structurally similar region of the rabies virus glycoprotein were synthesized. The effect of the peptides on carbachol-induced 22Na+ flux into BC3H-1 cells, which contain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on their surfaces, was measured. Both the neurotoxin and glycoprotein peptides inhibited ion transport with IC50 values of 10(-4) M to 7 x 10(-7) M. The most effective peptides correspond to neurotoxin loop 2 and inhibited 22Na+ flux in the micromolar range comparable to the competitive antagonist d-tubocurarine. These findings show that neurotoxin loop 2 and the corresponding rabies virus glycoprotein segment interact with the agonist binding site of teh acetylcholine receptor and that short synthetic peptides representing portions of larger molecules by themselves can exert a biological effect on a large macromolecular complex like the acetylcholine receptor.

  12. Alteration of the N-linked Glycosylation Condition of E1 Glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia Alters Virulence in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E1, along with Erns and E2 is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). Previously we showed that glycosylation status of virulent CSFV strain Brescia E2 or Erns affects virus virulence. Here, the three putative glycosylation sites of E1 were serially removed by ...

  13. Removal of a N-linked Glycosylation Site on the Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia E(rns) Glycoprotein Affects Virulence in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) E(rns) glycoprotein is involved in several functions; including virus attachment and entry to target cells, production of antibodies, and virulence. Here, we describe the role of CSFV strain Brescia E(rns) glycosylation on virulence in swine. Amino acid residue N...

  14. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2, along with E^rns and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions including cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. In infected cells, E2 forms homodimers as well as heterodimers with E1, media...

  15. Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein gM can interact with the cellular protein p32 and knockdown of p32 impairs virus.

    PubMed

    Changotra, Harish; Turk, Susan M; Artigues, Antonio; Thakur, Nagendra; Gore, Mindy; Muggeridge, Martin I; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M

    2016-02-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein complex gMgN has been implicated in assembly and release of fully enveloped virus, although the precise role that it plays has not been elucidated. We report here that the long predicted cytoplasmic tail of gM is not required for complex formation and that it interacts with the cellular protein p32, which has been reported to be involved in nuclear egress of human cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus. Although redistribution of p32 and colocalization with gM was not observed in virus infected cells, knockdown of p32 expression by siRNA or lentivirus-delivered shRNA recapitulated the phenotype of a virus lacking expression of gNgM. A proportion of virus released from cells sedimented with characteristics of virus lacking an intact envelope and there was an increase in virus trapped in nuclear condensed chromatin. The observations suggest the possibility that p32 may also be involved in nuclear egress of Epstein-Barr virus.

  16. Characterization of Immune Responses Induced by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein (GP) and Truncated GP Isoform DNA Vaccines and Protection Against Lethal Ebola Virus Challenge in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Carrion, Ricardo; Mohan, Gopi S.; Nunneley, Jerritt; Staples, Hilary; Ticer, Anysha; Patterson, Jean L.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang, Chinglai

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its surface glycoprotein (GP), Ebola virus directs the production of large quantities of a truncated glycoprotein isoform (sGP) that is secreted into the extracellular space. We recently reported that sGP actively diverts host antibody responses against the epitopes that it shares with GP and thereby allows itself to absorb anti-GP antibodies, a phenomenon we termed “antigenic subversion.” To investigate the effect of antigenic subversion by sGP on protection against virus infection, we compared immune responses induced by different prime-boost immunization regimens with GP and sGP DNA vaccines in mice and their efficacy against lethal Ebola virus challenge. Similar levels of anti-GP antibodies were induced by 2 immunizations with sGP and GP DNA vaccines. However, 2 immunizations with GP but not sGP DNA vaccine fully protected mice from lethal challenge. Boosting with sGP or GP DNA vaccine in mice that had been primed by GP or sGP DNA vaccine augmented the levels of anti-GP antibody responses and further improved protective efficacy against Ebola virus infection. These results show that both the quality and the levels of anti-GP antibody responses affect the efficacy of protection against Ebola virus infection. PMID:25877553

  17. Characterization of Immune Responses Induced by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein (GP) and Truncated GP Isoform DNA Vaccines and Protection Against Lethal Ebola Virus Challenge in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Carrion, Ricardo; Mohan, Gopi S; Nunneley, Jerritt; Staples, Hilary; Ticer, Anysha; Patterson, Jean L; Compans, Richard W; Yang, Chinglai

    2015-10-01

    In addition to its surface glycoprotein (GP), Ebola virus directs the production of large quantities of a truncated glycoprotein isoform (sGP) that is secreted into the extracellular space. We recently reported that sGP actively diverts host antibody responses against the epitopes that it shares with GP and thereby allows itself to absorb anti-GP antibodies, a phenomenon we termed "antigenic subversion." To investigate the effect of antigenic subversion by sGP on protection against virus infection, we compared immune responses induced by different prime-boost immunization regimens with GP and sGP DNA vaccines in mice and their efficacy against lethal Ebola virus challenge. Similar levels of anti-GP antibodies were induced by 2 immunizations with sGP and GP DNA vaccines. However, 2 immunizations with GP but not sGP DNA vaccine fully protected mice from lethal challenge. Boosting with sGP or GP DNA vaccine in mice that had been primed by GP or sGP DNA vaccine augmented the levels of anti-GP antibody responses and further improved protective efficacy against Ebola virus infection. These results show that both the quality and the levels of anti-GP antibody responses affect the efficacy of protection against Ebola virus infection.

  18. Transmembrane Domains of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoproteins: Residues Involved in E1E2 Heterodimerization and Involvement of These Domains in Virus Entry▿

    PubMed Central

    Ciczora, Yann; Callens, Nathalie; Penin, François; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Dubuisson, Jean

    2007-01-01

    The transmembrane (TM) domains of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 have been shown to play multiple roles during the biogenesis of the E1E2 heterodimer. By using alanine scanning insertion mutagenesis within the TM domains of HCV envelope glycoproteins, we have previously shown that the central regions of these domains as well as the N-terminal part of the TM domain of E1 are involved in heterodimerization. Here, we used a tryptophan replacement scan of these regions to identify individual residues that participate in those interactions. Our mutagenesis study identified at least four residues involved in heterodimerization: Gly 354, Gly 358, Lys 370, and Asp 728. Interestingly, Gly 354 and Gly 358 belong to a GXXXG oligomerization motif. Our tryptophan mutants were also used to generate retrovirus-based, HCV-pseudotyped particles (HCVpp) in order to analyze the effects of these mutations on virus entry. Surprisingly, two mutants consistently displayed higher infectivity compared to that of the wild type. In contrast, HCVpp infectivity was strongly affected for many mutants, despite normal E1E2 heterodimerization and normal levels of incorporation of HCV glycoproteins into HCVpp. The characterization of some of these HCVpp mutants in the recently developed in vitro fusion assay using fluorescent-labeled liposomes indicated that mutations reducing HCVpp infectivity without altering E1E2 heterodimerization affected the fusion properties of HCV envelope glycoproteins. In conclusion, this mutational analysis identified residues involved in E1E2 heterodimerization and revealed that the TM domains of HCV envelope glycoproteins play a major role in the fusion properties of these proteins. PMID:17166909

  19. Localization and synthesis of an antigenic determinant of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D that stimulates the production of neutralizing antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, G.H.; Dietzschold, B.; Ponce de Leon, M.; Long, D.; Golub, E.; Varrichio, A.; Pereira, L.; Eisenberg, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    An antigenic determinant capable of inducing type-common herpes simplex virus (HSV)-neutralizing antibodies has been located on glycoprotein D (gD) of HSV type 1 (HSV-1). A peptide of 16 amino acids corresponding to residues 8 to 23 of the mature glycoprotein (residues 33 to 48 of the predicted gD-1 sequence) was synthesized. This peptide reacted with an anti-gD monoclonal antibody (group VII) previously shown to neutralize the infectivity of HSV-1 and HSV-2. The peptide was also recognized by polyclonal antibodies prepared against purified gD-1 but was less reactive with anti-gD2 sera. Sera from animals immunized with the synthetic peptide reacted with native gD and neutralized both HSV-1 and HSV-2.

  20. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of the attachment glycoprotein of phocine distemper viruses of the 2002 and 1988 epizootics.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Line; Arctander, Peter; Jensen, Trine H; Dietz, Hans-Henrik; Hammer, Anne S; Banyard, Ashley C; Barrett, Thomas; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the possible origin and spread of the dramatic re-emergent 2002 distemper epizootic observed among seals in Danish Waters, we have sequenced wild-type genes of the attachment (H) glycoproteins of viruses from both the 2002 and 1988 epizootics. Phylogenetic analysis of the H genes of phocine distemper virus (PDV) together with other morbilliviruses, suggests that the re-emergent 2002 PDV is more closely related to a putative recent ancestral PDV than the 1988 PDV isolates. Moreover, upsurges of distemper disease in land-living carnivores linked in time and locality to the 2002 seal epizootic in Danish Waters was investigated and determined to be caused by canine distemper virus, the closest relative of PDV, revealing no direct epidemiological link to the seal epizootics.

