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Sample records for lat electron flux

  1. Searching for Dark Matter Signatures in the GLAST LAT Electron Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Profumo, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    We explored several viable scenarios of how LAT might observe DM, when the spectral feature is predicted to be observed in the HE electron flux It has been demonstrated elsewhere that LAT will be capable to detect HE electrons flux in energy range from 20 GeV to - 1 TeV with 520% energy resolution and good statistics If there is a DM-caused feature in the HE electron flux (in the range 20 GeV - 1 TeV), LAT will be the best current instrument to observe it!

  2. LAT Perspectives in Detection of High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Ormes, J. F.; Funk, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) science objectives and capabilities in the detection of high energy electrons in the energy range from 20 GeV to approx. 1 TeV are presented. LAT simulations are used to establish the event selections. It is found that maintaining the efficiency of electron detection at the level of 30% the residual hadron contamination does not exceed 2-3% of the electron flux. LAT should collect approx. ten million of electrons with the energy above 20 GeV for each year of observation. Precise spectral reconstruction with high statistics presents us with a unique opportunity to investigate several important problems such as studying galactic models of IC radiation, revealing the signatures of nearby sources such as high energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, testing the propagation model, and searching for KKDM particles decay through their contribution to the electron spectrum.

  3. Fermi LAT Observations of Cosmic-Ray Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Designed as a gamma-ray instrument, the LAT is a capable detector of high energy cosmic ray electrons. The LAT is composed of a 4x4 array of identical towers. Each tower has a Tracker and a Calorimeter module. Entire LAT is covered by segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD). The electron data analysis is based on that developed for photons. The main challenge is to identify and separate electrons from all other charged species, mainly CR protons (for gamma-ray analysis this is provided by the Anti-Coincidence Detector)

  4. Analysis of the cumulative neutrino flux from Fermi LAT blazar populations using 3 years of IceCube data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glüsenkamp, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    The recent discovery of a diffuse neutrino flux up to PeV energies raises the question of which populations of astrophysical sources contribute to this diffuse signal. One extragalactic candidate source population to produce high-energy neutrinos are Blazars. We present results from a likelihood analysis searching for cumulative neutrino emission from Blazar populations selected with the 2nd Fermi LAT AGN catalogue (2LAC) using an IceCube data set that has been optimized for the detection of individual sources. In contrast to previous searches with IceCube, the investigated populations contain up to hundreds of sources, the biggest one being the entire Blazar sample measured by the Fermi-LAT. No significant neutrino signal was found from any of these populations. Some implications of this non-observation for the origin of the observed PeV diffuse signal will be discussed.

  5. New Results on High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons Observed with Fermi LAT and Their Implications on the Models of Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes, in detail, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). Observations made from the June 11, 2008 launch and a discussion of observations made of high energy cosmic ray electrons is also presented.

  6. Electron Flux of Radiation Belts Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows meridional (from north-south) plane projections of the REPT-A and REPT-B electron flux values. The animation first shows the expected two-belt Van Allen zone structure; from Se...

  7. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  8. Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the spacecraft’s main scientificinstrument. This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering the LAT,where it is converted into an electron (red) and a...

  9. Electron transport fluxes in potato plateau regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    Electron transport fluxes in the potato plateau regime are calculated from the solutions of the drift kinetic equation and fluid equations. It is found that the bootstrap current density remains finite in the region close to the magnetic axis, although it decreases with increasing collision frequency. This finite amount of the bootstrap current in the relatively collisional regime is important in modeling tokamak startup with 100{percent} bootstrap current. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Electron energy flux in the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.; Sugiura, M.

    1971-01-01

    Description of studies of electrons between 10 eV and 9.9 keV in the solar wind. The transport of energy in the rest frame of the plasma is evaluated and shown to be parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The presence of electrons from solar events causes this energy-flux density to exceed the heat flow due to thermal electrons. In one such event, the observations are shown to be consistent with the solar-electron observations made at higher energies. When observations are made at a point connected to the earth's bow shock by an interplanetary-field line, a comparatively large energy flux along the field toward the sun is observed, but the heat flow remains outwardly directed during this time interval. In either situation the heat flow is found to be consistent with measurements made on Vela satellites by a different method. These values, less than .01 ergs/sq cm/sec, are sufficiently low to require modifications to the Spitzer-Harm conductivity formula for use in solar-wind theories.

  11. Bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Zwickl, R. D.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    ISEE 3 plasma and magnetic field data are used here to document the general characteristics of bidirectional electron heat flux events (BEHFEs). Significant field rotations often occur at the beginning and/or end of such events and, at times, the large-field rotations characteristic of 'magnetic clouds' are present. Approximately half of all BEHFEs are associated with and follow interplanetary shocks, while the other events have no obvious shock associations. When shock-associated, the delay from shock passage typically is about 13 hours, corresponding to a radial separation of about 0.16 AU. When independent of any shock association, BEHFEs typically are about 0.13 AU thick in the radial direction. It is suggested that BEHFEs are one of the more prominent signatures of coronal mass ejection events in the solar wind at 1 AU.

  12. Electronic and nuclear flux densities in the H2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, G.; Paulus, B.; Pérez-Torres, J. F.; Pohl, V.

    2014-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and nuclear flux densities of a vibrating H2 molecule after an electronic excitation by a short femtosecond laser pulse. The final state, a coherent superposition of the electronic ground state X1Σg+ and the electronic excited state B1Σu+, evolves freely and permits the partition of the electronic flux density into two competing fluxes: the adiabatic and the transition flux density. The nature of the two fluxes allows us to identify two alternating dynamics of the electronic motion, occurring on the attosecond and the femtosecond time scales. In contradistinction to the adiabatic electronic flux density, the transition electronic flux density shows a dependence on the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field, encoding information of the interaction of the electrons with the electric field. Furthermore, the nuclear flux density displays multiple reversals, a quantum effect recently discovered by Manz et al. [J. Manz, J. F. Pérez-Torres, and Y. Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 153004 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.153004], calling for investigation of the electronic flux density.

  13. Constraining decaying dark matter with Fermi LAT gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Le; Sigl, Günter; Weniger, Christoph; Maccione, Luca; Redondo, Javier E-mail: christoph.weniger@desy.de E-mail: redondo@mppmm.mpg.de

    2010-06-01

    High energy electrons and positrons from decaying dark matter can produce a significant flux of gamma rays by inverse Compton off low energy photons in the interstellar radiation field. This possibility is inevitably related with the dark matter interpretation of the observed PAMELA and FERMI excesses. The aim of this paper is providing a simple and universal method to constrain dark matter models which produce electrons and positrons in their decay by using the Fermi LAT gamma-ray observations in the energy range between 0.5 GeV and 300 GeV. We provide a set of universal response functions that, once convolved with a specific dark matter model produce the desired constraints. Our response functions contain all the astrophysical inputs such as the electron propagation in the galaxy, the dark matter profile, the gamma-ray fluxes of known origin, and the Fermi LAT data. We study the uncertainties in the determination of the response functions and apply them to place constraints on some specific dark matter decay models that can well fit the positron and electron fluxes observed by PAMELA and Fermi LAT. To this end we also take into account prompt radiation from the dark matter decay. We find that with the available data decaying dark matter cannot be excluded as source of the PAMELA positron excess.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGN Fermi/LAT γ-ray and 37GHz fluxes (Nieppola+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieppola, E.; Tornikoski, M.; Valtaoja, E.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Hovatta, T.; Laehteenmaeki, A.; Tammi, J.

    2012-02-01

    Our radio data include unpublished 37GHz flux density measurements from the Aalto University Metsahovi Radio Observatory. Metsahovi radio telescope is a radome-enclosed antenna with a diameter of 13.7m. It is situated in Kirkkonummi, Finland, at 60m above sea level. (1 data file).

  15. First Results on the High Energy Cosmic Ray Electron Spectrum from Fermi Lat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses energy reconstruction, electron-hadron separation, validation of Monte Carlo with flight data and an assessment of systematic errors from the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  16. Flux and Photon Spectral Index Distributions of Fermi-LAT Blazars and Contribution to the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U.

    2011-12-09

    We present a determination of the distributions of gamma-ray flux - the so called LogN-LogS relation - and photon spectral index for the 352 blazars detected with a greater than approximately seven sigma detection threshold and located above {+-} 20{sup o} Galactic latitude by the Large Area Telescope of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in its first year catalog. Because the flux detection threshold depends on the photon index, the observed raw distributions do not provide the true LogN-LogS counts or the true distribution of the photon index. We use the non-parametric methods developed by Efron and Petrosian to reconstruct the intrinsic distributions from the observed ones which account for the data truncations introduced by observational bias and includes the effects of the possible correlation among the two variables. We demonstrate the robustness of our procedures using a simulated data set of blazars and then apply these to the real data and find that for the population as a whole the intrinsic flux distribution can be represented by a broken power law of slopes -2.37 {+-} 0.13 and -1.70 {+-} 0.26, and the intrinsic photon index distribution can be represented by a Gaussian with mean 2.41 {+-} 0.13 and 1{sigma} width of 0.25 {+-} 0.03. We also find the intrinsic distributions for the sub-populations of BL Lac and FSRQs type blazars separately. We then calculate the contribution of blazars to the diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background radiation to be 28% {+-} 19%.

  17. Electron heat flux constraints in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S.P.; Skoug, R.M.; Daughton, W.

    1999-06-01

    Enhanced fluctuations from electromagnetic heat flux instabilities may, through wave-particle scattering, constrain the electron heat flux which flows parallel to the background magnetic field in the solar wind. A corollary of this hypothesis is that instability thresholds should correspond to observable bounds on the heat flux. Here plasma and magnetic field data from February and March 1995 of the Ulysses mission is analyzed in terms of the core/halo electron model to yield scaling relations of dimensionless electron parameters and empirical upper bounds on the dimensionless heat flux as functions of the core {beta}. Use of these scaling relations in linear Vlasov theory for the whistler and Alfv{acute e}n heat flux instabilities in homogeneous plasmas yields threshold conditions on the dimensionless heat flux which are also functions of the electron core {beta}. The empirical bounds and the theoretical thresholds are similar and are therefore consistent with the hypothesis. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Electronic Flux Density beyond the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Axel; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2016-05-19

    In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electronic wave function is typically real-valued and hence the electronic flux density (current density) seems to vanish. This is unfortunate for chemistry, because it precludes the possibility to monitor the electronic motion associated with the nuclear motion during chemical rearrangements from a Born-Oppenheimer simulation of the process. We study an electronic flux density obtained from a correction to the electronic wave function. This correction is derived via nuclear velocity perturbation theory applied in the framework of the exact factorization of electrons and nuclei. To compute the correction, only the ground state potential energy surface and the electronic wave function are needed. For a model system, we demonstrate that this electronic flux density approximates the true one very well, for coherent tunneling dynamics as well as for over-the-barrier scattering, and already for mass ratios between electrons and nuclei that are much larger than the true mass ratios.

  19. Electron flux at the surface of titanium tritide films

    SciTech Connect

    Kherani, N.P.; Shmayda, W.T. . Research Center)

    1992-03-01

    Certain metal tritides have been investigated as reliable and quasi-constant sources of electrons for a number of practical purposes with particular attention to the dependence of the electron emission rate as a function of temperature. The objective of this paper is to carry out simple calculations that illustrate the relative ranking of a numbed of binary metal tritides with respect to the maximum achievable electron flux; examine semi-empirically the energy spectrum of the electrons emanating from the surface of a titanium tritide film; and present experimental measurements of the electron emission rate from the surface of titanium tritide films. THe results suggest that beryllium tritide would yield the greatest electron emission rate of all the metal tritides; the emitted flux has a significant component of secondary electrons; and, the total electron emission rate is quite sensitive to the condition of the emitting surface.

  20. Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Nagatani, Yukinori

    2014-02-10

    A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device, inserted in a transmission electron microscope. The scheme significantly improves the prospect of realizing a quantum-enhanced electron microscope for radiation-sensitive specimens.

  1. Electron flux through apo-and holoferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, Danny N.; Davis, Jason J.

    2007-04-01

    Conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) has been used to investigate electronic transport through the protein ferritin in both its holo and apo forms. The presence of the iron oxide core has a notable effect on both conductance and the molecular response to probe-induced compression. This response can also be contrasted with that of the much smaller metalloprotein cytochrome c, across which electron transport can be simulated by a single non-resonant tunnel barrier model. Tapping mode AFM imaging, in different compressional regimes, reveals both the mineral core of holoferritin and significant collapse of the hollow protein cavity of apoferritin. These topographic findings correlate well with CP-AFM conductance data and facilitate a clearer description of electron transport across these molecules.

  2. Forecasting relativistic electron flux using dynamic multiple regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H.-L.; Billings, S. A.; Surjalal Sharma, A.; Wing, S.; Boynton, R. J.; Walker, S. N.

    2011-02-01

    The forecast of high energy electron fluxes in the radiation belts is important because the exposure of modern spacecraft to high energy particles can result in significant damage to onboard systems. A comprehensive physical model of processes related to electron energisation that can be used for such a forecast has not yet been developed. In the present paper a systems identification approach is exploited to deduce a dynamic multiple regression model that can be used to predict the daily maximum of high energy electron fluxes at geosynchronous orbit from data. It is shown that the model developed provides reliable predictions.

  3. Frozen flux violation, electron demagnetization and magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2015-10-01

    We argue that the analogue in collisionless plasma of the collisional diffusion region of magnetic reconnection is properly defined in terms of the demagnetization of the plasma electrons that enable "frozen flux" slippage to occur. This condition differs from the violation of the "frozen-in" condition, which only implies that two fluid effects are involved, rather than the necessary slippage of magnetic flux as viewed in the electron frame. Using 2D Particle In Cell (PIC) simulations, this approach properly finds the saddle point region of the flux function. Our demagnetization conditions are the dimensionless guiding center approximation expansion parameters for electrons which we show are observable and determined locally by the ratio of non-ideal electric to magnetic field strengths. Proxies for frozen flux slippage are developed that (a) are measurable on a single spacecraft, (b) are dimensionless with theoretically justified threshold values of significance, and (c) are shown in 2D simulations to recover distinctions theoretically possible with the (unmeasurable) flux function. A new potentially observable dimensionless frozen flux rate, ΛΦ, differentiates significant from anecdotal frozen flux slippage. A single spacecraft observable, ϒ, is shown with PIC simulations to be essentially proportional to the unobservable local Maxwell frozen flux rate. This relationship theoretically establishes electron demagnetization in 3D as the general cause of frozen flux slippage. In simple 2D cases with an isolated central diffusion region surrounded by separatrices, these diagnostics uniquely identify the traditional diffusion region (without confusing it with the two fluid "ion-diffusion" region) and clarify the role of the separatrices where frozen flux violations do occur but are not substantial. In the more complicated guide and asymmetric 2D cases, substantial flux slippage regions extend out along, but inside of, the preferred separatrices, demonstrating that

  4. Frozen flux violation, electron demagnetization and magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Daughton, W.

    2015-10-15

    We argue that the analogue in collisionless plasma of the collisional diffusion region of magnetic reconnection is properly defined in terms of the demagnetization of the plasma electrons that enable “frozen flux” slippage to occur. This condition differs from the violation of the “frozen-in” condition, which only implies that two fluid effects are involved, rather than the necessary slippage of magnetic flux as viewed in the electron frame. Using 2D Particle In Cell (PIC) simulations, this approach properly finds the saddle point region of the flux function. Our demagnetization conditions are the dimensionless guiding center approximation expansion parameters for electrons which we show are observable and determined locally by the ratio of non-ideal electric to magnetic field strengths. Proxies for frozen flux slippage are developed that (a) are measurable on a single spacecraft, (b) are dimensionless with theoretically justified threshold values of significance, and (c) are shown in 2D simulations to recover distinctions theoretically possible with the (unmeasurable) flux function. A new potentially observable dimensionless frozen flux rate, Λ{sub Φ}, differentiates significant from anecdotal frozen flux slippage. A single spacecraft observable, ϒ, is shown with PIC simulations to be essentially proportional to the unobservable local Maxwell frozen flux rate. This relationship theoretically establishes electron demagnetization in 3D as the general cause of frozen flux slippage. In simple 2D cases with an isolated central diffusion region surrounded by separatrices, these diagnostics uniquely identify the traditional diffusion region (without confusing it with the two fluid “ion-diffusion” region) and clarify the role of the separatrices where frozen flux violations do occur but are not substantial. In the more complicated guide and asymmetric 2D cases, substantial flux slippage regions extend out along, but inside of, the preferred separatrices

  5. Automated Science Processing for GLAST LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, James

    2007-07-12

    Automated Science Processing (ASP) will be performed by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) on data from the satellite as soon as the Level 1 data are available in the ground processing pipeline. ASP will consist of time-critical science analyses that will facilitate follow-up and multi-wavelength observations of transient sources. These analyses include refinement of gamma-ray burst (GRB) positions, timing, flux and spectral properties, off-line searches for untriggered GRBs and gamma-ray afterglows, longer time scale monitoring of a standard set of sources (AGNs, X-ray binaries), and searches for previously unknown flaring sources in the LAT band. We describe the design of ASP and its scientific products; and we show results of a prototype implementation, driven by the standard LAT data processing pipeline, as applied to simulated LAT and GBM data.

  6. Automated Science Processing for GLAST LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, James; Carson, Jennifer; Focke, Warren; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    Automated Science Processing (ASP) will be performed by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) on data from the satellite as soon as the Level 1 data are available in the ground processing pipeline. ASP will consist of time-critical science analyses that will facilitate follow-up and multi-wavelength observations of transient sources. These analyses include refinement of gamma-ray burst (GRB) positions, timing, flux and spectral properties, off-line searches for untriggered GRBs and gamma-ray afterglows, longer time scale monitoring of a standard set of sources (AGNs, X-ray binaries), and searches for previously unknown flaring sources in the LAT band. We describe the design of ASP and its scientific products; and we show results of a prototype implementation, driven by the standard LAT data processing pipeline, as applied to simulated LAT and GBM data.

  7. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ˜10 % due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We have isolated a sample of 135 ±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  8. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; et al

    2016-06-10

    In muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux frommore » 9% to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.« less

  9. Molecular isotopic effects on coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Kenfack, A.; Paulus, B.; Barth, I.; Marquardt, F.

    2010-12-15

    A full quantum treatment shows that coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes exhibit a strong sensitivity to a small mass change in a vibrating molecule. This has been exemplified with the existing isotopes of H{sub 2}{sup +} as well as few fictitious ones. We find that the fluxes undergo a significant change as one goes from one isotope of reduced mass {mu} to another. Other well-defined observables are likewise affected. It turns out that as a general rule, the heavier the isotope, the larger the flux, the smaller the dispersion, and the longer the revival period. While we were able to confirm analytically that the time at the first turning point scales as {radical}({mu}) and that the revival period changes linearly with {mu}, the mechanism of other observables remains subtle as the result of quantum interference highlighted by the pronounced difference observed on the dispersion pattern.

  10. Electron Heat Flux in Pressure Balance Structures at Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar wind near solar minimum. Rom previous studies, PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes and be related to network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere. We investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs, applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data. At 2001 AGU Spring meeting, we reported that PBSs have structures like current sheets or plasmoids, and suggested that they are associated with network activity at the base of polar plumes. In this paper, we have analyzed high-energy electron data at Ulysses/SWOOPS to see whether bi-directional electron flow exists and confirm the conclusions more precisely. As a result, although most events show a typical flux directed away from the Sun, we have obtained evidence that some PBSs show bi-directional electron flux and others show an isotropic distribution of electron pitch angles. The evidence shows that plasmoids are flowing away from the Sun, changing their flow direction dynamically in a way not caused by Alfven waves. From this, we have concluded that PBSs are generated due to network activity at the base of polar plumes and their magnetic structures axe current sheets or plasmoids.

  11. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    PubMed

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Polar cap auroral electron fluxes observed with Isis 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winningham, J. D.; Heikkila, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Three types of auroral particle precipitation have been observed over the polar caps, well inside the auroral oval, by means of the soft particle spectrometer on the Isis 1 satellite. The first type is a uniform, very soft (about 100 eV) electron 'polar rain' over the entire polar cap; this may well be present with very weak intensity at all times, but it is markedly enhanced during worldwide geomagnetic storms. A second type of precipitation is a structured flux of electrons with energies near 1 keV, suggestive of localized 'polar showers'; it seems likely that these are the cause of the sun-aligned auroral arcs that have been observed during moderately quiet conditions. During periods of intense magnetic disturbance this precipitation can become very intense and exhibit a characteristic pattern that we have come to call a 'polar squall'.

  13. A determination of the gamma-ray flux and photon spectral index distributions of blazars from the Fermi-LAT 3LAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, J.

    2015-11-01

    We present a determination of the distributions of gamma-ray photon flux - the so-called LogN-LogS relation - and photon spectral index for blazars, based on the third extragalactic source catalogue of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Large Area Telescope, and considering the photon energy range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV. The data set consists of the 774 blazars in the so-called Clean sample detected with a greater than approximately 7σ detection threshold and located above ±20° Galactic latitude. We use non-parametric methods verified in previous works to reconstruct the intrinsic distributions from the observed ones which account for the data truncations introduced by observational bias and includes the effects of the possible correlation between the flux and photon index. The intrinsic flux distribution can be represented by a broken power law with a high-flux power-law index of -2.43 ± 0.08 and a low-flux power-law index of -1.87 ± 0.10. The intrinsic photon index distribution can be represented by a Gaussian with mean of 2.62 ± 0.05 and width of 0.17 ± 0.02. We also report the intrinsic distributions for the subpopulations of BL Lac and FSRQ (Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar)-type blazars separately and these differ substantially. We then estimate the contribution of FSRQs and BL Lacs to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background radiation. Under the simplistic assumption that the flux distributions probed in this analysis continue to arbitrary low flux, we calculate that the best-fitting contribution of FSRQs is 35 per cent and BL Lacs 17 per cent of the total gamma-ray output of the Universe in this energy range.

  14. Quasi-classical theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic molecular processes.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-11-26

    The standard Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (EFD). A previously proposed "coupled-channels" theory permits the extraction of the EFD from the BO wave function for one-electron diatomic systems, but attempts at generalization to many-electron polyatomic systems are frustrated by technical barriers. An alternative "quasi-classical" approach, which eliminates the explicit quantum dynamics of the electrons within a classical framework, yet retains the quantum character of the nuclear motion, appears capable of yielding EFDs for arbitrarily complex systems. Quasi-classical formulas for the EFD in simple systems agree with corresponding coupled-channels formulas. Results of the application of the new quasi-classical formula for the EFD to a model triatomic system indicate the potential of the quasi-classical scheme to elucidate the dynamical role of electrons in electronically adiabatic processes in more complex multiparticle systems.

  15. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+).

  16. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  17. Chandra and Swift Observations of Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Davide; Cheung, T.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the last year we targeted some of the unidentified Fermi-LAT objects (UFOs) at high Galactic latitude with Chandra and Swift in order to determine the basic properties (positions, fluxes, hardness ratios) of all X-ray sources within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. These satellites enable us to detect the X-ray conterparts with a flux limit that is at least an order of magnitude lower than achieved in extant RASS data and to further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources. Here we present the results obtained with 5 Chandra pointings of high Galactic latitude UFOs in the Fermi-LAT 3-months bright source list. The association of detected X-ray sources within the improved 11-months Fermi-LAT localization circles with available optical and radio observations is discussed.

  18. Extreme relativistic electron fluxes at geosynchronous orbit: Analysis of GOES E > 2 MeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Nigel P.; Horne, Richard B.; Isles, John D.; Rodriguez, Juan V.

    2015-03-01

    Relativistic electrons (E > 1 MeV) cause internal charging on satellites and are an important space weather hazard. A key requirement in space weather research concerns extreme events and knowledge of the largest flux expected to be encountered over the lifetime of a satellite mission. This is interesting both from scientific and practical points of view since satellite operators, engineers, and the insurance industry need this information to better evaluate the effects of extreme events on their spacecraft. Here we conduct an extreme value analysis of daily averaged E > 2 MeV electron fluxes from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) during the 19.5 year period from 1 January 1995 to 30 June 2014. We find that the daily averaged flux measured at GOES West is typically a factor of about 2.5 higher than that measured at GOES East, and we conduct independent analyses for these two locations. The 1 in 10, 1 in 50, and 1 in 100 year daily averaged E > 2 MeV electron fluxes at GOES West are 1.84 ×105, 5.00 ×105, and 7.68 ×105 cm-2 s-1 sr-1, respectively. The corresponding fluxes at GOES East are 6.53 ×104, 1.98 ×105, and 3.25 ×105 cm-2 s-1 sr-1, respectively. The largest fluxes seen during the 19.5 year period on 29 July 2004 were particularly extreme and were seen by satellites at GOES West and GOES East. The extreme value analysis suggests that this event was a 1 in 50 year event.

  19. GUST LAT Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Because gamma-ray astrophysics profits in powerful ways from multi-wavelength studies, the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch. Many aspects of this program are of direct interest to observers using VERITAS and other atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes, whose capabilities complement those of GLAST. This talk with describe some of the current developmental concepts for GLAST LAT multiwavelength work, including release of data for transient sources, nearly-continuous monitoring of selected time-variable sources, pulsar timing, follow-on observations for source identification, coordinated blazar campaigns, and cross-calibration with other high-energy telescopes. Although few details are firm at this stage of preparation for GLAST, the LAT Collaboration looks forward to cooperation with a broad cross-section of the multiwave-length community. The GLAST Large Area Telescope is an international effort, with U.S. funding provided by the Department of Energy and NASA.

  20. Beta electron fluxes inside a magnetic plasma cavern: Calculation and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupitskii, E. L.; Smirnov, E. V.; Kulikova, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    We study the possibility of electrostatic blanking of beta electrons in the expanding spherical blob of a radioactive plasma in a rarefied ionosphere. From numerical studies on the dynamics of beta electrons departing a cavern, we obtain the form of a function that determines the portion of departing electrons and calculate the flux density of beta electrons inside the cavern in relation to the Starfish Prime nuclear blast. We show that the flux density of electrons in geomagnetic flux tubes and inside the cavern depend on a correct allowance for the quantity of beta electrons returning to the cavern. On the basis of a physical analysis, we determine the approximate criterion for the return of electrons from a geomagnetic flux tube to the cavern. We compare calculation results in terms of the flux density of beta electrons inside the cavern with the recently published experimental results from operation Starfish Prime.

  1. PIC Simulation of the Electron Whistler Heat Flux Instability in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, E.; Min, K.; Roberts, D. A.; Hwang, K. J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Dokgo, K.

    2015-12-01

    Electrons in the solar wind are often observed as two distinguishable components; a thermal dense core and a suprathermal halo. The relative drift and anisotropy of these two electron components determine the electron heat flux, which can excite various electromagnetic instabilities. Among these, the whistler has been found to be one of the most commonly-observed and important instabilities. The electron parameters derived from the measured solar wind are comparable to the threshold values predicted by the linear Vlasov theory of the whistler heat flux instability. The enhanced magnetic field fluctuations driven by the heat flux instability, in turn, prevent the drift speed difference between the two populations from increasing. This indicates that the electron heat flux is constrained and regulated by heat flux instabilities through the wave-particle scattering. Such electron heat flux regulation has widely been observed and in best agreement with the whistler heat flux instability. Here we present the growth of the electron heat flux instability in the solar wind condition using 1D PIC simulation with a periodic boundary condition. The two Maxwellian electron components are found to predominantly excite the whistler waves. We examine the growth rates of the whistle instability with respect to various plasma parameters such as the difference in drift speeds between the two components and temperature of the halo, to show the electron heat flux regulation by the whistler.

  2. A selection rule for the directions of electronic fluxes during unimolecular pericyclic reactions in the electronic ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manz, Jörn; Yamamoto, Kentaro

    2012-05-01

    Unimolecular pericyclic reactions in a non-degenerate electronic ground state proceed under the constraint of zero electronic angular momentum. This restriction engenders a selection rule on the directions of electronic fluxes. Accordingly, clockwise or counter-clockwise fluxes are 'forbidden', whereas pincer-like fluxes (which consist of concerted clockwise and counter-clockwise fluxes) are 'allowed'. The selection rule is illustrated for three reactions: the degenerate Cope rearrangement of hexadiene, hydrogen transfer in malonaldehyde, and double proton transfer in the formic acid dimer.

  3. A survey of superthermal electron flux depressions, or "electron holes," within the illuminated Martian induced magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. E. S.; Lester, M.; Nichols, J. D.; Sánchez-Cano, B.; Andrews, D. J.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Fränz, M.

    2016-05-01

    Since Mars lacks a global intrinsic magnetic field, the solar wind interacts directly with the Martian upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The presence of localized intense remnant crustal magnetic fields adds to this interaction, making the Martian plasma system a unique environment within the solar system. Rapid reductions in the electron flux, referred to as "electron holes," occur within the Martian induced magnetosphere (IM). We present a statistical analysis of this phenomenon identified from proxy measurements of the electron flux derived from measurements by the Analyser of Space Plasmas and Energetic Neutral Atoms Electron Spectrometer experiment on board the Mars Express (MEX) spacecraft. The study is completed for the period of 9 February 2004 to 9 May 2014. Electron holes are observed within the IM in more than 56% of MEX orbits during this study period, occurring predominantly at altitudes less than 1300 km, with the majority in the negative X Mars-Centric Solar Orbital direction. The spatial distribution above the surface of Mars is observed to bear close resemblance to that of the crustal magnetic fields as predicted by the Cain et al. magnetic field model, suggesting that they play an important role in the formation of these phenomena.

  4. Plasmaspheric Electron Densities and Plasmashere-Ionosphere Coupling Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, Janos; Cherneva, Nina; Shevtsov, Boris; Sannikov, Dmitry; Ferencz, Csaba; Koronczay, David

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities and ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling fluxes are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet [1] detects millions of whistlers in a year. The system has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu) project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model [2], that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups [3]. In this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods from Karymshina station (Kamchatka, Russia). Refilling rates, that are not yet known in details are also presented for the various periods. 1.Lichtenberger, J., C. Ferencz, L. Bodnár, D. Hamar, and P. Steinbach (2008), Automatic whistler detector and analyzer system: Automatic whistler detector, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467. 2. Lichtenberger, J. (2009), A new whistler inversion method, J. Geophys. Res., 114, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799. 3. Lichtenberger, J., C. Ferencz, D. Hamar, P. Steinbach, C. J. Rodger, M. A. Clilverd, and A. B. Collier (2010), Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer system: Implementation of the analyzer algorithm, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A12214, doi:10.1029/2010JA015931.

  5. Electron flux controlled switching between electron beam induced etching and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Milos; Lobo, Charlene J.; Hartigan, Gavin; Ralph Knowles, W.

    2007-03-01

    Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) and etching (EBIE) are promising methods for the fabrication of three-dimensional nanodevices, wiring of nanostructures, and repair of photolithographic masks. Here, we study simultaneous EBID and EBIE, and demonstrate an athermal electron flux controlled transition between material deposition and etching. The switching is observed when one of the processes has both a higher efficiency and a lower precursor partial pressure than the other. This is demonstrated in two technologically important systems: during XeF2-mediated etching of chrome on a photolithographic mask and during deposition and etching of carbonaceous films on a semiconductor surface. Simultaneous EBID and EBIE can be used to enhance the spatial localization of etch profiles. It plays a key role in reducing contamination buildup rates during low vacuum electron imaging and deposition of high purity nanostructures in the presence of oxygen-containing gases.

  6. Sharper Fermi LAT Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo, Stephen; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has a point spread function with large tails, consisting of events affected by tracker ineffiencies, inactive volumes, and hard scattering; these tails can make source confusion a limiting factor. The parameter CTBCORE, available in the publicly available Extended Fermi LAT data, estimates the quality of each event's direction reconstruction; by implementing a cut in this parameter, the tails of the point spread function can be suppressed at the cost of losing effective area. We implement cuts on CTBCORE and present updated instrument response functions derived from the Fermi LAT data itself, along with all-sky maps generated with these cuts. Having shown the effectiveness of these cuts, especially at low energies, we encourage their use in analyses where angular resolution is more important than Poisson noise.

  7. Fermi-LAT upper limits on gamma-ray emission from colliding wind binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, M.; Reimer, O.; Reimer, A.; Egberts, K.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Colliding wind binaries (CWBs) are thought to give rise to a plethora of physical processes including acceleration and interaction of relativistic particles. Observation of synchrotron radiation in the radio band confirms there is a relativistic electron population in CWBs. Accordingly, CWBs have been suspected sources of high-energy γ-ray emission since the COS-B era. Theoretical models exist that characterize the underlying physical processes leading to particle acceleration and quantitatively predict the non-thermal energy emission observable at Earth. Aims: We strive to find evidence of γ-ray emission from a sample of seven CWB systems: WR 11, WR 70, WR 125, WR 137, WR 140, WR 146, and WR 147. Theoretical modelling identified these systems as the most favourable candidates for emitting γ-rays. We make a comparison with existing γ-ray flux predictions and investigate possible constraints. Methods: We used 24 months of data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope to perform a dedicated likelihood analysis of CWBs in the LAT energy range. Results: We find no evidence of γ-ray emission from any of the studied CWB systems and determine corresponding flux upper limits. For some CWBs the interplay of orbital and stellar parameters renders the Fermi -LAT data not sensitive enough to constrain the parameter space of the emission models. In the cases of WR140 and WR147, the Fermi -LAT upper limits appear to rule out some model predictions entirely and constrain theoretical models over a significant parameter space. A comparison of our findings to the CWB η Car is made.

  8. Auroral electron precipitation and flux tube erosion in Titan’s upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snowden, D.; Yelle, R. V.; Galand, M.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Jones, G. H.; Lavvas, P.

    2013-09-01

    Cassini dasta shows that Titan’s atmosphere strongly depletes the electron content in Saturn’s flux tubes, producing features known as electron bite-outs, which indicate that the flux of auroral electrons decreases over time. To understand this process we have developed a time-dependent two-stream model, which uses field line geometries and drift paths calculated by a three-dimensional multi-fluid model of Titan’s plasma interaction. The boundary conditions of the model account for the time-dependent reduction or increase in electron flux along Saturn’s magnetic field lines because of the loss or production of electrons in Titan’s atmosphere. The modification of the auroral electron flux depends on the electron bounce period in Saturn’s outer magnetosphere; therefore, we also calculate electron bounce periods along several Kronian field lines accounting for both the magnetic mirroring force and the field-aligned electric potential in Saturn’s plasma sheet. We use the time-dependent two-stream model to calculate how the reduction in the auroral electron flux affects electron impact ionization and energy deposition rates in Titan’s upper atmosphere. We find that the flux of higher energy (>50 eV) electrons entering Titan’s atmosphere is strongly reduced over time, resulting in smaller ionization and energy deposition rates below ∼1300 km altitude. Finally, we show that sample spectrograms produced from our calculations are consistent with CAPS-ELS data.

  9. Electron Flux Models at GEO: 30 keV - 600 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, R.; Balikhin, M. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walker, S. N.; Ganushkina, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Forecast models are developed for the electron fluxes measured by the Magnetospheric Electron Detector (MagED) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 13. The models employ solar wind and geomagnetic indices as inputs to produce a forecast of the electron flux at Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) for five energy ranges from 30 keV - 600 keV. All of these models will be implemented in real time to forecast the electron fluxes on the PROGRESS project website (https://ssg.group.shef.ac.uk/progress2/html/index.phtml).

  10. Sawtooth oscillations in the flux of runaway electrons to the PLT limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D.

    1982-03-01

    Increased fluxes of runaway electrons at the PLT limiter are observed in the few milliseconds following internal disruptions. These fluxes have an inverted (outside) sawtooth character. The time for the flux to reach a maximum after the disruption has been studied as a function of the plasma parameters for thousands of PLT discharges. One interpretation is that this delay represents the time for a perturbation to the runaway electron population to travel from the q = 1 region to the plasma boundary. These times are approx. 10/sup -1/ of the electron thermal confinement times and increase with the plasma electron density.

  11. Nightside electron flux measurements at Mars by the Phobos-2 HARP instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shutte, N.; Gringauz, K.; Kiraly, P.; Kotova, G.; Nagy, A. F.; Rosenbauer, H.; Szego, K.; Verigin, M.

    1995-01-01

    All the available nightside electron data obtained during circular orbits at Mars from the Phobos-2 Hyperbolic Retarded Potential Analyzer (HARP) instrument have been examined in detail and are summarized in this paper. An electron flux component with energies exceeding that of the unperturbed solar wind was observed inside the magnetosheath, indicating the presence of acceleration mechanism(s). The character of the electron fluxes measured in the magnetotail cannot be classified in any simple manner, however, there is a correlation between the electron fluxes measured well inside this region and the unperturbed solar wind ram pressure.

  12. Energy Dependent Responses of Relativistic Electron Fluxes in the Outer Radiation Belt to Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase 4 or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3-2.5 MeV electrons fluxes show increase, whereas 2.5-14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such 'energy dependent' behavior of electrons preferably occurs during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and these 'energy dependent' events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examined one of the cases where observed EMIC waves can resonate effectively with >2.5 MeV electrons and scatter them into the atmosphere. The correlation study further illustrates that electron flux drop-outs during storm main phases do not correlate well with the flux build-up during storm recovery phases. We suggest that a combination of efficient EMIC-induced scattering and weaker chorus-driven acceleration provide a viable candidate for the energy dependent responses of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons to geomagnetic storms. These results are of great interest to both understanding of the radiation belt dynamics and applications in space weather.

  13. Selective four electron reduction of O2 by an iron porphyrin electrocatalyst under fast and slow electron fluxes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Subhra; Sengupta, Kushal; Mittra, Kaustuv; Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Dey, Abhishek

    2012-08-01

    An iron porphyrin catalyst with four electron donor groups is reported. The porphyrin ligand bears a distal hydrogen bonding pocket which inverts the normal axial ligand binding selectivity exhibited by porphyrins bearing sterically crowded distal structures. This catalyst specifically reduces O(2) by four electrons under both fast and slow electron fluxes at pH 7.

  14. Initial-state dependence of coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenfack, A.; Marquardt, F.; Paramonov, G. K.; Barth, I.; Lasser, C.; Paulus, B.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate that coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes in molecules can strongly depend on the initial state preparation. Starting the dynamics of an aligned D2+ molecule at two different initial conditions, the inner and the outer turning points, we observe qualitatively different oscillation patterns of the nuclear fluxes developing after 30 fs. This corresponds to different orders of magnitude bridged by the time evolution of the nuclear dispersion. Moreover, there are attosecond time intervals within which the electronic fluxes do not adapt to the nuclei motion depending on the initial state. These results are inferred from two different approaches for the numerical flux simulation, which are both in good agreement.

  15. Regulation of the solar wind electron heat flux from 1 to 5 AU: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, E.E.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gary, S.P.; Phillips, J.L.; Balogh, A.

    1994-12-01

    In this study the authors use observations from the three-dimensional electron spectrometer and magnetometer aboard the Ulysses spacecraft to examine the solar wind electron heat flux from 1.2 to 5.4 AU in the ecliptic plane. Throughout Ulysses` transit to 5.4 AU, the electron heat flux decreases more rapidly ({approximately}R{sup {minus}3.0}) than simple collisionless expansion along the local magnetic field and is smaller than expected for a thermal gradient heat flux, q{sub {parallel}}e(r)={minus}k{sub {parallel}}{del}{sub {parallel}}T{sub e}(r). The radial gradients and magnitudes expected for a number of electron heat flux regulatory mechanisms are examined and compared to the observations. The best agreement is found for heat flux regulation by the whistler heat flux instability. The upper bound and radial scaling for the electron heat flux predicted for the whistler heat flux instability are consistent with observations.

  16. Energy dependence of relativistic electron flux variations in the outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Li, Jinxing; Fu, Suiyan; Pu, Zuyin; Chen, Lunjin; Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt, depending on the delicate competition between electron energization and loss processes. Despite the well-known "energy independent" prototype in which electron fluxes enhance after geomagnetic storms at all energies, we present observations of "energy dependent" events, i.e., post-storm electron fluxes at lower energies (0.3-2.5 MeV, measured by MEPED/POES) recover or even exceed the pre-storm level, while electron fluxes at higher energies (2.5-14 MeV, measured by PET/SAMPEX) do not restore. The statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies: ~ 82% (3%) storm events produce increased (decreased) flux for 0.3-2.5 MeV electrons, while ~ 37% (45%) storms lead to enhancements (reductions) of 2.5-14 MeV electron flux. Superposed epoch analysis suggests that "energy dependent" events preferentially occur during periods of high solar wind density along with high dynamic pressure. Previous statistical studies have shown that this kind of solar wind conditions account for significant enhancements of EMIC waves, which cause efficient precipitation of > 2 MeV electrons into atmosphere via pitch angle scattering. Two cases of "energy dependent" events are investigated in detail with evident observations of EMIC waves that can resonate effectively with >2 MeV electrons. Besides, we do not capture much differences in the chorus wave activity between those "energy dependent" and "energy independent" events. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that EMIC waves play a crucial role in the occurrences of those "energy dependent" events in the outer zone during geomagnetic storms.

  17. Neutral hydrogen flux measured at 100- to 200-km altitude in an electron aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, G. E.; Anderson, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen fluxes were measured at altitudes of 120-200 km by a rocket payload that also measured electron and proton fluxes and vector magnetic fields. An intense electron arc was crossed, while an upper limit to the flux of 0.5- to 20-keV protons was 1,000,000 per sq cm s sr keV. A neutral flux of 50,000,000 per sq cm s sr was observed, assuming hydrogen with greater than 1-keV energy, with greater north-south extent than the electron flux. Its pitch angle distribution was peaked toward 90 deg, tending toward isotropy in the center. This is fitted to a model describing spreading of an initial proton arc above 500 km.

  18. Empirical predictive models of daily relativistic electron flux at geostationary orbit: Multiple regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Laura E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Pilipenko, Viacheslav; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Clilverd, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The daily maximum relativistic electron flux at geostationary orbit can be predicted well with a set of daily averaged predictor variables including previous day's flux, seed electron flux, solar wind velocity and number density, AE index, IMF Bz, Dst, and ULF and VLF wave power. As predictor variables are intercorrelated, we used multiple regression analyses to determine which are the most predictive of flux when other variables are controlled. Empirical models produced from regressions of flux on measured predictors from 1 day previous were reasonably effective at predicting novel observations. Adding previous flux to the parameter set improves the prediction of the peak of the increases but delays its anticipation of an event. Previous day's solar wind number density and velocity, AE index, and ULF wave activity are the most significant explanatory variables; however, the AE index, measuring substorm processes, shows a negative correlation with flux when other parameters are controlled. This may be due to the triggering of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves by substorms that cause electron precipitation. VLF waves show lower, but significant, influence. The combined effect of ULF and VLF waves shows a synergistic interaction, where each increases the influence of the other on flux enhancement. Correlations between observations and predictions for this 1 day lag model ranged from 0.71 to 0.89 (average: 0.78). A path analysis of correlations between predictors suggests that solar wind and IMF parameters affect flux through intermediate processes such as ring current (Dst), AE, and wave activity.

  19. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes

    PubMed Central

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed. PMID:26167432

  20. Supercomplex assembly determines electron flux in the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Lapuente-Brun, Esther; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Latorre-Pellicer, Ana; Colás, Carmen; Balsa, Eduardo; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Quirós, Pedro M; Calvo, Enrique; Rodríguez-Hernández, M A; Navas, Plácido; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Ángel; López-Otín, Carlos; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2013-06-28

    The textbook description of mitochondrial respiratory complexes (RCs) views them as free-moving entities linked by the mobile carriers coenzyme Q (CoQ) and cytochrome c (cyt c). This model (known as the fluid model) is challenged by the proposal that all RCs except complex II can associate in supercomplexes (SCs). The proposed SCs are the respirasome (complexes I, III, and IV), complexes I and III, and complexes III and IV. The role of SCs is unclear, and their existence is debated. By genetic modulation of interactions between complexes I and III and III and IV, we show that these associations define dedicated CoQ and cyt c pools and that SC assembly is dynamic and organizes electron flux to optimize the use of available substrates.

  1. Energetic electron precipitation into the middle atmosphere -- Constructing the loss cone fluxes from MEPED POES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesse Tyssøy, H.; Sandanger, M. I.; Ødegaard, L.-K. G.; Stadsnes, J.; Aasnes, A.; Zawedde, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the chemistry of the middle atmosphere (50-90 km) is still an outstanding question as accurate quantification of EEP is lacking due to instrumental challenges and insufficient pitch angle coverage of current particle detectors. The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors (MEPED) instrument on board the NOAA/Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) and MetOp spacecraft has two sets of electron and proton telescopes pointing close to zenith (0°) and in the horizontal plane (90°). Using measurements from either the 0° or 90° telescope will underestimate or overestimate the bounce loss cone flux, respectively, as the energetic electron fluxes are often strongly anisotropic with decreasing fluxes toward the center of the loss cone. By combining the measurements from both telescopes with electron pitch angle distributions from theory of wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, a complete bounce loss cone flux is constructed for each of the electron energy channels >50 keV, >100 keV, and >300 keV. We apply a correction method to remove proton contamination in the electron counts. We also account for the relativistic (>1000 keV) electrons contaminating the proton detector at subauroral latitudes. This gives us full range coverage of electron energies that will be deposited in the middle atmosphere. Finally, we demonstrate the method's applicability on strongly anisotropic pitch angle distributions during a weak geomagnetic storm in February 2008. We compare the electron fluxes and subsequent energy deposition estimates to OH observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite substantiating that the estimated fluxes are representative for the true precipitating fluxes impacting the atmosphere.

  2. Electron heat flux dropouts in the solar wind - Evidence for interplanetary magnetic field reconnection?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.; Bame, S. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    An examination of ISEE-3 data from 1978 reveal 25 electron heat flux dropout events ranging in duration from 20 min to over 11 hours. The heat flux dropouts are found to occur in association with high plasma densities, low plasma velocities, low ion and electron temperatures, and low magnetic field magnitudes. It is suggested that the heat flux dropout intervals may indicate that the spacecraft is sampling plasma regimes which are magnetically disconnected from the sun and instead are connected to the outer heliosphere at both ends.

  3. Evaluation of the Antiproton Flux from the Antineutrino Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. V.; Belotsky, K. M.; Bogomolov, Yu V.; Budaev, R. I.; Dunaeva, O. A.; Kirillov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Laletin, M. N.; Lukyanov, A. D.; Malakhov, V. V.; Mayorov, A. G.; Mayorova, M. A.; Mosichkin, A. F.; Okrugin, A. A.; Rodenko, S. A.; Shitova, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Recent experiments in high enegry cosmic ray physics, PAMELA and AMS-02, excite a new interest to the mechanisms of generation of galactic antiparticles. In spite of the fact that global picture coincides with the predictions of the standard model, there are some black spots stimulating scientists to involve into research a particularly new physics like dark matter. In the present work, we make an attempt to estimate the impact of standard neutrino processes into the total flux of secondary antiprotons detected by contemporary experiments.

  4. Artificial neural network prediction model for geosynchronous electron fluxes: Dependence on satellite position and particle energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dae-Kyu; Lee, Dae-Young; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Hwang, Junga; Kim, Jaehun

    2016-04-01

    Geosynchronous satellites are often exposed to energetic electrons, the flux of which varies often to a large extent. Since the electrons can cause irreparable damage to the satellites, efforts to develop electron flux prediction models have long been made until recently. In this study, we adopt a neural network scheme to construct a prediction model for the geosynchronous electron flux in a wide energy range (40 keV to >2 MeV) and at a high time resolution (as based on 5 min resolution data). As the model inputs, we take the solar wind variables, geomagnetic indices, and geosynchronous electron fluxes themselves. We also take into account the magnetic local time (MLT) dependence of the geosynchronous electron fluxes. We use the electron data from two geosynchronous satellites, GOES 13 and 15, and apply the same neural network scheme separately to each of the GOES satellite data. We focus on the dependence of prediction capability on satellite's magnetic latitude and MLT as well as particle energy. Our model prediction works less efficiently for magnetic latitudes more away from the equator (thus for GOES 13 than for GOES 15) and for MLTs nearer to midnight than noon. The magnetic latitude dependence is most significant for an intermediate energy range (a few hundreds of keV), and the MLT dependence is largest for the lowest energy (40 keV). We interpret this based on degree of variance in the electron fluxes, which depends on magnetic latitude and MLT at geosynchronous orbit as well as particle energy. We demonstrate how substorms affect the flux variance.

  5. A statistical approach to determining energetic outer radiation belt electron precipitation fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon Wedlund, Mea; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; Cresswell-Moorcock, Kathy; Cobbett, Neil; Breen, Paul; Danskin, Donald; Spanswick, Emma; Rodriguez, Juan V.

    2014-05-01

    Subionospheric radio wave data from an Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-Belt (Dynamic) Deposition VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortia (AARDDVARK) receiver located in Churchill, Canada, is analyzed to determine the characteristics of electron precipitation into the atmosphere over the range 3 < L < 7. The study advances previous work by combining signals from two U.S. transmitters from 20 July to 20 August 2010, allowing error estimates of derived electron precipitation fluxes to be calculated, including the application of time-varying electron energy spectral gradients. Electron precipitation observations from the NOAA POES satellites and a ground-based riometer provide intercomparison and context for the AARDDVARK measurements. AARDDVARK radiowave propagation data showed responses suggesting energetic electron precipitation from the outer radiation belt starting 27 July 2010 and lasting ~20 days. The uncertainty in >30 keV precipitation flux determined by the AARDDVARK technique was found to be ±10%. Peak >30 keV precipitation fluxes of AARDDVARK-derived precipitation flux during the main and recovery phase of the largest geomagnetic storm, which started on 4 August 2010, were >105 el cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The largest fluxes observed by AARDDVARK occurred on the dayside and were delayed by several days from the start of the geomagnetic disturbance. During the main phase of the disturbances, nightside fluxes were dominant. Significant differences in flux estimates between POES, AARDDVARK, and the riometer were found after the main phase of the largest disturbance, with evidence provided to suggest that >700 keV electron precipitation was occurring. Currently the presence of such relativistic electron precipitation introduces some uncertainty in the analysis of AARDDVARK data, given the assumption of a power law electron precipitation spectrum.

  6. Dynamics of electron fluxes in the near-rocket region in the ARAKS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhovkina, N. I.

    2012-05-01

    In the ARAKS experiment, electron pulses were injected into the ionosphere from onboard a rocket. For different series of pulses, the initial energy of electrons was 27 and 15 keV and the current strength was ˜0.5 A. On board the rocket, the distributions of electron fluxes directed toward the rocket were measured using the retarding potential by the electron energy up to 3000 eV. In this work, it is shown that the appearance of extreme values of the intensity of electron fluxes higher than 200 eV at the tail of the electron energy distribution can be explained by the nonmonotonic acceleration of electrons in the fields of electrostatic turbulence. The dynamics of electron and ion fluxes can be influenced by the polarization drift. It should be noted that extreme values of the flux intensities were not observed at heights lower than 130 km. This can be connected with the suppression of electrostatic oscillations by collisions of electrons with ionospheric components.

  7. Solar flux variation of the electron temperature morning overshoot in the equatorial F region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, C.; Liu, H.; Truhlík, V.; Lühr, H.; Richards, P. G.

    2011-04-01

    Using 8 years of CHAMP satellite observations of the equatorial electron temperature, Te, we investigate its behavior during the morning overshoot and at ionospheric altitudes below 450 km including its variation with solar activity. The morning Te has a maximum at the dip equator and decreases gradually with increasing latitude, which is due to the increasing importance of heat conduction as the dip angle becomes larger. The amplitude of the equatorial morning overshoot Te decreases with increasing solar flux by about -10°K/solar flux unit depending on season and longitude. Trends of similar magnitude are predicted by the FLIP model. The model calculations confirm that the electron cooling due to enhanced electron-ion collisions increases faster than the heating of thermal electrons through collision with photoelectrons for increasing solar EUV. Both data and model showed that elevated electron temperatures persist to later local times during low solar activity. Obviously, the decreased background plasma density, together with the slower rise of electron density after sunrise under such conditions are responsible for the longer persistence. First investigations of longitudinal aspects revealed that the strength of the anticorrelation between morning Te and solar flux and the seasonal difference of the Te amplitude varies with longitude. The positive correlation between the morning overshoot and solar flux at 600 km as was shown earlier in Hinotori data is consistent with FLIP predictions and radar observations. The solar flux variation of the morning Te reverses sign between 400 and 600 km.

  8. Estimating the energy deposition in the mesosphere from anisotropic electron fluxes during REP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadsnes, Johan; Sandanger, Marit; Nesse Tyssoy, Hilde; Odegaard, Linn-Kristine; Asnes, Arne

    Data from the MEPED particle spectrometers on the Polar Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) are often used for estimating the energy deposition in the upper atmosphere from electrons in the energy range 30 keV - 2.5 MeV. MEPED includes two collimated electron detectors, which are pointing approximately towards zenith (0 degree detector) and in the horizontal plane (90 degree detector). At medium and high geomagnetic latitudes the 0 degree detector measures particles within a limited part of the bounce loss cone and the 90 degree detector measures particles outside or near the edge of the loss cone. The electron fluxes often show strong pitch angle anisotropy which causes large uncertainty in the estimate of energy deposition based on these measurements. An upper estimate is derived from the 90 degree detector and a lower estimate from the 0 degree detector. The electron anisotropy is to a large extent determined by wave-particle interactions causing pitch angle diffusion driving electrons into the bounce loss cone. The pitch angle anisotropy is dependent on the strength of the diffusion. We are developing a method for calculating the flux versus pitch angle in the loss cone based on the measured electron fluxes and modeled flux profiles from pitch angle scattering by whistler mode waves. We will present results from calculation of the energy deposition using the derived anisotropic flux distribution during a REP event in 2008.

  9. LATS1 (LATS, large tumor suppressor, homolog 1 (Drosophila))

    PubMed Central

    Visser-Grieve, Stacy; van Rensburg, Helena J Janse; Yang, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    LATS1 tumor suppressor is a serine/threonine kinase of the AGC kinase family and a core component of the Hippo pathway in mammals. LATS1 regulates various biological processes such as cell cycle progression, genetic stability, cell motility and adhesion, apoptosis, stem cell renewal and differentiation (Visser and Yang, 2010; Mo et al., 2014). LATS1 performs these functions by phosphorylating various substrates such as transcriptional co-activators YAP and TAZ (Zhao et al., 2007; Hao et al., 2008). LATS1 is also required for tissue homeostasis in both flies and mice (Visser et al., 2010). In addition to its roles in a broad spectrum of normal biological processes, loss of LATS1 has been shown to be important for the development of cancer and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs (Visser et al., 2010). Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying loss-of-LATS1-induced tumorigenesis and drug resistance will shed light on the design of new cancer treatment strategies in the future.

  10. Design of a high-flux instrument for ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippetto, D.; Qian, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and optimization of a new instrument for ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging. The proposed instrument merges the high peak current and relativistic electron energies of radio-frequency guns, with the high average electron flux of static electron microscopes, extending the beam parameter space achievable with relativistic electrons by many orders of magnitude. An immediate consequence of this work is a broader range of accessible science by using electron probes, enabling techniques as femtosecond nano-diffraction and coherent diffraction imaging, and paving the way to direct observation of ultrafast dynamics in complex and isolated samples, from nanocrystals, to nano/micro droplets and organic molecules.

  11. Rapid increase in relativistic electron flux controlled by nonlinear phase trapping of whistler chorus elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shinji; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Seki, Kanako

    2016-07-01

    Wave-particle interactions with whistler chorus waves are believed to provide a primary acceleration for electrons in the outer radiation belt. Previous models for flux enhancement of the radiation belt have assumed the stochastic process as a diffusion manner of successive random-phase interactions, but physical mechanisms for the acceleration are not fully incorporated in these models because of the lack of a nonlinear scattering process. Here we report rapid increase in relativistic electron flux by using an innovative computer simulation model that incorporates not only diffusive process but also nonlinear scattering processes. The simulations show that three types of scattering simultaneously occur, which are diffusive, phase trapping, and phase bunching. It is found that the phase trapping is the most efficient mechanism to produce the MeV electrons rapidly in the scattering processes. The electrons are accelerated from 400 keV to over 1 MeV in time scale less than 60 s. On the other hand, as the phase trapping is suppressed by the breaking of relative phase angle between waves and gyrating electrons during the interaction, the increase of electron flux at MeV energy is clearly reduced. Our simulations conclude that the phase-trapping process causes a significant effect for the increase in relativistic electron flux and suggest that a quasi-linear diffusion model is not always valid to fully describe the relativistic electron acceleration.

  12. Field-aligned fluxes of energetic electrons related to the onset of magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremser, G.; Korth, A.; Ullaland, S. L.; Roux, A.; Perraut, S.; Pedersen, A.; Schmidt, R.; Tanskanen, P.

    1987-08-01

    Observations of bidirectional field-aligned fluxes of energetic electrons (16 to 80 keV) at magnetic substorm onset are discussed. The electron fluxes appear 4 min after the onset of the expansion phase, last 1.5 min, and are associated with strong spatial gradients of the ion intensity. The observations are interpreted in terms of a model in which a surface wave develops at the transition from dipolelike to taillike geomagnetic fieldlines. The surface wave couples into kinetic Alfven waves that propagate along the fieldlines, are reflected at the ionosphere, and interact with mirrored electrons on their way back towards the equatorial plane.

  13. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    DOEpatents

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  14. Analysis of Voyager Observed High-Energy Electron Fluxes in the Heliosheath Using MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washimi, Haruichi; Webber, W. R.; Zank, Gary P.; Hu, Qiang; Florinski, Vladimir; Adams, James; Kubo, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft (V1 and V2) observed electrons of 6-14 MeV in the heliosheath which showed several incidences of flux variation relative to a background of gradually increasing flux with distance from the Sun. The increasing flux of background electrons is thought to result from inward radial diffusion. We compare the temporal electron flux variation with dynamical phenomena in the heliosheath that are obtained from our MHD simulations. Because our simulation is based on V2 observed plasma data before V2 crossed the termination shock, this analysis is effective up to late 2008, i.e., about a year after the V2-crossing, during which disturbances, driven prior to the crossing time, survived in the heliosheath. Several electron flux variations correspond to times directly associated with interplanetary shock events. One noteworthy example corresponds to various times associated with the March 2006 interplanetary shock, these being the collision with the termination shock, the passage past the V1 spacecraft, and the collision with the region near the heliopause, as identified by W.R. Webber et al. for proton/helium of 7-200 MeV. Our simulations indicate that all other electron flux variations, except one, correspond well to the times when a shock-driven magneto-sonic pulse and its reflection in the heliosheath either passed across V1/V2, or collided with the termination shock or with the plasma sheet near the heliopause. This result suggests that variation in the electron flux should be due to either direct or indirect effects of magnetosonic pulses in the heliosheath driven by interplanetary shocks

  15. Multidirectional Angular Electronic Flux during Adiabatic Attosecond Charge Migration in Excited Benzene.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gunter; Liu, ChunMei; Manz, Jörn; Paulus, Beate; Pérez-Torres, Jhon Fredy; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-07-14

    Recently, adiabatic attosecond charge migration (AACM) has been monitored and simulated for the first time, with application to the oriented iodoacetylene cation where AACM starts from the initial superposition of the ground state (φ0) and an electronic excited state (φ1). Here, we develop the theory for electronic fluxes during AACM in ring-shaped molecules, with application to oriented benzene prepared in the superposition of the ground and first excited singlet states. The initial state and its time evolution are analogous to coherent tunneling where φ0 and φ1 have different meanings; however, they denote the wave functions of the lowest tunneling doublet. This analogy suggests to transfer the theory of electronic fluxes during coherent tunneling to AACM, with suitable modifications which account for (i) the different time scales and (ii) the different electronic states, and which make use of (iii) the preparation of the initial state for AACM by a linearly polarized laser pulse. Application to benzene yields the multidirectional angular electronic flux with a pincer-motion type pattern during AACM: this unequivocal result confirms a previous working hypothesis. Moreover, the theory of AACM allows quantification of the electronic flux; that is, the maximum number of electrons (out of 42) which flow concertedly during AACM in benzene is 6 × 0.08 = 0.48.

