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Sample records for late gadolinium-enhanced mri

  1. Emerging concepts for myocardial late gadolinium enhancement MRI.

    PubMed

    Doltra, Adelina; Amundsen, Brage Hoyem; Gebker, Rolf; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement is a useful tool for scar detection, based on differences in the volume of distribution of gadolinium, an extracellular agent. The presence of fibrosis in the myocardium amenable to be detected with late gadolinium enhancement MRI is found not only in ischemic cardiomyopathy, in which it offers information regarding viability and prognosis, but also in a wide variety of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. In the following review we will discuss the methodological aspects of gadolinium-based imaging, as well as its applications and anticipated future developments.

  2. [Studies of three-dimensional cardiac late gadolinium enhancement MRI at 3.0 Tesla].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masaru; Ikeda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Momoe

    2008-12-20

    Cardiac late Gadolinium enhancement MR imaging has been shown to allow assessment of myocardial viability in patients with ischemic heart disease. The current standard approach is a 3D inversion recovery sequence at 1.5 Tesla. The aims of this study were to evaluate the technique feasibility and clinical utility of MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy. In phantom and volunteer studies, the inversion time required to suppress the signal of interests and tissues was prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. In the clinical study, the average inversion time to suppress the signal of myocardium at 3.0 Tesla with respect to MR viability imaging at 1.5 Tesla was at 15 min after the administration of contrast agent (304.0+/-29.2 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 283.9+/-20.9 at 1.5 Tesla). The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium was equal at both field strengths (4.06+/-1.30 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 4.42+/-1.85 at 1.5 Tesla). Even at this early stage, MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla provides high quality images in patients with myocardial infarction. The inversion time is significantly prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium at 3.0 Tesla are equal to 1.5 Tesla. Further investigation is needed for this technical improvement, for clinical evaluation, and for limitations.

  3. Quantification of fibrosis in infarcted swine hearts by ex vivo late gadolinium-enhancement and diffusion-weighted MRI methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Mihaela; Ghugre, Nilesh R.; Ramanan, Venkat; Morikawa, Lily; Stanisz, Greg; Dick, Alexander J.; Wright, Graham A.

    2013-08-01

    Many have speculated that MRI signal characteristics can be used to identify regions of heterogeneous infarct associated with an arrhythmogenic substrate; however, direct evidence of this relationship is limited. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the remodelling characteristics of fibrosis by means of histology and high-resolution MR imaging. For this purpose, we performed whole-mount histology in heart samples (n = 9) collected from five swine at six weeks post-infarction and compared the extent of fibrosis in the infarcted areas delineated in these histological images with that obtained ex vivo by MRI using late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) methods. All MR images were obtained at a submillimetre resolution (i.e., voxel size of 0.6×0.6×1.2 mm3). Specifically, in the histology images, we differentiated moderate fibrosis (consisting of a mixture of viable and non-viable myocytes, known as border zone, BZ) from severe fibrosis (i.e., the dense scar). Correspondingly, tissue heterogeneities in the MR images were categorized by a Gaussian mixture model into healthy, BZ and scar. Our results showed that (a) both MRI methods were capable of qualitatively distinguishing sharp edges between dense scar and healthy tissue from regions of heterogeneous BZ; (b) the BZ and dense scar areas had intermediate-to-high increased values of signal intensity in the LGE images and of apparent diffusion coefficient in the DWI, respectively. In addition, as demonstrated by the Picrosirius Red and immunohistochemistry stains, the viable bundles in the BZ were clearly separated by thin collagen strands and had reduced expression of Cx43, whereas the core scar was composed of dense fibrosis. A quantitative analysis demonstrated that the comparison between BZ/scar extent in LGE and DWI to the corresponding areas identified in histology yielded very good correlations (i.e., for the scar identified by LGE, R2 was 0.96 compared to R2 = 0.93 for the

  4. Prognostic Value of Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gaztanaga, Juan; Paruchuri, Vijayapraveena; Elias, Elliott; Wilner, Jonathan; Islam, Shahidul; Sawit, Simonette; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Sanz, Javier; Garcia, Mario J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic value of late gadolinium enhancement seen on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICMP). Patients with NICMP are at increased risk for cardiovascular events and death. The presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in CMR may be associated with a poor prognosis, but its significance is still under investigation. We retrospectively studied 105 consecutive patients with NICMP and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤40% referred for CMR. The cohort was analyzed for the presence of LGE and left and right ventricular functional parameters. Patients were followed for the composite end point of hospitalization for congestive heart failure, appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy, or all-cause mortality. LGE was observed in 68% (n = 71) of the cohort. Both groups were similar in age, LVEF and LV end-diastolic volume. The LGE+ patients were more often men and had larger right ventricular volumes. At a mean follow-up of 806 ± 582 days, there were 26 patients (23 in the LGE+ group) who reached the primary end point. Event-free survival was significantly worse for the LGE+ patients. After adjusting for traditional risk factors (age, gender, and LVEF), patients with LGE had an increased risk of experiencing the primary end point (hazard ratio 4.47, 95% CIs 1.27 to 15.74, p = 0.02). The presence of LGE in patients with NICMP strongly predicts the occurrence of adverse events. In conclusion, this may be important in risk stratification and management. PMID:27614850

  5. Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Patients with Nonischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Memon, Sarfaraz; Ganga, Harsha V; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    One-third of all patients with heart failure have nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDM). Five-year mortality from NIDM is as high as 20% with sudden cardiac death (SCD) as the cause in 30% of the deaths. Currently, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is used as the main criteria to risk stratify patients requiring an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to prevent SCD. However, LVEF does not necessarily reflect myocardial propensity for electrical instability leading to ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Due to the differential risk in various subgroups of patients for arrhythmic death, it is important to identify appropriate patients for ICD implantation so that we can optimize healthcare resources and avoid the complications of ICDs in individuals who are unlikely to benefit. We performed a systematic search and review of clinical trials of NIDM and the use of ICDs and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for risk stratification. LGE identifies patients with NIDM who are at high risk for SCD and enables optimized patient selection for ICD placement, while the absence of LGE may reduce the need for ICD implantation in patients with NIDM who are at low risk for future VF/VT or SCD. PMID:27071516

  6. Patterns of late gadolinium enhancement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to assess whether cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers (DMDc) may index any cell milieu elements of LV dysfunction and whether this cardiac phenotype may be related to genotype. The null hypothesis was that myocardial fibrosis, assessed by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), might be similarly accounted for in DMDc and gender and age-matched controls. Methods Thirty DMDc patients had CMR and genotyping with 37 gender and age-matched controls. Systolic and diastolic LV function was assessed by 2D-echocardiography. Results Absolute and percent LGE were higher in muscular symptomatic (sym) than asymptomatic (asy) DMDc (1.77 ± 0.27 vs 0.76 ± 0.17 ml; F = 19.6, p < 0.0001 and 1.86 ± 0.26% vs 0.68 ± 0.17%, F = 22.1, p < 0.0001, respectively). There was no correlation between LGE and age. LGE was seen most frequently in segments 5 and 6; segment 5 was involved in all asy-DMDc. Subepicardial LGE predominated, compared to the mid-myocardial one (11 out of 14 DMDc). LGE was absent in the subendocardium. No correlations were seen between genotyping (type of mutation, gene region and protein domain), confined to the exon’s study, and cardiac phenotype. Conclusions A typical myocardial LGE-pattern location (LV segments 5 and 6) was a common finding in DMDc. LGE was more frequently subepicardial plus midmyocardial in sym-DMDc, with normal LV systolic and diastolic function. No genotype-phenothype correlation was found. PMID:25008475

  7. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Among Survivors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Neilan, Tomas G.; Farhad, Hoshang; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Shah, Ravi V.; Dodson, John A.; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Danik, Stephan B.; Verdini, Daniel J.; Tokuda, Michifumi; Tedrow, Usha B.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Hoffmann, Udo; Ghoshhajra, Brian B.; Stevenson, William G.; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to describe the role of contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in the workup of patients with aborted sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and in the prediction of long-term outcomes. BACKGROUND Myocardial fibrosis is a key substrate for SCA, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on a CMR study is a robust technique for imaging of myocardial fibrosis. METHODS We performed a retrospective review of all survivors of SCA who were referred for CMR studies and performed follow-up for the subsequent occurrence of an adverse event (death and appropriate defibrillator therapy). RESULTS After a workup that included a clinical history, electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and coronary angiogram, 137 patients underwent CMR for workup of aborted SCA (66% male; mean age 56 ± 11 years; left ventricular ejection fraction 43 ± 12%). The presenting arrhythmias were ventricular fibrillation (n = 105 [77%]) and ventricular tachycardia (n = 32 [23%]). Overall, LGE was found in 98 patients (71%), with an average extent of 9.9 ± 5% of the left ventricular myocardium. CMR imaging provided a diagnosis or an arrhythmic substrate in 104 patients (76%), including the presence of an infarct-pattern LGE in 60 patients (44%), noninfarct LGE in 21 (15%), active myocarditis in 14 (10%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 3 (2%), sarcoidosis in 3, and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in 3. In a median follow-up of 29 months (range 18 to 43 months), there were 63 events. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest predictors of recurrent events were the presence of LGE (adjusted hazard ratio: 6.7; 95% CI: 2.38 to 18.85; p < 0.001) and the extent of LGE (hazard ratio: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.19; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with SCA, CMR with contrast identified LGE in 71% and provided a potential arrhythmic substrate in 76%. In follow-up, both the presence and extent of LGE identified a group at markedly increased risk of future adverse events. PMID

  8. Volumetric Late Gadolinium-Enhanced Myocardial Imaging with Retrospective Inversion Time Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kecskemeti, Steve; Johnson, Kevin; François, Christopher J.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Unal, Orhan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a novel free-breathing three-dimensional radial late Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique (3D LGE-MRI) with isotropic resolution and retrospective inversion time (TI) selection for myocardial viability imaging. Materials and Methods The 3D LGE-MRI featuring an interleaved and bit-reversed radial k-space trajectory was evaluated in twelve subjects that also had clinical breathhold Cartesian 2D LGE-MRI. The 3D LGE-MRI acquisition requires a predicted TI and a user controlled data acquisition window that determines the sampling width around the predicted TI. Sliding window reconstructions with update rates of 1x the repetition time (TR) allow for a user selectable TI to obtain the maximum nulling of the myocardium. The retrospective nature of the acquisition allows the user to choose from a range of possible TI times centered on the expected TI. Those projections most corrupted by respiratory motion, as determined by a respiratory bellows signal, were re-sampled according to the diminishing variance algorithm. The quality of the left ventricular myocardial nulling on the 3D LGE-MRI and 2D LGE-MRI was assessed using a 4-point Likert scale by two experienced radiologists. Comparison of image quality scores for the two methods was performed using generalized estimating equations. Results All 3D LGE-MRI cases produced similar nulling of myocardial signal as the 2D LGE-MRI. The image quality of myocardial nulling was not significantly different between the two acquisitions (mean nulling of 3.4 for 2D vs. 3.1 for 3D, and p=0.0645). The average absolute deviation from mean scores was also not determined to be statistically significant (1.8 for 2D and 0.4 for 3D and p = 0.1673). Total acquisition time was approximately 9 minutes for 3D LGE-MRI with voxel sizes ranging from 1.63 to 2.03 mm3. Conversely, the total imaging time was twice as long for the 2D DCE-MRI (>17 minutes) with an eight times larger voxel size of 1.4 mm

  9. Quantitative assessment of synovitis in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease using gadolinium-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Neal, David C; O'Brien, Jack C; Burgess, Jamie; Jo, Chanhee; Kim, Harry K W

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative method to assess hip synovitis in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) is not currently available. To develop this method, the areas of synovial enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced MRI (Gd-MRI) were measured by two independent observers. The volume of synovial enhancement was significantly increased in the initial and the fragmentation stages of LCPD (Waldenström stages I and II), with a persistence of synovitis into the reossification stage (stage III). The Gd-MRI method had high interobserver and intraobserver agreements and may serve as a useful method to monitor the effect of various treatments on hip synovitis in LCPD. PMID:25305048

  10. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging in assessment of myocardial viability: techniques and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Juan, Laura; Crean, Andrew M; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of myocardial viability is of ever-evolving interest in cardiovascular imaging, with major societies having incorporated viability imaging as class I or class IIa indications in their guidelines to better guide patient management. As with late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (MR), assessment of residual myocardial viability or the extent of myocardial infarction is straightforward and this technique may easily be combined with other cardiac MR modules. In clinical routine functional assessment and myocardial perfusion imaging if often used in conjunction allowing for a comprehensive assessment of ischemic heart disease.

  11. Registration of dynamic multiview 2D ultrasound and late gadolinium enhanced images of the heart: Application to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterization.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Julián; Simon, Antoine; Halbert, Edgar; Tavard, François; Carré, François; Hernández, Alfredo; Donal, Erwan; Schnell, Frédéric; Garreau, Mireille

    2016-02-01

    Describing and analyzing heart multiphysics requires the acquisition and fusion of multisensor cardiac images. Multisensor image fusion enables a combined analysis of these heterogeneous modalities. We propose to register intra-patient multiview 2D+t ultrasound (US) images with multiview late gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images acquired during cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in order to fuse mechanical and tissue state information. The proposed procedure registers both US and LGE to cine MRI. The correction of slice misalignment and the rigid registration of multiview LGE and cine MRI are studied, to select the most appropriate similarity measure. It showed that mutual information performs the best for LGE slice misalignment correction and for LGE and cine registration. Concerning US registration, dynamic endocardial contours resulting from speckle tracking echocardiography were exploited in a geometry-based dynamic registration. We propose the use of an adapted dynamic time warping procedure to synchronize cardiac dynamics in multiview US and cine MRI. The registration of US and LGE MRI was evaluated on a dataset of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A visual assessment of 330 left ventricular regions from US images of 28 patients resulted in 92.7% of regions successfully aligned with cardiac structures in LGE. Successfully-aligned regions were then used to evaluate the abilities of strain indicators to predict the presence of fibrosis. Longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay of aligned left ventricular regions were computed from corresponding regional strain curves from US. The Mann-Withney test proved that the expected values of these indicators change between the populations of regions with and without fibrosis (p < 0.01). ROC curves otherwise proved that the presence of fibrosis is one factor amongst others which modifies longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay. PMID:26619189

  12. Late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify early features of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). We characterise myocardial and functional findings in carriers of lamin A/C mutation to facilitate the recognition of these patients using this method. We also investigated the connection between myocardial fibrosis and conduction abnormalities. Methods Seventeen lamin A/C mutation carriers underwent CMR. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and cine images were performed to evaluate myocardial fibrosis, regional wall motion, longitudinal myocardial function, global function and volumetry of both ventricles. The location, pattern and extent of enhancement in the left ventricle (LV) myocardium were visually estimated. Results Patients had LV myocardial fibrosis in 88% of cases. Segmental wall motion abnormalities correlated strongly with the degree of enhancement. Myocardial enhancement was associated with conduction abnormalities. Sixty-nine percent of our asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients showed mild ventricular dilatation, systolic failure or both in global ventricular analysis. Decreased longitudinal systolic LV function was observed in 53% of patients. Conclusions Cardiac conduction abnormalities, mildly dilated LV and depressed systolic dysfunction are common in DCM caused by a lamin A/C gene mutation. However, other cardiac diseases may produce similar symptoms. CMR is an accurate tool to determine the typical cardiac involvement in lamin A/C cardiomyopathy and may help to initiate early treatment in this malignant familiar form of DCM. PMID:21689390

  13. Intra-cardiac distribution of late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac sarcoidosis and dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Makoto; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saotome, Masao; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Hayashi, Hideharu; Saitoh, Takeji

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac involvement of sarcoid lesions is diagnosed by myocardial biopsy which is frequently false-negative, and patients with cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) who have impaired left ventricular (LV) systolic function are sometimes diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Late gadolinium enhancement (LE) in magnetic resonance imaging is now a critical finding in diagnosing CS, and the novel Japanese guideline considers myocardial LE to be a major criterion of CS. This article describes the value of LE in patients with CS who have impaired LV systolic function, particularly the diagnostic and clinical significance of LE distribution in comparison with DCM. LE existed at all LV segments and myocardial layers in patients with CS, whereas it was localized predominantly in the midwall of basal to mid septum in those with DCM. Transmural (nodular), circumferential, and subepicardial and subendocardial LE distribution were highly specific in patients with CS, whereas the prevalence of striated midwall LE were high both in patients with CS and with DCM. Since sarcoidosis patients with LE have higher incidences of heart failure symptoms, ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden cardiac death, the analyses of extent and distribution of LE are crucial in early diagnosis and therapeutic approach for patients with CS. PMID:27721933

  14. Prognostic Value of Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Cardiac Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Marianna; Pica, Silvia; Reant, Patricia; Abdel-Gadir, Amna; Treibel, Thomas A.; Banypersad, Sanjay M.; Maestrini, Viviana; Barcella, William; Rosmini, Stefania; Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Sayed, Rabya H.; Patel, Ketna; Mamhood, Shameem; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Whelan, Carol J.; Herrey, Anna S.; Lachmann, Helen J.; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D.; Manisty, Charlotte H.; Schelbert, Eric B.; Kellman, Peter; Gillmore, Julian D.; Hawkins, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    Background— The prognosis and treatment of the 2 main types of cardiac amyloidosis, immunoglobulin light chain (AL) and transthyretin (ATTR) amyloidosis, are substantially influenced by cardiac involvement. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) is a reference standard for the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis, but its potential for stratifying risk is unknown. Methods and Results— Two hundred fifty prospectively recruited subjects, 122 patients with ATTR amyloid, 9 asymptomatic mutation carriers, and 119 patients with AL amyloidosis, underwent LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Subjects were followed up for a mean of 24±13 months. LGE was performed with phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) and without (magnitude only). These were compared with extracellular volume measured with T1 mapping. PSIR was superior to magnitude-only inversion recovery LGE because PSIR always nulled the tissue (blood or myocardium) with the longest T1 (least gadolinium). LGE was classified into 3 patterns: none, subendocardial, and transmural, which were associated with increasing amyloid burden as defined by extracellular volume (P<0.0001), with transitions from none to subendocardial LGE at an extracellular volume of 0.40 to 0.43 (AL) and 0.39 to 0.40 (ATTR) and to transmural at 0.48 to 0.55 (AL) and 0.47 to 0.59 (ATTR). Sixty-seven patients (27%) died. Transmural LGE predicted death (hazard ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.1–13.7; P<0.0001) and remained independent after adjustment for N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, ejection fraction, stroke volume index, E/E′, and left ventricular mass index (hazard ratio, 4.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3–13.1; P<0.05). Conclusions— There is a continuum of cardiac involvement in systemic AL and ATTR amyloidosis. Transmural LGE is determined reliably by PSIR and represents advanced cardiac amyloidosis. The PSIR technique provides incremental information on outcome even after

  15. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World

    PubMed Central

    Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). PMID:27660737

  16. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Edgar; Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). PMID:27660737

  17. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World

    PubMed Central

    Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF).

  18. Detection of small hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison of conventional gadolinium-enhanced MRI with gadolinium-enhanced MRI after the administration of ferucarbotran.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y K; Kim, C S; Han, Y M

    2009-06-01

    We compared the diagnostic efficacy of gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MRI with that of Gd-enhanced MRI after administration of ferucarbotran for revealing small hypervascular hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). 24 patients with 34 HCCs (ranging in size from 0.6-2.0 cm) underwent Gd-enhanced three-dimensional dynamic MRI followed, after an interval of 5-11 days (mean, 7 days), by Gd-enhanced three-dimensional dynamic MRI after administration of ferucarbotran. The two Gd-enhanced arterial-phase MRI scans were compared quantitatively by measuring the tumour-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and qualitatively by evaluating the tumour-liver contrast using matched-pairs analysis. The tumour-liver CNR with Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging after ferucarbotran (250.3 +/- 103.7) was higher than that with Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging (221.1 +/- 96.1) (p < 0.001). Matched-pairs analysis indicated that, for three lesions, the relative tumour-liver contrast was slightly better with Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging after ferucarbotran than with conventional Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging; however, in the case of the remaining 31 lesions, the two images were equivalent. We concluded that, although Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging after ferucarbotran results in better tumour-liver CNR than Gd-enhanced arterial-phase imaging, the ability of the two techniques to reveal small hypervascular HCCs is the same.

  19. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of acute gouty arthritis on top of chronic gouty involvement in different joints.

    PubMed

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El-Naggar, Ahmed; El-Shaarawy, Nashwa; Abd-Allah, Mayada A; Gamal, Rania M; Fathy, Ahmed; Hawass, Mona; Rasker, Johannes J

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the current study are to describe gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of an acute flare of established gouty arthritis in different joints and to examine a possible association between serum uric acid and MRI signs indicative of ongoing inflammation and/or structural joint damage as well as association with disease characteristics and laboratory findings. Twenty-seven male patients with established chronic gout agreed to participate, mean age 47.6 years, and mean disease duration in months 43.2 (±31.8). For all patients, detailed demographic, disease characteristics, and laboratory findings were obtained and correlated with MRI findings. In 27 patients with established gout, a total of 50 MRI studies were performed of the following joints: feet joints (n = 23), ankles (n = 18), knees (n = 5), and hand and wrist joints (n = 4). MRI revealed capsular thickening in 19 patients, bone marrow edema (BME) in 15, soft tissue edema (STE) in 20, joint effusion in 21, bone erosions in 17, cartilaginous erosions in 4, and tenosynovitis in 9 cases. In 17 cases, tophaceous lesions were found. Post contrast MRI showed synovial thickening in seven cases. Positive correlations were observed between serum uric acid levels and the following MRI findings: capsular thickening (r = 0.552, p = 0.003), BME (r = 0.668, p ≤ 0.0001), STE (r = 0.559, p = 0.002), and tenosynovitis (r = 0.513, p = 0.006). Using MRI in chronic gout, important features can be detected like BME, minute cartilaginous erosions, and hypertrophic synovial inflammation in post contrast MR images. Serum uric acid (SUA) was positively correlated with capsular thickening, BME, STE, and tenosynovitis.

  20. Comparison of semi-automated scar quantification techniques using high-resolution, 3-dimensional late-gadolinium-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Rajchl, Martin; Stirrat, John; Goubran, Maged; Yu, Jeff; Scholl, David; Peters, Terry M; White, James A

    2015-02-01

    The quantification and modeling of myocardial scar is of expanding interest for image-guided therapy, particularly in the field of arrhythmia management. Migration towards high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) MRI techniques for spatial mapping of myocardial scar provides superior spatial registration. However, to date no systematic comparison of available approaches to 3D scar quantification have been performed. In this study we compare the reproducibility of six 3D scar segmentation algorithms for determination of left ventricular scar volume. Additionally, comparison to two-dimensional (2D) scar quantification and 3D manual segmentation is performed. Thirty-five consecutive patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy were recruited and underwent conventional 2D late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and 3D isotropic LGE imaging (voxel size 1.3 mm(3)) using a 3 T scanner. 3D LGE datasets were analyzed using six semi-automated segmentation techniques, including the signal threshold versus reference mean (STRM) technique at >2, >3, >5 and >6 standard deviations (SD) above reference myocardium, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) technique, and an optimization-based technique called hierarchical max flow (HMF). The mean ejection fraction was 32.1 ± 12.7 %. Reproducibility was greatest for HMF and FWHM techniques with intra-class correlation coefficient values ≥0.95. 3D scar quantification and modeling is clinically feasible in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. While several approaches show acceptable reproducibility, HMF appears superior due to maintenance of accuracy towards manual segmentations.

  1. Quantitative assessment of intervertebral disc glycosaminoglycan distribution by gadolinium-enhanced MRI in orthopedic patients.

    PubMed

    Vaga, Stefania; Raimondi, Manuela Teresa; Caiani, Enrico Gianluca; Costa, Francesco; Giordano, Carmen; Perona, Franco; Zerbi, Alberto; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Our hypothesis was that the enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) imaging protocol could be used in patients to quantify the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) in intervertebral discs (IVD). To test this hypothesis, 23 patients with degenerative disc pathology scheduled for surgery were studied by a specific dGEMRIC protocol: each patient underwent two MRI scans, before and 3.5 hr after Gd(DTPA)2-injection of a nonconventional dose of 40 mL. Then, T(1PRE-ENH) and T(1POST-ENH) parametric images of the disc were obtained, from which a new index DeltaT(1) of the molecular status of the IVD was computed (T(1PRE-ENH) - T(1POST-ENH)). A total of 31 tissue samples (one or two from each patient) obtained at herniectomy were collected and biochemically analyzed for sGAG content and used as the gold standard for comparison. DeltaT(1) values in correspondence to degenerated sectors were higher (158 +/- 36 ms) compared to normal sectors (80 +/- 13 ms). Linear regression analysis between MRI-derived and biochemistry-derived measurements resulted in a significant correlation (r = 0.73, P < 0.0001). The DeltaT(1) parametric images, calculated using the modified dGEMRIC technique, provided noninvasive quantitative information about sGAG content within discal tissue in vivo, which resulted in agreement with biochemical analysis. The application of this new MRI method could provide diagnostic information for standard treatment of lumbar discopathy and for innovative therapies of regenerative medicine. PMID:18050346

  2. Ultrafast 3D spin-echo acquisition improves Gadolinium-enhanced MRI signal contrast enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Han, S. H.; Cho, F. H.; Song, Y. K.; Paulsen, J.; Song, Y. Q.; Kim, Y. R.; Kim, J. K.; Cho, G.; Cho, H.

    2014-01-01

    Long scan times of 3D volumetric MR acquisitions usually necessitate ultrafast in vivo gradient-echo acquisitions, which are intrinsically susceptible to magnetic field inhomogeneities. This is especially problematic for contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI applications, where non-negligible T2* effect of contrast agent deteriorates the positive signal contrast and limits the available range of MR acquisition parameters and injection doses. To overcome these shortcomings without degrading temporal resolution, ultrafast spin-echo acquisitions were implemented. Specifically, a multiplicative acceleration factor from multiple spin echoes (×32) and compressed sensing (CS) sampling (×8) allowed highly-accelerated 3D Multiple-Modulation-Multiple-Echo (MMME) acquisition. At the same time, the CE-MRI of kidney with Gd-DOTA showed significantly improved signal enhancement for CS-MMME acquisitions (×7) over that of corresponding FLASH acquisitions (×2). Increased positive contrast enhancement and highly accelerated acquisition of extended volume with reduced RF irradiations will be beneficial for oncological and nephrological applications, in which the accurate in vivo 3D quantification of contrast agent concentration is necessary with high temporal resolution. PMID:24863102

  3. Nocturnal Blood Pressure Pattern Affects Left Ventricular Remodeling and Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Patients with Hypertension and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Hajime; Imai, Yasuko; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Tokumaru, Aya M.; Fujimoto, Hajime; Harada, Kazumasa

    2013-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent predictor of cardiac mortality, regardless of its etiology. Previous studies have shown that high nocturnal blood pressure (BP) affects LV geometry in hypertensive patients. It has been suggested that continuous pressure overload affects the development of LVH, but it is unknown whether persistent pressure influences myocardial fibrosis or whether the etiology of LVH is associated with myocardial fibrosis. Comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) including the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) technique can evaluate both the severity of changes in LV geometry and myocardial fibrosis. We tested the hypothesis that the nocturnal non-dipper BP pattern causes LV remodeling and fibrosis in patients with hypertension and LVH. Methods Forty-seven hypertensive patients with LVH evaluated by echocardiography (29 men, age 73.0±10.4 years) were examined by comprehensive CMR and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Results and Conclusions Among the 47 patients, twenty-four had nocturnal non-dipper BP patterns. Patients with nocturnal non-dipper BP patterns had larger LV masses and scar volumes independent of etiologies than those in patients with dipper BP patterns (p = 0.035 and p = 0.015, respectively). There was no significant difference in mean 24-h systolic BP between patients with and without nocturnal dipper BP patterns (p = 0.367). Among hypertensive patients with LVH, the nocturnal non-dipper blood pressure pattern is associated with both LV remodeling and myocardial fibrosis independent of LVH etiology. PMID:23840777

  4. Left Atrial Late Gadolinium Enhancement with Water-Fat Separation: the Importance of Phase-encoding Order

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jaime L.; Knowles, Benjamin R.; Goldfarb, James W.; Manning, Warren J.; Peters, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare two late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) methods: a Dixon LGE sequence with sequential phase-encoding order, reconstructed using water-fat separation, and standard fat-saturated LGE. Materials and Methods We have implemented a dual-echo Dixon LGE method for reconstructing water-only images, and compared it to fat-saturated LGE in twelve patients prior to their first pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) procedure. Images were analyzed for quality and fat-suppression. Regions of the left atrium were evaluated by a blinded observer (1=prominent enhancement, 0=mild or absent enhancement) on two sets of images (fat-saturated and water-only LGE), and agreement was assessed. Results Water-only LGE showed a trend toward better fat-suppression (p=0.06), with a significantly more homogeneous blood pool signal and reduced inflow artifacts (both p<0.01). Agreement between fat-saturated LGE and water-only methods was found in 84% of regions, significantly correlated by chi-squared test (p<0.001). The kappa value was 0.52 (moderate). The average number of enhancing segments was higher for fat-saturated LGE than water-only LGE (4.2 ±2.7 vs. 3.2±2.9, p=0.03). Conclusion The two-point Dixon LGE technique reduces artifacts due to a centric k-space order. A similar enhancement pattern was observed irrespective of the LGE technique, with more enhancement detected by fat-saturated LGE. PMID:24105717

  5. Significance of Late Gadolinium Enhancement at Right Ventricular Attachment to Ventricular Septum in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Raymond H; Maron, Barry J; Olivotto, Iacopo; Assenza, Gabriele E; Haas, Tammy S; Lesser, John R; Gruner, Christiane; Crean, Andrew M; Rakowski, Harry; Rowin, Ethan; Udelson, James; Lombardi, Massimo; Tomberli, Benedetta; Spirito, Paolo; Formisano, Francesco; Marra, Martina P; Biagini, Elena; Autore, Camillo; Manning, Warren J; Appelbaum, Evan; Roberts, William C; Basso, Cristina; Maron, Martin S

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) with extensive late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) is a novel marker for increased risk for sudden death (SD) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Small focal areas of LGE confined to the region of right ventricular (RV) insertion to ventricular septum (VS) have emerged as a frequent and highly visible CMR imaging pattern of uncertain significance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of LGE confined to the RV insertion area in patients with HC. CMR was performed in 1,293 consecutive patients with HC from 7 HC centers, followed for 3.4 ± 1.7 years. Of 1,293 patients (47 ± 14 years), 134 (10%) had LGE present only in the anterior and/or inferior areas of the RV insertion to VS, occupying 3.7 ± 2.9% of left ventricular myocardium. Neither the presence nor extent of LGE in these isolated areas was a predictor of adverse HC-related risk, including SD (adjusted hazard ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 1.50, p = 0.53; adjusted hazard ratio 1.16/10% increase in LGE, 95% confidence interval 0.29 to 4.65, p = 0.83, respectively). Histopathology in 20 HC hearts show the insertion areas of RV attachment to be composed of a greatly expanded extracellular space characterized predominantly by interstitial-type fibrosis and interspersed disorganized myocyte patterns and architecture. In conclusion, LGE confined to the insertion areas of RV to VS was associated with low risk of adverse events (including SD). Gadolinium pooling in this region of the left ventricle does not reflect myocyte death and repair with replacement fibrosis or scarring.

  6. Characteristics and clinical relevance of late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac magnetic resonance in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sano, Makoto; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suwa, Kenichiro; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Shimoyama, Kumiko; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ogawa, Noriyoshi; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is considerably frequent in autopsy, but the early identification is clinically difficult. Recent advantages in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) enabled to detect myocardial fibrotic scar as late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). We aimed to examine the prevalence and distribution of LGE in patients with SSc, and associate them with clinical features, electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac function. Forty patients with SSc (58 ± 14 years-old, 35 females, limited/diffuse 25/15, disease duration 106 ± 113 months) underwent serological tests, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and CMR. Seven patients (17.5 %) showed LGE in 26 segments of left ventricle (LV). LGE distributed mainly in the basal to mid inter-ventricular septum and the right ventricular (RV) insertion points, but involved all the myocardial regions. More patients with LGE showed NYHA functional class II and more (71 vs. 21 %, p < 0.05), bundle branch blocks (57 vs. 6 %, p < 0.05), LV ejection fraction (LVEF) < 50 % (72 vs. 6 %, p < 0.01), LV asynergy (43 vs. 0 %, p < 0.01) and RVEF < 40 % (100 vs. 39 %, p < 0.01). There was no difference in disease duration, disease types, or prevalence of positive autoimmune antibodies or high serum NT-proBNP level (>125 pg/ml). When cardiac involvement of SSc was defined as low LVEF, ECG abnormalities or high NT-proBNP, the sensitivity, specificity positive and negative predictive values of LGE were 36, 92, 71 and 72 %, respectively. We could clarify the prevalence and distribution of LGE in Japanese patients with SSc. The presence of LGE was associated with cardiac symptom, conduction disturbance and impaired LV/RV contraction.