  1. Mapping the zoonotic niche of Lassa fever in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mylne, Adrian Q. N.; Pigott, David M.; Longbottom, Joshua; Shearer, Freya; Duda, Kirsten A.; Messina, Jane P.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Moyes, Catherine L.; Golding, Nick; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is a viral haemorrhagic illness responsible for disease outbreaks across West Africa. It is a zoonosis, with the primary reservoir species identified as the Natal multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis. The host is distributed across sub-Saharan Africa while the virus' range appears to be restricted to West Africa. The majority of infections result from interactions between the animal reservoir and human populations, although secondary transmission between humans can occur, particularly in hospital settings. Methods Using a species distribution model, the locations of confirmed human and animal infections with Lassa virus (LASV) were used to generate a probabilistic surface of zoonotic transmission potential across sub-Saharan Africa. Results Our results predict that 37.7 million people in 14 countries, across much of West Africa, live in areas where conditions are suitable for zoonotic transmission of LASV. Four of these countries, where at-risk populations are predicted, have yet to report any cases of Lassa fever. Conclusions These maps act as a spatial guide for future surveillance activities to better characterise the geographical distribution of the disease and understand the anthropological, virological and zoological interactions necessary for viral transmission. Combining this zoonotic niche map with detailed patient travel histories can aid differential diagnoses of febrile illnesses, enabling a more rapid response in providing care and reducing the risk of onward transmission. PMID:26085474

  2. The Association of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoproteins with Apolipoproteins E and B Early in Assembly Is Conserved in Lipoviral Particles*

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Audrey; Dumans, Amélie; Beaumont, Elodie; Etienne, Loïc; Roingeard, Philippe; Meunier, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus and in the HCV cell culture system (HCVcc), it is known that highly infectious virus particles have low to very low buoyant densities. These low densities have been attributed to the association of HCV with lipoprotein components, which occur during the viral morphogenesis. The resulting hybrid particles are known as lipoviral particles (LVP); however, very little is known about how these particles are created. In our study, we used Huh7.5 cells to investigate the intracellular association between envelope proteins and apolipoproteins B and E (ApoB and ApoE, respectively). In particular, we were interested in the role of this association in initiating LVP morphogenesis. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ApoB, ApoE, and HCV glycoproteins formed a protein complex early in the HCV lifecycle. Confocal analyses of naïve, E1E2-transduced and HCVcc-infected cells showed that HCV glycoproteins, ApoB and ApoE were found strongly colocalized only in the endoplasmic reticulum. We also found that HCV glycoproteins, ApoB and ApoE were already associated with intracellular infectious viral particles and, furthermore, that the protein complex was conserved in the infectious viral particles present in the supernatant of infected Huh7.5 cells. The association of HCV glycoproteins with ApoE was also evidenced in the HCVpp system, using the non-hepatic HEK293T cell line. We suggest that the complex formed by HCV E1E2, ApoB, and ApoE may initiate lipoviral particle morphogenesis. PMID:24838241

  3. Production and characterization of a fusion peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG29).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Jiao; Zhao, Ping-Sen; Wu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Hua-Lei; Zhao, Li-Li; Xue, Xiang-Hong; Gai, Wei-Wei; Gao, Yu-Wei; Yang, Song-Tao; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2014-12-01

    Gene therapy targeting the brain holds great promise in curing nervous system degenerative diseases in clinical applications. With this in mind, in a previous study a 29 amino-acid peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG29) with a nonamer stretch of arginine residues (RVG29-9R) at its carboxy-terminus was exploited as a ligand for brain-targeting gene delivery. Importantly, the report demonstrated that the RVG29-9R vector was able to cross the blood-brain barrier. RVG29-9R is currently synthesized by commercial companies with high associated costs. In this study, in order to reduce the costs of producing RVG29-9R, we have expressed and purified 6mg of a recombinant peptide (RVG29-9R-6His) from 0.4g of cultured Escherichia coli. We assessed the physiochemical properties of RVG29-9R-6His, its cytotoxicity, and the in vitro transfection efficiency in Neuro 2a cells (which express the acetylcholine receptor). Our results reveal that the RVG29-9R-6His peptide recognized Neuro 2a cells in a dose-dependent manner and it was also able to bind plasmid DNA and deliver it into the Neuro 2a cells effectively. Therefore, our study has demonstrated that the recombinant RVG29-9R-6His peptide retains the functions of RVG29-9R and so may provide an economically viable and alternative production method for the manufacture of RVG29-9R.

  4. Structure and expression of the herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein gB gene.

    PubMed Central

    Stuve, L L; Brown-Shimer, S; Pachl, C; Najarian, R; Dina, D; Burke, R L

    1987-01-01

    The gene for glycoprotein gB2 of herpes simplex virus type 2 strain 333 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in mammalian cells. The gB2 protein had an overall nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology of 86% with the cognate gB1 protein. However, of the 125 amino acid substitutions or deletions, only 12.5% were conservative replacements. These differences were clustered within an NH2-terminal region, a central region, and a COOH-terminal region, resulting in domains of near identity broken by small regions of marked divergence. Regions of greatest homology included a 90-amino-acid stretch starting at residue 484 and 39 amino acids spanning residues 835 to 873, which cover a rate-of-entry locus mapped to Ala-552 and a syn locus mapped to Arg-857, respectively, in gB1 by Bzik et al. (D. J. Bzik, B. A. Fox, N. A. DeLuca, and S. Person, Virology 133:301-314, 1984). Pellett et al. (P. E. Pellett, K. G. Kousoulas, L. Pereira, and B. Roizman, J. Virol. 53:243-253, 1985) mapped the mutations in three monoclonal antibody-resistant gB1 mutants between amino acids 273 and 443. These epitopes are included in a region of 98 residues identical between gB1 and gB2. The identity of this protein was verified by placing a truncated gene lacking the 303 carboxyl-terminal amino acids of gB2 into mammalian COS and CHO cells. Expression was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation. This protein will be purified from the stable CHO cell lines and compared with gB1 for immunogenicity and protective efficacy in animal challenge models. Images PMID:3027364

  5. Genomic and antigenic variations of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus major envelope GP5 glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Pirzadeh, B; Gagnon, C A; Dea, S

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the importance of genomic and antigenic variations which may have affected the major envelope glycoprotein GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates responsible for outbreaks in Quebec and Ontario, in comparison with the modified-live U.S. vaccine strain (MLV) and the European prototype strain from Lelystad (LV). Nucleotide sequence analyses of the open reading frame (ORF)5 genes showed that all of the isolates studied were heterogenous, amino acid (aa) identities varied from 88 to 99% with the MLV strain, and between 51 and 54% with the LV strain. The aa substitutions were randomly scattered across the protein, although one region between residues 26 and 39 was found to correspond to a hypervariable region which involved 0 to 3 potential N-glycosylation sites. The ORF5 encoded products of 5 of these isolates, including the MLV and LV strains, were expressed in E. coli as recombinant proteins fused to the glutathione S-transferase (GST) protein and used to raise hyperimmune anti-ORF5 sera in rabbits. The reactivity patterns of strain-specific hyperimmune anti-ORF5 sera and a panel of 4 monoclonal antibodies directed against the ORF5 gene product of the Quebec IAF-Klop strain of PRRSV, indicated that GP5 of field isolates also underwent antigenic variations. The data suggest that neutralizing epitopes, independent of conformation and glycosylation, are also associated with antigenic variability of the GP5 of PRRSV. PMID:9684045

  6. Contribution of Disulfide Bridging to Epitope Expression of the Dengue Type 2 Virus Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Roehrig, John T.; Volpe, Katharine E.; Squires, Jennifer; Hunt, Ann R.; Davis, Brent S.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.