  16. Correlation between Poynting flux and soft electron precipitation in the dayside polar cap boundary regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yue; Sheng, Cheng; Su, Yi-Jiun; Hairston, Marc R.; Knipp, Delores; Huang, Cheryl Y.; Ober, Daniel; Redmon, Rob J.; Coley, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Observations have revealed large Poynting flux and soft electron precipitation around the cusp region, which have strong impacts on the polar ionosphere/thermosphere. Simulations also confirmed that Poynting flux and soft electron precipitation significantly change the neutral density and dynamics around the dayside polar cap boundary regions. However, no detailed study has been conducted to show if they should coincide with each other or not. Our analysis of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite data reveals a complex correlation between them. Poynting flux and soft particle precipitation are coincident in some cases (match cases), but a clear displacement between them can also be identified in others (nonmatch cases). In the 29 cusp crossings from F13 we investigated, the ratio between nonmatch and match cases is close to 1:4. In nonmatch cases, the displacement between the Poynting flux enhancement and soft particle precipitation enhancement can be as large as 1° in geomagnetic latitude.

  17. The effect of different solar wind parameters upon significant relativistic electron flux dropouts in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinliang; Li, Wen; Bortnik, Jacob; Thorne, Richard M.; Lu, Quanming; Ma, Qianli; Tao, Xin; Wang, Shui

    2015-06-01

    Superposed epoch analyses were performed on 193 significant relativistic electron flux dropout events, in order to study the roles of different solar wind parameters in driving the depletion of relativistic electrons, using ~16 years of data from the POES and GOES missions, and the OMNIWEB solar wind database. We find that the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz play key roles in causing the relativistic electron flux dropouts, but also that either large solar wind dynamic pressure or strong southward IMF Bz by itself is capable of producing the significant depletion of relativistic electrons. The relativistic electron flux dropouts occur not only when the magnetopause is compressed closer to the Earth but also when the magnetopause is located very far (> ~10 RE). Importantly, our results show that in addition to the large solar wind dynamic pressure, which pushes the magnetopause inward strongly and causes the electrons to escape from the magnetosphere, relativistic electrons can also be scattered into the loss cone and precipitate into the Earth's atmosphere during periods of strong southward IMF Bz, which preferentially provides a source of free energy for electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave excitation. This is supported by the fact that the strongest electron precipitation into the atmosphere is found in the dusk sector, where EMIC waves are typically observed in the high-density plasmasphere or plume and cause efficient electron precipitation down to ~1 MeV.

  18. The Effect of Different Solar Wind Parameters upon Significant Relativistic Electron Flux Dropouts in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Li, W.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Lu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Superposed epoch analyses were performed on 193 significant relativistic electron flux dropout events, in order to study the roles of different solar wind parameters in driving the depletion of relativistic electrons, using ~16 years of data from the POES and GOES missions, and the OMNIWEB solar wind database. We find that the solar wind dynamic pressure and IMF Bz play key roles in causing the relativistic electron flux dropouts, but also that either large solar wind dynamic pressure or strong southward IMF Bz by itself is capable of producing the significant depletion of relativistic electrons. The relativistic electron flux dropouts occur not only when the magnetopause is compressed closer to the Earth, but also when the magnetopause is located very far (> ~10 RE). Importantly, our results show that in addition to the large solar wind dynamic pressure, which pushes the magnetopause inward strongly and causes the electrons to escape from the magnetosphere, relativistic electrons can also be scattered into the loss cone and precipitate into the Earth's atmosphere during periods of strong southward IMF Bz, which preferentially provides a source of free energy for electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave excitation. This is supported by the fact that the strongest electron precipitation into the atmosphere is found in the dusk sector, where EMIC waves are typically observed in the high-density plasmasphere or plume and cause efficient electron precipitation down to ~ 1 MeV.

  19. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Borovsky, J. E.; Denton, J. S.; Pitchford, D.; Hartley, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite-years of observations from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local-times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bi-linear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ion flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local-time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3-hour Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II (CEASE-II), also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicate a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user-requirements.

  20. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Borovsky, J. E.; Denton, J. S.; Pitchford, D.; Hartley, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite years of observations from the magnetospheric plasma analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bilinear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ion flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3 h Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II, also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicates a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user requirements.

  1. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    DOE PAGES

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Borovsky, J. E.; Denton, J. S.; Pitchford, D.; Hartley, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite-years of observations from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local-times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bi-linear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ionmore » flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local-time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3-hour Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II (CEASE-II), also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicate a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user-requirements.« less

  2. Properties of electron flux spectra around the plasmapause in the chorus and hiss regions using POES.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian; Rodger, Craig; Clilverd, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The European FP7 PLASMON project aims to provide observations of plasmaspheric densities, and link the plasmaspheric variations to relativistic electron precipitation from the radiation belts. This is intended to assist in the estimation and prevent damage of space assets from space weather events as well as to improve forecasting (http://plasmon.elte.hu). As part of the PLASMON project, electron fluxes from the POES series of satellites are being used to determine the link between energetic electron precipitation energy spectra and magnitude to the position of the plasmapause. The MEPED instrument onboard POES measures electron flux from 90° (trapped particles) and 0° (losscone) telescopes, in 3 integral energy channels (>30, >100 and >300 keV). These fluxes have been compared to the DEMETER/IDP instrument to confirm that published geometric factor corrections (Yando et al. 2011) can be accurately applied to the POES data to produce as accurate as possible fluxes. These global fluxes have then been separated into regions in which Chorus (23:00-11:00 MLT) and Hiss (11:00-16:00 MLT) whistler mode waves are expected to occur, in 0.2 L-shell bins with a 20 minute temporal resolution. The plasmapause locations have been determined from the O'Brien and Moldwin (2003) models based on Kp, Ae and Dst peaks. We are currently comparing the POES spectral gradient and flux magnitude with plasmapause location and geomagnetic activity for the locations in which chorus and hiss are known to occur. This presentation will focus on the electron flux spectral gradient behaviour either side of the plasmapause, a value that is difficult to measure from ground based techniques.

  3. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  4. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. PMID:25279617

  5. Geodesic mode instability driven by electron and ion fluxes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Elfimov, A. G. Camilo de Souza, F.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2015-11-15

    The effect of the parallel electron current and plasma flux on Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAM) in a tokamak is analyzed by kinetic theory taking into the account the ion Landau damping and diamagnetic drifts. It is shown that the electron current and plasma flow, modeled by shifted Maxwell distributions of electrons and ions, may overcome the ion Landau damping generating the GAM instability when the parallel electron current velocity is larger than the effective parallel GAM phase velocity of sidebands, Rqω. The instability is driven by the electron current and the parallel ion flux cross term. Possible applications to tokamak experiments are discussed. The existence of the geodesic ion sound mode due to plasma flow is shown.

  6. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: cluster observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M.; Matteini, L.; Santolík, O.

    2014-11-20

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ∼10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β {sub e∥} is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β {sub e∥} ≥ 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  7. Whistler Mode Waves and the Electron Heat Flux in the Solar Wind: Cluster Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Matteini, L.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; de Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M.

    2014-11-01

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ~10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β e∥ is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β e∥ >= 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  8. Comparing Deep Dropouts of Relativistic Electron Fluxes with Geomagnetic Storms and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, D. F.; Brautigam, D. H.

    2005-05-01

    High fluxes of relativistic (> 1 MeV) electrons in the outer radiation belt are a recognized hazard to spacecraft in geosynchronous orbits through mechanisms such as deep dielectric charging. It is also known that the electron flux levels can be highly variable and do not always track geomagnetic activity, such as during large storms (e.g., Reeves et al., 2003). It has been noted that very deep dropouts or decreases down to low magnetic L shells of the population of electrons sometimes occur during intense storms driven by strong magnetic cloud/coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Two nice examples are during the late Oct. and late Nov. storms in 2003. We used daily-averaged flux data from the AFRL CEASE detector onboard the TSX5 satellite in LEO orbit to identify periods of deep dropouts from July 2000 to the present. We searched for uniform dropouts in the E > 1.2 MeV electron channel having fluxes < 0.1 electrons/cm**2 sec sr extending below L = 4. The dropout events were first identified visually on color plots and then by the quantitative criterion that the flux drop by a factor of 10 or more from one day to the next. About 40 events met these criteria and 75% of these occurred during geomagnetic storms with peak Dst < -50nT. Most of these stormtime dropout event-storms were driven by the strong southward solar wind magnetic fields associated with CMEs. We will discuss these results in terms of solar wind drivers of electron flux loss in the radiation belts.

  9. Neutrino-Electron Scattering in MINERvA for Constraining the NuMI Neutrino Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaewon

    2013-01-01

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is used as a reference process to constrain the neutrino flux at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam observed by the MINERvA experiment. Prediction of the neutrino flux at accelerator experiments from other methods has a large uncertainty, and this uncertainty degrades measurements of neutrino oscillations and neutrino cross-sections. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is a rare process, but its cross-section is precisely known. With a sample corresponding to $3.5\\times10^{20}$ protons on target in the NuMI low-energy neutrino beam, a sample of $120$ $\

  10. A new approach to predict and estimate enhancements of "killer" electron flux at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexander; Ryzhakova, Larisa; Tsegmed, Battuulai

    2016-09-01

    So-called "killer" electrons are electrons of relativistic energies (more than 1-2 MeV) forming the outer radiation belt. Their fluxes present a serious threat for on-board electronics of spacecraft orbiting in geosynchronous orbit. This provides actuality of the problem of electron flux forecast. The population of energetic electrons grows after immersion of the Earth's magnetosphere into a high-speed stream of the solar wind. One of the main mechanisms of acceleration of magnetospheric electrons to relativistic energies assumed to be their wave-particle interaction with the ultra-low-frequency or very-low-frequency waves. Accordingly, the previously proposed prognostic methods were based on the connection of the outer radiation belt population with the speed of the solar wind and the activity of the low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere. In this paper, we propose to build a forecast based on a new kind of the multiple regressions model with sliding window of predictors. A set of predictors used in the successful multiple regressions model include parameters that reflect processes of replenishment of the outer radiation belt due to the acceleration of seed electrons as well as processes of the devastation of the electron flux in the geosynchronous region due to outward adiabatic transport and outward radial diffusion. To characterize these processes, we use the following set of parameters measured on the ground and in situ: the solar wind speed, density and dynamic pressure of the interplanetary plasma, the intensity of ultra-low-frequency oscillations in front of the magnetosphere and on the ground, the flux of seed electrons (of hundreds eV energy) at geosynchronous orbit, the actual values of the magnetic field at L=6.6, and interplanetary electric field. Coefficients in the model equation are derived from experimental data using the least-squares method. Test calculations using the proposed model have shown promising results.

  11. Reaction electronic flux and its role in DNA intramolecular proton transfers.

    PubMed

    Durán, Rocío; Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Herrera, Bárbara

    2016-06-01

    Proton transfer reactions present a key step in many biological and chemical processes. Here, we focused on the electronic changes in the proton transfer reactions of the four DNA bases. In combination with the previous structural analysis the reaction electronic flux together with local descriptors as the Hirshfeld-I charges allow us to identify chemical events and rationalize the underlying reaction mechanism. Our results show that imine-enamine in adenine and citosyne, and keto-enol tautomerizations in thymine and guanine have different reaction mechanisms. The former involve net structural rearrangements driven by favoured electrostatic interactions between the proton and the acceptor atom whereas the keto-enol tautomerizations require electronic changes reflected in the reaction electronic flux and changes in the NBO bond orders which favour the proton transfer reaction.

  12. The First Fermi LAT Supernova Remnant Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reposeur, T.; Rousseau, R.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wells, B.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, we demonstrate the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. We model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  13. Hot-electron flux observation in large-area microwave sustained plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudela, Jozef; Terebessy, Tibor; Kando, Masashi

    2000-03-01

    Flux of hot electrons directed away from the waveguiding plasma-dielectric interface was experimentally observed in large-area microwave discharges. The energy of these electrons attains values of some 60 eV, and they are believed to be originating from the resonantly-enhanced electric field region localized near the dielectric. The phenomenon appears to play a significant role in discharge heating mechanism, which is demonstrated by plasma parameter profiles.

  14. Ion Flux Measurements in Electron Beam Produced Plasmas in Atomic and Molecular Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, S. G.; Leonhardt, D.; Blackwell, D. D.; Murphy, D. P.; Fernsler, R. F.; Meger, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    In this presentation, mass- and time-resolved measurements of ion fluxes sampled from pulsed, electron beam-generated plasmas will be discussed. Previous works have shown that energetic electron beams are efficient at producing high-density plasmas (10^10-10^12 cm-3) with low electron temperatures (Te < 1.0 eV) over the volume of the beam. Outside the beam, the plasma density and electron temperature vary due, in part, to ion-neutral and electron-ion interactions. In molecular gases, electron-ion recombination plays a significant role while in atomic gases, ion-neutral interactions are important. These interactions also determine the temporal variations in the electron temperature and plasma density when the electron beam is pulsed. Temporally resolved ion flux and energy distributions at a grounded electrode surface located adjacent to pulsed plasmas in pure Ar, N_2, O_2, and their mixtures are discussed. Measurements are presented as a function of operating pressure, mixture ratio, and electron beam-electrode separation. The differences in the results for atomic and molecular gases will also be discussed and related to their respective gas-phase kinetics.

  15. Integral probability of auroral electron flux events from SSJ/4 DMSP F9 electron measurements. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, D.A.; Bounar, K.H.

    1992-05-18

    A study has been completed to determine the probability of observing different levels of auroral electron precipitation both within fixed spatial elements in magnetic local time and corrected geomagnetic latitude, and within spatial elements when the magnetic local time is fixed but the latitude range can be varied. The auroral electron precipitation probability is defined for a series of thresholds in electron average energy and electron energy flux as a function of geomagnetic activity. The study provides the capability to determine the probability of observation of an auroral electron precipitation event for any specified threshold in average energy, energy flux, and level of geomagnetic activity for any location in the auroral region or for any line of sight through the auroral region. The input for the study is one year of data from the SSJ/4 electron and proton spectrometer flown on the F9 satellite of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) comprising approximately 10, 141 hemispheric passes through the auroral region. The binning technique used to determine these probabilities is presented and some results are discussed. The operation of the software package to display the probability results is described. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), Aurora, Precipitating electrons, Geomagnetic Kp index, Integral probability.

  16. Relativistic electron microbursts and variations in trapped MeV electron fluxes during the 8-9 October 2012 storm: SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Blake, J. Bernard; Reeves, Geoffery D.; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that whistler mode chorus is responsible for both acceleration of MeV electrons and relativistic electron microbursts through resonant wave-particle interactions. Relativistic electron microbursts have been considered as an important loss mechanism of radiation belt electrons. Here we report on the observations of relativistic electron microbursts and flux variations of trapped MeV electrons during the 8-9 October 2012 storm, using the SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes satellites. Observations by the satellites show that relativistic electron microbursts correlate well with the rapid enhancement of trapped MeV electron fluxes by chorus wave-particle interactions, indicating that acceleration by chorus is much more efficient than losses by microbursts during the storm. It is also revealed that the strong chorus wave activity without relativistic electron microbursts does not lead to significant flux variations of relativistic electrons. Thus, effective acceleration of relativistic electrons is caused by chorus that can cause relativistic electron microbursts.

  17. Quantum theory of concerted electronic and nuclear fluxes associated with adiabatic intramolecular processes.

    PubMed

    Bredtmann, Timm; Diestler, Dennis J; Li, Si-Dian; Manz, Jörn; Pérez-Torres, Jhon Fredy; Tian, Wen-Juan; Wu, Yan-Bo; Yang, Yonggang; Zhai, Hua-Jin

    2015-11-28

    An elementary molecular process can be characterized by the flow of particles (i.e., electrons and nuclei) that compose the system. The flow, in turn, is quantitatively described by the flux (i.e., the time-sequence of maps of the rate of flow of particles though specified surfaces of observation) or, in more detail, by the flux density. The quantum theory of concerted electronic and nuclear fluxes (CENFs) associated with electronically adiabatic intramolecular processes is presented. In particular, it is emphasized how the electronic continuity equation can be employed to circumvent the failure of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, which always predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (EFD). It is also shown that all CENFs accompanying coherent tunnelling between equivalent "reactant" and "product" configurations of isolated molecules are synchronous. The theory is applied to three systems of increasing complexity. The first application is to vibrating, aligned H2(+)((2)Σg(+)), or vibrating and dissociating H2(+)((2)Σg(+), J = 0, M = 0). The EFD maps manifest a rich and surprising structure in this simplest of systems; for example, they show that the EFD is not necessarily synchronous with the nuclear flux density and can alternate in direction several times over the length of the molecule. The second application is to coherent tunnelling isomerization in the model inorganic system B4, in which all CENFs are synchronous. The contributions of core and valence electrons to the EFD are separately computed and it is found that core electrons flow with the nuclei, whereas the valence electrons flow obliquely to the core electrons in distinctive patterns. The third application is to the Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene, which also involves coherent tunnelling. An especially interesting discovery is that the so-called "pericyclic" electrons do not behave in the manner typically portrayed by the traditional Lewis structures with appended arrows. Indeed, it is

  18. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: application to the hydrogen molecule ion.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J; Kenfack, A; Manz, J; Paulus, B

    2012-03-22

    This article presents the results of the first quantum simulations of the electronic flux density (j(e)) by the "coupled-channels" (CC) theory, the fundamentals of which are presented in the previous article [Diestler, D. J. J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, DOI: 10.1021/jp207843z]. The principal advantage of the CC scheme is that it employs exclusively standard methods of quantum chemistry and quantum dynamics within the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA). The CC theory goes beyond the BOA in that it yields a nonzero j(e) for electronically adiabatic processes, in contradistinction to the BOA itself, which always gives j(e) = 0. The CC is applied to oriented H(2)(+) vibrating in the electronic ground state ((2)Σ(g)(+)), for which the nuclear and electronic flux densities evolve on a common time scale of about 22 fs per vibrational period. The system is chosen as a touchstone for the CC theory, because it is the only one for which highly accurate flux densities have been calculated numerically without invoking the BOA [Barth et al, Chem. Phys. Lett. 2009, 481, 118]. Good agreement between CC and accurate results supports the CC approach, another advantage of which is that it allows a transparent interpretation of the temporal and spatial properties of j(e).

  19. Solar System Gamma Ray observations using Fermi-LAT detector

    SciTech Connect

    Giglietto, N.

    2009-04-08

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in June 2008, is an international space mission dedicated to the study of the high-energy gamma rays from the Universe. The main instrument aboard Fermi is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), a pair conversion telescope equipped with the state-of-the art in gamma-ray detectors technology, and operating at energies >30 MeV. During first two months of data taking, Fermi has detected high-energy gamma rays from the quiet Sun and the Moon. This emission is produced by interactions of cosmic rays; by nucleons with the solar and lunar surface, and electrons with solar photons in the heliosphere. While the Moon was detected by EGRET on CGRO with low statistics, Fermi provides high-sensitivity measurements on a daily basis allowing both short- and long-term variability to be studied. Since Galactic cosmic rays are at their maximum flux at solar minimum we expect that the quiescent solar and lunar emission to be a maximum during the period covered by this report. Fermi is the only mission capable of monitoring the Sun at energies above several hundred MeV over the full 24th solar cycle. We present first analysis showing images of Moon and the quiet emission of the solar disk, giving a description of the analysis tools used.

  20. The Mars aurora: UV detections and in situ electron flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, J.-C.; Soret, L.; Lundin, R.; Libert, L.; Stiepen, A.; Radioti, A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed search through the database of the SPICAM instrument on board Mars Express made it possible to identify 16 signatures of the CO Cameron and CO2+ doublet auroral emissions. These auroral UV signatures are all located in the southern hemisphere in the vicinity of the statistical boundary between open and closed field lines. The energy spectrum of the energetic electrons was simultaneously measured by ASPERA-3/ELS at higher altitude. The UV aurora is generally shifted from the region of enhanced downward electron energy flux by a few to several tens of degrees of latitude, suggesting that precipitation occurs in magnetic cusp like structures along inclined magnetic field lines. The ultraviolet brightness shows no proportionality with the electron flux measured at the spacecraft altitude. The Mars aurora appears as a sporadic short-lived feature. Results of Monte Carlo simulations will be compared with the observed brightness of the Cameron and CO2+ bands.

  1. Nonstorm time dropout of radiation belt electron fluxes on 24 September 2013

    DOE PAGES

    Su, Zhenpeng; Gao, Zhonglei; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Zhu, Hui; Li, Wen; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2016-07-15

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts during the main phase of geomagnetic storms have received increasing attention in recent years. Here we focus on a rarely reported nonstorm time dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes on 24 September 2013. Within several hours, the radiation belt electron fluxes exhibited a significant (up to 2 orders of magnitude) depletion over a wide range of radial distances (L > 4.5), energies (~500 keV to several MeV) and equatorial pitch angles (0° ≤ αe ≤ 180°). STEERB simulations show that the relativistic electron loss in the region L = 4.5–6.0 was primarily caused bymore » the pitch angle scattering of observed plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. Furthermore, our results emphasize the complexity of radiation belt dynamics and the importance of wave-driven precipitation loss even during nonstorm times.« less

  2. Do electron flux and solar x-ray in juxtaposition prior a seismic event make signature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Umesh Prasad; Sinha, Madhurendra Nath

    2014-09-01

    Variation in the trend of electron flux graph in the ionosphere on the global map is common with respect to proton flux variation in inverse manner seen on diurnal basis. Continuous observation connected with the NOAA , IPS and SOHO satellite respectively of USA, Australia ,Japan and India have revealed the facts remarkably peculiar and interesting trend other than usual graph of Electron flux and solar x-ray decrease in peak level immediate prior a seismic event. An observation recorded in juxtaposition the trend of correlation establishes this fact. This typify the events like Iran 14th April, China 17th April 2013, with 7.8 and 7.3 MW, New Zealand 6.8 MW on 16th August 2013, Pakistan 7.8 Mw and 6.8 Mw respectively on25th September, and 26th September'2013 are the supportive illustrations to the concluding concepts. The trend is also observed during the solar coronal mass ejection event. Events occur deceptively quite similar to the pre seismicity. Its diagnostic distinction can be made with the solar data available by SWPC (Australia) forecasting for solar prominences data prediction and forecasting tool. Most of the seismic phenomena are the diagnostic preseismic phenomena as the electron flux anomaly mechanism and principle clarify on the basis of fundamental laws of electrostatics and Maxwell equation of electromagnetic wave theory. This may prove a precursory tool in the seismic event forecasting and prediction technique.

  3. Mechanisms of the outer radiation belt electron flux variation during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Obara, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated variations of the energetic electron flux (> 0.4 MeV) and the magnetic field in the outer radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard Tsubasa (Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1). Since Tsubasa operates in geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) with an orbital period of 10 hours and an inclination of 28.5 degrees, it has provided a rare opportunity for directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and the magnetic field during magnetic storms. The decreases of the energetic electron flux during the main phase of the magnetic storms, and the subsequent recoveries and enhancements during the recovery phase in the outer radiation belt are linked respectively to typical variations of the magnetic field. At the moment that the outer radiation belt flux sharply drops during the main phase of the 17 April 2002 magnetic storm, the butterfly distribution is observed at L=5 and the magnetic equator where the magnitude of magnetic field is much smaller than the IGRF model. Calculating the drift motions of the energetic electrons in the Tyganenko 2001 magnetospheric magnetic field model, shows that the drift-shell splitting mechanism could generate the butterfly distribution due to loss of the near-equatorially mirroring electrons through dayside magnetopause boundary. We evaluate roles and contributions of the other possible mechanisms to explain the flux decreases. We discuss the three-dimensional field configuration in the magnetopause to compare with the low earth orbital observation of the outer radiation belt flux.

  4. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  5. On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

  6. Fermi LAT Observations of the Crab Nebula During the Exceptional April 2011 Outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The Crab Nebula, formerly thought to be steady in gamma rays, shows unexpected and occasionally dramatic variability in high-energy gamma rays. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi recorded several strong outbursts, including dedicated pointed observations of the brightest yet seen, a spectacular flare in April 2011. These observations provide a particularly detailed look at the temporal and spectral characteristics of the nebula during the flare. The LAT data show an additional component in the spectral energy distribution that peaks at a maximum of $375\\pm26\\mathrm{MeV}$. In the probable scenario that this component is synchrotron emission, the electrons are accelerated to extreme energies that are difficult to reconcile with the very rapid change in flux and the expectation for acceleration processes and conditions occurring within the pulsar wind nebula. The physical location and mechanism driving the flares remains undetermined despite observations across the spectrum made by a variety of instruments including the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Very Large Array. I will present timing and spectral studies of the high-energy gamma-ray data, discuss implications for the origin of the flares, and highlight preparations for the next major flare.

  7. Can the electron heat flux at 1 AU be collisional ? Results from kinetic simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Simone; Pantellini, Filippo; Matteini, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    Recent results using statistically significant data of the solar wind at 1AU (see Bale et al. ApJL 769:L22, 2013) have shown that when the thermal Knudsen number, the ratio between the electron mean free path and the temperature scale height, falls below ~0.3, the electron heat flux Q does rapidly approach the classical collisional Spitzer-Harm limit Q_SH ~ T5/2 dT/dr, where T is the temperature and r the heliocentric distance. This experimental finding seems to contradict a number of theoretical works which suggest that the collisional expression for the heat flux is only guaranteed for Knudsen numbers smaller than ~0.001 (e.g. Shoub ApJ, 266, 339-369, 1983; Scudder & Karimabadi, ApJ, 770:26, 2013) . Indeed, using a fully kinetic model including the effect of Coulomb collisions and the expansion of the solar wind with heliocentric distance, we do observe that the heat flux strength approaches the collisional value for Knudsen numbers below ~0.3, in rather good agreement with the experimental data of Bale et al (2013). However, closer inspection of the variation of the plasma parameters with heliocentric distance shows that for Knudsen numbers between 0.01-0.3 the heat flux Q does NOT vary with temperature as predicted by Q_SH. We conclude that even though observations at 1 AU seem to indicate that the electron heat flux intensity Q approaches the collisional limit Q_SH for Knudsen below ~0.3, the latter is not a generally valid closure in the solar wind for Knudsen large that 0.01.

  8. New Results on High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons Observed with Fermi LAT and Their Implications on the Origin of Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope on-board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has collected more than 10 million cosmic ray electrons with energy above 7 GeV since its science operation on orbit. High energy electrons rapidly lose their energy by synchrotron radiation on Galactic magnetic fields and by inverse Compton scattering on the interstellar radiation field. The typical distance over which a 1 TeV electron loses half its total energy is estimated to be 300-400 pc.This makes them a unique tool for probing nearby Galactic space. Observed spectrum has a harder spectral index than was previously reported and suggests the presence of nearby sources of high energy electrons. One of viable candidates are nearby pulsars, possibly some of recently discovered by Fermi. At the same time the dark matter origin of such sources cannot be ruled out. I will also report our current upper limits on cosmic ray electrons anisotropy which helps to set constraints on their local sources.

  9. Bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux and hemispherically symmetric polar rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    THe paper examines ISEE 3 solar wind electron data obtained concurrent with reported symmetric polar rain events and it is found that a bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux is present whenever such polar cap events occur. In contrast to the normal situation when only one of the earth's polar caps is magnetically connected to the sun, during hemispherically symmetric polar rain events either both of the earth's polar caps are magnetically connected to the sun, or else both are connected to a magnetic loop which is entirely disconnected from the sun. The relative timing between bidirectional solar wind heat flux and symmetrical polar rain events can be utilized to determine certain magnetospheric quantities such as the cross-tail convection speed.

  10. Energy distribution of electron flux at electrodes in a low pressure capacitively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Dorf, Leonid; Kenney, Jason; Collins, Ken

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) model is used to examine the energy distribution of electron flux at electrodes [labeled ge(ɛ,t), where ɛ is energy and t is time] in a low pressure 60 MHz capacitively coupled Ar discharge. The effect of gas pressure and an auxiliary DC voltage on ge(ɛ,t) is also investigated. It is found that the electrons only leave the plasma for a short time period during the radio-frequency (RF) cycle when the sheath collapses at the electrode. Furthermore, majority of the exiting electrons have energies below 10 eV with a distribution ge(ɛ,t) that is narrow in both energy and time. At relatively high pressures (≥4.67 Pa for the conditions considered), the relationship between the time-average distribution ge(ɛ) and electron temperature in the plasma (Te) can be easily established. Below 4.67 Pa, kinetic effects become important, making it difficult to interpret ge(ɛ) in terms of Te. At low pressures, ge(ɛ,t) is found to broaden in both energy and time except for a narrow pressure range around 1.2 Pa where the distribution narrows temporally. These low pressure kinetic phenomena are observed when the electrons can be accelerated by expanding sheaths to speeds that allow them to traverse the inter-electrode distance quickly (<1.5 RF cycles for conditions considered) and when electrons undergo few collisions during this excursion. The mean energy of exiting electrons increases with decreasing gas pressure, especially below 1.0 Pa, due to higher Te and secondary electrons retaining a larger fraction of the energy they gained during initial sheath acceleration. For the relatively small DC voltages examined (|Vdc|/Vrf ≤ 0.15), the application of a negative DC voltage on an electrode decreases the electron flux there but has a weak impact on the ge profile.

  11. Fast electron flux driven by lower hybrid wave in the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Chen, R.; Wang, L.; Gan, K. F.; Yang, J. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Liu, S. C.; Li, M. H.; Ding, S.; Yan, N.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Shao, L. M.; Li, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, N.; and others

    2015-02-15

    The fast electron flux driven by Lower Hybrid Wave (LHW) in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in EAST is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. The five bright belts flowing along the magnetic field lines in the SOL and hot spots at LHW guard limiters observed by charge coupled device and infrared cameras are attributed to the fast electron flux, which is directly measured by retarding field analyzers (RFA). The current carried by the fast electron flux, ranging from 400 to 6000 A/m{sup 2} and in the direction opposite to the plasma current, is scanned along the radial direction from the limiter surface to the position about 25 mm beyond the limiter. The measured fast electron flux is attributed to the high parallel wave refractive index n{sub ||} components of LHW. According to the antenna structure and the LHW power absorbed by plasma, a broad parallel electric field spectrum of incident wave from the antennas is estimated. The radial distribution of LHW-driven current density is analyzed in SOL based on Landau damping of the LHW. The analytical results support the RFA measurements, showing a certain level of consistency. In addition, the deposition profile of the LHW power density in SOL is also calculated utilizing this simple model. This study provides some fundamental insight into the heating and current drive effects induced by LHW in SOL, and should also help to interpret the observations and related numerical analyses of the behaviors of bright belts and hot spots induced by LHW.

  12. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B. A.

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energy channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).

  13. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energymore » channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).« less

  14. Statistical Observations and Predictions of Time Changes in Electron Flux at Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, D. K.; Larsen, B.; Friedel, R. H.; Geoffrey, R.

    2015-12-01

    A statistical survey of time changes in particle flux values (df/dt) at geosynchronous orbit reveals trends that are instructive to predictive magnetosphere models. A single spacecraft can provide short time scale df/dt measurements, while multiple spacecraft can provide values over periods comparable to the spacecraft separation. Using data from multiple LANL-GEO spacecraft provides a unique view of temporal and spatial variations that allow us to gauge time and length scales for changing particle fluxes at GEO. These scales provide a base ability to predict the plasma environment conditions for spacecraft crossing GEO. Probability distribution functions based on electron df/dt values are used to predict the electron flux at a given magnetic local time at GEO based on prior measurements. The predictions, when compared to new data taken in the same region, provide some measure of how the electron plasma environment at GEO has changed in the interim period. These predictions are compared to data from the Van Allen Probes as their orbits cross GEO to verify the validity of this technique.

  15. Degradation of Silicone Oils Exposed to Geostationary Environment Components: Ultraviolet Radiations and Electron Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochem, H.; Rejsek-Riba, V.; Maerten, E.; Baceiredo, A.; Remaury, S.

    Degradation of polydimethylsiloxane and vinyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane oils exposed to UV radiation or 1.25 MeV electron flux was investigated using EPR, GC Headspace, NMR, GPC and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. To examine the influence of synthetic method, these two oils were prepared by ring opening polymerization using either an inorganic initiator KOH or an organic catalyst N-Heterocyclic carbene. Under UV radiation, any chemical change is observed for polydimethylsiloxane, whereas vinyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane presents a decrease of vinyl functions and an increase of chain length. Both polydimethylsiloxane and vinyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane demonstrated a degradation of thermo-optical properties, more significant for oils synthesized with organic catalyst. By improving oil purification, the degradation of thermo-optical properties can be reduced. Effects of electron flux are similar for each oil, thus independently of synthetic method and end functions. Electron flux generates important chemical damages initiated by homolytic chain scissions. Radical recombination produces gases (methane and ethane), new functions (Si-H) and bonds across silicone chains leading to a solid state material. Crosslinking of chains occurs by formation of R-Si-(O)3 and Si-CH2-Si groups. Silyl radicals are trapped in the polymer network and can be detected even 1 week after the end of irradiation.

  16. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gast, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The results show, for the first time, that neither e+ nor e- can be described by a single power law above 27.2 and 52.3 GeV, respectively. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. The dependence of the electron and positron fluxes on time will also be discussed.

  17. Prediction Model of the Geosynchronous Electron Fluxes at a Wide Energy Range Based on a Neural Network Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, D. K.; Lee, D. Y.; Kim, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    The orbit in the range 2 to 7 Re (earth radii), which include the geosynchronous orbit, is known to be filled with particles of various energies. High flux levels of energetic electrons can cause irreparable damage to the instruments and equipment on satellites. Significant problems in satellite systems due to flux enhancement have promoted development of electron flux prediction model. In this study, we adopted a neural network technique to prediction the electron flux in a geosynchronous orbit. Solar wind data and geomagnetic indices are used for input parameter of neural network. As a result, we present combinations of solar wind and geomagnetic indices that show highest prediction efficiency. Our prediction model can predict the typical substorm-associated energetic (~40-400 keV) and relativistic-energy (> 0.8 MeV, > 2 MeV) electron fluxes up to 24 hours ahead with a reasonably good prediction efficiency.

  18. Electron-flux infrared response to varying π-bond topology in charged aromatic monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Redlich, Britta

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of delocalized π-electrons with molecular vibrations is key to charge transport processes in π-conjugated organic materials based on aromatic monomers. Yet the role that specific aromatic motifs play on charge transfer is poorly understood. Here we show that the molecular edge topology in charged catacondensed aromatic hydrocarbons influences the Herzberg-Teller coupling of π-electrons with molecular vibrations. To this end, we probe the radical cations of picene and pentacene with benchmark armchair- and zigzag-edges using infrared multiple-photon dissociation action spectroscopy and interpret the recorded spectra via quantum-chemical calculations. We demonstrate that infrared bands preserve information on the dipolar π-electron-flux mode enhancement, which is governed by the dynamical evolution of vibronically mixed and correlated one-electron configuration states. Our results reveal that in picene a stronger charge π-flux is generated than in pentacene, which could justify the differences of electronic properties of armchair- versus zigzag-type families of technologically relevant organic molecules.

  19. Computation of the electronic flux density in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J; Kenfack, A; Manz, J; Paulus, B; Pérez-Torres, J F; Pohl, V

    2013-09-12

    A molecule in the electronic ground state described in the Born–Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) by the wave function ΨBO = Φ0χ0 (where Φ0 is the time-independent electronic energy eigenfunction and χ0 is a time-dependent nuclear wave packet) exhibits a nonzero nuclear flux density, whereas it always displays zero electronic flux density (EFD), because the electrons are in a stationary state. A hierarchical approach to the computation of the EFD within the context of the BOA, which utilizes only standard techniques of quantum chemistry (to obtain Φ0) and quantum dynamics (to describe the evolution of χ0 on the ground-state potential energy surface), provides a resolution of this puzzling, nonintuitive result. The procedure is applied to H2(+) oriented parallel with the z-axis and vibrating in the ground state (2)Σg(+). First, Φ0 and χ0 are combined by the coupled-channels technique to give the normally dominant z-component of the EFD. Imposition of the constraints of electronic continuity, cylindrical symmetry of Φ0 and two boundary conditions on the EFD through a scaling procedure yields an improved z-component, which is then used to compute the complementary orthogonal ρ-component. The resulting EFD agrees with its highly accurate counterpart furnished by a non-BOA treatment of the system.

  20. Variation of energetic electron flux in Earth's radiation belts based on Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongxin; Zhong, Zhihong; Yu, Deyin

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's radiation belts have been an important research topic of solar-terrestrial physics from 1958. In 2012, Van Allen Probes (VAP) were launched into near-equatorial orbit and provide very good in-situ observations of energetic particles in inner magnetosphere. Since magnetospheric substorm can cause the severe disturbance of the Earth's megnetospheric environment, here we focus on the characteristics of energetic electron fluxes in the radiation belts during substorm time and non-storm time. Energetic electron data observed by the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and Energetic Particle Composition and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT) of VAP during 2012 to 2014 are carefully analyzed. We select portions of energetic electron data from substorm onset phase, growth phase, recovery phase, and quiet time, and make a comparisons with theoretical computations. We find that the electron differential fluxes present E-1 shape at lower energies (<1MeV), and have a sharp transition with steeper slopes at high energies for large L-shells, which are in coincidence with Mauk's model [Mauk et al., 2010].

  1. Electron-flux infrared response to varying π-bond topology in charged aromatic monomers.

    PubMed

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Redlich, Britta

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of delocalized π-electrons with molecular vibrations is key to charge transport processes in π-conjugated organic materials based on aromatic monomers. Yet the role that specific aromatic motifs play on charge transfer is poorly understood. Here we show that the molecular edge topology in charged catacondensed aromatic hydrocarbons influences the Herzberg-Teller coupling of π-electrons with molecular vibrations. To this end, we probe the radical cations of picene and pentacene with benchmark armchair- and zigzag-edges using infrared multiple-photon dissociation action spectroscopy and interpret the recorded spectra via quantum-chemical calculations. We demonstrate that infrared bands preserve information on the dipolar π-electron-flux mode enhancement, which is governed by the dynamical evolution of vibronically mixed and correlated one-electron configuration states. Our results reveal that in picene a stronger charge π-flux is generated than in pentacene, which could justify the differences of electronic properties of armchair- versus zigzag-type families of technologically relevant organic molecules. PMID:27577323

  2. Electron-flux infrared response to varying π-bond topology in charged aromatic monomers

    PubMed Central

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Redlich, Britta

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of delocalized π-electrons with molecular vibrations is key to charge transport processes in π-conjugated organic materials based on aromatic monomers. Yet the role that specific aromatic motifs play on charge transfer is poorly understood. Here we show that the molecular edge topology in charged catacondensed aromatic hydrocarbons influences the Herzberg-Teller coupling of π-electrons with molecular vibrations. To this end, we probe the radical cations of picene and pentacene with benchmark armchair- and zigzag-edges using infrared multiple-photon dissociation action spectroscopy and interpret the recorded spectra via quantum-chemical calculations. We demonstrate that infrared bands preserve information on the dipolar π-electron-flux mode enhancement, which is governed by the dynamical evolution of vibronically mixed and correlated one-electron configuration states. Our results reveal that in picene a stronger charge π-flux is generated than in pentacene, which could justify the differences of electronic properties of armchair- versus zigzag-type families of technologically relevant organic molecules. PMID:27577323

  3. Electron-flux infrared response to varying π-bond topology in charged aromatic monomers.

    PubMed

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Redlich, Britta

    2016-08-31

    The interaction of delocalized π-electrons with molecular vibrations is key to charge transport processes in π-conjugated organic materials based on aromatic monomers. Yet the role that specific aromatic motifs play on charge transfer is poorly understood. Here we show that the molecular edge topology in charged catacondensed aromatic hydrocarbons influences the Herzberg-Teller coupling of π-electrons with molecular vibrations. To this end, we probe the radical cations of picene and pentacene with benchmark armchair- and zigzag-edges using infrared multiple-photon dissociation action spectroscopy and interpret the recorded spectra via quantum-chemical calculations. We demonstrate that infrared bands preserve information on the dipolar π-electron-flux mode enhancement, which is governed by the dynamical evolution of vibronically mixed and correlated one-electron configuration states. Our results reveal that in picene a stronger charge π-flux is generated than in pentacene, which could justify the differences of electronic properties of armchair- versus zigzag-type families of technologically relevant organic molecules.

  4. A cytochrome C oxidase model catalyzes oxygen to water reduction under rate-limiting electron flux.

    PubMed

    Collman, James P; Devaraj, Neal K; Decréau, Richard A; Yang, Ying; Yan, Yi-Long; Ebina, Wataru; Eberspacher, Todd A; Chidsey, Christopher E D

    2007-03-16

    We studied the selectivity of a functional model of cytochrome c oxidase's active site that mimics the coordination environment and relative locations of Fe(a3), Cu(B), and Tyr(244). To control electron flux, we covalently attached this model and analogs lacking copper and phenol onto self-assembled monolayer-coated gold electrodes. When the electron transfer rate was made rate limiting, both copper and phenol were required to enhance selective reduction of oxygen to water. This finding supports the hypothesis that, during steady-state turnover, the primary role of these redox centers is to rapidly provide all the electrons needed to reduce oxygen by four electrons, thus preventing the release of toxic partially reduced oxygen species. PMID:17363671

  5. Interplanetary magnetic field connection to the sun during electron heat flux dropouts in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Kahler, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses observations of 2- to 8.5-keV electrons, made by measurements aboard the ISEE 3 spacecraft during the periods of heat flux decreases (HFDs) reported by McComas et al. (1989). In at least eight of the total of 25 HFDs observed, strong streaming of electrons that were equal to or greater than 2 keV outward from the sun was recorded. In one HFD, an impulsive solar electron event was observed with an associated type III radio burst, which could be tracked from the sun to about 1 AU. It is concluded that, in many HFDs, the interplanetary field is still connected to the sun and that some energy-dependent process may produce HFDs without significantly perturbing electrons of higher energies.

  6. High energy electron fluxes in dc-augmented capacitively coupled plasmas I. Fundamental characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingmei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Power deposition from electrons in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) has components from stochastic heating, Joule heating, and from the acceleration of secondary electrons through sheaths produced by ion, electron, or photon bombardment of electrodes. The sheath accelerated electrons can produce high energy beams which, in addition to producing excitation and ionization in the gas can penetrate through the plasma and be incident on the opposite electrode. In the use of CCPs for microelectronics fabrication, there may be an advantage to having these high energy electrons interact with the wafer. To control the energy and increase the flux of the high energy electrons, a dc bias can be externally imposed on the electrode opposite the wafer, thereby producing a dc-augmented CCP (dc-CCP). In this paper, the characteristics of dc-CCPs will be discussed using results from a computational study. We found that for a given rf bias power, beams of high energy electrons having a narrow angular spread (<1°) can be produced incident on the wafer. The maximum energy in the high energy electron flux scales as ɛmax=-Vdc+Vrf+Vrf0, for a voltage on the dc electrode of Vdc, rf voltage of Vrf, and dc bias on the rf electrode of Vrf0. The dc current from the biased electrode must return to ground through surfaces other than the rf electrode and so seeks out a ground plane, typically the side walls. If the side wall is coated with a poorly conducting polymer, the surface will charge to drive the dc current through.

  7. The Role of Localized Inductive Electric Fields in Electron Injections Around Dipolarizing Flux Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, C.; Harris, C.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study energetic electron injections using an analytical model that describes self-consistent electric and magnetic field perturbations of a transient, localized dipolarizing flux bundle (DFB). This simple model can reproduce most injection signatures at multiple locations simultaneously, reaffirming earlier findings that an earthward-traveling DFB can both transport and accelerate electrons to suprathermal energies, and can thus be considered as the primary driver of short-lived (~<10 min) injections. We find that energetic electron drift paths are greatly influenced by the sharp magnetic field gradients around the localized DFB. If the gradients are weak the energetic electrons initiating at reconnection will drift out of the flow channel such that the observed injection is comprised mostly of plasma sheet electrons. However, if the duskward magnetic field gradients on the DFB's dawn flank are strong they can cause electrons to drift further earthward from the reconnection site than due to E x B alone. Similarly, strong dawnward magnetic field gradients on the DFB's dusk flank can extract energetic electrons from the inner magnetosphere out to the plasma sheet, where they can either be recirculated earthward or remain at higher L-shells. Therefore, the source of electrons observed during injection depends sensitively on the spacecraft location relative to the DFB and on the DFB's properties.

  8. Observations at geosynchronous orbit of a persistent Pc5 geomagnetic pulsation and energetic electron flux modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarris, T. E.; Loto'Aniu, T. M.; Li, X.; Singer, H. J.

    2007-07-01

    A long lasting narrow-band (4-7 mHz) Pc5 fluctuation event at geosynchronous orbit is presented through measurements from GOES-8 and GOES-10 and the response of energetic electrons with drift frequencies close to the narrow-band pulsation frequency is monitored through a spectral analysis of flux data from the LANL-SOPA energetic electron instrument. This analysis shows electron flux modulations at the magnetospheric pulsation's frequency as well as at various other frequencies in the Pc5 range, related to the particles' drift-frequencies and their harmonics. A drift resonance effect can be seen, with electron flux modulation becoming more evident in the energy channels of electrons with drift frequencies closer to the wave frequency; however no net increase or decrease in energetic electron flux is observed, indicating that the net energy transfer and transport of electrons is not significant. This Pc5 event has a long duration, being observed for more than a couple of days at geosynchronous orbit over several traversals of the two GOES satellites, and is localized in azimuthal extent. Spectral analysis shows that most of the power is in the transverse components. The frequency of the narrow-band event, as observed at geosynchronous orbit shifts during the time of the event from 7±0.5 mHz to about 4±0.5 mHz. On the ground, CARISMA magnetometers record no distinct narrow-band fluctuation in the magnetic field, and neither does Geotail, which is traversing the outer magnetosphere a few RE further out from geosynchronous orbit, at the same UT and LT that GOES-8 and -10 observe the pulsations, suggesting that that there is no connection to external fluctuations originating in the solar wind. An internal generation mechanism is suggested, such as could be provided by energetic ring current particles, even though conclusive evidence could not be provided for this particular event. Through a statistical study, it is found that this event belongs to a class of similar

  9. Extreme flux enhancement and persistent loss of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    The balance between source and loss processes is essential to understand the radiation belt particles, and extreme space weather events may provide the important hint. We report average profiles of the solar wind and outer radiation belt during the extreme flux enhancement of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit (GEO). It is found that seven of top ten extreme events at GEO during solar cycle 23 are associated with the magnetosphere inflation during the storm recovery phase as caused by the large-scale solar wind structure of very low dynamic pressure (¡1.0 nPa) during rapid speed decrease from very high (∼650 km/s) to typical (400-500 km/s) in a few days. For the seven events, the solar wind parameters, geomagnetic activity indices, and relativistic electron flux and geomagnetic field at GEO are superposed at the local noon period of GOES satellites to investigate the physical cause. The average profiles support the "double inflation" mechanism that the rarefaction of the solar wind and subsequent magnetosphere inflation are one of the best conditions to produce the extreme flux enhancement at GEO because of the excellent magnetic confinement of relativistic electrons by reducing the drift loss of trapped electrons at dayside magnetopause. On the other hand, relativistic electrons at GEO were persistently quiet in 2009 for almost the whole year. The solar wind speed, which has been known as a primary parameter controlling the outer belt electrons, was very slow in 2009 as expected, but still at a comparably low level as of 1997 when we did not observe such a persistently quiet condition. Here we show that the extremely weak interplanetary magnetic field of the very slow solar wind plays an essential role to diminish the source processes themselves such as magnetic storms and substorms, and in turn to suppress the relativistic electron flux at GEO over the time scale of a year, as an inevitable consequence of extremely weak open magnetic field of the

  10. Thermal flux limited electron Kapitza conductance in copper-niobium multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gaskins, John T.; Duda, John C.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Hattar, Khalid; Beechem, Thomas E.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Piekos, Edward S.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Misra, Amit

    2015-03-02

    We study the interplay between the contributions of electron thermal flux and interface scattering to the Kapitza conductance across metal-metal interfaces through measurements of thermal conductivity of copper-niobium multilayers. Thermal conductivities of copper-niobium multilayer films of period thicknesses ranging from 5.4 to 96.2 nm and sample thicknesses ranging from 962 to 2677 nm are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance over a range of temperatures from 78 to 500 K. The Kapitza conductances between the Cu and Nb interfaces in multilayer films are determined from the thermal conductivities using a series resistor model and are in good agreement with the electron diffuse mismatch model. Our results for the thermal boundary conductance between Cu and Nb are compared to literature values for the thermal boundary conductance across Al-Cu and Pd-Ir interfaces, and demonstrate that the interface conductance in metallic systems is dictated by the temperature derivative of the electron energy flux in the metallic layers, rather than electron mean free path or scattering processes at the interface.

  11. Thermal flux limited electron Kapitza conductance in copper-niobium multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheaito, Ramez; Hattar, Khalid; Gaskins, John T.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Duda, John C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Piekos, Edward S.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Misra, Amit; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-03-01

    We study the interplay between the contributions of electron thermal flux and interface scattering to the Kapitza conductance across metal-metal interfaces through measurements of thermal conductivity of copper-niobium multilayers. Thermal conductivities of copper-niobium multilayer films of period thicknesses ranging from 5.4 to 96.2 nm and sample thicknesses ranging from 962 to 2677 nm are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance over a range of temperatures from 78 to 500 K. The Kapitza conductances between the Cu and Nb interfaces in multilayer films are determined from the thermal conductivities using a series resistor model and are in good agreement with the electron diffuse mismatch model. Our results for the thermal boundary conductance between Cu and Nb are compared to literature values for the thermal boundary conductance across Al-Cu and Pd-Ir interfaces, and demonstrate that the interface conductance in metallic systems is dictated by the temperature derivative of the electron energy flux in the metallic layers, rather than electron mean free path or scattering processes at the interface.

  12. Thermal flux limited electron Kapitza conductance in copper-niobium multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheaito, Ramez; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Gaskins, John T.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Duda, John C.; Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Ihlefeld, Jon; Piekos, Edward S.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Misra, Amit; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-03-05

    The interplay between the contributions of electron thermal flux and interface scattering to the Kapitza conductance across metal-metal interfaces through measurements of thermal conductivity of copper-niobium multilayers was studied. Thermal conductivities of copper-niobium multilayer films of period thicknesses ranging from 5.4 to 96.2 nm and sample thicknesses ranging from 962 to 2677 nm are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance over a range of temperatures from 78 to 500 K. The Kapitza conductances between the Cu and Nb interfaces in multilayer films are determined from the thermal conductivities using a series resistor model and are in good agreement with the electron diffuse mismatch model. The results for the thermal boundary conductance between Cu and Nb are compared to literature values for the thermal boundary conductance across Al-Cu and Pd-Ir interfaces, and demonstrate that the interface conductance in metallic systems is dictated by the temperature derivative of the electron energy flux in the metallic layers, rather than electron mean free path or scattering processes at the interface.

  13. Thermal flux limited electron Kapitza conductance in copper-niobium multilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Cheaito, Ramez; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Gaskins, John T.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Duda, John C.; Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Ihlefeld, Jon; Piekos, Edward S.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Misra, Amit; et al

    2015-03-05

    The interplay between the contributions of electron thermal flux and interface scattering to the Kapitza conductance across metal-metal interfaces through measurements of thermal conductivity of copper-niobium multilayers was studied. Thermal conductivities of copper-niobium multilayer films of period thicknesses ranging from 5.4 to 96.2 nm and sample thicknesses ranging from 962 to 2677 nm are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance over a range of temperatures from 78 to 500 K. The Kapitza conductances between the Cu and Nb interfaces in multilayer films are determined from the thermal conductivities using a series resistor model and are in good agreement with the electron diffusemore » mismatch model. The results for the thermal boundary conductance between Cu and Nb are compared to literature values for the thermal boundary conductance across Al-Cu and Pd-Ir interfaces, and demonstrate that the interface conductance in metallic systems is dictated by the temperature derivative of the electron energy flux in the metallic layers, rather than electron mean free path or scattering processes at the interface.« less

  14. Solar modulation and interplanetary gradients of the galactic electrons flux, 1977 - 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Webber, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    The flux of electrons with energy from approx. 10 to 180 MeV measured with the electron telescope on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in the heliocentric radial range 1 - 22 AU between 1977 and 1984 is reported. Jovian electrons were clearly observable between 1978 and 1983 (radial range 2 - 12 AU) at energies below approx. 50 MeV. Above approx. 50 MeV the electron intensity exhibited temporal variations generally related to the 11 year modulation of protons 75 MeV. The overall magnitude of the electron intensity changes between the maximum intensity observed in 1977 and the minimum intensity in 1981 was a factor approx. 2, also comparable to that observed for 75 MeV protons. By early 1985 the electron intensity had apparently recovered to the level observed in 1977 whereas the proton intensity was still about 20% lower. A detailed interpretation of these electron variations in all energy channels depends on an accurate subtraction of background induced by energetic protons of a few 100 MeV. This subtraction is facilitated by calibration results at several energies.

  15. Fermi LAT Stacking Analysis of Swift Localized GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Schaal, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; von Kienlin, A.; Werner, M.; Wood, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    We perform a comprehensive stacking analysis of data collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) localized by the Swift spacecraft, which were not detected by the LAT but which fell within the instrument’s field of view at the time of trigger. We examine a total of 79 GRBs by comparing the observed counts over a range of time intervals to that expected from designated background orbits, as well as by using a joint likelihood technique to model the expected distribution of stacked counts. We find strong evidence for subthreshold emission at MeV to GeV energies using both techniques. This observed excess is detected during intervals that include and exceed the durations typically characterizing the prompt emission observed at keV energies and lasts at least 2700 s after the co-aligned burst trigger. By utilizing a novel cumulative likelihood analysis, we find that although a burst’s prompt γ-ray and afterglow X-ray flux both correlate with the strength of the subthreshold emission, the X-ray afterglow flux measured by Swift’s X-ray Telescope at 11 hr post trigger correlates far more significantly. Overall, the extended nature of the subthreshold emission and its connection to the burst’s afterglow brightness lend further support to the external forward shock origin of the late-time emission detected by the LAT. These results suggest that the extended high-energy emission observed by the LAT may be a relatively common feature but remains undetected in a majority of bursts owing to instrumental threshold effects.

  16. Theoretical position-velocity diagrams of flux, electron density, and electron temperature in Herbig-Haro objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indebetouw, Remy; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    Many features of Herbig-Haro objects can be reproduced using a kinematical bow shock model. We use the model to generate position-velocity (PV) diagrams of flux in H-alpha (O I) lambda lambda 6300+63, (S II) lambda lambda 6716+31, (O III) lambda lambda 4959+5007, and (C I) lambda lambda 9823+50, line ratios of (O I)/H-alpha, (O I)/(S II), (S II)/H-alpha, H-alpha(S II), and (O III)/H-alpha, electron density N(sub e), and electron temperature T(sub e). We show how position-velocity diagrams of N(sub e) and flux vary with shock velocity. By matching the diagrams from single lines, the line ratios, and N(sub e) with observations, we determined a narrow range of shock parameters for HH 1F, 2(A' + H), and 43 (B + C). We model the N(sub e) features of HH 2(A' + H) as a superposition of two bowshocks. We also show that the effects of slight misalignments of the two diagrams to be divided can produce artifacts in the line ratios and N(sub e) which obliterate the physical features. We show that N(sub e) in HH 1 can only be explained using the kinematical model by taking these misalignments into account.

  17. Relativistic electron flux comparisons at low and high altitudes with fast time resolution and broad spatial coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhof, W. L.; Gaines, E. E.; Mcglennon, J. P.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Belian, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Analyses are presented for the first high-time resolution multisatellite study of the spatial and temporal characteristics of a relativistic electron enhancement event with a rapid onset. Measurements of MeV electrons were made from two low-altitude polar orbiting satellites and three spacecraft at synchronous altitude. The electron fluxes observed by the low-altitude satellites include precipitating electrons in both the bounce and drift loss cones as well as electrons that are stably trapped, whereas the observations at geosynchronous altitude are dominated by the trapped population. The fluxes of greater than 1 MeV electrons at low-satellite altitude over a wide range of L shells tracked very well the fluxes greater than 0.93 MeV at synchronous altitude.

  18. Modification of the quantum mechanical flux formula for electron-hydrogen ionization through Bohm's velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randazzo, J. M.; Ancarani, L. U.

    2015-12-01

    For the single differential cross section (SDCS) for hydrogen ionization by electron impact (e -H problem), we propose a correction to the flux formula given by R. Peterkop [Theory of Ionization of Atoms by Electron Impact (Colorado Associated University Press, Boulder, 1977)]. The modification is based on an alternative way of defining the kinetic energy fraction, using Bohm's definition of velocities instead of the usual asymptotic kinematical, or geometrical, approximation. It turns out that the solution-dependent, modified energy fraction is equally related to the components of the probability flux. Compared to what is usually observed, the correction yields a finite and well-behaved SDCS value in the asymmetrical situation where one of the continuum electrons carries all the energy while the other has zero energy. We also discuss, within the S -wave model of the e -H ionization process, the continuity of the SDCS derivative at the equal energy sharing point, a property not so clearly observed in published benchmark results obtained with integral and S -matrix formulas with unequal final states.

  19. A Planar Probe for Ion Flux and Electron Temperature in the Electrode of a GEC Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodyear, A.; Lubeigt, W.; Verdonck, P. B.; Barroy, P. R. J.; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2000-10-01

    A radio frequency (rf) self-biased planar probe technique(J P Booth, N St J Braithwaite, A Goodyear, and P Barroy, Rev. Sci. Instrum., in press (July 2000)) for the measurement of positive ion flux and electron energy distribution functions has been implemented into the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) standard reference cell. Results are presented across a wide range of power-pressure parameter space. Insertion of electrostatic probes into plasmas can lead to perturbation of the plasma and this is particularly problematic in the GEC cell where the inter-electrode distance is small. Planar probes are inherently large, requiring a guard ring (at least as large as typical sheath thicknesses) to ensure that the sheath in front of the probe is truly planar. Once this criterion is satisfied, analysis of current-voltage (IV) characteristics obtained in this planar geometry is relatively straight forward. A planar probe has been engineered into the surface of the showerhead electrode of the GEC cell, aimed at minimal perturbation to the GEC standard, in terms of both physical presence and electrical influence. The probe is self-biased by a burst of rf voltage. It is then allowed to return to its original floating condition under the arrival of charged particles from the plasma. An IV characteristic is recorded during this time, giving positive ion flux and the high energy tail (a few eV and above) of the electron energy distribution function.