  7. Prognostic Implications of Left Ventricular Scar Determined by Late Gadolinium Enhanced Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Suksaranjit, Promporn; McGann, Christopher J; Akoum, Nazem; Biskupiak, Joseph; Stoddard, Gregory J; Kholmovski, Eugene G; Navaravong, Leenhapong; Rassa, Allen; Bieging, Erik; Chang, Lowell; Haider, Imran; Marrouche, Nassir F; Wilson, Brent D

    2016-10-01

    Left ventricular (LV) scar identified by late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is associated with adverse outcomes in coronary artery disease and cardiomyopathies. We sought to determine the prognostic significance of LV-LGE in atrial fibrillation (AF). We studied 778 consecutive patients referred for radiofrequency ablation of AF who underwent CMR. Patients with coronary artery disease, previous myocardial infarction, or hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy were excluded. The end points of interest were major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE), defined as a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack. Of the 754 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 60% were men with an average age of 64 years. Most (87%) had a normal LV ejection fraction of ≥55%. LV-LGE was found in 46 patients (6%). There were 32 MACCE over the mean follow-up period of 55 months. The MACCE rate was higher for patients with LV-LGE (13.0% vs 3.7%; p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, CHA2DS2-VASc score (hazard ratio [HR] 1.36, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.76), the presence of LV-LGE (HR 3.21, 95% CI 1.31 to 7.88), and the LV-LGE extent (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.78) were independent predictors of MACCE. In addition, the presence of LV-LGE was an independent predictor for ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (HR 3.61, 95% CI 1.18 to 11.01) after adjusting for CHA2DS2-VASc score. In conclusion, the presence and extent of LV scar identified by LGE-CMR were independent predictors of MACCE in patients with AF. PMID:27553101

  8. Evaluation of state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms for left ventricle infarct from late Gadolinium enhancement MR images.

    PubMed

    Karim, Rashed; Bhagirath, Pranav; Claus, Piet; Housden, R James; Chen, Zhong; Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Sohn, Hyon-Mok; Lara Rodríguez, Laura; Vera, Sergio; Albà, Xènia; Hennemuth, Anja; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto; Arbel, Tal; Gonzàlez Ballester, Miguel A; Frangi, Alejandro F; Götte, Marco; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias; Rhode, Kawal

    2016-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated the feasibility of late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging for guiding the management of patients with sequelae to myocardial infarction, such as ventricular tachycardia and heart failure. Clinical implementation of these developments necessitates a reproducible and reliable segmentation of the infarcted regions. It is challenging to compare new algorithms for infarct segmentation in the left ventricle (LV) with existing algorithms. Benchmarking datasets with evaluation strategies are much needed to facilitate comparison. This manuscript presents a benchmarking evaluation framework for future algorithms that segment infarct from LGE CMR of the LV. The image database consists of 30 LGE CMR images of both humans and pigs that were acquired from two separate imaging centres. A consensus ground truth was obtained for all data using maximum likelihood estimation. Six widely-used fixed-thresholding methods and five recently developed algorithms are tested on the benchmarking framework. Results demonstrate that the algorithms have better overlap with the consensus ground truth than most of the n-SD fixed-thresholding methods, with the exception of the Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) fixed-thresholding method. Some of the pitfalls of fixed thresholding methods are demonstrated in this work. The benchmarking evaluation framework, which is a contribution of this work, can be used to test and benchmark future algorithms that detect and quantify infarct in LGE CMR images of the LV. The datasets, ground truth and evaluation code have been made publicly available through the website: https://www.cardiacatlas.org/web/guest/challenges.

  9. Utility of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI (dGEMRIC) for qualitative evaluation of articular cartilage of patellofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Takehiro; Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Namura, Takehiko; Narita, Wataru; Ikoma, Kazuya; Suginoshita, Takehiko; Takamiya, Hisatake; Komiyama, Hiroto; Ito, Hirotoshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2006-08-01

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) was used for the measurement of relative proteoglycan depletion of articular cartilage in the patellofemoral (PF) joint following a proprietary protocol, which was compared with the X-ray images, proton density weighted MR images (PDWI) and arthroscopic findings. The study examined 30 knees. The ages ranged from 16 to 74 (average 40.3) years. The Gd-DTPA(2-)containing contrast medium was used in a single dose. The subjects were made to exercise the knee joint for 10 min; and MR images were taken 2 h after intravenous injection of contrast medium. T1-calculated images were produced and the region of interest (ROI) was set as follows. (1) ROI1: entire articular cartilage in a slice through the center of the patella. (2) ROI2: low signal region in T1-calculated images, which were set in a blind fashion by two observers. (3) ROI3: articular cartilage on one side that includes ROI2 where low signal region were detected (medial or lateral). ROI3 was set to examine the contrast of ROI2 with surrounding articular cartilage. The average T1 values of ROI1 was 393.5+/-33.6 ms for radiographic grade 0 and 361.3+/-11.1 ms for grade I, which showed a significant difference (P=0.036). The T1 value of ROI2 was 351.6+/-28.2 ms for grade I, 361.9+/-38.3 ms for grade II, 362.1+/-67.7 ms for grade III, and 297.8+/-54.1 ms for grade IV according to arthroscopic Outerbridge classification. All cases, that demonstrated decrease of T1 values on dGEMRIC (ROI2), showed abnormal arthroscopic or direct viewing findings. The ratio (ROI3/ROI2) in cases of only slight damage classified as Outerbridge grade I (6 cases) was an average of 1.04+/-0.02 and was 1.0 or greater in all cases, thereby indicating well-defined contrast with the surrounding cartilage. The diagnosis of damage in articular cartilage was possible in all 16 cases with radiographic K-L grade I on dGEMRIC, while the intensity changes were not found in 10 of 16 cases on PDWI

  10. Quantitative assessment of myocardial fibrosis in an age-related rat model by ex vivo late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging with histopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Beliveau, Pascale; Cheriet, Farida; Anderson, Stasia A; Taylor, Joni L; Arai, Andrew E; Hsu, Li-Yueh

    2015-10-01

    Late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging can detect the presence of myocardial infarction from ischemic cardiomyopathies (ICM). However, it is more challenging to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis from non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) with this technique due to more subtle and heterogeneous enhancement of the myocardium. This study investigates whether high-resolution LGE CMR can detect age-related myocardial fibrosis using quantitative texture analysis with histological validation. LGE CMR of twenty-four rat hearts (twelve 6-week-old and twelve 2-year-old) was performed using a 7T MRI scanner. Picrosirius red was used as the histopathology reference for collagen staining. Fibrosis in the myocardium was quantified with standard deviation (SD) threshold methods from the LGE CMR images and 3D contrast texture maps that were computed from gray level co-occurrence matrix of the CMR images. There was a significant increase of collagen fibers in the aged compared to the young rat histology slices (2.60±0.27 %LV vs. 1.24±0.29 %LV, p<0.01). Both LGE CMR and texture images showed a significant increase of myocardial fibrosis in the elderly compared to the young rats. Fibrosis in the LGE CMR images correlated strongly with histology with the 3 SD threshold (r=0.84, y=0.99x+0.00). Similarly, fibrosis in the contrast texture maps correlated with the histology using the 4 SD threshold (r=0.89, y=1.01x+0.00). High resolution ex-vivo LGE CMR can detect the presence of diffuse fibrosis that naturally developed in elderly rat hearts. Our results suggest that texture analysis may improve the assessment of myocardial fibrosis in LGE CMR images. PMID:26313531

  11. Quantitative assessment of myocardial fibrosis in an age-related rat model by ex vivo late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging with histopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Beliveau, Pascale; Cheriet, Farida; Anderson, Stasia A; Taylor, Joni L; Arai, Andrew E; Hsu, Li-Yueh

    2015-10-01

    Late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging can detect the presence of myocardial infarction from ischemic cardiomyopathies (ICM). However, it is more challenging to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis from non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) with this technique due to more subtle and heterogeneous enhancement of the myocardium. This study investigates whether high-resolution LGE CMR can detect age-related myocardial fibrosis using quantitative texture analysis with histological validation. LGE CMR of twenty-four rat hearts (twelve 6-week-old and twelve 2-year-old) was performed using a 7T MRI scanner. Picrosirius red was used as the histopathology reference for collagen staining. Fibrosis in the myocardium was quantified with standard deviation (SD) threshold methods from the LGE CMR images and 3D contrast texture maps that were computed from gray level co-occurrence matrix of the CMR images. There was a significant increase of collagen fibers in the aged compared to the young rat histology slices (2.60±0.27 %LV vs. 1.24±0.29 %LV, p<0.01). Both LGE CMR and texture images showed a significant increase of myocardial fibrosis in the elderly compared to the young rats. Fibrosis in the LGE CMR images correlated strongly with histology with the 3 SD threshold (r=0.84, y=0.99x+0.00). Similarly, fibrosis in the contrast texture maps correlated with the histology using the 4 SD threshold (r=0.89, y=1.01x+0.00). High resolution ex-vivo LGE CMR can detect the presence of diffuse fibrosis that naturally developed in elderly rat hearts. Our results suggest that texture analysis may improve the assessment of myocardial fibrosis in LGE CMR images.

  12. Myocardial Fibrosis Identified by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Late Gadolinium Enhancement is Associated with Adverse Ventricular Mechanics and Ventricular Tachycardia Late After Fontan Operation

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Rahul H.; Prakash, Ashwin; Powell, Andrew J.; Geva, Tal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the relationship between myocardial fibrosis identified by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and ventricular performance and arrhythmias in patients late after the Fontan operation. Background Patients who have undergone the Fontan palliation may develop ventricular dysfunction and arrhythmias, but the mechanisms and risk factors are poorly defined. Methods All patients who have had a Fontan operation and a CMR study with the myocardial delayed enhancement technique from January 2002 to November 2008 were retrospectively identified. Results Of 90 patients (mean age at study 23.1 ± 10.9 years), 25 (28%) had positive late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in the ventricular myocardium. Patients with positive LGE had lower mean ejection fraction (EF) (45% v. 56%, P<0.001), increased median end-diastolic volume (EDVi) (100 mL/BSA1.3 v. 82 mL/BSA1.3, P=0.004), increased median ventricular massi (63 g/BSA1.3 v. 45 g/BSA1.3, P<0.001), higher frequency of regional wall motion abnormalities (52% v. 28%, P=0.05), and higher frequency of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) (36% v. 11%, P=0.01). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that more extensive positive LGE, expressed as percent LGE of total myocardial mass, was associated with lower EF (P=0.002), increased EDVi (P<0.001), increased massi (P<0.001), and a higher frequency of NSVT (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.4, P=0.006). Conclusions In this cohort of late Fontan survivors, myocardial fibrosis was common and associated with adverse ventricular mechanics and higher prevalence of NSVT. Further studies are warranted to examine the utility of LGE for risk stratification and treatment of ventricular arrhythmia and dysfunction in Fontan patients. PMID:20394877

  13. A randomized prospective mechanistic cardiac magnetic resonance study correlating catheter stability, late gadolinium enhancement and 3 year clinical outcomes in robotically assisted vs. standard catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Arujuna, Aruna; Karim, Rashed; Zarinabad, Niloufar; Gill, Jaspal; Rhode, Kawal; Schaeffter, Tobias; Wright, Matthew; Rinaldi, C. Aldo; Cooklin, Michael; Razavi, Reza; O'Neill, Mark D.; Gill, Jaswinder S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To prospectively compare cardiac magnetic resonance late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) findings created by standard vs. robotically assisted catheter ablation lesions and correlate these with clinical outcomes. Methods and results Forty paroxysmal atrial fibrillation patients (mean age 54 ± 13.8 years) undergoing first left atrial ablation were randomized to either robotic-assisted navigation (Hansen Sensei® X) or standard navigation. Pre-procedural, acute (24 h post-procedure) and late (beyond 3 months) scans were performed with LGE and T2W imaging sequences and percentage circumferential enhancement around the pulmonary vein (PV) antra were quantified. Baseline pre-procedural enhancements were similar in both groups. On acute imaging, mean % encirclements by LGE and T2W signal were 72% and 80% in the robotic group vs. 60% (P = 0.002) and 76%(P = 0.45) for standard ablation. On late imaging, the T2W signal resolved to baseline in both groups. Late gadolinium enhancement remained the predominant signal with 56% encirclement in the robotic group vs. 45% in the standard group (P = 0.04). At 6 months follow-up, arrhythmia-free patients had an almost similar mean LGE encirclement (robotic 64%, standard 60%, P = 0.45) but in recurrences, LGE was higher in the robotic group (43% vs. 30%, P = 0.001). At mean 3 years follow-up, 1.3 procedures were performed in the robotic group compared with 1.9 (P < 0.001) in the standard to achieve a success rate of 80% vs. 75%. Conclusion Robotically assisted ablation results in greater LGE around the PV antrum. Effective lesions created through improved catheter stability and contact force during initial treatment may have a role in reducing subsequent re-do procedures. PMID:25687748

  14. Severe Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Small Pericardial Effusion, and Diffuse Late Gadolinium Enhancement by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Suspecting Cardiac Amyloidosis: Endomyocardial Biopsy Reveals an Unexpected Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Nina P.; Giusca, Sorin; Klingel, Karin; Nunninger, Peter; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy can be related to a multitude of cardiac disorders, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac amyloidosis, and hypertensive heart disease. Although the presence of LV hypertrophy is generally associated with poorer cardiac outcomes, the early differentiation between these pathologies is crucial due to the presence of specific treatment options. The diagnostic process with LV hypertrophy requires the integration of clinical evaluation, electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography, biochemical markers, and if required CMR and endomyocardial biopsy in order to reach the correct diagnosis. Here, we present a case of a patient with severe LV hypertrophy (septal wall thickness of 23 mm, LV mass of 264 g, and LV mass index of 147 g/m2), severely impaired longitudinal function, and preserved radial contractility (ejection fraction = 55%), accompanied by small pericardial effusion and diffuse late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Due to the imaging findings, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy, such as cardiac amyloidosis, was suspected. However, amyloid accumulation was excluded by endomyocardial biopsy, which revealed the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in an advanced hypertensive heart disease. PMID:27247807

  15. Relation of fragmented QRS complex to right ventricular fibrosis detected by late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance in adults with repaired tetralogy of fallot.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Jung; On, Young Keun; Kim, June Soo; Park, Seung Woo; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook; Kang, I-Seok; Lee, Heung Jae; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Huh, June

    2012-01-01

    Fragmented QRS (fQRS) on 12-lead electrocardiography reflects conduction delay caused by myocardial fibrosis and dysfunction. Ventricular fibrosis detected by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is reportedly correlated with worse clinical outcomes in adults with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of fQRS is associated with right ventricular (RV) fibrosis or dysfunction in this patient group. In 37 consecutive patients (median age 30 years, median age at repair 6.6 years), the number of leads showing fQRS, defined as the presence of >2 notches on the R/S wave in ≥2 contiguous leads, was counted. RV systolic function, dilatation, and LGE score were measured using LGE CMR. Ventricular LGE was observed mainly at the previous surgical sites: the RV outflow tract (33 of 37), ventricular septal defect patch region (15 of 37), and RV anterior wall (11 of 37). Fragmented QRS was found mostly in the right and mid precordial leads. The fQRS group (n = 20) demonstrated higher RV LGE scores (p <0.001) and lower RV ejection fractions (p = 0.02) and a trend toward larger RV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (p = 0.12 and p = 0.06, respectively) compared to the non-fQRS group (n = 17). The number of electrocardiographic leads showing fQRS was positively correlated with RV LGE score (r = 0.75, p <0.001). The presence of fQRS remained independently associated with the presence of supramedian RV LGE score, even after adjusting for relevant parameters. In conclusion, fQRS was closely associated with more extensive RV fibrosis and dysfunction in adults with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

  16. Incremental prognostic value of the SYNTAX score to late gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance images for patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shingo; Saito, Naka; Kirigaya, Hidekuni; Gyotoku, Daiki; Iinuma, Naoki; Kusakawa, Yuka; Iguchi, Kohei; Nakachi, Tatsuya; Fukui, Kazuki; Futaki, Masaaki; Iwasawa, Tae; Taguri, Masataka; Kimura, Kazuo; Umemura, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    The prognostic significance of the SYNTAX (Synergy between PCI with Taxus and cardiac surgery) score has recently been demonstrated in patients with stable multivessel or left main coronary artery disease (CAD). The present study determines whether adding the SYNTAX score to Framingham risk score (FRS), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and presence of myocardial infarction (MI) by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging can improve the risk stratification in patients with stable CAD. We calculated the SYNTAX score in 161 patients with stable CAD (mean age: 66 ± 10 years old). During a mean follow-up of 2.3 years, 56 (35 %) of 161 patients developed cardiovascular events defined as cardiovascular death, non-fatal MI, cerebral infarction, unstable angina pectoris, hospitalization due to heart failure and revascularization. Multivariate Cox regression analysis selected triglycerides [hazard ratio (HR): 1.005 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.001-1.008), p < 0.008], presence of LGE [HR: 6.329 (95 % CI: 2.662-15.05), p < 0.001] and the SYNTAX score [HR: 1.085 (95 % CI: 1.044-1.127), p < 0.001] as risk factors for future cardiovascular events. Adding the SYNTAX score to FRS, EF and LGE significantly improved the net reclassification index (NRI) [40.4 % (95 % CI: 18.1-54.8 %), p < 0.05] with an increase in C-statistics of 0.089 (from 0.707 to 0.796). An increase in C-statistics and significant improvement of NRI showed that adding the SYNTAX score to the FRS, LVEF and LGE incrementally improved risk stratification in patient with stable CAD.

  17. Late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of myocardial infarction: comparison of image quality between single and double doses of contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeo Koon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Kim, Sang Yoon; Chung, Jin Wook

    2014-12-01

    To compare the image quality of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) using a single dose of gadolinium contrast agent versus the conventional double dose for assessing myocardial infarction. This retrospective study examined 37 patients with chronic myocardial infarction who underwent LGE CMR using both inversion recovery (IR)-turbo fast low-angle shot magnitude-reconstructed and phase-sensitive images with two different dosages of gadolinium contrast agent: a single dose of 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium-DTPA in 17 patients and a double dose of 0.2 mmol/kg in 20 patients. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and visual conspicuity between infarct and normal myocardium (CNRinfarct-normal, conspicuityinfarct-normal) and between infarct and left ventricular cavity (CNRinfarct-LVC, conspicuityinfarct-LVC) were compared. Interobserver agreement for the maximal transmural extent of infarction was also evaluated. CNRinfarct-normal was significantly higher with double-dose gadolinium contrast agent (15.5 ± 20.7 vs. 40.4 ± 16.1 in magnitude images and 9.5 ± 2.8 vs. 11.2 ± 2.7 in phase-sensitive images, P < 0.001) while conspicuityinfarct-normal showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Both CNRinfarct-LVC (7.7 ± 10.7 vs. -6.6 ± 19.0 in magnitude images and 4.1 ± 2.3 vs. -0.4 ± 4.1 in phase-sensitive images, P < 0.05) and conspicuityinfarct-LVC were significantly better with single-dose gadolinium contrast. Interobserver agreement for assessing the transmural extent of infarction was moderate in both groups: 0.591 for single-dose and 0.472 for double-dose. LGE CMR using a single dose of gadolinium contrast agent showed significantly better contrast between infarcted myocardium and left ventricular cavity lumen without a significant decrease in visual contrast between infarcted myocardium and normal myocardium, compared to a double dose.

  18. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  19. In Vivo Tracking of Phagocytic Immune Cells Using a Dual Imaging Probe with Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI and Near-Infrared Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Joong; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Hyun Min; Shin, Weon Sup; Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-04-27

    A novel dual imaging probe for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging was developed by combining gadolinium (Gd)-chelating MR probe and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore, aza-BODIPY (AB; BODIPY = boron-dipyrromethene). This aza-BODIPY-based bimodal contrast agent (AB-BCA) showed a significant fluorescence emission around the NIR range and an enhanced longitudinal relaxivity in MR modality. The probe was easily delivered to phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, together with macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), and presented high-performance fluorescence and MR imaging without obvious cytotoxicity. For in vivo visualization of AB-BCA using MRI and optical imaging, bone marrow-derived DCs were labeled and injected into the footpad of mice, and labeled DCs were tracked in vivo. We observed the migration of AB-BCA-labeled DCs into the lymph nodes via lymphatic vessels using NIR fluorescence and T1-weighted MR images. This dual-modality imaging probe was used for noninvasive monitoring of DC migration into lymph nodes and could be useful for investigating advanced cellular immunotherapy. PMID:27058603

  20. Prevalence, Patterns, and Clinical Predictors of Left Ventricular Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Prior to Pulmonary Vein Antral Isolation for Atrial Fibrillation: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Nance, John W; Khurram, Irfan M; Nazarian, Saman; DeWire, Jane; Calkins, Hugh; Zimmerman, Stefan L

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is increasingly used to evaluate patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) before pulmonary vein antral isolation (PVAI). The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and pattern of left ventricular (LV) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in patients undergoing CMR before PVAI and compare the clinical and demographic differences of patients with and without LV LGE. Clinical and demographic data on 62 patients (mean age 61 ± 7.9, 69% male) undergoing CMR before PVAI for AF were collected. Two observers, masked to clinical histories, independently recorded the prevalence, extent (number of myocardial segments), and pattern (subendocardial, midmyocardial, or subepicardial) of LV LGE in each patient. Clinical and demographic predictors of LV LGE were determined using logistic regression. Twenty-three patients (37%) demonstrated LV LGE affecting a mean of 3.0 ± 2.1 myocardial segments. There was no difference in LV ejection fraction between patients with and without LGE, and most (65%) patients with LGE had normal wall motion. Only age (P = 0.04) and a history of congestive heart failure (P = .03) were statistically significant independent predictors of LGE. The most common LGE pattern was midmyocardial, seen in 17 of 23 (74%) patients. Only 4 of 23 (17%) patients had LGE in an "expected" pattern based on clinical history. Of the remaining 19 patients, 4 had known congestive heart failure, 5 nonischemic cardiomyopathy, 4 known coronary artery disease, and 2 prior aortic valve replacement. Six of 23 (26%) patients had no known coronary artery, valvular, or myocardial disease. There is a high prevalence of unexpected LV scar in patients undergoing CMR before PVAI for AF, with most patients demonstrating a nonischemic pattern of LV LGE and no wall motion abnormalities (ie, subclinical disease). The high prevalence of unexpected LGE in these patients may argue for CMR as the modality of choice for imaging

  1. Myocardial deformation imaging by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in comparison to late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance for analysis of myocardial fibrosis in severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Rainer; Altiok, Ertunc; Friedman, Zvi; Becker, Michael; Frick, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Myocardial deformation analysis by speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) has been used for analysis of myocardial viability and myocardial fibrosis. Patients with severe aortic stenosis are known to develop myocardial fibrosis. This study evaluated the association between myocardial fibrosis determined by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and 2-dimensional STE in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In 30 patients (78±7 years) with severe aortic stenosis (mean gradient 53±21 mm Hg), peak systolic circumferential strain based on 2-dimensional echocardiographic parasternal short-axis views and peak systolic longitudinal strain based on apical views were determined for analysis of regional function. LGE CMR was performed to define the amount of fibrosis in each segment within 24 hours of echocardiography. Relative amount of fibrosis was determined based on LGE CMR as gray-scale threshold 6 SDs above the mean signal intensity of the normal remote myocardium. There was a decrease in LGE from base to apex (14.4±8.7% for basal segments, 3.4±3.0% for midventricular segments, and 2.1±3.0% for apical segments; p<0.001). Simultaneously, there was an increase in myocardial deformation expressed as peak systolic longitudinal strain from base to apex (-11.6±7.0% for basal segments, -16.9±6.5% for midventricular segments, and -17.4±7.7% for apical segments; p=0.001). There was a negative correlation between the amount of myocardial fibrosis determined by LGE CMR and peak systolic longitudinal strain for the total left ventricle (r=-0.538, p=0.007). Myocardial fibrosis defined as LGE>10% could be identified by peak systolic longitudinal strain less than -11.6%, with a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 75% (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.69). In conclusion, myocardial fibrosis increases from apical to basal left ventricular segments in patients with severe aortic stenosis. There is an association between

  2. Gadolinium enhancement patterns of tumefactive demyelinating lesions: correlations with brain biopsy findings and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Shimizu, Yuko; Shibata, Noriyuki; Uchiyama, Shinichiro

    2014-10-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs) can mimic brain tumors on radiological images. TDLs are often referred to as tumefactive multiple sclerosis (TMS), but the heterogeneous nature and monophasic course of TDLs do not fulfill clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria for multiple sclerosis. Redefining TDLs, TMS and other inflammatory brain lesions is essential for the accurate clinical diagnosis of extensive demyelinating brain lesions. We retrospectively analyzed MRI from nine TDL cases that underwent brain biopsy. Patterns of gadolinium enhancement on MRI were categorized as homogenous, inhomogeneous, patchy and diffuse, open ring or irregular rim, and were compared with pathological hallmarks including demyelination, central necrosis, macrophage infiltration, angiogenesis and perivascular lymphocytic cuffing. All cases had coexistence of demyelinating features and axonal loss. Open-ring and irregular rim patterns of gadolinium enhancement were associated with macrophage infiltrations and angiogenesis at the inflammatory border. An inhomogeneous pattern of gadolinium enhancement was associated with perivascular lymphocytic cuffing. Central necrosis was seen in cases of severe multiple sclerosis and hemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy. These results suggest that the radiological features of TDLs may be related to different pathological processes, and indicate that MRI may be useful in understanding their pathophysiology. Further investigation is needed to determine the precise disease entity of these inflammatory demyelinating brain lesions.

  3. Regression of gadolinium-enhanced lesions in patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Lucchetta, Marta; Manara, Renzo; Perilongo, Giorgio; Clementi, Maurizio; Trevisson, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I is a genetic condition with an autosomal dominant transmission characterized by neurocutaneous involvement and a predisposition to tumor development. Central nervous system manifestations include benign areas of dysmyelination and possibly hazardous glial tumors whose clinical management may result challenging. Here, we report on three patients diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis type I whose brain MRI follow-up showed the presence of gadolinium-enhancing lesions which spontaneously regressed. In none of the three cases, the lesions showed any clinical correlate and eventually presented a striking reduction in size while gadolinium enhancement disappeared despite no specific therapy administration during the follow-up. Although their nature remains undetermined, these lesions presented a benign evolution. However, they might be misdiagnosed as potentially life-threatening tumors. Hitherto, a similar behavior has been described only in scattered cases and we believe these findings may be of particular interest for the clinical management of patients affected by neurofibromatosis type I.

  4. MRI studies in late-life mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Andreescu, Carmen; Aizenstein, Howard

    2012-01-01

    There are well-established patterns of structural brain changes associated with aging. The change in brain volume with age and with the diseases of aging presents a particular challenge for MRI studies in the elderly. Structural MRI is important for studies in normal aging, late-life depression, dementia, Alzheimer disease and other cognitive disorders to examine how age-associated changes in neuroanatomy are associated with specific age-related changes in brain function. Functional MRI has been a major advance for the fields of cognitive and affective neuroscience by allowing investigators to test theories of the underlying neural pathways controlling cognitive and emotional processes. In this chapter, we will review the contribution of MRI studies to late-life mood and anxiety disorders: major depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders in late-life. PMID:22167336

  5. MRI Studies in Late-Life Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Andreescu, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    There are well-established patterns of structural brain changes associated with aging. The change in brain volume with age and with the diseases of aging presents a particular challenge for MRI studies in the elderly. Structural MRI is important for studies in normal aging, late-life depression, dementia, Alzheimer disease and other cognitive disorders to examine how age-associated changes in neuroanatomy are associated with specific age-related changes in brain function. Functional MRI has been a major advance for the fields of cognitive and affective neuroscience by allowing investigators to test theories of the underlying neural pathways controlling cognitive and emotional processes. In this chapter, we will review the contribution of MRI studies to late-life mood and anxiety disorders: major depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders in late-life. PMID:22167336

  6. MRI Predictors of Treatment Response in Late-Life Depression

    PubMed Central

    Aizenstein, Howard J.; Khalef, Alexander; Walker, Sarah E.; Andreescu, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    In older adults, depression not only results in more years lived with disability than any other disease, but it also carries additional risk for suicide, medical comorbidities, and family care-giving burden. Because it can take many months to identify an effective treatment regimen, it is of upmost importance to shorten the window of time and identify early on what medication(s) and dosages will work effectively for individuals suffering from depression. Late-life depression (LLD) has been associated with greater burden of age-related changes, including atrophy, white matter ischemic changes, and alterations in functional connectivity (FC). Depression in midlife has been shown to alter affective reactivity and regulation, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in LLD have replicated the same abnormalities. Effective treatment can normalize these alterations. This article provides a review of the current literature using structural and functional neuroimaging to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) predictors of treatment response in LLD. The majority of the literature on structural MRI has focused on the vascular depression hypothesis, and studies support the view that loss of brain volume and white matter integrity is associated with poorer treatment outcomes. Studies using fMRI have reported that lower task-based activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and limbic regions is associated with poorer outcome. These imaging markers may be integrated into clinical decision-making to better treatment outcomes in the future. PMID:24381231

  7. Reproducibility of Gadolinium Enhancement Patterns and Wall Thickness in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Granillo, Gaston A.; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Capunay, Carlos; Zan, Macarena C. De; Carrascosa, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Background Reproducibility data of the extent and patterns of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is limited. Objective To explore the reproducibility of regional wall thickness (WT), LGE extent, and LGE patterns in patients with HCM assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods The extent of LGE was assessed by the number of segments with LGE, and by the total LV mass with LGE (% LGE); and the pattern of LGE-CMR was defined for each segment. Results A total of 42 patients (672 segments) with HCM constituted the study population. The mean WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.62 ± 1.0 mm (6.1%), with limits of agreement of 1.36 mm; -2.60 mm and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93-0.96). Maximum WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.19 ± 0.8 mm (0.9%), with limits of agreement of 1.32 mm; -1.70 mm, and an ICC of 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98). The % LGE showed a mean difference between observers of -1.17 ± 1.2 % (21%), with limits of agreement of 1.16%; -3.49%, and an ICC of 0.94 (95% CI 0.88-0.97). The mean difference between observers regarding the number of segments with LGE was -0.40 ± 0.45 segments (11%), with limits of agreement of 0.50 segments; -1.31 segments, and an ICC of 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-0.99). Conclusions The number of segments with LGE might be more reproducible than the percent of the LV mass with LGE. PMID:27305110

  8. Hepatocellular carcinoma: conventional MRI findings including gadolinium-enhanced dynamic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2006-05-01

    A great variety of MR pulse sequences for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are now available. In this article, we reviewed the current MR imaging techniques that are routinely used for hepatic imaging, and described the optimization of these sequences as well as the utility and characteristics of each sequence for the accurate diagnosis of HCCs. Then, we reviewed various MR imaging findings of advanced and early HCCs with emphasis on signal intensity and hemodynamic patterns. Finally, we described the value of multi-arterial-phase contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging of the whole liver with excellent temporal resolution for evaluating transitional hemodynamics of hepatic lesions during the six arterial phases.

  9. Late central demyelination after Fischer's syndrome: MRI studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, X; Ellie, E; Larrivière, M; Deleplanque, B; Lagueny, A; Julien, J

    1993-01-01

    The case of a patient who presented with clinical, electrophysiological, and MRI evidence of central demyelination is described. The patient had been admitted to hospital for Fischer's syndrome a few years previously. The association of these two events suggests that central and peripheral myelinopathy may be related in Fischer's syndrome. PMID:8509787

  10. Cardiac imaging using clinical 1.5 t MRI scanners in a murine ischemia/reperfusion model.

    PubMed

    Voelkl, Jakob G J; Haubner, Bernhard J; Kremser, Christian; Mayr, Agnes; Klug, Gert; Loizides, Alexander; Müller, Silvana; Pachinger, Otmar; Schocke, Michael; Metzler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    To perform cardiac imaging in mice without having to invest in expensive dedicated equipment, we adapted a clinical 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for use in a murine ischemia/reperfusion model. Phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) sequence facilitated the determination of infarct sizes in vivo by late gadolinium enhancement. Results were compared to histological infarct areas in mice after ischemia/reperfusion procedure with a good correlation (r = 0.807, P < .001). In addition, fractional area change (FAC) was assessed with single slice cine MRI and was matched to infarct size (r = -0.837) and fractional shortening (FS) measured with echocardiography (r = 0.860); both P < .001. Here, we demonstrate the use of clinical 1.5 MRI scanners as a feasible method for basic phenotyping in mice. These widely available scanners are capable of investigating in vivo infarct dimensions as well as assessment of cardiac functional parameters in mice with reasonable throughput.