    2004-01-01

    The individual contributions of each of the six conserved disulfide (SS) bonds in the dengue 2 virus envelope (E) glycoprotein (strain 16681) to epitope expression was determined by measuring the reactivities of a panel of well-defined monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with LLC-MK2 cells that had been transiently transformed with plasmid vectors expressing E proteins that were mutant in their SS bonds. Three domain I (DI) epitopes (C1, C3, and C4) were affected by elimination of any SS bond and were essentially the only epitopes affected by elimination of the amino-proximal SS1 formed between Cys 3 and Cys 30. The remaining DI epitope (C2) was sensitive to only SS3-bond (Cys 74-Cys 105) and SS6-bond (Cys 302-Cys 333) elimination. Of the four DII epitopes examined, reactivities of three anti-epitope MAbs (A1, A2, and A5) were reduced by elimination of SS2 (Cys 61-Cys 121), SS3, SS4 (Cys 94-Cys 116), SS5 (Cys 185-Cys 285), or SS6. The other DII epitope examined (A3) was sensitive only to SS2- and SS3-bond elimination. The three DIII epitopes tested (B2, B3, and B4) were most sensitive to elimination of SS6. The flavivirus group epitope (A1) was less sensitive to elimination of SS3 and SS6. This result may indicate that the region proximal to the E-protein fusion motif (amino acids 98 to 110) may have important linear components. If this observation can be confirmed, peptide mimics from this region of E protein might be able to interfere with flavivirus replication. PMID:14963174

  7. Antigenic characterization of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor incorporated into nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Kristen C.; Castillo-Menendez, Luis; Ding, Haitao; Espy, Nicole; Zhang, Shijian; Kappes, John C.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) into host cells is mediated by the viral envelope glycoproteins (Envs), which are derived by the proteolytic cleavage of a trimeric gp160 Env precursor. The mature Env trimer is a major target for entry inhibitors and vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. Env interstrain variability, conformational flexibility and heavy glycosylation contribute to evasion of the host immune response, and create challenges for structural characterization and vaccine development. Here we investigate variables associated with reconstitution of the HIV-1 Env precursor into nanodiscs, nanoscale lipid bilayer discs enclosed by membrane scaffolding proteins. We identified detergents, as well as lipids similar in composition to the viral lipidome, that allowed efficient formation of Env-nanodiscs (Env-NDs). Env-NDs were created with the full-length Env precursor and with an Env precursor with the majority of the cytoplasmic tail intact. The self-association of Env-NDs was decreased by glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The Env-NDs exhibited an antigenic profile expected for the HIV-1 Env precursor. Env-NDs were recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Of note, neutralizing antibody epitopes in the gp41 membrane-proximal external region and in the gp120:gp41 interface were well exposed on Env-NDs compared with Env expressed on cell surfaces. Most Env epitopes recognized by non-neutralizing antibodies were masked on the Env-NDs. This antigenic profile was stable for several days, exhibiting a considerably longer half-life than that of Env solubilized in detergents. Negative selection with weak neutralizing antibodies could be used to improve the antigenic profile of the Env-NDs. Finally, we show that lipid adjuvants can be incorporated into Env-NDs. These results indicate that Env-NDs represent a potentially useful platform for investigating the structural, functional and antigenic properties of the HIV-1 Env trimer in a membrane context

  8. The search for animal models for Lassa fever vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prevalent arenavirus in West Africa and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Currently there is no licensed LF vaccine and research and devlopment is hampered by the high cost of nonhuman primate animal models and by biocontainment requirements (BSL-4). In addition, a successful LF vaccine has to induce a strong cell-mediated cross-protective immunity against different LASV lineages. All of these challenges will be addressed in this review in the context of available and novel animal models recently described for evaluation of LF vaccine candidates.

  9. The search for animal models for Lassa fever vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prevalent arenavirus in West Africa and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Currently there is no licensed LF vaccine and research and devlopment is hampered by the high cost of nonhuman primate animal models and by biocontainment requirements (BSL-4). In addition, a successful LF vaccine has to induce a strong cell-mediated cross-protective immunity against different LASV lineages. All of these challenges will be addressed in this review in the context of available and novel animal models recently described for evaluation of LF vaccine candidates. PMID:23256740

  10. The catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF esterase: characterization by site-directed mutagenesis and functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Pleschka, S; Klenk, H D; Herrler, G

    1995-10-01

    Influenza C virus is able to inactivate its own cellular receptors by virtue of a sialate 9-O-acetylesterase that releases the acetyl residue at position C-9 of N-acetyl-9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2). The receptor-destroying enzyme activity is a function of the surface glycoprotein HEF and this esterase belongs to the class of serine hydrolases. In their active site, these enzymes contain a catalytic triad made up of a serine, a histidine and an aspartic acid residue. Sequence comparison with other serine esterases has indicated that, in addition to serine-71 (S71), the amino acids histidine-368 or -369 (H368/369) and aspartic acid 261 (D261) are the most likely candidates to form the catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein. By site-directed mutagenesis, mutants were generated in which alanine substituted for either of these amino acids. Using a phagemid expression vector, pSP1D-HEF the HEF gene was expressed in both COS 7 and MDCK I cells. The glycoprotein was obtained in a functional form only in the latter cells, as indicated by its transport to the cell surface and measurable enzyme activity. The low level of expression could be increased by stimulating the NF-KB-binding activity of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter/enhancer element of the vector. The esterase activity of the mutant proteins was compared with that of the wild-type glycoprotein. With Neu5,9Ac2 as the substrate, the esterase specific activities of the S71/A mutant and the H368,369/A mutant were reduced by more than 90%. In the case of the D261/A mutant the specific activity was reduced by 64%. From this data we conclude that S71, H368/369 and D261 are likely to represent the catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF. In addition, N280 is proposed to stabilize the oxyanion of the presumptive transition state intermediate formed by the enzyme-substrate complex.

  11. Prevention of lassa Fever in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Inegbenebor, Ute; Okosun, John; Inegbenebor, Josephine

    2010-01-01

    Although specific treatment is available for Lassa fever, early diagnosis is still difficult in most Nigerian primary and secondary health centers. This study was carried out to compare the case-fatality rates of Lassa fever and other medical diseases commonly seen in adult medical wards, to determine the community habits that make Lassa fever endemic in Edo Central District of Nigeria, with the aim of prescribing preventive measures for its control in Nigeria. The records of 908 inpatients in the adult medical wards of Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua and responses from respondents interviewed by trained interviewers on their knowledge, attitudes and practices pertaining to Lassa fever were used for this study. The case-fatality rate of Lassa fever in this center was 28%. Cultural factors and habits were found to favor endemicity of Lassa fever in Edo Central District of Nigeria. Preventive measures were prescribed for families and communities.

  12. Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein gIII is a major target antigen for murine and swine virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zuckermann, F A; Zsak, L; Mettenleiter, T C; Ben-Porat, T

    1990-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PrV) is the etiological agent of Aujeszky's disease, a disease that causes heavy economic losses in the swine industry. A rational approach to the generation of an effective vaccine against this virus requires an understanding of the immune response induced by it and of the role of the various viral antigens in inducing such a response. We have constructed mutants of PrV [strain PrV (Ka)] that differ from each other only in expression of the viral nonessential glycoproteins gI, gp63, gX, and gIII (i.e., are otherwise isogenic). These mutants were used to ascertain the importance of each of the nonessential glycoproteins in eliciting a PrV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in mice and pigs. Immunization of DBA/2 mice and pigs with a thymidine kinase-deficient (TK-) mutant of PrV elicits the formation of cytotoxic cells that specifically lyse syngeneic infected target cells. These PrV-specific cytolytic cells have the phenotype of major histocompatibility complex class I antigen-restricted CTLs. The relative number of CTLs specific for glycoproteins gI, gp63, gX, and gIII induced in mice vaccinated with a TK- mutant of PrV was ascertained by comparing their levels of cytotoxicity against syngeneic cells infected with either wild-type virus or gI-/gp63-, gX-, or gIII- virus deletion mutants. The PrV-specific CLTs were significantly less effective in lysing gIII(-)-infected targets than in lysing gI-/gp63-, gX-, or wild-type-infected targets. The in vitro secondary CTL response of lymphocytes obtained from either mice or pigs 6 or more weeks after immunization with a TK- mutant of PrV was also tested. Lymphocytes obtained from these animals were cultured with different glycoprotein-deficient mutants of PrV, and their cytolytic activities against wild-type-infected targets were ascertained. The importance of each of the nonessential viral glycoproteins in eliciting CTLs was assessed from the effectiveness of each of the virus mutants to

  13. The Use of Chimeric Virus-like Particles Harbouring a Segment of Hantavirus Gc Glycoprotein to Generate a Broadly-Reactive Hantavirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Razanskiene, Ausra; Petraityte-Burneikiene, Rasa; Klempa, Boris; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against viral glycoproteins have important diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In most cases, the MAbs specific to viral glycoproteins are raised against intact virus particles. The biosynthesis of viral glycoproteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria, yeast, insect or mammalian cells is often problematic due to their low expression level, improper folding and limited stability. To generate MAbs against hantavirus glycoprotein Gc, we have used initially a recombinant yeast-expressed full-length Puumala virus (PUUV) Gc protein. However, this approach was unsuccessful. As an alternative recombinant antigen, chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) harboring a segment of PUUV Gc glycoprotein were generated in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 99 amino acid (aa)-long segment of Gc protein was inserted into the major capsid protein VP1 of hamster polyomavirus at previously defined positions: either site #1 (aa 80–89) or site #4 (aa 280–289). The chimeric proteins were found to self-assemble to VLPs as evidenced by electron microscopy. Chimeric VLPs induced an efficient insert-specific antibody response in immunized mice. Monoclonal antibody (clone #10B8) of IgG isotype specific to hantavirus Gc glycoprotein was generated. It recognized recombinant full-length PUUV Gc glycoprotein both in ELISA and Western blot assay and reacted specifically with hantavirus-infected cells in immunofluorescence assay. Epitope mapping studies revealed the N-terminally located epitope highly conserved among different hantavirus strains. In conclusion, our approach to use chimeric VLPs was proven useful for the generation of virus-reactive MAb against hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. The generated broadly-reactive MAb #10B8 might be useful for various diagnostic applications. PMID:24513568