  20. Beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation: a treatment of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic molecular processes.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2013-06-01

    Intuition suggests that a molecular system in the electronic ground state Φ0 should exhibit an electronic flux density (EFD) in response to the motion of its nuclei. If that state is described by the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), however, a straightforward calculation of the EFD yields zero, since the electrons are in a stationary state, regardless of the state of the nuclear motion. Here an alternative pathway to a nonzero EFD from a knowledge of only the BOA ground-state wave function is proposed. Via perturbation theory a complete set of approximate vibronic eigenfunctions of the whole Hamiltonian is generated. If the complete non-BOA wave function is expressed in the basis of these vibronic eigenfunctions, the ground-state contribution to the EFD is found to involve a summation over excited states. Evaluation of this sum through the so-called "average excitation energy approximation" produces a nonzero EFD. An explicit formula for the EFD for the prototypical system, namely, oriented H2+ vibrating in the electronic ground state, is derived.

  1. Oxygen flux and dielectric response study of Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conducting (MIEC) heterogeneous functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbi, Fazle

    Dense mixed ionic-electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes consisting of ionic conductive perovskite-type and/or fluorite-type oxides and high electronic conductive spinel type oxides, at elevated temperature can play a useful role in a number of energy conversion related systems including the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), oxygen separation and permeation membranes, partial oxidization membrane reactors for natural gas processing, high temperature electrolysis cells, and others. This study will investigate the impact of different heterogeneous characteristics of dual phase ionic and electronic conductive oxygen separation membranes on their transport mechanisms, in an attempt to develop a foundation for the rational design of such membranes. The dielectric behavior of a material can be an indicator for MIEC performance and can be incorporated into computational models of MIEC membranes in order to optimize the composition, microstructure, and ultimately predict long term membrane performance. The dielectric behavior of the MIECs can also be an indicator of the transport mechanisms and the parameters they are dependent upon. For this study we chose a dual phase MIEC oxygen separation membrane consisting of an ionic conducting phase: gadolinium doped ceria-Ce0.8 Gd0.2O2 (GDC) and an electronic conductive phase: cobalt ferrite-CoFe2O4 (CFO). The membranes were fabricated from mixtures of Nano-powder of each of the phases for different volume percentages, sintered with various temperatures and sintering time to form systematic micro-structural variations, and characterized by structural analysis (XRD), and micro-structural analysis (SEM-EDS). Performance of the membranes was tested for variable partial pressures of oxygen across the membrane at temperatures from 850°C-1060°C using a Gas Chromatography (GC) system. Permeated oxygen did not directly correlate with change in percent mixture. An intermediate mixture 60%GDC-40%CFO had the highest flux compared to the 50%GDC

  2. Confronting recent AMS-02 positron fraction and Fermi-LAT extragalactic γ-ray background measurements with gravitino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carquín, Edson; Díaz, Marco A.; Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; Panes, Boris; Viaux, Nicolás

    2016-03-01

    Recent positron flux fraction measurements in cosmic-rays (CR) made by the AMS-02 detector confirm and extend the evidence on the existence of a new (yet unknown) source of high energy electrons and positrons. We test the gravitino dark matter of bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric models as this electrons/positrons source. Being a long lived weak-interacting and spin 3/2 particle, it offers several particularities which makes it an attractive dark matter candidate. We compute the electron, positron and γ-ray fluxes produced by each gravitino decay channel as it would be detected at the Earth's position. Combining the flux from the different decay modes we are able to reproduce AMS-02 measurements of the positron fraction, as well as the electron and positron fluxes, with a gravitino dark matter mass in the range 1-3 TeV and lifetime of ˜1.0-0.7×1026 s. The high statistics measurement of electron and positron fluxes, and the flattening in the behaviour of the positron fraction recently found by AMS-02 allow us to determine that the preferred gravitino decaying mode by the fit is W±τ∓, unlike previous analyses. Then we study the viability of these scenarios through their implication in γ-ray observations. For this we use the Extragalactic γ-ray Background recently reported by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration and a state-of-the-art model of its known contributors. Based on the γ-ray analysis we exclude the gravitino parameter space which provides an acceptable explanation of the AMS-02 data. Therefore, we conclude that the gravitino of bilinear R-parity violating models is ruled out as the unique primary source of electrons and positrons needed to explain the rise in the positron fraction.

  3. Relativistic electron flux dropouts in the outer radiation belt associated with corotating interaction regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C.-J.; Zong, Q.-G.; Wan, W.-X.; Zhang, H.; Du, A.-M.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how the relativistic electron fluxes drop out in the outer radiation belt under different conditions is of great importance. To investigate which mechanisms may affect the dropouts under different solar wind conditions, 1.5-6.0 MeV electron flux dropout events associated with 223 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) from 1994 to 2003 are studied using the observations of Solar, Anomalous, Magnetospheric Particle Explorer satellite. According to the superposed epoch analysis, it is found that high solar wind dynamic pressure with the peak median value of about 7 nPa is corresponding to the dropout of the median of the radiation belt content (RBC) index to 20% of the level before stream interface arrival, whereas low dynamic pressure with the peak median value of about 3 nPa is related to the dropout of the median of RBC index to 40% of the level before stream interface arrival. Furthermore, the influences of Russell-McPherron effect with respect to interplanetary magnetic field orientation on dropouts are considered. It is pointed out that under positive Russell-McPherron effect (+RM effect) condition, the median of RBC index can drop to 23% of the level before stream interface arrival, while for negative Russell-McPherron effect (-RM effect) events, the median of RBC index only drops to 37% of the level before stream interface arrival. From the evolution of phase space density profiles, the effect of +RM on dropouts can be through nonadiabatic loss.

  4. Determination of Flux-Gate Magnetometer Spin Axis Offsets with the Electron Drift Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, Ferdinand; Nakamura, Rumi; Giner, Lukas; Teubenbacher, Robert; Chutter, Mark; Leinweber, Hannes K.; Magnes, Werner

    2014-05-01

    Spin-stabilization of spacecraft enormously supports the in-flight calibration of onboard flux-gate magnetometers (FGMs): eight out of twelve calibration parameters can be determined by minimization of spin tone and harmonics in the calibrated magnetic field measurements. From the remaining four parameters, the spin axis offset is usually obtained by analyzing observations of Alfvénic fluctuations in the solar wind. If solar wind measurements are unavailable, other methods for spin axis offset determination need to be used. We present two alternative methods that are based on the comparison of FGM and electron drift instrument (EDI) data: (1) EDI measures the gyration periods of instrument-emitted electrons in the ambient magnetic field. They are inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength. Differences between FGM and EDI measured field strengths can be attributed to inaccuracies in spin axis offset, if the other calibration parameters are accurately known. (2) For EDI electrons to return to the spacecraft, they have to be sent out in perpendicular direction to the ambient magnetic field. Minimization of the variance of electron beam directions with respect to the FGM-determined magnetic field direction also yields an estimate of the spin axis offset. Prior to spin axis offset determination, systematic inaccuracies in EDI gyration period measurements and in the transformation of EDI beam directions into the FGM spin-aligned reference coordinate system have to be corrected. We show how this can be done by FGM/EDI data comparison, as well.

  5. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidatesmore » falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.« less

  6. Systematic electronic-structure investigation of substitutional impurity diffusion and flux coupling in bcc iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Luca; Nastar, Maylise; Sandberg, Nils; Olsson, Pär

    2016-05-01

    The diffusion properties of a wide range of impurities (transition metals and Al, Si, and P) in ferritic alloys are here investigated by means of a combined ab initio-atomic diffusion theory approach. The flux-coupling mechanisms and the solute-diffusion coefficients are inferred from electronic-structure calculations of solute-defect interactions and microscopic jump frequencies. All properties except the second-nearest-neighbor binding energy are found to have a characteristic bell shape as a function of the d -band filling for the 4 d and 5 d series, and an M shape for the 3 d row because of the out-of-trend behavior of Mn. The solute jump frequencies are governed by compressibility, which makes diffusion of large solutes faster, although this effect is partially compensated for by lower attempt frequencies and larger correlations with the vacancy. Diffusion coefficients are predicted in a wide temperature range, far below the experimentally accessible temperatures. In accordance with experiments, Co is found to be a slow diffuser in iron, and the same behavior is predicted for Re, Os, and Ir impurities. Finally, flux-coupling phenomena depend on the iron jump frequencies next to a solute atom, which are mainly controlled by similar electronic interactions to those determining the binding energies. Vacancy drag and solute enrichment at sinks systematically arise below a solute-dependent temperature threshold, directly correlated with the electronic-level interactions at the equilibrium and the saddle-point states. Early transition metals with repulsive second-nearest-neighbor interactions also diffuse via vacancy drag, although they show a lower temperature threshold than the late metals. This confirms that drag is the most common solute-vacancy coupling mechanism in iron at low temperatures, and this is likely to be confirmed as well for impurity diffusion in other transition metals.

  7. BIDIRECTIONAL FLUXES OF NEARLY RELATIVISTIC ELECTRONS DURING THE ONSET OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L. P.; Li, C.

    2013-03-10

    We report intensity and anisotropy measurements of energetic electrons in the energy range of {approx}27-{approx}500 keV as observed with the Wind and Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in 2000 June for several solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The solar sources of the SEP events are inferred from observations from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft. All of the events originate from the western limb active regions (ARs), which are well connected by interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines linking the Sun to near-Earth space. The observations on board Wind show bimodal pitch angle distributions (PADs), whereas ACE shows PADs with one peak, as is usually observed for impulsive injection of electrons at the Sun. During the time of observations, Wind was located, upstream of the Earth's bow shock in the dawn-noon sector, at distances of {approx}40-{approx}80 R{sub E} from the Earth, and we infer that it was magnetically connected to the quasi-parallel bow shock. Meanwhile, ACE, orbiting the Sun-Earth libration point L1, was not connected to the bow shock. The electron intensity-time profiles and the energy spectra show that the backstreaming electrons observed at Wind are not of magnetospheric origin. The observations suggest rather that the bidirectional electron fluxes are due to reflection or scattering by an obstacle located at a distance of less than {approx}150 R{sub E} in the anti-sunward direction, which is compatible with the obstacle being the Earth's bow shock or magnetosheath.

  8. Effects of the ionization in the tautomerism of uracil: A reaction electronic flux perspective.

    PubMed

    Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar; Gutiérrez-Oliva, Soledad; Mó, Otilia; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Yáñez, Manuel

    2015-10-30

    The one-step tautomerization processes of uracil and its radical cation and radical anion have been investigated in the light of the reaction force and reaction electronic flux (REF) formalisms. The relative energies of the different tautomers as well as the corresponding tautomerization barriers have been obtained through the use of the G4 high-level ab initio method and by means of B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(d, p) calculations. Systematically, the enol radical cations are more stable in relative terms than the neutral, due to the higher ionization energy of the diketo forms with respect to the enolic ones. Conversely, the enol radical anions, with the only exception of the 2-keto-N1 anion, are found to be less stable than the neutral. The effects of the ionization are also sizable on the tautomerization barriers although this effect also depends on the particular tautomerization process. The reaction force analysis shows that all reactions are mainly activated through structural rearrangements that initiate the electronic activity. This electronic activity is monitored along the reaction coordinate through the REF that obeys a delicate balance between the acid and basic character of the atoms involved in the hydrogen transfer. PMID:26285048

  9. Correlation of redox levels of component electron carriers with total electron flux in an electron-transport system. P-700 and the photoreduction of NADP+ in chloroplast fragments.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, T; McSwain, B D; Arnon, D I

    1977-04-11

    A mathematical analysis is described which measures the effects of actinic light intensity and concentration of an artificial electron donor on the steady-state light-induced redox level of a reaction-center pigment (e.g. P-700) and on the overall light-induced electron flux (e.g. reduction of NADP+). The analysis led to a formulation (somewhat similar to the Michaelis-Menten equation for enzyme kinetics) in which a parameter, I1/2, is defined as the actinic light intensity that, at a given concentration of electron donro, renders the reaction-center pigment half oxidized and half reduced. To determine the role of a presumed reaction-center pigment, I1/2 is compared with another parameter, equivalent to I1/2, that is obtained independently of the reaciton-center pigment by measuring the effect of actinic light intensity and concentration of electron donor on the overall electron flow. The theory was tested and validated in a model system with spinach Photosystem I chloroplast fragments by measurements of photooxidation of P-700 and light-induced reduction of NADP+ by reduced 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol. A possible extension of this mathematical analysis to more general electron-transport systems is discussed.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of magnetic flux density in a magnetic recording head and pseudo soft underlayer by electron holography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Weixing; Hirata, Kei; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Ishida, Yoichi; Kasai, Hiroto; Yanagiuchi, Katsuaki; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic interaction between the pole tip of a single-pole head and a pseudo soft underlayer in perpendicular magnetic recording was observed by electron holography. The magnetic flux density inside the soft underlayer was quantitatively evaluated. The distribution of magnetic flux density was calculated using the finite element method, and the influences of the modulation of the reference wave and stray fields were investigated by comparison with experimental results. The flux density observed was found to be underestimated due to the modulation of the phase shift in reference wave. The magnetic flux measured experimentally was larger than that inside the specimen because of the relatively large stray fields above and below the specimen in the direction of the electron beam.

  11. Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, GOES, and cluster observations of EMIC waves, ULF pulsations, and an electron flux dropout

    DOE PAGES

    Sigsbee, K.; Kletzing, C. A.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R.; Spence, H.; Reeves, G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Green, J. C.; Singer, H. J.; et al

    2016-03-04

    We examined an electron flux dropout during the 12–14 November 2012 geomagnetic storm using observations from seven spacecraft: the two Van Allen Probes, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS)-A (P5), Cluster 2, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) 13, 14, and 15. The electron fluxes for energies greater than 2.0 MeV observed by GOES 13, 14, and 15 at geosynchronous orbit and by the Van Allen Probes remained at or near instrumental background levels for more than 24 h from 12 to 14 November. For energies of 0.8 MeV, the GOES satellites observed two shorter intervalsmore » of reduced electron fluxes. The first interval of reduced 0.8 MeV electron fluxes on 12–13 November was associated with an interplanetary shock and a sudden impulse. Cluster, THEMIS, and GOES observed intense He+ electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves from just inside geosynchronous orbit out to the magnetopause across the dayside to the dusk flank. The second interval of reduced 0.8 MeV electron fluxes on 13–14 November was associated with a solar sector boundary crossing and development of a geomagnetic storm with Dst <–100 nT. At the start of the recovery phase, both the 0.8 and 2.0 MeV electron fluxes finally returned to near prestorm values, possibly in response to strong ultralow frequency (ULF) waves observed by the Van Allen Probes near dawn. A combination of adiabatic effects, losses to the magnetopause, scattering by EMIC waves, and acceleration by ULF waves can explain the observed electron behavior.« less

  12. ELECTRON HEAT FLUX IN THE SOLAR WIND: ARE WE OBSERVING THE COLLISIONAL LIMIT IN THE 1 AU DATA?

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Pantellini, F.

    2014-07-20

    Using statistically significant data at 1 AU, it has recently been shown (Bale et al.) that in the solar wind, when the Knudsen number K {sub T} (the ratio between the electron mean free path and the electron temperature scale height) drops below about 0.3, the electron heat flux q intensity rapidly approaches the classical collisional Spitzer-Härm limit. Using a fully kinetic model including the effect of Coulomb collisions and the expansion of the solar wind with heliocentric distance, we observe that the heat flux strength does indeed approach the collisional value for Knudsen numbers smaller than about 0.3 in very good agreement with the observations. However, closer inspection of the heat flux properties, such as its variation with the heliocentric distance and its dependence on the plasma parameters, shows that for Knudsen numbers between 0.02 and 0.3 the heat flux is not conveniently described by the Spitzer-Härm formula. We conclude that even though observations at 1 AU seem to indicate that the electron heat flux intensity approaches the collisional limit when the Knudsen drops below ∼0.3, the collisional limit is not a generally valid closure for a Knudsen larger than 0.01. Moreover, the good agreement between the heat flux from our model and the heat flux from solar wind measurements in the high-Knudsen number regime seems to indicate that the heat flux at 1 AU is not constrained by electromagnetic instabilities as both wave-particle and wave-wave interactions are neglected in our calculations.

  13. Precipitated Fluxes of Radiation Belt Electrons via Injection of Whistler-Mode Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    2005-12-01

    Inan et al. (U.S. Inan et al., Controlled precipitation of radiation belt electrons, Journal of Geophysical Research-Space Physics, 108 (A5), 1186, doi: 10.1029/2002JA009580, 2003.) suggested that the lifetime of energetic (a few MeV) electrons in the inner radiation belts may be moderated by in situ injection of whistler mode waves at frequencies of a few kHz. We use the Stanford 2D VLF raytracing program (along with an accurate estimation of the path-integrated Landau damping based on data from the HYDRA instrument on the POLAR spacecraft) to determine the distribution of wave energy throughout the inner radiation belts as a function of injection point, wave frequency and injection wave normal angle. To determine the total wave power injected and its initial distribution in k-space (i.e., wave-normal angle), we apply the formulation of Wang and Bell ( T.N.C. Wang and T.F. Bell, Radiation resistance of a short dipole immersed in a cold magnetoionic medium, Radio Science, 4 (2), 167-177, February 1969) for an electric dipole antenna placed at a variety of locations throughout the inner radiation belts. For many wave frequencies and wave normal angles the results establish that most of the radiated power is concentrated in waves whose wave normals are located near the resonance cone. The combined use of the radiation pattern and ray-tracing including Landau damping allows us to make quantitative estimates of the magnetospheric distribution of wave power density for different source injection points. We use these results to estimate the number of individual space-based transmitters needed to significantly impact the lifetimes of energetic electrons in the inner radiation belts. Using the wave power distribution, we finally determine the energetic electron pitch angle scattering and the precipitated flux signatures that would be detected.

  14. The HiLat satellite mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremouw, E. J.; Carlson, H. C.; Huffman, R. E.; Hardy, D. A.; Potemra, T. A.; Bythrow, P. F.; Meng, C.-I.; Rino, C. L.; Vickrey, J. F.; Livingston, R. L.

    1985-06-01

    The equipment, experiments and early results with the HILAT P83-1 satellite for studying high latitude ionospheric structures with scales from ten of meters to thousands of kilometers are outlined. HILAT carries a beacon, plasma monitor, electron spectrometer, magnetometer and photometers for recording scintillations, the total electron count, suprathermal electrons, electron flux and energies, the magnetic field characteristics and auroral spectra at 3914 and 6300 A. Data are gathered only on irregularities which are fully developed, and not during formative stages. Sample data are provided from traverses of an auroral arc.

  15. Predicting Electron Energy Flux Using Ground-Based Multi-Spectral Auroral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubbs, G. A.; Samara, M.; Michell, R.; Redmon, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution, multi-spectral auroral observations can now be routinely acquired using the Multi-spectral Observatory Of Sensitive EMCCDs (MOOSE), currently installed in Poker Flat, AK. Observations from the past 2 auroral seasons have yielded many simultaneous auroral observations in 4 different emission lines (427.8 nm, 557.7 nm, 630 nm, and 844.6 nm). From these data, the brightness of the absolute auroral emissions will be calculated. Combined with atmospheric modeling, auroral emission brightness will be used to predict the total energy flux and characteristic energy of the electrons responsible for the aurora. The theory behind this method is only developed for auroral measurements in the magnetic zenith, and therefore it is not known to what extent it can be applied off zenith. All-sky auroral image data will be examined and compared with DMSP satellite overpasses to quantify the extent to which the model can make predictions off-zenith, creating an empirical model that could then be applied to the many cases without overpasses. This will lead to large-scale 2-D maps of electron precipitation characteristics which can contribute to global ionospheric models.

  16. Fermi-LAT confirmation of enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.

    2016-10-01

    Preliminary LAT analysis confirms the recent enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula detected by AGILE (ATel #9586). The daily-averaged gamma-ray fluxes (E > 100 MeV) from the direction of the Crab Nebula were (4.8 +/- 0.5) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (Sep 30), (3.3 +/- 0.4) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (Oct 1), and (4.5 +/- 0.5) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (Oct 2). These are up to a factor of ~1.8 greater than the average gamma-ray flux of (2.71 +/- 0.02) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 reported in the third Fermi-LAT source catalog (Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23). All fluxes given are the sums of the pulsar and nebular emission, and with statistical uncertainties only.

  17. Minute-timescale >100 MeV γ-Ray Variability during the Giant Outburst of Quasar 3C 279 Observed by Fermi-LAT in 2015 June

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Anantua, R.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Nalewajko, K.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Sikora, M.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, L.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-06-01

    On 2015 June 16, Fermi-LAT observed a giant outburst from the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 with a peak >100 MeV flux of ˜3.6 × 10‑5 photons cm‑2 s‑1, averaged over orbital period intervals. It is historically the highest γ-ray flux observed from the source, including past EGRET observations, with the γ-ray isotropic luminosity reaching ˜1049 erg s‑1. During the outburst, the Fermi spacecraft, which has an orbital period of 95.4 minutes, was operated in a special pointing mode to optimize the exposure for 3C 279. For the first time, significant flux variability at sub-orbital timescales was found in blazar observations by Fermi-LAT. The source flux variability was resolved down to 2-minute binned timescales, with flux doubling times of less than 5 minutes. The observed minute-scale variability suggests a very compact emission region at hundreds of Schwarzschild radii from the central engine in conical jet models. A minimum bulk jet Lorentz factor (Γ) of 35 is necessary to avoid both internal γ-ray absorption and super-Eddington jet power. In the standard external radiation Comptonization scenario, Γ should be at least 50 to avoid overproducing the synchrotron self-Compton component. However, this predicts extremely low magnetization (˜5 × 10‑4). Equipartition requires Γ as high as 120, unless the emitting region is a small fraction of the dissipation region. Alternatively, we consider γ rays originating as synchrotron radiation of γ e ˜ 1.6 × 106 electrons, in a magnetic field B ˜ 1.3 kG, accelerated by strong electric fields E ˜ B in the process of magnetoluminescence. At such short distance scales, one cannot immediately exclude the production of γ-rays in hadronic processes.

  18. Minute-timescale >100 MeV γ-Ray Variability during the Giant Outburst of Quasar 3C 279 Observed by Fermi-LAT in 2015 June

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Anantua, R.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Nalewajko, K.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Sikora, M.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, L.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-06-01

    On 2015 June 16, Fermi-LAT observed a giant outburst from the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 with a peak >100 MeV flux of ˜3.6 × 10-5 photons cm-2 s-1, averaged over orbital period intervals. It is historically the highest γ-ray flux observed from the source, including past EGRET observations, with the γ-ray isotropic luminosity reaching ˜1049 erg s-1. During the outburst, the Fermi spacecraft, which has an orbital period of 95.4 minutes, was operated in a special pointing mode to optimize the exposure for 3C 279. For the first time, significant flux variability at sub-orbital timescales was found in blazar observations by Fermi-LAT. The source flux variability was resolved down to 2-minute binned timescales, with flux doubling times of less than 5 minutes. The observed minute-scale variability suggests a very compact emission region at hundreds of Schwarzschild radii from the central engine in conical jet models. A minimum bulk jet Lorentz factor (Γ) of 35 is necessary to avoid both internal γ-ray absorption and super-Eddington jet power. In the standard external radiation Comptonization scenario, Γ should be at least 50 to avoid overproducing the synchrotron self-Compton component. However, this predicts extremely low magnetization (˜5 × 10-4). Equipartition requires Γ as high as 120, unless the emitting region is a small fraction of the dissipation region. Alternatively, we consider γ rays originating as synchrotron radiation of γ e ˜ 1.6 × 106 electrons, in a magnetic field B ˜ 1.3 kG, accelerated by strong electric fields E ˜ B in the process of magnetoluminescence. At such short distance scales, one cannot immediately exclude the production of γ-rays in hadronic processes.

  19. Influence of osmolality of the medium on photosynthetic electron transport, proton fluxes and photophosphorylation in isolated thylakoids.

    PubMed

    Pan, R S; Sauna, Z; Dilley, R A; Sitaramam, V

    1995-02-01

    The high osmotic potential inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport was determined to be related to membrane compaction rather than to an effect of primary thylakoid volume changes. Osmotic inhibition of proton fluxes and phosphorylation were entirely due to osmotic inhibition of electron transport. The ATPase activity, the nature of coupling and the rate constant of proton efflux were not influenced by osmotic pressure, while the rate constant and the extent of proton influx were inhibited by osmotic pressure.

  20. Extracting the Size of the Cosmic Electron-Positron Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Balazs, C.

    2011-09-01

    Over the last few decades, numerous observations have hinted at an excess of high energy positrons in our locality. The most recent of these experiments has been the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite and the electron plus positron spectrum as measured by the Fermi-LAT satellite. Since the release of these measurements, there have been a plethora of papers where authors invoke new physics ranging from, modification of the cosmic ray propagation, supernova remnants and dark matter annihilation. Using a Bayesian likelihood analysis, we isolate the anomalous contribution of the cosmic electron-positron flux. A significant tension was found between the electron positron related data and non-electron-positron cosmic ray fluxes. Using 219 recent cosmic ray datum, we extracted the preferred values of the selected cosmic ray propagation parameters from the non-electron-positron related measurements. Based on these parameter values we calculated background predictions with uncertainties for PAMELA and Fermi-LAT. We found a deviation between the PAMELA and Fermi-LAT data and the predicted background even when uncertainties, including systematics, were taken into account. Interpreting this as a hint of new physics, we subtracted the background from the data extracting the size, shape and uncertainty of the anomalous contribution in a model independent fashion. We briefly compared the extracted signal to some theoretical results predicting such an anomaly.

  1. Concerted Electronic and Nuclear Fluxes During Coherent Tunnelling in Asymmetric Double-Well Potentials.

    PubMed

    Bredtmann, Timm; Manz, Jörn; Zhao, Jian-Ming

    2016-05-19

    The quantum theory of concerted electronic and nuclear fluxes (CENFs) during coherent periodic tunnelling from reactants (R) to products (P) and back to R in molecules with asymmetric double-well potentials is developed. The results are deduced from the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation as a coherent superposition of two eigenstates; here, these are the two states of the lowest tunnelling doublet. This allows the periodic time evolutions of the resulting electronic and nuclear probability densities (EPDs and NPDs) as well as the CENFs to be expressed in terms of simple sinusodial functions. These analytical results reveal various phenomena during coherent tunnelling in asymmetric double-well potentials, e.g., all EPDs and NPDs as well as all CENFs are synchronous. Distortion of the symmetric reference to a system with an asymmetric double-well potential breaks the spatial symmetry of the EPDs and NPDs, but, surprisingly, the symmetry of the CENFs is conserved. Exemplary application to the Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene shows that tunnelling of the ideal symmetric system can be suppressed by asymmetries induced by rather small external electric fields. The amplitude for the half tunnelling, half nontunnelling border is as low as 0.218 × 10(-8) V/cm. At the same time, the delocalized eigenstates of the symmetric reference, which can be regarded as Schrödinger's cat-type states representing R and P with equal probabilities, get localized at one or the other minima of the asymmetric double-well potential, representing either R or P.

  2. Flux-gate magnetometer spin axis offset calibration using the electron drift instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, Ferdinand; Nakamura, Rumi; Leinweber, Hannes K.; Chutter, Mark; Vaith, Hans; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Steller, Manfred; Magnes, Werner

    2014-10-01

    Spin-stabilization of spacecraft immensely supports the in-flight calibration of on-board flux-gate magnetometers (FGMs). From 12 calibration parameters in total, 8 can be easily obtained by spectral analysis. From the remaining 4, the spin axis offset is known to be particularly variable. It is usually determined by analysis of Alfvénic fluctuations that are embedded in the solar wind. In the absence of solar wind observations, the spin axis offset may be obtained by comparison of FGM and electron drift instrument (EDI) measurements. The aim of our study is to develop methods that are readily usable for routine FGM spin axis offset calibration with EDI. This paper represents a major step forward in this direction. We improve an existing method to determine FGM spin axis offsets from EDI time-of-flight measurements by providing it with a comprehensive error analysis. In addition, we introduce a new, complementary method that uses EDI beam direction data instead of time-of-flight data. Using Cluster data, we show that both methods yield similarly accurate results, which are comparable yet more stable than those from a commonly used solar wind-based method.

  3. Evidence for electron neutrino flavor change through measurement of the (8)B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Mark Stephen

    2001-11-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water Cerenkov detector designed to study solar neutrinos. Using 1 kiloton of heavy water as the target and detection medium, SNO is able to separately determine the flux of electron neutrinos (νe) and the flux of all active neutrinos from the Sun by measuring the rate of charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) interactions with deuterons. A comparison of these interaction rates allows for direct observation of solar neutrino oscillations. SNO can also search for oscillations by comparing the rate of CC and neutrino- electron elastic scattering (ES) events, since ES has both charged current and neutral current sensitivity. In this thesis, we present measurement of the 8B solar ν e flux of 1.78+0.13-0.14 (stat+syst) × 106cm-2s -1 (35% BP2000 SSM) through measurement of the CC rate over 169.3 days of livetime. We have also measured the 8B flux from the ES reaction to be 2.56+0.48-0.45 (stat+syst), consistent with measurements by previous water Cerenkov experiments. A flavor analysis comparing the CC measured flux with that determined through ES by SuperKamiokande yields a non- νe active neutrino flux from 8B of 3.62+1.06-1.08 × 106cm-2s-1 , providing evidence for νe --> ν μ,τ oscillations as a solution to the solar neutrino problem. This result excludes pure solar νe --> ν s oscillations at greater than the 99.7% C.I. The total active 8B neutrino flux has been measured to be 5.39+1.07-1.09 × 106cm-2s-1 , consistent with BP2000 SSM predictions. First analyses of the CC (NHit) spectrum and hep flux in SNO are presented. The CC spectrum is found to be a good fit to expectations from an undistorted 8B spectrum, and global best fit vacuum oscillation solutions are disfavored over the other solutions by the data. Through observations near the 8B endpoint with consideration of energy systematics, hep flux limits of 4.1 (90% C.I.) and 6.9 (99% C.I.) times SSM expectations are obtained. A statistical fit for the

  4. Development of a High-Brightness and High-Current Electron Gun for High-Flux γ-Ray Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimori, N.; Nagai, R.; Matsuba, S.; Hajima, R.; Yamamoto, M.; Honda, Y.; Miyajima, T.; Uchiyama, T.; Kuriki, M.

    2015-10-01

    A high-flux mono-energetic γ-ray beam can be generated via Compton scattering of high-power laser by high-brightness electron beam. We have developed a high-brightness and high-current electron gun for generation of the high-flux γ-ray beam. Recently we demonstrated 500 keV electron beam generation, which meets the high-brightness requirement, from our DC photocathode gun at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The gun was transported to High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) and connected to the following accelerator system. The gun operational status at KEK and our plan to develop a multialkali photocathode with a long lifetime are presented.

  5. Driver of quasi-periodic modulation of pulsating aurora: Role of cold electron flux and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, N.; Kadokura, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Nishiyama, T.

    2013-12-01

    Pulsating auroras are common phenomena, which are observed universally during the recovery phase of substorm in the auroral and subauroral zones. But, even today, generation mechanism of fundamental characteristics of pulsating aurora, such as, their periodicity and shapes are still open to discussion. Simultaneous observations onboard satellites and on the ground are important method to examine such fundamental characteristics of pulsating aurora. In this study we examined some selected pulsating auroral events, which obtained onboard THEMIS spacecraft and the THEMIS ground-based all-sky camera network. THEMIS satellites were located in the post midnight sector near the equatorial plane in the magnetosphere. We found following signatures of particle, field and wave in the magnetosphere at the onset and during pulsating aurora; 1) All pulsating aurora associate with high-energy(>5 keV) electron flux enhancement, 2) There is no evidence to identify a quasi-periodic(QP) modulation of high-energy electron flux, which may be directly corresponding to pulsating aurora observed on the ground, 3) QP modulation of cold electron flux(<10 eV) and electric field often show one-to-one correspondence to QP modulation of ELF wave intensity, both type of electromagnetic lower-band chorus wave and electrostatic ECH(electron cyclotron harmonic) wave, which may be closely relating to visible pulsating aurora observed on the ground, 4) Not all pulsating aurora associate with ELF wave enhancement, 5) Pitch angle distribution of QP modulated cold electrons show field-aligned to ambient magnetic field. In this study we focus on the characteristics of QP modulation of cold electron flux and electric field, which may play the driver of quasi-periodic modulation of pulsating aurora.

  6. The Mimas ghost revisited - An analysis of the electron flux and electron microsignatures observed in the vicinity of Mimas at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenette, D. L.; Stone, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the electron-absorption signature observed by the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 near the orbit of Mimas is presented. It is found that these observations cannot be explained as the absorption signature of Mimas. By combining Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 measurements of the electron flux at Mimas's orbit (L = 3.1), an electron spectrum is found in which most of the flux above about 100 keV is concentrated near 1 to 3 MeV. This spectral form is qualitatively consistent with the bandpass filter model of Van Allen et al. (1980). The expected Mimas absorption signature is calculated from this spectrum neglecting radial diffusion. Since no Mimas absorption signature was observed in the inbound Voyager 2 data, a lower limit on the diffusion coefficient for MeV electrons at L = 3.1 of D greater than 10 to the -8th sq Saturn radii/sec is obtained. With a diffusion coefficient this large, both the Voyager 2 and the Pioneer 11 small-scale electron-absorption-signature observations in Mimas's orbit are enigmatic. Thus the mechanism for producing these signatures is referred to as the Mimas ghost. A cloud of material in orbit with Mimas may account for the observed electron signature if the cloud is at least 1-percent opaque to electrons across a region extending over a few hundred kilometers.

  7. The Mimas ghost revisited: An analysis of the electron flux and electron microsignatures observed in the vicinity of Mimas at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenette, D. L.; Stone, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the electron absorption signature observed by the Cosmic Ray System (CRS) on Voyage 2 near the orbit of Mimas is presented. We find that these observations cannot be explained as the absorption signature of Mimas. Combing Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 measurements of the electron flux at Mimas's orbit (L=3.1), we find an electron spectrum where most of the flux above approx 100 keV is concentrated near 1 to 3 MeV. The expected Mimas absorption signature is calculated from this spectrum neglecting radial diffusion. A lower limit on the diffusion coefficient for MeV electrons is obtained. With a diffusion coefficient this large, both the Voyager 2 and the Pioneer 11 small-scale electron absorption signature observations in Mimas's orbit are enigmatic. Thus we refer to the mechanism for producing these signatures as the Mimas ghost. A cloud of material in orbit with Mimas may account for the observed electron signature if the cloud is at least 1% opaque to electrons across a region extending over a few hundred kilometers.

  8. Effect of Electron Temperature Fluctuations on the Anomalous Particle Flux inferred by Electrostatic Triple Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2010-11-01

    Plasma anomalous transport severely reduces the economical attractiveness of any possible fusion energy reactor based on magnetically confined thermonuclear plasma. Understanding the major mechanisms of this transport, mainly due to the anomalous particles losses, is vital to ameliorate the potential of such reactor, and plasma edge is a key area for this research. We reported here data of a 4-pin triple probe at TCABR tokamak [R=0.615m, a=0.18m, BT=1.15T, Ip<=120kA, ne(bar)<=4x10^19m-3, Te(0)<=600eV, Ti(0)<=400eV, 100ms, circular limiter]. Plasma density (ne), potential (Vp), electron temperature (Te), and respectively fluctuations, all were simultaneously measured or inferred with high spatial(˜3mm) and temporal (1μs) resolution. Corrections in the fluctuation driven particle flux(γ) via the poloidal electrical field (Eθ) and ne are used: real geometry of the tips; Vp (instead of floating potential) between the two tips for inferring Eθ; a correction on ne due to the finite electrical sheath formed at the probe ion collecting area via an analytical formula based on the Hutchinson model for collisionless plasma. The role of Te fluctuations in γ is analyzed and the results are correlated with the dynamic of the global plasma parameters on discharges under auxiliary heating via RF injection (4MHz, 30kW, Alfvén Wave scheme) in which confinement improvement has been observed.

  9. Fermi LAT Results and Perspectives in Measurements of High Energy Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Real breakthrough during last 1-1.5 years in cosmic ray electrons: ATIC, HESS, Pamela, and finally Fermi-LAT. New quality data have made it possible to start quantitative modeling. With the new data more puzzles than before on CR electrons origin. Need "multi-messenger" campaign: electrons, positrons, gammas, X-ray, radio, neutrino... It is viable that we are dealing with at least two distinct mechanisms of "primary" electron (both signs) production: a softer spectrum of negative electrons, and a harder spectrum of both e(+)+e(-). Exotic (e.g. DM) origin is not ruled out. Upper limits on CR electrons anisotropy are set. Good perspectives to have the Fermi LAT results on proton spectrum and positron fraction.

  10. NuLat: A Novel Design for a Reactor Anti-Neutrino Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, S. Derek; NuLat Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    NuLat is a proposed very-short baseline (3-10m) reactor electron antineutrino (anti-νe) experiment that will probe the current best fit for light sterile neutrino mixing, the 5 MeV excess seen in current short baseline reactor experiments, and serve as a portable surface detector for cooperative (~ 30m baseline) surface monitoring of reactors. The NuLat detector will use an optically segmented 3D Raghavan optical lattice (ROL) detector that channels light via total internal reflection from a scintillation event down the 3 primary axes to the detector faces. The high degree of segmentation allows for each voxel's energy to be determined independently of other voxels, thus providing high temporal and spatial resolution and energy reconstruction independent of position. NuLat detects anti-νe via inverse beta decay (IBD), which produces a positron and a neutron. Most of the time, the positron deposits its kinetic energy into a single voxel allowing superior derivation of the incident anti-νe's energy. The final state neutron is captured via (n, α) on 6 Li or 10 B after a characteristic delay time giving a coincidence tag. This talk will discuss the physics reach of NuLat using a solid loaded scintillator, and the timeline of the NuLat reactor anti-νe program. This research has been funded in part by the National Science Foundation on Award Numbers 1001394 and 1001078.

  11. Extreme energetic electron fluxes in low Earth orbit: Analysis of POES E > 30, E > 100, and E > 300 keV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Nigel P.; Horne, Richard B.; Isles, John D.; Green, Janet C.

    2016-02-01

    Energetic electrons are an important space weather hazard. Electrons with energies less than about 100 keV cause surface charging, while higher-energy electrons can penetrate materials and cause internal charging. In this study we conduct an extreme value analysis of the maximum 3-hourly flux of E > 30 keV, E > 100 keV, and E > 300 keV electrons in low Earth orbit as a function of L∗, for geomagnetic field lines that map to the outer radiation belt, using data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) from July 1998 to June 2014. The 1 in 10 year flux of E > 30 keV electrons shows a general increasing trend with distance ranging from 1.8 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=3.0 to 6.6 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=8.0. The 1 in 10 year flux of E > 100 keV electrons peaks at L∗=4.5-5.0 at 1.9 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 decreasing to minima of 7.1 × 106 and 8.7 × 106 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=3.0 and 8.0, respectively. In contrast to the E > 30 keV electrons, the 1 in 10 year flux of E > 300 keV electrons shows a general decreasing trend with distance, ranging from 2.4 × 106 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=3.0 to 1.2 × 105 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=8.0. Our analysis suggests that there is a limit to the E > 30 keV electrons with an upper bound in the range 5.1 × 107 to 8.8 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. However, the results suggest that there is no upper bound for the E > 100 keV and E > 300 keV electrons.

  12. Identifying Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects (UFOs) at High-Latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Chi Teddy

    2009-09-01

    We propose a Chandra study of 8 high Galactic latitude gamma-ray sources in the Fermi-LAT bright source list. These sources are currently unidentified, i.e., they are not clearly associated with established classes of gamma-ray emitters like blazars and pulsars. The proposed observations will determine the basic properties (fluxes, positions, hardness ratio/spectra) of all X-ray sources down to a 0.3-10 keV flux limit of 1.5e-14 erg/cm2/s within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. This will enable further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources.

  13. Fermi-LAT Observations of Galactic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observations of Galactic transients by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The LAT is producing spectacular results for the GeV transient sky, some of which are shown and reviewed. Some of the results in the GeV range that are discussed in this presentation are: (1) New blazars and unidentified transients (2) the jet of the Cygnus X-3 microquasar (3) gamma rays from V407 Cygni nova (4) Fast high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula

  14. Flux balance analysis reveals acetate metabolism modulates cyclic electron flow and alternative glycolytic pathways in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Stephen P.; Paget, Caroline M.; Johnson, Giles N.; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultured in the presence of acetate perform mixotrophic growth, involving both photosynthesis and organic carbon assimilation. Under such conditions, cells exhibit a reduced capacity for photosynthesis but a higher growth rate, compared to phototrophic cultures. Better understanding of the down regulation of photosynthesis would enable more efficient conversion of carbon into valuable products like biofuels. In this study, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and Flux Variability Analysis (FVA) have been used with a genome scale model of C. reinhardtii to examine changes in intracellular flux distribution in order to explain their changing physiology. Additionally, a reaction essentiality analysis was performed to identify which reaction subsets are essential for a given growth condition. Our results suggest that exogenous acetate feeds into a modified tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which bypasses the CO2 evolution steps, explaining increases in biomass, consistent with experimental data. In addition, reactions of the oxidative pentose phosphate and glycolysis pathways, inactive under phototrophic conditions, show substantial flux under mixotrophic conditions. Importantly, acetate addition leads to an increased flux through cyclic electron flow (CEF), but results in a repression of CO2 fixation via Rubisco, explaining the down regulation of photosynthesis. However, although CEF enhances growth on acetate, it is not essential—impairment of CEF results in alternative metabolic pathways being increased. We have demonstrated how the reactions of photosynthesis interconnect with carbon metabolism on a global scale, and how systems approaches play a viable tool in understanding complex relationships at the scale of the organism. PMID:26175742

  15. Comparative Study of Solar Wind Control on Ion and Electron Fluxes at Geo from Low to Relativistic Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, R. J.; Balikhin, M. A.; Billings, S. A.; Amariutei, O. A.

    2012-12-01

    A system identification approach is applied to find the relationship between solar wind parameters and particle measurements at geostationary orbit. The magnetosphere is treated as a black box input-output system, where ACE measurements are used as the inputs and GOES particle data are considered as the outputs. The Error Reduction Ratio is used to assess the significance of various solar wind parameters with respect to the evolution of plasma populations. In the case of electron fluxes, it is shown that the solar wind influence is in accordance with previously obtained results: a major influence of the bulk velocity for lower energies and substantial influence of the solar wind density on the electrons with higher energies. An online real time forecasting tool has been developed as the result to this approach. This tool provides more accurate and reliable forecasts of particle fluxes in various energy ranges.

  16. Ground-based observations of thunderstorm-correlated fluxes of high-energy electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chilingarian, A.; Daryan, A.; Arakelyan, K.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Mailyan, B.; Melkumyan, L.; Hovsepyan, G.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.; Vanyan, L.

    2010-08-15

    The Aragats Space Environmental Center facilities continuously measure fluxes of neutral and charged secondary cosmic ray incidents on the Earth's surface. Since 2003 in the 1-minute time series we have detected more than 100 enhancements in the electron, gamma ray, and neutron fluxes correlated with thunderstorm activities. During the periods of the count rate enhancements, lasting tens of minutes, millions of additional particles were detected. Based on the largest particle event of September 19, 2009, we show that our measurements support the existence of long-lasting particle multiplication and acceleration mechanisms in the thunderstorm atmosphere. For the first time we present the energy spectra of electrons and gamma rays from the particle avalanches produced in the thunderstorm atmosphere, reaching the Earth's surface.

  17. LATS2 Positively Regulates Polycomb Repressive Complex 2.

    PubMed

    Torigata, Kosuke; Daisuke, Okuzaki; Mukai, Satomi; Hatanaka, Akira; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Yabuta, Norikazu; Kondo, Yutaka; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    LATS2, a pivotal Ser/Thr kinase of the Hippo pathway, plays important roles in many biological processes. LATS2 also function in Hippo-independent pathway, including mitosis, DNA damage response and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. However, the physiological relevance and molecular basis of these LATS2 functions remain obscure. To understand novel functions of LATS2, we constructed a LATS2 knockout HeLa-S3 cell line using TAL-effector nuclease (TALEN). Integrated omics profiling of this cell line revealed that LATS2 knockout caused genome-wide downregulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and H3K27me3. Cell-cycle analysis revealed that downregulation of PRC2 was not due to cell cycle aberrations caused by LATS2 knockout. Not LATS1, a homolog of LATS2, but LATS2 bound PRC2 on chromatin and phosphorylated it. LATS2 positively regulates histone methyltransferase activity of PRC2 and their expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings reveal a novel signal upstream of PRC2, and provide insight into the crucial role of LATS2 in coordinating the epigenome through regulation of PRC2. PMID:27434182

  18. LATS2 Positively Regulates Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Torigata, Kosuke; Daisuke, Okuzaki; Mukai, Satomi; Hatanaka, Akira; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Yabuta, Norikazu; Kondo, Yutaka; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    LATS2, a pivotal Ser/Thr kinase of the Hippo pathway, plays important roles in many biological processes. LATS2 also function in Hippo-independent pathway, including mitosis, DNA damage response and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. However, the physiological relevance and molecular basis of these LATS2 functions remain obscure. To understand novel functions of LATS2, we constructed a LATS2 knockout HeLa-S3 cell line using TAL-effector nuclease (TALEN). Integrated omics profiling of this cell line revealed that LATS2 knockout caused genome-wide downregulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and H3K27me3. Cell-cycle analysis revealed that downregulation of PRC2 was not due to cell cycle aberrations caused by LATS2 knockout. Not LATS1, a homolog of LATS2, but LATS2 bound PRC2 on chromatin and phosphorylated it. LATS2 positively regulates histone methyltransferase activity of PRC2 and their expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings reveal a novel signal upstream of PRC2, and provide insight into the crucial role of LATS2 in coordinating the epigenome through regulation of PRC2. PMID:27434182

  19. ATel 7545: Fermi LAT Detection of a GeV flare from spectrally hard FSRQ S4 1800+44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux and an unusually hard gamma-ray spectrum from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) S4 1800+44 (also known as 3FGL J1801.5+4403, Acero et al. ...

  20. Fermi-LAT detection of hard spectrum gamma-ray activity from the FSRQ PKS 1532+01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, S.; Cheung, C. C.

    2015-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux and an unusually hard gamma-ray spectrum from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 1532+01 (also known as 3FGL J1534.5+0128, Acero et al.

  1. Erratum to ATel 6655: Fermi LAT Detection of a new Gamma-ray source Fermi J0507-5641

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, B.; Ojha, R.

    2014-11-01

    (The flux units have been corrected to x10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1.) The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed strong gamma-ray emission from a new source.

  2. Solder Flux Residues and Humidity-Related Failures in Electronics: Relative Effects of Weak Organic Acids Used in No-Clean Flux Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the results of humidity testing of weak organic acids (WOAs), namely adipic, succinic, glutaric, dl-malic, and palmitic acids, which are commonly used as activators in no-clean solder fluxes. The study was performed under humidity conditions varying from 60% relative humidity (RH) to ˜99%RH at 25°C. The following parameters were used for characterization of WOAs: mass gain due to water adsorption and deliquescence of the WOA (by quartz crystal microbalance), resistivity of the water layer formed on the printed circuit board (by impedance spectroscopy), and leakage current measured using the surface insulation resistance pattern in the potential range from 0 V to 10 V. The combined results indicate the importance of the WOA chemical structure for the water adsorption and therefore conductive water layer formation on the printed circuit board assembly (PCBA). A substantial increase of leakage currents and probability of electrochemical migration was observed at humidity levels above the RH corresponding to the deliquescence point of WOAs present as contaminants on the printed circuit boards. The results suggest that use of solder fluxes with WOAs having higher deliquescence point could improve the reliability of electronics operating under circumstances in which exposure to high humidity is likely to occur.

  3. The Prototype of Detector for Registration Neutron Fluxes Initiated by Electrons and Protons of High Energy in the Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnezdilov, I. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplun, A. A.; Taraskin, A. A.

    A prototype of detector for neutron fluxes, induced by electron and proton showers, registration has been designed. Neutron detector (ND) consists of three alternating layers composed of cadmium plates and plastic scintillator. An optimal detector solution based on a mathematical simulation has been proposed. This article contains technical information and a description of the experiment to determine neutron detection efficiency, as well as experimental and simulation data analysis results.

  4. The GLAST Mission, LAT and GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-04-05

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the next generation satellite experiment for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. It is a pair conversion telescope built with a plastic anticoincidence shield, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter, and the largest silicon strip tracker ever built. It will cover the energy range from 30 MeV to 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its predecessor EGRET. One of the most exciting science topics is the detection and observation of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper we present the work done so far by the GRB LAT science group in studying the performance of the LAT detector to observe GRBs.We report on the simulation framework developed by the group as well as on the science tools dedicated to GRBs data analysis. We present the LAT sensitivity to GRBs obtained with such simulations, and, finally, the general scheme of GRBs detection that will be adopted on orbit.

  5. The Fermi-LAT view of the colliding wind binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshirkov, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    Colliding wind binaries (CWBs) have been considered as a possible high-energy γ-ray sources for some time, however no system other than η Car has been detected. In the Letter, a sample of seven CWBs (WR 11, WR 70, WR 137, WR 140, WR 146, WR 147) which, by means of theoretic modelling, were deemed most promising candidates, was analysed using almost 7 yr of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. WR 11 (γ2 Vel) was detected at 6.1σ confidence level with a photon flux in 0.1-100 GeV range (1.8 ± 0.6) × 10-9 ph cm-2 s-1 and an energy flux (2.7 ± 0.5) × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1. At the adopted distance d = 340 pc this corresponds to a luminosity L = (3.7 ± 0.7) × 1031 erg s-1. This luminosity amounts to ˜6 × 10-6 fraction of the total wind kinetic power and ˜1.6 × 10-4 fraction of the power injected into the wind-wind interaction region of this system. Upper limits were set on the high energy flux from the WR 70 and WR 140 systems.

  6. Hot-electron production and suprathermal heat flux scaling with laser intensity from the two-plasmon-decay instability

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, H. X.; DuBois, D. F.; Myatt, J. F.; Russell, D. A.

    2012-10-15

    The fully kinetic reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) method has been applied to simulations of two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability, driven by crossed laser beams, in an inhomogeneous plasma for parameters consistent with recent direct-drive experiments related to laser-driven inertial fusion. The nonlinear saturated state is characterized by very spiky electric fields, with Langmuir cavitation occurring preferentially inside density channels produced by the ponderomotive beating of the crossed laser beams and the primary TPD Langmuir waves (LWs). The heated electron distribution function is, in all cases, bi-Maxwellian, with instantaneous hot-electron temperatures in the range 60-100 keV. The net hot-electron energy flux out of the system is a small fraction ({approx}1% to 2%) of the input laser intensity in these simulations. Scalings of the hot-electron temperature and suprathermal heat flux as functions of the laser intensity are obtained numerically from RPIC simulations. These simulations lead to the preliminary conclusion that Langmuir cavitation and collapse provide dissipation by producing suprathermal electrons, which stabilize the system in saturation and drive the LW spectrum to the small dissipation scales at the Landau cutoff. The Langmuir turbulence originates at an electron density 0.241 Multiplication-Sign the laser's critical density, where the crossed laser beams excite a 'triad' mode-a common forward LW plus a pair of backward LWs. Remnants of this 'triad' evolve in k-space and dominate the time-averaged energy spectrum. At times exceeding 10 ps, the excited Langmuir turbulence spreads toward lower densities. Comparisons of RPIC simulations with the extended Zakharov model are presented in appropriate regimes, and the necessary requirements for the validity of a quasi-linear Zakharov model (where the spatially averaged electron-velocity distribution is evolved) are verified by RPIC simulation results.

  7. GLAST LAT And Pulsars: What Do We Learn from Simulations?

    SciTech Connect

    Razzano, Massimiliano; Harding, Alice K.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-24

    Gamma-ray pulsars are among the best targets for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the GLAST mission. The higher sensitivity, time and energy resolution of the LAT will provide data of fundamental importance to understand the physics of these fascinating objects. Powerful tools for studying the LAT capabilities for pulsar science are the simulation programs developed within the GLAST Collaboration. Thanks to these simulations it is possible to produce a detailed distribution of gamma-ray photons in energy and phase that can be folded through the LAT Instrument Response Functions (IRFs). Here we present some of the main interesting results from the simulations developed to study the discovery potential of the LAT. In particular we will focus on the capability of the LAT to discover new radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars, on the discrimination between Polar Cap and Outer Gap models, and on the LAT pulsar sensitivity.

  8. An improved empirical model of electron and ion fluxes at geosynchronous orbit based on upstream solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, M. H.; Henderson, M. G.; Jordanova, V. K.; Thomsen, M. F.; Borovsky, J. E.; Woodroffe, J.; Hartley, D. P.; Pitchford, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new empirical model of the electron fluxes and ion fluxes at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) is introduced, based on observations by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) satellites. The model provides flux predictions in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV, as a function of local time, energy, and the strength of the solar wind electric field (the negative product of the solar wind speed and the z component of the magnetic field). Given appropriate upstream solar wind measurements, the model provides a forecast of the fluxes at GEO with a ~1 h lead time. Model predictions are tested against in-sample observations from LANL satellites and also against out-of-sample observations from the Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II detector on the AMC-12 satellite. The model does not reproduce all structure seen in the observations. However, for the intervals studied here (quiet and storm times) the normalized root-mean-square deviation < ~0.3. It is intended that the model will improve forecasting of the spacecraft environment at GEO and also provide improved boundary/input conditions for physical models of the magnetosphere.

  9. An improved empirical model of electron and ion fluxes at geosynchronous orbit based on upstream solar wind conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Denton, M. H.; Henderson, M. G.; Jordanova, V. K.; Thomsen, M. F.; Borovsky, J. E.; Woodroffe, J.; Hartley, D. P.; Pitchford, D.

    2016-07-27

    In this study, a new empirical model of the electron fluxes and ion fluxes at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) is introduced, based on observations by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) satellites. The model provides flux predictions in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV, as a function of local time, energy, and the strength of the solar wind electric field (the negative product of the solar wind speed and the z component of the magnetic field). Given appropriate upstream solar wind measurements, the model provides a forecast of the fluxes at GEO with a ~1 h lead time. Model predictionsmore » are tested against in-sample observations from LANL satellites and also against out-of-sample observations from the Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II detector on the AMC-12 satellite. The model does not reproduce all structure seen in the observations. However, for the intervals studied here (quiet and storm times) the normalized root-mean-square deviation < ~0.3. It is intended that the model will improve forecasting of the spacecraft environment at GEO and also provide improved boundary/input conditions for physical models of the magnetosphere.« less

  10. Electron flux and microbial community in microbial fuel cells (open-circuit and closed-circuit modes) and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaecheul; Park, Youghyun; Lee, Taeho

    2015-07-01

    A closed-circuit microbial fuel cell (C-MFC) was operated to investigate the electron flux under fed-batch mode, and the results were compared to those of open-circuit MFC (O-MFC) and a fermentation reactor (F-reactor). The current was the largest electron sink (52.7% of influent SCOD) in C-MFC, whereas biomass and methane gas were the most significant electron sinks in O-MFC and F-reactor. Interestingly, some of the unknown sink may have accumulated in the electrode of O-MFC. Principal component analysis based on gradient gel electrophoresis profiles showed that the microbial communities were significantly affected by the growth conditions and the presence of electrode, regardless of the circuit connection. Therefore, the electrode and circuit mode might help to control the amount of biomass and enhance the MFC performance.

  11. An evolutionarily conserved negative feedback mechanism in the Hippo pathway reflects functional difference between LATS1 and LATS2

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gun-Soo; Oh, Hyangyee; Kim, Minchul; Kim, Tackhoon; Johnson, Randy L.; Irvine, Kenneth D.; Lim, Dae-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway represses YAP oncoprotein activity through phosphorylation by LATS kinases. Although variety of upstream components has been found to participate in the Hippo pathway, the existence and function of negative feedback has remained uncertain. We found that activated YAP, together with TEAD transcription factors, directly induces transcription of LATS2, but not LATS1, to form a negative feedback loop. We also observed increased mRNA levels of Hippo upstream components upon YAP activation. To reveal the physiological role of this negative feedback regulation, we deleted Lats2 or Lats1 in the liver-specific Sav1-knockout mouse model which develops a YAP-induced tumor. Additional deletion of Lats2 severely enhanced YAP-induced tumorigenic phenotypes in a liver specific Sav1 knock-out mouse model while additional deletion of Lats1 mildly affected the phenotype. Only Sav1 and Lats2 double knock-down cells formed larger colonies in soft agar assay, thereby recapitulating accelerated tumorigenesis seen in vivo. Importantly, this negative feedback is evolutionarily conserved, as Drosophila Yorkie (YAP ortholog) induces transcription of Warts (LATS2 ortholog) with Scalloped (TEAD ortholog). Collectively, we demonstrated the existence and function of an evolutionarily conserved negative feedback mechanism in the Hippo pathway, as well as the functional difference between LATS1 and LATS2 in regulation of YAP. PMID:27006470

  12. FERMI-LAT SEARCH FOR PULSAR WIND NEBULAE AROUND GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2011-01-01

    The high sensitivity of the Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) offers the first opportunity to study faint and extended GeV sources such as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). After one year of observation the LAT detected and identified three PWNe: the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and the PWN inside MSH 15-52. In the meantime, the list of LAT detected pulsars increased steadily. These pulsars are characterized by high energy loss rates ( E-dot ) from {approx}3 x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} to 5 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} and are therefore likely to power a PWN. This paper summarizes the search for PWNe in the off-pulse windows of 54 LAT-detected pulsars using 16 months of survey observations. Ten sources show significant emission, seven of these likely being of magnetospheric origin. The detection of significant emission in the off-pulse interval offers new constraints on the {gamma}-ray emitting regions in pulsar magnetospheres. The three other sources with significant emission are the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and a new PWN candidate associated with the LAT pulsar PSR J1023-5746, coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023-575. We further explore the association between the HESS and the Fermi source by modeling its spectral energy distribution. Flux upper limits derived for the 44 remaining sources are used to provide new constraints on famous PWNe that have been detected at keV and/or TeV energies.

  13. Dense plasma heating and Gbar shock formation by a high intensity flux of energetic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeyre, X.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Gus'kov, S.

    2013-06-15

    Process of shock ignition in inertial confinement fusion implies creation of a high pressure shock with a laser spike having intensity of the order of a few PW/cm{sup 2}. However, the collisional (Bremsstrahlung) absorption at these intensities is inefficient and a significant part of laser energy is converted in a stream of energetic electrons. The process of shock formation in a dense plasma by an intense electron beam is studied in this paper in a planar geometry. The energy deposition takes place in a fixed mass target layer with the areal density determined by the electron range. A self-similar isothermal rarefaction wave of a fixed mass describes the expanding plasma. Formation of a shock wave in the target under the pressure of expanding plasma is described. The efficiency of electron beam energy conversion into the shock wave energy depends on the fast electron energy and the pulse duration. The model is applied to the laser produced fast electrons. The fast electron energy transport could be the dominant mechanism of ablation pressure creation under the conditions of shock ignition. The shock wave pressure exceeding 1 Gbar during 200–300 ps can be generated with the electron pulse intensity in the range of 5–10 PW/cm{sup 2}. The conclusions of theoretical model are confirmed in numerical simulations with a radiation hydrodynamic code coupled with a fast electron transport module.