  11. fMRI Correlates of White Matter Hyperintensities in Late-Life Depression

    PubMed Central

    Aizenstein, Howard J.; Andreescu, Carmen; Edelman, Kathryn L.; Cochran, Jennifer L.; Price, Julie; Butters, Meryl A.; Karp, Jordan; Patel, Meenal; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study tests whether or not the structural white matter lesions that are characteristic of late-life depression are associated with alterations in the functional affective circuits of late-life depression. This study used an emotional faces paradigm that has been shown to engage the affective limbic brain regions. Method Thirty-three elderly depressed patients and 27 nondepressed comparison subjects participated in this study. The patients were recruited through the NIMH-sponsored Advanced Center for Interventions and Services Research for the Study of Late-Life Mood Disorders at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Bioethics and Health Law. Structural and functional MRI was used to assess white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response on a facial expression affective-reactivity task in both elderly participants with nonpsychotic and non-bipolar major depression (unmedicated) and nondepressed elderly comparison subjects. Results As expected, greater subgenual cingulate activity was observed in the depressed patients relative to the nondepressed comparison subjects. This same region showed greater task-related activity associated with a greater burden of cerebrovascular white matter change in the depressed group. Moreover, the depressed group showed a significantly greater interaction of WMH by fMRI activity effect than the nondepressed group. Conclusions The observation that high WMH burden in late-life depression is associated with greater BOLD response on the affective-reactivity task supports the model that white matter ischemia in elderly depressed patients disrupts brain mechanisms of affective regulation and leads to limbic hyperactivation. PMID:21799066

  12. Late onset epilepsy associated with marijuana abuse: a case report with MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Fogang, Yannick Fogoum; Camara, Massaman; Mbonda, Paul Chimi; Toffa, Dènahin; Touré, Kamadore

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used illicit substance in the world. The relation between marijuana use and epileptic seizures is still controversial. We report a case of late onset epilepsy associated with marijuana abuse, with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. A 44-year-old patient was admitted for 03 isolated episodes of secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. He had a history of 26 years regular marijuana smoking. On admission, we found a tachycardia, psychomotor slowing, asymmetric hyperreflexia, bilateral Babinski sign without weakness. Laboratory work-up showed a high level of urine of Δ-9-tétrahydroxycannabinol. Electroencephalogram was normal. Brain MRI revealed abnormal signal intensities in the right frontal lobe and basal ganglia. Seizures cessation was obtained with anti-epileptic treatment. We suggest that marijuana abuse through vascular and toxic mechanisms could explain seizures in this case. PMID:25120871

  13. fMRI Activation in Late-Life Anxious Depression: a Potential Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Andreescu, Carmen; Butters, Meryl; Lenze, Eric J.; Venkatraman, Vijay K; Nable, Megan; Reynolds, Charles F.; Aizenstein, Howard J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective and Methods The neurobiology of late-life anxious depression (LLAD) is poorly characterized despite evidence that this is a common and severe subtype of late-life depression. To identify the neuroanatomical substrate of late-life anxious depression, we examined event-related fMRI data collected in 8 subjects with late-life depression, half of whom had high levels of comorbid anxiety. Subjects were trained on the Preparing to Overcome Prepotency (POP) task, which is an executive control task that reliably activates the lateral prefrontal cortex - anterior cingulate cortex cognitive control circuit. Results Time series analysis showed that, when compared with elderly depressed subjects, elderly subjects with anxious depression performing the POP task produced a significantly greater and more sustained signal in three regions: BA 24 (dorsal anterior cingulate), BA31 (posterior cingulate) and BA6 (prefrontal cortex). While elderly subjects with pure depression presented a bimodal activation curve in the dorsal anterior cingulate and the posterior cingulate, elderly subjects with anxious depression presented a sustained unimodal activation pattern. Conclusions Our preliminary results suggest specific activation patterns unique to anxious depression that may suggest greater and more sustained efforts of the ACC to carry out cognitive control tasks. Further research is needed to clarify the neuroanatomical basis of late-life anxious depression. PMID:19575412

  14. Renal safety of intravenous gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients awaiting liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Katherine M; Parikh, Mehul R; Runge, Thomas M; Perez, Sebastian D; Sakaria, Sonali S; Subramanian, Ram M

    2015-11-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis carries a high morbidity and mortality. Given the potential risk of contrast-induced nephropathy associated with iodinated intravenous contrast used in computed tomography (CT), alternate contrast modalities for abdominal imaging in liver transplant candidates need to be examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the renal safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium in patients awaiting liver transplantation. The study involved a retrospective analysis of 352 patients of abdominal MRI with low-dose gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) (0.05 mmol/kg) in patients with cirrhosis and without renal replacement therapy at a single center during the period from 2007 to 2013. For each case, serum creatinine before and within a few days after the MRI were compared. In addition, the patients were analyzed for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a reported complication of gadolinium in chronic kidney disease. The pre-MRI serum creatinine values ranged from 0.36 to 4.86 mg/dL, with 70 patients (20%) having values ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. A comparison of the pre- and post-MRI serum creatinine values did not demonstrate a clinically significant difference (mean change = 0.017 mg/dL; P = 0.38), including those patients with a pre-MRI serum creatinine ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. In addition, no cases of NSF were noted. In conclusion, our findings suggest that MRI with low-dose gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) is a nonnephrotoxic imaging modality in liver transplant candidates, and its use can be cautiously expanded to liver transplant candidates with concomitant renal insufficiency.

  15. Day of Injury CT and Late MRI Findings: Cognitive Outcome in a Pediatric Sample with Complicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jantz, Paul B; Farrer, Thomas J.; Abildskov, Tracy J.; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn; Yeates, Keith Owen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Complicated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or cmTBI is based on the presence of visibly identifiable brain pathology on the day-of-injury computed tomography (CT) scan. In a pediatric sample the relation of DOI CT to late MRI findings and neuropsychological outcome was examined. Methods MRI (> 12 months) was obtained in pediatric cmTBI patients and a sample of orthopedically injured (OI) children. Those children with positive imaging findings (MRI+) were quantitatively compared to those without (MRI-) or with the OI sample. Groups were also compared in neurocognitive outcome from WASI subtests and the WISC-IV Processing Speed Index (PSI), along with the Test of Everyday Attention for Children (TEA-Ch) and a parent-rated behavioral functioning measure (ABAS-II). Results Despite the MRI+ group having significantly more DOI CT findings than the MRI-group, no quantitative differences were found. WASI Vocabulary and Matrix Reasoning scores were significantly lower, but not PSI, TEA-Ch or ABAS-II scores. MRI+ and MRI-groups did not differ on these measures. Conclusions Heterogeneity in the occurrence of MRI-identified focal pathology was not associated with uniform changes in quantitative analyses of brain structure in cmTBI. Increased number of DOI CT abnormalities was associated with lowered neuropsychological performance. PMID:26186038

  16. Hepatic arterial-phase dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging: optimization with a test examination and a power injector.

    PubMed

    Earls, J P; Rofsky, N M; DeCorato, D R; Krinsky, G A; Weinreb, J C

    1997-01-01

    To optimize findings at dynamic gadolinium-enhanced hepatic magnetic resonance imaging in the hepatic arterial phase, a timing examination was performed after injection of a 0.5-mL timing bolus of gadopentetate dimeglumine. In the experimental group (n = 28), power injection was used and the imaging delay was determined in each patient on the basis of the results of the timing examination. In the control group (n = 28), hand injection and a fixed 20-second imaging delay were used. Arterial-phase examinations (defined as relative liver enhancement of not more than 30% of peak parenchymal enhancement) were successful in 26 (93%) experimental group patients and in 17 (61%) control group patients.

  17. Diagnosis of Vascular Compression at the Thoracic Outlet Using Gadolinium-Enhanced High-Resolution Ultrafast MR Angiography in Abduction and Adduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Spinosa, David J.; Angle, J. Fritz; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2000-03-15

    Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography allows rapid evaluation of the vascular structures of the thoracic outlet both in the neutral position and in abduction during one examination within FDA-approved dose limitations for contrast agents. The technique appears to be a good screening one for patients suspected of having vascular thoracic outlet syndrome.

  18. PET/MRI assessment of the infarcted mouse heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.; Sawiak, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure originating from myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Mouse models of ischaemia and reperfusion injury (I/R) are used to study the effects of novel treatment strategies targeting MI, however staging disease and treatment efficacy is a challenge. Damage and recovery can be assessed on the cellular, tissue or whole-organ scale but these are rarely measured in concert. Here, for the first time, we present data showing measures of injury in infarcted mice using complementary techniques for multi-modal characterisation of the heart. We use in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess heart function with cine-MRI, hindered perfusion with late gadolinium enhancement imaging and muscular function with displacement encoded with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI. These measures are followed by positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose to assess cellular metabolism. We demonstrate a protocol combining each of these measures for the same animal in the same imaging session and compare how the different markers can be used to quantify cardiac recovery on different scales following injury.

  19. [Optimization of high flip angle for late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging by phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence].

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Satoshi; Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Harashina, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akira; Shimokawa, Kenichi; Matsumura, Yoshio

    2013-04-01

    This study focuses on optimization of the flip angle (FA) of phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) reconstruction (PSIR-FA) to achieve improved tissue contrast. Intensity normalization removes the larger variations in image intensity caused by falloff, thus improving the visualization of tissue contrast. We evaluated tissue contrast for images in healthy volunteers using the phantom influence of T1 relaxation and FA. T1 relaxation is improved due to the T1(*) effect and enables a high PSIR-FA to be set. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the PSIR-FA 20° image is good, since magnetization is almost fully restored to normal. The usefulness of PSIR-FA 20 images was proved statistically. PSIR-FA 20° shows improved tissue contrast as a result of the high accuracy of intensity normalization.

  20. Risk stratification for major adverse cardiac events and ventricular tachyarrhythmias by cardiac MRI in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masakazu; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Kato, Takao; Izumi, Toshiaki; Inuzuka, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Miyaji, Yuki; Kawamura, Takayuki; Ikeguchi, Shigeru; Inoko, Moriaki; Kurita, Takashi; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Background The presence of myocardial fibrosis by cardiac MRI has prognostic value in cardiac sarcoidosis, and localisation may be equally relevant to clinical outcomes. Objective We aimed to analyse cardiac damage and function in detail and explore the relationship with clinical outcomes in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis using cardiac MRI. Methods We included 81 consecutive patients with cardiac sarcoidosis undergoing cardiac MR. Left ventricular mass and fibrosis mass were calculated, and localisation was analysed using a 17-segment model. Participants underwent follow-up through 2015, and the development of major adverse cardiac events including ventricular tachyarrhythmias was recorded. Results Increased left ventricular fibrosis mass was associated with increased prevalence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (p<0.001). When localisation was defined as the sum of late gadolinium enhancement in the left ventricular basal anterior and basal anteroseptal areas, or the right ventricular area, it was associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmias (p<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis during a median follow-up of 22.1 months showed that both the mass and localisation groupings for fibrosis were significantly associated with major adverse cardiac events or ventricular tachyarrhythmias and that when combined, the risk stratification was better than for each variable alone (p<0.001, respectively). By Cox-proportional hazard risk analysis, the localisation grouping was an independent predictor for the both. Conclusions In patients with cardiac sarcoidosis, both fibrosis mass and its localisation to the basal anterior/anteroseptal left ventricle, or right ventricle was associated with the development of major adverse cardiac events or ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Cardiac MR with late gadolinium enhancement may be useful for improving risk stratification in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:27547432

  1. Postmortem MRI: a novel window into the neurobiology of late life cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Dawe, Robert J; Yu, Lei; Leurgans, Sue E; Schneider, Julie A; Buchman, Aron S; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Bennett, David A; Boyle, Patricia A

    2016-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that indices of brain tissue integrity derived from postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are associated with late life decline in cognitive function and dementia, over and above contributions from common age-related neuropathologies. Cerebral hemispheres were obtained from 425 deceased older adults who had undergone 2 or more annual cognitive assessments, which included clinical diagnosis of dementia. Specimens underwent MRI to produce maps of transverse relaxation rate, R2. Voxelwise regression revealed brain regions where R2 was associated with cognitive decline. We then used random effects models to quantify the extent to which R2 accounted for variation in decline, after adjustment for demographics and neuropathologic indices of the 3 most common causes of dementia: Alzheimer's disease, cerebrovascular disease, and Lewy body disease. We additionally tested whether R2 was tied to greater likelihood of clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's dementia using logistic regression models. During an average of 8.1 years, the mean rate of decline in global cognitive function was 0.13 unit per year (p < 0.0001). The tissue alteration most commonly related to decline was R2 slowing in white matter. Each unit decrease in R2 was associated with an additional 0.053-unit per year steepening of the rate of global cognitive decline (p < 0.001). Furthermore, R2 accounted for 8.4% of the variance in rate of global cognitive decline, above and beyond the 26.5% accounted for by demographics and neuropathologic indices, and 7.1%-11.2% of the variance of the decline rates in episodic, semantic, and working memory and perceptual speed. Alterations in R2 were also related to an increased odds of clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's dementia (odds ratio = 2.000, 95% confidence interval 1.600, 2.604). Therefore, postmortem MRI indices of brain tissue integrity, particularly in white matter, are useful for elucidating the basis of late life cognitive

  2. Language lateralisation in late proficient bilinguals: a lexical decision fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Park, Haeme R P; Badzakova-Trajkov, Gjurgjica; Waldie, Karen E

    2012-04-01

    Approximately half the world's population can now speak more than one language. Understanding the neural basis of language organisation in bilinguals, and whether the cortical networks involved during language processing differ from that of monolinguals, is therefore an important area of research. A main issue concerns whether L2 (second language) is processed using the same neural mechanisms that mediate L1 (first language) processing. Moderating factors include the age of L2 acquisition and the level of proficiency. Here we used a lexical decision task with five conditions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate language processing in eight late proficient bilinguals when using Macedonian (L1) and English (L2). Bilinguals had greater bilateral activation during both L1 and L2 processing, and therefore weaker language lateralisation, compared to matched control English monolinguals. A greater amount of overall activation was also seen in bilinguals, especially during L2 conditions. Late proficient bilinguals living in their L2 environment employ a more extensive neural network than monolinguals when processing their second language. PMID:22245007

  3. Language lateralisation in late proficient bilinguals: a lexical decision fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Park, Haeme R P; Badzakova-Trajkov, Gjurgjica; Waldie, Karen E

    2012-04-01

    Approximately half the world's population can now speak more than one language. Understanding the neural basis of language organisation in bilinguals, and whether the cortical networks involved during language processing differ from that of monolinguals, is therefore an important area of research. A main issue concerns whether L2 (second language) is processed using the same neural mechanisms that mediate L1 (first language) processing. Moderating factors include the age of L2 acquisition and the level of proficiency. Here we used a lexical decision task with five conditions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate language processing in eight late proficient bilinguals when using Macedonian (L1) and English (L2). Bilinguals had greater bilateral activation during both L1 and L2 processing, and therefore weaker language lateralisation, compared to matched control English monolinguals. A greater amount of overall activation was also seen in bilinguals, especially during L2 conditions. Late proficient bilinguals living in their L2 environment employ a more extensive neural network than monolinguals when processing their second language.

  4. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Martin; Mateiescu, Serban Busch, Martin; Becker, Jan Garmer, Marietta Groenemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  5. Intramyocardial Hemorrhage: An Enigma for Cardiac MRI?

    PubMed Central

    Masselli, Gabriele; Monti, Riccardo; Spreca, Matteo; Gualdi, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a useful noninvasive technique for determining the presence of microvascular obstruction (MVO) and intramyocardial hemorrhage (IMH), frequently occurring in patients after reperfused myocardial infarction (MI). MVO, or the so-called no-reflow phenomenon, is associated with adverse ventricular remodeling and a poor prognosis during follow-up. Similarly, IMH is considered a severe damage after revascularization by percutaneous primary coronary intervention (PPCI) or fibrinolysis, which represents a worse prognosis. However, the pathophysiology of IMH is not fully understood and imaging modalities might help to better understand that phenomenon. While, during the past decade, several studies examined the distribution patterns of late gadolinium enhancement with different CMR sequences, the standardized CMR protocol for assessment of IMH is not yet well established. The aim of this review is to evaluate the available literature on this issue, with particular regard to CMR sequences. New techniques, such as positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), could be useful tools to explore molecular mechanisms of the myocardial infarction healing process. PMID:25759823

  6. Tailored management of atrial fibrillation using a LGE-MRI based model: from the clinic to the electrophysiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Gaston R; Marrouche, Nassir F

    2011-04-01

    Ablation provides a good therapeutic alternative for atrial fibrillation (AF) management; however, its effectiveness relies in adequate patient selection. Late gadolinium enhancement-magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI) allows for atrial arrhythmic substrate, as well as postablation scarring visualization. In this article, we describe a new staging system for AF based on the amount of left atrial enhancement on LGE-MRI (Utah I ≤ 5%, Utah II >5-20%, Utah III > 20-35%, and Utah IV > 35%). On the basis of patient stage, a more tailored approach to AF management can be taken. This includes triaging appropriate candidates for ablation (Utah stages I-III), as well as anticoagulation management based on an increase on the predictive statistics of the CHADS(2). LGE-MRI also allows for ablation lesion characterization. Acute edema, defined as enhancement on T2-weighted MRI images immediately post-AF ablation correlates with low voltage areas but not with LGE-MRI-defined scar. Post-AF ablation LGE-MRI scans show significant heterogeneity in the atrial wall on portions subject to radiofrequency (RF). We have postulated that some of these areas correspond to no-reflow type phenomenon. Postablation LGE-MRI can also help identify breaks in lesion sets and its correlation with conduction recovery has been used successfully to guide redo procedures. Real-time MRI-based ablation system has the potential advantage of tissue lesion visualization during RF delivery. To that end, we have developed a 3-Tesla-based real-time MRI ablation system. We demonstrated the feasibility to safely navigate, pace, and record intracardiac EGMs in the atrial chambers, as well as applying RF energy while directly visualizing lesion formation in real time. 

  7. MRI evaluation of injectable hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel therapy to limit ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, Shauna M; McGarvey, Jeremy R; Wang, Hua; Nikou, Amir; Arama, Leron; Koomalsingh, Kevin J; Kondo, Norihiro; Gorman, Joseph H; Pilla, James J; Gorman, Robert C; Wenk, Jonathan F; Burdick, Jason A

    2015-11-01

    Injectable biomaterials are an attractive therapy to attenuate left ventricular (LV) remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). Although studies have shown that injectable hydrogels improve cardiac structure and function in vivo, temporal changes in infarct material properties after treatment have not been assessed. Emerging imaging and modeling techniques now allow for serial, non-invasive estimation of infarct material properties. Specifically, cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assesses global LV structure and function, late-gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI enables visualization of infarcted tissue to quantify infarct expansion, and spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM) tagging provides passive wall motion assessment as a measure of tissue strain, which can all be used to evaluate infarct properties when combined with finite element (FE) models. In this work, we investigated the temporal effects of degradable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels on global LV remodeling, infarct thinning and expansion, and infarct stiffness in a porcine infarct model for 12 weeks post-MI using MRI and FE modeling. Hydrogel treatment led to decreased LV volumes, improved ejection fraction, and increased wall thickness when compared to controls. FE model simulations demonstrated that hydrogel therapy increased infarct stiffness for 12 weeks post-MI. Thus, evaluation of myocardial tissue properties through MRI and FE modeling provides insight into the influence of injectable hydrogel therapies on myocardial structure and function post-MI.

  8. Adaptive changes in early and late blind: a fMRI study of Braille reading.

    PubMed

    Burton, H; Snyder, A Z; Conturo, T E; Akbudak, E; Ollinger, J M; Raichle, M E

    2002-01-01

    Braille reading depends on remarkable adaptations that connect the somatosensory system to language. We hypothesized that the pattern of cortical activations in blind individuals reading Braille would reflect these adaptations. Activations in visual (occipital-temporal), frontal-language, and somatosensory cortex in blind individuals reading Braille were examined for evidence of differences relative to previously reported studies of sighted subjects reading print or receiving tactile stimulation. Nine congenitally blind and seven late-onset blind subjects were studied with fMRI as they covertly performed verb generation in response to reading Braille embossed nouns. The control task was reading the nonlexical Braille string "######". This study emphasized image analysis in individual subjects rather than pooled data. Group differences were examined by comparing magnitudes and spatial extent of activated regions first determined to be significant using the general linear model. The major adaptive change was robust activation of visual cortex despite the complete absence of vision in all subjects. This included foci in peri-calcarine, lingual, cuneus and fusiform cortex, and in the lateral and superior occipital gyri encompassing primary (V1), secondary (V2), and higher tier (VP, V4v, LO and possibly V3A) visual areas previously identified in sighted subjects. Subjects who never had vision differed from late blind subjects in showing even greater activity in occipital-temporal cortex, provisionally corresponding to V5/MT and V8. In addition, the early blind had stronger activation of occipital cortex located contralateral to the hand used for reading Braille. Responses in frontal and parietal cortex were nearly identical in both subject groups. There was no evidence of modifications in frontal cortex language areas (inferior frontal gyrus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Surprisingly, there was also no evidence of an adaptive expansion of the somatosensory or

  9. Review of Source Images is Necessary for the Evaluation of Gadolinium-Enhanced MR Angiography for Renal Artery Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrschuetz, M. Aschauer, M.; Portugaller, H.; Stix, A.; Wehrschuetz-Sigl, E.; Hausegger, K.; Ebner, F.

    2004-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess interobserver variability and accuracy in the evaluation of renal artery stenosis (RAS) with gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with hypertension. The authors found that source images are more accurate than maximum intensity projection (MIP) for depicting renal artery stenosis. Two independent radiologists reviewed MRA and DSA from 38 patients with hypertension. Studies were postprocessed to display images in MIP and source images. DSA was the standard for comparison in each patient. For each main renal artery, percentage stenosis was estimated for any stenosis detected by the two radiologists. To calculate sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, MRA studies and stenoses were categorized as normal, mild (1-39%), moderate (40-69%) or severe ({>=}70%), or occluded. DSA stenosis estimates of 70% or greater were considered hemodynamically significant. Analysis of variance demonstrated that MIP estimates of stenosis were greater than source image estimates for both readers. Differences in estimates for MIP versus DSA reached significance in one reader. The interobserver variance for MIP, source images and DSA was excellent (0.80< {kappa}{<=} 0.90). The specificity of source images was high (97%) but less for MIP (87%); average accuracy was 92% for MIP and 98% for source images. In this study, source images are significantly more accurate than MIP images in one reader with a similar trend was observed in the second reader. The interobserver variability was excellent. When renal artery stenosis is a consideration, high accuracy can only be obtained when source images are examined.

  10. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  11. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    MRI does not use ionizing radiation. No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of contrast (dye) used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions rarely ...

  12. Visualising uncertainty: Examining women's views on the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kate; Kochetkova, Inna; Whitby, Elspeth

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal screening occupies a prominent role within sociological debates on medical uncertainty. A particular issue concerns the limitations of routine screening which tends to be based on risk prediction. Computer assisted visual technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are now starting to be applied to the prenatal realm to assist in the diagnosis of a range of fetal and maternal disorders (from problems with the fetal brain to the placenta). MRI is often perceived in popular and medical discourse as a technology of certainty and truth. However, little is known about the use of MRI as a tool to confirm or refute the diagnosis of a range of disorders in pregnancy. Drawing on qualitative research with pregnant women attending a fetal medicine clinic in the North of England this paper examines the potential role that MRI can play in mediating pregnancy uncertainty. The paper will argue that MRI can create and manage women's feelings of uncertainty during pregnancy. However, while MRI may not always provide women with unequivocal answers, the detailed information provided by MR images combined with the interpretation and communication skills of the radiologist in many ways enables women to navigate the issue. Our analysis of empirical data therefore highlights the value of this novel technological application for women and their partners. It also seeks to stress the merit of taking a productive approach to the study of diagnostic uncertainty, an approach which recognises the concepts dual nature. PMID:27451338

  13. Visualising uncertainty: Examining women's views on the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kate; Kochetkova, Inna; Whitby, Elspeth

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal screening occupies a prominent role within sociological debates on medical uncertainty. A particular issue concerns the limitations of routine screening which tends to be based on risk prediction. Computer assisted visual technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are now starting to be applied to the prenatal realm to assist in the diagnosis of a range of fetal and maternal disorders (from problems with the fetal brain to the placenta). MRI is often perceived in popular and medical discourse as a technology of certainty and truth. However, little is known about the use of MRI as a tool to confirm or refute the diagnosis of a range of disorders in pregnancy. Drawing on qualitative research with pregnant women attending a fetal medicine clinic in the North of England this paper examines the potential role that MRI can play in mediating pregnancy uncertainty. The paper will argue that MRI can create and manage women's feelings of uncertainty during pregnancy. However, while MRI may not always provide women with unequivocal answers, the detailed information provided by MR images combined with the interpretation and communication skills of the radiologist in many ways enables women to navigate the issue. Our analysis of empirical data therefore highlights the value of this novel technological application for women and their partners. It also seeks to stress the merit of taking a productive approach to the study of diagnostic uncertainty, an approach which recognises the concepts dual nature.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of late iodine enhancement on cardiac computed tomography with a denoise filter for the evaluation of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takuya; Kido, Teruhito; Itoh, Toshihide; Saeki, Hideyuki; Shigemi, Susumu; Watanabe, Kouki; Kido, Tomoyuki; Aono, Shoji; Yamamoto, Masaya; Matsuda, Takeshi; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the image quality and diagnostic performance of late iodine enhancement (LIE) in dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) with low kilo-voltage peak (kVp) images and a denoise filter for the detection of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in comparison with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Hospital Ethics Committee approved the study protocol. Before discharge, 19 patients who received percutaneous coronary intervention after AMI underwent DSCT and 1.5 T MRI. Immediately after coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography, contrast medium was administered at a slow injection rate. LIE-CT scans were acquired via dual-energy CT and reconstructed as 100-, 140-kVp, and mixed images. An iterative three-dimensional edge-preserved smoothing filter was applied to the 100-kVp images to obtain denoised 100-kVp images. The mixed, 140-kVp, 100-kVp, and denoised 100-kVp images were assessed using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and their diagnostic performance in comparison with MRI and infarcted volumes were evaluated. Three hundred four segments of 19 patients were evaluated. Fifty-three segments showed LGE in MRI. The median CNR of the mixed, 140-, 100-kVp and denoised 100-kVp images was 3.49, 1.21, 3.57, and 6.08, respectively. The median CNR was significantly higher in the denoised 100-kVp images than in the other three images (P < 0.05). The denoised 100-kVp images showed the highest diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity. The percentage of myocardium in the four CT image types was significantly correlated with the respective MRI findings. The use of a denoise filter with a low-kVp image can improve CNR, sensitivity, and accuracy in LIE-CT.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of late iodine enhancement on cardiac computed tomography with a denoise filter for the evaluation of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takuya; Kido, Teruhito; Itoh, Toshihide; Saeki, Hideyuki; Shigemi, Susumu; Watanabe, Kouki; Kido, Tomoyuki; Aono, Shoji; Yamamoto, Masaya; Matsuda, Takeshi; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the image quality and diagnostic performance of late iodine enhancement (LIE) in dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) with low kilo-voltage peak (kVp) images and a denoise filter for the detection of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in comparison with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Hospital Ethics Committee approved the study protocol. Before discharge, 19 patients who received percutaneous coronary intervention after AMI underwent DSCT and 1.5 T MRI. Immediately after coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography, contrast medium was administered at a slow injection rate. LIE-CT scans were acquired via dual-energy CT and reconstructed as 100-, 140-kVp, and mixed images. An iterative three-dimensional edge-preserved smoothing filter was applied to the 100-kVp images to obtain denoised 100-kVp images. The mixed, 140-kVp, 100-kVp, and denoised 100-kVp images were assessed using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and their diagnostic performance in comparison with MRI and infarcted volumes were evaluated. Three hundred four segments of 19 patients were evaluated. Fifty-three segments showed LGE in MRI. The median CNR of the mixed, 140-, 100-kVp and denoised 100-kVp images was 3.49, 1.21, 3.57, and 6.08, respectively. The median CNR was significantly higher in the denoised 100-kVp images than in the other three images (P < 0.05). The denoised 100-kVp images showed the highest diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity. The percentage of myocardium in the four CT image types was significantly correlated with the respective MRI findings. The use of a denoise filter with a low-kVp image can improve CNR, sensitivity, and accuracy in LIE-CT. PMID:26202159

  16. A novel method for viability assessment by cinematographic and late contrast enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gang; Cockshott, Paul W.; Martin, Thomas N.; Foster, John E.; Elliott, Alex; Dargie, Henry; Groenning, Bjoern A.

    2004-04-01

    Using cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a combination of late contrast enhanced MR (ceMR) and cinematographic (CINE) images, a myocardial viability score can be derived. At present this score is produced by visual evaluation of wall motion abnormalities in combination with presence or absence of late hyper enhancement (LE) on ceMR. We set out to develop and validate image processing techniques derived from stereo vision capable of reducing the observer dependence and improving accuracy in the diagnosis of viable myocardium.

  17. Fear extinction, persistent disruptive behavior and psychopathic traits: fMRI in late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Moran D; van Lith, Koen; Kindt, Merel; Pape, Louise E; Doreleijers, Theo A H; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J; Popma, Arne

    2016-07-01

    Children diagnosed with a Disruptive Behavior Disorder (DBD, i.e. Oppositional Defiant Disorder or Conduct Disorder), especially those with psychopathic traits, are at risk of developing persistent and severe antisocial behavior. Reduced fear conditioning has been proposed to underlie persistent antisocial development. However, we have recently shown that both DBD persisters and desisters are characterized by increased fear conditioning compared with healthy controls (HCs). In this study, we investigated whether brain function during fear extinction is associated with DBD subgroup-membership and psychopathic traits. Adolescents from a childhood arrestee cohort (mean age 17.6 years, s.d. 1.4) who met criteria for a DBD diagnosis during previous assessments were re-assessed and categorized as persistent DBD (n = 25) or desistent DBD (n = 25). Functional MRI during the extinction phase of a classical fear-conditioning task was used to compare regional brain function between these subgroups and 25 matched controls. Both DBD persisters and desisters showed hyperreactivity during fear extinction, when compared with HCs. Impulsive-irresponsible psychopathic traits were positively associated with responses in the fear neurocircuitry and mediated the association between neural activation and group membership. These results suggest that fear acquisition and fear extinction deficits may provide an endophenotype for an emotionally hyperreactive subtype of antisocial development.

  18. A challenging diagnosis of late-onset tumefactive multiple sclerosis associated to cervicodorsal syringomyelia: doubtful CT, MRI, and bioptic findings

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Renata; Capasso, Raffaella; Galasso, Rosario; Cirillo, Mario; Taglialatela, Gemma; Galasso, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Tumefactive multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unusual variant of demyelinating disease characterized by lesions with pseudotumoral appearance on radiological imaging mimicking other space-occupying lesions, such as neoplasms, infections, and infarction. Especially when the patient's medical history is incompatible with MS, the differential diagnosis between these lesions constitutes a diagnostic challenge often requiring histological investigation. An older age at onset makes distinguishing tumefactive demyelinating lesion (TDL) from tumors even more challenging. Methods: We report a case of brain TDL as the initial manifestation of late-onset MS associated with cervico-dorsal syringomyelia. A 66-year-old Caucasian woman with a 15-day history headache was referred to our hospital because of the acute onset of paraphasia. She suffered from noncommunicating syringomyelia associated to basilar impression and she reported a 10-year history of burning dysesthesia of the left side of the chest extended to the internipple line level. Results: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations revealed a left frontal lesion with features suspicious for a tumor. Given the degree of overlap with other pathologic processes, CT and MRI findings failed to provide an unambiguous diagnosis; furthermore, because of the negative cerebrospinal fluid analysis for oligoclonal bands, the absence of other lesions, and the heightened suspicion of neoplasia, the clinicians opted to perform a stereotactic biopsy. Brain specimen analysis did not exclude the possibility of perilesional reactive gliosis and the patient, receiving anitiedemigen therapy, was monthly followed up. In the meanwhile, the second histological opinion of the brain specimen described the absence of pleomorphic glial cells indicating a tumor. These findings were interpreted as destructive inflammatory demyelinating disease and according to the evolution of MRI lesion burden, MS

  19. Quantification of microvascular cerebral blood flux and late-stage tumor compartmentalization in 9L gliosarcoma using flow enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Olivier; Geffroy, Françoise; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of tumor microvasculature are important to obtain an understanding of tumor angiogenesis and for the evaluation of therapies. In this work, we characterize the evolution of the microvascular flux at different stages of tumor growth in the 9L rat brain tumor model. The absolute quantification of cerebral blood flux is achieved with MRI at 7 T using the flow enhanced signal intensity (FENSI) method. FENSI flux maps were obtained between 5 and 14 days after glioma cell inoculation. Based on cerebral blood flux maps, we highlighted two main stages of tumor growth, below and above 3 mm, presenting distinct flux patterns and vascular properties. No significant difference emerged from the group analysis performed on the data collected at an early developmental stage (tumor size < 3 mm) when compared with healthy tissue. At a late developmental stage (tumor size > 3 mm), we observed a significant decrease in the cerebral blood flux inside the gliosarcoma (-33%, p < 0.01) and compartmentalization of the tumor (p < 0.05). FENSI flux maps delineated a low-flux tumor core (58 ± 17 μL/min/cm(2) ) and higher vascularized regions around the tumor periphery (85 ± 21 μL/min/cm(2) ). Histology was performed on 11 animals to finely probe the intratumor heterogeneity and microvessel density, and the results were compared with the information derived from FENSI flux maps. The hyper- and hypoperfused tumor regions revealed with FENSI at the late tumor developmental stage correlated well with the ratios of high and low blood vessel density (R(2) = 0.41) and fractional vascular surface (R(2) = 0.67) observed with fluorescence microscopy [cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) staining].