  14. A Tyrosine Motif in the Cytoplasmic Domain of Mason-Pfizer Monkey Virus Is Essential for the Incorporation of Glycoprotein into Virions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chisu; Dubay, Susan R.; Hunter, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) encodes a transmembrane (TM) glycoprotein with a 38-amino-acid-long cytoplasmic domain. After the release of the immature virus, a viral protease-mediated cleavage occurs within the cytoplasmic domain, resulting in the loss of 17 amino acids from the carboxy terminus. This maturational cleavage occurs between a histidine at position 21 and a tyrosine at position 22 in the cytoplasmic domain of the TM protein. We have demonstrated previously that a truncated TM glycoprotein with a 21-amino-acid-long cytoplasmic tail showed enhanced fusogenicity but could not be incorporated into virions. These results suggest that postassembly cleavage of the cytoplasmic domain removes a necessary incorporation signal and activates fusion activity. To investigate the contribution of tyrosine residues to the function of the glycoprotein complex and virus replication, we have introduced amino acid substitutions into two tyrosine residues found in the cytoplasmic domain. The effects of these mutations on glycoprotein biosynthesis and function, as well as on virus infectivity, have been examined. Mutation of tyrosine 34 to alanine had little effect on glycoprotein function. In contrast, substitutions at tyrosine 22 modulated fusion activity in either a positive or negative manner, depending on the substituting amino acid. Moreover, any nonaromatic substitution at this position blocked glycoprotein incorporation into virions and abolished infectivity. These results demonstrate that M-PMV employs a tyrosine signal for the selective incorporation of glycoprotein into budding virions. Antibody uptake studies show that tyrosine 22 is part of an efficient internalization signal in the cytoplasmic domain of the M-PMV glycoprotein that can also be positively and negatively influenced by changes at this site. PMID:12692221

  15. The use of chimeric virus-like particles harbouring a segment of hantavirus Gc glycoprotein to generate a broadly-reactive hantavirus-specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Razanskiene, Ausra; Petraityte-Burneikiene, Rasa; Klempa, Boris; Ulrich, Rainer G; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2014-02-07

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against viral glycoproteins have important diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In most cases, the MAbs specific to viral glycoproteins are raised against intact virus particles. The biosynthesis of viral glycoproteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria, yeast, insect or mammalian cells is often problematic due to their low expression level, improper folding and limited stability. To generate MAbs against hantavirus glycoprotein Gc, we have used initially a recombinant yeast-expressed full-length Puumala virus (PUUV) Gc protein. However, this approach was unsuccessful. As an alternative recombinant antigen, chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) harboring a segment of PUUV Gc glycoprotein were generated in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 99 amino acid (aa)-long segment of Gc protein was inserted into the major capsid protein VP1 of hamster polyomavirus at previously defined positions: either site #1 (aa 80-89) or site #4 (aa 280-289). The chimeric proteins were found to self-assemble to VLPs as evidenced by electron microscopy. Chimeric VLPs induced an efficient insert-specific antibody response in immunized mice. Monoclonal antibody (clone #10B8) of IgG isotype specific to hantavirus Gc glycoprotein was generated. It recognized recombinant full-length PUUV Gc glycoprotein both in ELISA and Western blot assay and reacted specifically with hantavirus-infected cells in immunofluorescence assay. Epitope mapping studies revealed the N-terminally located epitope highly conserved among different hantavirus strains. In conclusion, our approach to use chimeric VLPs was proven useful for the generation of virus-reactive MAb against hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. The generated broadly-reactive MAb #10B8 might be useful for various diagnostic applications.

  16. Serine 71 of the glycoprotein HEF is located at the active site of the acetylesterase of influenza C virus.

    PubMed

    Herrler, G; Multhaup, G; Beyreuther, K; Klenk, H D

    1988-01-01

    The acetylesterase of influenza C virus has been reported recently to be inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) [Muchmore EA, Varki A (1987) Science 236: 1293-1295]. As this inhibitor is known to bind covalently to the serine in the active site of serine esterases, we attempted to determine the serine in the active site of the influenza C acetylesterase. Incubation of purified influenza C virus with 3H-DFP resulted in the selective labelling of the influenza C glycoprotein HEF. The labelled glycoprotein was isolated from a SDS-polyacrylamide gel. Following reduction and carboxymethylation, tryptic peptides of HEF were prepared and analyzed by reversed phase HPLC. The peptide containing the 3H-DFP was subjected to sequence analysis. The amino acids determined from the NH2-terminus were used to locate the peptide on the HEF polypeptide. Radiosequencing revealed that 3H-DFP is attached to amino acid 17 of the tryptic peptide. These results indicate that serine 71 is the active-site serine of the acetylesterase of influenza C virus.

  17. Mutagenesis of the La Crosse Virus glycoprotein supports a role for Gc (1066-1087) as the fusion peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Plassmeyer, Matthew L.; Soldan, Samantha S.; Stachelek, Karen M.; Roth, Susan M.; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco . E-mail: scarano@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2007-02-20

    The La Crosse Virus (LACV) M segment encodes two glycoproteins (Gn and Gc), and plays a critical role in the neuropathogenesis of LACV infection as the primary determinant of neuroinvasion. A recent study from our group demonstrated that the region comprising the membrane proximal two-thirds of Gc, amino acids 860-1442, is critical in mediating LACV fusion and entry. Furthermore, computational analysis identified structural similarities between a portion of this region, amino acids 970-1350, and the E1 fusion protein of two alphaviruses: Sindbis virus and Semliki Forrest virus (SFV). Within the region 970-1350, a 22-amino-acid hydrophobic segment (1066-1087) is predicted to correlate structurally with the fusion peptides of class II fusion proteins. We performed site-directed mutagenesis of key amino acids in this 22-amino acid segment and determined the functional consequences of these mutations on fusion and entry. Several mutations within this hydrophobic domain affected glycoprotein expression to some extent, but all mutations either shifted the pH threshold of fusion below that of the wild-type protein, reduced fusion efficiency, or abrogated cell-to-cell fusion and pseudotype entry altogether. These results, coupled with the aforementioned computational modeling, suggest that the LACV Gc functions as a class II fusion protein and support a role for the region Gc 1066-1087 as a fusion peptide.

  18. Recovery of Recombinant Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Reveals a Function for Non-structural Glycoproteins Cleavage by Furin

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Éric; Zivcec, Marko; Chakrabarti, Ayan K.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Albariño, César G.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2015-01-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a negative-strand RNA virus of the family Bunyaviridae (genus: Nairovirus). In humans, CCHFV causes fever, hemorrhage, severe thrombocytopenia, and high fatality. A major impediment in precisely determining the basis of CCHFV’s high pathogenicity has been the lack of methodology to produce recombinant CCHFV. We developed a reverse genetics system based on transfecting plasmids into BSR-T7/5 and Huh7 cells. In our system, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase produced complementary RNA copies of the viral S, M, and L segments that were encapsidated with the support, in trans, of CCHFV nucleoprotein and L polymerase. The system was optimized to systematically recover high yields of infectious CCHFV. Additionally, we tested the ability of the system to produce specifically designed CCHFV mutants. The M segment encodes a polyprotein that is processed by host proprotein convertases (PCs), including the site-1 protease (S1P) and furin-like PCs. S1P and furin cleavages are necessary for producing the non-structural glycoprotein GP38, while S1P cleavage yields structural Gn. We studied the role of furin cleavage by rescuing a recombinant CCHFV encoding a virus glycoprotein precursor lacking a functional furin cleavage motif (RSKR mutated to ASKA). The ASKA mutation blocked glycoprotein precursor’s maturation to GP38, and Gn precursor’s maturation to Gn was slightly diminished. Furin cleavage was not essential for replication, as blocking furin cleavage resulted only in transient reduction of CCHFV titers, suggesting that either GP38 and/or decreased Gn maturation accounted for the reduced virion production. Our data demonstrate that nairoviruses can be produced by reverse genetics, and the utility of our system uncovered a function for furin cleavage. This viral rescue system could be further used to study the CCHFV replication cycle and facilitate the development of efficacious vaccines to counter this biological and public

  19. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen.

  20. Virulence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus coinfection in rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss) and nucleotide sequence analysis of the IHNV glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M; Rodríguez Saint-Jean, S; Pérez-Prieto, S I

    2003-08-01

    The outcomes of a coinfection of rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss) with Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) strain S46 and Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) strain S46 was determined after waterborne infection. Trout infected with the IHNV/IPNV.S46 sample, (a mixed sample containing equal infectious titers of the viruses) showed 50% less mortality than fish infected with either of the reference viruses alone. Forty-five days after the coinfection, IPNV antigens were detected by flow cytometry in 49 to 63% of the leukocytes from the surviving trout; whereas, only 9-15.6% of the leukocytes expressed IHNV viral antigens. IPNV was easily detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), whereas, for IHNV, a second step of amplification of a 753 bp fragment corresponding to the internal sequences of the IHNV G gene was necessary to optimize viral detection. The sequence of the IHNV gene involved in virulence, the glycoprotein (G) gene, was determined for the IHNV.S46 and compared with other sequences available in the GenBank. Changes found were not located in the antigenic domains of the glycoprotein and were considered not significant.