  14. Bimodal electron fluxes of nearly relativistic electrons during the onset of a solar particle event observed by Wind on 4 June 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lingpeng; Kartavykh, Yulia; Klecker, Berndt; Droege, Wolfgang

    We investigate electron fluxes in the energy range 27 -510 keV during a solar particle ob-served by the Wind spacecraft on 4 June 2000. The event occurred a few days after Wind had completed a transition through the magnetosphere and was located 70RE upstream from the Earth, possibly on magnetic field lines which were connected to the bow shock. At the onset of the event the electron pitch-angle distributions on Wind exhibit an unusual, bimodal pattern, whereas simultaneous ACE EPAM observations close to the L1 Lagrangian point of electrons in the same energy range show the familiar pattern of angular distributions which are strongly peaked in magnetic field direction away from the sun during the onset phase. Explanations for the observed bimodal pattern on Wind, such as an injection of electrons at the two footpoints of a possible interplanetary magnetic loop/tongue structure, or a reflection of the electrons at the bow shock will be discussed. We will also present a comparison of the Wind electron observations with results of a numerical simulation which includes pitch angle diffusion, focus-ing, and a reflection at a boundary close to the point of observation. Particular emphasis will be given to the investigation of pitch angle distributions, for which we will make use of the three-dimensional angular coverage of the Wind 3DP instrument.

  15. Multiwavelength Observations and Modeling of 1ES 1959+650 in a Low Flux State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Böttcher, M.; Bouvier, A.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nelson, T.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Skole, C.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Theiling, M.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the VERITAS observations of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 in the period 2007-2011. This source is detected at TeV energies by VERITAS at 16.4 standard deviation (σ) significance in 7.6 hr of observation in a low flux state. A multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) is constructed from contemporaneous data from VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, RXTE PCA, and Swift UVOT. Swift XRT data is not included in the SED due to a lack of simultaneous observations with VERITAS. In contrast to the orphan γ-ray flare exhibited by this source in 2002, the X-ray flux of the source is found to vary by an order of magnitude, while other energy regimes exhibit less variable emission. A quasi-equilibrium synchrotron self-Compton model with an additional external radiation field is used to describe three SEDs corresponding to the lowest, highest, and average X-ray states. The variation in the X-ray spectrum is modeled by changing the electron injection spectral index, with minor adjustments of the kinetic luminosity in electrons. This scenario produces small-scale flux variability of the order of <~ 2 in the high energy (E > 1 MeV) and very high energy (E > 100 GeV) γ-ray regimes, which is corroborated by the Fermi-LAT, VERITAS, and Whipple 10 m telescope light curves.

  16. Search for Gamma-Ray Emission from the Coma Cluster with Six Years of Fermi-LAT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; Rephaeli, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We present results from γ-ray observations of the Coma cluster incorporating six years of Fermi-LAT data and the newly released “Pass 8” event-level analysis. Our analysis of the region reveals low-significance residual structures within the virial radius of the cluster that are too faint for a detailed investigation with the current data. Using a likelihood approach that is free of assumptions on the spectral shape we derive upper limits on the γ-ray flux that is expected from energetic particle interactions in the cluster. We also consider a benchmark spatial and spectral template motivated by models in which the observed radio halo is mostly emission by secondary electrons. In this case, the median expected and observed upper limits for the flux above 100 {MeV} are 1.7 × 10-9 ph cm-2 s-1 and 5.2 × 10-9 ph cm-2 s-1 respectively (the latter corresponds to residual emission at the level of 1.8σ). These bounds are comparable to or higher than predicted levels of hadronic gamma-ray emission in cosmic-ray (CR) models with or without reacceleration of secondary electrons, although direct comparisons are sensitive to assumptions regarding the origin and propagation mode of CRs and magnetic field properties. The minimal expected γ-ray flux from radio and star-forming galaxies within the Coma cluster is roughly an order of magnitude below the median sensitivity of our analysis.

  17. Superthermal Electron Directional Fluxes and Their Pitch-Angle Distributions in the Region of the Diffuse Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, L. G.; Khazanov, G. V.; Glocer, A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Avanov, L. A.; Himwich, E. W.

    2015-12-01

    Based on the model developed by Khazanov et al. (2014), we present the solution of the Boltzmann-Landau kinetic equation that uniformly describes the entire electron distribution function in the diffuse aurora, including the affiliated production of secondary electrons and their energy interplay in the magnetosphere and two conjugated ionospheres. In this investigation superthermal electron activity along the magnetic field lines that lie at a distance of 4.6 and 6.8 Earth radii from the Earth's equator was considered. The major focus of this presentation is to study how both electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves (ECH) and upper bounded chorus (UBC) and lower bounded chorus (LBC) whistler mode waves influence the superthermal electron directional fluxes and their pitch-angle distributions in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. This is achieved by numerically solving the Boltzmann-Landau kinetic equation with ECH, LBC, and UBC wave activity taken into account and comparing the results to the solution of the Boltzmann-Landau kinetic equation when only the influence of coulomb collisions is considered. We also discuss how the wave-particle interaction processes contribute to the energy balance of thermal and superthermal plasmas in the ionosphere-magnetosphere system.

  18. Electron acceleration associated with the magnetic flux pileup regions in the near-Earth plasma sheet: A multicase study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.; Zhou, M.; Yao, Z. H.; Shi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations, we study electron acceleration (<30 keV) in the magnetic flux pileup regions (FPRs) in the near-Earth plasma sheet (X ~ -10 RE). We present three cases of FRPs associated with dipolarization fronts and substorm dipolarization. Based on the characteristics of the magnetic field, we defined the magnetic field enhancement region (MFER) as the magnetic field with significant ramp that is usually observed near the dipolarization front boundary layer. On the other side, the increased magnetic field without a significant ramp is the rest of a FPR. Our results show that betatron acceleration dominates for 10-30 keV electrons inside the MFER, whereas Fermi acceleration dominates for 10-30 keV electrons inside the rest of the FPR. Betatron acceleration is caused by the enhancement of the local magnetic field, whereas Fermi acceleration is related to the shrinking length of magnetic field line. These accelerated electrons inside the FPRs in the near-Earth tail play a potentially important role in the evolution of the Earth's electron radiation belt and substorms.

  19. Overexpression of L-Type Amino Acid Transporter 1 (LAT1) and 2 (LAT2): Novel Markers of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Barollo, Susi; Bertazza, Loris; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Censi, Simona; Cavedon, Elisabetta; Galuppini, Francesca; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Fassina, Ambrogio; Citton, Marilisa; Rubin, Beatrice; Pezzani, Raffaele; Benna, Clara; Opocher, Giuseppe; Iacobone, Maurizio; Mian, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Background 6-18F-fluoro-L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-FDOPA) PET is a useful tool in the clinical management of pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). 18F-FDOPA is a large neutral amino acid biochemically resembling endogenous L-DOPA and taken up by the L-type amino acid transporters (LAT1 and LAT2). This study was conducted to examine the expression of the LAT system in PHEO and MTC. Methods Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to assess LAT1 and LAT2 gene and protein expression in 32 PHEO, 38 MTC, 16 normal adrenal medulla and 15 normal thyroid tissue samples. Immunohistochemistry method was applied to identify the proteins’ subcellular localization. Results LAT1 and LAT2 were overexpressed in both PHEO and MTC by comparison with normal tissues. LAT1 presented a stronger induction than LAT2, and their greater expression was more evident in PHEO (15.1- and 4.1-fold increases, respectively) than in MTC (9.9- and 4.1-fold increases, respectively). Furthermore we found a good correlation between LAT1/2 and GLUT1 expression levels. A positive correlation was also found between urinary noradrenaline and adrenaline levels and LAT1 gene expression in PHEO. The increased expression of LAT1 is also confirmed at the protein level, in both PHEO and MTC, with a strong cytoplasmic localization. Conclusions The present study is the first to provide experimental evidence of the overexpression in some NET cancers (such as PHEO or MTC) of L-type amino acid transporters, and the LAT1 isoform in particular, giving the molecular basis to explain the increase of the DOPA uptake seen in such tumor cells. PMID:27224648

  20. Fluctuations in the electron system of a superconductor exposed to a photon flux

    PubMed Central

    de Visser, P. J.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Bueno, J.; Llombart, N.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2014-01-01

    In a superconductor, in which electrons are paired, the density of unpaired electrons should become zero when approaching zero temperature. Therefore, radiation detectors based on breaking of pairs promise supreme sensitivity, which we demonstrate using an aluminium superconducting microwave resonator. Here we show that the resonator also enables the study of the response of the electron system of the superconductor to pair-breaking photons, microwave photons and varying temperatures. A large range in radiation power (at 1.54 THz) can be chosen by carefully filtering the radiation from a blackbody source. We identify two regimes. At high radiation power, fluctuations in the electron system caused by the random arrival rate of the photons are resolved, giving a straightforward measure of the optical efficiency (48±8%) and showing an unprecedented detector sensitivity. At low radiation power, fluctuations are dominated by excess quasiparticles, the number of which is measured through their recombination lifetime. PMID:24496036

  1. Investigation on the electron flux to the wall in the VENUS ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Benitez, J. Y.; Hodgkinson, A.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Xie, D. Z.

    2016-02-01

    The long-term operation of high charge state electron cyclotron resonance ion sources fed with high microwave power has caused damage to the plasma chamber wall in several laboratories. Porosity, or a small hole, can be progressively created in the chamber wall which can destroy the plasma chamber over a few year time scale. A burnout of the VENUS plasma chamber is investigated in which the hole formation in relation to the local hot electron power density is studied. First, the results of a simple model assuming that hot electrons are fully magnetized and strictly following magnetic field lines are presented. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimental traces left by the plasma on the wall. However, it is too crude to reproduce the localized electron power density for creating a hole in the chamber wall. Second, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, following a population of scattering hot electrons, indicate a localized high power deposited to the chamber wall consistent with the hole formation process. Finally, a hypervapotron cooling scheme is proposed to mitigate the hole formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma chamber wall.

  2. Investigation on the electron flux to the wall in the VENUS ion source.

    PubMed

    Thuillier, T; Angot, J; Benitez, J Y; Hodgkinson, A; Lyneis, C M; Todd, D S; Xie, D Z

    2016-02-01

    The long-term operation of high charge state electron cyclotron resonance ion sources fed with high microwave power has caused damage to the plasma chamber wall in several laboratories. Porosity, or a small hole, can be progressively created in the chamber wall which can destroy the plasma chamber over a few year time scale. A burnout of the VENUS plasma chamber is investigated in which the hole formation in relation to the local hot electron power density is studied. First, the results of a simple model assuming that hot electrons are fully magnetized and strictly following magnetic field lines are presented. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimental traces left by the plasma on the wall. However, it is too crude to reproduce the localized electron power density for creating a hole in the chamber wall. Second, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, following a population of scattering hot electrons, indicate a localized high power deposited to the chamber wall consistent with the hole formation process. Finally, a hypervapotron cooling scheme is proposed to mitigate the hole formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma chamber wall. PMID:26931954

  3. Investigation on the electron flux to the wall in the VENUS ion source.

    PubMed

    Thuillier, T; Angot, J; Benitez, J Y; Hodgkinson, A; Lyneis, C M; Todd, D S; Xie, D Z

    2016-02-01

    The long-term operation of high charge state electron cyclotron resonance ion sources fed with high microwave power has caused damage to the plasma chamber wall in several laboratories. Porosity, or a small hole, can be progressively created in the chamber wall which can destroy the plasma chamber over a few year time scale. A burnout of the VENUS plasma chamber is investigated in which the hole formation in relation to the local hot electron power density is studied. First, the results of a simple model assuming that hot electrons are fully magnetized and strictly following magnetic field lines are presented. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimental traces left by the plasma on the wall. However, it is too crude to reproduce the localized electron power density for creating a hole in the chamber wall. Second, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, following a population of scattering hot electrons, indicate a localized high power deposited to the chamber wall consistent with the hole formation process. Finally, a hypervapotron cooling scheme is proposed to mitigate the hole formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma chamber wall.

  4. Crystallization of sputter-deposited amorphous Ge films by electron irradiation: Effect of low-flux pre-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okugawa, M.; Nakamura, R.; Ishimaru, M.; Yasuda, H.; Numakura, H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the effect of low-flux electron irradiation with 125 keV to sputter-deposited amorphous germanium on the amorphous structure and electron-induced crystallization microstructure by TEM following our previous study on the effect of aging at room temperature. In samples aged for 3 days, coarse, spherical particles about 100 nm in diameter appear dominantly. By low-flux pre-irradiation to the samples, a reduction in the size and number of coarse particles, embedded in the matrix with fine nanograins of the diamond cubic structure, was noted with the increase in fluence. The crystal structure of these coarse particles was found to be not cubic but hexagonal. In samples aged for 4 months, a similar tendency was observed. In samples aged for 7 months, on the other hand, the homogeneous diamond cubic structured nanograins were unchanged by pre-irradiation. These results indicate that pre-irradiation as well as aging modifies the amorphous structure, preventing the appearance of a hexagonal phase. The elimination of a certain amount of medium-range ordered clusters by pre-irradiation, included in as-deposited samples and the samples aged for 4 months, apparently gives rise to a reduction in the size and number of coarse particles with a metastable hexagonal structure.

  5. Monitoring electron and proton diffusion flux through three-dimensional, paper-based, variable biofilm and liquid media layers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gihoon; Choi, Seokheun

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this work is to pursue analytical approaches that elucidate electron and proton diffusion inside the Shewanella oneidensis biofilm and bulk liquid, which will inevitably promote the translation of Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) technology for renewable, "green energy" solutions that are in demand to sustain the world's ever-increasing energy demands and to mitigate the depletion of current resources. This study provides a novel strategy for monitoring electron/proton fluxes in 3-D multi-laminate structures of paper as a scaffold to support S. oneidensis biofilms and bulk media liquid. Multiple layers of paper containing bacterial cells and/or media are stacked to form a layered 3-D model of the overall biofilm/bulk liquid construct. Mass transport of electrons and protons into this 3-D system can be quantified along with the exploration of microbial energy production. Assembly of a 3D paper stack can be modular and allows us to control the thickness of the overall biofilm/bulk liquid construct with the different diffusion distances of the electrons/protons through the stack. By measuring the current generated from the 3-D stack, the electron and proton diffusivity through biofilms were quantitatively investigated. We found that (i) the diffusion length of the electrons/protons in the S. oneidensis biofilm/bulk liquid is a determinant factor for the MFC performance, (ii) the electron transfer through the endogenous mediators of S. oneidensis can be a more critical factor to limit the current/power generation of the MFCs than the proton transfer in the MFC system and (iii) the thicker biofilm allows higher and longer current generation but requires more time to reach a peak current value and increases the total energy loss of the MFC system.

  6. Partially dissecting the steady-state electron fluxes in Photosystem I in wild-type and pgr5 and ndh mutants of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Jiancun; Takahashi, Shunichi; Fan, Da-Yong; Badger, Murray R.; Chow, Wah S.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic electron flux (CEF) around Photosystem I (PS I) is difficult to quantify. We obtained the linear electron flux (LEFO2) through both photosystems and the total electron flux through PS I (ETR1) in Arabidopsis in CO2-enriched air. ΔFlux = ETR1 – LEFO2 is an upper estimate of CEF, which consists of two components, an antimycin A-sensitive, PGR5 (proton gradient regulation 5 protein)-dependent component and an insensitive component facilitated by a chloroplastic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH). Using wild type as well as pgr5 and ndh mutants, we observed that (1) 40% of the absorbed light was partitioned to PS I; (2) at high irradiance a substantial antimycin A-sensitive CEF occurred in the wild type and the ndh mutant; (3) at low irradiance a sizable antimycin A-sensitive CEF occurred in the wild type but not in the ndh mutant, suggesting an enhancing effect of NDH in low light; and (4) in the pgr5 mutant, and the wild type and ndh mutant treated with antimycin A, a residual ΔFlux existed at high irradiance, attributable to charge recombination and/or pseudo-cyclic electron flow. Therefore, in low-light-acclimated plants exposed to high light, ΔFlux has contributions from various paths of electron flow through PS I. PMID:26442071

  7. ) Mold Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Myung-Duk; Shi, Cheng-Bin; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2014-10-01

    The effects of basicity (CaO/SiO2), B2O3, and Li2O addition on the crystallization behaviors of lime-silica-based mold fluxes have been investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and single hot thermocouple technique. It was found that the crystallization temperature of cuspidine increased with increasing the basicity of mold fluxes. The crystallization of wollastonite was suppressed with increasing the mold flux basicity due to the enhancement of cuspidine crystallization. The addition of B2O3 suppresses the crystallization of mold flux. The crystallization temperature of mold flux decreases with Li2O addition. The size of cuspidine increases, while the number of cuspidine decreases with increasing mold flux basicity. The morphology of cuspidine in mold fluxes with lower basicity is largely dendritic. The dendritic cuspidine in mold fluxes is composed of many fine cuspidine crystals. On the contrary, in mold fluxes with higher basicity, the cuspidine crystals are larger in size with mainly faceted morphology. The crystalline phase evolution was also calculated using a thermodynamic database, and compared with the experimental results determined by DSC and XRD. The results of thermodynamic calculation of crystalline phase formation are in accordance with the results determined by DSC and XRD.

  8. Bimodal fluxes of near-relativistic electrons during the onset of solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Dröge, W.; Klecker, B.

    2013-07-01

    We report for several solar energetic particle events (SEPs) intensity and anisotropy measurements of energetic electrons in the energy range ˜27 to ˜500 keV as observed with the Wind and ACE spacecraft in June 2000. The observations onboard Wind show bimodal pitch angle distributions (PADs), whereas ACE shows PADs with one peak, as usually observed for impulsive injection of electrons at the Sun. During the time of observation Wind was located upstream of the Earth's bow shock, in the dawn-noon sector, at distances of ˜40 to ˜70REfrom the Earth, and magnetically well connected to the quasi-parallel bow shock, whereas ACE, located at the libration point L1, was not connected to the bow shock. The electron intensity-time profiles and energy spectra show that the backstreaming electrons observed at Wind are not of magnetospheric origin. The observations rather suggest that the bimodal electron PADs are due to reflection or scattering at an obstacle located at a distance of less than ˜150RE in the antisunward direction, compatible with the bow shock or magnetosheath of the magnetosphere of the Earth. For a modeling of the observations, we have performed transport simulations which include the effects of pitch angle diffusion, adiabatic focusing, and reflection at a boundary close to the point of observation. The results of the simulations demonstrate that the bimodal PADs are compatible with the reflection of electrons at a nearby boundary, at distances of ˜70RE. This finding is supported by the orbital configuration and the magnetic field direction: Whereas ACE is not connected, Wind is well connected to the magnetosphere of the Earth.

  9. Dynamics of multiple flux tubes in sawtoothing KSTAR plasmas heated by electron cyclotron waves: I. Experimental analysis of the tube structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, G. H.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Bierwage, A.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; the KSTAR Team

    2015-01-01

    Multiple (two or more) flux tubes are commonly observed inside and/or near the q = 1 flux surface in KSTAR tokamak plasmas with localized electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (ECH/CD). Detailed 2D and quasi-3D images of the flux tubes obtained by an advanced imaging diagnostic system showed that the flux tubes are m/n = 1/1 field-aligned structures co-rotating around the magnetic axis. The flux tubes typically merge together and become like the internal kink mode of the usual sawtooth, which then collapses like a usual sawtooth crash. A systematic scan of ECH/CD beam position showed a strong correlation with the number of flux tubes. In the presence of multiple flux tubes close to the q = 1 surface, the radially outward heat transport was enhanced, which explains naturally temporal changes of electron temperature. We emphasize that the multiple flux tubes are a universal feature distinct from the internal kink instability and play a critical role in the control of sawteeth using ECH/CD.

  10. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  11. Magnetic flux density environment of several electron-bombardment ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilowicz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the external magnetic field of several electron-bombardment mercury ion thrusters were made using a single axis fluxgate magnetometer. The axial dipole moment accounted for most of the external field. In addition, residual fields from an electromagnet thruster were approximately 20 percent of the initial field. Simple degaussing of the axial magnets reduced the residual fields to 1 to 2 percent of the initial field.

  12. Effect of flux surface curvature on the linear coupling of electron cyclotron waves in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusainov, T. A.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Shalashov, A. G.

    2012-02-01

    Specific features of the linear interaction of ordinary and extraordinary electromagnetic waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range in a nonuniform plasma confined in a toroidal magnetic trap are considered. Reduced wave equations taking into account the curvature of the cut-off surfaces in toroidal geometry are formulated. Using these equations, the distributions of the wave fields in the coupling region are analyzed. A method for calculating quasi-optical beams passed through the region of linear wave interaction is proposed.

  13. Predicted CALET Measurements of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Abundances and Electron and Positron Fluxes Using the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian

    2012-03-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is an imaging calorimeter under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014 for a planned 5 year mission. CALET consists of a charge detection module (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (r.l.) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) with 27 r.l. of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of the experiment are to measure electron energy spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1,000 TeV. In this paper we discuss the capability of CALET to make additional measurements by exploiting the geomagnetic field it will be exposed to in the ISS 51.6^o inclination orbit. The rare nuclei heavier than nickel (Z=28) can be resolved using the CHD and top IMC layers without requiring particle energy determination in the TASC in field regions where the rigidity cutoffs are above minimum ionization in the scintillator. CALET can also measure the distinct fluxes of cosmic ray positrons and electrons using the earth shadow of the geomagnetic field.

  14. Conceptual Design of Vacuum Chamber for testing of high heat flux components using electron beam as a source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. S.; Swamy, Rajamannar; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Divertors Division, Prototype

    2012-11-01

    A conceptual design of vacuum chamber is proposed to study the thermal response of high heat flux components under energy depositions of the magnitude and durations expected in plasma fusion devices. It is equipped with high power electron beam with maximum beam power of 200 KW mounted in a stationary horizontal position from back side of the chamber. The electron beam is used as a heat source to evaluate the heat removal capacity, material performance under thermal loads & stresses, thermal fatigue etc on actively cooled mock - ups which are mounted on a flange system which is the front side door of the chamber. The tests mock - ups are connected to a high pressure high temperature water circulation system (HPHT-WCS) operated over a wide range of conditions. The vacuum chamber consists of different ports at different angles to view the mock -up surface available for mock -up diagnostics. The vacuum chamber is pumped with different pumps mounted on side ports of the chamber. The chamber is shielded from X - rays which are generated inside the chamber when high-energy electrons are incident on the mock-up. The design includes development of a conceptual design with theoretical calculations and CAD modelling of the system using CATIA V5. These CAD models give an outline on the complete geometry of HHF test chamber, fabrication challenges and safety issues. FEA analysis of the system has been performed to check the structural integrity when the system is subjected to structural & thermal loads.

  15. Onset of diffuse reflectivity and fast electron flux inhibition in 528-nm-laser{endash}solid interactions at ultrahigh intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, T.; Theobald, W.; Sauerbrey, R.; Uschmann, I.; Altenbernd, D.; Teubner, U.; Gibbon, P.; Foerster, E.; Malka, G.; Miquel, J.L.

    1997-10-01

    Using a high-power femtosecond frequency-doubled Nd:glass laser system with a contrast ratio of 10{sup 12}, the interaction between light and matter up to intensities of 10{sup 19} Wthinspcm{sup {minus}2}has been investigated. The absorption of the laser light in solid aluminum is almost independent of the polarization, peaks at about 25{degree}, and reaches values of almost 45{percent}. Assuming an exponential electron distribution, a temperature of 420 keV at 4{times}10{sup 18} Wthinspcm{sup {minus}2}was measured. These experiments and the detection of the hard-x-ray radiation (60 keV{endash}1 MeV) implied a conversion efficiency of 10{sup {minus}4}{endash}10{sup {minus}3} into suprathermal electrons. A second low-energy electron distribution either with trajectories mainly parallel to the target surface or with a reduced penetration depth due to flux inhibition was also inferred from K{alpha} line radiation measurements. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, K.T.

    2005-10-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be

  17. Finite Element Solution of the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Equation for Coupled Electron-Photon Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Liscum-Powell, Jennifer L.; Prinja, Anil B.; Morel, Jim E.; Lorence, Leonard J Jr.

    2002-11-15

    A novel approach is proposed for charged particle transport calculations using a recently developed second-order, self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) form of the Boltzmann transport equation with continuous slowing-down. A finite element discretization that is linear continuous in space and linear discontinuous (LD) in energy is described and implemented in a one-dimensional, planar geometry, multigroup, discrete ordinates code for charged particle transport. The cross-section generating code CEPXS is used to generate the electron and photon transport cross sections employed in this code. The discrete ordinates SAAF transport equation is solved using source iteration in conjunction with an inner iteration acceleration scheme and an outer iteration acceleration scheme. Outer iterations are required with the LD energy discretization scheme because the two angular flux unknowns within each group are coupled, which gives rise to effective upscattering. The inner iteration convergence is accelerated using diffusion synthetic acceleration, and the outer iteration convergence is accelerated using a diamond difference approximation to the LD energy discretization. Computational results are given that demonstrate the effectiveness of our convergence acceleration schemes and the accuracy of our discretized SAAF equation.

  18. Rerouting Cellular Electron Flux To Increase the Rate of Biological Methane Production.

    PubMed

    Catlett, Jennie L; Ortiz, Alicia M; Buan, Nicole R

    2015-10-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane, a gas that is both an efficient renewable fuel and a potent greenhouse gas. We observed that overexpression of the cytoplasmic heterodisulfide reductase enzyme HdrABC increased the rate of methane production from methanol by 30% without affecting the growth rate relative to the parent strain. Hdr enzymes are essential in all known methane-producing archaea. They function as the terminal oxidases in the methanogen electron transport system by reducing the coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine sulfonate) heterodisulfide, CoM-S-S-CoB, to regenerate the thiol-coenzymes for reuse. In Methanosarcina acetivorans, HdrABC expression caused an increased rate of methanogenesis and a decrease in metabolic efficiency on methylotrophic substrates. When acetate was the sole carbon and energy source, neither deletion nor overexpression of HdrABC had an effect on growth or methane production rates. These results suggest that in cells grown on methylated substrates, the cell compensates for energy losses due to expression of HdrABC with an increased rate of substrate turnover and that HdrABC lacks the appropriate electron donor in acetate-grown cells. PMID:26162885

  19. Rerouting Cellular Electron Flux To Increase the Rate of Biological Methane Production

    PubMed Central

    Catlett, Jennie L.; Ortiz, Alicia M.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane, a gas that is both an efficient renewable fuel and a potent greenhouse gas. We observed that overexpression of the cytoplasmic heterodisulfide reductase enzyme HdrABC increased the rate of methane production from methanol by 30% without affecting the growth rate relative to the parent strain. Hdr enzymes are essential in all known methane-producing archaea. They function as the terminal oxidases in the methanogen electron transport system by reducing the coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine sulfonate) heterodisulfide, CoM-S-S-CoB, to regenerate the thiol-coenzymes for reuse. In Methanosarcina acetivorans, HdrABC expression caused an increased rate of methanogenesis and a decrease in metabolic efficiency on methylotrophic substrates. When acetate was the sole carbon and energy source, neither deletion nor overexpression of HdrABC had an effect on growth or methane production rates. These results suggest that in cells grown on methylated substrates, the cell compensates for energy losses due to expression of HdrABC with an increased rate of substrate turnover and that HdrABC lacks the appropriate electron donor in acetate-grown cells. PMID:26162885

  20. Rerouting Cellular Electron Flux To Increase the Rate of Biological Methane Production.

    PubMed

    Catlett, Jennie L; Ortiz, Alicia M; Buan, Nicole R

    2015-10-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane, a gas that is both an efficient renewable fuel and a potent greenhouse gas. We observed that overexpression of the cytoplasmic heterodisulfide reductase enzyme HdrABC increased the rate of methane production from methanol by 30% without affecting the growth rate relative to the parent strain. Hdr enzymes are essential in all known methane-producing archaea. They function as the terminal oxidases in the methanogen electron transport system by reducing the coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine sulfonate) heterodisulfide, CoM-S-S-CoB, to regenerate the thiol-coenzymes for reuse. In Methanosarcina acetivorans, HdrABC expression caused an increased rate of methanogenesis and a decrease in metabolic efficiency on methylotrophic substrates. When acetate was the sole carbon and energy source, neither deletion nor overexpression of HdrABC had an effect on growth or methane production rates. These results suggest that in cells grown on methylated substrates, the cell compensates for energy losses due to expression of HdrABC with an increased rate of substrate turnover and that HdrABC lacks the appropriate electron donor in acetate-grown cells.

  1. Fermi-LAT observations of the Sagittarius B complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui-zhi; Jones, David I.; Aharonian, Felix

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We use 5 years of Fermi-LAT data towards the Galactic-centre giant molecular cloud complex, Sagittarius B, to test questions of how well-mixed the Galactic component of cosmic rays are and what the level of the cosmic-ray sea in different parts of the Galaxy is. Methods: We use dust-opacity maps from the Planck satellite to obtain independent methods for background subtraction and an estimate for the mass of the region. We then present high-quality spectra of γ-ray emission from 0.3 to 30 GeV and obtain an estimate of the cosmic-ray spectrum from the region. Results: We obtain an estimate of the mass of the region of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 107M⊙ using the Planck data, which agrees well with molecular-line-derived estimates for the same region. We find that the γ-ray flux from this region is fitted well with a cosmic-ray spectrum that is the same as is observed locally, with evidence of a small over-density at intermediate (1-10 GeV) energies. Conclusions: We conclude that the γ-ray and cosmic-ray spectrum in the region can be well-fitted using a local cosmic-ray spectrum.

  2. Fermi-LAT Observation of Supernova Remnant S147

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, J.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Tajima, H.; Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Lande, J.; Ballet, J.; Hanabata, Y.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Takahashi, T.; /JAXA, Sagamihara

    2012-08-17

    We present an analysis of gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region around SNR S147 (G180.0-1.7). A spatially extended gamma-ray source detected in an energy range of 0.2-10 GeV is found to coincide with SNR S147. We confirm its spatial extension at >5{sigma} confidence level. The gamma-ray flux is (3.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, corresponding to a luminosity of 1.3 x 10{sup 34} (d/1.3 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1} in this energy range. The gamma-ray emission exhibits a possible spatial correlation with prominent H{alpha} filaments of S147. There is no indication that the gamma-ray emission comes from the associated pulsar PSR J0538+2817. The gamma-ray spectrum integrated over the remnant is likely dominated by the decay of neutral {pi} mesons produced through the proton-proton collisions in the filaments. Reacceleration of pre-existing CRs and subsequent adiabatic compression in the filaments is sufficient to provide the required energy density of high-energy protons.

  3. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV flare from blazar TXS 0646-176

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar TXS 0646-176 , also known as MRC 0646-176 and 3FGL J0648.8-1740, with radio counterpart position R.A.: 102.11874 deg, -17.73484 deg, (J2000.0, Petrov et al. 2006, AJ, 131, 1872 ) and with redshift z=1.232 (Hewitt & Burbidge 1993, ApJS, 87, 451).

  4. Fermi LAT detection of increasing gamma-ray activity of blazar OJ 287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escande, L.; Schinzel, F. K.

    2011-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the optically bright BL Lac object OJ 287 (RA: 08h 54m 48.874s , Dec: +20d 06m 30.64s, J2000.0, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at z=0.306 (Falomo, Scarpa, & Bersanelli 1994, ApJS, 93, 125; Sitko & Junkkarinen 1985, PASP, 97, 1158).

  5. Fermi-LAT Detection of a Gamma-ray Flare from Cygnus X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Loh, Alan

    2016-09-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed a gamma-ray flare from the high-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-3. Preliminary analysis indicates that on 2016 September 15 and 16, the gamma-ray source was observed with respective daily averaged fluxes (E > 100MeV) of (2.2+/-0.4) x 10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1 and (2.8+/-0.4) x 10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1 (errors are statistical only).

  6. Fermi LAT Detection of a Gamma-ray Flare from the BL Lac Object ON 246

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Josefa

    2015-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the BL Lac object ON 246 (RA=187.55871 deg, Dec=25.30198 deg, J2000, Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13; with redshift z=0.135, Nass et al. 1996, A&A, 309, 419), also known as S3 1227+25 and 3FGL J1230.3+2519 (3FGL; Acero et al. 2015, arXiv:1501.02003).

  7. Fermi LAT detection of renewed activity from the blazar PKS 1502+106

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1502+106 (also known as OR 103, S3 1502+10 and 3FGL J1504.4+1029, Acero et al., arXiv:1501.02003), with radio coordinates, (J2000.0), R.A.: 226.10408 deg, Dec: 10.49422 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880). This blazar has a redshift of z=1.8383 (Hewett & Wild 2010, MNRAS, 405, 2302).

  8. Fermi LAT Detection of a Rapid, Powerful Gamma-ray Flare of the FSRQ CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Ojha, Roopesh

    2015-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 3FGL J2232.5+1143, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23) with radio coordinates R.A.: 338.1517038 deg, Dec: 11.7308067 deg (J2000, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at redshift z=1.037 (Schmidt 1965, ApJ, 141, 1295).

  9. Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from PKS 1124-186

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allafort, A.

    2011-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1124-186, also known as CGRaBS J1127-1857 and 1FGL J1126.8-1854 (RA=11h27m04.3924s, DEC=-18d57m17.440s, J2000; Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880). The source is located at redshift z=1.048 (Drinkwater et al.

  10. Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from PKS 0235-618

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutini, Sara

    2010-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from 1FGL J0238.3-6132 (Abdo, A. et al 2010, ApJ, 715, 429) a source positionally consistent with the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar PKS 0235-618 (RA: 02h36m53.2457s DEC: -61d36m15.183, J2000, Fey, A. et al. 2004, AJ, 127, 1791) with a redshift of z=0.465 (Healey, S.

  11. Fermi LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the BL Lac object AP Librae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the BL Lac object AP Lib (also known as PKS 1514-24 and 3FGL J1517.6-2422), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 229.424221 deg, Dec.: -24.372076 deg, (J2000.0, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  12. Fermi LAT detection of increasing gamma-ray activity from NGC 1275 and B3 0908+416B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivato, G.; Buson, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from sources positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar B3 0908+416B (also known as 3FGL J0912.2+4126, Acero et al. 2015 ApJS, 218, 23) and the radio galaxy NGC 1275 (also known as Perseus A and 3FGL J0319.8+4130).

  13. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Y; Manabe, T; Kajita, S; Ohno, N; Takagi, M; Tsuchiya, H; Morisaki, T

    2014-09-01

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ~4 × 10(19) m(-2) s(-1) when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  14. Analysis of the Variation of Energetic Electron Flux with Respect to Longitude and Distance Normal to the Magnetic Equatorial Plane for Galileo Energetic Particle Detector Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swimm, Randall; Garrett, Henry B.; Jun, Insoo; Evans, Robin W.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we examine ten-minute omni-directional averages of energetic electron data measured by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD). Count rates from electron channels B1, DC2, and DC3 are evaluated using a power law model to yield estimates of the differential electron fluxes from 1 MeV to 11 MeV at distances between 8 and 51 Jupiter radii. Whereas the orbit of the Galileo spacecraft remained close to the rotational equatorial plane of Jupiter, the approximately 11 degree tilt of the magnetic axis of Jupiter relative to its rotational axis allowed the EPD instrument to sample high energy electrons at limited distances normal to the magnetic equatorial plane. We present a Fourier analysis of the semi-diurnal variation of electron fluxes with longitude.

  15. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Y. Manabe, T.; Ohno, N.; Takagi, M.; Kajita, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Morisaki, T.

    2014-09-15

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ∼4 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} s{sup −1} when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  16. Interinstrument calibration using magnetic field data from the flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) and electron drift instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Teubenbacher, R.; Giner, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Steller, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Chutter, M.; Fornaçon, K.-H.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Carr, C.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the magnetic field data obtained from the flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) and the magnetic field data deduced from the gyration time of electrons measured by the electron drift instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster to determine the spin-axis offset of the FGM measurements. Data are used from orbits with their apogees in the magnetotail, when the magnetic field magnitude was between about 20 and 500 nT. Offset determination with the EDI-FGM comparison method is of particular interest for these orbits, because no data from solar wind are available in such orbits to apply the usual calibration methods using the Alfvén waves. In this paper, we examine the effects of the different measurement conditions, such as direction of the magnetic field relative to the spin plane and field magnitude in determining the FGM spin-axis offset, and also take into account the time-of-flight offset of the EDI measurements. It is shown that the method works best when the magnetic field magnitude is less than about 128 nT and when the magnetic field is aligned near the spin-axis direction. A remaining spin-axis offset of about 0.4 ∼ 0.6 nT was observed for Cluster 1 between July and October 2003. Using multipoint multi-instrument measurements by Cluster we further demonstrate the importance of the accurate determination of the spin-axis offset when estimating the magnetic field gradient.

  17. Storm-time fingerprints of Pc 4-5 waves on energetic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Marina; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Zesta, Eftyhia; Balasis, George; Mann, Ian R.; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2014-05-01

    Geospace magnetic storms, associated with either coronal mass ejections (CMEs) or high speed solar streams, involve global variations of the geomagnetic field as well as acceleration of charged particles in the magnetosphere. Ultra low frequency (ULF) waves with frequencies in the range of a few mHz (Pc 4-5 waves) can be generated externally by compressive variations in the solar wind or shear flow along the magnetopause unstable to the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect. Furthermore, low frequency instabilities of ring current ions are also considered as a possible internal driver of ULF wave growth. We examine power enhancements of ULF waves during four successive magnetic storms, which occurred in July 2004 and were characterized by a decreasing minimum of the Dst index, from -76 nT down to -197 nT. During the course of the magnetic storms, ULF wave power variations have been observed nearly simultaneously at different magnetic latitudes and longitudes by the ground-based CARISMA, IMAGE, 210 MM and SAMBA magnetometer networks. Nonetheless, stronger magnetic storms were accompanied by greater ULF wave power enhancements tending to be more pronounced at magnetic stations located at lower L shells. Furthermore, the generation and penetration of ULF wave power deep into the inner magnetosphere seems to be contributing to the energization and transport of relativistic electrons. Except for the magnetic storm on 25 July 2000, the three magnetic storms on 17, 23 and 27 July 2004 were characterized by a significant increase in the flux of electrons with energies higher than 1 MeV, as measured by GOES-10 and -12 during the recovery phase of each storm. On the other hand, when looking at the magnetic storm on 17 August 2001, the initial decrease was followed by an increase six days after the commencement of the storm. The electron flux decrease was more than two orders of magnitude and remained low after the recovery of the Dst index. These observations provided us the basis for

  18. GRB2 Nucleates T Cell Receptor-Mediated LAT Clusters That Control PLC-γ1 Activation and Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mahmood Yousif; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein required for signaling downstream of multiple receptors. To address the role of GRB2 in receptor-mediated signaling, the expression of GRB2 was suppressed in human CD4+ T cells and its role downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) was examined. Interestingly, GRB2 deficient T cells had enhanced signaling from complexes containing the TCR. However, GRB2 deficient T cells had substantially reduced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. This defect was attributed to diminished formation of linker for activation of T cells (LAT) signaling clusters, which resulted in reduced MAP kinase activation, calcium flux, and PLC-γ1 recruitment to LAT signaling clusters. Add back of wild-type GRB2, but not a novel N-terminal SH3 domain mutant, rescued LAT microcluster formation, calcium mobilization, and cytokine release, providing the first direct evidence that GRB2, and its ability to bind to SH3 domain ligands, is required for establishing LAT microclusters. Our data demonstrate that the ability of GRB2 to facilitate protein clusters is equally important in regulating TCR-mediated functions as its capacity to recruit effector proteins. This highlights that GRB2 regulates signaling downstream of adaptors and receptors by both recruiting effector proteins and regulating the formation of signaling complexes.

  19. Analysis of the effectiveness of ground-based VLF wave observations for predicting or nowcasting relativistic electron flux at geostationary orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Laura E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Smith, A. J.; Clilverd, Mark; Pilipenko, Viacheslav; Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    2015-03-01

    Poststorm relativistic electron flux enhancement at geosynchronous orbit has shown correlation with very low frequency (VLF) waves measured by satellite in situ. However, our previous study found little correlation between electron flux and VLF measured by a ground-based instrument at Halley, Antarctica. Here we explore several possible explanations for this low correlation. Using 220 storms (1992-2002), our previous work developed a predictive model of the poststorm flux at geosynchronous orbit based on explanatory variables measured a day or two before the flux increase. In a nowcast model, we use averages of variables from the time period when flux is rising during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms and limit the VLF (1.0 kHz) measure to the dawn period at Halley (09:00-12:00 UT). This improves the simple correlation of VLF wave intensity with flux, although the VLF effect in an overall multiple regression is still much less than that of other factors. When analyses are performed separately for season and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz orientation, VLF outweighs the influence of other factors only during winter months when IMF Bz is in an average northward orientation.

  20. A STACKED ANALYSIS OF 115 PULSARS OBSERVED BY THE FERMI LAT

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, A.

    2015-05-10

    Due to the low gamma-ray fluxes from pulsars above 50 GeV and the small collecting area of space-based telescopes, the gamma-ray emission discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in ∼150 pulsars is largely unexplored at these energies. In this regime, the uncertainties on the spectral data points and/or the constraints from upper limits are not sufficient to provide robust tests of competing emission models in individual pulsars. The discovery of power-law-type emission from the Crab pulsar at energies exceeding 100 GeV provides a compelling justification for exploration of other pulsars at these energies. We applied the method of aperture photometry to measure pulsar emission spectra from Fermi-LAT data and present a stacked analysis of 115 pulsars selected from the Second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars. This analysis, which uses an average of ∼4.2 yr of data per pulsar, aggregates low-level emission which cannot be resolved in individual objects but can be detected in an ensemble. We find no significant stacked excess at energies above 50 GeV. An upper limit of 30% of the Crab pulsar level is found for the average flux from 115 pulsars in the 100–177 GeV energy range at the 95% confidence level. Stacked searches exclusive to the young pulsar sample, the millisecond pulsar sample, and several other promising sub-samples also return no significant excesses above 50 GeV.

  1. Search for extended γ-ray emission around AGN with H.E.S.S. and Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Atäı, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemie`re, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; Malyshev, D.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission from blazars inevitably gives rise to electron-positron pair production through the interaction of these γ-rays with the extragalactic background light (EBL). Depending on the magnetic fields in the proximity of the source, the cascade initiated from pair production can result in either an isotropic halo around an initially beamed source or a magnetically broadened cascade flux. Aims: Both extended pair-halo (PH) and magnetically broadened cascade (MBC) emission from regions surrounding the blazars 1ES 1101-232, 1ES 0229+200, and PKS 2155-304 were searched for using VHE γ-ray data taken with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) and high-energy (HE; 100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) γ-ray data with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Methods: By comparing the angular distributions of the reconstructed γ-ray events to the angular profiles calculated from detailed theoretical models, the presence of PH and MBC was investigated. Results: Upper limits on the extended emission around 1ES 1101-232, 1ES 0229+200, and PKS 2155-304 are found to be at a level of a few per cent of the Crab nebula flux above 1 TeV, depending on the assumed photon index of the cascade emission. Assuming strong extra-Galactic magnetic field (EGMF) values, >10-12 G, this limits the production of pair haloes developing from electromagnetic cascades. For weaker magnetic fields, in which electromagnetic cascades would result in MBCs, EGMF strengths in the range (0.3-3)× 10-15 G were excluded for PKS 2155-304 at the 99% confidence level, under the assumption of a 1 Mpc coherence length.

  2. Fermi/LAT Observations of Swift/BAT Seyfert Galaxies: On the Contribution of Radio-Quiet Active Galactic Nuclei to the Extragalactic gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Davis, David S.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the analysis of 2.1 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data on 491 Seyfert galaxies detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey. Only the two nearest objects, NGC 1068 and NGC 4945, which were identified in the Fermi first year catalog, are detected. Using Swift/BAT and radio 20 cm fluxes, we define a new radio-loudness parameter R(sub X,BAT) where radio-loud objects have logR(sub X,BAT) > -4.7. Based on this parameter, only radio-loud sources are detected by Fermi/LAT. An upper limit to the flux of the undetected sources is derived to be approx.2x10(exp -11) photons/sq cm/s, approximately seven times lower than the observed flux of NGC 1068. Assuming a median redshift of 0.031, this implies an upper limit to the gamma-ray (1-100 GeV) luminosity of < approx.3x10(exp 41) erg/s. In addition, we identified 120 new Fermi/LAT sources near the Swift/BAT Seyfert galaxies with significant Fermi/LAT detections. A majority of these objects do not have Swift/BAT counterparts, but their possible optical counterparts include blazars, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and quasars.

  3. FERMI/LAT OBSERVATIONS OF SWIFT/BAT SEYFERT GALAXIES: ON THE CONTRIBUTION OF RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI TO THE EXTRAGALACTIC {gamma}-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Stacy H.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Davis, David S.

    2011-12-01

    We present the analysis of 2.1 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data on 491 Seyfert galaxies detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey. Only the two nearest objects, NGC 1068 and NGC 4945, which were identified in the Fermi first year catalog, are detected. Using Swift/BAT and radio 20 cm fluxes, we define a new radio-loudness parameter R{sub X,BAT} where radio-loud objects have log R{sub X,BAT} > -4.7. Based on this parameter, only radio-loud sources are detected by Fermi/LAT. An upper limit to the flux of the undetected sources is derived to be {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, approximately seven times lower than the observed flux of NGC 1068. Assuming a median redshift of 0.031, this implies an upper limit to the {gamma}-ray (1-100 GeV) luminosity of {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}. In addition, we identified 120 new Fermi/LAT sources near the Swift/BAT Seyfert galaxies with significant Fermi/LAT detections. A majority of these objects do not have Swift/BAT counterparts, but their possible optical counterparts include blazars, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and quasars.

  4. Laser-assisted tympanostomy (LAT) in adult individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopakis, E. P.; Lachanas, V. A.; Helidonis, Emmanuel S.; Velegrakis, G.

    2004-06-01

    Objectives: To assess outcome, in adult individuals undergone Laser Assisted Tympanostomy (LAT) without ventilation tube placement. Method: LAT was performed on a total of 95 ears (72 individuals). Indications included serous otitis media with effusion (44 ears/31 patients), eustachian tube dysfunction (32 ears/24 patients), acute otitis media (13 ears/11 patients), and endoscopic visualization of the middle ear (6 ears/6 patients). Results: Middle ear disease was resolved after the closure of tympanostomy in 48% of patients with serous otitis media with effusion. In 78% of patients with Eustachian tube dysfunction symptoms were diminished. All patients with acute otitis media had a satisfactory outcome. LAT was found quite effective in patients undergoing middle ear endoscopy. Conclusion: LAT without ventilation tubes provides a safe alternative surgical option in adult patients in certain cases. The selection criteria for this procedure are addressed in detail.

  5. Fast Ignition relevant study of the flux of high intensity laser generated electrons via a hollow cone into a laser-imploded plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M; Adam, J; Akli, K; Borgheshi, M; Chen, M; Evans, R; Freeman, R; Hatchett, S; Hill, J; Heron, A; King, J; Lancaster, K; Mackinnon, A; Norreys, P; Phillips, T; Romagnani, L; Snavely, R; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C

    2005-10-11

    An integrated experiment relevant to fast ignition is described. A Cu doped CD spherical shell target is imploded around an inserted hollow Au cone by a six beam 600J, 1ns laser to a peak density of 4gcm{sup -3} and a diameter of 100 {micro}m. A 10 ps, 20TW laser pulse is focused into the cone at the time of peak compression. The flux of high-energy electrons through the imploded material is determined from the yield of Cu K{alpha} fluorescence by comparison with a Monte Carlo model and is estimated to carry 15% of the laser energy. Collisional and Ohmic heating are modeled. An electron spectrometer shows significantly greater reduction of the transmitted electron flux than is due to binary collisions and Ohmic potential. Enhanced scattering by instability-induced magnetic fields is suggested.

  6. Fermi-LAT Detection of Gravitational Lens Delayed Gamma-Ray Flares from Blazar B0218+357

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Larsson, S.; Scargle, J. D.; Amin, M. A.; Blandford, R. D.; Bulmash, D.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Corbet, R. D. H.; Falco, E. E.; Marshall, P. J.; Wood, D. L.; Ajello, M.; Bastieri, D.; Chekhtman, A.; D'Ammando, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grove, J. E.; Lott, B.; Ohja, R.; Orienti, M.; Perkins, J. S.; Razzano, M.; Smith, A. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Wood, K. S.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), we report the first clear gamma-ray measurement of a delay between flares from the gravitationally lensed images of a blazar. The delay was detected in B0218+357, a known double-image lensed system, during a period of enhanced gamma-ray activity with peak fluxes consistently observed to reach greater than 20-50 times its previous average flux. An auto-correlation function analysis identified a delay in the gamma-ray data of 11.46 plus or minus 0.16 days (1 sigma) that is approximately 1 day greater than previous radio measurements. Considering that it is beyond the capabilities of the LAT to spatially resolve the two images, we nevertheless decomposed individual sequences of superposing gamma-ray flares/delayed emissions. In three such approximately 8-10 day-long sequences within an approximately 4-month span, considering confusion due to overlapping flaring emission and flux measurement uncertainties, we found flux ratios consistent with approximately 1, thus systematically smaller than those from radio observations. During the first, best-defined flare, the delayed emission was detailed with a Fermi pointing, and we observed flux doubling timescales of approximately 3-6 hours implying as well extremely compact gamma-ray emitting regions.

  7. GAMMA-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY FROM THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED BLAZAR PKS 1830–211 OBSERVED BY Fermi LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Amin, M. A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bulmash, D. E-mail: stefano.ciprini@asdc.asi.it E-mail: dammando@ira.inaf.it E-mail: sara.buson@pd.infn.it E-mail: dammando@ira.inaf.it; and others

    2015-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830–211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ∼3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 10{sup 50} erg s{sup –1}, makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830–211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  8. Effect of C-Terminal Protein Tags on Pentitol and l-Arabinose Transport by Ambrosiozyma monospora Lat1 and Lat2 Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Peter; Valkonen, Mari; Viljanen, Kaarina

    2014-01-01

    Functional expression in heterologous hosts is often less successful for integral membrane proteins than for soluble proteins. Here, two Ambrosiozyma monospora transporters were successfully expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as tagged proteins. Growth of A. monospora on l-arabinose instead of glucose caused transport activities of l-arabinose, l-arabitol, and ribitol, measured using l-[1-3H]arabinose, l-[14C]arabitol, and [14C]ribitol of demonstrated purity. A. monospora LAT1 and LAT2 genes were cloned earlier by using their ability to improve the growth of genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae on l-arabinose. However, the l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of S. cerevisiae carrying LAT1 or LAT2 are only slightly greater than those of control strains. S. cerevisiae carrying the LAT1 or LAT2 gene fused in frame to the genes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (mCherry) or adenylate kinase (AK) exhibited large (>3-fold for LAT1; >20-fold for LAT2) increases in transport activities. Lat1-mCherry transported l-arabinose with high affinity (Km ≈ 0.03 mM) and l-arabitol and ribitol with very low affinity (Km ≥ 75 mM). The Lat2-GFP, Lat2-mCherry, and Lat2-AK fusion proteins could not transport l-arabinose but were high-affinity pentitol transporters (Kms ≈ 0.2 mM). The l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of A. monospora could not be completely explained by any combination of the observed properties of tagged Lat1 and Lat2, suggesting either that tagging and expression in a foreign membrane alters the transport kinetics of Lat1 and/or Lat2 or that A. monospora contains at least one more l-arabinose transporter. PMID:24561586

  9. Effect of C-terminal protein tags on pentitol and L-arabinose transport by Ambrosiozyma monospora Lat1 and Lat2 transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Londesborough, John; Richard, Peter; Valkonen, Mari; Viljanen, Kaarina

    2014-05-01

    Functional expression in heterologous hosts is often less successful for integral membrane proteins than for soluble proteins. Here, two Ambrosiozyma monospora transporters were successfully expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as tagged proteins. Growth of A. monospora on l-arabinose instead of glucose caused transport activities of l-arabinose, l-arabitol, and ribitol, measured using l-[1-(3)H]arabinose, l-[(14)C]arabitol, and [(14)C]ribitol of demonstrated purity. A. monospora LAT1 and LAT2 genes were cloned earlier by using their ability to improve the growth of genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae on l-arabinose. However, the l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of S. cerevisiae carrying LAT1 or LAT2 are only slightly greater than those of control strains. S. cerevisiae carrying the LAT1 or LAT2 gene fused in frame to the genes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (mCherry) or adenylate kinase (AK) exhibited large (>3-fold for LAT1; >20-fold for LAT2) increases in transport activities. Lat1-mCherry transported l-arabinose with high affinity (Km ≈ 0.03 mM) and l-arabitol and ribitol with very low affinity (Km ≥ 75 mM). The Lat2-GFP, Lat2-mCherry, and Lat2-AK fusion proteins could not transport l-arabinose but were high-affinity pentitol transporters (Kms ≈ 0.2 mM). The l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of A. monospora could not be completely explained by any combination of the observed properties of tagged Lat1 and Lat2, suggesting either that tagging and expression in a foreign membrane alters the transport kinetics of Lat1 and/or Lat2 or that A. monospora contains at least one more l-arabinose transporter.

  10. Comparative dynamics of relativistic electron fluxes during two geomagnetic storms on 17-18 March and on 22-23 June 22-23 in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, Natalia; Kalegaev, Vladimir; Beresneva, Evgeniya; Stanislav, Ganitskiy

    2016-07-01

    The role of solar wind in the outer Earth`s radiation belt dynamics is under consideration during the last decades. Unfortunately, the physical mechanisms that control the loss and acceleration of the magnetospheric relativistic electron fluxes are not evident until now. In this study we compared and contrasted some features of relativistic electron flux dynamics during two largest geomagnetic storms in 2015 (17-18 March and 22-23 June) having the similar Dst-variations profiles and amplitudes (~200 nT). Analysis of experimental data from Van Allen Probes (RBSP), GOES, Electro, POES, Meteor satellites was combined with theoretical investigations on the base of the A2000 model of the magnetospheric magnetic field. Multipoint observations at GEO and LEO show the dramatic changes in the MeV electron populations during the main phase of the magnetic storms. We found the solar wind and IMF variations responsible for large-scale magnetospheric current system changes that reveal themselves in the relativistic electron flux dynamics.

  11. Comparative analysis of NOAA REFM and SNB3GEO tools for the forecast of the fluxes of high-energy electrons at GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balikhin, M. A.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Boynton, R. J.; Walker, S. N.; Aryan, H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Billings, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable forecasts of relativistic electrons at geostationary orbit (GEO) are important for the mitigation of their hazardous effects on spacecraft at GEO. For a number of years the Space Weather Prediction Center at NOAA has provided advanced online forecasts of the fluence of electrons with energy >2 MeV at GEO using the Relativistic Electron Forecast Model (REFM). The REFM forecasts are based on real-time solar wind speed observations at L1. The high reliability of this forecasting tool serves as a benchmark for the assessment of other forecasting tools. Since 2012 the Sheffield SNB3GEO model has been operating online, providing a 24 h ahead forecast of the same fluxes. In addition to solar wind speed, the SNB3GEO forecasts use solar wind density and interplanetary magnetic field Bz observations at L1.The period of joint operation of both of these forecasts has been used to compare their accuracy. Daily averaged measurements of electron fluxes by GOES 13 have been used to estimate the prediction efficiency of both forecasting tools. To assess the reliability of both models to forecast infrequent events of very high fluxes, the Heidke skill score was employed. The results obtained indicate that SNB3GEO provides a more accurate 1 day ahead forecast when compared to REFM. It is shown that the correction methodology utilized by REFM potentially can improve the SNB3GEO forecast.

  12. Relationship between energy flux Q and mean energy of auroral electron spectra based on radar data from the 1987 CEDAR Campaign at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, D.J.; Hecht, J.H.; Christensen, A.B.; Kelly, J.

    1994-10-01

    The incoherent scatter radar at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, measured electron density profiles from 90 to 500 km during four auroral events over a 3-hour period on February 28, 1987. The profiles were obtained with the radar pointed along the magnetic field near zenith at 15-s intervals. Under the assumption that proton/H atom precipitation was unimportant during these events a representation of the incident electron flux was obtained by fitting calculated profiles with measured profiles in the vicinity of their peaks (lower E region). Maxwellian and Gaussian electron distributions with high- and low-energy tails were used to generate the calculated profiles. The distributions were specified in terms of average energy and energy flux Q. The authors find that they can clearly distinguish between profiles that result from a Maxwellian incident electron spectrum and those that result from a Gaussian spectrum. Interpreting Gaussian and Maxwellian spectra as representative of discrete and diffuse aurora, respectively, the measurements indicated good correlation between and Q for discrete aurora, while essentially no correlation was observed for diffuse aurora. This is consistent with current understanding that discrete auroras are produced by electrons accelerated by magnetic field-aligned potential drops whereas diffuse auroras are produced by pitch angle diffusion of plasma sheet electrons into the loss cone. 27 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Fermi-LAT and Suzaku Observations of the Radio Galaxy Centaurus B

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, Junichiro; Tanaka, Y.T.; Stawarz, L.; O'Sullivan, S.P.; Cheung, C.C.; Kataoka, J.; Funk, S.; Yuasa, T.; Odaka, H.; Takahashi, T.; Svoboda, J.; /European Space Agency

    2012-08-17

    CentaurusB is a nearby radio galaxy positioned in the Southern hemisphere close to the Galactic plane. Here we present a detailed analysis of about 43 months accumulation of Fermi-LAT data and of newly acquired Suzaku X-ray data for Centaurus B. The source is detected at GeV photon energies, although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that it is an artifact due to incorrect modeling of the bright Galactic diffuse emission in the region. The LAT image provides a weak hint of a spatial extension of the {gamma} rays along the radio lobes, which is consistent with the lack of source variability in the GeV range. We note that the extension cannot be established statistically due to the low number of the photons. Surprisingly, we do not detect any diffuse emission of the lobes at X-ray frequencies, with the provided upper limit only marginally consistent with the previously claimed ASCA flux. The broad-band modeling shows that the observed {gamma}-ray flux of the source may be produced within the lobes, if the diffuse non-thermal X-ray emission component is not significantly below the derived Suzaku upper limit. This association would imply that efficient in-situ acceleration of the ultrarelativistic particles is occurring and that the lobes are dominated by the pressure from the relativistic particles. However, if the diffuse X-ray emission is much below the Suzaku upper limits, the observed {gamma}-ray flux is not likely to be produced within the lobes, but instead within the unresolved core of Centaurus B. In this case, the extended lobes could be dominated by the pressure of the magnetic field.

  14. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2.

    PubMed

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB(0,+) became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20-25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB(0,+), respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB(0,+), as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose.

  15. The First FERMI-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L.; Thompson, D. J.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy great than (20 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above approximately 20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  16. THE FIRST FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bouvier, A. E-mail: giacomov@slac.stanford.edu; and others

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (∼> 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ∼20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  17. Fermi-LAT Observations of the LIGO Event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Arimoto, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giomi, M.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Granot, J.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T. M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zhu, S.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has an instantaneous field of view (FoV) covering ∼ 1/5 of the sky and it completes a survey of the entire sky in high-energy gamma-rays every 3 hr. It enables searches for transient phenomena over timescales from milliseconds to years. Among these phenomena could be electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave (GW) sources. In this paper, we present a detailed study of the LAT observations relevant to Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) event GW150914, which is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and has been interpreted as being due to the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The localization region for GW150914 was outside the LAT FoV at the time of the GW signal. However, as part of routine survey observations, the LAT observed the entire LIGO localization region within ∼70 minutes of the trigger and thus enabled a comprehensive search for a γ-ray counterpart to GW150914. The study of the LAT data presented here did not find any potential counterparts to GW150914, but it did provide limits on the presence of a transient counterpart above 100 MeV on timescales of hours to days over the entire GW150914 localization region.