  20. Classifying late-onset dementia with MRI: Is arteriosclerotic brain degeneration the most common cause of Alzheimer’s syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Henry-Feugeas, Marie Cécile; Onen, Fannie; Claeys, Elisabeth Schouman

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to use early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the causes of cognitive decline in elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Baseline structural and flow quantification MR sequences, and clinical and neuropsychological follow-up for at least two years, were performed on 62 elderly subjects with MCI. Of these subjects, 17 progressed to dementia, and 15 of these progressed to dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT). Conversion to clinically diagnosed DAT was related to six distinct MR profiles, including one profile suggesting severe AD (20% of these converters) and five profiles suggesting severe cerebrovascular dysfunction. Two profiles suggested arteriosclerotic brain degeneration, one profile suggested severe venous windkessel dysfunction, and two suggested marked cerebral hypoperfusion associated with very low craniospinal compliance or marked brain atrophy. As compared with vascular MR type converters, AD MR type converters showed high executive and mobility predementia performances. Severe whole anteromesial temporal atrophy and predominantly left brain atrophy on visual MR analysis was only observed in AD MR type converters. In conclusion, these observations enhance the pathogenic complexity of the Alzheimer syndrome, and suggest that the role of arteriosclerotic brain degeneration in late life dementia is underestimated. PMID:18488889

  1. Quantitative assessment of myocardial strain with displacement encoding with stimulated echoes MRI in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Hideki; Nagata, Motonori; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Kato, Shingo; Takase, Shinichi; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Ishida, Masaki; Dohi, Kaoru; Ito, Masaaki; Sakuma, Hajime

    2013-12-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance and reproducibility of strain assessment with displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in identifying contractile abnormalities in myocardial segments with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). DENSE CMR was obtained on short-axis planes of the left ventricle (LV) in 24 patients with suspected coronary artery disease. e1 and e2 strains of LV wall were quantified. Cine MRI was acquired to determine percent systolic wall thickening (%SWT), followed by (LGE) CMR. The diagnostic performance of e1, e2 and %SWT for predicting the presence of LGE was evaluated by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Myocardial scar on LGE CMR was observed in 91 (24 %) of 384 segments. The area under ROC curve for predicting the segments with LGE was 0.874 by e1, 0.916 by e2 and 0.828 by %SWT (p = 0.001 between e2 and %SWT). Excellent inter-observer reproducibility was found for strain [Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.962 for e1, 0.955 for e2] as compared with %SWT (ICC = 0.790). DENSE CMR can be performed as a part of routine CMR study and allows for quantification of myocardial strain with high inter-observer reproducibility. Myocardial strain, especially e2 is useful in detecting altered abnormal systolic contraction in the segments with myocardial scar.

  2. MRI and FDG PET/CT imaging manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Sweiss, Nadera J

    2015-12-01

    A 52-year-old man had biopsy-proven sarcoidosis of mediastinal lymph nodes. Cardiac sarcoidosis was confirmed on cardiac MRI with typical imaging features as delayed gadolinium enhancement. Follow-up FDG PET/CT with a 3-day pretest diet modification showed suppression of overall myocardial uptake of FDG but with multifocal abnormal FDG uptake in the myocardium regions corresponding to the previous MRI findings. Additional noncardiac active sarcoidosis involving multiple organ and lymph nodes were also visualized on FDG PET/CT. PMID:26544904

  3. Accuracy of prediction of infarct-related arrhythmic circuits from image-based models reconstructed from low and high resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dongdong; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Pashakhanloo, Farhad; Prakosa, Adityo; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; McVeigh, Elliot; Halperin, Henry; Trayanova, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Identification of optimal ablation sites in hearts with infarct-related ventricular tachycardia (VT) remains difficult to achieve with the current catheter-based mapping techniques. Limitations arise from the ambiguities in determining the reentrant pathways location(s). The goal of this study was to develop experimentally validated, individualized computer models of infarcted swine hearts, reconstructed from high-resolution ex-vivo MRI and to examine the accuracy of the reentrant circuit location prediction when models of the same hearts are instead reconstructed from low clinical-resolution MRI scans. To achieve this goal, we utilized retrospective data obtained from four pigs ~10 weeks post infarction that underwent VT induction via programmed stimulation and epicardial activation mapping via a multielectrode epicardial sock. After the experiment, high-resolution ex-vivo MRI with late gadolinium enhancement was acquired. The Hi-res images were downsampled into two lower resolutions (Med-res and Low-res) in order to replicate image quality obtainable in the clinic. The images were segmented and models were reconstructed from the three image stacks for each pig heart. VT induction similar to what was performed in the experiment was simulated. Results of the reconstructions showed that the geometry of the ventricles including the infarct could be accurately obtained from Med-res and Low-res images. Simulation results demonstrated that induced VTs in the Med-res and Low-res models were located close to those in Hi-res models. Importantly, all models, regardless of image resolution, accurately predicted the VT morphology and circuit location induced in the experiment. These results demonstrate that MRI-based computer models of hearts with ischemic cardiomyopathy could provide a unique opportunity to predict and analyze VT resulting for from specific infarct architecture, and thus may assist in clinical decisions to identify and ablate the reentrant circuit(s). PMID

  4. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J. )

    1990-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography.

  5. An experimental study on use of 7T MRI for evaluation of myocardial infarction in SD rats transfected with pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Tian, Ruiqing; Shen, Xiangchun; Chen, Yushu; Chen, Wei; Gan, Lu; Shen, Guiquan; Ju, Haiyue; Yang, Li; Gao, Fabao

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to build the myocardial infarction model in SD rats transfected with pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid and study the effect of the transfection using 7T MRI. Twenty-four male SD rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid transfection group (with improved coronary perfusion delivery) and myocardial infarction model group. Cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine-MRI), T2-mapping and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac imaging were performed at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 7 d after myocardial infarction, respectively. The signal intensity, area at risk (AAR), myocardium infarction core (MIC) and salvageable myocardial zone (SMZ) were compared. The hearts were harvested for anatomic characterization, which was related to pathological examination (TTC staining, HE staining, Masson staining and immunohistochemical staining). The Cine-MRI results showed that pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid transfection group had higher end-diastolic volume (EDV) with a reduction in MIC and SMZ, as compared with the myocardial infarction model group. MIC, SMZ and AAR of the plasmid transfection declined over time. At 7 d, the two groups did not differ significantly in AAR and T2 value. According to Western Blotting, VEGF was up-regulated, while CaSR and caspase-3 were downregulated in the plasmid transfection group, as compared with the model group. In conclusion, a good treatment effect was achieved by coronary perfusion of pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid. 7T CMR sequences provide a non-invasive quantification of the treatment efficacy. However, the assessment of myocardial injury using T2 value and AAR in the presence of edema is less accurate. The myocardial protection of the plasmid transfection group may be related to the inhibition of myocardial apoptosis, vascular endothelial cell (VEC) proliferation and collagen proliferation. The CaSR signaling pathway may contribute to reversing the apoptosis. PMID:27648128

  6. An experimental study on use of 7T MRI for evaluation of myocardial infarction in SD rats transfected with pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Tian, Ruiqing; Shen, Xiangchun; Chen, Yushu; Chen, Wei; Gan, Lu; Shen, Guiquan; Ju, Haiyue; Yang, Li; Gao, Fabao

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to build the myocardial infarction model in SD rats transfected with pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid and study the effect of the transfection using 7T MRI. Twenty-four male SD rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid transfection group (with improved coronary perfusion delivery) and myocardial infarction model group. Cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine-MRI), T2-mapping and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac imaging were performed at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 7 d after myocardial infarction, respectively. The signal intensity, area at risk (AAR), myocardium infarction core (MIC) and salvageable myocardial zone (SMZ) were compared. The hearts were harvested for anatomic characterization, which was related to pathological examination (TTC staining, HE staining, Masson staining and immunohistochemical staining). The Cine-MRI results showed that pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid transfection group had higher end-diastolic volume (EDV) with a reduction in MIC and SMZ, as compared with the myocardial infarction model group. MIC, SMZ and AAR of the plasmid transfection declined over time. At 7 d, the two groups did not differ significantly in AAR and T2 value. According to Western Blotting, VEGF was up-regulated, while CaSR and caspase-3 were downregulated in the plasmid transfection group, as compared with the model group. In conclusion, a good treatment effect was achieved by coronary perfusion of pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid. 7T CMR sequences provide a non-invasive quantification of the treatment efficacy. However, the assessment of myocardial injury using T2 value and AAR in the presence of edema is less accurate. The myocardial protection of the plasmid transfection group may be related to the inhibition of myocardial apoptosis, vascular endothelial cell (VEC) proliferation and collagen proliferation. The CaSR signaling pathway may contribute to reversing the apoptosis. PMID:27648128

  7. An experimental study on use of 7T MRI for evaluation of myocardial infarction in SD rats transfected with pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Tian, Ruiqing; Shen, Xiangchun; Chen, Yushu; Chen, Wei; Gan, Lu; Shen, Guiquan; Ju, Haiyue; Yang, Li; Gao, Fabao

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to build the myocardial infarction model in SD rats transfected with pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid and study the effect of the transfection using 7T MRI. Twenty-four male SD rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid transfection group (with improved coronary perfusion delivery) and myocardial infarction model group. Cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine-MRI), T2-mapping and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac imaging were performed at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 7 d after myocardial infarction, respectively. The signal intensity, area at risk (AAR), myocardium infarction core (MIC) and salvageable myocardial zone (SMZ) were compared. The hearts were harvested for anatomic characterization, which was related to pathological examination (TTC staining, HE staining, Masson staining and immunohistochemical staining). The Cine-MRI results showed that pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid transfection group had higher end-diastolic volume (EDV) with a reduction in MIC and SMZ, as compared with the myocardial infarction model group. MIC, SMZ and AAR of the plasmid transfection declined over time. At 7 d, the two groups did not differ significantly in AAR and T2 value. According to Western Blotting, VEGF was up-regulated, while CaSR and caspase-3 were downregulated in the plasmid transfection group, as compared with the model group. In conclusion, a good treatment effect was achieved by coronary perfusion of pcDNA 3.1(+)/VEGF121 plasmid. 7T CMR sequences provide a non-invasive quantification of the treatment efficacy. However, the assessment of myocardial injury using T2 value and AAR in the presence of edema is less accurate. The myocardial protection of the plasmid transfection group may be related to the inhibition of myocardial apoptosis, vascular endothelial cell (VEC) proliferation and collagen proliferation. The CaSR signaling pathway may contribute to reversing the apoptosis.

  8. Can Harry Potter still put a spell on us in a second language? An fMRI study on reading emotion-laden literature in late bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chun-Ting; Jacobs, Arthur M; Conrad, Markus

    2015-02-01

    In this fMRI study we contrasted emotional responses to literary reading in late bilinguals' first or second language. German participants with adequate English proficiency in their second language (L2) English read short text passages from Harry Potter books characterized by a "negative" or "positive" versus "neutral" emotional valence manipulation. Previous studies have suggested that given sufficient L2 proficiency, neural substrates involved in L1 versus L2 do not differ (Fabbro, 2001). On the other hand, the question of attenuated emotionality of L2 language processing is still an open debate (see Conrad, Recio, & Jacobs, 2011). Our results revealed a set of neural structures involved in the processing of emotion-laden literature, including emotion-related amygdala and a set of lateral prefrontal, anterior temporal, and temporo-parietal regions associated with discourse comprehension, high-level semantic integration, and Theory-of-Mind processing. Yet, consistent with post-scan emotion ratings of text passages, factorial fMRI analyses revealed stronger hemodynamic responses to "happy" than to "neutral" in bilateral amygdala and the left precentral cortex that were restricted to L1 reading. Furthermore, multivariate pattern analyses (MVPA) demonstrated better classifiability of differential patterns of brain activity elicited by passages of different emotional content in L1 than in L2 for the whole brain level. Overall, our results suggest that reading emotion-laden texts in our native language provides a stronger and more differentiated emotional experience than reading in a second language.

  9. Can Harry Potter still put a spell on us in a second language? An fMRI study on reading emotion-laden literature in late bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chun-Ting; Jacobs, Arthur M; Conrad, Markus

    2015-02-01

    In this fMRI study we contrasted emotional responses to literary reading in late bilinguals' first or second language. German participants with adequate English proficiency in their second language (L2) English read short text passages from Harry Potter books characterized by a "negative" or "positive" versus "neutral" emotional valence manipulation. Previous studies have suggested that given sufficient L2 proficiency, neural substrates involved in L1 versus L2 do not differ (Fabbro, 2001). On the other hand, the question of attenuated emotionality of L2 language processing is still an open debate (see Conrad, Recio, & Jacobs, 2011). Our results revealed a set of neural structures involved in the processing of emotion-laden literature, including emotion-related amygdala and a set of lateral prefrontal, anterior temporal, and temporo-parietal regions associated with discourse comprehension, high-level semantic integration, and Theory-of-Mind processing. Yet, consistent with post-scan emotion ratings of text passages, factorial fMRI analyses revealed stronger hemodynamic responses to "happy" than to "neutral" in bilateral amygdala and the left precentral cortex that were restricted to L1 reading. Furthermore, multivariate pattern analyses (MVPA) demonstrated better classifiability of differential patterns of brain activity elicited by passages of different emotional content in L1 than in L2 for the whole brain level. Overall, our results suggest that reading emotion-laden texts in our native language provides a stronger and more differentiated emotional experience than reading in a second language. PMID:25305809

  10. Correlation of Scar in Cardiac MRI and High‐Resolution Contact Mapping of Left Ventricle in a Chronic Infarct Model

    PubMed Central

    THAJUDEEN, ANEES; STEWART, BRIAN; COKIC, IVAN; NAKAGAWA, HIROSHI; SHEHATA, MICHAEL; AMORN, ALLEN M.; KALI, AVINASH; LIU, EZH; HARLEV, DORON; BENNETT, NATHAN; DHARMAKUMAR, ROHAN; CHUGH, SUMEET S.; WANG, XUNZHANG

    2015-01-01

    Background Endocardial mapping for scars and abnormal electrograms forms the most essential component of ventricular tachycardia ablation. The utility of ultra‐high resolution mapping of ventricular scar was assessed using a multielectrode contact mapping system in a chronic canine infarct model. Methods Chronic infarcts were created in five anesthetized dogs by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. Late gadolinium‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (LGE MRI) was obtained 4.9 ± 0.9 months after infarction, with three‐dimensional (3D) gadolinium enhancement signal intensity maps at 1‐mm and 5‐mm depths from the endocardium. Ultra‐high resolution electroanatomical maps were created using a novel mapping system (Rhythmia Mapping System, Rhythmia Medical/Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA) Rhythmia Medical, Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA with an 8.5F catheter with mini‐basket electrode array (64 tiny electrodes, 2.5‐mm spacing, center‐to‐center). Results The maps contained 7,754 ± 1,960 electrograms per animal with a mean resolution of 2.8 ± 0.6 mm. Low bipolar voltage (<2 mV) correlated closely with scar on the LGE MRI and the 3D signal intensity map (1‐mm depth). The scar areas between the MRI signal intensity map and electroanatomic map matched at 87.7% of sites. Bipolar and unipolar voltages, compared in 592 electrograms from four MRI‐defined scar types (endocardial scar, epicardial scar, mottled transmural scar, and dense transmural scar) as well as normal tissue, were significantly different. A unipolar voltage of <13 mV correlated with transmural extension of scar in MRI. Electrograms exhibiting isolated late potentials (ILPs) were manually annotated and ILP maps were created showing ILP location and timing. ILPs were identified in 203 ± 159 electrograms per dog (within low‐voltage areas) and ILP maps showed gradation in timing of ILPs at different locations in the scar. Conclusions Ultra

  11. Rhesus monkey brain development during late infancy and the effect of phencyclidine: a longitudinal MRI and DTI study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cirong; Tian, Xiaoguang; Liu, Huilang; Mo, Yin; Bai, Fan; Zhao, Xudong; Ma, Yuanye; Wang, Jianhong

    2015-02-15

    Early brain development is a complex and rapid process, the disturbance of which may cause the onset of brain disorders. Based on longitudinal imaging data acquired from 6 to 16 months postnatal, we describe a systematic trajectory of monkey brain development during late infancy, and demonstrate the influence of phencyclidine (PCP) on this trajectory. Although the general developmental trajectory of the monkey brain was close to that of the human brain, the development in monkeys was faster and regionally specific. Gray matter volume began to decrease during late infancy in monkeys, much earlier than in humans in whom it occurs in adolescence. Additionally, the decrease of gray matter volume in higher-order association regions (the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes) occurred later than in regions for primary functions (the occipital lobe and cerebellum). White matter volume displayed an increasing trend in most brain regions, but not in the occipital lobe, which had a stable volume. In addition, based on diffusion tensor imaging, we found an increase in fractional anisotropy and a decrease in diffusivity, which may be associated with myelination and axonal changes in white matter tracts. Meanwhile, we tested the influence of 14-day PCP treatment on the developmental trajectories. Such treatment tended to accelerated brain maturation during late infancy, although not statistically significant. These findings provide comparative information for the understanding of primate brain maturation and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  12. Infarct density distribution by MRI in the porcine model of acute and chronic myocardial infarction as a potential method transferable to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; Simor, Tamas; Lenkey, Zsofia; van der Geest, Rob J; Kirschner, Robert; Toth, Levente; Brott, Brigitta C; Elgavish, Ada; Elgavish, Gabriel A

    2014-06-01

    To study the feasibility of a myocardial infarct (MI) quantification method [signal intensity-based percent infarct mapping (SI-PIM)] that is able to evaluate not only the size, but also the density distribution of the MI. In 14 male swine, MI was generated by 90 min of closed-chest balloon occlusion followed by reperfusion. Seven (n = 7) or 56 (n = 7) days after reperfusion, Gd-DTPA-bolus and continuous-infusion enhanced late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI, and R1-mapping were carried out and post mortem triphenyl-tetrazolium-chloride (TTC) staining was performed. MI was quantified using binary [2 or 5 standard deviation (SD)], SI-PIM and R1-PIM methods. Infarct fraction (IF), and infarct-involved voxel fraction (IIVF) were determined by each MRI method. Bias of each method was compared to the TTC technique. The accuracy of MI quantification did not depend on the method of contrast administration or the age of the MI. IFs obtained by either of the two PIM methods were statistically not different from the IFs derived from the TTC measurements at either MI age. IFs obtained from the binary 2SD method overestimated IF obtained from TTC. IIVF among the three different PIM methods did not vary, but with the binary methods the IIVF gradually decreased with increasing the threshold limit. The advantage of SI-PIM over the conventional binary method is the ability to represent not only IF but also the density distribution of the MI. Since the SI-PIM methods are based on a single LGE acquisition, the bolus-data-based SI-PIM method can effortlessly be incorporated into the clinical image post-processing procedure.

  13. HW 01-3 CARDIAC AND VASCULAR MRI IN HYPERTENSION EVALUATION.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Chol

    2016-09-01

    Chronic hypertension can result in deleterious effects on various vascular organs including the heart and vessels. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has the unique advantage of the ability to assess ventricular volumes and function, valvular abnormalities, vascular pathology, myocardial perfusion and tissue characterization with high accuracy and reproducibility and also avoid the risk of radiation. As this is the case, CMR seems to be an ideal method for comprehensive assessment of patients with systemic hypertension.In the heart itself, left ventricular hypertrophy with myocardial fibrosis and diastolic or systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle are all important consequences of systemic hypertension that can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. In addition, increased risk of coronary artery disease is another critical end-result of chronic hypertension. CMR can be utilized to assess all of these consequences using cine-MRI, late Gadolinium enhancement, tagging, and myocardial perfusion imaging.In the arteries, atheromatous plaque and aneurysm formation with the possibility of wall dissection or formation of intramural hematomas are important end-results of longstanding uncontrolled hypertension. With vascular MRI, all of these findings are assessable readily and accurately. Currently, newer techniques such as 4-D flow imaging of the aortic blood flow is being studied for use in understanding the mechanics of blood flow damaging the vessels. Another aspect of vascular MRI that is highly anticipated is the evaluation of pulsed wave velocity. With accurate measurement of vascular flow within any part of the body, and also precise measurement of the distance between various points of the aorta, the propagation velocities of the blood can be assessed with CMR and can be utilized to evaluate the effects of increased central blood pressure, instead of various assumptions using peripheral blood pressure for evaluation of PWV. In addition, evaluation of

  14. Correlation between findings on MRCP and gadolinium-enhanced MR of the liver and a survival model for primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Bojan D; Nikolaidis, Paul; Hammond, Nancy A; Martin, John A; Petrovic, Polina V; Desai, Pankaja M; Miller, Frank H

    2007-12-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic, progressive disease of inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts. The ability to predict survival is important for appropriate management and treatment decisions. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between specific findings on the enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the liver and the corresponding magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatogram (MRCP) and a survival model for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), the Mayo Risk Score. During a five-year period, 47 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis were identified who had a complete MRI/MRCP examination. The extent of anatomical changes of the biliary tree and the degree of peribiliary enhancement in the hepatic parenchyma were compared with the Mayo Risk Score for each patient. Peribiliary enhancement was present to a varying extent in 38 of 47 cases of PSC. Peribiliary enhancement 3 min after gadolinium administration had a weak correlation with the Mayo Risk Score (analysis of variance P<0.01, Pearson correlation r=0.37). No statistically significant relationship between the severity of extrahepatic or intrahepatic duct changes and the Mayo Risk Score was found (analysis of variance P=0.24, P=0.38, respectively). Although biliary tree changes on MRCP aid in the diagnosis of PSC, they do not correlate with survival, as predicted by the Mayo Risk Score. Peribiliary enhancement on MRI of the liver is a finding occurring to a variable extent in primary sclerosing cholangitis but does not correlate significantly with survival.

  15. Visual cortex activation in late-onset, Braille naive blind individuals: an fMRI study during semantic and phonological tasks with heard words.

    PubMed

    Burton, Harold; McLaren, Donald G

    2006-01-01

    Visual cortex activity in the blind has been shown in Braille literate people, which raise the question of whether Braille literacy influences cross-modal reorganization. We used fMRI to examine visual cortex activation during semantic and phonological tasks with auditory presentation of words in two late-onset blind individuals who lacked Braille literacy. Multiple visual cortical regions were activated in the Braille naive individuals. Positive BOLD responses were noted in lower tier visuotopic (e.g., V1, V2, VP, and V3) and several higher tier visual areas (e.g., V4v, V8, and BA 37). Activity was more extensive and cross-correlation magnitudes were greater during the semantic compared to the phonological task. These results with Braille naive individuals plausibly suggest that visual deprivation alone induces visual cortex reorganization. Cross-modal reorganization of lower tier visual areas may be recruited by developing skills in attending to selected non-visual inputs (e.g., Braille literacy, enhanced auditory skills). Such learning might strengthen remote connections with multisensory cortical areas. Of necessity, the Braille naive participants must attend to auditory stimulation for language. We hypothesize that learning to attend to non-visual inputs probably strengthens the remaining active synapses following visual deprivation, and thereby, increases cross-modal activation of lower tier visual areas when performing highly demanding non-visual tasks of which reading Braille is just one example.

  16. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI differentiation of meningioma from dural metastases: a pilot study with immunohistochemical observations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bronwyn E; Woltjer, Randall L; Prola-Netto, Joao; Nesbit, Gary M; Gahramanov, Seymur; Pham, Thao; Wagner, Jaime; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2016-09-01

    Malignant dural neoplasms are not reliably distinguished from benign dural neoplasms with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI enhancement in central nervous system (CNS) diseases imaged with ferumoxytol has been attributed to intracellular uptake in macrophages rather than vascular leakage. We compared imaging to histopathology and immunohistochemistry in meningiomas and dural metastases having ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI (FeMRI) and gadolinium-enhanced MRI (GdMRI) in order to correlate enhancement patterns to macrophage presence and vascular state. All patients having extraaxial CNS tumors were retrospectively selected from one of two ongoing FeMRI studies. Enhancement was compared between GdMRI and FeMRI. Diagnoses were confirmed histologically and/or by characteristic imaging. Tumor and vascular histology was reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining for CD68 (a macrophage marker), Connexin-43 (Cx43) (a marker of normal gap junctions), and smooth muscle actin (SMA) as a marker of vascularity, was performed in seven study cases with available tissue. Immunohistochemistry was performed on archival material from 33 subjects outside of the current study as controls: 20 WHO grade I cases of meningioma and 13 metastatic tumors. Metastases displayed marked delayed enhancement on FeMRI, similar to GdMRI. Four patients with dural metastases and one patient with meningioma showed similar enhancement on FeMRI and GdMRI. Five meningiomas with typical enhancement on GdMRI lacked enhancement on FeMRI. Enhancement on FeMRI was better associated with decreased Cx43 expression than intralesional macrophages. These pilot data suggest that FeMRI may better differentiate metastatic disease from meningiomas than GdMRI, and that differences in tumor vasculature rather than macrophage presence could underlie differences in contrast enhancement. PMID:27393348

  17. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  18. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  19. A preliminary fMRI study of a novel self-paced written fluency task: observation of left-hemispheric activation, and increased frontal activation in late vs. early task phases

    PubMed Central

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Das, Sunit; Schweizer, Tom A.; Graham, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological tests of verbal fluency are very widely used to characterize impaired cognitive function. For clinical neuroscience studies and potential medical applications, measuring the brain activity that underlies such tests with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is of significant interest—but a challenging proposition because overt speech can cause signal artifacts, which tend to worsen as the duration of speech tasks becomes longer. In a novel approach, we present the group brain activity of 12 subjects who performed a self-paced written version of phonemic fluency using fMRI-compatible tablet technology that recorded responses and provided task-related feedback on a projection screen display, over long-duration task blocks (60 s). As predicted, we observed robust activation in the left anterior inferior and medial frontal gyri, consistent with previously reported results of verbal fluency tasks which established the role of these areas in strategic word retrieval. In addition, the number of words produced in the late phase (last 30 s) of written phonemic fluency was significantly less (p < 0.05) than the number produced in the early phase (first 30 s). Activation during the late phase vs. the early phase was also assessed from the first 20 s and last 20 s of task performance, which eliminated the possibility that the sluggish hemodynamic response from the early phase would affect the activation estimates of the late phase. The last 20 s produced greater activation maps covering extended areas in bilateral precuneus, cuneus, middle temporal gyrus, insula, middle frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus. Among these areas, greater activation was observed in the bilateral middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann area BA 9) and cingulate gyrus (BA 24, 32) likely as part of the initiation, maintenance, and shifting of attentional resources. Consistent with previous pertinent fMRI literature involving overt and covert verbal responses, these findings highlight

  20. A preliminary fMRI study of a novel self-paced written fluency task: observation of left-hemispheric activation, and increased frontal activation in late vs. early task phases.

    PubMed

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Das, Sunit; Schweizer, Tom A; Graham, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological tests of verbal fluency are very widely used to characterize impaired cognitive function. For clinical neuroscience studies and potential medical applications, measuring the brain activity that underlies such tests with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is of significant interest-but a challenging proposition because overt speech can cause signal artifacts, which tend to worsen as the duration of speech tasks becomes longer. In a novel approach, we present the group brain activity of 12 subjects who performed a self-paced written version of phonemic fluency using fMRI-compatible tablet technology that recorded responses and provided task-related feedback on a projection screen display, over long-duration task blocks (60 s). As predicted, we observed robust activation in the left anterior inferior and medial frontal gyri, consistent with previously reported results of verbal fluency tasks which established the role of these areas in strategic word retrieval. In addition, the number of words produced in the late phase (last 30 s) of written phonemic fluency was significantly less (p < 0.05) than the number produced in the early phase (first 30 s). Activation during the late phase vs. the early phase was also assessed from the first 20 s and last 20 s of task performance, which eliminated the possibility that the sluggish hemodynamic response from the early phase would affect the activation estimates of the late phase. The last 20 s produced greater activation maps covering extended areas in bilateral precuneus, cuneus, middle temporal gyrus, insula, middle frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus. Among these areas, greater activation was observed in the bilateral middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann area BA 9) and cingulate gyrus (BA 24, 32) likely as part of the initiation, maintenance, and shifting of attentional resources. Consistent with previous pertinent fMRI literature involving overt and covert verbal responses, these findings highlight the

  1. Breast imaging with ultrasound tomography: a comparative study with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranger, Bryan; Littrup, Peter; Duric, Neb; Li, Cuiping; Schmidt, Steven; Lupinacci, Jessica; Myc, Lukasz; Szczepanski, Amy; Rama, Olsi; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of an ultrasound tomography (UST) prototype relative to magnetic resonance (MR) for imaging overall breast anatomy and accentuating tumors relative to background tissue. The study was HIPAA compliant, approved by the Institutional Review Board, and performed after obtaining the requisite informed consent. Twenty-three patients were imaged with MR and the UST prototype. T1 weighted images with fat saturation, with and without gadolinium enhancement, were used to examine anatomical structures and tumors, while T2 weighted images were used to identify cysts. The UST scans generated sound speed, attenuation, and reflection images. A qualitative visual comparison of the MRI and UST images was then used to identify anatomical similarities. A more focused approach that involved a comparison of reported masses, lesion volumes, and breast density was used to quantify the findings from the visual assessment. Our acoustic tomography prototype imaged distributions of fibrous stroma, parenchyma, fatty tissues, and lesions in patterns similar to those seen in the MR images. The range of thresholds required to establish tumor volume equivalency between MRI and UST suggested that a universal threshold for isolating masses relative to background tissue is feasible with UST. UST has demonstrated the ability to visualize and characterize breast tissues in a manner comparable to MRI. Thresholding techniques accentuate masses relative to background anatomy, which may prove clinically useful for early cancer detection.

  2. Single-trial EEG-informed fMRI reveals spatial dependency of BOLD signal on early and late IC-ERP amplitudes during face recognition.

    PubMed

    Wirsich, Jonathan; Bénar, Christian; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Descoins, Médéric; Soulier, Elisabeth; Le Troter, Arnaud; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine; Guye, Maxime

    2014-10-15

    Simultaneous EEG-fMRI has opened up new avenues for improving the spatio-temporal resolution of functional brain studies. However, this method usually suffers from poor EEG quality, especially for evoked potentials (ERPs), due to specific artifacts. As such, the use of EEG-informed fMRI analysis in the context of cognitive studies has particularly focused on optimizing narrow ERP time windows of interest, which ignores the rich diverse temporal information of the EEG signal. Here, we propose to use simultaneous EEG-fMRI to investigate the neural cascade occurring during face recognition in 14 healthy volunteers by using the successive ERP peaks recorded during the cognitive part of this process. N170, N400 and P600 peaks, commonly associated with face recognition, were successfully and reproducibly identified for each trial and each subject by using a group independent component analysis (ICA). For the first time we use this group ICA to extract several independent components (IC) corresponding to the sequence of activation and used single-trial peaks as modulation parameters in a general linear model (GLM) of fMRI data. We obtained an occipital-temporal-frontal stream of BOLD signal modulation, in accordance with the three successive IC-ERPs providing an unprecedented spatio-temporal characterization of the whole cognitive process as defined by BOLD signal modulation. By using this approach, the pattern of EEG-informed BOLD modulation provided improved characterization of the network involved than the fMRI-only analysis or the source reconstruction of the three ERPs; the latter techniques showing only two regions in common localized in the occipital lobe.

  3. Histological Confirmation and Biological Significance of Cartilage Canals Demonstrated Using High Field MRI in Swine at Predilection Sites of Osteochondrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Ferenc; Nissi, Mikko J.; Zhang, Jinjin; Benson, Michael; Schmitter, Sebastian; Ellermann, Jutta M.; Carlson, Cathy S.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage canal vessels in epiphyseal cartilage have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans. The present study aimed to validate high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods to visualize these vessels in young pigs. Osteochondral samples from the distal femur and distal humerus (predilection sites of osteochondrosis) of piglets were imaged post-mortem: (1) using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in an MRI scanner, followed by histological evaluation; and (2) after barium perfusion using μCT, followed by clearing techniques. In addition, both stifle joints of a 25-day-old piglet were imaged in vivo using SWI and gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted MRI, after which distal femoral samples were harvested and evaluated using μCT and histology. Histological sections were compared to corresponding MRI slices, and three-dimensional visualizations of vessels identified using MRI were compared to those obtained using μCT and to the cleared specimens. Vessels contained in cartilage canals were identified using MRI, both ex vivo and in vivo; their locations matched those observed in the histological sections, μCT images, and cleared specimens of barium-perfused tissues. The ability to visualize cartilage canal blood vessels by MRI, without using a contrast agent, will allow future longitudinal studies to evaluate their role in developmental orthopedic disease. PMID:23939946

  4. Multimodality Fusion with MRI, CT, and Ultrasound Contrast for Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amalou, Hayet; Wood, Bradford J

    2012-01-01

    Fusion technology with electromagnetic (EM) tracking enables navigation with multimodality feedback that lets the operator use different modalities during different parts of the image-guided procedure. This may be particularly helpful in patients with renal insufficiency undergoing kidney tumor ablation, in whom there is a desire to minimize or avoid nephrotoxic iodinated contrast exposure. EM tracking software merges and fuses different imaging modalities such as MRI, CT, and ultrasound and can also display the position of needles in real time in relation to preprocedure imaging, which may better define tumor targets than available intraoperative imaging. EM tracking was successfully used to ablate a poorly visualized renal tumor, through the combined use of CT, gadolinium-enhanced MR, and contrast-enhanced US imaging to localize the tumor. PMID:23304625

  5. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  6. Cardiac MRI evaluation of myocardial disease.