  1. Evidence that maturation of the N-linked glycans of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) glycoproteins is required for virus-mediated cell fusion: The effect of {alpha}-mannosidase inhibitors on RSV infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Terence P.; Jeffree, Chris E.; Li, Ping; Rixon, Helen W. McL.; Brown, Gaie; Aitken, James D.; MacLellan, Kirsty; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: rjsugrue@ntu.edu.sg

    2006-07-05

    Glycan heterogeneity of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) protein was demonstrated by proteomics. The effect of maturation of the virus glycoproteins-associated glycans on virus infectivity was therefore examined using the {alpha}-mannosidase inhibitors deoxymannojirimycin (DMJ) and swainsonine (SW). In the presence of SW the N-linked glycans on the F protein appeared in a partially mature form, whereas in the presence of DMJ no maturation of the glycans was observed. Neither inhibitor had a significant effect on G protein processing or on the formation of progeny virus. Although the level of infectious virus and syncytia formation was not significantly affected by SW-treatment, DMJ-treatment correlated with a one hundred-fold reduction in virus infectivity. Our data suggest that glycan maturation of the RSV glycoproteins, in particular those on the F protein, is an important step in virus maturation and is required for virus infectivity.

  2. Immunogenicity of an aphthovirus chimera of the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Grigera, P R; Garcia-Briones, M; Periolo, O; la Torre, J L; Wagner, R R

    1996-01-01

    An oligodeoxynucleotide coding for amino acids 139 through 149 of antigenic site A (ASA) of the VP1 capsid protein of the foot-and-mouth disease virus C3 serotype (FMDV C3) was inserted into three different in-frame sites of the vesicular stomatitis virus New Jersey serotype (VSV-NJ) glycoprotein (G) gene cDNA present in plasmid pKG97 under control of the bacteriophage T7 polymerase promoter. Transfection of these plasmids into CV1 cells coinfected with the T7 polymerase-expressing vaccinia virus recombinant vTF1-6,2 resulted in expression of chimeric proteins efficiently reactive with both anti-FMDV and anti-VSV G antibodies. However, in vitro translation of transcripts of these VSV-G/FMDV-ASA chimeric plasmids resulted in proteins that were recognized by anti-G serum but not by anti-FMDV serum, indicating a requirement for in vivo conformation to expose the ASA antigenic determinant. Insertion of DNA coding for a dimer of the ASA unidecapeptide between the VSV-NJ G gene region coding for amino acids 160 and 161 gave rise to a chimeric ASA-dimer protein designated GF2d, which reacted twice as strongly with anti-FMDV antibody as did chimeric proteins in which the ASA monomer was inserted in the same position or two other G-gene positions. For even greater expression of chimeric VSV-G/FMDV-ASA proteins, plasmid pGF2d and a deletion mutant p(delta)GF2d (G protein deleted of 324 C-terminal amino acids) were inserted into baculovirus vectors expressing chimeric proteins GF2d-bac and deltaGF2d-bac produced in Sf9 insect cells. Mice vaccinated with three booster injections of 30 microg each of partially purified GF2d-bac protein responded by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with FMDV antibody titers of 1,000 units, and those injected with equivalent amounts of deltaGF2d-bac protein showed serum titers of up to 10,000 units. Particularly impressive were FMDV neutralizing antibody titers in serum of mice vaccinated with deltaGF2d-bac protein, which approached those in the

  3. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein mediates apoptosis in activated PBMC by a mechanism dependent on gp41 function

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali; Tompkins, Wayne A. . E-mail: Wayne_Tompkins@ncsu.edu

    2004-12-20

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes immunodeficiency in cats, which parallels HIV-1-induced immunodeficiency in humans. It has been established that HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates T cell loss via a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding. The Env glycoprotein of FIV, similar to HIV, requires CXCR4 binding for viral entry, as well as inducing membrane fusion leading to syncytia formation. However, the role of FIV Env in T cell loss and the molecular mechanisms governing this process have not been elucidated. We studied the role of Env glycoprotein in FIV-mediated T cell apoptosis in an in vitro model. Our studies demonstrate that membrane-expressed FIV Env induces apoptosis in activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding, as the process was inhibited by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, studies regarding the role of CD134, the recently identified primary receptor of FIV, suggest that binding to CD134 may not be important for induction of apoptosis in PBMC. However, inhibiting Env-mediated fusion post CXCR4 binding by FIV gp41-specific fusion inhibitor also inhibited apoptosis. Under similar conditions, a fusion-defective gp41 mutant was unable to induce apoptosis in activated PBMC. Our findings are the first report suggesting the potential of FIV Env to mediate apoptosis in bystander cells by a process that is dependent on gp41 function.

  4. Recombinant Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Vaccine Elicits Antibodies Targeting Multiple Epitopes on the Envelope Glycoproteins Associated with Broad Cross-Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason Alexander Ji-Xhin; Bhat, Rakesh; Hockman, Darren; Logan, Michael; Chen, Chao; Levin, Aviad; Frey, Sharon E.; Belshe, Robert B.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) antivirals are on the horizon, a global prophylactic vaccine for HCV remains elusive. The diversity of the virus is a major concern for vaccine development; there are 7 major genotypes of HCV found globally. Therefore, a successful vaccine will need to protect against HCV infection by all genotypes. Despite the diversity, many monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with broadly cross-neutralizing activity have been described, suggesting the presence of conserved epitopes that can be targeted to prevent infection. Similarly, a vaccine comprising recombinant envelope glycoproteins (rE1E2) derived from the genotype 1a HCV-1 strain has been shown to be capable of eliciting cross-neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs, chimpanzees, and healthy human volunteers. In order to investigate the basis for this cross-neutralization, epitope mapping of anti-E1E2 antibodies present within antisera from goats and humans immunized with HCV-1 rE1E2 was conducted through peptide mapping and competition studies with a panel of cross-neutralizing MAbs targeting various epitopes within E1E2. The immunized-goat antiserum was shown to compete with the binding of all MAbs tested (AP33, HC33.4, HC84.26, 1:7, AR3B, AR4A, AR5A, IGH526, and A4). Antisera showed the best competition against HC84.26 and AR3B and the weakest competition against AR4A. Furthermore, antisera from five immunized human vaccinees were shown to compete with five preselected MAbs (AP33, AR3B, AR4A, AR5A, and IGH526). These data show that immunization with HCV-1 rE1E2 elicits antibodies targeting multiple cross-neutralizing epitopes. Our results further support the use of such a vaccine antigen to induce cross-genotype neutralization. IMPORTANCE An effective prophylactic vaccine for HCV is needed for optimal control of the disease burden. The high diversity of HCV has posed a challenge for developing vaccines that elicit neutralizing antibodies for protection against infection

  5. Genetic variation in vitro and in vivo of an attenuated Lassa vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan C; Goicochea, Marco; Nadai, Yuka; Eyzaguirre, Lindsay M; Carr, Jean K; Tallon, Luke J; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Myers, Garry; Fraser, Claire M; Su, Qi; Djavani, Mahmoud; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2014-03-01

    The attenuated Lassa vaccine candidate ML29 is a laboratory-produced reassortant between Lassa and Mopeia viruses, two Old World arenaviruses that differ by 40% in nucleic acid sequence. In our previous studies, ML29 elicited sterilizing immunity against Lassa virus challenge in guinea pigs and marmosets and virus-specific cell-mediated immunity in both simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques. Here, we show that ML29 is stable after 12 passages in vitro without losing its plaque morphology or its attenuated phenotype in suckling mice. Additionally, we used deep sequencing to characterize the viral population comprising the original stock of ML29, the stock of ML29 after 12 passages in Vero cells, and the ML29 isolates obtained from vaccinated animals. Twenty-seven isolates bore approximately 77 mutations that exceeded 20% of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) changes at any single locus. Of these 77 mutations, 5 appeared to be host specific, for example, appearing in mice but not in primates. None of these mutations were reversions of ML29 to the sequences of the parental Lassa and Mopeia viruses. The host-specific mutations indicate viral adaptations to virus-host interactions, and such interactions make reasonable targets for antiviral approaches. Variants capable of chronic infection did not emerge from any of the primate infections, even in immune-deficient animals, indicating that the ML29 reassortant is reasonably stable in vivo. In conclusion, the preclinical studies of ML29 as a Lassa virus vaccine candidate have been advanced, showing high levels of protection in nonhuman primates and acceptable stability both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. The cytoplasmic tail of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF negatively affects transport to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Oeffner, F; Klenk, H D; Herrler, G