  18. The First Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Dingus, B. L.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gruber, D.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kawano, T.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tierney, D.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Xiong, S.; Yang, Z.

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ~20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  19. Advances on Sensitive Electron-injection based Cameras for Low-Flux, Short-Wave-Infrared Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathipour, Vala; Bonakdar, Alireza; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-08-01

    Short-wave infrared (SWIR) photon detection has become an essential technology in the modern world. Sensitive SWIR detector arrays with high pixel density, low noise levels and high signal-to-noise-ratios are highly desirable for a variety of applications including biophotonics, light detection and ranging, optical tomography, and astronomical imaging. As such many efforts in infrared detector research are directed towards improving the performance of the photon detectors operating in this wavelength range. We review the history, principle of operation, present status and possible future developments of a sensitive SWIR detector technology, which has demonstrated to be one of the most promising paths to high pixel density focal plane arrays for low flux applications. The so-called electron-injection (EI) detector was demonstrated for the first time (in 2007). It offers an overall system-level sensitivity enhancement compared to the p-i-n diode due to a stable internal avalanche-free gain. The amplification method is inherently low noise, and devices exhibit an excess noise of unity. The detector operates in linear-mode and requires only bias voltage of a few volts. The stable detector characteristics, makes formation of high yield large-format, and high pixel density focal plane arrays less challenging compared to other detector technologies such as avalanche photodetectors. Detector is based on the mature InP material system (InP/InAlAs/GaAsSb/InGaAs), and has a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. It takes advantage of a unique three-dimensional geometry and combines the efficiency of a large absorbing volume with the sensitivity of a low-dimensional switch (injector) to sense and amplify signals. Current devices provide high-speed response ~ 5 ns rise time, and low jitter ~ 12 ps at room temperature. The internal dark current density is ~ 1 μA/cm2 at room temperature decreasing to 0.1 nA/cm2 at 160 K. EI detectors have been designed, fabricated, and tested during two

  20. Lats1 suppresses centrosome overduplication by modulating the stability of Cdc25B

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Satomi; Yabuta, Norikazu; Yoshida, Kaori; Okamoto, Ayumi; Miura, Daisaku; Furuta, Yasuhide; Abe, Takaya; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Numerical aberration of the centrosome results in chromosome missegregation, eventually leading to chromosomal instability, a hallmark of human tumor malignancy. Large tumor suppressors 1 and 2 (Lats1 and Lats2) are central kinases in the Hippo pathway and regulate development and tumorigenesis by coordinating the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Importantly, Lats1 and Lats2 also play pivotal roles in cell cycle checkpoint and mitosis. The Lats proteins localize at centrosomes, but their centrosomal functions remain elusive. Here, we generated Lats1-null knockout (Lats1−/−) mice and established Lats1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In Lats1−/− MEFs, centrosomes were markedly overduplicated, leading to severe mitotic defects such as chromosome missegregation and cytokinesis failure. We also found that Lats1 physically interacts with Cdc25B phosphatase that localizes both at the centrosome and in the nucleus and regulates the linkage between the centrosome cycle and mitotic progression. Although Lats1 did not phosphorylate Cdc25B, loss of Lats1 in MEFs caused abnormal accumulation of Cdc25B protein and hyperactivation of Cdk2 toward nucleophosmin (NPM/B23), one of the licensing factors involved in centriole duplication. Taken together, these data suggest that Lats1 regulates Cdc25B protein level and subsequent Cdk2 activity, thereby suppressing centrosome overduplication during interphase. PMID:26530630

  1. Search for gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies with Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Bravo, César; Araya, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have found a positive correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies and their gamma-ray luminosity. Galaxies with a high SFR are expected to produce a large amount of high-energy cosmic rays, which emit gamma-rays when interacting with the interstellar medium and radiation fields. We search for gamma-ray emission from a sample of galaxies within and beyond the Local Group with data from the LAT instrument onboard the Fermi satellite. We exclude recently detected galaxies (NGC 253, M82, NGC 4945, NGC 1068, NGC 2146, Arp 220) and use seven years of cumulative `Pass 8' data from the LAT in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. No new detections are seen in the data and upper limits for the gamma-ray fluxes are calculated. The correlation between gamma-ray luminosity and infrared luminosity for galaxies obtained using our new upper limits is in agreement with a previously published correlation, but the new upper limits imply that some galaxies are not as efficient gamma-ray emitters as previously thought.

  2. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission toward the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Harding, A. K.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Karwin, C.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Malyshev, D.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-03-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has provided the most detailed view to date of the emission toward the Galactic center (GC) in high-energy γ-rays. This paper describes the analysis of data taken during the first 62 months of the mission in the energy range 1–100 GeV from a 15° × 15° region about the direction of the GC. Specialized interstellar emission models (IEMs) are constructed to enable the separation of the γ-ray emissions produced by cosmic ray particles interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation fields in the Milky Way into that from the inner ∼1 kpc surrounding the GC, and that from the rest of the Galaxy. A catalog of point sources for the 15° × 15° region is self-consistently constructed using these IEMs: the First Fermi-LAT Inner Galaxy Point Source Catalog (1FIG). The spatial locations, fluxes, and spectral properties of the 1FIG sources are presented, and compared with γ-ray point sources over the same region taken from existing catalogs. After subtracting the interstellar emission and point-source contributions a residual is found. If templates that peak toward the GC are used to model the positive residual the agreement with the data improves, but none of the additional templates tried account for all of its spatial structure. The spectrum of the positive residual modeled with these templates has a strong dependence on the choice of IEM.

  3. Search for gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies with Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Bravo, César; Araya, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have found a positive correlation between the star-formation rate of galaxies and their gamma-ray luminosity. Galaxies with a high star-formation rate are expected to produce a large amount of high-energy cosmic rays, which emit gamma-rays when interacting with the interstellar medium and radiation fields. We search for gamma-ray emission from a sample of galaxies within and beyond the Local Group with data from the LAT instrument onboard the Fermi satellite. We exclude recently detected galaxies (NGC 253, M82, NGC 4945, NGC 1068, NGC 2146, Arp 220) and use seven years of cumulative "Pass 8" data from the LAT in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. No new detections are seen in the data and upper limits for the gamma-ray fluxes are calculated. The correlation between gamma-ray luminosity and infrared luminosity for galaxies obtained using our new upper limits is in agreement with a previously published correlation, but the new upper limits imply that some galaxies are not as efficient gamma-ray emitters as previously thought.

  4. A Southern Sky Survey with Fermi LAT and ASKAP

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-04-29

    We present the prospects for a future joint gamma-ray and radio survey of southern hemisphere sources using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the upcoming Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope. ASKAP is a next generation radio telescope designed to perform surveys at GHz frequencies at a much higher survey speed than previous radio telescopes, and is scheduled to start engineering observations in 2011. The survey capabilities of both Fermi LAT and ASKAP are described, and the planned science surveys for ASKAP are summarized. We give some expected details of the Variable and Slow Transient (VAST) survey using ASKAP, which will search for transients on timescales from 5 seconds to years. Some observational properties of faint and transient sources seen at gamma-ray and radio wavelengths are summarized, and prospects and strategies for using ASKAP survey data for LAT source counterpart identification are summarized.

  5. Fast ignition relevant study of the flux of high intensity laser-generated electrons via a hollow cone into a laser-imploded plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M

    2007-11-20

    An integrated experiment relevant to fast ignition. A Cu-doped deuterated polymer spherical shell target with an inserted hollow Au cone is imploded by a six-beam 900-J, 1-ns laser. A 10-ps, 70-J laser pulse is focused into the cone at the time of peak compression. The flux of high-energy electrons through the imploded material is determined from the yield of Cu K{sub {alpha}} fluorescence by comparison with a Monte Carlo model. The electrons are estimated to carry about 15% of the laser energy. Collisional and Ohmic heating are modeled, and Ohmic effects are shown to be relatively unimportant. An electron spectrometer shows significantly greater reduction of the transmitted electron flux than is calculated in the model. Enhanced scattering by instability-induced magnetic fields is suggested. An extension of this fluor-based technique to measurement of coupling efficiency to the ignition hot spot in future larger-scale fast ignition experiments is outlined.

  6. Environmental Tests of the Flight GLAST LAT Tracker Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Belli, F.; Borden, T.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cecchi, C.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Angelis, A.De; Drell, P.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Goodman, J.; Himel, T.

    2008-03-12

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space telescope (GLAST) is a gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in 2008. Before the assembly of the Tracker subsystem of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) science instrument of GLAST, every component (tray) and module (tower) has been subjected to extensive ground testing required to ensure successful launch and on-orbit operation. This paper describes the sequence and results of the environmental tests performed on an engineering model and all the flight hardware of the GLAST LAT Tracker. Environmental tests include vibration testing, thermal cycles and thermal-vacuum cycles of every tray and tower as well as the verification of their electrical performance.

  7. Why do intimate partners live apart? Evidence on LAT relationships across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Liefbroer, Aart C.; Poortman, Anne-Rigt; Seltzer, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most research asks whether or not cohabitation has come to rival marriage. Little is known about the meaning of living apart together (LAT) relationships, and whether LAT is an alternative to marriage and cohabitation or a dating relationship. OBJECTIVE We examine across Europe: (1) the prevalence of LAT, (2) the reasons for LAT, and (3) the correlates of (a) LAT relationships vis-à-vis being single, married, or cohabiting, and (b) different types of LAT union. METHODS Using Generations and Gender Survey data from ten Western and Eastern European countries, we present descriptive statistics about LATs and estimate multinominal logistic regression models to assess the correlates of being in different types of LAT unions. RESULTS LAT relationships are uncommon, but they are more common in Western than Eastern Europe. Most people in LAT unions intend to live together but are apart for practical reasons. LAT is more common among young people, those enrolled in higher education, people with liberal attitudes, highly educated people, and those who have previously cohabited or been married. Older people and divorced or widowed persons are more likely to choose LAT to maintain independence. Surprisingly, attitudinal and educational differences are more pronounced in Eastern Europe than in Western Europe. CONCLUSIONS A tentative conclusion is that LAT is more often a stage in the union formation process than an alternative to marriage and cohabitation. Yet some groups do view LAT as substituting for marriage and cohabitation, and these groups differ between East and West. In Eastern Europe a cultural, highly educated elite seems to be the first to resist traditional marriage norms and embrace LAT (and cohabitation) as alternative living arrangements, whereas this is less the case in Western Europe. In Western Europe, LAT unions are mainly an alternative for persons who have been married before or had children in a prior relationship. PMID:26085812

  8. Activated PLC-γ1 is catalytically induced at LAT but activated PLC-γ1 is localized at both LAT- and TCR-containing complexes.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Orcutt, Noemi; Vacaflores, Aldo; Connolly, Sean F; Bunnell, Stephen C; Houtman, Jon C D

    2014-04-01

    Phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) is a key regulator of T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling. Activation of the TCR enhances PLC-γ1 enzymatic function, resulting in calcium influx and the activation of PKC family members and RasGRP. The current model is that phosphorylation of LAT tyrosine 132 facilitates the recruitment of PLC-γ1, leading to its activation and function at the LAT complex. In this study, we examined the phosphorylation kinetics of LAT and PLC-γ1 and the cellular localization of activated PLC-γ1. We observed that commencement of the phosphorylation of LAT tyrosine 132 and PLC-γ1 tyrosine 783 occurred simultaneously, supporting the current model. However, once begun, PLC-γ1 activation occurred more rapidly than LAT tyrosine 132. The association of LAT and PLC-γ1 was more transient than the interaction of LAT and Grb2 and a pool of activated PLC-γ1 translocated away from LAT to cellular structures containing the TCR. These studies demonstrate that LAT and PLC-γ1 form transient interactions that catalyze the activation of PLC-γ1, but that activated PLC-γ1 resides in both LAT and TCR clusters. Together, this work highlights that our current model is incomplete and the activation and function of PLC-γ1 in T cells is highly complex.

  9. Fermi LAT further detection of a GeV flare from low redshift source PKS 0521-36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafrate, G.; Longo, F.; D'Ammando, F.

    2010-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with 1FGL J0522.8-3632, a source associated with PKS 0521-36 (RA: 05h22m57.98465s, DEC: -36d27m30.8509, J2000, Lambert et al. 2009, A&A, 493, 317) at z=0.055. Preliminary analysis indicates that the source on June 17, 2010 was in a high state with a gamma-ray flux (E>100MeV) of (1.0 ± 0.2) e-6 ph/cm2/s (statistical uncertainty only), about 10 times the flux reported in the 1FGL catalogue (Abdo et al.

  10. First Fermi LAT detection of a strong GeV gamma-ray flare from blazar PKS 0403-13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 0403-13 (also known as TXS 0403-132, OF -105, RX J0405.5-1308, and 3FGL J0405.5-1307), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 61.391680 deg, Dec.: -13.137136 deg (J2000.0, Fey et al. 2004, AJ, 127, 3587) and with redshift z=0.5706+/-0.0001 (Marziani et al. 1996, ApJS, 104, 37). Preliminary analysis indicates that on 2016 July 11, PKS 0403-13 was in a high state with a daily averaged gamma-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) of (1.6+/-0.3) X 10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1 (statistical uncertainty only), about 140 times greater than its four-year average flux reported in the third Fermi-LAT source catalog (3FGL, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23). The corresponding daily averaged spectral photon index (E > 100 MeV) of 2.3+/-0.2 (statistical uncertainty only) is compatible with the 3FGL catalog value of 2.35+/-0.11.

  11. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the blazar PKS 2023-07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2023-07 (also known as NRAO 629, TXS 2022-077, 3EG J2025-0744, 1AGLR J2027-0747 and 3FGL J2025.6-0736), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 306.419418 deg, Dec.: -7.597969 deg (J2000.0, Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13) and with redshift z=1.388 (Drinkwater et al. 1997, MNRAS, 284, 85). Preliminary analysis indicates that on 2016 April 9, PKS 2023-07 was in a high state with a daily averaged gamma-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) of (2.0+/-0.3) X 10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1 (statistical uncertainty only), about 16 times greater than its four-year average flux reported in the third Fermi-LAT source catalog (3FGL, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23). The corresponding daily averaged spectral photon index (E > 100 MeV) of 2.4+/-0.2 (statistical uncertainty only) is compatible with the 3FGL catalog value of 2.18+/-0.03.

  12. Detection of a flare at Fermi LAT energies during a multiwavelength campaign on Markarian 180

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbarra, C.; Bastieri, D.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of the analysis of Markarian 180 (1ES 1133+704), a BL Lac object embedded in a giant elliptical galaxy, obtained for a period of 45 day, during which multi-wavelength observations were ongoing. The multi-wavelength campaign on Mrk180 was in 2008 (from 2008-10-24 to 2008-12-08) and was coordinated by Stefan Rugamer (MAGIC Collaboration). The Mrk 180 is associated with a quasar-like object whose distance can be determined unambiguously, thanks to the measurement of absorption line that gives the redshift (z=0.046; Ulrich 1978). The source was observed by the LAT of the Fermi satellite, and it was possible to discover a change of flux, at the energies 100 MeV-300 GeV, during the multi-wavelength campaign period. Results of the analysis are shown.

  13. Constraints on the spectrum of HESS J0632+057 from Fermi-LAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, D.; Chernyakova, M.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the results of ˜7.5 yrs of the very-high energy (10-600 GeV) observations of HESS J0632+057 with Fermi-LAT. In the highest energy band, 200 - 600 GeV, the source is detected with the statistical significance ≳ 4.7σ at orbital phases 0.2 - 0.4 and 0.6 - 0.8 at which HESS J0632+057 is known to demonstrate enhanced emission in TeV energy band. The analysis did not reveal the emission from HESS J0632+057 at lower energies and different orbital phases. Using the upper limits on source's flux we locate the break of the spectrum to >140 GeV and low-energy slope <1.6 (3σ statistical significance).

  14. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the blazar PKS 0514-459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 0514-459 (also known as RX J0515.7-4556 and 3FGL J0515.3-4557), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 78.938767 deg, Dec.: -45.945369 deg (J2000.0, Costa & Loyola 1996, A & AS, 115, 75) and with redshift z=0.194 (Stickel, Kuehr, & Fried 1993, A & AS, 97, 483).

  15. Fermi-LAT detection of hard spectrum gamma-ray flare from FSRQ S4 1800+44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparrini, D.; Buson, S.

    2016-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux and an unusually hard gamma-ray spectrum from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) S4 1800+44 (also known as 3FGL J1801.5+4403, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23) with radio counterpart coordinates (J2000.0), R.A. = 270.3846454 deg, Dec. = 44.0727500 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  16. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the blazar PKS 1313-333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1313-333 (also known as TXS 1313-333, OP -322, 2EG J1314-3430 and 3FGL J1316.0-3338), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 199.033275 deg, Dec.: -33.64977 deg, (J2000.0, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) and with redshift z=1.210 (Jauncey et al. 1982, AJ, 87, 763).

  17. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the BL Lac object OT 081

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Thompson, D.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the BL Lac object OT 081 (also known as PKS 1749+096, 4C 09.57, 0FGL J1751.5+0935, 1FGL J1751.5+0937, 2FGL J1751.5+0938, 1FHL J1751.5+0938, 3FGL J1751.5+0939), with the radio counterpart position R.A.: 267.88674 deg, Dec.: 9.65020 deg (J2000.0, Lanyi et al. 2010, AJ, 139, 1695).

  18. Variations of daytime and nighttime electron temperature and heat flux in the upper ionosphere, topside ionosphere and lower plasmasphere for low and high solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truhlik, Vladimir; Triskova, Ludmila; Bilitza, Dieter; Podolska, Katerina

    2009-12-01

    A database of the electron temperature (Te) comprising of most of the available LEO satellite measurements is used for studying the solar activity variations of Te. The Te data are grouped for two levels of solar activity (low LSA and high HSA), five altitude ranges between 350 and 2000 km, and day and night. By fitting a theoretical expression to the Te values we obtain variation of Te along magnetic field lines and heat flux for LSA and HSA. We have found that Te increases with increase in solar activity at low and mid-latitudes during nighttime at all altitudes studied. During daytime the Te response to solar activity depends on latitude, altitude, and season. This analysis shows existence of anti-correlation between Te and solar activity at mid-latitudes below 700 km during the equinox and winter day hours. Heat fluxes show small latitudinal dependence for daytime but substantial for nighttime.

  19. Multi-satellite characterization of the large energetic electron flux increase at L = 4-7, in the five-day period following the March 24, 1991, solar energetic particle event

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, J.C.; Cayton, T.E.; Belian, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    Following the giant magnetic storm that started on March 24, 1991, and the immediately-preceding solar energetic particle (SEP) event, a dramatic increase in the flux of energetic electrons was observed to occur on several satellites (using Los Alamos instruments aboard two geosynchronous satellites and two GPS satellites, plus energetic electron data from the CRRES satellite) sampling the L=4-7 region of the magnetosphere. We find that: this flux buildup at the larger L-values (L--6-7) first appears near the magnetic equator and subsequently spreads to higher magnetic latitudes; the flux buildup near the magnetic equator peaks first at the higher L before it peaks at the lower L; analysis of the angular distribution of energetic electrons at geosynchronous orbit shows that the flux buildup begins first with the buildup of energetic electrons (>300 keV) moving perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  20. Studying Gamma-Ray Blazars With the GLAST-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, B.; Carson, J.; Madejski, G.; Ciprini, S.; Dermer, C.D.; Giommi, P.; Lonjou, V.; Reimer, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-13

    Thanks to its sensitivity (4 10{sup -9} ph (E> 100 MeV) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for one year of observation), the GLAST LAT should detect many more (over a thousand) gamma-ray blazars than currently known. This large blazar sample will enable detailed population studies to be carried out. Moreover, the LAT large field-of-view combined with the scanning mode will provide a very uniform exposure over the sky, allowing a constant monitoring of several tens of blazars and flare alerts to be issued. This poster presents the LAT performance relevant to blazar studies, more particularly related to timing and spectral properties. Major specific issues regarding the blazar phenomenon that the LAT data should shed light on thanks to these capabilities will be discussed, as well as the different approaches foreseen to address them. The associated data required in other bands, to be collected in contemporaneous/simultaneous multiwavelength campaigns are mentioned as well.

  1. Relationship between Relativistic Electron Flux in the Inner Magnetosphere and ULF Pulsation on the Ground Associated with Long-term Variations of Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, K.; Nagatsuma, T.; Troshichev, O. A.; Obara, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Saita, S.; Yoshikawa, A.; Yumoto, K.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study the relativistic electron flux (0.59-1.18MeV) measured by Standard Dose Monitor (SDOM) onboard DRTS (KODAMA) satellite at the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) is analyzed to investigate the long term (from 2002 to 2014) variations of the electron flux enhancement (REF) during the passage of Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) and/or Coronal Mass Ejection (CMEs). The long term variations of the REF clearly shows the 27-days period associated with the high speed solar wind velocity caused by the CIRs, whereas it is very few that the enhancement of REF lasts for several days after passage of CMEs. The 27-days period enhancement of REF represents the quite strong peak in 2003 when the high speed stream of the solar wind were quit active. We also conducted the same analysis for the Pc5 pulsations observed on the ground. The ground magnetic variations data globally observed by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and International Center for Space Weather Science and Education (ICSWSE) Kyushu University are used to investigate the long term variations of Pc5 power. The same signature in the REF variations is shown in the time variability of the Pc5 power on the ground. These results indicate that the solar wind condition strongly affects the acceleration process of the relativistic electron flux by the ULF wave. In particular the dependence of the REF and Pc5 variations on the sector structures and their seasonal variations strongly suggest that the relationship between Pc5 and REF variations could be controlled by the Russell-McPherron effect.

  2. Gamma-telescopes Fermi/LAT and GAMMA-400 Trigger Systems Event Recognizing Methods Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Murchenko, A. E.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Kheymits, M. D.

    value because of its calorimeter thickness is only ∼10 X0 and energy of registered particles is defined by shower profile analysis. Less than 3% photons will be wrongly recognized as electrons or protons in double-layer ACtop taking into account both temporal and amplitude trigger marker analysis methods during onboard processing in the counting and triggers signals formation system of GAMMA-400. The proton rejection factor will be ∼10-5. The Fermi/LAT based on a 4 × 4 array of identical towers each contains a tracker, calorimeter and data acquisition module. Each tracker consists of 18 x-y silicon-strip layers. The calorimeter in each tower made of eight layers in a hodoscopic arrangement for measure the three-dimensional profiles of showers permits corrections for energy leakage and enhances the capability to discriminate hadronic cosmic rays. The each layer consists of 12 CsI(Tl) based bars. The segmented anticoincidence shield covers the array of towers. Unfortunately, several types of biases lead to systematic effects caused high values of relative systematic uncertainties of the exposure, the number of signal events, the induced fractional signal and so on. For example non confirmed announcement of ∼133 GeV line detection and lost sources in different Fermi catalogues (1FGL, 2FGL, 3FGL) - just well seen in 2FGL Cygnus X-3 (J2032.1+4049) does not appear in 3FGL. It allows to conclude sufficient biases in LAT characteristics obtained methods and event recognized algorithms. Now Fermi/LAT operates during ∼ 7 years but effective caveats methods continuously to be proposed. Respectively, continuation of measurements with use of other telescopes is necessary, and realization of GAMMA-400 will allow improving the results.

  3. Implications of Fermi-LAT observations on the origin of IceCube neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bin; Li, Zhuo; Zhao, Xiaohong E-mail: zhaoxh@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-11-01

    The IceCube (IC) collaboration recently reported the detection of TeV-PeV extraterrestrial neutrinos whose origin is yet unknown. By the photon-neutrino connection in pp and pγ interactions, we use the Fermi-LAT observations to constrain the origin of the IC detected neutrinos. We find that Galactic origins, i.e., the diffuse Galactic neutrinos due to cosmic ray (CR) propagation in the Milky Way, and the neutrinos from the Galactic point sources, may not produce the IC neutrino flux, thus these neutrinos should be of extragalactic origin. Moreover, the extragalactic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may not account for the IC neutrino flux, the jets of active galactic nuclei may not produce the IC neutrino spectrum, but the starburst galaxies (SBGs) may be promising sources. As suggested by the consistency between the IC detected neutrino flux and the Waxman-Bahcall bound, GRBs in SBGs may be the sources of both the ultrahigh energy, ∼> 10{sup 19}eV, CRs and the 1–100 PeV CRs that produce the IC detected TeV-PeV neutrinos.

  4. LATS1/WARTS phosphorylates MYPT1 to counteract PLK1 and regulate mammalian mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Chiyoda, Tatsuyuki; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Shimizu, Takatsune; Naoe, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Ishizawa, Jo; Arima, Yoshimi; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Masaaki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Aoki, Daisuke; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    In the mitotic exit network of budding yeast, Dbf2 kinase phosphorylates and regulates Cdc14 phosphatase. In contrast, no phosphatase substrates of LATS1/WARTS kinase, the mammalian equivalent of Dbf2, has been reported. To address this discrepancy, we performed phosphoproteomic screening using LATS1 kinase. Screening identified MYPT1 (myosin phosphatase–targeting subunit 1) as a new substrate for LATS1. LATS1 directly and preferentially phosphorylated serine 445 (S445) of MYPT1. An MYPT1 mutant (S445A) failed to dephosphorylate Thr 210 of PLK1 (pololike kinase 1), thereby activating PLK1. This suggests that LATS1 promotes MYPT1 to antagonize PLK1 activity. Consistent with this, LATS1-depleted HeLa cells or fibroblasts from LATS1 knockout mice showed increased PLK1 activity. We also found deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage–induced LATS1 activation caused PLK1 suppression via the phosphorylation of MYPT1 S445. Furthermore, LATS1 knockdown cells showed reduced G2 checkpoint arrest after DNA damage. These results indicate that LATS1 phosphorylates a phosphatase as does the yeast Dbf2 and demonstrate a novel role of LATS1 in controlling PLK1 at the G2 DNA damage checkpoint. PMID:22641346

  5. Strong enhancement of 10-100 keV electron fluxes by combined effects of chorus waves and time domain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qianli; Mourenas, Didier; Artemyev, Anton; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Time domain structures (TDSs) are trains of intense electric field spikes observed in large numbers during plasma injections in the outer radiation belt. Here we explore the question of their importance in energetic electron acceleration and loss in this region. Although the most common TDSs can preaccelerate low-energy electrons up to 1-5 keV energies, they often cannot produce by themselves the seed population of 30-150 keV electrons, which are needed for a subsequent energization up to relativistic energies during storms or substorms. However, we demonstrate by numerical simulations that modifications of the low-energy electron pitch angle and energy distributions due to interactions with TDS lead to more efficient scattering of electrons by chorus waves toward both higher and lower pitch angles, ultimately leading to both significantly higher fluxes in the 10-100 keV energy range and more intense 1-100 keV precipitation into the atmosphere, potentially affecting the outer radiation belt dynamics.

  6. Constraints on the Galactic Halo Dark Matter from Fermi-LAT Diffuse Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, Theresa J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Guiriec, Sylvain Germain; McEnery, Julie E.; Scargle. J. D.; Troja, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    We have performed an analysis of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the Milky Way halo region, searching for a signal from dark matter annihilation or decay. In the absence of a robust dark matter signal, constraints are presented. We consider both gamma rays produced directly in the dark matter annihilation/decay and produced by inverse Compton scattering of the e+/e- produced in the annihilation/decay. Conservative limits are derived requiring that the dark matter signal does not exceed the observed diffuse gamma-ray emission. A second set of more stringent limits is derived based on modeling the foreground astrophysical diffuse emission using the GALPROP code. Uncertainties in the height of the diffusive cosmic-ray halo, the distribution of the cosmic-ray sources in the Galaxy, the index of the injection cosmic-ray electron spectrum, and the column density of the interstellar gas are taken into account using a profile likelihood formalism, while the parameters governing the cosmic-ray propagation have been derived from fits to local cosmic-ray data. The resulting limits impact the range of particle masses over which dark matter thermal production in the early universe is possible, and challenge the interpretation of the PAMELA/Fermi-LAT cosmic ray anomalies as the annihilation of dark matter.

  7. Electronics for Satellite Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert P.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2006-05-16

    The tracking detector for the LAT science instrument on the GLAST mission is an example of a large-scale particle detection system built primarily by particle physicists for space flight within the context of a NASA program. The design and fabrication model in most ways reflected practice and experience from particle physics, but the quality assurance aspects were guided by NASA. Similarly, most of the electronics in the LAT as a whole were designed and built by staff at a particle physics lab. This paper reports on many of the challenges and lessons learned in the experience of designing and building the tracking detector and general LAT electronics for use in the NASA GLAST mission.

  8. Plasma and energetic electron flux variations in the Mercury 1 C event - Evidence for a magnetospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christon, S. P.

    1989-06-01

    Charge-particle and magnetic-field data obtained during the first encounter (on March 29, 1974) of Mariner 10 with the planet Mercury are reexamined, and a new interpretation of the Mariner 10 energetic electron, plasma electron, and magnetic field data near the outbound magnetopause at Mercury is presented. It is shown that Mariner 10 sampled the hot substorm energized magnetospheric plasma sheet for the first 36 sec of the C event and, for the next 48 sec, alternatiely sampled hot (plasma sheet) and cold (boundary-layer magnetosheathlike) plasma regions. It is argued that the counting rate of the ID1 event (i.e., a particle event triggering detector D1 but not the D2, D3, or D7 detectors) thoughout the C event most probably represents a pulse pileup response to about 35-175 keV electrons, rather than the nominal above-175 keV electrons presumed in the earlier interpretations.

  9. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T. Z.; Behm, K.; Dong, C. F.; Davoine, X.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Petrov, V.; Chvykov, V.; Cummings, P.; Hou, B.; Maksimchuk, A.; Nees, J. A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2016-08-01

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays.

  10. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  11. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; Caraveo, P.A.; Casandjian, J.M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; /more authors..

    2012-08-17

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to {gamma}{gamma} should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  12. Intense energetic electron flux enhancements in Mercury's magnetosphere: An integrated view with high-resolution observations from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Dewey, Ryan M.; Lawrence, David J.; Goldsten, John O.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Anderson, Brian J.; Ho, George C.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Raines, Jim M.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-03-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury has provided a wealth of new data about energetic particle phenomena. With observations from MESSENGER's Energetic Particle Spectrometer, as well as data arising from energetic electrons recorded by the X-Ray Spectrometer and Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) instruments, recent work greatly extends our record of the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic electrons at Mercury. The combined data sets include measurements from a few keV up to several hundred keV in electron kinetic energy and have permitted relatively good spatial and temporal resolution for many events. We focus here on the detailed nature of energetic electron bursts measured by the GRNS system, and we place these events in the context of solar wind and magnetospheric forcing at Mercury. Our examination of data at high temporal resolution (10 ms) during the period March 2013 through October 2014 supports strongly the view that energetic electrons are accelerated in the near-tail region of Mercury's magnetosphere and are subsequently "injected" onto closed magnetic field lines on the planetary nightside. The electrons populate the plasma sheet and drift rapidly eastward toward the dawn and prenoon sectors, at times executing multiple complete drifts around the planet to form "quasi-trapped" populations.

  13. Energetic-electron flux enhancements in Mercury's magnetosphere: An integrated view with high-resolution observations from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-04-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury has provided a wealth of new data about energetic particle phenomena. With observations from MESSENGER's Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS), as well as data arising from energetic electrons recorded by the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) and Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) instruments, recent work greatly extends our record of the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic electrons at Mercury. The combined data sets include measurements from a few keV up to several hundred keV in electron kinetic energy and have permitted relatively good spatial and temporal resolution for many events. We focus here on the detailed nature of energetic electron bursts measured by the GRNS system, and we place these events in the context of solar wind and magnetospheric forcing at Mercury. Our examination of data at high temporal resolution (10 ms) during the period March 2013 through October 2014 supports strongly the view that energetic electrons are accelerated in the near-tail region of Mercury's magnetosphere and are subsequently "injected" onto closed magnetic field lines on the planetary night side. The electrons populate the plasma sheet and drift rapidly eastward toward the dawn and pre-noon sectors, at time executing multiple complete drifts around the planet to form "quasi-trapped" populations.

  14. Polar observations of ion/electron bursts at the pre-dawn polar cap boundary: evidence for internal reconnection of overdraped lobe flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandholt, P. E.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2008-08-01

    Observations made by Polar of ion-electron bursts on the dawn side of the polar cap are presented. They occurred when conditions external to the magnetosphere corresponded to that of the sheath region of a magnetic cloud, which was characterized by very high densities/dynamic pressure and a magnetic field which was strong in all components and which was tilted antisunward (Bx<0) and northward (Bz>0) with its clock angle lying between 20 and 90° (By: 8 15 nT). A clear temporal development in the energy range spanned by the individual ion bursts (from 0.2 2 keV to 1 10 keV) was present. We relate this to a corresponding temporal evolution in the cloud sheath field and plasma. We analyze the solar wind-magnetosphere aspects of the observations using the concepts of (i) (i) overdraped lobe flux, (ii) Bx- and By-regulated sequential reconnections in opposite hemispheres (magnetopause and internal modes), and (iii) newly-closed magnetic flux. In particular, we find that the most energetic ion bursts (accompanied by bi-directionally streaming electrons at 1 10 keV and intense magnetosheath-origin fluxes) are located on newly closed field lines generated by internal reconnection occurring between overdraped lobe field lines and the closed geomagnetic field. This result corroborates a topology of lobe reconnection under conditions of dipole tilt and/or nonzero IMF Bx component advanced by Watanabe et al. (2006), which in our case is adapted to nonzero IMF By conditions.

  15. PSR J2030+3641: RADIO DISCOVERY AND GAMMA-RAY STUDY OF A MIDDLE-AGED PULSAR IN THE NOW IDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT SOURCE 1FGL J2030.0+3641

    SciTech Connect

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Romani, R. W.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Parent, D.; DeCesar, M. E.; Harding, A. K.; Ferrara, E. C.; Donato, D.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M. E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu

    2012-02-10

    In a radio search with the Green Bank Telescope of three unidentified low Galactic latitude Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources, we have discovered the middle-aged pulsar J2030+3641 associated with 1FGL J2030.0+3641 (2FGL J2030.0+3640). Following the detection of gamma-ray pulsations using a radio ephemeris, we have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution based on gamma-ray and radio pulse arrival times which spans the entire Fermi mission. With a rotation period of 0.2 s, a spin-down luminosity of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1}, and a characteristic age of 0.5 Myr, PSR J2030+3641 is a middle-aged neutron star with spin parameters similar to those of the exceedingly gamma-ray-bright and radio-undetected Geminga. Its gamma-ray flux is 1% that of Geminga, primarily because of its much larger distance, as suggested by the large integrated column density of free electrons, DM = 246 pc cm{sup -3}. We fit the gamma-ray light curve, along with limited radio polarimetric constraints, to four geometrical models of magnetospheric emission, and while none of the fits have high significance some are encouraging and suggest that further refinements of these models may be worthwhile. We argue that not many more non-millisecond radio pulsars may be detected along the Galactic plane that are responsible for LAT sources, but that modified methods to search for gamma-ray pulsations should be productive-PSR J2030+3641 would have been found blindly in gamma rays if only {approx}> 0.8 GeV photons had been considered, owing to its relatively flat spectrum and location in a region of high soft background.

  16. PSR J2030+364I: Radio Discovery and Gamma-ray Study of a Middle-aged Pulsar in the Now Identified Fermi-LAT Source 1FGL J2030.0+3641

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Johnston, S.; Romani, R. W.; Parent, D.; Decesar, M. E.; Harding, A. K.; Donato, D.; SazParkinson, P. M.; Ferrara, E. C.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Wood, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    In a radio search with the Green Bank Telescope of three unidentified low Galactic latitude Fermi-LAT sources, we have discovered the middle-aged pulsar J2030+3641, associated with IFGL J2030.0+3641 (2FGL J2030.0+3640). Following the detection of gamma-ray pulsations using a radio ephemeris, we have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution based on gamma-ray and radio pulse arrival times that spans the entire Fermi mission. With a rotation period of 0.28, spin-down luminosity of 3 x 10(exp 34) erg/s, and characteristic age of 0.5 Myr, PSR J2030+3641 is a middle-aged neutron star with spin parameters similar to those of the exceedingly gamma-ray-bright and radio-undetected Geminga. Its gamma-ray flux is 1 % that of Geminga, primarily because of its much larger distance, as suggested by the large integrated column density of free electrons, DM = 246 pc/cu cm. We fit the gamma-ray light curve, along with limited radio polarimetric constraints, to four geometrical models of magnetospheric emission, and while none of the fits have high significance some are encouraging and suggest that further refinements of these models may be worthwhile. We argue that not many more non-millisecond radio pulsars may be detected along the Galactic plane that are responsible for LAT sources, but that modified methods to search for gamma-ray pulsations should be productive - PSR J2030+364 I would have been found blindly in gamma rays if only > or approx. 0.8 GeV photons had been considered, owing to its relatively flat spectrum and location in a region of high soft background.

  17. Gamma-Ray Observations of the Supernova Remnant RX J0852.0-4622 with the Fermi LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Allafort, A.; Ballet, J.; Funk, S.; Giordano, F.; Hewitt, J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Tajima, H.; Tibolla, O.; Uchiyama, Y.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-12-13

    We report on gamma-ray observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In the Fermi LAT data, we find a spatially extended source at the location of the SNR. The extension is consistent with the SNR size seen in other wavelengths such as X-rays and TeV gamma rays, leading to the identification of the gamma-ray source with the SNR. The spectrum is well described as a power law with a photon index of {Lambda} = 1.85 {+-} 0.06 (stat){sub -0.19}{sup +0.18} (sys), which smoothly connects to the H.E.S.S. spectrum in the TeV energy band. We discuss the gamma-ray emission mechanism based on multiwavelength data. The broadband data can be fit well by a model in which the gamma rays are of hadronic origin. We also consider a scenario with inverse Compton scattering of electrons as the emission mechanism of the gamma rays. Although the leptonic model predicts a harder spectrum in the Fermi LAT energy range, the model can fit the data considering the statistical and systematic errors.

  18. Kinetic analysis of electron flux in cytochrome P450 reductases reveals differences in rate-determining steps in plant and mammalian enzymes.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, Douglas A; Tonkin, Rochelle; Meints, Carla E; Wolthers, Kirsten R

    2015-10-15

    Herein, we compare the kinetic properties of CPR from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATR2), with CPR from Artemisia annua (aaCPR) and human CPR (hCPR). While all three CPR forms elicit comparable rates for cytochrome c(3+) turnover, NADPH reduction of the FAD cofactor is ∼50-fold faster in aaCPR and ATR2 compared to hCPR, with a kobs of ∼500 s(-1) (6 °C). Stopped-flow analysis of the isolated FAD-domains reveals that NADP(+)-FADH2 charge-transfer complex formation is also significantly faster in the plant enzymes, but the rate of its decay is comparable for all three proteins. In hCPR, transfer of a hydride ion from NADPH to FAD is tightly coupled to subsequent FAD to FMN electron transfer, indicating that the former catalytic event is slow relative to the latter. In contrast, interflavin electron transfer is slower than NADPH hydride transfer in aaCPR and ATR2, occurring with an observed rate constant of ∼50 s(-1). Finally, the transfer of electrons from FMN to cytochrome c(3+) is rapid (>10(3) s(-1)) in all three enzymes and does not limit catalytic turnover. In combination, the data reveal differences in rate-determining steps between plant CPR and their mammalian equivalent in mediating the flux of reducing equivalents from NADPH to external electron acceptors. PMID:26361974

  19. Cosmic-ray electron flux measured by the PAMELA experiment between 1 and 625 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Borisov, S; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Consiglio, L; De Pascale, M P; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Gillard, W; Grishantseva, L; Jerse, G; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Malvezzi, V; Marcelli, L; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Nikonov, N; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S J; Stockton, J C; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Wu, J; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2011-05-20

    Precision measurements of the electron component in the cosmic radiation provide important information about the origin and propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Here we present new results regarding negatively charged electrons between 1 and 625 GeV performed by the satellite-borne experiment PAMELA. This is the first time that cosmic-ray e⁻ have been identified above 50 GeV. The electron spectrum can be described with a single power-law energy dependence with spectral index -3.18 ± 0.05 above the energy region influenced by the solar wind (> 30 GeV). No significant spectral features are observed and the data can be interpreted in terms of conventional diffusive propagation models. However, the data are also consistent with models including new cosmic-ray sources that could explain the rise in the positron fraction.

  20. Intense energetic-electron flux enhancements in Mercury's magnetosphere: An integrated view with high-resolution observations from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, R. M.; Baker, D. N.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Peplowski, P. N.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Ho, G. C.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Schriver, D.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    One of the surprising observations by Mariner 10 during its March 1974 flyby of Mercury was the detection of intense bursts of energetic particles in Mercury's magnetosphere in association with substorm-like magnetic field reconfigurations. A full understanding of where, when, and how such particle bursts occur was not possible from the limited Mariner 10 data. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury has provided a wealth of new data about energetic particle phenomena. With observations from MESSENGER's Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS), as well as data arising from energetic electrons recorded by the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) and Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) instruments, recent work has greatly extended our record of the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic electrons at Mercury. The combined data sets include measurements from a few keV up to several hundred keV in electron kinetic energy and have permitted relatively good spatial and temporal resolution for many events. We focus here on the detailed nature of energetic electron bursts measured by the GRNS system, and we place these events in the context of solar wind and magnetospheric forcing at Mercury. Our examination of data at high temporal resolution (10 ms) during the period March 2013 through October 2014 supports strongly the view that energetic electrons are accelerated in the near-tail region of Mercury's magnetosphere and are subsequently "injected" onto closed magnetic field lines on the planetary night side. The electrons evidently fill the plasma sheet volume and drift rapidly eastward toward the dawn and pre-noon sectors, at time executing multiple complete drifts around the planet to form "quasi-trapped" populations.

  1. Fermi-LAT Detection of Gamma-ray Emission from the FSRQ B2 1846+32B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Carpenter, Bryce; Buson, Sara

    2015-11-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed a hard spectrum gamma-ray flare from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) B2 1846+32B with coordinates RA: 18h48m34.3611s, Dec: 32d44m00.139s, J2000, (Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13) at z=0.981 (Massaro et al. 2015, ApJS, 217, 2). Preliminary analysis indicates that on 19 November 2015 this source was in a high-flux state, with a daily averaged gamma-ray flux (E > 100MeV) of (1.0+/-0.1) X 10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1 (statistical uncertainty only).

  2. The Oxygen quantum yield in diverse algae and cyanobacteria is controlled by partitioning of flux between linear and cyclic electron flow within photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-09-01

    We have measured flash-induced oxygen quantum yields (O2-QYs) and primary charge separation (Chl variable fluorescence yield, Fv/Fm) in vivo among phylogenetically diverse microalgae and cyanobacteria. Higher O2-QYs can be attained in cells by releasing constraints on charge transfer at the Photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side by adding membrane-permeable benzoquinone (BQ) derivatives that oxidize plastosemiquinone QB(-) and QBH2. This method allows uncoupling PSII turnover from its natural regulation in living cells, without artifacts of isolating PSII complexes. This approach reveals different extents of regulation across species, controlled at the QB(-) acceptor site. Arthrospira maxima is confirmed as the most efficient PSII-WOC (water oxidizing complex) and exhibits the least regulation of flux. Thermosynechococcus elongatus exhibits an O2-QY of 30%, suggesting strong downregulation. WOC cycle simulations with the most accurate model (VZAD) show that a light-driven backward transition (net addition of an electron to the WOC, distinct from recombination) occurs in up to 25% of native PSIIs in the S2 and S3 states, while adding BQ prevents backward transitions and increases the lifetime of S2 and S3 by 10-fold. Backward transitions occur in PSIIs that have plastosemiquinone radicals in the QB site and are postulated to be physiologically regulated pathways for storing light energy as proton gradient through direct PSII-cyclic electron flow (PSII-CEF). PSII-CEF is independent of classical PSI/cyt-b6f-CEF and provides an alternative proton translocation pathway for energy conversion. PSII-CEF enables variable fluxes between linear and cyclic electron pathways, thus accommodating species-dependent needs for redox and ion-gradient energy sources powered by a single photosystem.

  3. The Oxygen quantum yield in diverse algae and cyanobacteria is controlled by partitioning of flux between linear and cyclic electron flow within photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-09-01

    We have measured flash-induced oxygen quantum yields (O2-QYs) and primary charge separation (Chl variable fluorescence yield, Fv/Fm) in vivo among phylogenetically diverse microalgae and cyanobacteria. Higher O2-QYs can be attained in cells by releasing constraints on charge transfer at the Photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side by adding membrane-permeable benzoquinone (BQ) derivatives that oxidize plastosemiquinone QB(-) and QBH2. This method allows uncoupling PSII turnover from its natural regulation in living cells, without artifacts of isolating PSII complexes. This approach reveals different extents of regulation across species, controlled at the QB(-) acceptor site. Arthrospira maxima is confirmed as the most efficient PSII-WOC (water oxidizing complex) and exhibits the least regulation of flux. Thermosynechococcus elongatus exhibits an O2-QY of 30%, suggesting strong downregulation. WOC cycle simulations with the most accurate model (VZAD) show that a light-driven backward transition (net addition of an electron to the WOC, distinct from recombination) occurs in up to 25% of native PSIIs in the S2 and S3 states, while adding BQ prevents backward transitions and increases the lifetime of S2 and S3 by 10-fold. Backward transitions occur in PSIIs that have plastosemiquinone radicals in the QB site and are postulated to be physiologically regulated pathways for storing light energy as proton gradient through direct PSII-cyclic electron flow (PSII-CEF). PSII-CEF is independent of classical PSI/cyt-b6f-CEF and provides an alternative proton translocation pathway for energy conversion. PSII-CEF enables variable fluxes between linear and cyclic electron pathways, thus accommodating species-dependent needs for redox and ion-gradient energy sources powered by a single photosystem. PMID:27117512

  4. Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

  5. FERMI/LAT OBSERVATIONS OF LS 5039

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M. E-mail: ttanaka@slac.stanford.ed E-mail: adam.hill@obs.ujf-grenoble.f

    2009-11-20

    The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 +- 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 +- 0.5(stat) +- 1.8(syst) x10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 +- 0.3(stat) +- 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index GAMMA = 1.9 +- 0.1(stat) +- 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

  6. Search for Dark Matter Satellites Using the FERMI-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T.J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T.H.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; /more authors..

    2012-08-16

    Numerical simulations based on the {Lambda}CDM model of cosmology predict a large number of as yet unobserved Galactic dark matter satellites. We report the results of a Large Area Telescope (LAT) search for these satellites via the {gamma}-ray emission expected from the annihilation of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. Some dark matter satellites are expected to have hard {gamma}-ray spectra, finite angular extents, and a lack of counterparts at other wavelengths. We sought to identify LAT sources with these characteristics, focusing on {gamma}-ray spectra consistent with WIMP annihilation through the b{bar b} channel. We found no viable dark matter satellite candidates using one year of data, and we present a framework for interpreting this result in the context of numerical simulations to constrain the velocity-averaged annihilation cross section for a conventional 100 GeV WIMP annihilating through the b{bar b} channel.

  7. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Frederick; Bonnell, Jerry; Hughes, Richard; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; /Ohio State U.

    2007-10-15

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the onground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified.

  8. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Frederick; Hughes, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; Bonnell, Jerry; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James

    2007-07-12

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the on-ground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified.

  9. Search for Dark Matter Satellites Using the Fermi-Lat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; McEnery, J. E.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations based on the ACDM model of cosmology predict a large number of as yet unobserved Galactic dark matter satellites. We report the results of a Large Area Telescope (LAT) search for these satellites via the gamma-ray emission expected from the annihilation of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. Some dark matter satellites are expected to have hard gamma-ray spectra, finite angular extents, and a lack of counterparts at other wavelengths. We sought to identify LAT sources with these characteristics, focusing on gamma-ray spectra consistent with WIMP annihilation through the bb(sup raised bar) channel. We found no viable dark matter satellite candidates using one year of data, and we present a framework for interpreting this result in the context of numerical simulations to constrain the velocity-averaged annihilation cross section for a conventional 100 Ge V WIMP annihilating through the bb(sup raised bar) channel.

  10. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays. PMID:27610860

  11. Five Years of the Fermi LAT Flare Advocate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Ojha, R.; Gasparrini, D.; Ciprini, S.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Fermi LAT Flare Advocates

    2014-01-01

    Since the launch of the Fermi satellite, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) team has run a program that provides a daily review of the the gamma-ray sky as soon as Fermi LAT data becomes available. The Flare Advocate/Gamma-ray Sky Watcher (FA-GSW) program allows a rapid analysis of the Automatic Science Processing (ASP) products and triggers dedicated followup analyses by several LAT science groups such as those studying Galactic transients, extragalactic sources and new gamma-ray sources. Significant gamma-ray detections also trigger rapid communications to the entire astrophysical community via astronomical telegrams and gamma-ray coordination network notices. The FA-GSW program plays a key role in maximizing the science return from Fermi by increasing the rate of multi-frequency observations of sources in an active gamma-ray state. In the past ~5 years blazar flaring activity of varying strength and duty cycles, gravitationally lensed blazars, flares from Galactic sources (like Nova Delphini and the Crab Nebula), unidentified transients near and off the Galactic plane, and emission from the quiet and flaring Sun, represent the range of detections made. Flare Advocates have published about 250 Astronomical Telegrams and they publish a weekly blog. Timely, extensive multi-frequency campaigns have been organized to follow-up on these phenomena leading to some of Fermi’s most interesting results.

  12. A simple, quantitative approach to the coupling of photophosphorylation to electron flow in terms of proton fluxes.

    PubMed

    McCarty, R E; Portis, A R

    1976-11-16

    A simple relationship between observed phosphorylation efficiencies (P/e ratios) and internal proton concentration in spinach chloroplast thylakoids has been derived. P/e ratios, varked by either changing the light intensity or by adding the energy transfer inhibitor, 4'-deoxyphlorizin, were found to change with internal proton concentration in accordance with this relationship. A quantitative prediction of the effect of uncouplers on the P/e ratio can probably also be made. By extrapolation of plots of observed P/e ratios against internal proton concentration divided by the overall rate of electron flow, a maximum intrinsic P/e of about 0.66 is obtained. Assuming that two protons appear inside thylakoids per electron transferred, a P/e ratio of 0.66 suggests that three internal protons are consumed for each ATP formed. Internal protons may be considered to be substrates for the phosphorylation reaction. Hill plots of phosphorylation rate vs. internal proton concentration also indicate that three protons are consumed for each ATP synthesized. Thus, the H+ concentration gradient behaves quantitatively, as well as qualitatively, as if it is the connecting link between electron flow and phosphorylation in illuminated thylakoids.

  13. The strontium inorganic mutant of the water oxidizing center (CaMn4O5) of PSII improves WOC efficiency but slows electron flux through the terminal acceptors.

    PubMed

    Gates, Colin; Ananyev, Gennady; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-09-01

    Herein we extend prior studies of biosynthetic strontium replacement of calcium in PSII-WOC core particles to characterize whole cells. Previous studies of Thermosynechococcus elongatus found a lower rate of light-saturated O2 from isolated PSII-WOC(Sr) cores and 5-8× slower rate of oxygen release. We find similar properties in whole cells, and show it is due to a 20% larger Arrhenius activation barrier for O2 evolution. Cellular adaptation to the sluggish PSII-WOC(Sr) cycle occurs in which flux through the QAQB acceptor gate becomes limiting for turnover rate in vivo. Benzoquinone derivatives that bind to QB site remove this kinetic chokepoint yielding 31% greater O2 quantum yield (QY) of PSII-WOC(Sr) vs. PSII-WOC(Ca). QY and efficiency of the WOC(Sr) catalytic cycle are greatly improved at low light flux, due to fewer misses and backward transitions and 3-fold longer lifetime of the unstable S3 state, attributed to greater thermodynamic stabilization of the WOC(Sr) relative to the photoactive tyrosine YZ. More linear and less cyclic electron flow through PSII occurs per PSII-WOC(Sr). The organismal response to the more active PSII centers in Sr-grown cells at 45°C is to lower the number of active PSII-WOC per Chl, producing comparable oxygen and energy per cell. We conclude that redox and protonic energy fluxes created by PSII are primary determinants for optimal growth rate of T. elongatus. We further conclude that the (Sr-favored) intermediate-spin S=5/2 form of the S2 state is the active form in the catalytic cycle relative to the low-spin S=1/2 form. PMID:27317268

  14. THE GAMMA-RAY AND NEUTRINO SKY: A CONSISTENT PICTURE OF FERMI-LAT, MILAGRO, AND ICECUBE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaggero, Daniele; Urbano, Alfredo; Valli, Mauro; Grasso, Dario; Marinelli, Antonio E-mail: alfredo.leonardo.urbano@cern.ch E-mail: dario.grasso@pi.infn.it

    2015-12-20

    We compute the γ-ray and neutrino diffuse emission of the Galaxy on the basis of a recently proposed phenomenological model characterized by radially dependent cosmic-ray (CR) transport properties. We show how this model, designed to reproduce both Fermi-LAT γ-ray data and local CR observables, naturally reproduces the anomalous TeV diffuse emission observed by Milagro in the inner Galactic plane. Above 100 TeV our picture predicts a neutrino flux that is about five (two) times larger than the neutrino flux computed with conventional models in the Galactic Center region (full-sky). Explaining in that way up to ∼25% of the flux measured by IceCube, we reproduce the full-sky IceCube spectrum adding an extra-Galactic component derived from the muonic neutrinos flux in the northern hemisphere. We also present precise predictions for the Galactic plane region where the flux is dominated by the Galactic emission.

  15. ULF waves and radiation belts: earthward penetration of Pc 4-5 waves and energetic electron flux enhancements during geospace magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Marina; Daglis, Ioannis; Zesta, Eftyhia; Balasis, George; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2013-04-01

    Energetic particle fluxes in the outer radiation belt can vary over orders of magnitude on time scales ranging from minutes, to days and years. Geospace magnetic storms when sufficiently strong to exceed key thresholds of the Dst index may either increase or decrease the fluxes of energetic electrons. We examine the responses of energetic electrons to nine moderate, intense and weak magnetic storms, which occurred at different phases of the solar cycle, and compare these with concurrent variations of ULF wave power. Pc 4-5 waves with frequencies in the range of a few mHz may be generated internally in the magnetosphere by low frequency instabilities of ring current ions and externally by shear instabilities at the magnetopause flanks, or compressive variations in the solar wind. Here, we present multipoint observations from ground-based magnetometer arrays collocated with electron drift orbits, which are complemented and measurements by conjugate multi-point satellites, such as CHAMP, Cluster, GOES and THEMIS. We discuss the excitation, growth and decay characteristics of Pc 4-5 waves during the different phases of the magnetic storms with particular emphasis on the distribution of Pc 4-5 wave power over a variety of L shells. We investigate whether Pc 4-5 wave power penetrates to lower L shell values during periods of relatively intense geomagnetic activity as compared to weak magnetic storms. Structural changes of the magnetosphere during intense geomagnetic storms can play an important role in the generation and penetration of Pc 4-5 waves deep into the inner magnetosphere, which in turn is of significance for the wave-particle interactions contributing to the acceleration, transport and loss of electrons in the outer radiation belt. We present preliminary statistics of Pc 4-5 waves observed during magnetic storms of varying intensity, which occurred over the course of the previous solar cycle. This work is supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework

  16. The LATS2 tumor suppressor inhibits SREBP and suppresses hepatic cholesterol accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Aylon, Yael; Gershoni, Anat; Rotkopf, Ron; Biton, Inbal E.; Porat, Ziv; Koh, Anna P.; Sun, Xiaochen; Lee, Youngmin; Fiel, Maria-Isabel; Hoshida, Yujin; Friedman, Scott L.; Johnson, Randy L.; Oren, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is a major regulator of organ size. In the liver, Hippo pathway deregulation promotes hyperplasia and hepatocellular carcinoma primarily through hyperactivation of its downstream effector, YAP. The LATS2 tumor suppressor is a core member of the Hippo pathway. A screen for LATS2-interacting proteins in liver-derived cells identified the transcription factor SREBP2, master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis. LATS2 down-regulation caused SREBP activation and accumulation of excessive cholesterol. Likewise, mice harboring liver-specific Lats2 conditional knockout (Lats2-CKO) displayed constitutive SREBP activation and overexpressed SREBP target genes and developed spontaneous fatty liver disease. Interestingly, the impact of LATS2 depletion on SREBP-mediated transcription was clearly distinct from that of YAP overexpression. When challenged with excess dietary cholesterol, Lats2-CKO mice manifested more severe liver damage than wild-type mice. Surprisingly, apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis were actually attenuated relative to wild-type mice, in association with impaired p53 activation. Subsequently, Lats2-CKO mice failed to recover effectively from cholesterol-induced damage upon return to a normal diet. Additionally, decreased LATS2 mRNA in association with increased SREBP target gene expression was observed in a subset of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cases. Together, these findings further highlight the tight links between tumor suppressors and metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27013235

  17. The Search for Milky Way Halo Substructure WIMP Annihilations Using the GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Wai, Larry; /SLAC

    2007-02-05

    The GLAST LAT Collaboration is one among several experimental groups, covering a wide range of approaches, pursuing the search for the nature of dark matter. The GLAST LAT has the unique ability to find new sources of high energy gamma radiation emanating directly from WIMP annihilations in situ in the universe. Using it's wide band spectral and full sky spatial capabilities, the GLAST LAT can form ''images'' in high energy gamma-rays of dark matter substructures in the gamma-ray sky. We describe a preliminary feasibility study for indirect detection of milky way dark matter satellites using the GLAST LAT.

  18. Cosmological Evolution of the FSRQ Gamma-ray Luminosity Function and Spectra and the Contribution to the Background Based on Fermi-LAT Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Jack; Petrosian, V.; Ko, A.

    2013-04-01

    The Fermi-LAT has accumulated a large sample of blazars with known flux and spectral index. However, since blazars with harder spectra can be detected to lower fluxes than ones with softer ones with the LAT, the observed bi-variate flux-index distribution is severely truncated at low fluxes and softer spectra. Previously we have used the non-parametric method developed by Efron and Petrosian (EP) to correct the Fermi data for this truncation and obtained the true mono-variate distributions of spectral index and flux (commonly called the logN-logS relation) from which we obtained the blazar contribution to EGB as a function of flux directly from the data (Singal et al. 2012). Extrapolating this to lowest possible fluxes we estimated the total contribution of blazars to the EGB. By now many of the FSRQ blazars are identified with active galactic nuclei and their redshifts measured or obtained from archives (M. Shaw et al., 2012). With the addition of the redshifts we can now calculate the FSRQ blazar luminosities and from the tri-variate luminosity-index-redshift distribution determine the luminosity function and index distribution and their evolutions with redshifts. The EP method can be generalized to this three dimensional case (as we done for SDSS quasars; Singal et al. 2013). In this talk we will present the results from this analysis, which will allow us to compare the density and luminosity evolution of FSRQ blazars with other AGNs. In addition, we can determine the redshift and luminosity (instead of flux) variation of the contribution to the EGB which may allow a more reliable estimate of the total contribution of FSRQ blazars to the EGB.