    PubMed

    Captur, Gabriella; Manisty, Charlotte; Moon, James C

    2016-09-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a key imaging technique for cardiac phenotyping with a major clinical role. It can assess advanced aspects of cardiac structure and function, scar burden and other myocardial tissue characteristics but there is new information that can now be derived. This can fill many of the gaps in our knowledge with the potential to change thinking, disease classifications and definitions as well as patient care. Established techniques such as the late gadolinium enhancement technique are now embedded in clinical care. New techniques are coming through. Myocardial tissue characterisation techniques, particularly myocardial mapping can precisely measure tissue magnetisation-T1, T2, T2* and also the extracellular volume. These change in disease. Key biological pathways are now open for scrutiny including focal fibrosis (scar) and diffuse fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and infiltration. Other new areas to engage in where major insights are growing include detailed assessments of myocardial mechanics and performance, spectroscopy and hyperpolarised CMR. In spite of the advances, challenges remain, particularly surrounding utilisation, technical development to improve accuracy, reproducibility and deliverability, and the role of multidisciplinary research to understand the detailed pathological basis of the MR signal changes. Collectively, these new developments are galvanising CMR uptake and having a major translational impact on healthcare globally and it is steadily becoming key imaging tool. PMID:27354273

  7. Task-based optimization of flip angle for texture analysis in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Jonathan F.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Altbach, Maria I.; Galons, Jean-Phillippe; Bhattacharyya, Achyut; Sharma, Puneet; Bhattacharyya, Tulshi; Bilgin, Ali; Martin, Diego R.

    2016-03-01

    Chronic liver disease is a worldwide health problem, and hepatic fibrosis (HF) is one of the hallmarks of the disease. The current reference standard for diagnosing HF is biopsy followed by pathologist examination, however this is limited by sampling error and carries risk of complications. Pathology diagnosis of HF is based on textural change in the liver as a lobular collagen network that develops within portal triads. The scale of collagen lobules is characteristically on order of 1-5 mm, which approximates the resolution limit of in vivo gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the delayed phase. We have shown that MRI of formalin fixed human ex vivo liver samples mimic the textural contrast of in vivo Gd-MRI and can be used as MRI phantoms. We have developed local texture analysis that is applied to phantom images, and the results are used to train model observers. The performance of the observer is assessed with the area-under-the-receiveroperator- characteristic curve (AUROC) as the figure of merit. To optimize the MRI pulse sequence, phantoms are scanned with multiple times at a range of flip angles. The flip angle that associated with the highest AUROC is chosen as optimal based on the task of detecting HF.

  8. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  9. Superior MRI outcomes with alemtuzumab compared with subcutaneous interferon β-1a in MS

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Elizabeth; Brinar, Vesna V.; Cohen, Jeffrey A.; Coles, Alasdair J.; Giovannoni, Gavin; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Havrdova, Eva; Selmaj, Krzysztof W.; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Weiner, Howard L.; Lake, Stephen L.; Margolin, David H.; Thomas, David R.; Panzara, Michael A.; Compston, D. Alastair S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe detailed MRI results from 2 head-to-head phase III trials, Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis Study I (CARE-MS I; NCT00530348) and Study II (CARE-MS II; NCT00548405), of alemtuzumab vs subcutaneous interferon β-1a (SC IFN-β-1a) in patients with active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: The impact of alemtuzumab 12 mg vs SC IFN-β-1a 44 μg on MRI measures was evaluated in patients with RRMS who were treatment-naive (CARE-MS I) or who had an inadequate response, defined as at least one relapse, to prior therapy (CARE-MS II). Results: Both treatments prevented T2-hyperintense lesion volume increases from baseline. Alemtuzumab was more effective than SC IFN-β-1a on most lesion-based endpoints in both studies (p < 0.05), including decreased risk of new/enlarging T2 lesions over 2 years and gadolinium-enhancing lesions at year 2. Reduced risk of new T1 lesions (p < 0.0001) and gadolinium-enhancing lesion conversion to T1-hypointense black holes (p = 0.0078) were observed with alemtuzumab vs SC IFN-β-1a in CARE-MS II. Alemtuzumab slowed brain volume loss over 2 years in CARE-MS I (p < 0.0001) and II (p = 0.012) vs SC IFN-β-1a. Conclusions: Alemtuzumab demonstrated greater efficacy than SC IFN-β-1a on MRI endpoints in active RRMS. The superiority of alemtuzumab was more prominent during the second year of both studies. These findings complement the superior clinical efficacy of alemtuzumab over SC IFN-β-1a in RRMS. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00530348 and NCT00548405. Classification of evidence: The results reported here provide Class I evidence that, for patients with active RRMS, alemtuzumab is superior to SC IFN-β-1a on multiple MRI endpoints. PMID:27590291

  10. Association of Circulating Matrix Metalloproteinases with Carotid Artery Characteristics: The ARIC Carotid MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaubatz, John W.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Wasserman, Bruce A.; He, Max; Chambless, Lloyd E.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hoogeveen, Ron C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship of plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) with carotid artery characteristics measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a cross-sectional investigation among Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Carotid MRI Study participants. Methods and Results A stratified random sample was recruited based on intima-media thickness (IMT) from a previous ultrasound examination. A high-resolution gadolinium-enhanced MRI exam of the carotid artery was performed in 2004–2005 on 1,901 ARIC cohort participants. Multiple carotid wall characteristics including wall thickness, lumen area, calcium area, lipid core and fibrous cap measures were evaluated for associations with plasma MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9 and TIMP-1. Plasma MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-7 were significantly higher among participants in the high IMT group compared to those in the low IMT group. Normalized wall index was independently associated with MMP-3, MMP-7, and TIMP-1. MMP-7 was positively associated with carotid calcification. Mean fibrous cap thickness was significantly higher in individuals with elevated TIMP-1 levels. In addition, TIMP-1 was positively associated with measures of lipid core. Conclusions Circulating levels of specific MMPs and TIMP-1 were associated with carotid wall remodeling and structural changes related to plaque burden in the elderly. PMID:20167662

  11. Unsupervised classification of cirrhotic livers using MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gobert; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kato, Hiroki; Kondo, Hiroshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2008-03-01

    Cirrhosis of the liver is a chronic disease. It is characterized by the presence of widespread nodules and fibrosis in the liver which results in characteristic texture patterns. Computerized analysis of hepatic texture patterns is usually based on regions-of-interest (ROIs). However, not all ROIs are typical representatives of the disease stage of the liver from which the ROIs originated. This leads to uncertainties in the ROI labels (diseased or non-diseased). On the other hand, supervised classifiers are commonly used in determining the assignment rule. This presents a problem as the training of a supervised classifier requires the correct labels of the ROIs. The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of an unsupervised classifier, the k-means clustering, in classifying ROI based data. In addition, a procedure for generating a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve depicting the classification performance of k-means clustering is also reported. Hepatic MRI images of 44 patients (16 cirrhotic; 28 non-cirrhotic) are used in this study. The MRI data are derived from gadolinium-enhanced equilibrium phase images. For each patient, 10 ROIs selected by an experienced radiologist and 7 texture features measured on each ROI are included in the MRI data. Results of the k-means classifier are depicted using an ROC curve. The area under the curve (AUC) has a value of 0.704. This is slightly lower than but comparable to that of LDA and ANN classifiers which have values 0.781 and 0.801, respectively. Methods in constructing ROC curve in relation to k-means clustering have not been previously reported in the literature.

  12. New method for predicting estrogen receptor status utilizing breast MRI texture kinetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Baishali; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of breast cancer typically shows that tumors are heterogeneous with spatial variations in blood flow and cell density. Here, we examine the potential link between clinical tumor imaging and the underlying evolutionary dynamics behind heterogeneity in the cellular expression of estrogen receptors (ER) in breast cancer. We assume, in an evolutionary environment, that ER expression will only occur in the presence of significant concentrations of estrogen, which is delivered via the blood stream. Thus, we hypothesize, the expression of ER in breast cancer cells will correlate with blood flow on gadolinium enhanced breast MRI. To test this hypothesis, we performed quantitative analysis of blood flow on dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and correlated it with the ER status of the tumor. Here we present our analytic methods, which utilize a novel algorithm to analyze 20 volumetric DCE-MRI breast cancer tumors. The algorithm generates post initial enhancement (PIE) maps from DCE-MRI and then performs texture features extraction from the PIE map, feature selection, and finally classification of tumors into ER positive and ER negative status. The combined gray level co-occurrence matrices, gray level run length matrices and local binary pattern histogram features allow quantification of breast tumor heterogeneity. The algorithm predicted ER expression with an accuracy of 85% using a Naive Bayes classifier in leave-one-out cross-validation. Hence, we conclude that our data supports the hypothesis that imaging characteristics can, through application of evolutionary principles, provide insights into the cellular and molecular properties of cancer cells.

  13. Correct diagnosis of Warthin tumor in the parotid gland with dynamic MRI.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takenori; Suzuki, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Maya; Watanabe, Mika; Tateda, Yutaka; Oshima, Takeshi; Kato, Kengo; Sagai, Shun; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Shiga, Kiyoto

    2012-01-01

    Warthin tumor (WT) is a benign tumor of the salivary gland primarily affecting middle-aged men. WT is almost exclusively located in the parotid gland and tend to grow slowly without symptoms. Although fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) often correctly diagnoses these tumors, they are occasionally misdiagnosed as malignant. Our study sought to distinguish between WT and non-WT using dynamic MRI. In dynamic MRI, a series of images are taken over time measuring the intensity of gadolinium uptake by the parotid. We examined two patients for this study. The first was a 53-year old male, heavy smoker, experiencing manic-depressive episodes. He received a brain MRI at which time his parotid tumor was discovered. Parotid FNAC indicated a squamous cell carcinoma. The second patient was a 76-year old male, moderate smoker and drinker, who had been complaining about swelling in the neck. FNAC of the parotid indicated acinic cell carcinoma and gadolinium-enhanced MRI suggested the tumor was malignant. Prior to surgically extracting of these masses, we performed dynamic MRI on each patient. Both tumors exhibited a pattern consisting of rapid enhancement and rapid attenuation, the pattern of which is characteristic of WT. The surgical specimens confirmed that both were WTs without malignant transformation. Our findings indicate that dynamic MRI is a useful tool for preoperative diagnosis of WT, where other examinations indicate malignancy. Early and correct diagnosis of WT can minimize the use of invasive procedures, and eliminate the stress placed on the patient from a diagnosis of cancer.

  14. A geometric flow for segmenting vasculature in proton-density weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Collins, D Louis; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2008-08-01

    Modern neurosurgery takes advantage of magnetic resonance images (MRI) of a patient's cerebral anatomy and vasculature for planning before surgery and guidance during the procedure. Dual echo acquisitions are often performed that yield proton-density (PD) and T2-weighted images to evaluate edema near a tumor or lesion. In this paper we develop a novel geometric flow for segmenting vasculature in PD images, which can also be applied to the easier cases of MR angiography data or Gadolinium enhanced MRI. Obtaining vasculature from PD data is of clinical interest since the acquisition of such images is widespread, the scanning process is non-invasive, and the availability of vessel segmentation methods could obviate the need for an additional angiographic or contrast-based sequence during preoperative imaging. The key idea is to first apply Frangi's vesselness measure [Frangi, A., Niessen, W., Vincken, K.L., Viergever, M.A., 1998. Multiscale vessel enhancement filtering. In: International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, vol. 1496 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pp. 130-137] to find putative centerlines of tubular structures along with their estimated radii. This measure is then distributed to create a vector field which allows the flux maximizing flow algorithm of Vasilevskiy and Siddiqi [Vasilevskiy, A., Siddiqi, K., 2002. Flux maximizing geometric flows. IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence 24 (12), 1565-1578] to be applied to recover vessel boundaries. We carry out a qualitative validation of the approach on PD, MR angiography and Gadolinium enhanced MRI volumes and suggest a new way to visualize the segmentations in 2D with masked projections. We validate the approach quantitatively on a single-subject data set consisting of PD, phase contrast (PC) angiography and time of flight (TOF) angiography volumes, with an expert segmented version of the TOF volume viewed as the ground truth. We then

  15. Gauging MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, Ison; Goodman, Jeremy

    2009-11-01

    Axisymmetric stability of viscous resistive magnetized Couette flow is re-examined, with emphasis on flows that would be hydrodynamically stable according to Rayleigh's criterion: opposing gradients of angular velocity and specific angular momentum. A uniform axial magnetic field permeates the fluid. In this regime, magnetorotational instability (MRI) may occur. It is proved that MRI is suppressed, in fact no instability at all occurs, with insulating boundary conditions, when the magnetic resistivity is sufficiently large. This shows conclusively that small magnetic dissipation is a feature of this instability for all magnetic Prandtl numbers. A criterion is provided for the onset of MRI.

  16. Musculoskeletal MRI.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jaime E; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    MRI has the unique ability to detect abnormal fluid content, and is therefore unparalleled in its role of detection, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning and follow-up evaluation of musculoskeletal disease. MRI in companion animals should be considered in the following circumstances: a definitive diagnosis cannot be made on radiographs; a patient is nonresponsive to medical or surgical therapy; prognostic information is desired; assessing surgical margins and traumatic and/or infectious joint and bone disease; ruling out subtle developmental or early aggressive bone lesions. The MRI features of common disorders affecting the shoulder, elbow, stifle, carpal, and tarsal joints are included in this chapter.

  17. Task-based optimization of flip angle for fibrosis detection in T1-weighted MRI of liver.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jonathan F; Furenlid, Lars R; Altbach, Maria I; Galons, Jean-Philippe; Bhattacharyya, Achyut; Sharma, Puneet; Bhattacharyya, Tulshi; Bilgin, Ali; Martin, Diego R

    2016-07-01

    Chronic liver disease is a worldwide health problem, and hepatic fibrosis (HF) is one of the hallmarks of the disease. The current reference standard for diagnosing HF is biopsy followed by pathologist examination; however, this is limited by sampling error and carries a risk of complications. Pathology diagnosis of HF is based on textural change in the liver as a lobular collagen network that develops within portal triads. The scale of collagen lobules is characteristically in the order of 1 to 5 mm, which approximates the resolution limit of in vivo gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the delayed phase. We use MRI of formalin-fixed human ex vivo liver samples as phantoms that mimic the textural contrast of in vivo Gd-MRI. We have developed a local texture analysis that is applied to phantom images, and the results are used to train model observers to detect HF. The performance of the observer is assessed with the area-under-the-receiver-operator-characteristic curve (AUROC) as the figure-of-merit. To optimize the MRI pulse sequence, phantoms were scanned with multiple times at a range of flip angles. The flip angle that was associated with the highest AUROC was chosen as optimal for the task of detecting HF. PMID:27446971

  18. Improved myocardial strain measured by strain-encoded magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shintaro; Kimura, Fumiko; Osman, Nael; Sugi, Keiki; Tanno, Jun; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Shiono, Ayako; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    2013-11-01

    A woman aged 64 years with cardiac sarcoidosis responded favourably to corticosteroid therapy in terms of recovered longitudinal myocardial strain, as evaluated by strain-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (SENC-MRI). In contrast, circumferential myocardial strain and late gadolinium enhancement demonstrated minimal improvement, suggesting relatively advanced pathology of the myocardial middle layer. We propose SENC-MRI as a marker of disease at an early stage of cardiac sarcoidosis.

  19. Effects of delayed-release dimethyl fumarate on MRI measures in the phase 3 CONFIRM study

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Robert J.; Phillips, J. Theodore; Hutchinson, Michael; Havrdova, Eva; Kita, Mariko; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A.M.; Tozer, Daniel J.; MacManus, David G.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Goodsell, Mary; Yang, Minhua; Zhang, Ray; Viglietta, Vissia; Dawson, Katherine T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of oral delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF; also known as gastro-resistant DMF) on MRI lesion activity and load, atrophy, and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) measures from the Comparator and an Oral Fumarate in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (CONFIRM) study. Methods: CONFIRM was a 2-year, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of DMF 240 mg twice (BID) or 3 times daily (TID) in 1,417 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS); subcutaneous glatiramer acetate 20 mg once daily was included as an active reference comparator. The number and volume of T2-hyperintense, T1-hypointense, and gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) lesions, as well as whole brain volume and MTR, were assessed in 681 patients (MRI cohort). Results: DMF BID and TID produced significant and consistent reductions vs placebo in the number of new or enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions and new nonenhancing T1-hypointense lesions after 1 and 2 years of treatment and in the number of Gd+ lesions at week 24, year 1, and year 2. Lesion volumes were also significantly reduced. Reductions in brain atrophy and MTR changes with DMF relative to placebo did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: The robust effects on MRI active lesion counts and total lesion volume in patients with RRMS demonstrate the ability of DMF to exert beneficial effects on inflammatory lesion activity in multiple sclerosis, and support DMF therapy as a valuable new treatment option in RRMS. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence of reduction in brain lesion number and volume, as assessed by MRI, over 2 years of delayed-release DMF treatment. PMID:25681448

  20. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  1. Battlefield MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  2. A solitary fibrous tumor arising in the parapharyngeal space, with MRI and FDG-PET findings.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Naohiro; Kondo, Satoru; Murono, Shigeyuki; Minato, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu

    2009-06-01

    We present the imaging and pathological features of a 38-year-old man in whom a large parapharyngeal solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) on the left side was found. On MRI, the tumor showed a nodule-in-nodule appearance. The inner nodule revealed high signal intensities both on T1- and T2-weighted MR images. The entire tumor showed heterogeneous enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) identified heterogeneous radiotracer uptake of FDG in the inner nodule of the tumor. Histologic examinations revealed an admixture of growth patterns, including a "patternless pattern" and "haemangiopericytoma-like pattern". The tumor was positive for CD34. Imaging features of SFT arising in the parapharyngeal space are discussed with a review of literatures. This is the first report of FDG-PET finding of SFT arising in the head and neck. More cases are needed to achieve diagnostic significance from FDG-PET findings of parapharyngeal SFTs.

  3. Sea urchin puncture resulting in PIP joint synovial arthritis: case report and MRI study.

    PubMed

    Liram, N; Gomori, M; Perouansky, M

    2000-01-01

    Of the 600 species of sea urchins, approximately 80 may be venomous to humans. The long spined or black sea urchin, Diadema setosum may cause damage by the breaking off of its brittle spines after they penetrate the skin. Synovitis followed by arthritis may be an unusual but apparently not a rare sequel to such injury, when implantation occurs near a joint. In this case report, osseous changes were not seen by plain x-rays. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to expose the more salient features of both soft tissue and bone changes of black sea urchin puncture injury 30 months after penetration. In all likelihood, this type of injury may be more common than the existing literature at present suggests. It is believed to be the first reported case in this part of the world as well as the first MRI study describing this type of joint pathology. Local and systemic reactions to puncture injuries from sea urchin spines have been described previously. These may range from mild, local irritation lasting a few days to granuloma formation, infection and on occasions systemic illness. The sea urchin spines are composed of calcium carbonate with proteinaceous covering. The covering tends to cause immune reactions of variable presentation. There are only a handful of reported cases with sea urchin stings on record, none of them from the Red Sea. However, this condition is probably more common than is thought and can present difficulty in diagnosis. In this case report, the inflammation responded well to heat treatment, mobilization and manipulation of the joint in its post acute and chronic stages. As some subtle changes in soft tissues and the changes in bone were not seen either on plain x-rays or ultrasound scan, gadolinium-enhanced MRI was used to unveil the marked changes in the joint.

  4. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    MRI - pelvis; MRI - hips; Pelvic MRI with prostate probe; Magnetic resonance imaging - pelvis ... care provider if you are afraid of close spaces (have claustrophobia). You may be given a medicine ...

  5. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... the same breast or the other breast after breast cancer has been diagnosed Distinguish between scar tissue and ...

  6. MRI to delineate the gross tumor volume of nasopharyngeal cancers: which sequences and planes should be used?

    PubMed Central

    Popovtzer, Aron; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Tatro, Daniel; Feng, Felix Y.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been found to be better than computed tomography for defining the extent of primary gross tumor volume (GTV) in advanced nasopharyngeal cancer. It is routinely applied for target delineation in planning radiotherapy. However, the specific MRI sequences/planes that should be used are unknown. Methods Twelve patients with nasopharyngeal cancer underwent primary GTV evaluation with gadolinium-enhanced axial T1 weighted image (T1) and T2 weighted image (T2), coronal T1, and sagittal T1 sequences. Each sequence was registered with the planning computed tomography scans. Planning target volumes (PTVs) were derived by uniform expansions of the GTVs. The volumes encompassed by the various sequences/planes, and the volumes common to all sequences/planes, were compared quantitatively and anatomically to the volume delineated by the commonly used axial T1-based dataset. Results Addition of the axial T2 sequence increased the axial T1-based GTV by 12% on average (p = 0.004), and composite evaluations that included the coronal T1 and sagittal T1 planes increased the axial T1-based GTVs by 30% on average (p = 0.003). The axial T1-based PTVs were increased by 20% by the additional sequences (p = 0.04). Each sequence/plane added unique volume extensions. The GTVs common to all the T1 planes accounted for 38% of the total volumes of all the T1 planes. Anatomically, addition of the coronal and sagittal-based GTVs extended the axial T1-based GTV caudally and cranially, notably to the base of the skull. Conclusions Adding MRI planes and sequences to the traditional axial T1 sequence yields significant quantitative and anatomically important extensions of the GTVs and PTVs. For accurate target delineation in nasopharyngeal cancer, we recommend that GTVs be outlined in all MRI sequences/planes and registered with the planning computed tomography scans. PMID:25177248

  7. Classification of cirrhotic liver in Gadolinium-enhanced MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gobert; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Zhang, Xuejun; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Zhou, Xiangrong; Hara, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroki; Kondo, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2007-03-01

    Cirrhosis of the liver is characterized by the presence of widespread nodules and fibrosis in the liver. The fibrosis and nodules formation causes distortion of the normal liver architecture, resulting in characteristic texture patterns. Texture patterns are commonly analyzed with the use of co-occurrence matrix based features measured on regions-of-interest (ROIs). A classifier is subsequently used for the classification of cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic livers. Problem arises if the classifier employed falls into the category of supervised classifier which is a popular choice. This is because the 'true disease states' of the ROIs are required for the training of the classifier but is, generally, not available. A common approach is to adopt the 'true disease state' of the liver as the 'true disease state' of all ROIs in that liver. This paper investigates the use of a nonsupervised classifier, the k-means clustering method in classifying livers as cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic using unlabelled ROI data. A preliminary result with a sensitivity and specificity of 72% and 60%, respectively, demonstrates the feasibility of using the k-means non-supervised clustering method in generating a characteristic cluster structure that could facilitate the classification of cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic livers.

  8. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  9. Late paternities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jean

    2007-06-01

    Late paternities are frequent. Very often these couples ask for medically assisted procreation. In general, it is considered that the couple should not be treated differently from the couple where the father is younger. Recent studies show a certain number of specific risks linked to the late paternities. Doctors and society do not act in the same way towards men and women: a 'sensible age' for women to no longer attempt pregnancy has been set in many countries at 42 years of age, whereas men aged 80 can benefit from IVF attempts and be reimbursed by the state or insurance companies. This is an obvious inequity. PMID:17579995

  10. Usefulness of MRI in takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kohan, Andres Alejandro; Levy Yeyati, Ezequiel; De Stefano, Luciano; Dragonetti, Laura; Pietrani, Marcelo; Perez de Arenaza, Diego; Belziti, Cesar; García-Mónaco, Ricardo Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a disease that can be misinterpreted as a more serious acute coronary syndrome. Its clinical characteristics resemble those of a myocardial infarct, while its imaging characteristics are critical on correctly characterizing and diagnosing the disease. From angiography, where coronary anatomy is evaluated, to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), where morphology and tissue characterization is assessed, the array of imaging options is quite extent. In particular, CMR has achieved great improvements (stronger magnetic fields, better coils, etc.) in the last decade which in turn has made this imaging technology more attractive in the evaluation and diagnosis of TC. With its superior soft tissue resolution and dynamic imaging capabilities, CMR is currently, perhaps, the most useful imaging technique in TC as apical ballooning or medio-basal wall motion abnormalities (WMA), presence of wall edema and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) characteristics are critical in the diagnosis and characterization of this pathology. In this review, CMRs role in TC will be evaluated in light of the current available evidence in medical literature, while also revising the clinical and physiopathologic characteristics of TC. PMID:24834411

  11. MRI-Guided Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions1

    PubMed Central

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Yodh, A G; Schnall, Mitchell D; Chance, Britton

    2002-01-01

    Abstract We present the clinical implementation of a novel hybrid system that combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared (NIR) optical measurements for the noninvasive study of breast cancer in vivo. Fourteen patients were studied with a MR-NIR prototype imager and spectrometer. A diffuse optical tomographic scheme employed the MR images as a priori information to implement an image-guided NIR localized spectroscopic scheme. All patients who entered the study also underwent gadolinium-enhanced MRI and biopsy so that the optical findings were cross-validated with MR readings and histopathology. The technique quantified the oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin of five malignant and nine benign breast lesions in vivo. Breast cancers were found with decreased oxygen saturation and higher blood concentration than most benign lesions. The average hemoglobin concentration ([H]) of cancers was 0.130±0.100 mM, and the average hemoglobin saturation (Y) was 60±9% compared to [H]=0.018±0.005 mM and Y=69±6% of background tissue. Fibroadenomas exhibited high hemoglobin concentration [H]=0.060±0.010 mM and mild decrease in oxygen saturation Y=67±2%. Cysts and other normal lesions were easily differentiated based on intrinsic contrast information. This novel optical technology can be a significant add-on in MR examinations and can be used to characterize functional parameters of cancers with diagnostic and treatment prognosis potential. It is foreseen that the technique can play a major role in functional activation studies of brain and muscle as well. PMID:12082551

  12. Getting an MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) A A A en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed ...

  13. MRI brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are expected to be allowed to request MRI scans for adults for selected clinically appropriate indications from November 2013 as part of the expansion of Medicare-funded MRI services announced by the Federal Government in 2011. This article aims to give a brief overview of MRI brain imaging relevant to GPs, which will facilitate explanation of scan findings and management planning with their patients. Basic imaging techniques, common findings and terminology are presented using some illustrative case examples.

  14. CEST MRI reporter genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanshu; Bulte, Jeff W M; Gilad, Assaf A

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several reporter genes have been developed that can serve as a beacon for non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we provide a brief summary of recent advances in MRI reporter gene technology, as well as detailed "hands-on" protocols for cloning, expression, and imaging of reporter genes based on chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST).

  15. Reliability of Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Necessity of Repeating MRI in Noncooled and Cooled Infants With Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Miller, Steven P; Zwicker, Jill G; Xu, Qi; Wong, Darren S T; Roland, Elke H; Hill, Alan; Chau, Vann

    2016-04-01

    In cooled newborns with encephalopathy, although late magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan (10-14 days of age) is reliable in predicting long-term outcome, it is unknown whether early scan (3-6 days of life) is. We compared the predominant pattern and extent of lesion between early and late MRI in 89 term neonates with neonatal encephalopathy. Forty-three neonates (48%) were cooled. The predominant pattern of lesions and the extent of lesion in the watershed region agreed near perfectly in noncooled (kappa = 0.94; k = 0.88) and cooled (k = 0.89; k = 0.87) infants respectively. There was perfect agreement in the extent of lesion in the basal nuclei in noncooled infants (k = 0.83) and excellent agreement in cooled infants (k = 0.67). Changes in extent of lesions on late MRI occurred in 19 of 89 infants, with higher risk in infants with hypoglycemia and moderate-severe lesions in basal nuclei. In most term neonates with neonatal encephalopathy, early MRI (relative to late scan) robustly predicts the predominant pattern and extent of injury.

  16. Associations between the properties of the cartilage matrix and findings from quantitative MRI in human osteoarthritic cartilage of the knee.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Du, Xiaotao; Liu, Jun; Mao, Fengyong; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Shuai; Xu, Yan; Zang, Fengchao; Wang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the properties of the cartilage matrix and the results of T2 mapping and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (dGEMRIC) in human knee osteoarthritic cartilage. Osteochondral samples were harvested from the middle part of the femoral condyle and tibial plateaus of 20 patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) during total knee arthroplasty. Sagittal T2 mapping, T1pre, and T1Gd were performed using 7.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) distribution was evaluated by OARSI, collagen anisotropy was assessed by polarized light microscopy (PLM), and biochemical analyses measured water, GAG, and collagen content. Associations between properties of the cartilage matrix and T2 and ΔR1 (1/T1Gd-1/T1pre) values were explored using correlation analysis. T2 and ΔR1 values were significantly correlated with the degree of cartilage degeneration (OARSI grade; Ρ = 0.53 and 0.77). T2 values were significantly correlated with water content (r = 0.69; P < 0.001), GAG content (r = -0.43; P < 0.001), and PLM grade (r = 0.47; P < 0.001), but not with collagen content (r = -0.02; P = 0.110). ΔR1 values were significantly correlated with GAG content (r = -0.84; P < 0.001) and PLM grade (r = 0.41; P < 0.001). Taken together, T2 mapping and dGEMRIC results were correlated with the properties of the cartilage matrix in human knee osteoarthritic cartilage. Combination T2 mapping and dGEMRIC represents a potential non-invasive monitoring technique to detect the progress of knee OA. PMID:26097577

  17. Predominant Corticospinal Tract Involvement in a Late Infant with Krabbe Disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ayumi; Kibe, Tetsuya; Irahara, Kaori; Sakai, Norio; Yokochi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    A case of late-infantile Krabbe disease in a patient who presented with developmental regression and spastic quadriplegia in late infancy is reported. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 11 months of age showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement, which usually appears in adult Krabbe disease. Galactocerebrosidase activity in lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts was very low. Genetic testing revealed compound heterozygous mutations of the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) gene, c.635_646 delinsCTC and c.1901T>C [p.L618S], both of which are known pathogenic mutations. It has been reported that the c.1901T>C [p.L618S] mutation is associated with the late-onset phenotype and, in a past case, a homozygous mutation at this location showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI. Although further analysis is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanism, this combination of mutations is likely to be associated with this unusual MRI finding in late-infantile Krabbe disease. Because these types of mutations are common for Japanese patients, it is possible that there are more undiagnosed and late-diagnosed patients of late-infantile Krabbe disease who display limited lesions on MRI. Pediatricians should be aware that patients with late-infantile Krabbe disease can present with predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI. PMID:27679535

  18. Predominant Corticospinal Tract Involvement in a Late Infant with Krabbe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Ayumi; Kibe, Tetsuya; Irahara, Kaori; Sakai, Norio; Yokochi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    A case of late-infantile Krabbe disease in a patient who presented with developmental regression and spastic quadriplegia in late infancy is reported. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 11 months of age showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement, which usually appears in adult Krabbe disease. Galactocerebrosidase activity in lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts was very low. Genetic testing revealed compound heterozygous mutations of the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) gene, c.635_646 delinsCTC and c.1901T>C [p.L618S], both of which are known pathogenic mutations. It has been reported that the c.1901T>C [p.L618S] mutation is associated with the late-onset phenotype and, in a past case, a homozygous mutation at this location showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI. Although further analysis is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanism, this combination of mutations is likely to be associated with this unusual MRI finding in late-infantile Krabbe disease. Because these types of mutations are common for Japanese patients, it is possible that there are more undiagnosed and late-diagnosed patients of late-infantile Krabbe disease who display limited lesions on MRI. Pediatricians should be aware that patients with late-infantile Krabbe disease can present with predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI. PMID:27679535

  19. Predominant Corticospinal Tract Involvement in a Late Infant with Krabbe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Ayumi; Kibe, Tetsuya; Irahara, Kaori; Sakai, Norio; Yokochi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    A case of late-infantile Krabbe disease in a patient who presented with developmental regression and spastic quadriplegia in late infancy is reported. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 11 months of age showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement, which usually appears in adult Krabbe disease. Galactocerebrosidase activity in lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts was very low. Genetic testing revealed compound heterozygous mutations of the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) gene, c.635_646 delinsCTC and c.1901T>C [p.L618S], both of which are known pathogenic mutations. It has been reported that the c.1901T>C [p.L618S] mutation is associated with the late-onset phenotype and, in a past case, a homozygous mutation at this location showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI. Although further analysis is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanism, this combination of mutations is likely to be associated with this unusual MRI finding in late-infantile Krabbe disease. Because these types of mutations are common for Japanese patients, it is possible that there are more undiagnosed and late-diagnosed patients of late-infantile Krabbe disease who display limited lesions on MRI. Pediatricians should be aware that patients with late-infantile Krabbe disease can present with predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI.