    1999-02-01

    The surface glycoprotein, HEF, of influenza C virus (C/Johannesburg/1/66) has been shown to undergo a post-translation conformational change that is evident in a dramatic change of electrophoretic mobility. If the corresponding gene is expressed in the absence of other viral proteins, this folding process does not occur at all or only very inefficiently. A chimaeric protein, HEF-HA(Tail), in which the short cytoplasmic tail (Arg-Thr-Lys) of HEF was replaced by the cytoplasmic tail of the haemagglutinin of an influenza A virus (fowl plague virus) was constructed. In contrast to the wild-type protein, the chimaeric protein was detected on the cell surface. No further improvement of the surface expression was observed when both the transmembrane domain and the cytoplasmic tail were replaced by the corresponding domains of either the influenza A haemagglutinin or gp40, an endogenous protein of MDCK cells. For the HEF-HA(Tail) construct this study shows that a substantial amount of the protein is converted to the 100 kDa mature form that is observed in virus-infected cells. The HEF-HA expressed on the cell surface reacted positively in esterase and haemadsorption assays, indicating that it was present in a biologically active form. The results show that the short cytoplasmic tail of HEF has a negative effect on the folding and surface transport of this protein. How this effect may be prevented during a virus infection is discussed.

  7. Protective effects of recombinant glycoprotein D based prime boost approach against duck enteritis virus in mice model.

    PubMed

    Aravind, S; Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Gaikwad, Satish S; Shukla, Sanjeev Kumar; Saravanan, R; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2015-11-01

    Duck virus enteritis, also known as duck plague, is an acute herpes viral infection of ducks caused by duck enteritis virus (DEV). The method of repeated immunization with a live attenuated vaccine has been used for the prevention and control of duck enteritis virus (DEV). However, the incidence of the disease in vaccinated flocks and latency reactivation are the major constraints in the present vaccination programme. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy afforded by intramuscular inoculation of plasmid DNA encoding DEV glycoprotein D (pCDNA-gD) followed by DEV gD expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisia (rgD) was assessed in a murine model. Compared with mice inoculated with DNA (pCDNA-gD) or protein (rgD) only, mice inoculated with the combination of gD DNA and protein had enhanced ELISA antibody titers to DEV and had accelerated clearance of virus following challenge infection. Furthermore, the highest levels of lymphocyte proliferation response, IL-4, IL-12 and IFN-γ production were induced following priming with the DNA vaccine and boosting with the rgD protein. For instance, the specially designed recombinant DEV vector vaccine would be the best choice to use in ducks. It offers an excellent solution to the low vaccination coverage rate in ducks. We expect that the application of this novel vaccine in the near future will greatly decrease the virus load in the environment and reduce outbreaks of DEV in ducks.

  8. T-helper cell and associated antibody response to synthetic peptides of the E glycoprotein of Murray Valley encephalitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, J H; Allan, J E; Roehrig, J T; Brubaker, J R; Uren, M F; Hunt, A R

    1991-01-01

    A battery of 16 synthetic peptides, selected primarily by computer analysis for predicted B- and T-cell epitopes, was prepared from the deduced amino acid sequence of the envelope (E) glycoprotein of Murray Valley encephalitis (MVE) virus. We examined all of the peptides for T-helper (Th)-cell recognition and antibody induction in three strains of mice: C57BL/6, BALB/c, and C3H. Lymphoproliferative and interleukin-2 assays were performed on splenic T cells from mice inoculated with peptides in Freund's incomplete adjuvant or with MVE virus. Several peptides found to contain predicted T-cell epitopes elicited a Th-cell response in at least one strain of mice, usually with a concomitant antibody response. Peptides 145 (amino acids 145 to 169) and 17 (amino acids 356 to 376) were strongly recognized by T cells from all three inbred strains of mice. Peptide 06 (amino acids 230 to 251) primed C57BL/6 mice for Th- and B-cell reactivity with native MVE virus, and T cells from virus-immune mice were stimulated by this peptide. Peptide 06 was recognized by several Th-cell clones prepared from mice immunized with MVE, West Nile, or Kunjin virus. These results indicate that it may be feasible to design synthetic flavivirus peptides that define T-cell epitopes capable of generating a helper cell response for B-cell epitopes involved in protective immunity. PMID:1832722

  9. Heterologous expression of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus glycoprotein 5 in Bordetella bronchisepticaaroA mutant

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Sang Ik; SEO, Ja Young; KIM, Tae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically important disease around the globe. Protection against this virus remains problematic. Here, we evaluated antibody (IgG & IgA) inducibility of a heterologous PRRSV glycoprotein 5 (GP5) expressed in a live attenuated Bordetella bronchisepticaaroA mutant strain (BBS-GP5). Mice and pigs were primed with recombinant GP5 (rGP5) subcutaneously followed by boosting with live BBS-GP5. As a result, anti-GP5 IgG was induced in both mice (P<0.001) and pigs (P<0.1). Pigs were challenged with live PRRSV (VR2332). Viral RNA was found to be significantly (P<0.01) removed in the vaccinated pig group. Overall, BBS-GP5 is a good candidate as a live attenuated vaccine against PRRSV infection. PMID:27349762

  10. Efficacy of Favipiravir Alone and in Combination With Ribavirin in a Lethal, Immunocompetent Mouse Model of Lassa Fever.

    PubMed

    Oestereich, Lisa; Rieger, Toni; Lüdtke, Anja; Ruibal, Paula; Wurr, Stephanie; Pallasch, Elisa; Bockholt, Sabrina; Krasemann, Susanne; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Günther, Stephan

    2016-03-15

    We studied the therapeutic potential of favipiravir (T-705) for Lassa fever, both alone and in combination with ribavirin. Favipiravir suppressed Lassa virus replication in cell culture by 5 log10 units. In a novel lethal mouse model, it lowered the viremia level and the virus load in organs and normalized levels of cell-damage markers. Treatment with 300 mg/kg per day, commenced 4 days after infection, when the viremia level had reached 4 log10 virus particles/mL, rescued 100% of Lassa virus-infected mice. We found a synergistic interaction between favipiravir and ribavirin in vitro and an increased survival rate and extended survival time when combining suboptimal doses in vivo.

  11. Reduced cell surface expression of processed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein in the presence of Nef.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, O; Rivière, Y; Heard, J M; Danos, O

    1993-01-01

    nef genes from two laboratory grown human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains and from two proviruses that had not been propagated in vitro were introduced into CD4+ lymphoblastoid CEM cells. The stable expression of all four Nef proteins was associated with an almost complete abrogation of CD4 cell surface localization. The consequences of the presence of Nef on gp160 cleavage, gp120 surface localization, and envelope-induced cytopathic effect were examined in CEM cells in which the HIV-1 env gene was expressed from a vaccinia virus vector. The presence of Nef did not modify the processing of gp160 into its subunits but resulted in a significant decrease of cell surface levels of gp120, associated with a dramatic reduction of the fusion-mediated cell death. Surface levels of mutant envelope glycoproteins unable to bind CD4 were not altered in Nef-expressing cells, suggesting that the phenomenon was CD4 dependent. The intracellular accumulation of fully processed envelope glycoproteins could significantly delay the cytopathic effect associated with envelope surface expression in HIV-infected cells and may be relevant to the selective advantage associated with Nef during the in vivo infectious process. Images PMID:8497051

  12. The role of eukaryotic subtilisin-like endoproteases for the activation of human immunodeficiency virus glycoproteins in natural host cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hallenberger, S; Moulard, M; Sordel, M; Klenk, H D; Garten, W

    1997-01-01

    Proteolytic activation of the precursor envelope glycoproteins gp160 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and gp140 of HIV-2, a prerequisite for viral infection, results in the formation of gp120/gp41 and gp125/gp36, respectively. Cleavage is mediated by cellular proteases. Furin, a member of the eukaryotic subtilisin family, has been shown to be an activating protease for HIV. Here, we compared the presence of furin and other mammalian subtilisins in lymphatic cells and tissues. Northern blot analyses revealed that furin and the recently discovered protease LPC/PC7 were the only subtilisin-like enzymes transcribed in such cells. Furin was identified as an enzymatically active endoprotease present in different lymphocytic, as well as monocytic, cell lines. When expressed from vaccinia virus vectors, the proprotein convertases were correctly processed, transported, and secreted into the media and enzymatically active. Coexpression of different subtilisins with the HIV envelope precursors revealed that furin and LPC/PC7 are able to cleave HIV-1 gp160. Moreover, both enzymes proteolytically processed the envelope precursor of HIV-2. gp140 was also cleaved to some extent by PC1, which is not, however, present in lymphatic cells. Furin- and LPC/PC7-catalyzed cleavage of HIV-1 gp160 resulted in biologically active envelope protein. In conclusion, among the known members of the subtilisin family, only furin and LPC/PC7 fulfill the requirements of a protease responsible for in vivo activation of HIV envelope glycoproteins. PMID:8995623

  13. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E1 Antigenic Site 314-324 in Complex with Antibody IGH526.