  19. Flat band analogues and flux driven extended electronic states in a class of geometrically frustrated fractal networks.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Atanu; Pal, Biplab; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate, by explicit construction, that a single band tight binding Hamiltonian defined on a class of deterministic fractals of the b = 3N Sierpinski type can give rise to an infinity of dispersionless, flat-band like states which can be worked out analytically using the scale invariance of the underlying lattice. The states are localized over clusters of increasing sizes, displaying the existence of a multitude of localization areas. The onset of localization can, in principle, be 'delayed' in space by an appropriate choice of the energy of the electron. A uniform magnetic field threading the elementary plaquettes of the network is shown to destroy this staggered localization and generate absolutely continuous sub-bands in the energy spectrum of these non-translationally invariant networks.

  20. Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springford, Michael

    1997-03-01

    1. J. J. Thomson and the discovery of the electron A. B. P. Pippard; 2. The isolated electron W. N. Cottingham; 3. The relativistic electron D. I. Olive; 4. The electron glue B. L. Gyorffy; 5. The electron fluid P. Coleman; 6. The magnetic electron G. G. Lonzarich; 7. The paired electron A. J. Leggett; 8. The heavy electron M. Springford; 9. The coherent electron Y. Imry and M. Peskin; 10. The composite electron R. Nicholas; 11. The electron in the cosmos M. S. Longair.

  1. Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springford, Michael

    2008-12-01

    1. J. J. Thomson and the discovery of the electron A. B. P. Pippard; 2. The isolated electron W. N. Cottingham; 3. The relativistic electron D. I. Olive; 4. The electron glue B. L. Gyorffy; 5. The electron fluid P. Coleman; 6. The magnetic electron G. G. Lonzarich; 7. The paired electron A. J. Leggett; 8. The heavy electron M. Springford; 9. The coherent electron Y. Imry and M. Peskin; 10. The composite electron R. Nicholas; 11. The electron in the cosmos M. S. Longair.

  2. Photosynthetic acclimation to drought stress in Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck seedlings is largely dependent on thermal dissipation and enhanced electron flux to photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Campos, Huitziméngari; Trejo, Carlos; Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia B; García-Nava, Rodolfo; Conde-Martínez, F Víctor; Cruz-Ortega, Ma Del Rocío

    2014-10-01

    Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck, a crassulacean acid metabolism plant that is adapted to water-limited environments, has great potential for bioenergy production. However, drought stress decreases the requirement for light energy, and if the amount of incident light exceeds energy consumption, the photosynthetic apparatus can be injured, thereby limiting plant growth. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of drought and re-watering on the photosynthetic efficiency of A. salmiana seedlings. The leaf relative water content and leaf water potential decreased to 39.6 % and -1.1 MPa, respectively, over 115 days of water withholding and recovered after re-watering. Drought caused a direct effect on photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in light-acclimated leaves, as indicated by a decrease in the photosynthetic electron transport rate. Additionally, down-regulation of photochemical activity occurred mainly through the inactivation of PSII reaction centres and an increased thermal dissipation capacity of the leaves. Prompt fluorescence kinetics also showed a larger pool of terminal electron acceptors in photosystem I (PSI) as well as an increase in some JIP-test parameters compared to controls, reflecting an enhanced efficiency and specific fluxes for electron transport from the plastoquinone pool to the PSI terminal acceptors. All the above parameters showed similar levels after re-watering. These results suggest that the thermal dissipation of excess energy and the increased energy conservation from photons absorbed by PSII to the reduction of PSI end acceptors may be an important acclimation mechanism to protect the photosynthetic apparatus from over-excitation in Agave plants. PMID:24798124

  3. Photosynthetic acclimation to drought stress in Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck seedlings is largely dependent on thermal dissipation and enhanced electron flux to photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Campos, Huitziméngari; Trejo, Carlos; Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia B; García-Nava, Rodolfo; Conde-Martínez, F Víctor; Cruz-Ortega, Ma Del Rocío

    2014-10-01

    Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck, a crassulacean acid metabolism plant that is adapted to water-limited environments, has great potential for bioenergy production. However, drought stress decreases the requirement for light energy, and if the amount of incident light exceeds energy consumption, the photosynthetic apparatus can be injured, thereby limiting plant growth. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of drought and re-watering on the photosynthetic efficiency of A. salmiana seedlings. The leaf relative water content and leaf water potential decreased to 39.6 % and -1.1 MPa, respectively, over 115 days of water withholding and recovered after re-watering. Drought caused a direct effect on photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in light-acclimated leaves, as indicated by a decrease in the photosynthetic electron transport rate. Additionally, down-regulation of photochemical activity occurred mainly through the inactivation of PSII reaction centres and an increased thermal dissipation capacity of the leaves. Prompt fluorescence kinetics also showed a larger pool of terminal electron acceptors in photosystem I (PSI) as well as an increase in some JIP-test parameters compared to controls, reflecting an enhanced efficiency and specific fluxes for electron transport from the plastoquinone pool to the PSI terminal acceptors. All the above parameters showed similar levels after re-watering. These results suggest that the thermal dissipation of excess energy and the increased energy conservation from photons absorbed by PSII to the reduction of PSI end acceptors may be an important acclimation mechanism to protect the photosynthetic apparatus from over-excitation in Agave plants.

  4. Pulsars above 10 GeV: Fermi LAT Observations and Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Dave

    2012-01-01

    The success of the Fermi Large Area Telescope in studying gamma-ray pulsars offers hints about future work above 10 GeV. The infrastructure for discovering pulsars will be similar between LAT and any future telescope. Some of the Fermi LAT results suggest intriguing questions about the future of high-energy pulsar studies.

  5. Reciprocal regulation of amino acid import and epigenetic state through Lat1 and EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Dann, Stephen G; Ryskin, Michael; Barsotti, Anthony M; Golas, Jonathon; Shi, Celine; Miranda, Miriam; Hosselet, Christine; Lemon, Luanna; Lucas, Judy; Karnoub, Maha; Wang, Fang; Myers, Jeremy S; Garza, Scott J; Follettie, Maximillian T; Geles, Kenneth G; Klippel, Anke; Rollins, Robert A; Fantin, Valeria R

    2015-01-01

    Lat1 (SLC7A5) is an amino acid transporter often required for tumor cell import of essential amino acids (AA) including Methionine (Met). Met is the obligate precursor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the methyl donor utilized by all methyltransferases including the polycomb repressor complex (PRC2)-specific EZH2. Cell populations sorted for surface Lat1 exhibit activated EZH2, enrichment for Met-cycle intermediates, and aggressive tumor growth in mice. In agreement, EZH2 and Lat1 expression are co-regulated in models of cancer cell differentiation and co-expression is observed at the invasive front of human lung tumors. EZH2 knockdown or small-molecule inhibition leads to de-repression of RXRα resulting in reduced Lat1 expression. Our results describe a Lat1-EZH2 positive feedback loop illustrated by AA depletion or Lat1 knockdown resulting in SAM reduction and concomitant reduction in EZH2 activity. shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lat1 results in tumor growth inhibition and points to Lat1 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25979827

  6. Why doesn't lat/lon calculated by the GCTP projection parameters match lat/lon report in the Latitude / Longitude fields in the product? Which fields are affected by the geolocation problem?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... and "Longitude" fields which explicitly specify the lat/lon location for the center of each pixel. The "Latitude" and "Longitude" ... geolocation information. By comparing the implicit lat/lon against the explicit lat/lon, one can determine which pixels have been ...

  7. Annihilation Lines from Dark Matter with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ylinen, Tomi

    2010-06-23

    Dark matter is today one of the most intriguing but so far unresolved issues in physics. Many extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics predict a stable Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) that may annihilate directly into two gamma-rays. If the WIMPs are non-relativistic, the gamma-rays from this channel will have an energy equal to the mass of the WIMP. The signature caused by this annihilation is a spectral line, smeared out only by the energy resolution of the detector. The signal would be a ''smoking gun'' for dark matter, since no other astrophysical source should be able to produce it. We present here the preliminary results from the search for a dark matter line on a limited data set from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which was successfully launched on June 11, 2008. The Fermi-LAT is a pair-conversion detector for gamma-rays with an energy range from 20 MeV to 300 GeV and has an unprecedented resolution and sensitivity.

  8. Characterizing high-energy light curves of Fermi/Lat GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, Jarred

    2015-08-21

    A systematic analysis of the light curves of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRBs) with redshift and detected at high-energy (> 100 MeV) by Fermi/LAT has never been done before our work, because there were only a handful of detections. Now we have 20 of those, which we can use to characterize the GRBs in their rest frame. We compared a characteristic decay times Tc of GRBs with redshifts using the new “Pass 8” data, and used a Crystal Ball function to parametrize GRB characteristics. An unexpected anti-correlation between Tc and the peak flux was observed. This means that brighter peaked GRBs have shorter durations. There is also no correlation between the Tc and the decay index, which makes the anti-correlation with brightness more clear. This results appears to be consistent with the External Shock model, which is one of the competing hypothesis on the origin of the high-energy emission. We did not observe any bimodality, which is seen in GRBs at lower energies.

  9. Fermi LAT upper limits on gamma-ray emission from colliding wind binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, M.; Reimer, O.; Reimer, A.; Egberts, K.

    2012-12-01

    Colliding wind binaries (CWBs) are thought to give rise to a plethora of physical processes including acceleration and interaction of relativistic particles. Consequently, CWBs have been considered as putative gamma-ray emitters since the COS-B era. On the basis of 24 months of Fermi-LAT data, seven CWB systems are analyzed: WR 11, WR 70, WR 125, WR 137, WR 140, WR 146 and WR 147. Specific theoretical predictions for the gamma-ray emission of CWBs identify these systems as the most promising candidates among known WR-binaries due to their respective stellar and orbital parameters. We find no evidence of gamma-ray emission from any of the studied CWB systems and flux upper limits are determined. In some of the studied CWBs the interplay of orbital and stellar parameters render the Fermi data as not sufficiently sensitive to constrain parameters of the emission model. In others large uncertainties in input parameters of the gamma-ray emission model yield a large variance among model parameters that can be accommodated by the data. However, in the case of WR 140 and WR 147, the Fermi upper limits appear to rule out some early model predictions and constrain later theoretical models over a significant parameter space.

  10. Characterizing high-energy light curves of Fermi/LatGRBs - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, Jarred

    2015-08-23

    A systematic analysis of the light curves of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRBs) with redshift and detected at high-energy (> 100 MeV) by Fermi/LAT has never been done before our work, because there were only a handful of detections. Now we have 20 of those, which we can use to characterize the GRBs in their rest frame. We compared a characteristic decay times Tc of GRBs with redshifts using the new "Pass8" data, and used a Crystal Ball function to parametrize GRB characteristics. An unexpected anti-correlation between Tc and the peak flux was observed. This means that brighter peaked GRBs have shorter durations. There is also no correlation between Tc and the decay index, which is one of the competing hypothesis on the origin of the high-energy emission. We did not observe any bimodality, which is seen in GRBs at lower energies.

  11. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Saadeldin, Mona K; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5'UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer.

  12. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saadeldin, Mona K.; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M.; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2015-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5′UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer. PMID:25628642

  13. Fermi-LAT Discovery of Extended Gamma-Ray Emission in the Direction of Supernova Remnant W51C

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; /more authors..

    2012-03-30

    The discovery of bright gamma-ray emission coincident with supernova remnant (SNR) W51C is reported using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. W51C is a middle-aged remnant ({approx}10{sup 4} yr) with intense radio synchrotron emission in its shell and known to be interacting with a molecular cloud. The gamma-ray emission is spatially extended, broadly consistent with the radio and X-ray extent of SNR W51C. The energy spectrum in the 0.2-50 GeV band exhibits steepening toward high energies. The luminosity is greater than 1 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1} given the distance constraint of D > 5.5 kpc, which makes this object one of the most luminous gamma-ray sources in our Galaxy. The observed gamma-rays can be explained reasonably by a combination of efficient acceleration of nuclear cosmic rays at supernova shocks and shock-cloud interactions. The decay of neutral p mesons produced in hadronic collisions provides a plausible explanation for the gamma-ray emission. The product of the average gas density and the total energy content of the accelerated protons amounts to {bar n}{sub H} W{sub p} {approx_equal} 5 x 10{sup 51} (D/6 kpc){sup 2} erg cm{sup -3}. Electron density constraints from the radio and X-ray bands render it difficult to explain the LAT signal as due to inverse Compton scattering. The Fermi LAT source coincident with SNR W51C sheds new light on the origin of Galactic cosmic rays.

  14. Constraining Gamma-Ray Emission from Luminous Infrared Galaxies with Fermi-LAT; Tentative Detection of Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Thompson, Todd A.

    2016-05-01

    Star-forming galaxies produce gamma-rays primarily via pion production, resulting from inelastic collisions between cosmic-ray protons and the interstellar medium (ISM). The dense ISM and high star formation rates of luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) imply that they should be strong gamma-ray emitters, but so far only two LIRGs have been detected. Theoretical models for their emission depend on the unknown fraction of cosmic-ray protons that escape these galaxies before interacting. We analyze Fermi-LAT data for 82 of the brightest Infrared Astronomical Satellite LIRGs and ULIRGs. We examine each system individually and carry out a stacking analysis to constrain their gamma-ray fluxes. We report the detection of the nearest ULIRG Arp 220 (˜4.6σ). We observe a gamma-ray flux (0.8-100 GeV) of 2.4 × 10-10 phot cm-2 s-1 with a photon index of 2.23 (8.2 × 1041 erg s-1 at 77 Mpc). We also derive upper limits (ULs) for the stacked LIRGs and ULIRGs. The gamma-ray luminosity of Arp 220 and the stacked ULs agree with calorimetric predictions for dense star-forming galaxies. With the detection of Arp 220, we extend the gamma-ray-IR luminosity correlation to the high-luminosity regime with {log}{L}0.1-100{GeV}=1.25× {log}{L}8-1000μ {{m}}+26.7 as well as the gamma-ray-radio continuum luminosity correlation with {log}{L}0.1-100{GeV}=1.22× {log}{L}1.4{GHz}+13.3. The current survey of Fermi-LAT is on the verge of detecting more LIRGs/ULIRGs in the local universe, and we expect even more detections with deeper Fermi-LAT observations or the next generation of gamma-ray detectors.

  15. Constraining Gamma-Ray Emission from Luminous Infrared Galaxies with Fermi-LAT; Tentative Detection of Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Thompson, Todd A.

    2016-05-01

    Star-forming galaxies produce gamma-rays primarily via pion production, resulting from inelastic collisions between cosmic-ray protons and the interstellar medium (ISM). The dense ISM and high star formation rates of luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) imply that they should be strong gamma-ray emitters, but so far only two LIRGs have been detected. Theoretical models for their emission depend on the unknown fraction of cosmic-ray protons that escape these galaxies before interacting. We analyze Fermi-LAT data for 82 of the brightest Infrared Astronomical Satellite LIRGs and ULIRGs. We examine each system individually and carry out a stacking analysis to constrain their gamma-ray fluxes. We report the detection of the nearest ULIRG Arp 220 (˜4.6σ). We observe a gamma-ray flux (0.8–100 GeV) of 2.4 × 10‑10 phot cm‑2 s‑1 with a photon index of 2.23 (8.2 × 1041 erg s‑1 at 77 Mpc). We also derive upper limits (ULs) for the stacked LIRGs and ULIRGs. The gamma-ray luminosity of Arp 220 and the stacked ULs agree with calorimetric predictions for dense star-forming galaxies. With the detection of Arp 220, we extend the gamma-ray–IR luminosity correlation to the high-luminosity regime with {log}{L}0.1-100{GeV}=1.25× {log}{L}8-1000μ {{m}}+26.7 as well as the gamma-ray–radio continuum luminosity correlation with {log}{L}0.1-100{GeV}=1.22× {log}{L}1.4{GHz}+13.3. The current survey of Fermi-LAT is on the verge of detecting more LIRGs/ULIRGs in the local universe, and we expect even more detections with deeper Fermi-LAT observations or the next generation of gamma-ray detectors.

  16. Oncogenicity of L-type amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1) revealed by targeted gene disruption in chicken DT40 cells: LAT1 is a promising molecular target for human cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkawa, Mayumi; Ohno, Yoshiya; Masuko, Kazue; Takeuchi, Akiko; Suda, Kentaro; Kubo, Akihiro; Kawahara, Rieko; Okazaki, Shogo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi; Yagi, Hideki; Hashimoto, Yoshiyuki; Masuko, Takashi

    2011-03-25

    Highlights: {yields} We established LAT1 amino-acid transporter-disrupted DT40 cells. {yields} LAT1-disrupted cells showed slow growth and lost the oncogenicity. {yields} siRNA and mAb inhibited human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. {yields} LAT1 is a promising target molecule for cancer therapy. -- Abstract: L-type amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is the first identified light chain of CD98 molecule, disulfide-linked to a heavy chain of CD98. Following cDNA cloning of chicken full-length LAT1, we have constructed targeting vectors for the disruption of chicken LAT1 gene from genomic DNA of chicken LAT1 consisting of 5.4 kb. We established five homozygous LAT1-disrupted (LAT1{sup -/-}) cell clones, derived from a heterozygous LAT1{sup +/-} clone of DT40 chicken B cell line. Reactivity of anti-chicken CD98hc monoclonal antibody (mAb) with LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 cells was markedly decreased compared with that of wild-type DT40 cells. All LAT1{sup -/-} cells were deficient in L-type amino-acid transporting activity, although alternative-splice variant but not full-length mRNA of LAT1 was detected in these cells. LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 clones showed outstandingly slow growth in liquid culture and decreased colony-formation capacity in soft agar compared with wild-type DT40 cells. Cell-cycle analyses indicated that LAT1{sup -/-} DT40 clones have prolonged cell-cycle phases compared with wild-type or LAT1{sup +/-} DT40 cells. Knockdown of human LAT1 by small interfering RNAs resulted in marked in vitro cell-growth inhibition of human cancer cells, and in vivo tumor growth of HeLa cells in athymic mice was significantly inhibited by anti-human LAT1 mAb. All these results indicate essential roles of LAT1 in the cell proliferation and occurrence of malignant phenotypes and that LAT1 is a promising candidate as a molecular target of human cancer therapy.

  17. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  18. Brightest Fermi-LAT flares of PKS 1222+216: implications on emission and acceleration processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Pankaj; Singh, K. P.; Sahayanathan, Sunder

    2014-11-20

    We present a high time resolution study of the two brightest γ-ray outbursts from a blazar PKS 1222+216 observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in 2010. The γ-ray light curves obtained in four different energy bands, 0.1-3, 0.1-0.3, 0.3-1, and 1-3 GeV, with time bins of six hours, show asymmetric profiles with similar rise times in all the bands but a rapid decline during the April flare and a gradual one during the June flare. The light curves during the April flare show an ∼2 day long plateau in 0.1-0.3 GeV emission, erratic variations in 0.3-1 GeV emission, and a daily recurring feature in 1-3 GeV emission until the rapid rise and decline within a day. The June flare shows a monotonic rise until the peak, followed by a gradual decline powered mainly by the multi-peak 0.1-0.3 GeV emission. The peak fluxes during both the flares are similar except in the 1-3 GeV band in April, which is twice the corresponding flux during the June flare. Hardness ratios during the April flare indicate spectral hardening in the rising phase followed by softening during the decay. We attribute this behavior to the development of a shock associated with an increase in acceleration efficiency followed by its decay leading to spectral softening. The June flare suggests hardening during the rise followed by a complicated energy dependent behavior during the decay. Observed features during the June flare favor multiple emission regions while the overall flaring episode can be related to jet dynamics.

  19. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2

    PubMed Central

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB0,+ became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20–25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB0,+, respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB0,+, as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose. PMID:25580517

  20. Deep view of the Large Magellanic Cloud with six years of Fermi-LAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Martin, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romani, R. W.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The nearby Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) provides a rare opportunity of a spatially resolved view of an external star-forming galaxy in γ-rays. The LMC was detected at 0.1-100 GeV as an extended source with CGRO/EGRET and using early observations with the Fermi-LAT. The emission was found to correlate with massive star-forming regions and to be particularly bright towards 30 Doradus. Aims: Studies of the origin and transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the Milky Way are frequently hampered by line-of-sight confusion and poor distance determination. The LMC offers a complementary way to address these questions by revealing whether and how the γ-ray emission is connected to specific objects, populations of objects, and structures in the galaxy. Methods: We revisited the γ-ray emission from the LMC using about 73 months of Fermi-LAT P7REP data in the 0.2-100 GeV range. We developed a complete spatial and spectral model of the LMC emission, for which we tested several approaches: a simple geometrical description, template-fitting, and a physically driven model for CR-induced interstellar emission. Results: In addition to identifying PSR J0540-6919 through its pulsations, we find two hard sources positionally coincident with plerion N 157B and supernova remnant N 132D, which were also detected at TeV energies with H.E.S.S. We detect an additional soft source that is currently unidentified. Extended emission dominates the total flux from the LMC. It consists of an extended component of about the size of the galaxy and additional emission from three to four regions with degree-scale sizes. If it is interpreted as CRs interacting with interstellar gas, the large-scale emission implies a large-scale population of ~1-100 GeV CRs with a density of ~30% of the local Galactic value. On top of that, the three to four small-scale emission regions would correspond to enhancements of the CR density by factors 2 to 6 or higher, possibly more energetic and younger populations

  1. Changing Horses in Midstream: Fermi LAT Computing and SCons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogart, J. R.; Golpayegani, N.

    2011-07-01

    (For the Fermi LAT Collaboration) Several years into GLAST (now Fermi) offline software development it became evident we would need a replacement for our original build system, the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) developed at CERN, in order to support Mac users and to keep pace with newer compilers and operating system versions on our traditional platforms, Linux and Windows. The open source product SCons emerged as the only viable alternative and development began in earnest several months before Fermi's successful launch in June of 2008. Over two years later the conversion is nearing completion. This paper describes the conversion to and our use of SCons, concentrating on the resulting environment for users and developers and how it was achieved. Topics discussed include SCons and its interaction with Fermi code, GoGui, a cross-platform gui for Fermi developers, and issues specific to Windows developer support.

  2. Cerebral cortex hyperthyroidism of newborn mct8-deficient mice transiently suppressed by lat2 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Bárbara; Martínez de Mena, Raquel; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Nunes, Virginia; Palacín, Manuel; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone entry into cells is facilitated by transmembrane transporters. Mutations of the specific thyroid hormone transporter, MCT8 (Monocarboxylate Transporter 8, SLC16A2) cause an X-linked syndrome of profound neurological impairment and altered thyroid function known as the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. MCT8 deficiency presumably results in failure of thyroid hormone to reach the neural target cells in adequate amounts to sustain normal brain development. However during the perinatal period the absence of Mct8 in mice induces a state of cerebral cortex hyperthyroidism, indicating increased brain access and/or retention of thyroid hormone. The contribution of other transporters to thyroid hormone metabolism and action, especially in the context of MCT8 deficiency is not clear. We have analyzed the role of the heterodimeric aminoacid transporter Lat2 (Slc7a8), in the presence or absence of Mct8, on thyroid hormone concentrations and on expression of thyroid hormone-dependent cerebral cortex genes. To this end we generated Lat2-/-, and Mct8-/yLat2-/- mice, to compare with wild type and Mct8-/y mice during postnatal development. As described previously the single Mct8 KO neonates had a transient increase of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine concentration and expression of thyroid hormone target genes in the cerebral cortex. Strikingly the absence of Lat2 in the double Mct8Lat2 KO prevented the effect of Mct8 inactivation in newborns. The Lat2 effect was not observed from postnatal day 5 onwards. On postnatal day 21 the Mct8 KO displayed the typical pattern of thyroid hormone concentrations in plasma, decreased cortex 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine concentration and Hr expression, and concomitant Lat2 inactivation produced little to no modifications. As Lat2 is expressed in neurons and in the choroid plexus, the results support a role for Lat2 in the supply of thyroid hormone to the cerebral cortex during early postnatal development. PMID:24819605

  3. Differential Requirement for LAT and SLP-76 in GPVI versus T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Barbi A.; Myung, Peggy S.; Obergfell, Achim; Myers, Erin E.; Cheng, Alec M.; Watson, Stephen P.; Pear, Warren S.; Allman, David; Shattil, Sanford J.; Koretzky, Gary A.

    2002-01-01

    Mice deficient in the adaptor Src homology 2 domain-containing leukocyte phosphoprotein of 76 kD (SLP-76) exhibit a bleeding disorder and lack T cells. Linker for activation of T cells (LAT)-deficient mice exhibit a similar T cell phenotype, but show no signs of hemorrhage. Both SLP-76 and LAT are important for optimal platelet activation downstream of the collagen receptor, GPVI. In addition, SLP-76 is involved in signaling mediated by integrin αIIbβ3. Because SLP-76 and LAT function coordinately in T cell signal transduction, yet their roles appear to differ in hemostasis, we investigated in detail the functional consequences of SLP-76 and LAT deficiencies in platelets. Previously we have shown that LAT−/− platelets exhibit defective responses to the GPVI-specific agonist, collagen-related peptide (CRP). Consistent with this, we find that surface expression of P-selectin in response to high concentrations of GPVI ligands is reduced in both LAT- and SLP-76–deficient platelets. However, platelets from LAT−/− mice, but not SLP-76−/− mice, aggregate normally in response to high concentrations of collagen and convulxin. Additionally, unlike SLP-76, LAT is not tyrosine phosphorylated after fibrinogen binding to integrin αIIbβ3, and collagen-stimulated platelets deficient in LAT spread normally on fibrinogen-coated surfaces. Together, these findings indicate that while LAT and SLP-76 are equally required for signaling via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and pre-TCR, platelet activation downstream of GPVI and αIIbβ3 shows a much greater dependency on SLP-76 than LAT. PMID:11901197

  4. Cerebral cortex hyperthyroidism of newborn mct8-deficient mice transiently suppressed by lat2 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Bárbara; Martínez de Mena, Raquel; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Nunes, Virginia; Palacín, Manuel; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone entry into cells is facilitated by transmembrane transporters. Mutations of the specific thyroid hormone transporter, MCT8 (Monocarboxylate Transporter 8, SLC16A2) cause an X-linked syndrome of profound neurological impairment and altered thyroid function known as the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. MCT8 deficiency presumably results in failure of thyroid hormone to reach the neural target cells in adequate amounts to sustain normal brain development. However during the perinatal period the absence of Mct8 in mice induces a state of cerebral cortex hyperthyroidism, indicating increased brain access and/or retention of thyroid hormone. The contribution of other transporters to thyroid hormone metabolism and action, especially in the context of MCT8 deficiency is not clear. We have analyzed the role of the heterodimeric aminoacid transporter Lat2 (Slc7a8), in the presence or absence of Mct8, on thyroid hormone concentrations and on expression of thyroid hormone-dependent cerebral cortex genes. To this end we generated Lat2-/-, and Mct8-/yLat2-/- mice, to compare with wild type and Mct8-/y mice during postnatal development. As described previously the single Mct8 KO neonates had a transient increase of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine concentration and expression of thyroid hormone target genes in the cerebral cortex. Strikingly the absence of Lat2 in the double Mct8Lat2 KO prevented the effect of Mct8 inactivation in newborns. The Lat2 effect was not observed from postnatal day 5 onwards. On postnatal day 21 the Mct8 KO displayed the typical pattern of thyroid hormone concentrations in plasma, decreased cortex 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine concentration and Hr expression, and concomitant Lat2 inactivation produced little to no modifications. As Lat2 is expressed in neurons and in the choroid plexus, the results support a role for Lat2 in the supply of thyroid hormone to the cerebral cortex during early postnatal development.

  5. Effect of Redox Balance Alterations on Cellular Localization of LAT and Downstream T-Cell Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gringhuis, Sonja I.; Papendrecht-van der Voort, Ellen A. M.; Leow, Angela; Levarht, E. W. Nivine; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Verweij, Cornelis L.

    2002-01-01

    The integral membrane protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a central adapter protein in the T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling pathways. The cellular localization of LAT is extremely sensitive to intracellular redox balance alterations. Reduced intracellular levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH), a hallmark of chronic oxidative stress, resulted in the membrane displacement of LAT, abrogated TCR-mediated signaling and consequently hyporesponsiveness of T lymphocytes. The membrane displacement of LAT is accompanied by a considerable difference in the mobility of LAT upon native and nonreducing denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, a finding indicative of a conformational change. Targeted mutation of redox-sensitive cysteine residues within LAT created LAT mutants which remain membrane anchored under conditions of chronic oxidative stress. The expression of redox-insensitive LAT mutants allows for restoration of TCR-mediated signal transduction, whereas CD28-mediated signaling pathways remained impaired. These results are indicative that the membrane displacement of LAT as a result of redox balance alterations is a consequence of a conformational change interfering with the insertion of LAT into the plasma membrane. Conclusively, the data suggest a role for LAT as a crucial intermediate in the sensitivity of TCR signaling and hence T lymphocytes toward chronic oxidative stress. PMID:11756537

  6. Stabilization of a prokaryotic LAT transporter by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Banqueri, Arturo; Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Bartoccioni, Paola; Kowalczyk, Lukasz; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Palacín, Manuel; Vázquez-Ibar, José Luis

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge of three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution of membrane transport proteins has improved considerably our understanding of their physiological roles and pathological implications. However, most structural biology techniques require an optimal candidate within a protein family for structural determination with (a) reasonable production in heterologous hosts and (b) good stability in detergent micelles. SteT, the Bacillus subtilis L-serine/L-threonine exchanger is the best-known prokaryotic paradigm of the mammalian L-amino acid transporter (LAT) family. Unfortunately, SteT's lousy stability after extracting from the membrane prevents its structural characterization. Here, we have used an approach based on random mutagenesis to engineer stability in SteT. Using a split GFP complementation assay as reporter of protein expression and membrane insertion, we created a library of 70 SteT mutants each containing random replacements of one or two residues situated in the transmembrane domains. Analysis of expression and monodispersity in detergent of this library permitted the identification of evolved versions of SteT with a significant increase in both expression yield and stability in detergent with respect to wild type. In addition, these experiments revealed a correlation between the yield of expression and the stability in detergent micelles. Finally, and based on protein delipidation and relipidation assays together with transport experiments, possible mechanisms of SteT stabilization are discussed. Besides optimizing a member of the LAT family for structural determination, our work proposes a new approach that can be used to optimize any membrane protein of interest. PMID:26976827

  7. Search for Spatially Extended Fermi-LAT Sources Using Two Years of Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lande, Joshua; Ackermann, Markus; Allafort, Alice; Ballet, Jean; Bechtol, Keith; Burnett, Toby; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Funk, Stefan; Giordano, Francesco; Grondin, Marie-Helene; Kerr, Matthew; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne

    2012-07-13

    Spatial extension is an important characteristic for correctly associating {gamma}-ray-emitting sources with their counterparts at other wavelengths and for obtaining an unbiased model of their spectra. We present a new method for quantifying the spatial extension of sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). We perform a series of Monte Carlo simulations to validate this tool and calculate the LAT threshold for detecting the spatial extension of sources. We then test all sources in the second Fermi -LAT catalog (2FGL) for extension. We report the detection of seven new spatially extended sources.

  8. Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Bursts and Insight from Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.

    2011-01-01

    A new revolution in GRB observation and theory has begun over the last 3 years since the launch of the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. The new window into high energy gamma-rays opened by the Fermi-LAT is providing insight into prompt emission mechanisms and possibly also afterglow physics. The LAT detected GRBs appear to be a new unique subset of extremely energetic and bright bursts. In this talk I will discuss the context and recent discoveries from these LAT GRBs and the large database of broadband observations collected by Swift over the last 7 years and how through comparisons between the Swift, GBM, and LAT GRB samples, we can learn about the unique characteristics and relationships between each population.

  9. Very Rapid High-amplitude Gamma-Ray Variability in Luminous Blazar PKS 1510-089 Studied with Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Stawarz, L.; Tanaka, Y.T.; Takahashi, T.; Madejski, G.; D'Ammando, F.

    2013-03-20

    Here we report on the detailed analysis of the γ-ray light curve of a luminous blazar PKS 1510-089 observed in the GeV range with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite during the period 2011 September - December. By investigating the properties of the detected three major flares with the shortest possible time binning allowed by the photon statistics, we find a variety of temporal characteristics and variability patterns. This includes a clearly asymmetric profile (with a faster flux rise and a slower decay) of the flare resolved on sub-daily timescales, a superposition of many short uncorrelated flaring events forming the apparently coherent longer-duration outburst, and a huge single isolated outburst unresolved down to the timescale of three-hours. In the latter case we estimate the corresponding γ-ray flux doubling timescale to be below one hour, which is extreme and never previously reported for any active galaxy

  10. ATel draft: Fermi LAT detection of a new Gamma-ray Source PKS 2247-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.

    2016-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed strong gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the radio source PKS 2247-131 with coordinates RA=342.4983854 deg, Dec=-12.8546736 deg (J2000; Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source is not in any published LAT catalog and was not detected by AGILE or EGRET.

  11. PAMELA and Fermi LAT signals from long-lived Kaluza-Klein dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Nobuchika; Yamada, Toshifumi

    2009-10-01

    We propose a simple extension of the minimal universal extra dimension model by introducing a small curvature. The model is formulated as a small anti-de Sitter curvature limit of the five-dimensional standard model (SM) in the Randall-Sundrum background geometry. While the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) particle can be thermal relic dark matter as usual in the universal extra dimension model, the KK parity is explicitly broken in the presence of the small curvature and the KK dark matter decays into the SM fermions with a long lifetime. Couplings of the KK dark matter with SM fermion pairs in the five-dimensional bulk are controlled by fermion bulk masses. By tuning bulk masses of quarks, we can suppress KK dark matter decay into quarks. With a suitable choice of bulk masses for leptons, KK dark matter decay into leptons can account for the cosmic-ray electron/positron excesses reported by the recent PAMELA and Fermi LAT satellite experiments.

  12. LATS2-mediated YAP1 phosphorylation is involved in HCC tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chao; Wang, Xintian; Liang, Lufeng

    2015-01-01

    YAP (yes-associated protein) is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation and apoptosis. Although YAP plays an important role in various tumors, the underlying mechanism in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumorigenesis remains unclear. In this study, we observed that the LATS2 was highly expressed in Bel-7402 and HepG2 cell lines, and LATS2 protein level was negatively correlated with YAP1 in HCC cells. And then, we inhibited LATS2 expression by transfecting with siRNA. Western blot and Immunofluorescent staining analysis demonstrated that LATS2 inhibition decreased the dephosphorylation of YAP1 protein and promoted YAP1 nuclear accumulation in HCC cells. Moreover, Immunoprecipitation assay results also indicated that Yap binds directly to TEAD2 and LATS2 inhibition-mediated dephosphorylation increased the YAP1/TEAD2 association, leading to YAP1/TEAD2 transcriptional activation, which in turn upregulated cell invasion in HCC cells. Taken together, our current data indicated a new regulatory mechanism of YAP1 by the LATS2-mediated phosphorylation that was involved in HCC tumorigenesis. PMID:25973055

  13. MicroRNA-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion by targeting LATS2

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ying; Gao, Yan

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • miR-181b is upregulated in human ovarian cancer tissues. • miR-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell proliferation and invasion. • LATS2 is a direct target of miR-181b. • LATS2 is involved in miR-181b-induced ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are strongly implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this study, we showed significant upregulation of miR-181b in ovarian cancer tissues, compared with the normal ovarian counterparts. Forced expression of miR-181b led to remarkably enhanced proliferation and invasion of ovarian cancer cells while its knockdown induced significant suppression of these cellular events. The tumor suppressor gene, LATS2 (large tumor suppressor 2), was further identified as a novel direct target of miR-181b. Specifically, miR-181b bound directly to the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of LATS2 and suppressed its expression. Restoration of LATS2 expression partially reversed the oncogenic effects of miR-181b. Our results indicate that miR-181b promotes proliferation and invasion by targeting LATS2 in ovarian cancer cells. These findings support the utility of miR-181b as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  14. The relationship between electron flux and the redox poise of the quinone pool in plant mitochondria. Interplay between quinol-oxidizing and quinone-reducing pathways.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergen, C W; Wagner, A M; Krab, K; Moore, A L

    1994-12-15

    The dependence of electron flux through quinone-reducing and quinol-oxidizing pathways on the redox state of the ubiquinone (Q) pool was investigated in plant mitochondria isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Bintje, fresh tissue and callus), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and Arum italicum. We have determined the redox state of the Q pool with two different methods, the Q-electrode and Q-extraction techniques. Although results from the two techniques agree well, in all tissues tested (with the exception of fresh potato) an inactive pool of QH2 was detected by the extraction technique that was not observed with the electrode. In potato callus mitochondria, an inactive Q pool was also found. An advantage of the extraction method is that it permits determination of the Q redox state in the presence of substances that interfere with the Q-electrode, such as benzohydroxamate and NADH. We have studied the relation between rate and Q redox state for both quinol-oxidizing and quinone-reducing pathways under a variety of metabolic conditions including state 3, state 4, in the presence of myxothiazol, and benzohydroxamate. Under state 4 conditions or in the presence of myxothiazol, a non-linear dependence of the rate of respiration on the Q-redox state was observed in potato callus mitochondria and in sweet potato mitochondria. The addition of benzohydroxamate, under state 4 conditions, removed this non-linearity confirming that it is due to activity of the cyanide-resistant pathway. The relation between rate and Q redox state for the external NADH dehydrogenase in potato callus mitochondria was found to differ from that of succinate dehydrogenase. It is suggested that the oxidation of cytoplasmic NADH in vivo uses the cyanide-resistant pathway more than the pathway involving the oxidation of succinate. A model is used to predict the kinetic behaviour of the respiratory network. It is shown that titrations with inhibitors of the alternative oxidase cannot be used to

  15. On Possible Interpretations of the High Energy Electron-Positron Spectrum Measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.; Profumo, S.; Strong, A.W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bloom, E.D.; Bregeon, J.; Di Bernardo, G.; Gaggero, D.; Giglietto, N.; Kamae, T.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Moiseev, A.A.; Morselli, A.; Ormes, J.F.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pohl, M.; Razzano, M.; Sgro, C.

    2009-05-15

    The Fermi-LAT experiment recently reported high precision measurements of the spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons-plus-positrons (CRE) between 20 GeV and 1 TeV. The spectrum shows no prominent spectral features, and is significantly harder than that inferred from several previous experiments. Here we discuss several interpretations of the Fermi results based either on a single large scale Galactic CRE component or by invoking additional electron-positron primary sources, e.g. nearby pulsars or particle Dark Matter annihilation. We show that while the reported Fermi-LAT data alone can be interpreted in terms of a single component scenario, when combined with other complementary experimental results, specifically the CRE spectrum measured by H.E.S.S. and especially the positron fraction reported by PAMELA between 1 and 100 GeV, that class of models fails to provide a consistent interpretation. Rather, we find that several combinations of parameters, involving both the pulsar and dark matter scenarios, allow a consistent description of those results. We also briefly discuss the possibility of discriminating between the pulsar and dark matter interpretations by looking for a possible anisotropy in the CRE flux.

  16. HIGH-FREQUENCY RADIO PROPERTIES OF SOURCES IN THE FERMI-LAT 1 YEAR POINT SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Murphy, Tara; Ekers, Ronald D.; Edwards, Philip G.; Massardi, Marcella

    2010-08-01

    The high-frequency radio sky, like the gamma-ray sky surveyed by the Fermi satellite, is dominated by flat spectrum radio quasars and BL Lac objects at bright flux levels. To investigate the relationship between radio and gamma-ray emission in extragalactic sources, we have cross-matched the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey catalog (AT20G) with the Fermi-LAT 1 year Point Source Catalog (1FGL). The 6.0 sr of sky covered by both catalogs ({delta} < 0{sup 0}, |b|>1.{sup 0}5) contains 5890 AT20G radio sources and 604 1FGL gamma-ray sources. The AT20G source positions are accurate to within {approx}1 arcsec and, after excluding known Galactic sources, 43% of Fermi 1FGL sources have an AT20G source within the 95% Fermi confidence ellipse. Monte Carlo tests imply that at least 95% of these matches are genuine associations. Only five gamma-ray sources (1% of the Fermi catalog) have more than one AT20G counterpart in the Fermi error box. The AT20G matches also generally support the active galactic nucleus (AGN) associations in the First LAT AGN Catalog. We find a trend of increasing gamma-ray flux density with 20 GHz radio flux density. The Fermi detection rate of AT20G sources is close to 100% for the brightest 20 GHz sources, decreasing to 20% at 1 Jy, and to roughly 1% at 100 mJy. Eight of the matched AT20G sources have no association listed in 1FGL and are presented here as potential gamma-ray AGNs for the first time. We also identify an alternative AGN counterpart to one 1FGL source. The percentage of Fermi sources with AT20G detections decreases toward the Galactic plane, suggesting that the 1FGL catalog contains at least 50 Galactic gamma-ray sources in the southern hemisphere that are yet to be identified.

  17. Fermi-LAT Constraints on the Pulsar Wind Nebula Nature of HESS J1857+026

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, R.; Grondin, M.-H.; VanEtten, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Bogdanov, S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kaspi, V. M.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Camilo, F.; Casandjian, J. M.; Espinoza, C. M.; Johnston, S.; Lyne, A. G.; Smith, D. A.; Stappers, B. W.; Caliandro, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    Since its launch, the Fermi satellite has firmly identified 5 pulsar wind nebulae plus a large number of candidates, all powered by young and energetic pulsars. HESS J1857+026 is a spatially extended gamma-ray source detected by H.E.S.S. and classified as a possible pulsar wind nebula candidate powered by PSR J1856+0245. Aims. We search for -ray pulsations from PSR J1856+0245 and explore the characteristics of its associated pulsar wind nebula. Methods. Using a rotational ephemeris obtained from the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory at 1.5 GHz, we phase.fold 36 months of gamma-ray data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard Fermi. We also perform a complete gamma-ray spectral and morphological analysis. Results. No pulsation was detected from PSR J1856+0245. However, significant emission is detected at a position coincident with the TeV source HESS J1857+026. The gamma-ray spectrum is well described by a simple power law with a spectral index of Gamma = 1.53 +/- 0.11(sub stat) +/- 0.55(sub syst) and an energy flux of G(0.1 C100 GeV) = (2.71 +/- 0.52(sub stat) +/- 1.51(sub syst) X 10(exp -11) ergs/ sq cm/s. This implies a gamma.ray efficiency of approx 5 %, assuming a distance of 9 kpc, the gamma-ray luminosity of L(sub gamma) (sub PWN) (0.1 C100 GeV) = (2.5 +/- 0.5(sub stat) +/- 1.5(sub syst)) X 10(exp 35)(d/(9kpc))(exp 2) ergs/s and E-dot = 4.6 X 10(exp 36) erg /s, in the range expected for pulsar wind nebulae. Detailed multi-wavelength modeling provides new constraints on its pulsar wind nebula nature.

  18. Deep Morphological and Spectral Study of the SNR RCW 86 with Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Condon, B.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Dubner, G.; Dumora, D.; Duvidovich, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giacani, E.; Giglietto, N.; Glanzman, T.; Green, D. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kensei, S.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Vink, J.; Wood, K. S.; Yassine, M.

    2016-03-01

    RCW 86 is a young supernova remnant (SNR) showing a shell-type structure at several wavelengths and is thought to be an efficient cosmic-ray (CR) accelerator. Earlier Fermi Large Area Telescope results reported the detection of γ-ray emission coincident with the position of RCW 86 but its origin (leptonic or hadronic) remained unclear due to the poor statistics. Thanks to 6.5 years of data acquired by the Fermi-LAT and the new event reconstruction Pass 8, we report the significant detection of spatially extended emission coming from RCW 86. The spectrum is described by a power-law function with a very hard photon index ({{Γ }}=1.42+/- {0.1}{{stat}}+/- {0.06}{{syst}}) in the 0.1-500 GeV range and an energy flux above 100 MeV of (2.91+/- {0.8}{{stat}}+/- {0.12}{{syst}}) × {10}-11 erg cm-2 s-1. Gathering all the available multiwavelength (MWL) data, we perform a broadband modeling of the nonthermal emission of RCW 86 to constrain parameters of the nearby medium and bring new hints about the origin of the γ-ray emission. For the whole SNR, the modeling favors a leptonic scenario in the framework of a two-zone model with an average magnetic field of 10.2 ± 0.7 μG and a limit on the maximum energy injected into protons of 2 × 1049 erg for a density of 1 cm-3. In addition, parameter values are derived for the north-east and south-west (SW) regions of RCW 86, providing the first indication of a higher magnetic field in the SW region.

  19. Hunting dark matter gamma-ray lines with the Fermi LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Vertongen, Gilles; Weniger, Christoph E-mail: weniger@mppmu.mpg.de

    2011-05-01

    Monochromatic photons could be produced in the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles. At high energies, the search for such line features in the cosmic gamma-ray spectrum is essentially background free because plausible astrophysical processes are not expected to produce such a signal. The observation of a gamma-ray line would hence be a 'smoking-gun' signature for dark matter, making the search for such signals particularly attractive. Among the different dark matter models predicting gamma-ray lines, the local supersymmetric extension of the standard model with small R-parity violation and gravitino LSP is of particular interest because it provides a framework where primordial nucleosynthesis, gravitino dark matter and thermal leptogenesis are naturally consistent. Using the two-years Fermi LAT data, we present a dedicated search for gamma-ray lines coming from dark matter annihilation or decay in the Galactic halo. Taking into account the full detector response, and using a binned profile likelihood method, we search for significant line features in the energy spectrum of the diffuse flux observed in different regions of the sky. No evidence for a line signal at the 5σ level is found for photon energies between 1 and 300 GeV, and conservative bounds on dark matter decay rates and annihilation cross sections are presented. Implications for gravitino dark matter in presence of small R-parity violation are discussed, as well as the impact of our results on the prospect for seeing long-lived neutralinos or staus at the LHC.

  20. Fermi-LAT constraints on the pulsar wind nebula nature of HESS J1857+026

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, R.; Grondin, M.-H.; Van Etten, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Bogdanov, S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kaspi, V. M.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Camilo, F.; Casandjian, J. M.; Espinoza, C. M.; Johnston, S.; Lyne, A. G.; Smith, D. A.; Stappers, B. W.; Caliandro, G. A.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Since its launch, the Fermi satellite has firmly identified 5 pulsar wind nebulae plus a large number of candidates, all powered by young and energetic pulsars. HESS J1857 + 026 is a spatially extended γ-ray source detected by H.E.S.S. and classified as a possible pulsar wind nebula candidate powered by PSR J1856 + 0245. Aims: We search for γ-ray pulsations from PSR J1856+0245 and explore the characteristics of its associated pulsar wind nebula. Methods: Using a rotational ephemeris obtained from the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory at 1.5 GHz, we phase-fold 36 months of γ-ray data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard Fermi. We also perform a complete γ-ray spectral and morphological analysis. Results: No γ-ray pulsations were detected from PSR J1856+0245. However, significant emission is detected at a position coincident with the TeV source HESS J1857 + 026. The γ-ray spectrum is well described by a simple power-law with a spectral index of Γ = 1.53 ± 0.11stat ± 0.55syst and an energy flux of G(0.1-100 GeV) = (2.71 ± 0.52stat ± 1.51syst) × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1. The γ-ray luminosity is LPWNγ (0.1-100 GeV)=(2.5 ± 0.5stat ± 1.5syst) × 1035 (d/9 kpc)2 erg s-1, assuming a distance of 9 kpc. This implies a γ-ray efficiency of ~5% for Ė = 4.6 × 1036 erg s-1, in the range expected for pulsar wind nebulae. Detailed multi-wavelength modeling provides new constraints on its pulsar wind nebula nature.

  1. Hunting dark matter gamma-ray lines with the Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertongen, Gilles; Weniger, Christoph

    2011-05-01

    Monochromatic photons could be produced in the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles. At high energies, the search for such line features in the cosmic gamma-ray spectrum is essentially background free because plausible astrophysical processes are not expected to produce such a signal. The observation of a gamma-ray line would hence be a `smoking-gun' signature for dark matter, making the search for such signals particularly attractive. Among the different dark matter models predicting gamma-ray lines, the local supersymmetric extension of the standard model with small R-parity violation and gravitino LSP is of particular interest because it provides a framework where primordial nucleosynthesis, gravitino dark matter and thermal leptogenesis are naturally consistent. Using the two-years Fermi LAT data, we present a dedicated search for gamma-ray lines coming from dark matter annihilation or decay in the Galactic halo. Taking into account the full detector response, and using a binned profile likelihood method, we search for significant line features in the energy spectrum of the diffuse flux observed in different regions of the sky. No evidence for a line signal at the 5σ level is found for photon energies between 1 and 300 GeV, and conservative bounds on dark matter decay rates and annihilation cross sections are presented. Implications for gravitino dark matter in presence of small R-parity violation are discussed, as well as the impact of our results on the prospect for seeing long-lived neutralinos or staus at the LHC.

  2. HESS and Fermi-LAT discovery of γ-rays from the blazar 1ES 1312-423

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HESS Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gast, H.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Göring, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spieß, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; Perkins, J. S.; Ojha, R.; Stevens, J.; Edwards, P. G.; Kadler, M.

    2013-09-01

    A deep observation campaign carried out by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) on Centaurus A enabled the discovery of γ-rays from the blazar 1ES 1312-423, 2° away from the radio galaxy. With a differential flux at 1 TeV of φ(1 TeV) = (1.9 ± 0.6stat ± 0.4sys) × 10-13 cm-2 s-1 TeV-1 corresponding to 0.5 per cent of the Crab nebula differential flux and a spectral index Γ = 2.9 ± 0.5stat ± 0.2sys, 1ES 1312-423 is one of the faintest sources ever detected in the very high energy (E > 100 GeV) extragalactic sky. A careful analysis using three and a half years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) data allows the discovery at high energies (E > 100 MeV) of a hard spectrum (Γ = 1.4 ± 0.4stat ± 0.2sys) source coincident with 1ES 1312-423. Radio, optical, UV and X-ray observations complete the spectral energy distribution of this blazar, now covering 16 decades in energy. The emission is successfully fitted with a synchrotron self-Compton model for the non-thermal component, combined with a blackbody spectrum for the optical emission from the host galaxy.

  3. Fermi LAT Observation of Centaurus a Radio Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahakyan, N. V.

    2013-01-01

    The results of analysis of approximately 3 year gamma-ray observations (August 2008-July 2011) of the core of radio galaxy Centaurus A with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi LAT) are presented. Binned likelihood analysis method applying to the data shows that below several GeV the spectrum can be described by a single power-law with photon index Γ = 2.73 ± 0.06. However, at higher energies the new data show significant excess above the extrapolation of the energy spectrum from low energies. The comparison of the corresponding Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) at GeV energies with the SED in the TeV energy band reported by the H.E.S.S. collaboration shows that we deal with two or perhaps even three components of gamma-radiation originating from different regions located within the central 10 kpc of Centaurus A. The analysis of gamma-ray data of Centaurus A lobe accumulated from the beginning of the operation until November 14, 2011 show extension of the HE gamma-ray emission beyond the WMAP radio image in the case of the Northern lobe [9]. The possible origins of gamma-rays from giant radio lobes of Centaurus A are discussed in the context of hadronic and leptonic scenarios.

  4. Three Millisecond Pulsars in Fermi LAT Unassociated Bright Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, O.; Wolff, M. T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; DeCesar, M. E.; Cognard, I.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Grove, J. E.; Abdo, A. A.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guillemot, L.; Gwon, C.; Johnston, S.; Harding, A. K.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind gamma-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (<= 2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of gamma-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient gamma-ray producers. The gamma-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few Ge V, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of approx 10(exp 30) - 10(exp 31) erg/s are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  5. THREE MILLISECOND PULSARS IN FERMI LAT UNASSOCIATED BRIGHT SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Wolff, M. T.; Grove, J. E.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, Oe.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Cheung, C. C.; Abdo, A. A.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; Cognard, I.; Freire, P. C. C.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D. E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil

    2011-01-20

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and {gamma}-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind {gamma}-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby ({<=}2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of {gamma}-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient {gamma}-ray producers. The {gamma}-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few GeV, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of {approx}10{sup 30}-10{sup 31} erg s{sup -1} are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  6. Essential amino acid transporter Lat4 (Slc43a2) is required for mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Guetg, Adriano; Mariotta, Luca; Bock, Lukas; Herzog, Brigitte; Fingerhut, Ralph; Camargo, Simone M R; Verrey, François

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid (AA) uniporter Lat4 (Slc43a2) mediates facilitated diffusion of branched-chain AAs, methionine and phenylalanine, although its physiological role and subcellular localization are not known. We report that Slc43a2 knockout mice were born at expected Mendelian frequency but displayed an ∼10% intrauterine growth retardation and low amniotic fluid AAs, suggesting defective transplacental transport. Postnatal growth was strongly reduced, with premature death occurring within 9 days such that further investigations were made within 3 days of birth. Lat4 immunofluorescence showed a strong basolateral signal in the small intestine, kidney proximal tubule and thick ascending limb epithelial cells of wild-type but not Slc43a2 null littermates and no signal in liver and skeletal muscle. Experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that Lat4 functioned as a symmetrical low affinity uniporter with a K0.5 of ∼5 mm for both in- and efflux. Plasma AA concentration was decreased in Slc43a2 null pups, in particular that of non-essential AAs alanine, serine, histidine and proline. Together with an increased level of plasma long chain acylcarnitines and a strong alteration of liver gene expression, this indicates malnutrition. Attempts to rescue pups by decreasing the litter size or by nutrients injected i.p. did not succeed. Radioactively labelled leucine but not lysine given per os accumulated in the small intestine of Slc43a2null pups, suggesting the defective transcellular transport of Lat4 substrates. In summary, Lat4 is a symmetrical uniporter for neutral essential AAs localizing at the basolateral side of (re)absorbing epithelia and is necessary for early nutrition and development. Key points Lat4 (Slc43a2) transports branched-chain amino acids, phenylalanine and methionine, and is expressed in kidney tubule and small intestine epithelial cells. Using a new knockout model as a negative control, it is shown that Lat4 is expressed at the basolateral

  7. High flux heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Edward M.; Mackowski, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    This interim report documents the results of the first two phases of a four-phase program to develop a high flux heat exchanger for cooling future high performance aircraft electronics. Phase 1 defines future needs for high flux heat removal in advanced military electronics systems. The results are sorted by broad application categories: (1) commercial digital systems, (2) military data processors, (3) power processors, and (4) radar and optical systems. For applications expected to be fielded in five to ten years, the outlook is for steady state flux levels of 30-50 W/sq cm for digital processors and several hundred W/sq cm for power control applications. In Phase 1, a trade study was conducted on emerging cooling technologies which could remove a steady state chip heat flux of 100 W/sq cm while holding chip junction temperature to 90 C. Constraints imposed on heat exchanger design, in order to reflect operation in a fighter aircraft environment, included a practical lower limit on coolant supply temperature, the preference for a nontoxic, nonflammable, and nonfreezing coolant, the need to minimize weight and volume, and operation in an accelerating environment. The trade study recommended the Compact High Intensity Cooler (CHIC) for design, fabrication, and test in the final two phases of this program.

  8. Enrico: Python package to simplify Fermi-LAT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, David; Deil, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Enrico analyzes Fermi data. It produces spectra (model fit and flux points), maps and lightcurves for a target by editing a config file and running a python script which executes the Fermi science tool chain.

  9. Fermi-LAT Detection of an Unusual Hard Spectrum and Enhanced Gamma-ray Emission from the FSRQ PKS B1035-281

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Ojha, Roopesh

    2016-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed increasing gamma-ray flux and an unusually hard spectrum from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS B1035-281 (also known as 3FGL J1037.5-2821, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23) with radio coordinates R.A.: 159.4269058 deg, Dec: -28.3844750 deg (J2000, Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13) at redshift z=1.066 (Shaw et al. 2012, ApJ, 748, 49). Preliminary analysis indicates that on 24 February 2016 this source was in a high-flux state, with a daily averaged gamma-ray flux (E > 100MeV) of (0.7+/-0.1) X 10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1 (statistical uncertainty only) corresponding to a flux increase of a factor of about 30 over its four-year average flux (3FGL J1037.5-2821).

  10. Fluxes of diffuse gamma rays and neutrinos from cosmic-ray interactions with the circumgalactic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashev, Oleg; Troitsky, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    The Milky Way is surrounded by a gravitationally bound gas corona extending up to the Galaxy's virial radius. Interactions of cosmic-ray particles with this gas give rise to energetic secondary gamma rays and neutrinos. We present a quantitative analysis of the neutrino and gamma-ray fluxes from the corona of the Milky Way together with a combined contribution of coronae of other galaxies. The high-energy neutrino flux is insufficient to explain the IceCube results, while the contribution to the FERMI-LAT diffuse gamma-ray flux is not negligible.

  11. Probing the cosmic-ray content of galaxy clusters by stacking Fermi-LAT count maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, B.; Tchernin, C.; Eckert, D.; Farnier, C.; Manalaysay, A.; Straumann, U.; Walter, R.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: Radio observations have shown that galaxy clusters are giant reservoirs of cosmic rays (CR). Although a gamma-ray signal from the cluster volume is expected to arise through interactions of CR protons with the ambient plasma, a confirming observation is still missing. Methods: We searched for a cumulative gamma-ray emission in the direction of galaxy clusters by analysing a collection of stacked Fermi-LAT count maps. Additionally, we investigated possible systematic differences in the emission between cool-core and non-cool-core cluster populations. Results: Making use of a sample of 53 clusters selected from the HIFLUGCS catalog, we do not detect a significant signal from the stacked sample. The upper limit on the average flux per cluster derived for the total stacked sample is at the level of a few 10-11 ph cm-2 s-1 at a 95% confidence level in the 1-300 GeV band, assuming power-law spectra with photon indices 2.0, 2.4, 2.8, and 3.2. Separate stacking of the cool-core and non-cool-core clusters in the sample lead to similar values of around 5 × 10-11 ph cm-2 s-1 and 2 × 10-11 ph cm-2 s-1, respectively. Conclusions: Under the assumption that decaying π0, produced in collisions between CRs and the ambient thermal gas, are responsible for gamma-ray emission, we set upper limits on the average CR content in galaxy clusters. For the entire cluster population, our upper limit on the gamma-ray flux translates into an upper limit on the average CR-to-thermal energy ratio of 4.6% for a photon index of 2.4, although it is possible for individual systems to exceed this limit. Our 95% upper limits are at the level expected from numerical simulations, which most likely suggests that the injection of CR at cosmological shocks is less efficient than previously assumed.