  20. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  1. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  3. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. It may be used to screen ... following diagnosis, or further evaluate abnormalities seen on mammography. Breast MRI does not use ionizing radiation, and ...

  4. Abdominal MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... used to look at: Blood flow in the abdomen Blood vessels in the abdomen The cause of ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  6. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  7. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... have been no reported side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves. The most common type of ... health care provider before the test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers ...

  8. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... have been no reported side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves. The most common type of ... tell your provider before the test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers ...

  9. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... have been no reported side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves. The most common type of ... tell your provider before the test The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers ...

  10. Molecular fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bartelle, Benjamin B.; Barandov, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of brain function depends on understanding the dynamics of diverse neural signaling processes over large tissue volumes in intact animals and humans. Most existing approaches to measuring brain signaling suffer from limited tissue penetration, poor resolution, or lack of specificity for well-defined neural events. Here we discuss a new brain activity mapping method that overcomes some of these problems by combining MRI with contrast agents sensitive to neural signaling. The goal of this “molecular fMRI” approach is to permit noninvasive whole-brain neuroimaging with specificity and resolution approaching current optical neuroimaging methods. In this article, we describe the context and need for molecular fMRI as well as the state of the technology today. We explain how major types of MRI probes work and how they can be sensitized to neurobiological processes, such as neurotransmitter release, calcium signaling, and gene expression changes. We comment both on past work in the field and on challenges and promising avenues for future development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain researchers currently have a choice between measuring neural activity using cellular-level recording techniques, such as electrophysiology and optical imaging, or whole-brain imaging methods, such as fMRI. Cellular level methods are precise but only address a small portion of mammalian brains; on the other hand, whole-brain neuroimaging techniques provide very little specificity for neural pathways or signaling components of interest. The molecular fMRI techniques we discuss have particular potential to combine the specificity of cellular-level measurements with the noninvasive whole-brain coverage of fMRI. On the other hand, molecular fMRI is only just getting off the ground. This article aims to offer a snapshot of the status and future prospects for development of molecular fMRI techniques. PMID:27076413

  11. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  12. Usefulness of cardiac MRI in the prognosis and follow-up of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Pons-Lladó, G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool that makes it possible to evaluate patients with cardiovascular disease; in addition to infarction and alterations in myocardial perfusion, cardiac MRI is useful for evaluating other phenomena such as microvascular obstruction and ischemia. The main prognostic factors in cardiac MRI are ventricular dysfunction, necrosis in late enhancement sequences, and ischemia in stress sequences. In acute myocardial infarction, cardiac MRI can evaluate the peri-infarct zone and quantify the size of the infarct. Furthermore, cardiac MRI's ability to detect and evaluate microvascular obstruction makes it a fundamental tool for establishing the prognosis of ischemic heart disease. In patients with chronic ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI can detect ischemia induced by pharmacological stress and can diagnose infarcts that can be missed on other techniques. PMID:25648795

  13. Usefulness of cardiac MRI in the prognosis and follow-up of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Pons-Lladó, G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool that makes it possible to evaluate patients with cardiovascular disease; in addition to infarction and alterations in myocardial perfusion, cardiac MRI is useful for evaluating other phenomena such as microvascular obstruction and ischemia. The main prognostic factors in cardiac MRI are ventricular dysfunction, necrosis in late enhancement sequences, and ischemia in stress sequences. In acute myocardial infarction, cardiac MRI can evaluate the peri-infarct zone and quantify the size of the infarct. Furthermore, cardiac MRI's ability to detect and evaluate microvascular obstruction makes it a fundamental tool for establishing the prognosis of ischemic heart disease. In patients with chronic ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI can detect ischemia induced by pharmacological stress and can diagnose infarcts that can be missed on other techniques.

  14. Polarized noble gas MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P. III; Lange, Eduard E. de; Knight-Scott, Jack; Maier, Therese; Bogorad, Paul; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Cates, Gordon; Happer, William; Daniel, Thomas M.; Truwit, Jonathon D.

    1998-01-20

    The development of convenient methods to polarize liter quantities of the noble gases helium-3 and xenon-129 has provided the opportunity for a new MRI method to visualize the internal air spaces of the human lung. These spaces are usually poorly seen with hydrogen-based MRI, because of the limited water content of the lung and the low thermal polarization of the water protons achieved in conventional magnets. In addition, xenon, which has a relatively high solubility and a sufficiently persistent polarization level in blood and biological tissue, offers the prospect of providing perfusion images of the lung, brain and other organs.

  15. MRI of the brain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the brain creates a detailed image of the complex structures in the brain. An MRI can give a three-dimensional depiction of the brain, making location of problems such ...

  16. MRI in decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, J; Tempka, A; Stroszczynski, C; Amodio, F; Hosten, N; Haas, J; Felix, R

    2000-05-01

    We report a case of decompression illness in which the patient developed paraparesis during scuba diving after rapid ascent. MRI of the spine revealed a focal intramedullary lesion consistent with the symptoms. The pathophysiological and radiological aspects of spinal decompression illness are discussed.

  17. Neuroimaging findings in late-onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Changtae; Lim, Hyun Kook; Lee, Chang Uk

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in late-onset mental disorders. Among them, geriatric schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are significant health care risks and major causes of disability. We discussed whether late-onset schizophrenia (LOS) and late-onset bipolar (LOB) disorder can be a separate entity from early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) and early-onset bipolar (EOB) disorder in a subset of late-life schizophrenia or late-life bipolar disorder through neuroimaging studies. A literature search for imaging studies of LOS or LOB was performed in the PubMed database. Search terms used were "(imaging OR MRI OR CT OR SPECT OR DTI OR PET OR fMRI) AND (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) AND late onset." Articles that were published in English before October 2013 were included. There were a few neuroimaging studies assessing whether LOS and LOB had different disease-specific neural substrates compared with EOS and EOB. These researches mainly observed volumetric differences in specific brain regions, white matter hyperintensities, diffusion tensor imaging, or functional neuroimaging to explore the differences between LOS and LOB and EOS and EOB. The aim of this review was to highlight the neural substrates involved in LOS and LOB through neuroimaging studies. The exploration of neuroanatomical markers may be the key to the understanding of underlying neurobiology in LOS and LOB. PMID:24401535

  18. Effects of high-impact training on bone and articular cartilage: 12-month randomized controlled quantitative MRI study.

    PubMed

    Multanen, Juhani; Nieminen, Miika T; Häkkinen, Arja; Kujala, Urho M; Jämsä, Timo; Kautiainen, Hannu; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Ahola, Riikka; Selänne, Harri; Ojala, Risto; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Heinonen, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis and osteoporosis often coexist in postmenopausal women. The simultaneous effect of bone-favorable high-impact training on these diseases is not well understood and is a topic of controversy. We evaluated the effects of high-impact exercise on bone mineral content (BMC) and the estimated biochemical composition of knee cartilage in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. Eighty women aged 50 to 66 years with mild knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to undergo supervised progressive exercise three times a week for 12 months (n = 40) or to a nonintervention control group (n = 40). BMC of the femoral neck, trochanter, and lumbar spine was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The biochemical composition of cartilage was estimated using delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cartilage (dGEMRIC), sensitive to cartilage glycosaminoglycan content, and transverse relaxation time (T2) mapping that is sensitive to the properties of the collagen network. In addition, we evaluated clinically important symptoms and physical performance-related risk factors of falling: cardiorespiratory fitness, dynamic balance, maximal isometric knee extension and flexion forces, and leg power. Thirty-six trainees and 40 controls completed the study. The mean gain in femoral neck BMC in the exercise group was 0.6% (95% CI, -0.2% to 1.4%) and the mean loss in the control group was -1.2% (95% CI, -2.1% to -0.4%). The change in baseline, body mass, and adjusted body mass change in BMC between the groups was significant (p = 0.005), whereas no changes occurred in the biochemical composition of the cartilage, as investigated by MRI. Balance, muscle force, and cardiorespiratory fitness improved significantly more (3% to 11%) in the exercise group than in the control group. Progressively implemented high-impact training, which increased bone mass, did not affect the biochemical composition of cartilage and may be feasible

  19. Spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as detected by cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nessim; Williams, Ronald B; Yarmozik, June A; Biederman, Robert W W

    2014-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetically determined heart muscle disease; characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Spiral HCM is described as having a counterclockwise rotation pattern of hypertrophy along with variable degrees of fibrosis. A 34-year-old female presented with symptoms suggestive of heart failure. Echocardiography showed concentric LVH with normal contractility. Cardiac MRI showed asymmetric septal hypertrophy with mid-cavity obliteration and a spiral pattern of variably increasing wall thickness. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) demonstrated several areas of abnormal postgadolinium uptake. We report a case of spiral HCM. We should consider cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as the reference standard for diagnosing HCM. PMID:24749165

  20. Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy Meeting the Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Revised Criteria? Don't Forget Sarcoidosis!

    PubMed Central

    Vasaturo, Sabina; Ploeg, David E.; Buitrago, Guadalupe; Zeppenfeld, Katja; Veselic-Charvat, Maud

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman was referred for ventricular fibrillation with resuscitation. A CT-angiography showed signs of a right ventricular enlargement without obvious cause. A cardiac MRI demonstrated a dilated and hypokinetic right ventricle with extensive late gadolinium enhancement. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) was suspected according to the "revised ARVD task force criteria". An endomyocardial biopsy was inconclusive. The patient developed purulent pericarditis after epicardial ablation therapy and died of toxic shock syndrome. The post-mortem pathologic examination demonstrated sarcoidosis involving the heart, lungs, and thyroid gland. PMID:25995699

  1. Eosinophilic granuloma: MRI manifestations.

    PubMed

    Beltran, J; Aparisi, F; Bonmati, L M; Rosenberg, Z S; Present, D; Steiner, G C

    1993-01-01

    The appearance on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 16 cases of pathologically proven eosinophilic granuloma were reviewed retrospectively and correlated with the radiographic appearance of the lesion. The most common MR appearance (ten cases) was a focal lesion, surrounded by an extensive, ill-defined bone marrow and soft tissue reaction with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, considered to represent bone marrow and soft tissue edema (the flare phenomenon). The MRI manifestations of eosinophilic granuloma, especially during the early stages, are nonspecific, and may stimulate an aggressive lesion such as osteomyelitis or Ewings sarcoma, or other benign bone tumors such as osteoid osteoma or chondroblastoma. PMID:8480200

  2. MRI of the penis.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, A

    2012-11-01

    MRI of the penis is an expensive test that is not always superior to clinical examination or ultrasound. However, it shows many of the important structures, and in particular the combination of tumescence from intracavernosal alprostadil, and high-resolution T(2) sequences show the glans, corpora and the tunica albuginea well. In this paper we summarise the radiological anatomy and discuss the indications for MRI. For penile cancer, it may be useful in cases where the local stage is not apparent clinically. In priapism, it is an emerging technique for assessing corporal viability, and in fracture it can in most cases make the diagnosis and locate the injury. In some cases of penile fibrosis and Peyronie's disease, it may aid surgical planning, and in complex pelvic fracture may replace or augment conventional urethrography. It is an excellent investigation for the malfunctioning penile prosthesis.

  3. Superconducting magnets for MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    Three types of magnets are currently used to provide the background field required for magnet resonance imaging (MRI). (i) Permanent magnets produce fields of up to 0.3 T in volumes sufficient for imaging the head or up to 0.15 T for whole body imaging. Cost and simplicity of operation are advantages, but relatively low field, weight (up to 100 tonnes) and, to a small extent, instability are limitations. (ii) Water-cooled magnets provide fields of up to 0.25 T in volumes suitable for whole body imaging, but at the expense of power (up to 150 kW for 0.25 T) and water-cooling. Thermal stability of the field requires the maintenance of constant temperature through periods both of use and of quiescence. (iii) Because of the limitations imposed by permanent and resistive magnets, particularly on field strength, the superconducting magnet is now most widely used to provide background fields of up to 2 T for whole body MRI. It requires very low operating power and that only for refrigeration. Because of the constant low temperature, 4.2 K, at which its stressed structure operates, its field is stable. The following review deals principally with superconducting magnets for MRI. However, the sections on field analysis apply to all types of magnet and the description of the source terms of circular coils and of the principals of design of solenoids apply equally to resistive solenoidal magnets.

  4. Predicting and Monitoring Cancer Treatment Response with DW-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Thoeny, Harriet C.; Ross, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    An imaging biomarker that would provide for an early quantitative metric of clinical treatment response in cancer patients would provide for a paradigm shift in cancer care. Currently, non-image based clinical outcome metrics include morphology, clinical and laboratory parameters however, these are obtained relatively late following treatment. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) holds promise for use as a cancer treatment response biomarker as it is sensitive to macromolecular and microstructural changes which can occur at the cellular level earlier than anatomical changes during therapy. Studies have shown that successful treatment of a many tumor types can be detected using DW-MRI as an early increase in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Additionally, low pre-treatment ADC values of various tumors are often predictive of better outcome. These capabilities, once validated, could provide for an important opportunity to individualize therapy thereby minimizing unnecessary systemic toxicity associated with ineffective therapies with the additional advantage of improving overall patient health care and associated costs. In this report, we provide a brief technical overview of DW-MRI acquisition protocols, quantitative image analysis approaches and review studies which have implemented DW-MRI for the purpose of early prediction of cancer treatment response. PMID:20575076

  5. Chronic neuroborreliosis by B. garinii: an unusual case presenting with epilepsy and multifocal brain MRI lesions.

    PubMed

    Matera, Giovanni; Labate, Angelo; Quirino, Angela; Lamberti, Angelo G; BorzÃ, Giuseppe; Barreca, Giorgio S; Mumoli, Laura; Peronace, Cinzia; Giancotti, Aida; Gambardella, Antonio; FocÃ, Alfredo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2014-07-01

    Late/chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) represents a challenging entity whose diagnosis requires a combination of clinical and laboratory findings, surrounded by much controversy. Here we describe a patient who had a peculiar form of late LNB with CNS lesions shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and epileptic seizures, etiologically diagnosed by conventional and molecular methods. The current case provides evidence that patients presenting with epileptic seizures and MRI-detected multifocal lesions, particularly when a facial palsy has also occurred, should raise the suspicion of LNB, as this diagnosis has important implications for treatment and prognosis. PMID:25180856

  6. Intraoperative MRI and functional mapping.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Thomas; Szelenyi, Andrea; Senft, Christian; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Sure, Ulrich; Nimsky, Christopher; Seifert, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The integration of functional and anatomical data into neuronavigation is an established standard of care in many neurosurgical departments. Yet, this method has limitations as in most cases the data are acquired prior to surgery. Due to brain-shift the accurate presentation of functional as well as anatomical structures declines in the course of surgery. In consequence, the acquisition of information during surgery about the brain's current functional state is of specific interest. The advancement of imaging technologies (e.g. fMRI, MEG, Intraoperative Optical Intrinsic Signal Imaging--IOIS) and neurophysiological techniques and the advent of intraoperative MRI all had a major impact on neurosurgery. The combination of modalities such as neurophysiology and intraoperative MRI (ioMRI), as well as the acquisition of functional MRI during surgery (ifMRI) are in the focus of this work. Especially the technical aspects and safety issues are elucidated.

  7. Sodium MRI: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-01-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges and limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  8. Late magnetic resonance imaging and clinical findings in neonates with unilateral lesions on cranial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Bouza, H; Dubowitz, L M; Rutherford, M; Cowan, F; Pennock, J M

    1994-11-01

    Twenty-two neonates (11 term and 11 preterm) with predominantly unilateral hemispheric lesions on ultrasound were re-examined clinically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at between two and nine years of age. The aim was to correlate early ultrasound and late MRI findings with the development of hemiplegia. At follow-up, five children were normal and 15 had hemiplegia, which was mild in seven and moderate in 10. The presence or absence of hemiplegia, or its severity, could not be predicted from either early ultrasound or later MRI appearances. PMID:7958513

  9. Gradient echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Copenhaver, B R.; Shin, J; Warach, S; Butman, J A.; Saver, J L.; Kidwell, C S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have demonstrated that gradient echo (GRE) MRI sequences are as accurate as CT for the detection of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the context of acute stroke. However, many physicians who currently read acute stroke imaging studies may be unfamiliar with interpretation of GRE images. Methods: An NIH Web-based training program was developed including a pretest, tutorial, and posttest. Physicians involved in the care of acute stroke patients were encouraged to participate. The tutorial covered acute, chronic, and mimic hemorrhages as they appear on CT, diffusion-weighted imaging, and GRE sequences. Ability of users to identify ICH presence, type, and age on GRE was compared from the pretest to posttest timepoint. Results: A total of 104 users completed the tutorial. Specialties represented included general radiology (42%), general neurology (16%), neuroradiology (15%), stroke neurology (14%), emergency medicine (1%), and other (12%). Median overall score improved pretest to posttest from 66.7% to 83.3%, p < 0.001. Improvement by category was as follows: acute ICH, 66.7%–100%, p < 0.001; chronic ICH, 33.3%–66.7%, p < 0.001; ICH negatives/mimics, 100%–100%, p = 0.787. Sensitivity for identification of acute hemorrhage improved from 68.2% to 96.4%. Conclusions: Physicians involved in acute stroke care achieved significant improvement in gradient echo (GRE) hemorrhage interpretation after completing the NIH GRE MRI tutorial. This indicates that a Web-based tutorial may be a viable option for the widespread education of physicians to achieve an acceptable level of diagnostic accuracy at reading GRE MRI, thus enabling confident acute stroke treatment decisions. GLOSSARY AHA/ASA = American Heart Association/American Stroke Association; CME = continuing medical education; DWI = diffusion-weighted imaging; GRE = gradient echo; ICH = intracerebral hemorrhage; tPA = tissue plasminogen activator. PMID:19414724

  10. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  11. Nanoformulations for molecular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale contrast agents have shown the ability to increase the detection sensitivity of MRI by several orders of magnitude, endowing this traditionally macroscopic modality with the ability to observe unique molecular signatures. Herein, we describe three types of nanoparticulate contrast agents: iron oxide nanoparticles, gadolinium-based nanoparticles, and bio-essential manganese, cobalt, nickel, and copper ion-containing nanoformulations. Some of these agents have been approved for clinical use, but more are still under development for medical imaging. The advantages and disadvantages of each nanoformulation, in terms of intrinsic magnetism, ease of synthesis, and biodistribution, etc. are discussed. PMID:22488901

  12. Hyperoxia and Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Bulte, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen plays a fundamental role in functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging is the foundation stone of all FMRI and is still the essential workhorse of the vast majority of FMRI procedures. Hemoglobin may provide the magnetic properties that allow the technique to work, but it is oxygen that allows the contrast to effectively be switched on or off, and it is oxygen that we are interested in tracking in order to observe the oxygen metabolism changes. In general the changes in venous oxygen saturation are observed in order to infer changes in the correlated mechanisms, which can include changes in cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and the fraction of inspired oxygen. By independently manipulating the fraction of inspired oxygen it is possible to alter the amount of dissolved oxygen in the plasma, the venous saturation, or even the blood flow. The effects that these changes have on the observed MRI signal can be either a help or a hindrance depending on how well the changes induced are understood. The administration of supplemental inspired oxygen is in a unique position to provide a flexible, noninvasive, inexpensive, patient-friendly addition to the MRI toolkit to enable investigations to look beyond statistics and regions of interest, and actually produce calibrated, targeted measurements of blood flow, metabolism or pathology. PMID:27343097

  13. Late-term abortion.

    PubMed

    Epner, J E; Jonas, H S; Seckinger, D L

    1998-08-26

    Recent proposed federal legislation banning certain abortion procedures, particularly intact dilatation and extraction, would modify the US Criminal Code such that physicians performing these procedures would be liable for monetary and statutory damages. Clarification of medical procedures is important because some of the procedures used to induce abortion prior to viability are identical or similar to postviability procedures. This article reviews the scientific and medical information on late-term abortion and late-term abortion techniques and includes data on the prevalence of late-term abortion, abortion-related mortality and morbidity rates, and legal issues regarding fetal viability and the balance of maternal and fetal interests. According to enacted American Medical Association (AMA) policy, the use of appropriate medical terminology is critical in defining late-term abortion procedures, particularly intact dilatation and extraction, which is a variant of but distinct from dilatation and evacuation. The AMA recommends that the intact dilatation and extraction procedure not be used unless alternative procedures pose materially greater risk to the woman and that abortions not be performed in the third trimester except in cases of serious fetal anomalies incompatible with life. Major medical societies are urged to collaborate on clinical guidelines on late-term abortion techniques and circumstances that conform to standards of good medical practice. More research on the advantages and disadvantages of specific abortion procedures would help physicians make informed choices about specific abortion procedures. Expanded ongoing data surveillance systems estimating the prevalence of abortion are also needed. PMID:9728645

  14. Late-term abortion.

    PubMed

    Epner, J E; Jonas, H S; Seckinger, D L

    1998-08-26

    Recent proposed federal legislation banning certain abortion procedures, particularly intact dilatation and extraction, would modify the US Criminal Code such that physicians performing these procedures would be liable for monetary and statutory damages. Clarification of medical procedures is important because some of the procedures used to induce abortion prior to viability are identical or similar to postviability procedures. This article reviews the scientific and medical information on late-term abortion and late-term abortion techniques and includes data on the prevalence of late-term abortion, abortion-related mortality and morbidity rates, and legal issues regarding fetal viability and the balance of maternal and fetal interests. According to enacted American Medical Association (AMA) policy, the use of appropriate medical terminology is critical in defining late-term abortion procedures, particularly intact dilatation and extraction, which is a variant of but distinct from dilatation and evacuation. The AMA recommends that the intact dilatation and extraction procedure not be used unless alternative procedures pose materially greater risk to the woman and that abortions not be performed in the third trimester except in cases of serious fetal anomalies incompatible with life. Major medical societies are urged to collaborate on clinical guidelines on late-term abortion techniques and circumstances that conform to standards of good medical practice. More research on the advantages and disadvantages of specific abortion procedures would help physicians make informed choices about specific abortion procedures. Expanded ongoing data surveillance systems estimating the prevalence of abortion are also needed.

  15. Gallium-67 scintigraphy as an aid in the detection of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Klein, M; Ahn, C S; Drum, D E; Tow, D E

    1994-09-01

    Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is considered the study of choice for diagnosing spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Most of such cases, however, are not suspected initially, and thus do not benefit from the procedure. A case of SEA is described in which positive Ga-67 scintigraphy shortly before onset of lower extremity dysfunction was instrumental in obtaining an emergency gadolinium-enhanced MRI and establishing the diagnosis.

  16. Late Mitochondrial Acquisition, Really?

    PubMed Central

    Degli Esposti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a timely critique of a recent Nature paper by Pittis and Gabaldón that has suggested a late origin of mitochondria in eukaryote evolution. It shows that the inferred ancestry of many mitochondrial proteins has been incorrectly assigned by Pittis and Gabaldón to bacteria other than the aerobic proteobacteria from which the ancestor of mitochondria originates, thereby questioning the validity of their suggestion that mitochondrial acquisition may be a late event in eukaryote evolution. The analysis and approach presented here may guide future studies to resolve the true ancestry of mitochondria. PMID:27289097

  17. Lateness to School Remediation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugwuegbulam, Charles N.; Ibrahim, Haj. Naheed

    2015-01-01

    Primary and secondary school in Nigeria encourage punctuality to school yet a good number of the learners came late to school. This is especially true in the case of day students. Learners who come late to school are usually punished in one way or the other yet the lateness to school phenomenon still persist. Lateness to school behaviour affects…

  18. Magnetostimulation in MRI.

    PubMed

    Irnich, W; Schmitt, F

    1995-05-01

    In national and international bodies, there is active discussion of appropriate safety regulations of levels of magnetic field strength in MRI. Present limits are usually expressed in terms of the switching rate dB/dt, but the validity of this is open to debate. Application of the fundamental law of electrostimulation is well-established, both on theoretical and experimental grounds. Application of this law, in combination with Maxwell's law, yields a very simple equation that we call the fundamental law of magnetostimulation. This law has the hyperbolic form of a strength-duration curve and allows an estimation of the lowest possible value of the magnetic flux density capable of stimulating nerves and muscles. Calculations prove that the threshold for heart excitation is much higher than those for nerve and muscle stimulations. Experimental results from us and other authors confirm the correctness of the derived laws for magnetostimulation. In light of these findings, proposed safety limits should be reconsidered. PMID:7596265

  19. Speaking with a Single Cerebral Hemisphere: fMRI Language Organization after Hemispherectomy in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liegeois, Frederique; Connelly, Alan; Baldeweg, Torsten; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2008-01-01

    Speech-related fMRI activation was examined in six hemispherectomy patients (three left LX, three right RX, four with congenital and two with late-acquired hemiplegia) operated in childhood for the relief of drug-resistant epilepsy. Although the temporal and sensorimotor pattern of activation was similar to that found in neurologically intact…

  20. fMRI adaptation revisited.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jonas; Solomon, Samuel G; Kohn, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Adaptation has been widely used in functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies to infer neuronal response properties in human cortex. fMRI adaptation has been criticized because of the complex relationship between fMRI adaptation effects and the multiple neuronal effects that could underlie them. Many of the longstanding concerns about fMRI adaptation have received empirical support from neurophysiological studies over the last decade. We review these studies here, and also consider neuroimaging studies that have investigated how fMRI adaptation effects are influenced by high-level perceptual processes. The results of these studies further emphasize the need to interpret fMRI adaptation results with caution, but they also provide helpful guidance for more accurate interpretation and better experimental design. In addition, we argue that rather than being used as a proxy for measurements of neuronal stimulus selectivity, fMRI adaptation may be most useful for studying population-level adaptation effects across cortical processing hierarchies.

  1. MRI of plants and foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  2. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  3. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications. PMID:23376346

  4. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-04-17

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications.

  5. High frame rate retrospectively triggered Cine MRI for assessment of murine diastolic function.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Bram F; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Motaal, Abdallah G; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2013-03-01

    To assess left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in mice with Cine MRI, a high frame rate (>60 frames per cardiac cycle) is required. For conventional electrocardiography-triggered Cine MRI, the frame rate is inversely proportional to the pulse repetition time (TR). However, TR cannot be lowered at will to increase the frame rate because of gradient hardware, spatial resolution, and signal-to-noise limitations. To overcome these limitations associated with electrocardiography-triggered Cine MRI, in this paper, we introduce a retrospectively triggered Cine MRI protocol capable of producing high-resolution high frame rate Cine MRI of the mouse heart for addressing left ventricular diastolic function. Simulations were performed to investigate the influence of MRI sequence parameters and the k-space filling trajectory in relation to the desired number of frames per cardiac cycle. An optimized protocol was applied in vivo and compared with electrocardiography-triggered Cine for which a high-frame rate could only be achieved by several interleaved acquisitions. Retrospective high frame rate Cine MRI proved superior to the interleaved electrocardiography-triggered protocols. High spatial-resolution Cine movies with frames rates up to 80 frames per cardiac cycle were obtained in 25 min. Analysis of left ventricular filling rate curves allowed accurate determination of early and late filling rates and revealed subtle impairments in left ventricular diastolic function of diabetic mice in comparison with nondiabetic mice.

  6. MRI and intraocular tamponade media.

    PubMed

    Manfrè, L; Fabbri, G; Avitabile, T; Biondi, P; Reibaldi, A; Pero, G

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen patients who underwent surgery for retinal detachment and injection of intraocular tamponade media (silicone oil, fluorosilicone oil, or perfluorocarbon liquid) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images. The ophthalmic tamponade media showed different signal intensity, according to their chemical structure. Unlike ophthalmoscopy or ultrasonography, MRI showed no oil-related artefact, making possible recognition of recurrent retinal detachment.

  7. Midlife migraine and late-life parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Ross, G. Webster; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Garcia, Melissa; Gudmundsson, Larus S.; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Wagner, Amy K.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that having migraine in middle age is related to late-life parkinsonism and a related disorder, restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease (WED). Methods: The AGES-Reykjavik cohort (born 1907–1935) has been followed since 1967. Headaches were classified based on symptoms assessed in middle age. From 2002 to 2006, 5,764 participants were reexamined to assess symptoms of parkinsonism, diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD), family history of PD, and RLS/WED. Results: Subjects with midlife migraine, particularly migraine with aura (MA), were in later life more likely than others to report parkinsonian symptoms (odds ratio [OR]MA = 3.6 [95% CI 2.7–4.8]) and diagnosed PD (ORMA = 2.5 [95% CI 1.2–5.2]). Women with MA were more likely than others to have a parent (ORMA = 2.26 [95% CI 1.3–4.0]) or sibling (ORMA = 1.78 [95% CI 1.1–2.9]) with PD. Late-life RLS/WED was increased for headache generally. Associations were independent of cardiovascular disease and MRI-evident presumed ischemic lesions. Conclusions: These findings suggest there may be a common vulnerability to, or consequences of, migraine and multiple indicators of parkinsonism. Additional genetic and longitudinal observational studies are needed to identify candidate pathways that may account for the comorbid constellation of symptoms. PMID:25230997

  8. Late Babylonian Astrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, John M.

    The last five centuries BC saw the development of several new forms of astrology in Babylonia. Key to these new astrological techniques was the invention of the zodiac in about 400 BC. These new forms of astrology include personal horoscopes, astral medicine, and the exploitation of geometrical relationships between the position of heavenly bodies. Several Late Babylonian astrological doctrines were later adopted within Greek astrology.

  9. Hybrid-SPRITE MRI.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2013-10-01

    In a FID based frequency encoding MRI experiment the central part of k-space is not generally accessible due to the probe dead time. This portion of k-space is however crucial for image reconstruction. SPRITE (Single Point Ramped Imaging with T1 Enhancement), SPI with a linearly ramped phase encode gradient, has been employed to image short relaxation time systems for many years with great success. It is a robust imaging method in significant measure because it provides acquisition of high quality k-space origin data. We propose a new sampling scheme, termed hybrid-SPRITE, combining phase and frequency encoding to ensure high quality images with reduced acquisition times, reduced gradient duty cycle and increased sensitivity. In hybrid-SPRITE, numerous time domain points are collected to assist image reconstruction. An Inverse Non-uniform Discrete Fourier Transform (INDFT) is employed in 1D applications. A pseudo-polar grid is exploited in 2D hybrid-SPRITE for rapid and accurate image reconstruction. PMID:23916990

  10. Is there a place for cardiovascular magnetic resonance conditional devices in systemic inflammatory diseases?

    PubMed

    Mavrogeni, Sophie I; Poulos, George; Sfikakis, Petros P; Kitas, George D; Kolovou, Genovefa; Theodorakis, George

    2016-06-01

    Rhythm disturbances and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are important manifestations of cardiac involvement in systemic inflammatory diseases (SID). The commonest events demanding the implantation of a device include ventricular tachycardia and atrioventricular block, mainly diagnosed in sarcoidosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. In SCD, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) identified areas of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in 71% and provided an arrhythmic substrate in 76%, while during the follow-up, the extent of LGE identified a subgroup at increased risk for future adverse events. CMR has been successfully used for detection of cardiac disease in SID, including myocarditis, coronary, microvascular and valvular disease. Additionally, SIDs have a higher probability to need MRI scanning of other organs, due to their systemic disease. These reasons support the necessity of an MRI conditional device in SIDs. A broad selection of devices, approved for the MRI environment under defined conditions allows the safe and accurate scanning of SID patients. PMID:26878099

  11. Coping – Late Side Effects

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer treatment can cause late side effects that may not show up for months or years after treatment. These late effects may include heart and lung problems, bone loss, eye and hearing changes, lymphedema, and other problems

  12. Differential neural mechanisms for early and late prediction error detection.

    PubMed

    Malekshahi, Rahim; Seth, Anil; Papanikolaou, Amalia; Mathews, Zenon; Birbaumer, Niels; Verschure, Paul F M J; Caria, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that prediction, instantiated at different perceptual levels, facilitate visual processing and enable prompt and appropriate reactions. Until now, the mechanisms underlying the effect of predictive coding at different stages of visual processing have still remained unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate early and late processing of spatial prediction violation by performing combined recordings of saccadic eye movements and fast event-related fMRI during a continuous visual detection task. Psychophysical reverse correlation analysis revealed that the degree of mismatch between current perceptual input and prior expectations is mainly processed at late rather than early stage, which is instead responsible for fast but general prediction error detection. Furthermore, our results suggest that conscious late detection of deviant stimuli is elicited by the assessment of prediction error's extent more than by prediction error per se. Functional MRI and functional connectivity data analyses indicated that higher-level brain systems interactions modulate conscious detection of prediction error through top-down processes for the analysis of its representational content, and possibly regulate subsequent adaptation of predictive models. Overall, our experimental paradigm allowed to dissect explicit from implicit behavioral and neural responses to deviant stimuli in terms of their reliance on predictive models. PMID:27079423

  13. Differential neural mechanisms for early and late prediction error detection

    PubMed Central

    Malekshahi, Rahim; Seth, Anil; Papanikolaou, Amalia; Mathews, Zenon; Birbaumer, Niels; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.; Caria, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that prediction, instantiated at different perceptual levels, facilitate visual processing and enable prompt and appropriate reactions. Until now, the mechanisms underlying the effect of predictive coding at different stages of visual processing have still remained unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate early and late processing of spatial prediction violation by performing combined recordings of saccadic eye movements and fast event-related fMRI during a continuous visual detection task. Psychophysical reverse correlation analysis revealed that the degree of mismatch between current perceptual input and prior expectations is mainly processed at late rather than early stage, which is instead responsible for fast but general prediction error detection. Furthermore, our results suggest that conscious late detection of deviant stimuli is elicited by the assessment of prediction error’s extent more than by prediction error per se. Functional MRI and functional connectivity data analyses indicated that higher-level brain systems interactions modulate conscious detection of prediction error through top-down processes for the analysis of its representational content, and possibly regulate subsequent adaptation of predictive models. Overall, our experimental paradigm allowed to dissect explicit from implicit behavioral and neural responses to deviant stimuli in terms of their reliance on predictive models. PMID:27079423

  14. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  15. Estimating Motion From MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    OZTURK, CENGIZHAN; DERBYSHIRE, J. ANDREW; MCVEIGH, ELLIOT R.