    PubMed

    Kong, Leopold; Kadam, Rameshwar U; Giang, Erick; Ruwona, Tinashe B; Nieusma, Travis; Culhane, Jeffrey C; Stanfield, Robyn L; Dawson, Philip E; Wilson, Ian A; Law, Mansun

    2015-08-14

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-strand RNA virus within the Flaviviridae family. The viral "spike" of HCV is formed by two envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2, which together mediate viral entry by engaging host receptors and undergoing conformational changes to facilitate membrane fusion. While E2 can be readily produced in the absence of E1, E1 cannot be expressed without E2 and few reagents, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), are available for study of this essential HCV glycoprotein. A human mAb to E1, IGH526, was previously reported to cross-neutralize different HCV isolates, and therefore, we sought to further characterize the IGH526 neutralizing epitope to obtain information for vaccine design. We found that mAb IGH526 bound to a discontinuous epitope, but with a major component corresponding to E1 residues 314-324. The crystal structure of IGH526 Fab with this E1 glycopeptide at 1.75Å resolution revealed that the antibody binds to one face of an α-helical peptide. Single mutations on the helix substantially lowered IGH526 binding but did not affect neutralization, indicating either that multiple mutations are required or that additional regions are recognized by the antibody in the context of the membrane-associated envelope oligomer. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the free peptide is flexible in solution, suggesting that it requires stabilization for use as a candidate vaccine immunogen.

  14. Role of Natural Killer Cells in Innate Protection Against Lethal Ebola Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Cells Protect against Lethal Ebola Virus Infection174 Several viruses , including human cytomegalovirus, HIV, and Epstein-Barr virus replicate...with VRP-encoding Ebola VP40 blocked IFN- se- cretion induced by the VLPs, whereas control sera from mice vaccinated with a VRP encoding the Lassa virus ...encephalitis replicon particles expressing VP40 (VRP-VP40), or Lassa virus N (VRP- Lassa ), were preincubated for 1 h on ice with 10 g of VLPs

  15. Lassa Fever in Post-Conflict Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Hartnett, Jessica N.; Levy, Danielle C.; Yenni, Rachael E.; Moses, Lina M.; Fullah, Mohammed; Momoh, Mambo; Fonnie, Mbalu; Fonnie, Richard; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J.; Kargbo, Kandeh; Ottomassathien, Darin; Muncy, Ivana J.; Jones, Abigail B.; Illick, Megan M.; Kulakosky, Peter C.; Haislip, Allyson M.; Bishop, Christopher M.; Elliot, Deborah H.; Brown, Bethany L.; Zhu, Hu; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Andersen, Kristian G.; Gire, Stephen K.; Tabrizi, Shervin; Tariyal, Ridhi; Stremlau, Mathew; Matschiner, Alex; Sampey, Darryl B.; Spence, Jennifer S.; Cross, Robert W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Folarin, Onikepe A.; Happi, Christian T.; Pitts, Kelly R.; Geske, F. Jon; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Robinson, James E.; Wilson, Russell B.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Henderson, Lee A.; Khan, S. Humarr; Bausch, Daniel G.; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lassa fever (LF), an often-fatal hemorrhagic disease caused by Lassa virus (LASV), is a major public health threat in West Africa. When the violent civil conflict in Sierra Leone (1991 to 2002) ended, an international consortium assisted in restoration of the LF program at Kenema Government Hospital (KGH) in an area with the world's highest incidence of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Clinical and laboratory records of patients presenting to the KGH Lassa Ward in the post-conflict period were organized electronically. Recombinant antigen-based LF immunoassays were used to assess LASV antigenemia and LASV-specific antibodies in patients who met criteria for suspected LF. KGH has been reestablished as a center for LF treatment and research, with over 500 suspected cases now presenting yearly. Higher case fatality rates (CFRs) in LF patients were observed compared to studies conducted prior to the civil conflict. Different criteria for defining LF stages and differences in sensitivity of assays likely account for these differences. The highest incidence of LF in Sierra Leone was observed during the dry season. LF cases were observed in ten of Sierra Leone's thirteen districts, with numerous cases from outside the traditional endemic zone. Deaths in patients presenting with LASV antigenemia were skewed towards individuals less than 29 years of age. Women self-reporting as pregnant were significantly overrepresented among LASV antigenemic patients. The CFR of ribavirin-treated patients presenting early in acute infection was lower than in untreated subjects. Conclusions/Significance Lassa fever remains a major public health threat in Sierra Leone. Outreach activities should expand because LF may be more widespread in Sierra Leone than previously recognized. Enhanced case finding to ensure rapid diagnosis and treatment is imperative to reduce mortality. Even with ribavirin treatment, there was a high rate of fatalities underscoring the need to

  16. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  17. Capacity building permitting comprehensive monitoring of a severe case of Lassa hemorrhagic fever in Sierra Leone with a positive outcome: case report.

    PubMed

    Grove, Jessica N; Branco, Luis M; Boisen, Matt L; Muncy, Ivana J; Henderson, Lee A; Schieffellin, John S; Robinson, James E; Bangura, James J; Fonnie, Mbalu; Schoepp, Randal J; Hensley, Lisa E; Seisay, Alhassan; Fair, Joseph N; Garry, Robert F

    2011-06-20

    Lassa fever is a neglected tropical disease with a significant impact on the health care system of endemic West African nations. To date, case reports of Lassa fever have focused on laboratory characterisation of serological, biochemical and molecular aspects of the disease imported by infected individuals from Western Africa to the United States, Canada, Europe, Japan and Israel. Our report presents the first comprehensive real time diagnosis and characterization of a severe, hemorrhagic Lassa fever case in a Sierra Leonean individual admitted to the Kenema Government Hospital Lassa Fever Ward. Fever, malaise, unresponsiveness to anti-malarial and antibiotic drugs, followed by worsening symptoms and onset of haemorrhaging prompted medical officials to suspect Lassa fever. A recombinant Lassa virus protein based diagnostic was employed in diagnosing Lassa fever upon admission. This patient experienced a severe case of Lassa hemorrhagic fever with dysregulation of overall homeostasis, significant liver and renal system involvement, the interplay of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during the course of hospitalization and an eventual successful outcome. These studies provide new insights into the pathophysiology and management of this viral illness and outline the improved infrastructure, research and real-time diagnostic capabilities within LASV endemic areas.

  18. Capacity building permitting comprehensive monitoring of a severe case of Lassa hemorrhagic fever in Sierra Leone with a positive outcome: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lassa fever is a neglected tropical disease with a significant impact on the health care system of endemic West African nations. To date, case reports of Lassa fever have focused on laboratory characterisation of serological, biochemical and molecular aspects of the disease imported by infected individuals from Western Africa to the United States, Canada, Europe, Japan and Israel. Our report presents the first comprehensive real time diagnosis and characterization of a severe, hemorrhagic Lassa fever case in a Sierra Leonean individual admitted to the Kenema Government Hospital Lassa Fever Ward. Fever, malaise, unresponsiveness to anti-malarial and antibiotic drugs, followed by worsening symptoms and onset of haemorrhaging prompted medical officials to suspect Lassa fever. A recombinant Lassa virus protein based diagnostic was employed in diagnosing Lassa fever upon admission. This patient experienced a severe case of Lassa hemorrhagic fever with dysregulation of overall homeostasis, significant liver and renal system involvement, the interplay of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during the course of hospitalization and an eventual successful outcome. These studies provide new insights into the pathophysiology and management of this viral illness and outline the improved infrastructure, research and real-time diagnostic capabilities within LASV endemic areas. PMID:21689444

  19. Gene Knockdown of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Using DNA-Directed RNA Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    e _s~u~m mary - Introduction: Alphaviruses are a large family of RNA viruses that can cause acute infection resulting in arthritis and encephalitis...One of the important alphaviruses is the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. This virus has been linked to a number of outbreaks in both North and... replication of VEE virus in vitro. Bhogal, H.S., McLaws, L.J., and Jager, S.J. 2006. Gene Knockdown of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus E2

  20. A synthetic peptide to the E glycoprotein of Murray Valley encephalitis virus defines multiple virus-reactive T- and B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, J H; Roehrig, J T; Brubaker, J R; Hunt, A R; Allan, J E