  12. A kinase shRNA screen links LATS2 and the pRB tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Tschöp, Katrin; Conery, Andrew R; Litovchick, Larisa; Decaprio, James A; Settleman, Jeffrey; Harlow, Ed; Dyson, Nicholas

    2011-04-15

    pRB-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation is a complex process that depends on the action of many proteins. However, little is known about the specific pathways that cooperate with the Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and the variables that influence pRB's ability to arrest tumor cells. Here we describe two shRNA screens that identify kinases that are important for pRB to suppress cell proliferation and pRB-mediated induction of senescence markers. The results reveal an unexpected effect of LATS2, a component of the Hippo pathway, on pRB-induced phenotypes. Partial knockdown of LATS2 strongly suppresses some pRB-induced senescence markers. Further analysis shows that LATS2 cooperates with pRB to promote the silencing of E2F target genes, and that reduced levels of LATS2 lead to defects in the assembly of DREAM (DP, RB [retinoblastoma], E2F, and MuvB) repressor complexes at E2F-regulated promoters. Kinase assays show that LATS2 can phosphorylate DYRK1A, and that it enhances the ability of DYRK1A to phosphorylate the DREAM subunit LIN52. Intriguingly, the LATS2 locus is physically linked with RB1 on 13q, and this region frequently displays loss of heterozygosity in human cancers. Our results reveal a functional connection between the pRB and Hippo tumor suppressor pathways, and suggest that low levels of LATS2 may undermine the ability of pRB to induce a permanent cell cycle arrest in tumor cells.

  13. Cloning of two genes (LAT1,2) encoding specific L: -arabinose transporters of the L: -arabinose fermenting yeast Ambrosiozyma monospora.

    PubMed

    Verho, Ritva; Penttilä, Merja; Richard, Peter

    2011-07-01

    We identified and characterized two genes, LAT1 and LAT2, which encode specific L: -arabinose transporters. The genes were identified in the L: -arabinose fermenting yeast Ambrosiozyma monospora. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae had only very low L: -arabinose transport activity; however, when LAT1 or LAT2 was expressed, L: -arabinose transport was facilitated. When the LAT1 or LAT2 were expressed in an S. cerevisiae mutant where the main hexose transporters were deleted, the L: -arabinose transporters could not restore growth on D: -glucose, D: -fructose, D: -mannose or D: -galactose. This indicates that these sugars are not transported and suggests that the transporters are specific for L: -arabinose.

  14. Energetic particle characteristics of magnetotail flux ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    During the recent ISEE-3 Geotail Mission three events have been identified from the magnetometer data which are consistent with a spacecraft crossing of a magnetotail flux rope. Energetic electron and proton observations obtained by the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system during two of the possible flux rope events are presented. During one event remote sensing of the flux rope with energetic protons reveals that the flux rope is crossed by the spacecraft from south to north. This allows determination of the bandedness of the magnetic field twist and of the flux rope velocity relative to the spacecraft. A minimal flux rope radius of 3 earth radii is derived. Energetic proton intensity is highest just inside of the flux rope and decreases towards the core. Energetic electrons are streaming tailward near the outer boundary, indicating openness of the field lines, and are isotropic through the inner part of the flux rope.

  15. ENERGETIC FERMI/LAT GRB 100414A: ENERGETIC AND CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, Yuji; Tsai, Patrick P.; Huang, Kuiyun; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Tashiro, Makoto S.

    2012-03-20

    This study presents multi-wavelength observational results for energetic GRB 100414A with GeV photons. The prompt spectral fitting using Suzaku/WAM data yielded spectral peak energies of E{sup src}{sub peak} of 1458.7{sup +132.6}{sub -106.6} keV and E{sub iso} of 34.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 52} erg with z = 1.368. The optical afterglow light curves between 3 and 7 days were effectively fitted according to a simple power law with a temporal index of {alpha} = -2.6 {+-} 0.1. The joint light curve with earlier Swift/UVOT observations yields a temporal break at 2.3 {+-} 0.2 days. This was the first Fermi/LAT detected event that demonstrated the clear temporal break in the optical afterglow. The jet opening angle derived from this temporal break was 5.{sup 0}8, consistent with those of other well-observed long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The multi-wavelength analyses in this study showed that GRB 100414A follows E{sup src}{sub peak}-E{sub iso} and E{sup src}{sub peak}-E{sub {gamma}} correlations. The late afterglow revealed a flatter evolution with significant excesses at 27.2 days. The most straightforward explanation for the excess is that GRB 100414A was accompanied by a contemporaneous supernova. The model light curve based on other GRB-SN events is marginally consistent with that of the observed light curve.

  16. Identification of a novel latency-specific splice donor signal within the herpes simplex virus type 1 2.0-kilobase latency-associated transcript (LAT): translation inhibition of LAT open reading frames by the intron within the 2.0-kilobase LAT.

    PubMed

    Spivack, J G; Woods, G M; Fraser, N W

    1991-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 establishes latent infection in trigeminal ganglia of mice infected via the eye. A family of three colinear viral transcripts (LATs), 2.0, 1.5, and 1.45 kb, is present in latently infected ganglia. To characterize these LATs, lambda gt10 cDNA libraries were constructed with RNAs isolated from the trigeminal ganglia of latently infected mice. A series of recombinant bacteriophage were isolated containing cDNA inserts covering 1.7 kb of the 2.0-kb LAT. Splice junctions of the smaller LATs and the 3' end of the 2.0-kb LAT were identified by sequence analysis of RNA polymerase chain reaction products. No splice acceptor site, which does not support the hypotheses that the 2.0-kb LAT is an intron. However, the data are consistent with the possibility of a short leader sequence or multiple LAT transcription start sites. To generate the smaller 1.5- and 1.45-kb LATs, there is a 559-nucleotide intron spliced from the 2.0-kb LAT in strain F and a 556-nucleotide intron in strain 17+. The nucleotide sequences at the 5' and 3' ends of these introns are characteristic of spliced transcripts from eukaryotic protein-encoding genes, with one significant difference; i.e., the 5' end of the LAT intron is GC instead of the consensus sequence GT. This splice donor sequence is conserved in herpes simplex virus type 1 strains F, 17+, and KOS. Processing of the 2.0-kb LAT to form the spliced LATs preserves two open reading frames (ORFs) at the 3' end of the LATs; no new ORFs are created. Splicing of the LATs positions a 276-nucleotide leader sequence close to these ORFs and removes an intron that inhibits their translation in vitro. The novel 5' structure of the intron within the 2.0-kb LAT may be part of a control mechanism for transcription processing that results in splicing of the LATs only in sensory neurons during latent infection and reactivation but not during the viral replication cycle.

  17. PSR J0007+7303 in the CTA1 SNR: New Gamma-ray Results from Two Years of Fermi-LAT Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Wood, K. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Gargano, F.; Giordano, F.; Ray, P. S.; Parent, D.; Harding, A. K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Wood, D. L.; Wolff, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main results of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope is the discovery of gamma-ray selected pulsars. The high magnetic field pulsar, PSR J0007+7303 in CTA1, was the first ever to be discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations. Based on analysis of 2 years of LAT survey data, we report on the discovery of I-ray emission in the off-pulse phase interval at the approx. 6sigma level. The flux from this emission in the energy range E > or =::: 100 MeV is F(sub 100) = (1.73+/-0.40) x 10(exp -8) photons/sq cm/s and is best fitted by a power law with a photon index of Gamma = 2.54+/-0.14. The pulsed gamma-ray flux in the same energy range is F(sub 100) = (3.95+/-0.07) x 10(exp -7) photons/sq cm/s and is best fitted by an exponentially-cutoff power-law spectrum with a photon index of Gamma = 1.41+/-0.23 and a cutoff energy E(sub c) = 4.04+/-0.20 GeV. We find no flux variability neither at the 2009 May glitch nor in the long term behavior. We model the gamma-ray light curve with two high-altitude emission models, the outer gap and slot gap, and find that the model that best fits the data depends strongly on the assumed origin of the off-pulse emission. Both models favor a large angle between the magnetic axis and observer line of sight, consistent with the nondetection of radio emission being a geometrical effect. Finally we discuss how the LAT results bear on the understanding of the cooling of this neutron star.

  18. Confronting Galactic and Extragalactic γ-Rays Observed by Fermi-LAT with Annihilating Dark Matter in an Inert Higgs Doublet Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Modak, Kamakshya; Majumdar, Debasish

    2015-08-01

    In this thorough study, we focus on the indirect detection of dark matter (DM) through the examination of unexplained galactic and extragalactic γ-ray signatures for a low-mass DM model. For this purpose, we consider a simple Higgs-portal DM model, namely, the inert Higgs doublet model (IHDM) where the SM is extended with an additional complex SU(2)L doublet scalar. The stability of the DM candidate in this model, i.e., the lightest neutral scalar component of the extra doublet, is ensured by imposing discrete {{{Z}}}2 symmetry. The reduced-{χ }2 analysis using theoretical, experimental, and observational constraints suggests that the best-fit value of DM mass in this model is ∼63.5 GeV. We analyze the anomalous GeV γ-ray excess from the Galactic Center in light of the best-fit IHDM parameters. We further check the consistency of the best-fit IHDM parameters with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) obtained limits on photon flux for 18 Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) known to be mostly dominated by DM. Also, since the γ-ray signal from DM annihilation is assumed to be embedded within the extragalactic γ-ray background (EGB), the theoretical calculations of photon flux for the best-fit parameter point in the IHDM framework are compared with the Fermi-LAT results for diffuse and isotropic EGB for different extragalactic and astrophysical background parametrizations. We show that the low-mass DM in the IHDM framework can satisfactorily account for all of the observed continuum γ-ray fluxes originating from galactic and extragalactic sources. The extensive analysis performed in this work is valid for any Higgs-portal model with DM mass comparable to that considered in this work.

  19. Cerebral Cortex Hyperthyroidism of Newborn Mct8-Deficient Mice Transiently Suppressed by Lat2 Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Bárbara; Martínez de Mena, Raquel; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Nunes, Virginia; Palacín, Manuel; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M.; Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone entry into cells is facilitated by transmembrane transporters. Mutations of the specific thyroid hormone transporter, MCT8 (Monocarboxylate Transporter 8, SLC16A2) cause an X-linked syndrome of profound neurological impairment and altered thyroid function known as the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. MCT8 deficiency presumably results in failure of thyroid hormone to reach the neural target cells in adequate amounts to sustain normal brain development. However during the perinatal period the absence of Mct8 in mice induces a state of cerebral cortex hyperthyroidism, indicating increased brain access and/or retention of thyroid hormone. The contribution of other transporters to thyroid hormone metabolism and action, especially in the context of MCT8 deficiency is not clear. We have analyzed the role of the heterodimeric aminoacid transporter Lat2 (Slc7a8), in the presence or absence of Mct8, on thyroid hormone concentrations and on expression of thyroid hormone-dependent cerebral cortex genes. To this end we generated Lat2-/-, and Mct8-/yLat2-/- mice, to compare with wild type and Mct8-/y mice during postnatal development. As described previously the single Mct8 KO neonates had a transient increase of 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine concentration and expression of thyroid hormone target genes in the cerebral cortex. Strikingly the absence of Lat2 in the double Mct8Lat2 KO prevented the effect of Mct8 inactivation in newborns. The Lat2 effect was not observed from postnatal day 5 onwards. On postnatal day 21 the Mct8 KO displayed the typical pattern of thyroid hormone concentrations in plasma, decreased cortex 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine concentration and Hr expression, and concomitant Lat2 inactivation produced little to no modifications. As Lat2 is expressed in neurons and in the choroid plexus, the results support a role for Lat2 in the supply of thyroid hormone to the cerebral cortex during early postnatal development. PMID:24819605

  20. Constraints on the pMSSM from LAT Observations of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R.C.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Murgia, S.; Bloom, E.D.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2012-03-15

    We examine the ability for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) to constrain Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) dark matter through a combined analysis of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We examine the Lightest Supersymmetric Particles (LSPs) for a set of {approx}71k experimentally valid supersymmetric models derived from the phenomenological-MSSM (pMSSM). We find that none of these models can be excluded at 95% confidence by the current analysis; nevertheless, many lie within the predicted reach of future LAT analyses. With two years of data, we find that the LAT is currently most sensitive to light LSPs (mLSP < 50 GeV) annihilating into {tau}-pairs and heavier LSPs annihilating into b{bar b}. Additionally, we find that future LAT analyses will be able to probe some LSPs that form a sub-dominant component of dark matter. We directly compare the LAT results to direct detection experiments and show the complementarity of these search methods.

  1. Multiwavelength Observations of the AGN 1ES 0414+009 with VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, Swift-XRT, and MDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Böttcher, M.; Bouvier, A.; Bugaev, V.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huan, H.; Hughes, G.; Hui, C. M.; Imran, A.; Jameil, O.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kerr, J.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lee, K.; Madhavan, A. S.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nelson, T.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Ruppel, J.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Şentürk, G. D.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Stroh, M.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Tsurusaki, K.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vivier, M.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2012-08-01

    We present observations of the BL Lac object 1ES 0414+009 in the >200 GeV gamma-ray band by the VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes. 1ES 0414+009 was observed by VERITAS between 2008 January and 2011 February, resulting in 56.2 hr of good quality pointed observations. These observations resulted in a detection of 822 events from the source corresponding to a statistical significance of 6.4 standard deviations (6.4σ) above the background. The source flux, showing no evidence for variability, is measured as (5.2 ± 1.1stat ± 2.6sys) × 10-12 photons cm-2 s-1 above 200 GeV, equivalent to approximately 2% of the Crab Nebula flux above this energy. The differential photon spectrum from 230 GeV to 850 GeV is well fit by a power law with a photon index of Γ = 3.4 ± 0.5stat ± 0.3sys and a flux normalization of (1.6 ± 0.3stat ± 0.8sys) × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1 at 300 GeV. We also present multiwavelength results taken in the optical (MDM), x-ray (Swift-XRT), and GeV (Fermi-LAT) bands and use these results to construct a broadband spectral energy distribution (SED). Modeling of this SED indicates that homogenous one-zone leptonic scenarios are not adequate to describe emission from the system, with a lepto-hadronic model providing a better fit to the data.

  2. Broad Line Radio Galaxies Observed with Fermi-LAT: The Origin of the GeV Gamma-Ray Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, L.; Takahashi, Y.; Cheung, C.C.; Hayashida, M.; Grandi, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Celotti, A.; Fegan, S.J.; Fortin, P.; Maeda, K.; Nakamori, T.; Taylor, G.B.; Tosti, G.; Digel, S.W.; McConville, W.; Finke, J.; D'Ammando, F.; /IASF, Palermo /INAF, Rome

    2012-06-07

    We report on a detailed investigation of the {gamma}-ray emission from 18 broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) based on two years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. We confirm the previously reported detections of 3C 120 and 3C 111 in the GeV photon energy range; a detailed look at the temporal characteristics of the observed {gamma}-ray emission reveals in addition possible flux variability in both sources. No statistically significant {gamma}-ray detection of the other BLRGs was however found in the considered dataset. Though the sample size studied is small, what appears to differentiate 3C 111 and 3C 120 from the BLRGs not yet detected in {gamma}-rays is the particularly strong nuclear radio flux. This finding, together with the indications of the {gamma}-ray flux variability and a number of other arguments presented, indicate that the GeV emission of BLRGs is most likely dominated by the beamed radiation of relativistic jets observed at intermediate viewing angles. In this paper we also analyzed a comparison sample of high accretion-rate Seyfert 1 galaxies, which can be considered radio-quiet counterparts of BLRGs, and found none were detected in {gamma}-rays. A simple phenomenological hybrid model applied for the broad-band emission of the discussed radio-loud and radio-quiet type 1 active galaxies suggests that the relative contribution of the nuclear jets to the accreting matter is {ge} 1% on average for BLRGs, while {le} 0.1% for Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  3. Probing gamma-ray emissions of Fermi-LAT pulsars with a non-stationary outer gap model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, J.; Ng, C. W.; Cheng, K. S.

    2016-02-01

    We explore a non-stationary outer gap scenario for gamma-ray emission process in pulsar magnetosphere. Electrons/positrons that migrate along the magnetic field line and enter the outer gap from the outer/inner boundaries activate the pair-creation cascade and high-energy emission process. In our model, the rate of the particle injection at the gap boundaries is key physical quantity to control the gap structure and properties of the gamma-ray spectrum. Our model assumes that the injection rate is time variable and the observed gamma-ray spectrum are superposition of the emissions from different gap structures with different injection rates at the gap boundaries. The calculated spectrum superposed by assuming power law distribution of the particle injection rate can reproduce sub-exponential cut-off feature in the gamma-ray spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT. We fit the phase-averaged spectra for 43 young/middle-age pulsars and 14 millisecond pulsars with the model. Our results imply that (1) a larger particle injection at the gap boundaries is more frequent for the pulsar with a larger spin-down power and (2) outer gap with an injection rate much smaller than the Goldreich-Julian value produces observed >10 GeV emissions. Fermi-LAT gamma-ray pulsars show that (i) the observed gamma-ray spectrum below cut-off energy tends to be softer for the pulsar with a higher spin-down rate and (ii) the second peak is more prominent in higher energy bands. Based on the results of the fitting, we describe possible theoretical interpretations for these observational properties. We also briefly discuss Crab-like millisecond pulsars that show phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray pulses.

  4. The X-Ray Counterpart to LAT PSR J2021+4026 and Its Interesting Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Becker, W.; Carraminana, A.; De Luca, A.; Dormandy, M.; Harding, A.; Kanbach, G.; O'Dell, S. L.; Parkinson, P. Saz; Ray, P.; Razzano, M.; Romani, R.; Tennant, A. F.; Swarz, D. A.; Thompson, D.; Ziegler, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the likely identification of the X-ray counterpart to LAT PSR J2021+4026, using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S3 and timing analysis of Large Area telescope (LAT) data from the Fermi satellite. The X-ray source that lies closest (10 arcsec) to the position determined from the Fermi-LAT timing solution has no cataloged infrared-to-visible counterpart and we have set an upper limit to its optical I and R band emission. The source exhibits a X-ray spectrum which is different when compared to Geminga and CTA 1, and this may have implications for the evolutionary track of radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars.

  5. Sharper Fermi LAT images: instrument response functions for an improved event selection

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2014-11-20

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has a point-spread function (PSF) with large tails, consisting of events affected by tracker inefficiencies, inactive volumes, and hard scattering; these tails can make source confusion a limiting factor. The parameter CTBCORE, available in the publicly available Extended Fermi LAT data (available at http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/data/access/), estimates the quality of each event's direction reconstruction; by implementing a cut in this parameter, the tails of the PSF can be suppressed at the cost of losing effective area. We implement cuts on CTBCORE and present updated instrument response functions derived from the Fermi LAT data itself, along with all-sky maps generated with these cuts. Having shown the effectiveness of these cuts, especially at low energies, we encourage their use in analyses where angular resolution is more important than Poisson noise.

  6. Sharper Fermi LAT Images: Instrument Response Functions for an Improved Event Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2014-11-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has a point-spread function (PSF) with large tails, consisting of events affected by tracker inefficiencies, inactive volumes, and hard scattering; these tails can make source confusion a limiting factor. The parameter CTBCORE, available in the publicly available Extended Fermi LAT data (available at http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/data/access/), estimates the quality of each event's direction reconstruction; by implementing a cut in this parameter, the tails of the PSF can be suppressed at the cost of losing effective area. We implement cuts on CTBCORE and present updated instrument response functions derived from the Fermi LAT data itself, along with all-sky maps generated with these cuts. Having shown the effectiveness of these cuts, especially at low energies, we encourage their use in analyses where angular resolution is more important than Poisson noise.

  7. Simulation of a two step TGF ignition above cloudtops with MeV electron input fluxes generated in the electric fields of lightning streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of high energy electrons which contribute to the Runaway Electron Avalanche of a TGF are not precisely known, or yet observed, though the most obvious source would seem to be the products of cosmic ray showers, or electron avalanches generated in the high electric field near the tips of lightning leaders. With our TGF simulation software package LEPTRACK we can easily create all kinds of electric field geometries and are investigating the second scenario with combinations of lightning leader and streamer micro-fields producing electron avalanches, which may or may not be runaway, which are then input to the macro-fields expected at or above thunderstorm cloudtops.We will present the detailed evolution of photon, electron, neutron/proton and ionization density fields resulting to demonstrate the possibility that TGF origin is not one of the two models currently proposed but may be a combination of both.

  8. A Case of Leser-Trélat Syndrome Associated with a Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Dietrich; Puhlmann, Silvio; Barth, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratoses can often be found in elderly people. In general, they appear gradually. In cases of a sudden eruption with itching it might be paraneoplastic. Although some authors doubt the existence of the paraneoplastic Leser-Trélat syndrome, we present a case of sudden eruption of seborrheic keratoses connected with a newly diagnosed renal cell carcinoma. As far as we know, this is the first case report of a Leser-Trélat syndrome with a malignancy of the kidney. PMID:26500537

  9. Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Observations of Nova Lupus 2016 (ASASSN-16kt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Jean, P.; Shore, S. N.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope performed a ~6-day Target of Opportunity (ToO) observation of Nova Lupus 2016 (ATel #9538, #9539, CBET #4322) that commenced on September 28. Considering earlier all-sky survey Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations as well, preliminary analysis indicates gamma-ray emission at ~2 sigma was detected around 1 to 2 days after the optical peak on September 25th (pre-validated AAVSO visual lightcurve; ATel #9550, CBET #4322) when the optical spectra show opaque ejecta, similar to previous gamma-ray detected novae (Fermi-LAT collaboration, 2014 Science 345, 554; Cheung et al. 2016 ApJ 826, 142).

  10. First Results From GLAST-LAT Integrated Towers Cosmic Ray Data Taking And Monte Carlo Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Brigida, M.; Caliandro, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giordano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Loparco, F.; Marangelli, B.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Mirizzi, N.; Raino, S.; Spinelli, P.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari

    2007-02-15

    GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a gamma ray telescope instrumented with silicon-strip detector planes and sheets of converter, followed by a calorimeter (CAL) and surrounded by an anticoincidence system (ACD). This instrument is sensitive to gamma rays in the energy range between 20 MeV and 300 GeV. At present, the first towers have been integrated and pre-launch data taking with cosmic ray muons is being performed. The results from the data analysis carried out during LAT integration will be discussed and a comparison with the predictions from the Monte Carlo simulation will be shown.

  11. VLBA observations of radio faint Fermi-LAT sources above 10 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lico, R.; Giroletti, M.; Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The first Fermi-LAT high-energy source catalog (1FHL), containing γ-ray sources detected above 10 GeV, is an ideal sample for characterizing the physical properties of the most extreme γ-ray sources. Aims: We investigate the pc scale properties of a subsample of radio faint 1FHL sources with the aim of confirming the proposed blazar associations by revealing a compact high brightness temperature radio core, and we propose new low-frequency counterparts for the unassociated γ-ray sources (UGS). Moreover, we increase the number of 1FHL sources with high-resolution observations to explore the possible connection between radio and γ rays at E> 10 GeV. Methods: We observed 84 1FHL sources, mostly blazars of high synchrotron peaked (HSP) type, in the northern sky with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. These sources lack high-resolution radio observations and have at least one NRAO VLA sky survey counterpart within the 95% confidence radius. For those sources without a well-identified radio counterpart we exploit the VLBA multiple phase-center correlation capability to identify the possible low-frequency candidates. Results: For ~93% of the sources in our sample we reveal a compact high brightness temperature radio core, which supports their proposed blazar association. The vast majority of the detected sources are radio weak, with a median VLBI flux density value of 16.3 mJy. For the detected sources we obtain an average brightness temperature on the order of 2 × 1010 K. We find a compact component for 16 UGS, for which we propose a new low-frequency association. Conclusions: We find brightness temperature values that do not require high Doppler factors, and are in agreement with the expected values for the equipartition of energy between particles and magnetic field. We find strong indications for the blazar nature of all of the detected UGS, for which we propose new low-frequency associations. The characterization of the physical properties of

  12. Cloning and molecular characterization of cationic amino acid transporter y⁺LAT1 in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jixuan; Tan, Qingsong; Zhu, Wenhuan; Chen, Chen; Liang, Xufang; Pan, Lei

    2014-02-01

    The solute carrier family 7A, member 7 gene encodes the light chain- y⁺L amino acid transporter-1 (y⁺LAT1) of the heterodimeric carrier responsible for cationic amino acid (CAA) transport across the basolateral membranes of epithelial cells in intestine and kidney. Rising attention has been given to y⁺LAT1 involved in CAA metabolic pathways and growth control. The molecular characterization and function analysis of y⁺LAT1 in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) is currently unknown. In the present study, full-length cDNA (2,688 bp), which encodes y⁺LAT1 and contains a 5'-untranslated region (319 bp), an open reading frame (1,506 bp) and a 3'-untranslated region (863 bp), has been cloned from grass carp. Amino acid sequence of grass carp y⁺LAT1 contains 11 transmembrane domains and shows 95 %, 80 % and 75 % sequence similarity to zebra fish, amphibian and mammalian y⁺LAT1, respectively. The tissue distribution and expression regulation by fasting of y⁺LAT1 mRNA were analyzed using real-time PCR. Our results showed that y⁺LAT1 mRNA was highly expressed in midgut, foregut and spleen while weakly expressed in hindgut, kidney, gill, brain, heart, liver and muscle. Nutritional status significantly influenced y⁺LAT1 mRNA expression in fish tissues, such as down-regulation of y⁺LAT1 mRNA expression after fasting (14 days).

  13. Gamma Rays from Radio Galaxies: FERMI/LAT Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandi, Paola

    We review the high energy properties of Misaligned AGNs associated with γ-ray sources detected by Fermi in 24 months of survey. Most of them are nearby emission low power radio galaxies (i.e FRIs) which probably have structured jets. On the contrary, high power radio sources (i.e FRIIs) with GeV emission are rare. The small number of FRIIs does not seem to be related to their higher redshifts. Assuming proportionality between the radio core flux and the γ-ray flux, several of them are expected to be bright enough to be detected above 100 MeV in spite of their distance. We suggest that beaming/jet structural differences are responsible for the detection rate discrepancy observed between FRIs and FRIIs.

  14. Identification of candidate millisecond pulsars from Fermi LAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xue-Jie; Wang, Zhong-Xiang; Vadakkumthani, Jithesh; Xing, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We report our detailed data analysis of 39 γ-ray sources selected from the 992 unassociated sources in the third Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog. The selection criteria, which were set for finding candidate millisecond pulsars (MSPs), are non-variables with curved spectra and >5° Galactic latitudes. From our analysis, 24 sources were found to be point-like sources not contaminated by background or nearby unknown sources. Three of them, J1544.6–1125, J1625.1–0021 and J1653.6–0158, have been previously studied, indicating that they are likely MSPs. The spectra of J0318.1+0252 and J2053.9+2922 do not have properties similar to known γ-ray MSPs, and we thus suggest that they are not MSPs. Analysis of archival X-ray data for most of the 24 sources was also conducted. Four sources were found with X-ray objects in their error circles, and 16 with no detection. The ratios between the γ-ray fluxes and X-ray fluxes or flux upper limits are generally lower than those of known γ-ray MSPs, suggesting that if the γ-ray sources are MSPs, none of the X-ray objects are their counterparts. Deep X-ray or radio observations of these sources are needed in order to identify their MSP nature.

  15. Voyager 2 Observes Energetic Electrons

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the Voyager 2 observations of energetic electrons. Voyager 2 detected a dramatic drop of the flux of electrons as it left the sector region. The intense flux came back as soon ...

  16. Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Bursts and Insights from Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.

    2010-01-01

    A new revolution in Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) observations and theory has begun over the last two years since the launch of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The new window into high energy gamma-rays opened by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) is providing insight into prompt emission mechanisms and possibly also afterglow physics. The LAT detected GRBs appear to be a new unique subset of extremely energetic and bright bursts compared to the large sample detected by Swift over the last 6 years. In this talk, I will discuss the context and recent discoveries from these LAT GRBs and the large database of broadband observations collected by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) and UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Through comparisons between the GRBs detected by Swift-BAT, G8M, and LAT, we can learn about the unique characteristics, physical differences, and the relationships between each population. These population characteristics provide insight into the different physical parameters that contribute to the diversity of observational GRB properties.

  17. Novel Technique for Monitoring the Performance of the LAT Instrument on Board the GLAST Satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Paneque, D.; Borgland, A.; Bovier, A.; Bloom, E.; Edmonds, Y.; Funk, S.; Godfrey, G.; Rando, R.; Wai, L.; Wang, P.

    2007-06-13

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an observatory designed to perform gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range 20 MeV to 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 25 MeV. GLAST will be launched at the end of 2007, opening a new and important window on a wide variety of high energy astrophysical phenomena . The main instrument of GLAST is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which provides break-through high-energy measurements using techniques typically used in particle detectors for collider experiments. The LAT consists of 16 identical towers in a four-by-four grid, each one containing a pair conversion tracker and a hodoscopic crystal calorimeter, all covered by a segmented plastic scintillator anti-coincidence shield. The scientific return of the instrument depends very much on how accurately we know its performance, and how well we can monitor it and correct potential problems promptly. We report on a novel technique that we are developing to help in the characterization and monitoring of LAT by using the power of classification trees to pinpoint in a short time potential problems in the recorded data. The same technique could also be used to evaluate the effect on the overall LAT performance produced by potential instrumental problems.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fermi LAT third source catalog (3FGL) (Acero+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; Deklotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez-Conde, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schulz, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer J. G, .; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; van Klaveren, B.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2015-08-01

    The data for the 3FGL catalog were taken during the period from 2008 August 4 (15:43 UTC) to 2012 July 31 (22:46 UTC), to covering close to 4yr. The LAT detects γ-rays in the energy range from 20MeV to more than 300GeV. (3 data files).

  19. 2FHL: The Second Catalog of Hard Fermi-LAT Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Furniss, A. K.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Hartmann, Dieter; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Romani, R. W.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, M.; Takahashi, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog of sources detected above 50 GeV by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) in 80 months of data. The newly delivered Pass 8 event-level analysis allows the detection and characterization of sources in the 50 GeV-2 TeV energy range. In this energy band, Fermi-LAT has detected 360 sources, which constitute the second catalog of hard Fermi-LAT sources (2FHL). The improved angular resolution enables the precise localization of point sources (˜1.‧7 radius at 68% C. L.) and the detection and characterization of spatially extended sources. We find that 86% of the sources can be associated with counterparts at other wavelengths, of which the majority (75%) are active galactic nuclei and the rest (11%) are Galactic sources. Only 25% of the 2FHL sources have been previously detected by Cherenkov telescopes, implying that the 2FHL provides a reservoir of candidates to be followed up at very high energies. This work closes the energy gap between the observations performed at GeV energies by Fermi-LAT on orbit and the observations performed at higher energies by Cherenkov telescopes from the ground.

  20. Regulation of the human LAT gene by the Elf-1 transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Finco, Timothy S; Justice-Healy, Geri E; Patel, Shivani J; Hamilton, Victoria E

    2006-01-01

    Background The LAT gene encodes an intracellular adaptor protein that links cell-surface receptor engagement to numerous downstream signalling events, and thereby plays an integral role in the function of cell types that express the gene, including T cells, mast cells, natural killer cells, and platelets. To date, the mechanisms responsible for the transcriptional regulation of this gene have not been investigated. Results In this study we have mapped the transcriptional start sites for the human LAT gene and localized the 5' and 3' boundaries of the proximal promoter. We find that the promoter contains both positive and negative regulatory regions, and that two binding sites for the Ets family of transcription factors have a strong, positive effect on gene expression. Each site binds the Ets family member Elf-1, and overexpression of Elf-1 augments LAT promoter activity. The promoter also contains a Runx binding site adjacent to one of the Ets sites. This site, which is shown to bind Runx-1, has an inhibitory effect on gene expression. Finally, data is also presented indicating that the identified promoter may regulate cell-type specific expression. Conclusion Collectively, these results provide the first insights into the transcriptional regulation of the LAT gene, including the discovery that the Ets transcription factor Elf-1 may play a central role in its expression. PMID:16464244

  1. Fermi LAT Gamma-ray Observations of IceCube-160731

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Toomey, M. W.; Kocevski, D.; Buson, S.

    2016-08-01

    We report follow-up of the extremely high-energy (EHE) IceCube-160731 neutrino event (AMON GCN notice; http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/notices_amon/6888376_128290.amon) with all-sky survey data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  2. Dephosphorylation of the adaptor LAT and phospholipase C-γ by SHP-1 inhibits natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Matalon, Omri; Fried, Sophia; Ben-Shmuel, Aviad; Pauker, Maor H; Joseph, Noah; Keizer, Danielle; Piterburg, Marina; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells discriminate between healthy cells and virally infected or transformed self-cells by tuning activating and inhibitory signals received through cell surface receptors. Inhibitory receptors inhibit NK cell function by recruiting and activating the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) to the plasma membrane. However, to date, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor VAV1 is the only direct SHP-1 substrate identified in NK cells. We reveal that the adaptor protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) as well as phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) and PLC-γ2 are SHP-1 substrates. Dephosphorylation of Tyr(132) in LAT by SHP-1 in NK cells abrogated the recruitment of PLC-γ1 and PLC-γ2 to the immunological synapse between the NK cell and a cancer cell target, which reduced NK cell degranulation and target cell killing. Furthermore, the ubiquitylation of LAT by the E3 ubiquitin ligases c-Cbl and Cbl-b, which was induced by LAT phosphorylation, led to the degradation of LAT in response to the engagement of inhibitory receptors on NK cells, which abrogated NK cell cytotoxicity. Knockdown of the Cbl proteins blocked LAT ubiquitylation, which promoted NK cell function. Expression of a ubiquitylation-resistant mutant LAT blocked inhibitory receptor signaling, enabling cells to become activated. Together, these data identify previously uncharacterized SHP-1 substrates and inhibitory mechanisms that determine the response of NK cells.

  3. SPECTRA OF COSMIC RAY ELECTRONS AND DIFFUSE GAMMA RAYS WITH THE CONSTRAINTS OF AMS-02 AND HESS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ding; Jin, Hong-Bo; Huang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    Recently, AMS-02 reported their results of cosmic ray (CR) observations. In addition to the AMS-02 data, we add HESS data to estimate the spectra of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays above TeV. In the conventional diffusion model, a global analysis is performed on the spectral features of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays by the GALRPOP package. The results show that the spectrum structure of the primary component of CR electrons cannot be fully reproduced by a simple power law and that the relevant break is around 100 GeV. At the 99% confidence level (C.L.) the injection indices above the break decrease from 2.54 to 2.35, but the ones below the break are only in the range of 2.746–2.751. The spectrum of CR electrons does not need to add TeV cutoff to also match the features of the HESS data. Based on the difference between the fluxes of CR electrons and their primary components, the predicted excess of CR positrons is consistent with the interpretation that these positrons originate from a pulsar or dark matter. In the analysis of the Galactic diffuse gamma rays with the indirect constraint of AMS-02 and HESS data, it is found that the fluxes of Galactic diffuse gamma rays are consistent with the GeV data of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the high-latitude regions. The results indicate that inverse Compton scattering is the dominant component in the range of hundreds of GeV to tens of TeV, respectively from the high-latitude regions to the low ones, and in all of the regions of the Galaxy the flux of diffuse gamma rays is less than that of CR electrons at the energy scale of 20 TeV.

  4. Spectra of Cosmic Ray Electrons and Diffuse Gamma Rays with the Constraints of AMS-02 and HESS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ding; Huang, Jing; Jin, Hong-Bo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, AMS-02 reported their results of cosmic ray (CR) observations. In addition to the AMS-02 data, we add HESS data to estimate the spectra of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays above TeV. In the conventional diffusion model, a global analysis is performed on the spectral features of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays by the GALRPOP package. The results show that the spectrum structure of the primary component of CR electrons cannot be fully reproduced by a simple power law and that the relevant break is around 100 GeV. At the 99% confidence level (C.L.) the injection indices above the break decrease from 2.54 to 2.35, but the ones below the break are only in the range of 2.746–2.751. The spectrum of CR electrons does not need to add TeV cutoff to also match the features of the HESS data. Based on the difference between the fluxes of CR electrons and their primary components, the predicted excess of CR positrons is consistent with the interpretation that these positrons originate from a pulsar or dark matter. In the analysis of the Galactic diffuse gamma rays with the indirect constraint of AMS-02 and HESS data, it is found that the fluxes of Galactic diffuse gamma rays are consistent with the GeV data of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the high-latitude regions. The results indicate that inverse Compton scattering is the dominant component in the range of hundreds of GeV to tens of TeV, respectively from the high-latitude regions to the low ones, and in all of the regions of the Galaxy the flux of diffuse gamma rays is less than that of CR electrons at the energy scale of 20 TeV.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The second Fermi-LAT >50GeV catalog (2FHL) (Ackermann+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; di Mauro, M.; di Venere, L.; Dominguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Furniss, A. K.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Hartmann, D.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; John Son, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Knodlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Romani, R. W.; Sanchez-Conde, M.; Parkinson, P. M. S.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, M.; Takahashi, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has been surveying the whole sky since 2008 August. In this paper we use 80 months of Pass 8 data to produce a catalog of sources detected by the LAT at energies between 50GeV and 2TeV. This constitutes the second catalog of hard Fermi-LAT sources, named 2FHL, which allows a thorough study of the properties of the whole sky in the sub-TeV domain. (4 data files).

  6. Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Detections of Classical Novae V1369 Centauri 2013 and V5668 Sagittarii 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Jean, P.; Shore, S. N.; Stawarz, Ł.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Knödlseder, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wood, D. L.; Desiante, R.; Longo, F.; Pivato, G.; Wood, K. S.

    2016-08-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detections of high-energy (>100 MeV) γ-ray emission from two recent optically bright classical novae, V1369 Centauri 2013 and V5668 Sagittarii 2015. At early times, Fermi target-of-opportunity observations prompted by their optical discoveries provided enhanced LAT exposure that enabled the detections of γ-ray onsets beginning ˜2 days after their first optical peaks. Significant γ-ray emission was found extending to 39-55 days after their initial LAT detections, with systematically fainter and longer-duration emission compared to previous γ-ray-detected classical novae. These novae were distinguished by multiple bright optical peaks that encompassed the time spans of the observed γ-rays. The γ-ray light curves and spectra of the two novae are presented along with representative hadronic and leptonic models, and comparisons with other novae detected by the LAT are discussed.

  7. Fermi LAT detection of a new high-energy transient gamma-ray source Fermi J0751-5136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, D.; Buson, S.

    2016-08-01

    During the week from 18 July through 25 July, 2016, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed gamma-ray activity from a previously unidentified transient source.

  8. Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Detections of Classical Novae V1369 Centauri 2013 and V5668 Sagittarii 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Jean, P.; Shore, S. N.; Stawarz, Ł.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Knödlseder, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wood, D. L.; Desiante, R.; Longo, F.; Pivato, G.; Wood, K. S.

    2016-08-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detections of high-energy (>100 MeV) γ-ray emission from two recent optically bright classical novae, V1369 Centauri 2013 and V5668 Sagittarii 2015. At early times, Fermi target-of-opportunity observations prompted by their optical discoveries provided enhanced LAT exposure that enabled the detections of γ-ray onsets beginning ˜2 days after their first optical peaks. Significant γ-ray emission was found extending to 39–55 days after their initial LAT detections, with systematically fainter and longer-duration emission compared to previous γ-ray-detected classical novae. These novae were distinguished by multiple bright optical peaks that encompassed the time spans of the observed γ-rays. The γ-ray light curves and spectra of the two novae are presented along with representative hadronic and leptonic models, and comparisons with other novae detected by the LAT are discussed.

  9. Detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars through blind frequency searches using the Fermi LAT.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bignami, G F; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Gwon, C; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Primack, J R; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wolff, M T; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-08-14

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars emitting radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. Although there are more than 1800 known radio pulsars, until recently only seven were observed to pulse in gamma rays, and these were all discovered at other wavelengths. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) makes it possible to pinpoint neutron stars through their gamma-ray pulsations. We report the detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches using the LAT. Most of these pulsars are coincident with previously unidentified gamma-ray sources, and many are associated with supernova remnants. Direct detection of gamma-ray pulsars enables studies of emission mechanisms, population statistics, and the energetics of pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants. PMID:19574346

  10. LAT gel, a powerful tool underused in the repair of paediatric lacerations.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Hill, V K P; Wilson, M H; Felstead, A M

    2014-08-01

    Paediatric lacerations presenting to emergency departments are a common cause of referral to surgical specialties in the UK. LAT gel (lidocaine, adrenaline, and tetracaine) is a safe and effective topical anaesthetic that can aid with the closure of uncomplicated lacerations, particularly in the paediatric trauma setting. The benefits to both the patient and management in terms of the avoidance of a general anaesthetic and the freeing up of hospital resources (e.g. beds, staffing, emergency theatre) make it an invaluable tool in the arsenal of the emergency department. The authors describe a reliable method of anaesthetizing lacerations with LAT gel and question its underuse within the emergency departments in the South West region of the UK. PMID:24861471

  11. A Fermi/LAT Trigger of Grating Observations of One Bright Nova in Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starrfield, Sumner

    2013-09-01

    A new and perplexing result in 2012 was the discovery by the Fermi/LAT that two Classical Novae (Mon 2012 and Sco 2012) were emitting gamma-rays at E > 100 MeV. The cause of this VHE emission is currently not understood but X-ray grating observations early in the outburst should shed light on the cause. We propose to obtain 2 grating spectra with Chandra of one bright CN in outburst. Our target will be determined based on a detection by the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT), a confirmation by ground-based spectroscopy that it is a CN, and a Swift/XRT determination that it is sufficiently bright for an HETG+ACIS-S grating observation. A second spectrum will be obtained with the LETG+HRC-S when the nova has transitioned into the Super Soft Source phase.

  12. Multiwavelength Observations of the TeV Binary LS I +61° 303 with VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, and Swift/XRT during a TeV Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Behera, B.; Berger, K.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Bugaev, V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Rajotte, J.; Ratliff, G.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sembroski, G. H.; Sheidaei, F.; Skole, C.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Zajczyk, A.; Zitzer, B.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of a multiwavelength observational campaign on the TeV binary system LS I +61° 303 with the VERITAS telescope array (>200 GeV), Fermi-LAT (0.3-300 GeV), and Swift/XRT (2-10 keV). The data were taken from 2011 December through 2012 January and show a strong detection in all three wavebands. During this period VERITAS obtained 24.9 hr of quality selected livetime data in which LS I +61° 303 was detected at a statistical significance of 11.9σ. These TeV observations show evidence for nightly variability in the TeV regime at a post-trial significance of 3.6σ. The combination of the simultaneously obtained TeV and X-ray fluxes do not demonstrate any evidence for a correlation between emission in the two bands. For the first time since the launch of the Fermi satellite in 2008, this TeV detection allows the construction of a detailed MeV-TeV spectral energy distribution from LS I +61° 303. This spectrum shows a distinct cutoff in emission near 4 GeV, with emission seen by the VERITAS observations following a simple power-law above 200 GeV. This feature in the spectrum of LS I +61° 303, obtained from overlapping observations with Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, may indicate that there are two distinct populations of accelerated particles producing the GeV and TeV emission.

  13. Multiwavelength observations of the TeV binary LS I +61° 303 with Veritas, Fermi-LAT, and Swift/xrt during a TeV outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Behera, B.; Chen, X.; Federici, S.; Berger, K.; Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Fortin, P.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A. E-mail: sheidaei@physics.utah.edu; and others

    2013-12-10

    We present the results of a multiwavelength observational campaign on the TeV binary system LS I +61° 303 with the VERITAS telescope array (>200 GeV), Fermi-LAT (0.3-300 GeV), and Swift/XRT (2-10 keV). The data were taken from 2011 December through 2012 January and show a strong detection in all three wavebands. During this period VERITAS obtained 24.9 hr of quality selected livetime data in which LS I +61° 303 was detected at a statistical significance of 11.9σ. These TeV observations show evidence for nightly variability in the TeV regime at a post-trial significance of 3.6σ. The combination of the simultaneously obtained TeV and X-ray fluxes do not demonstrate any evidence for a correlation between emission in the two bands. For the first time since the launch of the Fermi satellite in 2008, this TeV detection allows the construction of a detailed MeV-TeV spectral energy distribution from LS I +61° 303. This spectrum shows a distinct cutoff in emission near 4 GeV, with emission seen by the VERITAS observations following a simple power-law above 200 GeV. This feature in the spectrum of LS I +61° 303, obtained from overlapping observations with Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, may indicate that there are two distinct populations of accelerated particles producing the GeV and TeV emission.

  14. Recent Evidence for Gamma-ray Line Emission from Fermi-LAT: WIMP or Artifact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng; Finkbeiner, D. P.

    2013-04-01

    The recent claims of a gamma-ray line in the Galactic center at 130 GeV have generated excitement, not least because it could be a signal of dark matter annihilation. I will summarize the current state of the observations of the Galactic center, clusters, and unassociated halo objects. I will also speculate about models of particle dark matter that could explain the data, and possible systematic of the Fermi-LAT instrument that might contaminate the line detection.

  15. Fermi LAT detection of renewed and strong GeV activity from blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutini, Sara

    2015-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed an intense gamma-ray flare from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279, also known as 3FGL J1256.1-0547 (Acero et al. 2015, APJS, 218, 23), with radio coordinates R.A.: 194.0465271 deg, Dec: -5.7893119 deg (J2000.0; Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  16. Fermi LAT observations of PSR J1119-6127 before and after its recent bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, P. H. Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We report on the Fermi LAT observations of PSR J1119-6127, a rotation-powered pulsar with high magnetic field that showed two magnetar-like bursts on 2016-07-27 13:02:07.91 UT and 2016-07-28 01:27:51 UT, recorded by the Fermi GBM and Swift BAT instruments, respectively (Kennea et al., GCN Circ. 19735/ATel #9274; Younes et al., GCN Circ. 19736).

  17. Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from 4C +01.02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.

    2013-09-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed a gamma-ray outburst from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar 4C +01.02, also known as BZQ J0108+0135 (RA: 01h08m38.8s DEC : +01d35m00s, J2000.0, Kenneth et al. 1995) with redshift z=2.099 (Hewett et al. 1995).

  18. LAT-1 activity of meta-substituted phenylalanine and tyrosine analogs.

    PubMed

    Augustyn, Evan; Finke, Karissa; Zur, Arik A; Hansen, Logan; Heeren, Nathan; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Colas, Claire; Schlessinger, Avner; Thomas, Allen A

    2016-06-01

    The transporter protein Large-neutral Amino Acid Transporter 1 (LAT-1, SLC7A5) is responsible for transporting amino acids such as tyrosine and phenylalanine as well as thyroid hormones, and it has been exploited as a drug delivery mechanism. Recently its role in cancer has become increasingly appreciated, as it has been found to be up-regulated in many different tumor types, and its expression levels have been correlated with prognosis. Substitution at the meta position of aromatic amino acids has been reported to increase affinity for LAT-1; however, the SAR for this position has not previously been explored. Guided by newly refined computational models of the binding site, we hypothesized that groups capable of filling a hydrophobic pocket would increase binding to LAT-1, resulting in improved substrates relative to parent amino acid. Tyrosine and phenylalanine analogs substituted at the meta position with halogens, alkyl and aryl groups were synthesized and tested in cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation cell assays to determine activity. Contrary to our initial hypothesis we found that lipophilicity was correlated with diminished substrate activity and increased inhibition of the transporter. The synthesis and SAR of meta-substituted phenylalanine and tyrosine analogs is described.

  19. LAT-1 activity of meta-substituted phenylalanine and tyrosine analogs.

    PubMed

    Augustyn, Evan; Finke, Karissa; Zur, Arik A; Hansen, Logan; Heeren, Nathan; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Colas, Claire; Schlessinger, Avner; Thomas, Allen A

    2016-06-01

    The transporter protein Large-neutral Amino Acid Transporter 1 (LAT-1, SLC7A5) is responsible for transporting amino acids such as tyrosine and phenylalanine as well as thyroid hormones, and it has been exploited as a drug delivery mechanism. Recently its role in cancer has become increasingly appreciated, as it has been found to be up-regulated in many different tumor types, and its expression levels have been correlated with prognosis. Substitution at the meta position of aromatic amino acids has been reported to increase affinity for LAT-1; however, the SAR for this position has not previously been explored. Guided by newly refined computational models of the binding site, we hypothesized that groups capable of filling a hydrophobic pocket would increase binding to LAT-1, resulting in improved substrates relative to parent amino acid. Tyrosine and phenylalanine analogs substituted at the meta position with halogens, alkyl and aryl groups were synthesized and tested in cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation cell assays to determine activity. Contrary to our initial hypothesis we found that lipophilicity was correlated with diminished substrate activity and increased inhibition of the transporter. The synthesis and SAR of meta-substituted phenylalanine and tyrosine analogs is described. PMID:27106710

  20. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  1. Resolving the hadronic accelerator IC 443 with Fermi-LAT and VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John W.; Hays, Elizabeth A.; Tajima, Hiro; Schmid, Julia; LAT Collaboration, VERITAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) close to molecular clouds are ideal astrophysical laboratories to study cosmic ray acceleration and injection into the Galaxy. The Galactic SNR IC 443 is among the brightest and best-studied of such systems, detected as an extended gamma-ray source at both GeV and TeV energies. Previous observations with the AGILE and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray space telescopes have shown a low-energy cutoff at <200 MeV indicating relativistic protons are responsible for gamma-ray emission. Observations by the MAGIC and VERITAS ground-based gamma-ray telescopes show a steepening spectrum at TeV energies. Now, with updated Fermi-LAT observations using 7 yr of Pass 8 data above 1 GeV, the gamma-ray morphology of IC 443 is revealed as an inhomogeneous shell. Multi-wavelength observations have mapped the detailed physical conditions across the interaction site between the SNR and cloud, allowing us to separately study gamma-ray emission regions on scales less than 10 pc. We find an excellent correlation between GeV gamma-rays and the TeV morphology determined by VERITAS. The combination of new VERITAS and Fermi-LAT observations of IC 443 allows an unprecedented study of the environmental dependence of cosmic-ray diffusion in and around a hadronic accelerator.

  2. Magnetic-flux pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  3. Decreasing Electron Flux through the Cytochrome and/or Alternative Respiratory Pathways Triggers Common and Distinct Cellular Responses Dependent on Growth Conditions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Kristina; Yin, Guangkun; Duncan, Owen; Law, Simon R.; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Kaur, Parwinder; Meyer, Etienne; Wang, Yan; Small, Catherine Colas des Francs; Giraud, Estelle; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2015-01-01

    Diverse signaling pathways are activated by perturbation of mitochondrial function under different growth conditions.Mitochondria have emerged as an important organelle for sensing and coping with stress in addition to being the sites of important metabolic pathways. Here, responses to moderate light and drought stress were examined in different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant plants lacking a functional alternative oxidase (alternative oxidase1a [aox1a]), those with reduced cytochrome electron transport chain capacity (T3/T7 bacteriophage-type RNA polymerase, mitochondrial, and plastidial [rpoTmp]), and double mutants impaired in both pathways (aox1a:rpoTmp). Under conditions considered optimal for growth, transcriptomes of aox1a and rpoTmp were distinct. Under adverse growth conditions, however, transcriptome changes in aox1a and rpoTmp displayed a highly significant overlap and were indicative of a common mitochondrial stress response and down-regulation of photosynthesis. This suggests that the role of mitochondria to support photosynthesis is provided through either the alternative pathway or the cytochrome pathway, and when either pathway is inhibited, such as under environmental stress, a common, dramatic, and succinct mitochondrial signal is activated to alter energy metabolism in both organelles. aox1a:rpoTmp double mutants grown under optimal conditions showed dramatic reductions in biomass production compared with aox1a and rpoTmp and a transcriptome that was distinct from aox1a or rpoTmp. Transcript data indicating activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in aox1a:rpoTmp were supported by a proteomic analysis of over 200 proteins. Under optimal conditions, aox1a:rpoTmp plants seemed to switch on many of the typical mitochondrial stress regulators. Under adverse conditions, aox1a:rpoTmp turned off these responses and displayed a biotic stress response. Taken together, these results highlight the diverse signaling pathways activated by the

  4. Role of transcription and enzyme activities in redistribution of carbon and electron flux in response to N₂ and H₂ sparging of open-batch cultures of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405.

    PubMed

    Carere, Carlo R; Rydzak, Thomas; Cicek, Nazim; Levin, David B; Sparling, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Growth, end-product synthesis, enzyme activities, and transcription of select genes associated with the "malate shunt," pyruvate catabolism, H2 synthesis, and ethanol production were studied in the cellulolytic anaerobe, Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405, during open-batch fermentation of cellobiose to determine the effect of elevated N2 and H2 gas sparging on metabolism using a 14-L fermenter with a 7-L working volume. The metabolic shift from acetate, H2, and CO2 to ethanol and formate in response to high H2 versus high N2 sparging (20 mL s(-1)) was accompanied by (a) a 2-fold increase in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) activity, (b) a 10-fold increase in adhE transcription, and (c) a 3-fold decrease in adhZ transcription. A similar, but less pronounced, metabolic shift was also observed when the rate of N2 sparging was decreased from 20 to 2 mL s(-1), during which (a) NADH-dependent ADH and pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) activities increased by ∼1.5-fold, (b) adhY transcription increased 6-fold, and (c) transcription of selected pfor genes increased 2-fold. Here we demonstrate that transcription of genes involved in ethanol metabolism is tightly regulated in response to gas sparging. We discuss the potential impacts of dissolved H2 on electron carrier (NADH, NADPH, ferredoxin) oxidation and how these electron carriers can redirect carbon and electron flux and regulate adhE transcription. PMID:24463715

  5. RAPID GAMMA-RAY FLUX VARIABILITY DURING THE 2013 MARCH CRAB NEBULA FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, M.; Buehler, R.; Hays, E.; Cheung, C. C.; Grove, J. E.; Dutka, M. S.; Kerr, M.; Ojha, R. E-mail: rolf.buehler@desy.de

    2013-10-01

    We report on a bright flare in the Crab Nebula detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The period of significantly increased luminosity occurred in 2013 March and lasted for approximately two weeks. During this period, we observed flux variability on timescales of approximately 5 hr. The combined photon flux above 100 MeV from the pulsar and its nebula reached a peak value of (12.5 ± 0.8) · 10{sup –6} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} on 2013 March 6. This value exceeds the average flux by almost a factor of six and implies a ∼20 times higher flux for the synchrotron component of the nebula alone. This is the second brightest flare observed from this source. Spectral and temporal analysis of the LAT data collected during the outburst reveal a rapidly varying synchrotron component of the Crab Nebula while the pulsar emission remains constant in time.

  6. Cap and trade schemes on waste management: A case study of the Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) in England

    SciTech Connect

    Calaf-Forn, Maria; Roca, Jordi; Puig-Ventosa, Ignasi

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • LATS has been effective to achieve a reduction of the amount of landfilled waste. • LATS has been one of the few environmental instruments for waste management with a cap and trade methodology. • LATS has achieved to increase recycling of the biodegradable and other waste fractions. - Abstract: The Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) is one of the main instruments used in England to enforce the landfill diversion targets established in the Directive 1999/31/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 April 1999 on the landfill of waste (Landfill Directive). Through the LATS, biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) allowances for landfilling are allocated to each local authority, otherwise known as waste disposal authorities (WDAs). The quantity of landfill allowances received is expected to decrease continuously from 2005/06 to 2019/20 so as to meet the objectives of the Landfill Directive. To achieve their commitments, WDAs can exchange, buy, sell or transfer allowances among each other, or may re-profile their own allocation through banking and/or borrowing. Despite the goals for the first seven years – which included two target years (2005/06 and 2009/10) – being widely achieved (the average allocation of allowances per WDA was 22.9% higher than those finally used), market activity among WDAs was high and prices were not very stable. Results in terms of waste reduction and recycling levels have been satisfactory. The reduction of BMW landfilled (in percentage) was higher during the first seven years of the LATS period (2005/06–2011/12) (around 7% annually) than during the previous period (2001/02–2004/05) (4.2% annually). Since 2008, the significance of the LATS diminished because of an increase in the rate of the UK Landfill Tax. The LATS was suppressed after the 2012/13 target year, before what it was initially scheduled. The purpose of this paper is to describe the particularities of the LATS, analyse its performance as

  7. Achieving Zero Current for Polar Wind Outflow on Open Flux Tubes Subjected to Large Photoelectron Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. R.; Khazanov, G.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    In this study we investigate how the condition of zero current on open flux tubes with polar wind outflow, subjected to large photoelectron fluxes, can be achieved. We employ a steady state collisionless semikinetic model to determine the density profiles of O(+), H(+), thermal electrons and photoelectrons coming from the ionosphere along with H(+), ions and electrons coming from the magnetosphere. The model solution attains a potential distribution which both satisfies the condition of charge neutrality and zero current. For the range of parameters considered in this study we find that a 45-60 volt discontinuous potential drop may develop to reflect most of the photoelectrons back toward the ionosphere. This develops because the downward flux of electrons from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere on typical open flux tubes (e.g. the polar rain) appears to be insufficient to balance the photoelectron flux from the ionosphere.

  8. Flux Quantization Without Cooper Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadin, Alan

    2013-03-01

    It is universally accepted that the superconducting flux quantum h/2e requires the existence of a phase-coherent macroscopic wave function of Cooper pairs, each with charge 2e. On the contrary, we assert that flux quantization can be better understood in terms of single-electron quantum states, localized on the scale of the coherence length and organized into a real-space phase-antiphase structure. This packing configuration is consistent with the Pauli exclusion principle for single-electron states, maintains long-range phase coherence, and is compatible with much of the BCS formalism. This also accounts for h/2e in the Josephson effect, without Cooper pairs. Experimental evidence for this alternative picture may be found in deviations from h/2e in loops and devices much smaller than the coherence length. A similar phase-antiphase structure may also account for superfluids, without the need for boson condensation.

  9. Cap and trade schemes on waste management: a case study of the landfill allowance trading scheme (LATS) in England.

    PubMed

    Calaf-Forn, Maria; Roca, Jordi; Puig-Ventosa, Ignasi

    2014-05-01

    The Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) is one of the main instruments used in England to enforce the landfill diversion targets established in the Directive 1999/31/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 April 1999 on the landfill of waste (Landfill Directive). Through the LATS, biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) allowances for landfilling are allocated to each local authority, otherwise known as waste disposal authorities (WDAs). The quantity of landfill allowances received is expected to decrease continuously from 2005/06 to 2019/20 so as to meet the objectives of the Landfill Directive. To achieve their commitments, WDAs can exchange, buy, sell or transfer allowances among each other, or may re-profile their own allocation through banking and/or borrowing. Despite the goals for the first seven years - which included two target years (2005/06 and 2009/10) - being widely achieved (the average allocation of allowances per WDA was 22.9% higher than those finally used), market activity among WDAs was high and prices were not very stable. Results in terms of waste reduction and recycling levels have been satisfactory. The reduction of BMW landfilled (in percentage) was higher during the first seven years of the LATS period (2005/06-2011/12) (around 7% annually) than during the previous period (2001/02-2004/05) (4.2% annually). Since 2008, the significance of the LATS diminished because of an increase in the rate of the UK Landfill Tax. The LATS was suppressed after the 2012/13 target year, before what it was initially scheduled. The purpose of this paper is to describe the particularities of the LATS, analyse its performance as a waste management policy, make a comparison with the Landfill Tax, discuss its main features as regards efficiency, effectiveness and the application of the "polluter pays" principle and finally discuss if the effect of the increase in the Landfill Tax is what made the LATS ultimately unnecessary.

  10. Imaging the L-Type Amino Acid Transporter-1 (LAT1) with Zr-89 ImmunoPET

    PubMed Central

    Ikotun, Oluwatayo F.; Marquez, Bernadette V.; Huang, Chaofeng; Masuko, Kazue; Daiji, Miyamoto; Masuko, Takashi; McConathy, Jonathan; Lapi, Suzanne E.