    2007-01-01

    Invited Paper Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal imaging modality to measure blood flow and tissue motion. It provides excellent contrast between soft tissues, and images can be acquired at positions and orientations freely defined by the user. From a temporal sequence of MR images, boundaries and edges of tissues can be tracked by image processing techniques. Additionally, MRI permits the source of the image signal to be manipulated. For example, temporary magnetic tags displaying a pattern of variable brightness may be placed in the object using MR saturation techniques, giving the user a known pattern to detect for motion tracking. The MRI signal is a modulated complex quantity, being derived from a rotating magnetic field in the form of an induced current. Well-defined patterns can also be introduced into the phase of the magnetization, and could be thought of as generalized tags. If the phase of each pixel is preserved during image reconstruction, relative phase shifts can be used to directly encode displacement, velocity and acceleration. New methods for modeling motion fields from MRI have now found application in cardiovascular and other soft tissue imaging. In this review, we shall describe the methods used for encoding, imaging, and modeling motion fields with MRI. PMID:18958181

  16. Avoidance of late abortion.

    PubMed

    1979-11-24

    Induced abortion is now a common procedure in the United States and Britain. Methods for performing induced abortion are reviewed. Menstrual regulation, aspiration with a hand-held syringe and a flexible cannula within 6 weeks of the last period, is not often practiced in Britain. Several developing countries are using this simple technique to advantage. Vacuum aspiration in the 1st 12 weeks of pregnancy is the main method being used everywhere for 1st trimester procedures. Mortality rates with this method are low and, in well-organized clinics with experienced personnel, the rates can be reduced even further. It is agreed that 2nd trimester procedures are more complex, both physically and emotionally. In the last several years, dilatation and evacuation (D&E) has increased in popularity for 2nd trimester procedures. Dilation of the cervix is generally accomplished with laminaria, evacuation of the uterus with forceps, and then suction curettage applied. This procedure has replaced intraamniotic infusion, hysterotomy, and hysterectomy as the most commonly - practiced method, despite its need for special surgical skills and good clinical backup. Follow-up of abortions is difficult. Different long-term effects have been noted with different abortion procedures. Early abortion seems to have only a modest effect, if that. Whether late abortion has long-lasting effects remains open to question. Late abortion should be avoided.

  17. MRI artefacts after Bonebridge implantation.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, C; Mader, I; Arndt, S; Aschendorff, A; Laszig, R; Hassepass, F

    2014-07-01

    The new transcutaneous bone conduction implant (BCI) Bonebridge (BB, MED-EL) allows the skin to remain intact and therefore overcomes some issues related to percutaneous systems, such as skin reaction around the external screw and cosmetic complaints. According to manufacturer, BB is MRI conditional up to 1,5 Tesla (T). The artefact of the neurocranium after BB implantation is extensive as shown in the present report. This has to be taken into account when patients suffering conductive, mixed or single-sided hearing loss with candidacy for a BCI are counselled. In patients with comorbid intracranial tumour or other diseases of the brain that require imaging control scans with MRI percutaneous, BCI should be the implant of choice considering the very small artefact of the percutaneous screw in MRI.

  18. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included.

  19. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  20. The Raven MRI teaching file

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.B.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1990-01-01

    This book presents individually bound guides for each section of the body, the 1,000 concise and clearly illustrated case files cover neoplastic, non-neoplastic, degenerative, inflammatory, congenital, and acquired disease of the brain, head and neck, spine, musculoskeletal system, cardiovascular system, chest, abdomen, and male and female pelvis. It focuses on specific body regions; one is devoted to pediatric MRI; and one reviews the principles of MRI and identifies frequently encountered artifacts. It contains 100 completed case studies, with high-resolution MR images.

  1. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  2. Paramagnetic lanthanide chelates for multicontrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Cakić, Nevenka; Savić, Tanja; Stricker-Shaver, Janice; Truffault, Vincent; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Mirkes, Christian; Pohmann, Rolf; Scheffler, Klaus; Angelovski, Goran

    2016-07-28

    The preparation of a paramagnetic chelator that serves as a platform for multicontrast MRI, and can be utilized either as a T1-weighted, paraCEST or (19)F MRI contrast agent is reported. Its europium(iii) complex exhibits an extremely slow water exchange rate which is optimal for the use in CEST MRI. The potential of this platform was demonstrated through a series of MRI studies on tube phantoms and animals. PMID:27291157

  3. Cervical Spine MRI in Abused Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study attempted to use cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cord injury in 12 dead children with head injury from child abuse. Eighty percent of children autopsied had small cervical spine hemorrhages; MRI did not identify them and did not identify cord injury in any child studied, indicating that MRI scans are probably…

  4. MRI Biosensors: A Short Primer

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Angelique

    2013-01-01

    Interest in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agents for molecular imaging of biological function experienced a surge of excitement approximately 20 years ago with the development of the first activatable contrast agents that could act as biosensors and turn “on” in response to a specific biological activity. This brief tutorial, based on a short course lecture from the 2011 ISMRM meeting, provides an overview of underlying principles governing the design of biosensing contrast agents. We describe mechanisms by which a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent can be made into a sensor for both T1 and T2 types contrast agents. Examples of biological activities that can interact with a contrast agent are discussed using specific examples from the recent literature to illustrate the primary mechanisms of action that have been utilized to achieve activation. MRI sensors for pH, ion binding, enzyme cleavage, and oxidation-reduction are presented. This article is not meant to be an exhaustive review, but an illustrative primer to explain how activation can be achieved for an MRI contrast agent. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is not covered as these agents were covered in a separate lecture. PMID:23996662

  5. MRI of Little Leaguer's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Stephen F; Recht, Michael P; Profitt, Brad

    2006-02-01

    The MRI appearance of 'Little Leaguer's shoulder' has not been previously reported in the radiology literature. Purported etiologies include proximal humeral epiphyseolysis, osteochondrosis of the proximal humeral epiphysis, stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate, and rotational stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in four patients and review the literature.

  6. MRI findings in cobalamin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Kavita K; Arafat, Abou-Sharbin Maher; Ichaporia, Nasli Rustom; Jain, M M

    2003-01-01

    A 55 year old male presented 2 years after a jejuno-iliectomy with weakness of all limbs, paraesthesiae, and difficulty in walking. Clinical examination revealed loss of posterior column sensations. Investigations were suggestive of a deficiency of vitamin B12 and folate. MRI showed a band of hyperintensity on T2 image, in the dorsal portion of the spinal cord.

  7. Can Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and Diffusion-Weighted MRI (DW-MRI) Evaluate Inflammation Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianguo; Zhang, Faming; Luan, Yun; Cao, Peng; Liu, Fei; He, Wenwen; Wang, Dehang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate diagnosis efficacy of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in Crohn's disease (CD). To find out the correlations between functional MRI parameters including Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Vp, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with a serologic biomarker. The relationships between pharmacokinetic parameters and ADC were also studied. Thirty-two patients with CD (22 men, 10 women; mean age: 30.5 years) and 18 healthy volunteers without any inflammatory disease (10 men, 8 women; mean age, 34.11 years) were enrolled into this approved prospective study. Pearson analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Vp, and C-reactive protein (CRP), ADC, and CRP respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of the functional MRI parameters in terms of sensitivity and specificity were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Optimal cut-off values of each functional MRI parameters for differentiation of inflammatory from normal bowel were determined according to the Youden criterion. Mean value of Ktrans in the CD group was significantly higher than that of normal control group. Similar results were observed for Kep and Ve. On the contrary, the ADC value was lower in the CD group than that in the control group. Ktrans and Ve were shown to be correlated with CRP (r = 0.725, P < 0.001; r = 0.533, P = 0.002), meanwhile ADC showed negative correlation with CRP (r = −0.630, P < 0.001). There were negative correlations between the pharmacokinetic parameters and ADC, such as Ktrans to ADC (r = −0.856, P < 0.001), and Ve to ADC (r = −0.451, P = 0.01). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.994 for Ktrans (P < 0.001), 0.905 for ADC (P < 0.001), 0.806 for Ve (P < 0.001), and 0.764 for Kep (P = 0.002). The cut-off point of the Ktrans was found to be 0.931 min–1. This value provided the best trade-off between

  8. fMRI Validation of fNIRS Measurements During a Naturalistic Task

    PubMed Central

    Noah, J. Adam; Ono, Yumie; Nomoto, Yasunori; Shimada, Sotaro; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Zhang, Xian; Bronner, Shaw; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to compare brain activity recorded with near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in a dance video game task to that recorded in a reduced version of the task using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Recently, it has been shown that fNIRS can accurately record functional brain activities equivalent to those concurrently recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging for classic psychophysical tasks and simple finger tapping paradigms. However, an often quoted benefit of fNIRS is that the technique allows for studying neural mechanisms of complex, naturalistic behaviors that are not possible using the constrained environment of fMRI. Our goal was to extend the findings of previous studies that have shown high correlation between concurrently recorded fNIRS and fMRI signals to compare neural recordings obtained in fMRI procedures to those separately obtained in naturalistic fNIRS experiments. Specifically, we developed a modified version of the dance video game Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) to be compatible with both fMRI and fNIRS imaging procedures. In this methodology we explain the modifications to the software and hardware for compatibility with each technique as well as the scanning and calibration procedures used to obtain representative results. The results of the study show a task-related increase in oxyhemoglobin in both modalities and demonstrate that it is possible to replicate the findings of fMRI using fNIRS in a naturalistic task. This technique represents a methodology to compare fMRI imaging paradigms which utilize a reduced-world environment to fNIRS in closer approximation to naturalistic, full-body activities and behaviors. Further development of this technique may apply to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, late states of dementia, or those with magnetic susceptibility which are contraindicated for fMRI scanning. PMID:26132365

  9. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ellens, N; Farahani, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  10. Illusory Late Heavy Bombardments.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Patrick; Harrison, T Mark

    2016-09-27

    The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a hypothesized impact spike at ∼3.9 Ga, is one of the major scientific concepts to emerge from Apollo-era lunar exploration. A significant portion of the evidence for the existence of the LHB comes from histograms of (40)Ar/(39)Ar "plateau" ages (i.e., regions selected on the basis of apparent isochroneity). However, due to lunar magmatism and overprinting from subsequent impact events, virtually all Apollo-era samples show evidence for (40)Ar/(39)Ar age spectrum disturbances, leaving open the possibility that partial (40)Ar* resetting could bias interpretation of bombardment histories due to plateaus yielding misleadingly young ages. We examine this possibility through a physical model of (40)Ar* diffusion in Apollo samples and test the uniqueness of the impact histories obtained by inverting plateau age histograms. Our results show that plateau histograms tend to yield age peaks, even in those cases where the input impact curve did not contain such a spike, in part due to the episodic nature of lunar crust or parent body formation. Restated, monotonically declining impact histories yield apparent age peaks that could be misinterpreted as LHB-type events. We further conclude that the assignment of apparent (40)Ar/(39)Ar plateau ages bears an undesirably high degree of subjectivity. When compounded by inappropriate interpretations of histograms constructed from plateau ages, interpretation of apparent, but illusory, impact spikes is likely. PMID:27621460

  11. Illusory Late Heavy Bombardments.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Patrick; Harrison, T Mark

    2016-09-27

    The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a hypothesized impact spike at ∼3.9 Ga, is one of the major scientific concepts to emerge from Apollo-era lunar exploration. A significant portion of the evidence for the existence of the LHB comes from histograms of (40)Ar/(39)Ar "plateau" ages (i.e., regions selected on the basis of apparent isochroneity). However, due to lunar magmatism and overprinting from subsequent impact events, virtually all Apollo-era samples show evidence for (40)Ar/(39)Ar age spectrum disturbances, leaving open the possibility that partial (40)Ar* resetting could bias interpretation of bombardment histories due to plateaus yielding misleadingly young ages. We examine this possibility through a physical model of (40)Ar* diffusion in Apollo samples and test the uniqueness of the impact histories obtained by inverting plateau age histograms. Our results show that plateau histograms tend to yield age peaks, even in those cases where the input impact curve did not contain such a spike, in part due to the episodic nature of lunar crust or parent body formation. Restated, monotonically declining impact histories yield apparent age peaks that could be misinterpreted as LHB-type events. We further conclude that the assignment of apparent (40)Ar/(39)Ar plateau ages bears an undesirably high degree of subjectivity. When compounded by inappropriate interpretations of histograms constructed from plateau ages, interpretation of apparent, but illusory, impact spikes is likely.

  12. Modeling late Paleozoic glaciation

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; Baum, S.K. )

    1992-06-01

    Late Paleozoic glaciation on Gondwana is associated with changes in geography, solar luminosity, and estimated CO{sub 2} levels. To assess the relative importance of these boundary conditions, the authors conducted a suite of climate model simulations for the periods before, during, and after peak mid-Carboniferous ({approximately}300 Ma) glaciation (340, 300, and 255 and 225 Ma, respectively). Orbital insolation values favorable for glaciation and interglaciation were used for each time interval. Results indicate that changes in geography cause significant changes in snow area, but the temporal trend is not consistent with the geologic record for glaciation. Combined CO{sub 2}-plus-geography changes yield the best agreement with observations. In addition, interglacial orbital configurations result in almost ice-free conditions for the glacial interval at 300 Ma, at a time of low CO{sub 2}. The large simulated glacial-interglacial snowline fluctuations for Permian-Carboniferous time may explain cyclothem fluctuations at these times. Overall, results support the importance of the CO{sub 2} paradigm, but also indicate that a fuller understanding of past climate change requires consideration of paleogeographic, luminosity, and orbital insolation changes.

  13. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  14. Intraoperative, real-time, functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Gering, D T; Weber, D M

    1998-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) methods have been demonstrated to noninvasively identify motor-sensory, visual, and other areas of eloquent cortex for guiding surgical intervention. Typically, fMRI data are acquired preoperatively during a conventional surgical planning MRI examination. Unlike direct cortical stimulation at the time of surgery, however, preoperative fMRI methods do not account for the potential movement of tissues (relative to the time of functional imaging) that may occur in the surgical suite as a direct result of the intervention. Recently, an MRI device has been demonstrated for use in the surgical suite that has the potential to reduce the extent of cortical exposure required for the intervention. However, the invasive requirements of cortical mapping may supersede the invasive requirements of the surgical intervention itself. Consequently, we demonstrate here a modification to the intraoperative MRI device that facilitates a noninvasive, real-time, functional MR examination in the surgical suite.

  15. A Sensitive Period for Language in the Visual Cortex: Distinct Patterns of Plasticity in Congenitally versus Late Blind Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedny, Marina; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Dravida, Swethasri; Saxe, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that blindness enables visual circuits to contribute to language processing. We examined whether this dramatic functional plasticity has a sensitive period. BOLD fMRI signal was measured in congenitally blind, late blind (blindness onset 9-years-old or later) and sighted participants while they performed a sentence…

  16. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Amato, Daniela Maria; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Capasso, Immacolata; Rinaldo, Massimo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination) in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI. PMID:26339597

  17. Anxiety disorders in late life.

    PubMed Central

    Flint, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment of anxiety disorders in late life. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic and comorbidity data are derived from well designed random-sample community surveys. There are virtually no controlled data specific to treatment of anxiety in the elderly. Guidelines for treating anxiety disorders in late life, therefore, must be extrapolated from results of randomized controlled trials conducted in younger patients. MAIN MESSAGE: Generalized anxiety disorder and agoraphobia account for most cases of anxiety disorder in late life. Late-onset generalized anxiety is usually associated with depressive illness and, in this situation, the primary pharmacologic treatment is antidepressant medication. Most elderly people with agoraphobia do not give a history of panic attacks; exposure therapy is the preferred treatment for agoraphobia without panic. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians need to make more use of antidepressant medication and behavioural therapy and less use of benzodiazepines in treating anxiety disorders in late life. PMID:10587775

  18. Combination of dynamic (11)C-PIB PET and structural MRI improves diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linwen; Fu, Liping; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Jinming; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xu, Baixuan; Tian, Jiahe; Fan, Yong

    2015-08-30

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) is an established technique for measuring brain atrophy, and dynamic positron emission tomography with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PIB PET) has the potential to provide both perfusion and amyloid deposition information. It remains unclear, however, how to better combine perfusion, amyloid deposition and morphological information extracted from dynamic (11)C-PIB PET and sMRI with the goal of improving the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We adopted a linear sparse support vector machine to build classifiers for distinguishing AD and MCI subjects from cognitively normal (CN) subjects based on different combinations of regional measures extracted from imaging data, including perfusion and amyloid deposition information extracted from early and late frames of (11)C-PIB separately, and gray matter volumetric information extracted from sMRI data. The experimental results demonstrated that the classifier built upon the combination of imaging measures extracted from early and late frames of (11)C-PIB as well as sMRI achieved the highest classification accuracy in both classification studies of AD (100%) and MCI (85%), indicating that multimodality information could aid in the diagnosis of AD and MCI. PMID:26095348

  19. Pathohistological Evidence of Smoldering Inflammation in Rheumatic Heart Disease with Massive Left Atrial Calcification.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Mikio; Sugano, Yasuo; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ohara, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Takuya; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man, who had a history of a mitral valve replacement for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) 30 years previously, was admitted with progressive heart failure. Massive calcification was observed around the left atrium on multidetector CT, in addition to a late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)-positive layer adjacently outside of the calcification on MRI. He underwent a second mitral valve replacement for the prosthetic valve failure. Pathohistological analyses of a tissue section of the left atrial wall from a surgical specimen revealed lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration that coincided with the LGE-positive layer on MRI, suggesting the existence of sustained active inflammation even after the long period of RHD.

  20. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20–50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  1. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob; Røkke, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20-50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  2. MRI morphometry in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    MRI based evaluation of brain atrophy is regarded as a valid method to stage the disease and to assess progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Volumetric software programs have made it possible to quantify gray matter in the human brain in an automated fashion. At present, voxel based morphometry (VBM) is easily applicable to the routine clinical procedure with a short execution time. The importance of the VBM approach is that it is not biased to one particular structure and is able to assess anatomical differences throughout the brain. Stand-alone VBM software running on Windows, Voxel-based Specific Regional analysis system for AD (VSRAD), has been widely used in the clinical diagnosis of AD in Japan. On the other hand, recent application of graph theory to MRI has made it possible to analyze changes in structural connectivity in AD.

  3. Liver isolation in abdominal MRI.

    PubMed

    Rajasvaran, Logeswaran; Haw, Tan Wooi; Sarker, Shakowat Zaman

    2008-08-01

    This work presents a method for liver isolation in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abdomen images. It is based on a priori statistical information about the shape of the liver obtained from a training set using the segmentation approach. Morphological watershed algorithm is used as a key technique as it is a simple and intuitive method, producing a complete division of the image in separated regions even if the contrast is poor, and it is fast, with possibility for parallel implementation. To overcome the over-segmentation problem of the watershed process, image preprocessing and postprocessing are applied. Morphological smoothing, Gaussian smoothing, intensity thresholding, gradient computation and gradient thresholding are proposed for preprocessing with morphological and graph based region adjacent list constructed for region merging. A new integrated region similarity function is also defined for region merging control. The proposed method produces good isolation of liver in axial MRI images of the abdomen, as is shown in this paper.

  4. Polycatechol Nanoparticle MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwen; Huang, Yuran; Wang, Zhao; Carniato, Fabio; Xie, Yijun; Patterson, Joseph P; Thompson, Matthew P; Andolina, Christopher M; Ditri, Treffly B; Millstone, Jill E; Figueroa, Joshua S; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Scadeng, Miriam; Botta, Mauro; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2016-02-01

    Amphiphilic triblock copolymers containing Fe(III) -catecholate complexes formulated as spherical- or cylindrical-shaped micellar nanoparticles (SMN and CMN, respectively) are described as new T1-weighted agents with high relaxivity, low cytotoxicity, and long-term stability in biological fluids. Relaxivities of both SMN and CMN exceed those of established gadolinium chelates across a wide range of magnetic field strengths. Interestingly, shape-dependent behavior is observed in terms of the particles' interactions with HeLa cells, with CMN exhibiting enhanced uptake and contrast via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with SMN. These results suggest that control over soft nanoparticle shape will provide an avenue for optimization of particle-based contrast agents as biodiagnostics. The polycatechol nanoparticles are proposed as suitable for preclinical investigations into their viability as gadolinium-free, safe, and effective imaging agents for MRI contrast enhancement. PMID:26681255

  5. Late onset postpartum eclampsia without pre-eclamptic prodromi: clinical and neuroradiological presentation in two patients

    PubMed Central

    Veltkamp, R; Kupsch, A; Polasek, J; Yousry, T; Pfister, H

    2000-01-01

    In two patients eclampsia started 9 days postpartum. Headache and visual disturbances preceded seizures but none of the classic pre-eclamptic signs oedema, proteinuria, and hypertension were present until shortly before seizure onset. Brain herniation (patient 1) and status epilepticus (patient 2) necessitated neurointensive care management. Brain MRI initially showed only frontal sulcal effacement in one patient but later showed white matter hyperintensities on T2 weighted images and a previously undescribed pattern of cortical-subcortical postgadolinium enhancement on T1 weighted images in both. Neurological deficits and MRI findings were reversed with therapy in both patients. It is concluded that late postpartum eclampsia can manifest without classic prodromi and that characteristic MRI findings may lag behind clinical manifestation.

 PMID:11080241

  6. Parallel MRI at microtesla fields.

    PubMed

    Zotev, Vadim S; Volegov, Petr L; Matlashov, Andrei N; Espy, Michelle A; Mosher, John C; Kraus, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    Parallel imaging techniques have been widely used in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multiple receiver coils have been shown to improve image quality and allow accelerated image acquisition. Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-low fields (ULF MRI) is a new imaging approach that uses SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors to measure the spatially encoded precession of pre-polarized nuclear spin populations at microtesla-range measurement fields. In this work, parallel imaging at microtesla fields is systematically studied for the first time. A seven-channel SQUID system, designed for both ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG), is used to acquire 3D images of a human hand, as well as 2D images of a large water phantom. The imaging is performed at 46 mu T measurement field with pre-polarization at 40 mT. It is shown how the use of seven channels increases imaging field of view and improves signal-to-noise ratio for the hand images. A simple procedure for approximate correction of concomitant gradient artifacts is described. Noise propagation is analyzed experimentally, and the main source of correlated noise is identified. Accelerated imaging based on one-dimensional undersampling and 1D SENSE (sensitivity encoding) image reconstruction is studied in the case of the 2D phantom. Actual threefold imaging acceleration in comparison to single-average fully encoded Fourier imaging is demonstrated. These results show that parallel imaging methods are efficient in ULF MRI, and that imaging performance of SQUID-based instruments improves substantially as the number of channels is increased.

  7. Parallel MRI at microtesla fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Volegov, Petr L.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Espy, Michelle A.; Mosher, John C.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2008-06-01

    Parallel imaging techniques have been widely used in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multiple receiver coils have been shown to improve image quality and allow accelerated image acquisition. Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-low fields (ULF MRI) is a new imaging approach that uses SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors to measure the spatially encoded precession of pre-polarized nuclear spin populations at microtesla-range measurement fields. In this work, parallel imaging at microtesla fields is systematically studied for the first time. A seven-channel SQUID system, designed for both ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG), is used to acquire 3D images of a human hand, as well as 2D images of a large water phantom. The imaging is performed at 46 μT measurement field with pre-polarization at 40 mT. It is shown how the use of seven channels increases imaging field of view and improves signal-to-noise ratio for the hand images. A simple procedure for approximate correction of concomitant gradient artifacts is described. Noise propagation is analyzed experimentally, and the main source of correlated noise is identified. Accelerated imaging based on one-dimensional undersampling and 1D SENSE (sensitivity encoding) image reconstruction is studied in the case of the 2D phantom. Actual threefold imaging acceleration in comparison to single-average fully encoded Fourier imaging is demonstrated. These results show that parallel imaging methods are efficient in ULF MRI, and that imaging performance of SQUID-based instruments improves substantially as the number of channels is increased.

  8. Retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Castro, R; Oliveira, M I; Fernandes, T; Madureira, A J

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe a case of a retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst in a 36-year-old female. She presented with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. An MRI scan revealed an 8 cm cystic lesion in the left upper retroperitoneum, with intermediate signal on T2-weighted images, high signal on T1 weighted images, and lack of internal enhancement after gadolinium. After laparoscopic excision, the histology findings were compatible with a bronchogenic cyst, which is extremely uncommon in the retroperitoneum.

  9. Quantitative MRI Assessment of Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O.; Langston, James W.; Helton, Kathleen J.

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative MRI assessment of leukoencephalopathy is difficult because the MRI properties of leukoencephalopathy significantly overlap those of normal tissue. This report describes the use of an automated procedure for longitudinal measurement of tissue volume and relaxation times to quantify leukoencephalopathy. Images derived by using this procedure in patients undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are presented. Five examinations from each of five volunteers (25 examinations) were used to test the reproducibility of quantitated baseline and subsequent, normal-appearing images; the coefficients of variation were less than 2% for gray and white matter. Regions of leukoencephalopathy in patients were assessed by comparison with manual segmentation. Two radiologists manually segmented images from 15 randomly chosen MRI examinations that exhibited leukoencephalopathy. Kappa analyses showed that the two radiologists’ interpretations were concordant (κ = 0.70) and that each radiologist’s interpretations agreed with the results of the automated procedure (κ = 0.57 and 0.55).The clinical application of this method was illustrated by analysis of images from sequential MR examinations of two patients who developed leukoencephalopathy during treatment for ALL. The ultimate goal is to use these quantitative MR imaging measures to better understand therapy-induced neurotoxicity, which can be limited or even reversed with some combination of therapy adjustments and pharmacological and neurobehavioral interventions. PMID:11979570

  10. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, B; Wang, C C; Wang, J

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary mid-brain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases.

  11. [Sociological aspects of late fatherhood].

    PubMed

    Bessin, M

    2006-09-01

    Starting from a sociological research on late parenthood, the article shows quantitative and qualitative lessons on the subject--in particular concerning the fathers' perspective. Late parenthood has declined over the 20th Century, to increase again since 1980. The further exploitation of the survey EHF 99 shows the processes and the socio-demographic of late fatherhood, over three generations. This phenomenon is tightly related to the multiple descents and family recombinings. We also observe in these configurations major age differences between spouses and late relationship. The social bipolarity of this phenomenon appears clearly as far as late motherhood is concerned, but is less clear concerning fatherhood, since more blue collars and non qualified men are concerned. This difference is due to the important role played by migrants in this phenomenon. A qualitative survey conducted on the basis of biographic interviews has underlined the gendered logics of late family founding. These logics are linked to the discrepancies due to man/woman differences regarding their respective calendar of fertility and to their attitude towards work. The interviews which provide an analysis of the biographical processes of late parenthood are organised according to postponement or renewal logics, in the form of refoundation or repetition. They are linked to self-introspection and to the negotiations at work within a couple.

  12. 'MRI-tis' in the early diagnosis of axial SpA: issues and limitations.

    PubMed

    De Rycke, Leen; Maas, Mario; Tak, Paul P; Baeten, Dominique

    2010-11-01

    Sacroiliitis on conventional radiography, a key diagnostic feature of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA), often appears only late in the disease course. With the introduction of potent biologic agents that may also be effective in early disease, diagnostic techniques that can identify SpA early in the disease course would be highly beneficial to patients. MRI has been proposed as a novel diagnostic tool for early axial SpA based on the visualization of active inflammatory lesions in established axial SpA, as well as in pre-radiographic axial SpA. Accordingly, MRI is already widely used in clinical practice and has been included in new classification criteria. However, the specificity and predictive value of MRI lesions for the development of axial SpA remain to be fully defined and validated. Most data come from cross-sectional analyses and have not been validated in prospective studies, and the few available prospective studies were performed in highly selected patient populations and have assessed the value of MRI for the prediction of sacroiliitis rather than axial SpA. Also, some studies have indicated considerable diversity in the pattern and extent of MRI lesions, and suggest that many lesions are not specific for SpA. Prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to validate the utility of this new imaging modality for the diagnosis of axial SpA.

  13. Brain development in preterm infants assessed using advanced MRI techniques.

    PubMed

    Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David

    2014-03-01

    Infants who are born preterm have a high incidence of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral abnormalities, which may be associated with impaired brain development. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches, such as diffusion MRI (d-MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI), provide objective and reproducible measures of brain development. Indices derived from d-MRI can be used to provide quantitative measures of preterm brain injury. Although fMRI of the neonatal brain is currently a research tool, future studies combining d-MRI and fMRI have the potential to assess the structural and functional properties of the developing brain and its response to injury.

  14. MRI characteristics and scoring in HDLS due to CSF1R gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sundal, Christina; Van Gerpen, Jay A.; Nicholson, Alexandra M.; Wider, Christian; Shuster, Elizabeth A.; Aasly, Jan; Spina, Salvatore; Ghetti, Bernardino; Roeber, Sigrun; Garbern, James; Borjesson-Hanson, Anne; Tselis, Alex; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Miller, Bradley B.; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Heckman, Michael G.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Josephs, Keith A.; Baker, Matt; Andersen, Oluf; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W.; Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the brain MRI characteristics of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) with known mutations in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene (CSF1R) on chromosome 5. Methods: We reviewed 20 brain MRI scans of 15 patients with autopsy- or biopsy-verified HDLS and CSF1R mutations. We assessed sagittal T1-, axial T1-, T2-, proton density-weighted and axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images for distribution of white matter lesions (WMLs), gray matter involvement, and atrophy. We calculated a severity score based on a point system (0−57) for each MRI scan. Results: Of the patients, 93% (14 of 15) demonstrated localized WMLs with deep and subcortical involvement, whereas one patient revealed generalized WMLs. All WMLs were bilateral but asymmetric and predominantly frontal. Fourteen patients had a rapidly progressive clinical course with an initial MRI mean total severity score of 16.7 points (range 10−33.5). Gray matter pathology and brainstem atrophy were absent, and the corticospinal tracts were involved late in the disease course. There was no enhancement, and there was minimal cerebellar pathology. Conclusion: Recognition of the typical MRI patterns of HDLS and the use of an MRI severity score might help during the diagnostic evaluation to characterize the natural history and to monitor potential future treatments. Indicators of rapid disease progression were symptomatic disease onset before 45 years, female sex, WMLs extending beyond the frontal regions, a MRI severity score greater than 15 points, and mutation type of deletion. PMID:22843259

  15. In Vivo Imaging of Stepwise Vessel Occlusion in Cerebral Photothrombosis of Mice by 19F MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter M.; Stoll, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Background 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was recently introduced as a promising technique for in vivo cell tracking. In the present study we compared 19F MRI with iron-enhanced MRI in mice with photothrombosis (PT) at 7 Tesla. PT represents a model of focal cerebral ischemia exhibiting acute vessel occlusion and delayed neuroinflammation. Methods/Principal Findings Perfluorocarbons (PFC) or superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) were injected intravenously at different time points after photothrombotic infarction. While administration of PFC directly after PT induction led to a strong 19F signal throughout the entire lesion, two hours delayed application resulted in a rim-like 19F signal at the outer edge of the lesion. These findings closely resembled the distribution of signal loss on T2-weighted MRI seen after SPIO injection reflecting intravascular accumulation of iron particles trapped in vessel thrombi as confirmed histologically. By sequential administration of two chemically shifted PFC compounds 0 and 2 hours after illumination the different spatial distribution of the 19F markers (infarct core/rim) could be visualized in the same animal. When PFC were applied at day 6 the fluorine marker was only detected after long acquisition times ex vivo. SPIO-enhanced MRI showed slight signal loss in vivo which was much more prominent ex vivo indicative for neuroinflammation at this late lesion stage. Conclusion Our study shows that vessel occlusion can be followed in vivo by 19F and SPIO-enhanced high-field MRI while in vivo imaging of neuroinflammation remains challenging. The timing of contrast agent application was the major determinant of the underlying processes depicted by both imaging techniques. Importantly, sequential application of different PFC compounds allowed depiction of ongoing vessel occlusion from the core to the margin of the ischemic lesions in a single MRI measurement. PMID:22194810

  16. Maleimidyl magnetic nanoplatform for facile molecular MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Dan; Lee, Eugene; Ku, Minhee; Hwang, Seungyeon; Kim, Bongjune; Park, Yeonji; Lee, Young Han; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Yang, Jaemoon; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we developed the maleimidyl magnetic nanoplatform, which enables functional targeting of a biomarker-specific moiety for molecular imaging via MRI. The maleimide group of the maleimidyl magnetic nanoplatform is conjugated with a thiol group without additional crosslinkers and side products. A physicochemical analysis was conducted to verify the effectiveness of the maleimidyl magnetic nanoplatform, and the existence of the maleimidyl group was investigated using the platform. To prepare biomarker-specific MRI probes, a thiolated aptamer and peptide were immobilized onto the maleimidyl group of the maleimidyl magnetic nanoplatform. The fabricated MRI probes were applied to four cancer cell lines: HT1080, MCF7, MKN45, and HEK293T. To investigate the potential of the molecular MRI probe, the target-biomarker specificity was confirmed without serious cytotoxicity, and in vivo MRI analysis using a xenograft mouse model was demonstrated. We believe these results will be useful for fabricating molecular MRI probes for the diagnosis of cancer.