    1992-01-01

    Synthetic peptides from the envelope glycoprotein sequence of Murray Valley encephalitis (MVE) virus were previously evaluated in various strains of mice for both the induction of antibody and the in vitro proliferation of peptide-primed T-helper (Th) cells. MVE peptide 6 (amino acids 230 to 251) elicited reciprocal Th- and B-cell reactivity with native MVE virus after primary inoculation of C57BL/6 mice. In this study, we prepared overlapping subunit peptides of MVE peptide 6 and evaluated their immunogenicity. Analysis of these peptides delineated at least two B-cell epitopes that induced antibody reactive with MVE and other Japanese encephalitis serocomplex viruses. This antibody at low titer neutralized MVE virus. Genetic restriction of the antibody response to various T-cell elements within peptide 6 was observed in C3H, BALB/c, C57BL/6, and B10 congenic mice. One element demonstrable after primary immunization, located in the carboxy terminus, associated only with major histocompatibility complex class II IAb and IAbiEk glycoproteins. Functional stimulation with the peptides in association with IAkIEk and IAdIEd molecules was observed only after in vivo secondary stimulation. Peptide 6-1 (amino acids 230 to 241) was nonimmunogenic but could be recognized by Th cells from peptide 6-immunized mice. Further association of peptide 6 with the IAkIEk and IAdIEd subregions was demonstrated by the finding that T cells from MVE peptide 6-inoculated C3H and BALB/c mice primed for an antibody response to MVE virus. These results suggest that the peptide 6 sequence, which is relatively conserved among a number of flaviviruses, should be given consideration when synthetic immunogens for vaccine purposes are designed. PMID:1383567

  1. A clinical guide to viral haemorrhagic fevers: Ebola, Marburg and Lassa.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    The viral haemorrhagic fevers are a group of diseases that share many clinical features. Ebola, Marburg and Lassa are diseases that cause a relatively small number of deaths globally, but pose special risks to medical staff due to the ease of transmission, and can have a profound impact to the communities they affect. This article gives a brief overview of diseases caused by the Ebola, Marburg and Lassa viruses. It gives some practical advice to the clinician on the diagnosis and management of these diseases.

  2. [The therapeutic efficacy of ribamidil and virazole in experimental Lassa fever in monkeys].

    PubMed

    Dvoretskaia, V I; Bogatikov, G V; Pshenichnov, V A; Evseev, A A

    1991-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of ribamydil and virasol was evaluated in experimental Lassa fever in monkeys which received these drugs at various intervals after the onset of the clinical illness. Ribamydil or virasol administered in the first day of fever protected from death 60% to 66% of the infected animals, but when the drugs were given 2 days after the onset of fever the number of survivors declined to 0.20%. When the treatment was started 4 days after the onset of fever none of the drugs prevented deaths of Lassa virus-infected baboons.

  3. Variable Constraints on the Principal Immunodominant Domain of the Transmembrane Glycoprotein of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Merat, Rastine; Raoul, Herve; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Sonigo, Pierre; Pancino, Gianfranco

    1999-01-01

    Lentiviruses have in their transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) a highly immunogenic structure referred to as the principal immunodominant domain (PID). The PID forms a loop of 5 to 7 amino acids between two conserved cysteines. Previous studies showed that envelope (Env) glycoprotein functions of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) could be retained after extensive mutation of the PID loop sequence, in spite of its high conservation. In order to compare Env function in different lentiviruses, either random mutations were introduced in the PID loop sequence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) or the entire HIV-1 PID loop was replaced by the corresponding PID loop of FIV or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). In the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 ADA Env, mutations impaired the processing of the gp160 Env precursor, thereby abolishing viral infectivity. However, 6 of the 108 random Env mutants that were screened retained the capacity to induce cell membrane fusion. The SIV and FIV sequences and five random mutations were then introduced in the context of T-cell-line-adapted HIV-1 LAI which, although phenotypically distant from HIV-1 ADA, has an identical PID loop sequence. In contrast to the situation for HIV-1 ADA mutants, the cleavage of the Env precursor was unaffected in most HIV-1 LAI mutants. Such mutations, however, resulted in increased shedding of the gp120 surface glycoprotein (SU) from the gp41 TM. The HIV-1 LAI Env mutants showed high fusogenic efficiency. Three Env mutants retained the capacity to mediate virus entry in target cells, although less efficiently than the wild-type Env, and allowed the reconstitution of infectious molecular clones. These results indicated that in HIV-1, like FIV, the conserved PID sequence can be changed without impairing Env function. However, functional constraints on the PID of HIV-1 vary depending on the structural context of Env, presumably in relation to the role of the PID in the interaction of the SU and TM subunits

  4. A simple, inexpensive, robust and sensitive dot-blot assay for equal detection of the nonstructural-1 glycoprotein of all dengue virus serotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Detection of dengue virus (DENV) soluble/excreted (s/e) form of the nonstructural-1 (NS1) glycoprotein in patient acute-phase sera is ideal for diagnosis. The commercially-available detection assays are, however, too expensive for routine use and have low specificity, particularly for the s/e NS1 glycoprotein of DENV-2 and DENV-4, which are important causes of lethal human disease worldwide. Methods Mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were generated and screened against s/e NS1 glycoprotein purified from each DENV serotype to obtain those that reacted equally with each serotype, but not with yellow fever virus (YFV) s/e NS1 glycoprotein or human serum proteins. One MAb, MAb 2C4.6, was further tested against these DENV glycoproteins in human sera using simple, peroxidase-labelled secondary antibody/substrate-developed dot-blot assays. Results Optimal quenching of endogenous human serum peroxidases was attained using 3% H2O2 in H20 for 5 min. MAb 2C4.6 showed an acceptable detection sensitivity of < 32 ng/ml for the s/e NS1 glycoprotein of each DENV serotype but did not cross-react with the YFV s/e NS1 glycoprotein or human serum proteins. By contrast, the LX1 epitope-specific MAb, 3D1.4, showed similar detection sensitivity against only the DENV-1 NS1 glycoprotein, consistent with results from commercial DENV s/e NS1 glycoprotein detection assays. DENV s/e NS1 glycoproteins were stable in human sera after drying on the nitrocellulose membranes and storage for one month at ambient temperature (28°C) before being processed. The total assay time was reduced to 3 h without any loss of detection sensitivity. This dot-blot format was ideal for the circulating immune complex disruption step, which is required for increased DENV s/e NS1 glycoprotein detection. Conclusions This is the first study to determine the detection sensitivity of MAbs against known concentrations of s/e NS1 glycoprotein from each DENV serotype. The preparation of patient serum samples for

  5. Retargeting vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors with enhanced stability by in situ synthesized polymer shell.

    PubMed

    Liang, Min; Yan, Ming; Lu, Yunfeng; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2013-02-01

    The ability to introduce transgenes with precise specificity to the desired target cells or tissues is key to a more facile application of genetic therapy. Here, we describe a novel method using nanotechnology to generate lentiviral vectors with altered recognition of host cell receptor specificity. Briefly, the infectivity of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyped lentiviral vectors was shielded by a thin polymer shell synthesized in situ onto the viral envelope, and new binding ability was conferred to the shielded virus by introducing acrylamide-tailored cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide to the polymer shell. We termed the resulting virus "targeting nanovirus." The targeting nanovirus had similar titer with VSV-G pseudotypes and specifically transduced Hela cells with high transduction efficiency. In addition, the encapsulation of the VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus by the polymer shell did not change the pathway that VSV-G pseudotypes enter and fuse with cells, as well as later events such as reverse transcription and gene expression. Furthermore, the targeting nanovirus possessed enhanced stability in the presence of human serum, indicating protection of the virus by the polymer shell from human serum complement inactivation. This novel use of nanotechnology demonstrates proof of concept for an approach that could be more generally applied for redirecting viral vectors for laboratory and clinical purposes.

  6. Retargeting Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein Pseudotyped Lentiviral Vectors with Enhanced Stability by In Situ Synthesized Polymer Shell

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Min; Yan, Ming; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The ability to introduce transgenes with precise specificity to the desired target cells or tissues is key to a more facile application of genetic therapy. Here, we describe a novel method using nanotechnology to generate lentiviral vectors with altered recognition of host cell receptor specificity. Briefly, the infectivity of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyped lentiviral vectors was shielded by a thin polymer shell synthesized in situ onto the viral envelope, and new binding ability was conferred to the shielded virus by introducing acrylamide-tailored cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide to the polymer shell. We termed the resulting virus “targeting nanovirus.” The targeting nanovirus had similar titer with VSV-G pseudotypes and specifically transduced Hela cells with high transduction efficiency. In addition, the encapsulation of the VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus by the polymer shell did not change the pathway that VSV-G pseudotypes enter and fuse with cells, as well as later events such as reverse transcription and gene expression. Furthermore, the targeting nanovirus possessed enhanced stability in the presence of human serum, indicating protection of the virus by the polymer shell from human serum complement inactivation. This novel use of nanotechnology demonstrates proof of concept for an approach that could be more generally applied for redirecting viral vectors for laboratory and clinical purposes. PMID:23327104

  7. Synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences of snake venom neurotoxins and rabies virus glycoprotein bind to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Hawrot, E; Wilson, P T

    1987-01-01

    Peptides corresponding to portions of loop 2 of snake venom curare-mimetic neurotoxins and to a structurally similar region of rabies virus glycoprotein were synthesized. Interaction of these peptides with purified Torpedo electric organ acetylcholine receptor was tested by measuring their ability to block th