    2013-01-01

    The L-type amino acid transporter-1 (LAT1, SLC7A5) is upregulated in a wide range of human cancers, positively correlated with the biological aggressiveness of tumors, and a promising target for both imaging and therapy. Radiolabeled amino acids such as O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) that are transport substrates for system L amino acid transporters including LAT1 have met limited success for oncologic imaging outside of the brain, and thus new strategies are needed for imaging LAT1 in systemic cancers. Here, we describe the development and biological evaluation of a novel zirconium-89 labeled antibody, [89Zr]DFO-Ab2, targeting the extracellular domain of LAT1 in a preclinical model of colorectal cancer. This tracer demonstrated specificity for LAT1 in vitro and in vivo with excellent tumor imaging properties in mice with xenograft tumors. PET imaging studies showed high tumor uptake, with optimal tumor-to-non target contrast achieved at 7 days post administration. Biodistribution studies demonstrated tumor uptake of 10.5 ± 1.8 percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 7 days with a tumor to muscle ratio of 13 to 1. In contrast, the peak tumor uptake of the radiolabeled amino acid [18F]FET was 4.4 ± 0.5 %ID/g at 30 min after injection with a tumor to muscle ratio of 1.4 to 1. Blocking studies with unlabeled anti-LAT1 antibody demonstrated a 55% reduction of [89Zr]DFO-Ab2 accumulation in the tumor at 7 days. These results are the first report of direct PET imaging of LAT1 and demonstrate the potential of immunoPET agents for imaging specific amino acid transporters. PMID:24143237

  11. Flux-p: automating metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Birgitta E; Lamprecht, Anna-Lena; Steffen, Bernhard; Blank, Lars M

    2012-11-12

    Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in this complex analysis, but requires several steps that have to be carried out manually, hence restricting the use of this software for data interpretation to a rather small number of experiments. In this paper, we present Flux-P as an approach to automate and standardize 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, using the Bio-jETI workflow framework. Exemplarily based on the FiatFlux software, it demonstrates how services can be created that carry out the different analysis steps autonomously and how these can subsequently be assembled into software workflows that perform automated, high-throughput intracellular flux analysis of high quality and reproducibility. Besides significant acceleration and standardization of the data analysis, the agile workflow-based realization supports flexible changes of the analysis workflows on the user level, making it easy to perform custom analyses.

  12. SQUID With Integral Flux Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    In improved superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), change in size and shape of superconducting ring improves coupling to external signal coil and eases coil-positioning tolerances. More rugged and easier to manufacture than conventional SQUID's with comparable electrical characteristics. Thin-film superconducting flux concentrator utilizes Meissner effect to deflect magnetic field of signal coil into central hole of SQUID. Used in magnetometers, ammeters, analog-to-digital converters, and related electronic applications in which high signal-to-noise ratios required.

  13. High Energy Cosmic Electrons: Messengers from Nearby Cosmic Ray Sources or Dark Matter?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the recent discoveries by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope in reference to high energy cosmic electrons, and whether their source is cosmic rays or dark matter. Specific interest is devoted to Cosmic Ray electrons anisotropy,

  14. Inverse Compton X-Ray Emission from TeV Blazar Mrk 421 During a Historical Low-flux State Observed with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Jun; Stawarz, Łukasz

    2016-08-01

    We report on the detection of excess hard X-ray emission from the TeV BL Lac object Mrk 421 during the historical low-flux state of the source in 2013 January. Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observations were conducted four times between MJD 56294 and MJD 56312 with a total exposure of 80.9 ks. The source flux in the 3-40 keV range was nearly constant, except for MJD 56307 when the average flux level increased by a factor of three. Throughout the exposure, the X-ray spectra of Mrk 421 were well represented by a steep power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≃ 3.1, although a significant excess was noted above 20 keV in the MJD 56302 data when the source was in its faintest state. Moreover, Mrk 421 was detected at more than the 4σ level in the 40-79 keV count maps for both MJD 56307 and MJD 56302 but not during the remaining two observations. The detected excess hard X-ray emission connects smoothly with the extrapolation of the high-energy γ-ray continuum of the blazar constrained by Fermi-LAT during source quiescence. These findings indicate that while the overall X-ray spectrum of Mrk 421 is dominated by the highest-energy tail of the synchrotron continuum, the variable excess hard X-ray emission above 20 keV (on the timescale of a week) is related to the inverse Compton emission component. We discuss the resulting constraints on the variability and spectral properties of the low-energy segment of the electron energy distribution in the source.

  15. Inverse Compton X-Ray Emission from TeV Blazar Mrk 421 During a Historical Low-flux State Observed with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Jun; Stawarz, Łukasz

    2016-08-01

    We report on the detection of excess hard X-ray emission from the TeV BL Lac object Mrk 421 during the historical low-flux state of the source in 2013 January. Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observations were conducted four times between MJD 56294 and MJD 56312 with a total exposure of 80.9 ks. The source flux in the 3–40 keV range was nearly constant, except for MJD 56307 when the average flux level increased by a factor of three. Throughout the exposure, the X-ray spectra of Mrk 421 were well represented by a steep power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≃ 3.1, although a significant excess was noted above 20 keV in the MJD 56302 data when the source was in its faintest state. Moreover, Mrk 421 was detected at more than the 4σ level in the 40–79 keV count maps for both MJD 56307 and MJD 56302 but not during the remaining two observations. The detected excess hard X-ray emission connects smoothly with the extrapolation of the high-energy γ-ray continuum of the blazar constrained by Fermi-LAT during source quiescence. These findings indicate that while the overall X-ray spectrum of Mrk 421 is dominated by the highest-energy tail of the synchrotron continuum, the variable excess hard X-ray emission above 20 keV (on the timescale of a week) is related to the inverse Compton emission component. We discuss the resulting constraints on the variability and spectral properties of the low-energy segment of the electron energy distribution in the source.

  16. Tectonic significance of magnetic and gravity data across northern California (lat. 39[degree]N. to lat. 41[degree]N. )

    SciTech Connect

    Griscom, A.; Roberts, C.W.; Halvorson, P.F. )

    1993-04-01

    Aeromagnetic and isostatic residual gravity maps of an east-west transect across northern California show important tectonic features. A linear magnetic anomaly and west-sloping gradient extends over 300 km along the Franciscan-Great Valley contact (FGC) and across the Klamath Mountains province (KM) north to lat. 40[degree]45'N. The anomaly source lies at depths of 5--10 km beneath the KM and the FGC, and implies that the Franciscan complex of the Coast Ranges is thrust (and wedged) at least 80 km eastward beneath the KM to approximately long. 122[degree]40 minutes W. Calculations on a circular gravity low of [minus]50 mGal centered at the circular Bald Rock pluton (diameter about 15 km) in the Sierran foothills indicate a pluton thickness of about 15 km. The nearby Cascade and Merrimac plutons are located on the gradients of this gravity anomaly, have a relatively minor effect on it, and thus are interpreted to be thick (up to 5 km) laccolithic sills that emanate from the Bald Rock pluton, thinning away from it to a feather edge. Model studies indicate that the northeast contact of the Feather River periodotite body (FRPB) north of lat. 39[degree]40 minutes N. generally dips steeply northeast or vertical. The same contact south of this latitude dips east at angles of about 45[degree] to depths of at least 10 km. Magnetic patterns extending from the northern Sierra across the Cascades to the Klamath Mountains suggest that the FRPB may correlate with the Trinity ophiolite.

  17. Mutation of the phospholipase C-gamma1-binding site of LAT affects both positive and negative thymocyte selection.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Connie L; Lee, Jan; Steiner, Kevin L; Gurson, Jordan M; Depersis, Corinne L; El-Khoury, Dalal; Fuller, Claudette L; Shores, Elizabeth W; Love, Paul E; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2005-04-01

    Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a scaffolding adaptor protein that is critical for T cell development and function. A mutation of LAT (Y136F) that disrupts phospholipase C-gamma1 activation and subsequent calcium influx causes a partial block in T cell development and leads to a severe lymphoproliferative disease in homozygous knock-in mice. One possible contribution to the fatal disease of LAT Y136F knock-in mice could be from autoreactive T cells generated in these mice because of altered thymocyte selection. To examine the impact of the LAT Y136F mutation on thymocyte positive and negative selection, we bred this mutation onto the HY T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, recombination activating gene-2 knockout background. Female mice with this genotype showed a severe defect in positive selection, whereas male mice exhibited a phenotype resembling positive selection (i.e., development and survival of CD8(hi) HY TCR-specific T cells) instead of negative selection. These results support the hypothesis that in non-TCR transgenic, LAT Y136F knock-in mice, altered thymocyte selection leads to the survival and proliferation of autoreactive T cells that would otherwise be negatively selected in the thymus.

  18. International collaborative study of the endogenous reference gene LAT52 used for qualitative and quantitative analyses of genetically modified tomato.

    PubMed

    Yang, Litao; Zhang, Haibo; Guo, Jinchao; Pan, Liangwen; Zhang, Dabing

    2008-05-28

    One tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum) gene, LAT52, has been proved to be a suitable endogenous reference gene for genetically modified (GM) tomato detection in a previous study. Herein are reported the results of a collaborative ring trial for international validation of the LAT52 gene as endogenous reference gene and its analytical systems; 14 GMO detection laboratories from 8 countries were invited, and results were finally received from 13. These data confirmed the species specificity by testing 10 plant genomic DNAs, less allelic variation and stable single copy number of the LAT52 gene, among 12 different tomato cultivars. Furthermore, the limit of detection of LAT52 qualitative PCR was proved to be 0.1%, which corresponded to 11 copies of haploid tomato genomic DNA, and the limit of quantification for the quantitative PCR system was about 10 copies of haploid tomato genomic DNA with acceptable PCR efficiency and linearity. Additionally, the bias between the test and true values of 8 blind samples ranged from 1.94 to 10.64%. All of these validated results indicated that the LAT52 gene is suitable for use as an endogenous reference gene for the identification and quantification of GM tomato and its derivates.

  19. Charm contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis; Wille, Logan

    2016-07-01

    We revisit the estimate of the charm particle contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux that is expected to dominate at high energies because long-lived high-energy pions and kaons interact in the atmosphere before decaying into neutrinos. We focus on the production of forward charm particles which carry a large fraction of the momentum of the incident proton. In the case of strange particles, such a component is familiar from the abundant production of K+Λ pairs. These forward charm particles can dominate the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux in underground experiments. Modern collider experiments have no coverage in the very large rapidity region where charm forward pair production dominates. Using archival accelerator data as well as IceCube measurements of atmospheric electron and muon neutrino fluxes, we obtain an upper limit on forward D¯0Λc pair production and on the associated flux of high-energy atmospheric neutrinos. We conclude that the prompt flux may dominate the much-studied central component and represent a significant contribution to the TeV atmospheric neutrino flux. Importantly, it cannot accommodate the PeV flux of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, or the excess of events observed by IceCube in the 30-200 TeV energy range indicating either structure in the flux of cosmic accelerators, or a presence of more than one component in the cosmic flux observed.

  20. Involvement of the L-Type Amino Acid Transporter Lat2 in the Transport of 3,3'-Diiodothyronine across the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kinne, Anita; Wittner, Melanie; Wirth, Eva K; Hinz, Katrin M; Schülein, Ralf; Köhrle, Josef; Krause, Gerd

    2015-09-01

    Thyroid hormones are transported across cell membranes by transmembrane transporter proteins, for example by members of the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) and the L-type amino acid transporter (LAT) families. LATs consist of a light chain (e.g. LAT2) and a heavy chain (CD98), which is essential for their cell surface expression and functionality. The specificity of Lat2 for thyroid hormones and their metabolites and its role in their transport was not fully clear. This fact motivated us to establish a cell system to elucidate the uptake of thyroid hormones and their metabolites by mouse Lat2. The coinjection of cRNA coding for Lat2 and CD98 into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in a markedly increased level of 3,3'-diiodo-L-thyronine (3,3'-T2) and to some extent also enhanced T3 transport. To gain insight into properties of thyroid hormones and their metabolites transported by Lat2, we inhibited 3,3'-T2 uptake by various iodothyronine derivatives. T1 and T2 derivatives as well as 2-aminobicyclo-[2, 2,1]-heptane-2-carboxylic acid strongly competed with 3,3'-T2 uptake. In addition, we performed T2 uptake measurements with the thyroid hormone-specific transporter MCT8. For both Lat2 and MCT8, Km values in a low micromolar range were calculated. We demonstrated that oocytes are a suitable system for thyroid hormone transport studies mediated by Lat2. Our data indicates that Lat2 compared to other thyroid hormone transporters prefers 3,3'-T2 as the substrate. Thus, Lat2 might contribute to the availability of thyroid hormone by importing and/or exporting 3,3'-T2, which is generated either by T3 inactivation or by rapid deiodinase 1-mediated rT3 degradation. PMID:26601072

  1. Flux upper limits for 47 AGN observed with H.E.S.S. in 2004-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-04-01

    Context. About 40% of the observation time of the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) is dedicated to studying active galactic nuclei (AGN), with the aim of increasing the sample of known extragalactic very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) sources and constraining the physical processes at play in potential emitters. Aims: H.E.S.S. observations of AGN, spanning a period from April 2004 to December 2011, are investigated to constrain their γ-ray fluxes. Only the 47 sources without significant excess detected at the position of the targets are presented. Methods: Upper limits on VHE fluxes of the targets were computed and a search for variability was performed on the nightly time scale. Results: For 41 objects, the flux upper limits we derived are the most constraining reported to date. These constraints at VHE are compared with the flux level expected from extrapolations of Fermi-LAT measurements in the two-year catalog of AGN. The H.E.S.S. upper limits are at least a factor of two lower than the extrapolated Fermi-LAT fluxes for 11 objects. Taking into account the attenuation by the extragalactic background light reduces the tension for all but two of them, suggesting intrinsic curvature in the high-energy spectra of these two AGN. Conclusions: Compilation efforts led by current VHE instruments are of critical importance for target-selection strategies before the advent of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA).

  2. Fermi LAT detection of increase gamma-ray emission from OJ 248

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.

    2012-09-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed gamma-ray flaring activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar OJ 248 (also known as 2FGL J0830.5+2407, Nolan et al. 2012, ApJS, 199, 31) with radio coordinates R.A.: 127.7170254 deg, Dec: 24.1832836 deg (J2000, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at redshift z=0.94 (Hewitt & Burbidge 1993, ApJS, 87, 451).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The first Fermi LAT SNR catalog (1SC) (Acero+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson!, A. S.; Ka, Mae T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kerr, M.; Knodlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reposeur, T.; Rousseau, R.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wells, B.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; Den Hartog P. R.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have systematically characterized the Fermi/LAT 1-100GeV emission from 36 months (from 2008 August 4 to 2011 August 4) in 279 regions containing known radio SNRs, identifying sources emitting in the regions and then determining the likelihood that the source nearest the SNR is associated with it. We found 102 candidates, 30 of which have sufficient spatial overlap and significance with the alternative IEMs to suggest they are the GeV counterparts to their corresponding radio SNRs and an additional 14 candidates which may also be related to the SNRs. (3 data files).

  4. Fermi LAT and Swift flare of the FSRQ 4C +40.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Ojha, Roopesh; Pivato, Giovanna; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed a gamma-ray flare from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) 4C +40.25 (also known as B2 1020+40 and 3FGL J1023.1+3952, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with coordinates RA: 10h 23m 11.5661s, Dec: 39d 48m 15.378s, J2000, (Helmboldt et al. 2007, ApJ, 658, 203) and a redshift of 1.254 (Xu et al. 1994, AJ, 108, 395).

  5. Fermi-LAT detection of strong flaring activity from the FSRQ CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, J.; Carpenter, Bryce; Cutini, Sara

    2016-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed increasing gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 3FGL J2232.5+1143, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23) with radio coordinates R.A.: 338.1517038 deg, Dec: 11.7308067 deg (J2000, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at redshift z=1.037 (Schmidt 1965, ApJ, 141, 1295).

  6. Leser-Trélat Sign in Tumor-Stage Mycosis Fungoides.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Brandon; Shevchenko, Alina; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with numerous pruritic seborrheic keratoses, with an eruptive onset over the course of 3 months. At presentation, he was also found to have hypopigmented tumors diffusely scattered throughout his body that were found to be mycosis fungoides on histologic examination. A theory regarding the pathophysiology of the development of eruptive seborrheic keratoses in the presence of mycosis fungoides is briefly discussed and 10 previous case reports of the Leser-Trélat sign in the setting of mycosis fungoides are reviewed.

  7. Fermi/LAT search for counterpart to the IceCube event 67093193 (run 127853)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, G.; Magill, J. D.; Omodei, N.; Kocevski, D.; Ajello, M.; Buson, S.; Krauss, F.; Chiang, J.

    2016-04-01

    on behalf of the Fermi-LAT team: We have searched the Fermi Large Area Telescope data for a high-energy gamma-ray counterpart for the IceCube High Energy Starting Event (HESE) 67093193, detected in run 127853 on 2016-04-27 05:52:32.00 UT (AMON GCN notice rev. 2, http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/notices_amon/67093193_127853.amon . See http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/doc/Public_Doc_AMON_IceCube_GCN_Alerts_v2.pdf for a description of HESE events and related GCN notices).

  8. Giant lobes of Centaurus A as seen in radio and γ-ray images obtained with the Fermi-LAT and Planck satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-na; Yang, Rui-zhi; Mckinley, Benjamin; Aharonian, Felix

    2016-10-01

    The γ-ray data of Fermi-LAT on the giant lobes of Centaurus A are analysed together with the high frequency radio data obtained with the Planck satellite. The large γ-ray photon statistics, accumulated during seven years of observations, and the recently updated Fermi-LAT collaboration software tools allow substantial extension of the detected γ-ray emission towards higher energy, up to 30 GeV, and lower energy, down to 60 MeV. Moreover, the new γ-ray data allow us to explore the spatial features of γ-ray emission of the lobes. For the north lobe, we confirm, with higher statistical significance, our earlier finding on the extension of γ-ray emission beyond the radio image. Moreover, the new analysis reveals significant spatial variation of γ-ray spectra from both lobes. On the other hand, the Planck observations at microwave frequencies contain important information on spectra of synchrotron emission in the cutoff region, and thus allow model-independent derivation of the strength of the magnetic field and the distribution of relativistic electrons based on the combined γ-ray and radio data. The interpretation of multiwavelength spectral energy distributions of the lobes within a pure leptonic model requires strong enhancement of the magnetic field at the edge of the south lobe. Alternatively, a more complex, leptonic-hadronic model of the γ-ray emission, postulating a non-negligible contribution of the π0-decay component at highest energies, can explain the γ-ray data with a rather homogeneous distribution of the magnetic field over the giant lobes.

  9. Patterns of Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, A.; Cheung, M.

    2008-05-01

    The high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Solar Optical Telescope on the JAXA Hinode spacecraft have allowed capturing many examples of magnetic flux emergence from the scale of granulation to active regions. The observed patterns of emergence are quite similar. Flux emerges as a array of small bipoles on scales from 1 to 5 arc seconds throughout the region that the flux eventually condenses. Because the fields emerging from the underlying flux rope my appear many in small segments and the total flux (absolute sum) is not a conserved quantity the amount of total flux on the surface may vary significantly during the emergence process. Numerical simulations of flux emergence exhibit patterns similar to observations. Movies of both observations and numerical simulations will be presented.

  10. GIANT GAMMA-RAY BUBBLES FROM FERMI-LAT: ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY OR BIPOLAR GALACTIC WIND?

    SciTech Connect

    Su Meng; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2010-12-01

    Data from the Fermi-LAT reveal two large gamma-ray bubbles, extending 50{sup 0} above and below the Galactic center (GC), with a width of about 40{sup 0} in longitude. The gamma-ray emission associated with these bubbles has a significantly harder spectrum (dN/dE {approx} E {sup -2}) than the inverse Compton emission from electrons in the Galactic disk, or the gamma rays produced by the decay of pions from proton-interstellar medium collisions. There is no significant spatial variation in the spectrum or gamma-ray intensity within the bubbles, or between the north and south bubbles. The bubbles are spatially correlated with the hard-spectrum microwave excess known as the WMAP haze; the edges of the bubbles also line up with features in the ROSAT X-ray maps at 1.5-2 keV. We argue that these Galactic gamma-ray bubbles were most likely created by some large episode of energy injection in the GC, such as past accretion events onto the central massive black hole, or a nuclear starburst in the last {approx}10 Myr. Dark matter annihilation/decay seems unlikely to generate all the features of the bubbles and the associated signals in WMAP and ROSAT; the bubbles must be understood in order to use measurements of the diffuse gamma-ray emission in the inner Galaxy as a probe of dark matter physics. Study of the origin and evolution of the bubbles also has the potential to improve our understanding of recent energetic events in the inner Galaxy and the high-latitude cosmic ray population.

  11. The Search for High Energy Extended Emission by Fermi-LAT from Swift-Localized Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, J.; Racusin, J.L.; /NASA, Goddard

    2012-05-01

    The brighter Fermi-LAT bursts have exhibited emission at energies >0.1 GeV that persists as late as {approx}2 ks after the prompt phase has nominally ended. This so-called 'extended emission' could arise from continued activity of the prompt burst mechanism or it could be the start of a high energy afterglow component. The high energy extended emission seen by the LAT has typically followed a t{sup -}{gamma} power-law temporal decay where {gamma} {approx} 1.2-1.7 and has shown no strong indication of spectral evolution. In contrast, the prompt burst emission generally displays strong spectral variability and more complex temporal changes in the LAT band. This differing behavior suggests that the extended emission likely corresponds to an early afterglow phase produced by an external shock. In this study, we look for evidence of high energy extended emission from 145 Swift-localized GRBs that have occurred since the launch of Fermi. A majority of these bursts were either outside of the LAT field-of-view or were otherwise not detected by the LAT during the prompt phase. However, because of the scanning operation of the Fermi satellite, the long-lived extended emission of these bursts may be detectable in the LAT data on the {approx}few ks time scale. We will look for emission from individual bursts and will perform a stacking analysis in order to set bounds on this emission for the sample as a whole. The detection of such emission would have implications for afterglow models and for the overall energy budget of GRBs.

  12. Suenos Indocumentados: Using LatCrit to Explore the Testimonios of Undocumented and U.S. Born Chicana College Students on Discourses of Racist Nativism in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Lindsay Perez

    2010-01-01

    Latina/o critical race theory (LatCrit) is used as an overarching framework that examines the intersectionality of race, class, and gender while also acknowledging the unique forms of subordination within the Latina/o community based on immigration status, language, phenotype, and ethnicity. LatCrit allows for the specific examination of race and…

  13. Decreased reactivation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) mutant using the in vivo mouse UV-B model of induced reactivation

    PubMed Central

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Simpson, Jennifer L.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivations from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that control the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if reactivation of the HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutant (dLAT2903) was impaired in this model, as it is in the rabbit model of induced and spontaneous reactivation and in the explant TG induced reactivation model in mice. The eyes of mice latently infected with wild type HSV-1 strain McKrae (LAT(+) virus) or dLAT2903 (LAT(−) virus) were irradiated with UV-B and reactivation was determined. We found that compared to LAT(−) virus, LAT(+) virus reactivated at a higher rate as determined by shedding of virus in tears on days 3 to 7 after UV-B treatment. Thus, the UV-B induced reactivation model of HSV-1 appears to be a useful small animal model for studying the mechanisms involved in how LAT enhances the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The utility of the model for investigating the immune evasion mechanisms regulating the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle and for testing the protective efficacy of candidate therapeutic vaccines and drugs are discussed. PMID:26002839

  14. Systematics in the Electron Spectrum Measured by ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panov, A. D.; Zatsepin, V. I.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kouznetsov, E. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Postnikov, E. B.; Seo, E.S.; Watts, J.; Wefel, J. P.; Wu, J.

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of different parameters to separate electrons from protons in the ATIC experiment has been performed. Five separate discriminants were studied by different Monte Carlo programs, leading to a variety of results. Application to the ATIC data indicates the range of variation possible in the interpretation of the data. The results of this analysis, when compared with the published results [5], show good agreement in the most interesting region of energy (from 90 GeV to 600 GeV). The measured electron spectrum is compared with the recent data reported by Fermi/LAT, and there is no major disagreement between ATIC s results and Fermi/LAT. Finally, possible systematics-free, short energy scale features of the ATIC electron spectrum are mentioned. Keywords: ATIC, electron spectrum, fine structure

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fermi-LAT flaring gamma-ray sources from FAVA (Ackermann+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dalton, M.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; J! Ohannesso, N. G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kawano, T.; Knodlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Sanchez-Conde, M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    We applied FAVA (Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis) to the first 47 months of Fermi/LAT observations (2008 August 4 to 2012 July 16 UTC), in weekly time intervals. The total number of weeks is 206. We considered two ranges of gamma-ray energy, E>100MeV and E>800MeV, to increase the sensitivity for spectrally soft and hard flares, respectively. We generate measured and expected count maps with a resolution of 0.25deg2 per pixel. We found LAT counterparts for 192 of the 215 FAVA sources. Most of the associated sources, 177, are AGNs. (2 data files).

  16. Search for gamma-ray emissions from AE Aquarii with Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Rea, Nanda; De Ona Wilhelmi, Emma; Torres, Diego F.; Hou, Xian

    2016-07-01

    AE Aquarii is a cataclysmic variable with the fastest known rotating magnetized white dwarf (P_{spin} = 33.08 s). We report on deep searches for gamma-ray emission and pulsations from AE Aquarii in seven years of Fermi-LAT Pass 8 data. Using different X-ray observations spanning 20 years, we substantially extended the timing ephemeris of AE Aquarii. A spin phase jump was discovered between MJD 55122.5 - 56078.64 by X-ray timing analysis. Using the extended timing ephemeris, we searched for gamma-ray pulsations at the spin period and its first harmonic. No gamma-ray pulsation were detected above 3 sigma significance. Neither steady gamma-ray emission nor gamma-ray variability of AE Aquarii were detected by Fermi-LAT. We impose the most restrictive upper limit on the gamma-ray emission from AE Aquarii to date, as 1.23×10^{-12} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} in 0.1-300 GeV range providing constrains on models.

  17. EINSTEIN@HOME DISCOVERY OF FOUR YOUNG GAMMA-RAY PULSARS IN FERMI LAT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Pletsch, H. J.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Papa, M. A.; Guillemot, L.; Champion, D. J.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Ng, C.; Anderson, D.; Hammer, D.; Siemens, X.; Keith, M.; Ray, P. S. E-mail: lucas.guillemot@cnrs-orleans.fr

    2013-12-10

    We report the discovery of four gamma-ray pulsars, detected in computing-intensive blind searches of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found using a novel search approach, combining volunteer distributed computing via Einstein@Home and methods originally developed in gravitational-wave astronomy. The pulsars PSRs J0554+3107, J1422–6138, J1522–5735, and J1932+1916 are young and energetic, with characteristic ages between 35 and 56 kyr and spin-down powers in the range 6 × 10{sup 34}—10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1}. They are located in the Galactic plane and have rotation rates of less than 10 Hz, among which the 2.1 Hz spin frequency of PSR J0554+3107 is the slowest of any known gamma-ray pulsar. For two of the new pulsars, we find supernova remnants coincident on the sky and discuss the plausibility of such associations. Deep radio follow-up observations found no pulsations, suggesting that all four pulsars are radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. These discoveries, the first gamma-ray pulsars found by volunteer computing, motivate continued blind pulsar searches of the many other unidentified LAT gamma-ray sources.

  18. Radio Detection of the Fermi-LAT Blind Search Millisecond Pulsar J1311-3430

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Cheung, C. C.; Giroletti, M.; Cognard, I.; Camilo, F.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Roy, J.; Romani, R. W.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Kramer, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of radio emission from PSR J1311.3430, the first millisecond pulsar (MSP) discovered in a blind search of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray data. We detected radio pulsations at 2 GHz, visible for less than 10% of approximately 4.5 hr of observations using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Observations at 5 GHz with the GBT and at several lower frequencies with Parkes, Nan cay, and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope resulted in non-detections. We also report the faint detection of a steep spectrum continuum radio source (0.1 mJy at 5 GHz) in interferometric imaging observations with the Jansky Very Large Array. These detections demonstrate that PSR J1311.3430 is not radio quiet and provide additional evidence that radio-quiet MSPs are rare. The radio dispersion measure of 37.8 pc cm(exp -3) provides a distance estimate of 1.4 kpc for the system, yielding a gamma-ray efficiency of 30%, typical of LAT-detected MSPs. We see apparent excess delay in the radio pulses as the pulsar appears from eclipse and we speculate on possible mechanisms for the non-detections of the pulse at other orbital phases and observing frequencies.

  19. RADIO DETECTION OF THE FERMI-LAT BLIND SEARCH MILLISECOND PULSAR J1311-3430

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Cheung, C. C.; Giroletti, M.; Cognard, I.; Camilo, F.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Roy, J.; Romani, R. W.; Kerr, M.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2013-01-20

    We report the detection of radio emission from PSR J1311-3430, the first millisecond pulsar (MSP) discovered in a blind search of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray data. We detected radio pulsations at 2 GHz, visible for <10% of {approx}4.5 hr of observations using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Observations at 5 GHz with the GBT and at several lower frequencies with Parkes, Nancay, and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope resulted in non-detections. We also report the faint detection of a steep spectrum continuum radio source (0.1 mJy at 5 GHz) in interferometric imaging observations with the Jansky Very Large Array. These detections demonstrate that PSR J1311-3430 is not radio quiet and provide additional evidence that radio-quiet MSPs are rare. The radio dispersion measure of 37.8 pc cm{sup -3} provides a distance estimate of 1.4 kpc for the system, yielding a gamma-ray efficiency of 30%, typical of LAT-detected MSPs. We see apparent excess delay in the radio pulses as the pulsar appears from eclipse and we speculate on possible mechanisms for the non-detections of the pulse at other orbital phases and observing frequencies.

  20. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Berenji, Bijan

    2012-09-19

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics are unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.

  1. Evaluation of the Monotonic Lagrangian Grid and Lat-Long Grid for Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Carolyn; Dahm, Johann; Oran, Elaine; Alexandrov, Natalia; Boris, Jay

    2011-01-01

    The Air Traffic Monotonic Lagrangian Grid (ATMLG) is used to simulate a 24 hour period of air traffic flow in the National Airspace System (NAS). During this time period, there are 41,594 flights over the United States, and the flight plan information (departure and arrival airports and times, and waypoints along the way) are obtained from an Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Enhanced Traffic Management System (ETMS) dataset. Two simulation procedures are tested and compared: one based on the Monotonic Lagrangian Grid (MLG), and the other based on the stationary Latitude-Longitude (Lat- Long) grid. Simulating one full day of air traffic over the United States required the following amounts of CPU time on a single processor of an SGI Altix: 88 s for the MLG method, and 163 s for the Lat-Long grid method. We present a discussion of the amount of CPU time required for each of the simulation processes (updating aircraft trajectories, sorting, conflict detection and resolution, etc.), and show that the main advantage of the MLG method is that it is a general sorting algorithm that can sort on multiple properties. We discuss how many MLG neighbors must be considered in the separation assurance procedure in order to ensure a five-mile separation buffer between aircraft, and we investigate the effect of removing waypoints from aircraft trajectories. When aircraft choose their own trajectory, there are more flights with shorter duration times and fewer CD&R maneuvers, resulting in significant fuel savings.

  2. GRB2-Mediated Recruitment of THEMIS to LAT Is Essential for Thymocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Wolfgang; Brockmeyer, Claudia; Fu, Guo; Simister, Philip C.; de Wet, Ben; Martinez-Riaño, Ana; Hoerter, John A. H.; Feller, Stephan M.; Wülfing, Christoph; Gascoigne, Nicholas R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Thymocyte-expressed molecule involved in selection (THEMIS) is a recently identified regulator of thymocyte positive selection. THEMIS’s mechanism of action is unknown, and whether it has a role in TCR-proximal signaling is controversial. In this article, we show that THEMIS and the adapter molecule growth factor receptor–bound protein 2 (GRB2) associate constitutively through binding of a conserved PxRPxK motif within the proline-rich region 1 of THEMIS to the C-terminal SH3-domain of GRB2. This association is indispensable for THEMIS recruitment to the immunological synapse via the transmembrane adapter linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and for THEMIS phosphorylation by Lck and ZAP-70. Two major sites of tyrosine phosphorylation were mapped to a YY-motif close to proline-rich region 1. The YY-motif was crucial for GRB2 binding, suggesting that this region of THEMIS might control local phosphorylation-dependent conformational changes important for THEMIS function. Finally, THEMIS binding to GRB2 was required for thymocyte development. Our data firmly assign THEMIS to the TCR-proximal signaling cascade as a participant in the LAT signalosome and suggest that the THEMIS–GRB2 complex might be involved in shaping the nature of Ras signaling, thereby governing thymic selection. PMID:23460737

  3. Fermi LAT Observations of Gamma-Ray Transients Near the Galactic Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth Anne

    2010-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides unprecedented sensitivity for all-sky monitoring of gamma-ray activity from 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The observatory scans the entire sky every three hours and allows a general search for flaring activity on daily timescales. This search is conducted automatically as part of the ground processing and allows a fast response to transient events, typically less than a day. Most flares are spatially associated with known blazars, but in several cases during the first year of observations, gamma-ray flares occurring near the Galactic plane did not reveal any initially compelling counterparts. This prompted follow-up observations in X-ray, optical, and radio to attempt to identify the origin of the emission and probe the possible existence of a class of transient gamma-ray sources in the Galaxy. We will report on the details of these LAT events and the results of the multi-wavelength counterpart searches.

  4. Gamma-ray blazars and active galactic nuclei seen by the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, B.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ciprini, S.; Cutini, S.; Gasparrini, D.

    2015-03-01

    The third catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-LAT (3LAC) is presented. It is based on the third Fermi-LAT catalog (3FGL) of sources detected with a test statistic (TS) greater than 25 using the first 4 years of data. The 3LAC includes 1591 AGNs located at high Galactic latitudes, |b| > 10 (with 28 duplicate associations, thus corresponding to 1563 gamma-ray sources among 2192 sources in the 3FGL catalog), a 71% increase over the second catalog based on 2 years of data. A very large majority of these AGNs (98%) are blazars. About half of the newly detected blazars are of unknown type, i.e., they lack spectroscopic information of sufficient quality to determine the strength of their emission lines. The general properties of the 3LAC sample confirm previous findings from earlier catalogs, but some new subclasses (e.g., intermediate- and high-synchrotron-peaked FSRQs) have now been significantly detected.

  5. The First Fermi-LAT Catalog of Sources Above 10 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Moiseev, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of gamma-ray sources at energies above 10 GeV based on data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) accumulated during the first 3 yr of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of >10 GeV sources (1FHL) has 514 sources. For each source we present location, spectrum, a measure of variability, and associations with cataloged sources at other wavelengths. We found that 449 (87%) could be associated with known sources, of which 393 (76% of the 1FHL sources) are active galactic nuclei. Of the 27 sources associated with known pulsars, we find 20 (12) to have significant pulsations in the range >10 GeV (>25 GeV). In this work we also report that, at energies above 10 GeV, unresolved sources account for 27% +/- 8% of the isotropic ? -ray background, while the unresolved Galactic population contributes only at the few percent level to the Galactic diffuse background. We also highlight the subset of the 1FHL sources that are best candidates for detection at energies above 50-100 GeV with current and future ground-based ? -ray observatories.

  6. IFT20 controls LAT recruitment to the immune synapse and T-cell activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Omar I; Masi, Giulia; Carpier, Jean-Marie; Magalhaes, Joao G; Galgano, Donatella; Pazour, Gregory J; Amigorena, Sebastian; Hivroz, Claire; Baldari, Cosima T

    2016-01-12

    Biogenesis of the immune synapse at the interface between antigen-presenting cells and T cells assembles and organizes a large number of membrane proteins required for effective signaling through the T-cell receptor. We showed previously that the intraflagellar transport protein 20 (IFT20), a component of the intraflagellar transport system, controls polarized traffic during immune synapse assembly. To investigate the role of IFT20 in primary CD4(+) T cells in vitro and in vivo, we generated mice bearing a conditional defect of IFT20 expression in T cells. We show that in the absence of IFT20, although cell spreading and the polarization of the centrosome were unaffected, T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling and recruitment of the signaling adaptor LAT (linker for activation of T cells) at the immune synapse were reduced. As a consequence, CD4(+) T-cell activation and proliferation were also defective. In vivo, conditional IFT20-deficient mice failed to mount effective antigen-specific T-cell responses, and their T cells failed to induce colitis after adoptive transfer to Rag(-/-) mice. IFT20 is therefore required for the delivery of the intracellular pool of LAT to the immune synapse in naive primary T lymphocytes and for effective T-cell responses in vivo. PMID:26715756

  7. IFT20 controls LAT recruitment to the immune synapse and T-cell activation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vivar, Omar I.; Masi, Giulia; Carpier, Jean-Marie; Magalhaes, Joao G.; Galgano, Donatella; Pazour, Gregory J.; Amigorena, Sebastian; Hivroz, Claire; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of the immune synapse at the interface between antigen-presenting cells and T cells assembles and organizes a large number of membrane proteins required for effective signaling through the T-cell receptor. We showed previously that the intraflagellar transport protein 20 (IFT20), a component of the intraflagellar transport system, controls polarized traffic during immune synapse assembly. To investigate the role of IFT20 in primary CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, we generated mice bearing a conditional defect of IFT20 expression in T cells. We show that in the absence of IFT20, although cell spreading and the polarization of the centrosome were unaffected, T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling and recruitment of the signaling adaptor LAT (linker for activation of T cells) at the immune synapse were reduced. As a consequence, CD4+ T-cell activation and proliferation were also defective. In vivo, conditional IFT20-deficient mice failed to mount effective antigen-specific T-cell responses, and their T cells failed to induce colitis after adoptive transfer to Rag−/− mice. IFT20 is therefore required for the delivery of the intracellular pool of LAT to the immune synapse in naive primary T lymphocytes and for effective T-cell responses in vivo. PMID:26715756

  8. Bright gamma-ray flares of the quasars 3C 279 and PKS 1222+216 observed at the highest energies with Fermi-LAT and VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errando, Manel

    2014-08-01

    Flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) are the most powerful sources continuously detected at gamma-ray energies, with luminosities exceeding 1048 erg s-1. The high-energy emission of quasars peaks in the MeV-GeV band, and only a few episodic detections have been reported at very high energies (VHE, E>100 GeV). We will present the first results from an observing campaign on the FSRQ 3C 279 in April 2014 during the brightest gamma-ray outburst ever recorded for this object, with flux exceeding the historic 1991 flare seen by EGRET. Observations include simultaneous coverage with the Fermi-LAT satellite and the VERITAS ground-based array spanning four decades in energy from 100 MeV to 1 TeV with unprecedented sensitivity. We will also report on the detection of persistent VHE emission from the quasar PKS 1222+216 over a week-long period in March 2014. These observations present strong challenges to current models of energy dissipation in relativistic jets. The implications of the absence/presence of VHE emission in connection with flaring activity in the MeV-GeV regime will be discussed, especially concerning the role of ambient photon fields in the radiation mechanisms, and the size and location of the gamma-ray emission region.

  9. Study of LAT1 Expression in Brain Metastases: Towards a Better Understanding of the Results of Positron Emission Tomography Using Amino Acid Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Papin-Michault, Caroline; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Dufour, Maxime; Almairac, Fabien; Coutts, Mickael; Patouraux, Stéphanie; Virolle, Thierry; Darcourt, Jacques; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using radiolabeled amino acid (PET-AA) appears to be promising in distinguishing between recurrent tumour and radionecrosis in the follow-up of brain metastasis (BM). The amino acid transporter LAT1 and its cofactor CD98, which are involved in AA uptake, have never been investigated in BM. The aim of our study was to determine and compare the expression of LAT1 and CD98 in BM and in non-tumoral brain tissue (NT). The expression of LAT1 and CD98 were studied by immunohistochemistry in 67 BM, including 18 BM recurrences after radiotherapy, in 53 NT, and in 13 cases of patients with previously irradiated brain tumor and investigated by [18F] FDOPA-PET. LAT1 and CD98 expression were detected in 98.5% and 59.7% of BM respectively and were significantly associated with BM tissue as compared to NT (p<0.001). LAT1 expression in recurrent BM was significantly increased as compared to newly occurring BM. Ten cases investigated by [18F] FDOPA-PET corresponding to recurrent BM displayed significant [18F] FDOPA uptake and LAT1 overexpression whereas three cases corresponding to radionecrosis showed no or low uptake and LAT1 expression. LAT1 expression level and [18F] FDOPA uptake were significantly correlated. In conclusion, we hypothesized that BM may overexpress the AA transporter LAT1. We have shown that LAT1 overexpression was common in BM and was specific for BM as compared to healthy brain. These results could explain the specific BM uptake on PET-AA. PMID:27276226

  10. Return flux experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tveekrem, June L.

    1992-01-01

    All spacecraft emit molecules via outgassing, thruster plumes, vents, etc. The return flux is the portion of those molecules that scatter from the ambient atmosphere and return to the spacecraft. Return flux allows critical spacecraft surfaces to become contaminated even when there is no direct line of sight between the contamination source and the critical surface. Data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) show that contamination of LDEF surfaces could not have come entirely from direct flux. The data suggest significant return flux. Several computer models have been developed to simulate return flux, but the predictions have never been verified in orbit. Large uncertainties in predictions lead to overly conservative spacecraft designs. The purpose of the REturn FLux EXperiment (REFLEX) is to fly a controlled experiment that can be directly compared with predictions from several models.

  11. Return flux experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveekrem, June L.

    All spacecraft emit molecules via outgassing, thruster plumes, vents, etc. The return flux is the portion of those molecules that scatter from the ambient atmosphere and return to the spacecraft. Return flux allows critical spacecraft surfaces to become contaminated even when there is no direct line of sight between the contamination source and the critical surface. Data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) show that contamination of LDEF surfaces could not have come entirely from direct flux. The data suggest significant return flux. Several computer models have been developed to simulate return flux, but the predictions have never been verified in orbit. Large uncertainties in predictions lead to overly conservative spacecraft designs. The purpose of the REturn FLux EXperiment (REFLEX) is to fly a controlled experiment that can be directly compared with predictions from several models.

  12. Atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.

    2015-07-01

    Fluxes of the electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons observed by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface during thunderstorms originate so-called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). The relativistic runaway electron avalanches giving rise to TGEs originate in the thundercloud's lower dipole between the main negatively charged region in the middle of the thundercloud and transient lower positively charged region. Acceleration of electrons in the upper dipole between main negative and main positive charge regions leads to initiation of the terrestrial gamma flashes (TGFs) intensive researched during the last two decades by orbiting gamma ray observatories. TGFs are exceptionally intense, submillisecond bursts of electromagnetic radiation directed to the open space from the thunderstorm atmosphere. Unlike visible lightning, TGF beams do not create a hot plasma channel and optical flash; hence, in the literature they got name "dark lightning." We investigate the TGEs development in 1 min and 1 s time series of particle detector count rates. Synchronized time series of the near-surface electric field and lightning occurrences allows interconnecting two atmospheric phenomena. Registration of the Extensive Air Showers allows approaching problems of relation of the lightning occurrences and particle fluxes.

  13. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  14. Aspects of flux compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao

    In this thesis, we study three main aspects of flux compactifications: (1) classify supergravity solutions from flux compactification; (2) construct flux-deformed geometry and 4D low-energy theory to describe these flux vacua; and (3) study 4D particle phenomenology and cosmology of flux vacua. In the first part, we review G-structure, the basic tool to study supersymmetric flux solutions, and some typical solutions obtained in heterotic, type IIA and type IIB string theories. Then we present a comprehensive classification of supersymmetric vacua of M-theory compactification on 7D manifolds with general four-form fluxes. We analyze the cases where the resulting four-dimensional vacua have N = 1, 2, 3, 4 supersymmetry and the internal space allows for SU(2)-, SU(3)- or G 2-structures. In particular, we find for N = 2 supersymmetry, that the external space-time is Minkowski and the base manifold of the internal space is conformally Kahler for SU(2) structures, while for SU(3) structures the internal space has to be Einstein-Sasaki and no internal fluxes are allowed. Moreover, we provide a new vacuum with N = 1 supersymmetry and SU(3) structure, where all fluxes are non-zero and the first order differential equations are solved. In the second part, we simply review the methods used to construct one subclass of fluxed-deformed geometry or the so-called "twisted manifold", and the associated 4D effective theory describing these flux vacua. Then by employing (generalized) Scherk-Schwarz reduction, we construct the geometric twisting for Calabi-Yau manifolds of Voisin-Borcea type (K 3 x T2)/ Z2 and study the superpotential in a type IIA orientifold based on this geometry. The twists modify the direct product by fibering the K 3 over T2 while preserving the Z2 involution. As an important application, the Voisin-Borcea class contains T6/( Z2 x Z2 ), the usual setting for intersecting D6 brane model building. Past work in this context considered only those twists inherited

  15. Fermi LAT Detection of Pulsed Gamma-Rays From the Vela-Like Pulsars PSR J1048-5832 and PSR J2229+6114

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    We report the detection of {gamma}-ray pulsations ({ge}0.1 GeV) from PSR J2229+6114 and PSR J1048-5832, the latter having been detected as a low-significance pulsar by EGRET. Data in the {gamma}-ray band were acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, while the radio rotational ephemerides used to fold the {gamma}-ray light curves were obtained using the Green Bank Telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, and the Parkes Telescope. The two young radio pulsars, located within the error circles of the previously unidentified EGRET sources 3EG J1048-5840 and 3EG J2227+6122, present spin-down characteristics similar to the Vela pulsar. PSR J1048-5832 shows two sharp peaks at phases 0.15 {+-} 0.01 and 0.57 {+-} 0.01 relative to the radio pulse confirming the EGRET light curve, while PSR J2229+6114 presents a very broad peak at phase 0.49 {+-} 0.01. The {gamma}-ray spectra above 0.1 GeV of both pulsars are fit with power laws having exponential cutoffs near 3 GeV, leading to integral photon fluxes of (2.19 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.32) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J1048-5832 and (3.77 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.44) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J2229+6114. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. PSR J1048-5832 is one of the two LAT sources which were entangled together as 3EG J1048-5840. These detections add to the growing number of young {gamma}-ray pulsars that make up the dominant population of GeV {gamma}-ray sources in the Galactic plane.

  16. Timing and Fermi LAT Analysis of Four Millisecond Pulsars Discovered in Parkes Radio Searches of Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Ransom, Scott M.; Camilo, Fernando M.; Kerr, Matthew; Reynolds, John; Sarkissian, John; Freire, Paulo; Thankful Cromartie, H.; Barr, Ewan D.

    2016-01-01

    We present phase-connected timing solutions for four binary millisecond pulsars discovered in searches of Fermi LAT gamma-ray sources using the Parkes radio telescope. Follow-up timing observations of PSRs J0955-6150, J1012-4235, J1036-8317, and J1946-5403 have yielded timing models with precise orbital and astrometric parameters. For each pulsar, we also did a gamma-ray spectral analysis using LAT Pass 8 data and generated photon probabilities for use in a weighted H-test pulsation test. In all 4 cases, we detect significant gamma-ray pulsations, confirming the identification with the gamma-ray source originally targeted in the discovery observations. We describe the results of the pulse timing and gamma-ray spectral and timing analysis and the characteristics of each of the systems. The Fermi-LAT Collaboration acknowledges support for LAT development, operation and data analysis from NASA and DOE (United States), CEA/Irfu and IN2P3/CNRS (France), ASI and INFN (Italy), MEXT, KEK, and JAXA (Japan), and the K.A. Wallenberg Foundation, the Swedish Research Council and the National Space Board (Sweden). Science analysis support in the operations phase from INAF (Italy) and CNES (France) is also gratefully acknowledged. NRL participation was funded by NASA.

  17. Fermi LAT Detection of a New Gamma-ray Source Associated with B2 0748+33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. C.

    2016-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed strong gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the flat-spectrum radio quasar B2 0748+33 with coordinates R.A. = 117.9736383 deg, Decl.

  18. 50 CFR Table 2c to Part 660... - Sablefish North of 36° N. lat. Allocations, 2014 and Beyond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sablefish North of 36° N. lat. Allocations, 2014 and Beyond 2c Table 2c to Part 660, Subpart C Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  19. 50 CFR Table 1c to Part 660... - Sablefish North of 36° N. lat. Allocations, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sablefish North of 36° N. lat. Allocations, 2013 1c Table 1c to Part 660, Subpart C Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES...

  20. ATel 7453: Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from the FSRQ PKS 2032+107

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed gamma-ray flaring activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2032+107 (also known as 3FGL J2035.3+1055, Acero et al. ...

  1. Fermi-LAT TOO observations of PSR J1119-6127 following its 2016 magnetar-like outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, G.; Archibald, R.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kaspi, V.; Ray, P. S.; McEnery, J.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We requested and obtained Fermi-LAT target of opportunity (TOO) observations of the high-B gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1119-6127 between 2016 August 1 - 8. This pulsar recently showed magnetar-like bursts on 2016 July 27 and 28 (GCNs #19735, #19736, and ATel #9274).

  2. Video Meteor Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  3. EIGHT {gamma}-RAY PULSARS DISCOVERED IN BLIND FREQUENCY SEARCHES OF FERMI LAT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Dormody, M.; Ziegler, M.; Belfiore, A.; Johnson, R. P.; Ray, P. S.; Abdo, A. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gwon, C.; Ballet, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; De Luca, A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Johnson, T. J.; Freire, P. C. C. E-mail: mdormody@ucsc.ed E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-12-10

    We report the discovery of eight {gamma}-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches of {approx}650 source positions using the Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We present the timing models, light curves, and detailed spectral parameters of the new pulsars. PSRs J1023-5746, J1044-5737, J1413-5205, J1429-5911, and J1954+2836 are young ({tau}{sub c} < 100 kyr), energetic (E-dot {approx}>10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}), and located within the Galactic plane (|b| < 3{sup 0}). The remaining three pulsars, PSRs J1846+0919, J1957+5033, and J2055+25, are less energetic, and located off the plane. Five pulsars are associated with sources included in the Fermi-LAT bright {gamma}-ray source list, but only one, PSR J1413-6205, is clearly associated with an EGRET source. PSR J1023-5746 has the smallest characteristic age ({tau}{sub c} = 4.6 kyr) and is the most energetic (E-dot = 1.1x10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}) of all {gamma}-ray pulsars discovered so far in blind searches. By analyzing >100 ks of publicly available archival Chandra X-ray data, we have identified the likely counterpart of PSR J1023-5746 as a faint, highly absorbed source, CXOU J102302.8-574606. The large X-ray absorption indicates that this could be among the most distant {gamma}-ray pulsars detected so far. PSR J1023-5746 is positionally coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023-575, located near the young stellar cluster Westerlund 2, while PSR J1954+2836 is coincident with a 4.3{sigma} excess reported by Milagro at a median energy of 35 TeV. PSRs J1957+5033 and J2055+25 have the largest characteristic ages ({tau}{sub c} {approx} 1 Myr) and are the least energetic (E-dot {approx}5x10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}) of the newly discovered pulsars. We used recent XMM observations to identify the counterpart of PSR J2055+25 as XMMU J205549.4+253959. Deep radio follow-up observations of the eight pulsars resulted in no detections of pulsations and upper limits comparable to the faintest known

  4. Cap and trade schemes on waste management: a case study of the landfill allowance trading scheme (LATS) in England.

    PubMed

    Calaf-Forn, Maria; Roca, Jordi; Puig-Ventosa, Ignasi

    2014-05-01

    The Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) is one of the main instruments used in England to enforce the landfill diversion targets established in the Directive 1999/31/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 April 1999 on the landfill of waste (Landfill Directive). Through the LATS, biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) allowances for landfilling are allocated to each local authority, otherwise known as waste disposal authorities (WDAs). The quantity of landfill allowances received is expected to decrease continuously from 2005/06 to 2019/20 so as to meet the objectives of the Landfill Directive. To achieve their commitments, WDAs can exchange, buy, sell or transfer allowances among each other, or may re-profile their own allocation through banking and/or borrowing. Despite the goals for the first seven years - which included two target years (2005/06 and 2009/10) - being widely achieved (the average allocation of allowances per WDA was 22.9% higher than those finally used), market activity among WDAs was high and prices were not very stable. Results in terms of waste reduction and recycling levels have been satisfactory. The reduction of BMW landfilled (in percentage) was higher during the first seven years of the LATS period (2005/06-2011/12) (around 7% annually) than during the previous period (2001/02-2004/05) (4.2% annually). Since 2008, the significance of the LATS diminished because of an increase in the rate of the UK Landfill Tax. The LATS was suppressed after the 2012/13 target year, before what it was initially scheduled. The purpose of this paper is to describe the particularities of the LATS, analyse its performance as a waste management policy, make a comparison with the Landfill Tax, discuss its main features as regards efficiency, effectiveness and the application of the "polluter pays" principle and finally discuss if the effect of the increase in the Landfill Tax is what made the LATS ultimately unnecessary. PMID:24661742

  5. LCLS Spectral Flux Viewer

    2005-10-25

    This application (FluxViewer) is a tool for displaying spectral flux data for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This tool allows the user to view sliced spatial and energy distributions of the photons selected for specific energies and positions transverse to the beam axis.

  6. Tracking Inductive Flux Usage to Evaluate Flux Pumping in the Hybrid Scenario in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. Z.; Luce, T. C.; La Haye, R. J.; Petty, C. C.; Nazikian, R.

    2015-11-01

    In hybrid scenarios the presence of amplitude modulation of tearing modes by nonaxisymmetric instabilities (usually m/n=3/2 by ELMs) is necessary for the redistribution of magnetic poloidal flux (flux pumping) to be observed. The physical mechanism through which the poloidal flux is redistributed (current profile anomalously broadened) is not well understood. The evolution of normalized flux states is used to track the rate at which poloidal flux is provided by the coils, and the rate it is converted to kinetic energy in the plasma. In DIII-D hybrid discharges there is a measured deficit in the rate of change in the flux states indicating that poloidal flux is being consumed at a higher rate than it is being provided by the coils. This unexpected deficit disappears when the tearing mode is suppressed with electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and increases with the level of flux pumping present. One explanation for the deficit could be that the beneficial tearing mode facilitates the conversion of toroidal to poloidal magnetic flux. Supported by US DOE DE-FC02-04ER54698 DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. MicroRNA-103 promotes tumor growth and metastasis in colorectal cancer by directly targeting LATS2

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yong-Bin; Xiao, Kuang; Xiao, Gao-Chun; Tong, Shi-Lun; Ding, Yu; Wang, Qiu-Shuang; Li, Sheng-Bo; Hao, Zhi-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has become the third most common cancer worldwide and leads to a high mortality rate. Although colorectal cancer has been studied widely, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Increasing evidence shows that the abnormal expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in tumorigenesis. Previous studies have reported that miRNA-103 (miR-103) is dysregulated in CRC; however, the expression, function and mechanism of miR-103 in CRC are not well known. The present study showed that miR-103 was overexpressed in the primary tumor tissues of patients with CRC and was significantly associated with a more aggressive phenotype of CRC in patients. Survival rate analysis demonstrated that CRC patients with high miR-103 expression had a poorer overall survival compared with CRC patients with low miR-103 expression. In CRC cell lines, miR-103 inhibition significantly decreased the proliferation, invasion and migration of the cells in vitro. Furthermore, miR-103 repressed large tumor suppressor kinase 2 (LATS2) expression by directly binding to the LATS2-3′-untranslated region, and an inverse correlation was identified between the expression of miR-103 and LATS2 messenger RNA in primary CRC tissues. In addition, the restoration of LATS2 led to suppressed proliferation, invasion and migration of CRC cells. In vivo, miR-103 promotes tumor growth in nude mice. In summary, miR-103 performs a critical role in the promotion of the invasive and metastatic capacities of CRC, possibly by directly targeting LATS2. This miRNA may be involved in the development and progression of CRC. PMID:27602163

  8. A comparative electromyographical investigation of muscle utilization patterns using various hand positions during the lat pull-down.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Zink, Attila J; Szwed, Steven P

    2002-11-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effects of different hand positions on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of shoulder muscles during the performance of the lat pull-down exercise. Ten healthy men performed 3 repetitions of the lat pull-down exercise using their experimentally determined 10RM (repetition maximum) weight. Four different common variations of the lat pull-down were used: close grip (CG), supinated grip (SG), wide grip anterior (WGA), and wide grip posterior (WGP). Normalized root mean square of the EMG (NrmsEMG) activity for the right posterior deltoid (PD), latissimus dorsi (LD), pectoralis major (PM), teres major (TM), and long head of the triceps (TLH) were recorded using surface electrodes and normalized using maximum voluntary contractions. Repeated measures analysis of variance for each muscle detected statistical differences (p < 0.05) in myoelectric activity among hand positions during both the concentric and eccentric phases of the exercise. During the concentric phase, NrmsEMG results for the LD included WGA > WGP, SG, CG. For the TLH: WGA > WGP, SG, CG and WGP > CG, SG. For the PD: CG, WGA, SG > WGP. For the PM: CG, WGA, SG > WGP. During the eccentric phase, the LD produced the following patterns: WGA > WGP, SG, CG and WGP > CG. The TLH pattern showed WGA > SG and CG. For the PD: CG > WGA, WGP. The results indicate that changes in handgrip position affect the activities of specific muscles during the lat pull-down movement. Also, performance of the lat pull-down exercise using the WGA hand position produces greater muscle activity in the LD than any other hand position during both the concentric or eccentric phases of the movement.

  9. MicroRNA-103 promotes tumor growth and metastasis in colorectal cancer by directly targeting LATS2

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yong-Bin; Xiao, Kuang; Xiao, Gao-Chun; Tong, Shi-Lun; Ding, Yu; Wang, Qiu-Shuang; Li, Sheng-Bo; Hao, Zhi-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has become the third most common cancer worldwide and leads to a high mortality rate. Although colorectal cancer has been studied widely, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Increasing evidence shows that the abnormal expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in tumorigenesis. Previous studies have reported that miRNA-103 (miR-103) is dysregulated in CRC; however, the expression, function and mechanism of miR-103 in CRC are not well known. The present study showed that miR-103 was overexpressed in the primary tumor tissues of patients with CRC and was significantly associated with a more aggressive phenotype of CRC in patients. Survival rate analysis demonstrated that CRC patients with high miR-103 expression had a poorer overall survival compared with CRC patients with low miR-103 expression. In CRC cell lines, miR-103 inhibition significantly decreased the proliferation, invasion and migration of the cells in vitro. Furthermore, miR-103 repressed large tumor suppressor kinase 2 (LATS2) expression by directly binding to the LATS2-3′-untranslated region, and an inverse correlation was identified between the expression of miR-103 and LATS2 messenger RNA in primary CRC tissues. In addition, the restoration of LATS2 led to suppressed proliferation, invasion and migration of CRC cells. In vivo, miR-103 promotes tumor growth in nude mice. In summary, miR-103 performs a critical role in the promotion of the invasive and metastatic capacities of CRC, possibly by directly targeting LATS2. This miRNA may be involved in the development and progression of CRC.

  10. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3′-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity. - Highlights: • miR-21 is highly expressed in HR-HPV (+) radioresistant cervical cancer patients. • miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells. • miR-21 can decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. • miR-21 modulates radiosensitivity cervical cancer cell by directly targeting LATS1.

  11. Analysis of a herpes simplex virus type 1 LAT mutant with a deletion between th