  17. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  18. MRI Scans - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resonance Imaging) (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) 核磁共振成像(MRI) - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) 核磁共振成像( ...

  19. Helping the Habitually Late Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Jerry

    1978-01-01

    The author gives three major reasons for a student being habitually late to class: resistance, disorganization, or unavoidable schedule conflicts. He makes specific suggestions to teachers for dealing with the disorganized and resistant latecomers. (SJL)

  20. Late Blooming or Language Problem?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Late Blooming or Language Problem? Parents are smart. They listen to their ... or not their child is developing speech and language at a normal rate. If parents think that ...

  1. Late and chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Donta, Sam T

    2002-03-01

    This article reviews the late and chronic manifestations of Lyme disease. Special attention is given to the chronic manifestations of the disease, detailing its pathogenesis, clinical spectrum, and laboratory criteria for the diagnosis. Based on experimental evidence and experience, approaches to the successful treatment of the late and chronic disease are outlined. Much additional work is needed to improve the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of the disease, its diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Baja california: late cretaceous dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Morris, W J

    1967-03-24

    Late Cretaceous dinosaurs have been discovered along the Pacific margin of Baja California. The presence of Hypacrosaurus sp. is suggestive of correlation with the Upper Edmonton Formation, Alberta. Dissimilarities between the Baja California fauna and those from contemporary units along the eastern trend of the Rocky Mountains suggest that Baja California was ecologically separated from mainland Mexico during late Campanian and early Maastrictian time. PMID:17830047

  3. Hepatobiliary MRI: current concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Glockner, James F

    2007-04-01

    Evaluation of the liver and biliary system is a frequent indication for abdominal MRI. Hepatobiliary MRI comprises a set of noninvasive techniques that are usually very effective in answering most clinical questions. There are significant limitations, however, as well as considerable variation and disagreement regarding the optimal protocols for standard hepatic MRI and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP). This review discusses pulse sequences most often used in hepatic MRI and MRCP, examines a few sources of controversy in the current literature, and summarizes some recent and future developments in the field.

  4. Functional MRI and Outcome in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Giacino, Joseph T.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in task-based functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), and arterial-spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI have occurred at a rapid pace in recent years. These techniques for measuring brain function have great potential to improve the accuracy of prognostication for civilian and military patients with traumatic coma. In addition, fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL have provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of traumatic disorders of consciousness, as well as mechanisms of recovery from coma. However, functional neuroimaging techniques have yet to achieve widespread clinical use as prognostic tests for patients with traumatic coma. Rather, a broad spectrum of methodological hurdles currently limits the feasibility of clinical implementation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles of fMRI, rs-fMRI and ASL and their potential applications as prognostic tools for patients with traumatic coma. We also discuss future strategies for overcoming the current barriers to clinical implementation. PMID:23881623

  5. Late effects from hadron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2004-06-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  6. MRI of nasopharyngeal adenoid hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Surov, Alexey; Ryl, Ina; Bartel-Friedrich, Sylvia; Wienke, Andreas; Kösling, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    Nasopharyngeal adenoid hypertrophy (NAH) is a typical benign lesion. Due to involution, nasopharyngeal lymphatic tissue usually is not found in adults beyond the 30th to 40th year of life. However, occasionally NAH has been recognized after the 50th or 60th year. The aim of this study is to identify the frequency of NAH and to analyze its MRI findings in different age groups. From 2007 to 2011, 6693 MR investigations of the head were performed at our institution. MRI was obtained with a 1.5 T MRI device. NAH was identified in 18.0% of the patients. The frequency of NAH varied from 60.3% to 1.0% in the different age groups. The mean size of NAH was 23.2 ± 4.5 mm in cranio-caudal, 31.1 ± 5.2 mm in left-right, and 14.2 ± 4.1 mm in the anterior-posterior direction. The left-right and cranio-caudal sizes of NAH were largest in the 0-9 age group and decreased with age. On T1-w images most lesions (95.4%) were hypointense in comparison to the adjacent musculature. On T2-w fat-saturated images 82.4% of the lesions were hyperintense. After intravenous administration of contrast medium most lesions showed a slight enhancement (58.6%). Moderate enhancement was seen in 32.4% and a marked enhancement was identified in 9.0%. In the 0-9 age group most lesions showed a slight enhancement. Cysts within NAH were identified in 433 cases (35.9%). The frequency of cysts increased continuously with age, namely from 10.9% to 65.2%.

  7. Posterior cortical dementia with alexia: neurobehavioural, MRI, and PET findings.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, L; Selchen, D H; Black, S E; Kaplan, R; Garnett, E S; Nahmias, C

    1991-01-01

    A progressive disorder of relatively focal but asymmetric biposterior dysfunction is described in a 54 year old right handed male. Initial clinical features included letter-by-letter alexia, visual anomia, acalculia, mild agraphia, constructional apraxia, and visuospatial compromise. Serial testing demonstrated relentless deterioration with additional development of transcortical sensory aphasia, Gerstmann's tetrad, and severe visuoperceptual impairment. Amnesia was not an early clinical feature. Judgment, personality, insight, and awareness remained preserved throughout most of the clinical course. Extinction in the right visual field to bilateral stimulation was the sole neurological abnormality. Early CT was normal and late MRI showed asymmetrical bioccipitoparietal atrophy with greater involvement of the left hemisphere. Results from positron emission tomography (PET) showed bilaterally asymmetric (left greater than right) occipitotemporoparietal hypometabolism. The metabolic decrement was strikingly asymmetric with a 50% reduction in glucose consumption confined to the left occipital cortex. The picture of occipitotemporoparietal compromise verified by MRI, PET, and neurobehavioural testing would be unusual for such degenerative dementias as Alzheimer's (AD) and Pick's disease, although atypical AD with predominant occipital lobe involvement cannot be excluded. This case supports the concepts of posterior cortical dementia (PCD) as a clinically distinct entity and for the first time documents its corresponding metabolic deficit using PET. Images PMID:1865209

  8. Novel Imaging of Prostate Cancer with MRI, MRI/US, and PET.

    PubMed

    Koo, Phillip J; Kwak, Jennifer J; Pokharel, Sajal; Choyke, Peter L

    2015-12-01

    Imaging of prostate cancer presents many challenges to the imaging community. There has been much progress in this space in large part due to MRI and PET radiopharmaceuticals. Though MRI has been focused on the evaluation of local disease and PET on the detection of metastatic disease, these two areas do converge and will be complementary especially with the growth of new PET/MRI technologies. In this review article, we review novel MRI, MRI/US, and PET radiopharmaceuticals which will offer insight into the future direction of imaging in prostate cancer.

  9. Novel Imaging of Prostate Cancer with MRI, MRI/US, and PET.

    PubMed

    Koo, Phillip J; Kwak, Jennifer J; Pokharel, Sajal; Choyke, Peter L

    2015-12-01

    Imaging of prostate cancer presents many challenges to the imaging community. There has been much progress in this space in large part due to MRI and PET radiopharmaceuticals. Though MRI has been focused on the evaluation of local disease and PET on the detection of metastatic disease, these two areas do converge and will be complementary especially with the growth of new PET/MRI technologies. In this review article, we review novel MRI, MRI/US, and PET radiopharmaceuticals which will offer insight into the future direction of imaging in prostate cancer. PMID:26462919

  10. Physics of MRI: a primer.

    PubMed

    Plewes, Donald B; Kucharczyk, Walter

    2012-05-01

    This article is based on an introductory lecture given for the past many years during the "MR Physics and Techniques for Clinicians" course at the Annual Meeting of the ISMRM. This introduction is not intended to be a comprehensive overview of the field, as the subject of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) physics is large and complex. Rather, it is intended to lay a conceptual foundation by which magnetic resonance image formation can be understood from an intuitive perspective. The presentation is nonmathematical, relying on simple models that take the reader progressively from the basic spin physics of nuclei, through descriptions of how the magnetic resonance signal is generated and detected in an MRI scanner, the foundations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation, and a discussion of the Fourier transform and its relation to MR image formation. The article continues with a discussion of how magnetic field gradients are used to facilitate spatial encoding and concludes with a development of basic pulse sequences and the factors defining image contrast.

  11. MRI-conditional pacemakers: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, António M; Costa, Francisco; Tralhão, António; Marques, Hugo; Cardim, Nuno; Adragão, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Use of both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pacing devices has undergone remarkable growth in recent years, and it is estimated that the majority of patients with pacemakers will need an MRI during their lifetime. These investigations will generally be denied due to the potentially dangerous interactions between cardiac devices and the magnetic fields and radio frequency energy used in MRI. Despite the increasing reports of uneventful scanning in selected patients with conventional pacemakers under close surveillance, MRI is still contraindicated in those circumstances and cannot be considered a routine procedure. These limitations prompted a series of modifications in generator and lead engineering, designed to minimize interactions that could compromise device function and patient safety. The resulting MRI-conditional pacemakers were first introduced in 2008 and the clinical experience gathered so far supports their safety in the MRI environment if certain conditions are fulfilled. With this technology, new questions and controversies arise regarding patient selection, clinical impact, and cost-effectiveness. In this review, we discuss the potential risks of MRI in patients with electronic cardiac devices and present updated information regarding the features of MRI-conditional pacemakers and the clinical experience with currently available models. Finally, we provide some guidance on how to scan patients who have these devices and discuss future directions in the field. PMID:24851058

  12. MRI endoscopy using intrinsically localized probes

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana, Shashank; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is traditionally performed with fixed externally applied gradient magnetic fields and is hence intrinsically locked to the laboratory frame of reference (FoR). Here a method for high-resolution MRI that employs active, catheter-based, tiny internal probes that utilize the spatial properties of the probe itself for localization is proposed and demonstrated at 3 T. Because these properties are intrinsic to the probe, they move with it, transforming MRI from the laboratory FoR to the FoR of the device itself, analogous to an endoscope. The “MRI endoscope” can utilize loop coils and loopless antennas with modified sensitivity, in combination with adiabatic excitation by the device itself, to restrict the MRI sensitivity to a disk-shaped plane a few mm thick. Excitation with the MRI endoscope limits the eddy currents induced in the sample to an excited volume whose size is orders of magnitude below that excited by a conventional body MRI coil. Heat testing shows maximum local temperature increases of <1 °C during MRI, within regulatory guidelines. The method is demonstrated in a kiwifruit, in intact porcine and rabbit aortas, and in an atherosclerotic human iliac artery specimen, with in-plane resolution as small as 80 μm and 1.5–5 mm slice thickness. PMID:19378751

  13. High-performance computing MRI simulations.

    PubMed

    Stöcker, Tony; Vahedipour, Kaveh; Pflugfelder, Daniel; Shah, N Jon

    2010-07-01

    A new open-source software project is presented, JEMRIS, the Jülich Extensible MRI Simulator, which provides an MRI sequence development and simulation environment for the MRI community. The development was driven by the desire to achieve generality of simulated three-dimensional MRI experiments reflecting modern MRI systems hardware. The accompanying computational burden is overcome by means of parallel computing. Many aspects are covered that have not hitherto been simultaneously investigated in general MRI simulations such as parallel transmit and receive, important off-resonance effects, nonlinear gradients, and arbitrary spatiotemporal parameter variations at different levels. The latter can be used to simulate various types of motion, for instance. The JEMRIS user interface is very simple to use, but nevertheless it presents few limitations. MRI sequences with arbitrary waveforms and complex interdependent modules are modeled in a graphical user interface-based environment requiring no further programming. This manuscript describes the concepts, methods, and performance of the software. Examples of novel simulation results in active fields of MRI research are given.

  14. Pantopaque simulating thrombosed intracranial aneurysms on MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lidov, M.W.; Silvers, A.R.; Mosesson, R.E.; Stollman, A.L.; Som, P.M.

    1996-03-01

    A patient is presented in whom iophendylate (Pantopaque) within the basal cisterns closely resembled the appearance on MRI of thrombosed aneurysms of the middle cerebral arteries. The sometimes subtle differences between the appearances on MRI of Pantopaque and aneurysmal clot are discussed to permit accurate diagnosis without resorting to more invasive diagnostic tests, such as cerebral angiography. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Cranial computed tomography and MRI. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Physics and Instrumentation: CT and MRI; Normal Cranial CT and MRI Anatomy; The Orbit; The ventricles and Subarachnoid Spaces in Children; Primary Tumors in Children; Trauma: Craniocerebral and Craniofacial; Infectious Disease; and Stroke.

  16. NMR, MRI, and spectroscopic MRI in inhomogeneous fields

    DOEpatents

    Demas, Vasiliki; Pines, Alexander; Martin, Rachel W; Franck, John; Reimer, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-24

    A method for locally creating effectively homogeneous or "clean" magnetic field gradients (of high uniformity) for imaging (with NMR, MRI, or spectroscopic MRI) both in in-situ and ex-situ systems with high degrees of inhomogeneous field strength. THe method of imaging comprises: a) providing a functional approximation of an inhomogeneous static magnetic field strength B.sub.0({right arrow over (r)}) at a spatial position {right arrow over (r)}; b) providing a temporal functional approximation of {right arrow over (G)}.sub.shim(t) with i basis functions and j variables for each basis function, resulting in v.sub.ij variables; c) providing a measured value .OMEGA., which is an temporally accumulated dephasing due to the inhomogeneities of B.sub.0({right arrow over(r)}); and d) minimizing a difference in the local dephasing angle .phi.({right arrow over (r)},t)=.gamma..intg..sub.0.sup.t{square root over (|{right arrow over (B)}.sub.1({right arrow over (r)},t')|.sup.2+({right arrow over (r)}{right arrow over (G)}.sub.shimG.sub.shim(t')+.parallel.{right arrow over (B)}.sub.0({right arrow over (r)}).parallel..DELTA..omega.({right arrow over (r)},t'/.gamma/).sup.2)}dt'-.OMEGA. by varying the v.sub.ij variables to form a set of minimized v.sub.ij variables. The method requires calibration of the static fields prior to minimization, but may thereafter be implemented without such calibration, may be used in open or closed systems, and potentially portable systems.

  17. Late Silurian plutons in Yucatan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M. B.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1996-08-01

    U-Pb measurements of zircons from two composite plutons in the Maya Mountains of the Yucatan Block (Belize) give Late Silurian ages. Zircons from one of the five compositional phases of the Mountain Pine Ridge pluton yield an age of 418±3.6 Ma. A second compositional phase gives a minimum age of 404 Ma, and zircons from a third phase, although plagued with high common Pb, yield ages consistent with the other two. Zircons from one compositional phase of the Hummingbird-Mullins River pluton indicate an age of about 410-420 Ma. These data demonstrate that two of the three Maya Mountains plutons residing among the strata of the Late Pennsylvanian through Permian Santa Rosa Group are older than that sedimentation. Although the third pluton was not dated, both the similarity of sedimentary facies patterns adjacent to it to those adjacent to one of the plutons dated as Late Silurian and a published single Rb-Sr age of 428 ± 41 Ma suggest this third pluton also was emergent during Santa Rosa deposition. Thus the new U/Pb dates and other data suggest that all three Maya Mountains plutons pre-date Late Carboniferous sedimentation and that none intrude the Santa Rosa Group. Although very uniform ages of about 230 Ma amongst all plutons, derived from abundant earlier dating by the K-Ar system, led to the conclusion that intrusion mostly had occurred in the Late Triassic, the U-Pb ages (obtained from the same sites as the K-Ar dates) demonstrate that the K-Ar ages do not derive from a Late Triassic intrusive episode. The K-Ar dates probably are a signature of the rifting associated with Pangean breakup and formation of the Gulf of Mexico. In a reconstructed Pangea, the position of the Maya Mountains Late Silurian plutons suggests that the Late Silurian Acadian-Caledonian orogen of eastern North America extended through the region of the future Gulf of Mexico. Finally, the U-Pb ages of the Maya Mountains plutons are the same as those of a group of shocked zircons found in the

  18. [Late-onset dysthymic states].

    PubMed

    Siranchiev, M A

    2002-01-01

    Sixty patients with dysthymic states which had emerged in later age of 60-80 years were examined. Two clinical types of dysthymic states were described: anergic (20 patients) and hypothymic (40 patients). Different comorbid mental disorders--obsessive-phobic (14 cases), somatoform (10), personality deviations (20) and psycho-organic (7)--were found to be characteristic of late-onset dysthymic states. According to developmental features, late dysthymia was primary (first manifested in the elderly) and secondary (develops after several depressive episodes). In diagnostic terms, the former is considered as "dysthymia" (F34.1 ICD-10) and the latter--as "recurrent depressive disorder" (F33).

  19. Late-Notice HIE Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Provide a response to MOWG action item 1410-01: Analyze close approaches which have required mission team action on short notice. Determine why the approaches were identified later in the process than most other events. Method: Performed an analysis to determine whether there is any correlation between late notice event identification and space weather, sparse tracking, or high drag objects, which would allow preventive action to be taken Examined specific late notice events identified by missions as problematic to try to identify root cause and attempt to relate them to the correlation analysis.

  20. [Late-onset depression : Pathophysiology, diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Notzon, S; Alferink, J; Arolt, V

    2016-09-01

    Late-onset depression (LOD) is defined as depression manifesting for the first time in later life. Up to now, there has been no exact definition of the lower age limit for LOD. Psychopathological symptoms of LOD do not fundamentally differ from depression in other phases of life; however, cognitive deficits are typically more pronounced. The LOD is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Imaging studies show reduction in gray matter volume and white matter lesions caused by vascular diseases. The occurrence of depression with vascular lesions of the brain is also referred to as "vascular depression". The diagnostic procedure includes a detailed medical history and the observation of psychopathological changes, physical examination, laboratory tests, electroencephalograph (EEG), electrocardiograph (ECG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head and neuropsychological tests to measure cognitive deficits. Psychotherapy is an effective treatment option. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first-line pharmacological therapy. PMID:27531211

  1. THE DEFAULT MODE NETWORK IN LATE-LIFE ANXIOUS DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Andreescu, Carmen; Wu, Minjie; Butters, Meryl A.; Figurski, Jennifer; Reynolds, Charles F.; Aizenstein, Howard J

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this exploratory study is to examine the default-mode network (DMN) functional connectivity pattern in elderly depressed subjects with and without comorbid anxiety. Methods Functional MRI data were collected for 11 elderly depressed subjects with high comorbid anxiety and 8 elderly depressed subjects with low anxiety. We analyzed the resting connectivity patterns of the posterior cingulate cortex. We compared the DMN activity in the elderly depressed subjects with high versus low comorbid anxiety. Results Depressed elderly with high comorbid anxiety had increased functional connectivity in the posterior regions of the DMN and decreased functional connectivity in the anterior regions of the DMN. Conclusion Elderly depressed subjects with high anxiety display a dissociative pattern of connectivity in the DMN when compared with elderly depressed subjects with low anxiety. These results suggest a unique biological signature of the anxiety symptoms in the context of late-life depression. PMID:21765344

  2. ON THE ANISOTROPIC NATURE OF MRI-DRIVEN TURBULENCE IN ASTROPHYSICAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Gareth C.; Pessah, Martin E. E-mail: mpessah@nbi.dk

    2015-04-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is thought to play an important role in enabling accretion in sufficiently ionized astrophysical disks. The rate at which MRI-driven turbulence transports angular momentum is intimately related to both the strength of the amplitudes of the fluctuations on various scales and the degree of anisotropy of the underlying turbulence. This has motivated several studies to characterize the distribution of turbulent power in spectral space. In this paper we investigate the anisotropic nature of MRI-driven turbulence using a pseudo-spectral code and introduce novel ways for providing a robust characterization of the underlying turbulence. We study the growth of the MRI and the subsequent transition to turbulence via parasitic instabilities, identifying their potential signature in the late linear stage. We show that the general flow properties vary in a quasi-periodic way on timescales comparable to ∼10 inverse angular frequencies, motivating the temporal analysis of its anisotropy. We introduce a 3D tensor invariant analysis to quantify and classify the evolution of the anisotropy of the turbulent flow. This analysis shows a continuous high level of anisotropy, with brief sporadic transitions toward two- and three-component isotropic turbulent flow. This temporal-dependent anisotropy renders standard shell averaging especially when used simultaneously with long temporal averages, inadequate for characterizing MRI-driven turbulence. We propose an alternative way to extract spectral information from the turbulent magnetized flow, whose anisotropic character depends strongly on time. This consists of stacking 1D Fourier spectra along three orthogonal directions that exhibit maximum anisotropy in Fourier space. The resulting averaged spectra show that the power along each of the three independent directions differs by several orders of magnitude over most scales, except the largest ones. Our results suggest that a first

  3. On the Anisotropic Nature of MRI-driven Turbulence in Astrophysical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Gareth C.; Pessah, Martin E.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is thought to play an important role in enabling accretion in sufficiently ionized astrophysical disks. The rate at which MRI-driven turbulence transports angular momentum is intimately related to both the strength of the amplitudes of the fluctuations on various scales and the degree of anisotropy of the underlying turbulence. This has motivated several studies to characterize the distribution of turbulent power in spectral space. In this paper we investigate the anisotropic nature of MRI-driven turbulence using a pseudo-spectral code and introduce novel ways for providing a robust characterization of the underlying turbulence. We study the growth of the MRI and the subsequent transition to turbulence via parasitic instabilities, identifying their potential signature in the late linear stage. We show that the general flow properties vary in a quasi-periodic way on timescales comparable to ∼10 inverse angular frequencies, motivating the temporal analysis of its anisotropy. We introduce a 3D tensor invariant analysis to quantify and classify the evolution of the anisotropy of the turbulent flow. This analysis shows a continuous high level of anisotropy, with brief sporadic transitions toward two- and three-component isotropic turbulent flow. This temporal-dependent anisotropy renders standard shell averaging especially when used simultaneously with long temporal averages, inadequate for characterizing MRI-driven turbulence. We propose an alternative way to extract spectral information from the turbulent magnetized flow, whose anisotropic character depends strongly on time. This consists of stacking 1D Fourier spectra along three orthogonal directions that exhibit maximum anisotropy in Fourier space. The resulting averaged spectra show that the power along each of the three independent directions differs by several orders of magnitude over most scales, except the largest ones. Our results suggest that a first

  4. Language Lateralisation in Late Proficient Bilinguals: A Lexical Decision fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Haeme R. P.; Badzakova-Trajkov, Gjurgjica; Waldie, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately half the world's population can now speak more than one language. Understanding the neural basis of language organisation in bilinguals, and whether the cortical networks involved during language processing differ from that of monolinguals, is therefore an important area of research. A main issue concerns whether L2 (second language)…

  5. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-04-22

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  6. Mapping human preictal and ictal haemodynamic networks using simultaneous intracranial EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Umair J; Centeno, Maria; Thornton, Rachel C; Rodionov, Roman; Vulliemoz, Serge; McEvoy, Andrew W; Diehl, Beate; Walker, Matthew C; Duncan, John S; Carmichael, David W; Lemieux, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Accurately characterising the brain networks involved in seizure activity may have important implications for our understanding of epilepsy. Intracranial EEG-fMRI can be used to capture focal epileptic events in humans with exquisite electrophysiological sensitivity and allows for identification of brain structures involved in this phenomenon over the entire brain. We investigated ictal BOLD networks using the simultaneous intracranial EEG-fMRI (icEEG-fMRI) in a 30 year-old male undergoing invasive presurgical evaluation with bilateral depth electrode implantations in amygdalae and hippocampi for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. One spontaneous focal electrographic seizure was recorded. The aims of the data analysis were firstly to map BOLD changes related to the ictal activity identified on icEEG and secondly to compare different fMRI modelling approaches. Visual inspection of the icEEG showed an onset dominated by beta activity involving the right amygdala and hippocampus lasting 6.4 s (ictal onset phase), followed by gamma activity bilaterally lasting 14.8 s (late ictal phase). The fMRI data was analysed using SPM8 using two modelling approaches: firstly, purely based on the visually identified phases of the seizure and secondly, based on EEG spectral dynamics quantification. For the visual approach the two ictal phases were modelled as 'ON' blocks convolved with the haemodynamic response function; in addition the BOLD changes during the 30 s preceding the onset were modelled using a flexible basis set. For the quantitative fMRI modelling approach two models were evaluated: one consisting of the variations in beta and gamma bands power, thereby adding a quantitative element to the visually-derived models, and another based on principal components analysis of the entire spectrogram in attempt to reduce the bias associated with the visual appreciation of the icEEG. BOLD changes related to the visually defined ictal onset phase were revealed in the medial and

  7. Massively Parallel MRI Detector Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called “ultimate” SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. PMID:23453758

  8. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  9. Intra voxel analysis in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosanio, Michele; Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    A new application of Compressive Sensing (CS) in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) field is presented. In particular, first results of the Intra Voxel Analysis (IVA) technique are reported. The idea is to exploit CS peculiarities in order to distinguish different contributions inside the same resolution cell, instead of reconstructing images from not fully sampled k-space acquisition. Applied to MRI field, this means the possibility of estimating the presence of different tissues inside the same voxel, i.e. in one pixel of the obtained image. In other words, the method is the first attempt, as far as we know, of achieving Spectroscopy-like results starting from each pixel of MR images. In particular, tissues are distinguished each others by evaluating their spin-spin relaxation times. Within this manuscript, first results on clinical dataset, in particular a phantom made by aqueous solution and oil and an occipital brain lesion corresponding to a metastatic breast cancer nodule, are reported. Considering the phantom dataset, in particular focusing on the slice where the separation between water and oil occurs, the methodology is able to distinguish the two components with different spin-spin relaxation times. With respect to clinical dataset,focusing on a voxel of the lesion area, the approach is able to detect the presence of two tissues, namely the healthy and the cancer related ones, while in other location outside the lesion only the healthy tissue is detected. Of course, these are the first results of the proposed methodology, further studies on different types of clinical datasets are required in order to widely validate the approach. Although few datasets have been considered, results seem both interesting and promising.

  10. Early and Late Retirement Exits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brougham, Ruby R.; Walsh, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The current study proposes that personal need fulfillment (relatedness, generativity, identity, growth, and finances) predicts early and late retirement intentions. The personal needs of 160 full-time older employees were measured by personal goals, job satisfactions, job characteristics, and intrinsic motivation. Results suggest that the personal…

  11. Late onset globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Grewal, R P; Petronas, N; Barton, N W

    1991-11-01

    A 29 year old male with onset of globoid cell leukodystrophy at age 14 is described. This is the first case of enzymatically confirmed globoid cell leukodystrophy with onset of symptoms after the age of ten. This patient is unique because of the late onset and slow progression and extends the clinical spectrum of globoid cell leukodystrophy.

  12. Late onset globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, R P; Petronas, N; Barton, N W

    1991-01-01

    A 29 year old male with onset of globoid cell leukodystrophy at age 14 is described. This is the first case of enzymatically confirmed globoid cell leukodystrophy with onset of symptoms after the age of ten. This patient is unique because of the late onset and slow progression and extends the clinical spectrum of globoid cell leukodystrophy. Images PMID:1800646

  13. MRI visualisation by digitally reconstructed radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrurier, Antoine; Bönsch, Andrea; Lau, Robert; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    Visualising volumetric medical images such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) clients is often achieved by image browsing in sagittal, coronal or axial views or three-dimensional (3D) rendering. This latter technique requires fine thresholding for MRI. On the other hand, computing virtual radiograph images, also referred to as digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR), provides in a single two-dimensional (2D) image a complete overview of the 3D data. It appears therefore as a powerful alternative for MRI visualisation and preview in PACS. This study describes a method to compute DRR from T1-weighted MRI. After segmentation of the background, a histogram distribution analysis is performed and each foreground MRI voxel is labeled as one of three tissues: cortical bone, also known as principal absorber of the X-rays, muscle and fat. An intensity level is attributed to each voxel according to the Hounsfield scale, linearly related to the X-ray attenuation coefficient. Each DRR pixel is computed as the accumulation of the new intensities of the MRI dataset along the corresponding X-ray. The method has been tested on 16 T1-weighted MRI sets. Anterior-posterior and lateral DRR have been computed with reasonable qualities and avoiding any manual tissue segmentations. This proof-of-concept holds for research application for use in clinical PACS.

  14. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI.

    PubMed

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; LaPierre, Cristen D; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E J; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm(3) imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices. PMID:26469756

  15. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lapierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices.

  16. Recommendations for Real-Time Speech MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Sutton, Brad P.; Miquel, Marc E.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (RT-MRI) is being increasingly used for speech and vocal production research studies. Several imaging protocols have emerged based on advances in RT-MRI acquisition, reconstruction, and audio-processing methods. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art, discusses technical considerations, and provides specific guidance for new groups entering this field. We provide recommendations for performing RT-MRI of the upper airway. This is a consensus statement stemming from the ISMRM-endorsed Speech MRI summit held in Los Angeles, February 2014. A major unmet need identified at the summit was the need for consensus on protocols that can be easily adapted by researchers equipped with conventional MRI systems. To this end, we provide a discussion of tradeoffs in RT-MRI in terms of acquisition requirements, a priori assumptions, artifacts, computational load, and performance for different speech tasks. We provide four recommended protocols and identify appropriate acquisition and reconstruction tools. We list pointers to open-source software that facilitate implementation. We conclude by discussing current open challenges in the methodological aspects of RT-MRI of speech. PMID:26174802

  17. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  18. Nonvisual spatial navigation fMRI lateralizes mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in a patient with congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Grunwald, Thomas; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; König, Kristina; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-01-01

    Nonvisual spatial navigation functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may help clinicians determine memory lateralization in blind individuals with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report on an exceptional case of a congenitally blind woman with late-onset left MTLE undergoing presurgical memory fMRI. To activate mesial temporal structures despite the lack of visual memory, the patient was requested to recall familiar routes using nonvisual multisensory and verbal cues. Our findings demonstrate the diagnostic value of a nonvisual fMRI task to lateralize MTLE despite congenital blindness and may therefore contribute to the risk assessment for postsurgical amnesia in rare cases with refractory MTLE and accompanying congenital blindness.

  19. MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatments.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-02-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) allows noninvasive focal delivery of energy deep into soft tissues. The focused energy can be used to modify and eliminate tissue for therapeutic purposes while the energy delivery is targeted and monitored using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI compatible methods to deliver these exposures have undergone rapid development over the past 10 years such that clinical treatments are now routinely performed. This paper will review the current technical and clinical status of MRI-guided focused ultrasound therapy and discuss future research and development opportunities.

  20. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  1. MRI findings in Little Leaguer's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Song, James C; Lazarus, Martin L; Song, Alexandra Pae

    2006-02-01

    Little leaguer's shoulder, a stress injury of the proximal humeral physis, should be considered in the differential diagnosis for an adolescent baseball player with shoulder pain, especially if the player is pitching regularly in a competitive environment. While roentgenographs may or may not be helpful, depending on the duration and severity of the injury, we report the MRI appearance of a case of little leaguer's shoulder. We found MRI helpful in diagnosing injury to the growth plate that was radiographically occult; furthermore, we were able to document the patient's progress with a follow-up MRI examination, which showed improvement with treatment.

  2. MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy.

    PubMed

    Gulko, Edwin; Collins, Lee K; Murphy, Robyn C; Thornhill, Beverly A; Taragin, Benjamin H

    2015-02-01

    In modern times scurvy is a rarely encountered disease caused by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) deficiency. However, sporadic cases of scurvy persist, particularly within the pediatric population. Recent individual case reports highlight an increased incidence of scurvy among patients with autism or developmental delay, with isolated case reports detailing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of scurvy in these pediatric populations. We present the MRI findings of scurvy in four patients with autism or developmental delay, and review the literature on MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy. Despite its rarity, the radiologist must consider scurvy in a pediatric patient with a restricted diet presenting with arthralgia or myalgia. PMID:25109378

  3. MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy.

    PubMed

    Gulko, Edwin; Collins, Lee K; Murphy, Robyn C; Thornhill, Beverly A; Taragin, Benjamin H

    2015-02-01

    In modern times scurvy is a rarely encountered disease caused by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) deficiency. However, sporadic cases of scurvy persist, particularly within the pediatric population. Recent individual case reports highlight an increased incidence of scurvy among patients with autism or developmental delay, with isolated case reports detailing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of scurvy in these pediatric populations. We present the MRI findings of scurvy in four patients with autism or developmental delay, and review the literature on MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy. Despite its rarity, the radiologist must consider scurvy in a pediatric patient with a restricted diet presenting with arthralgia or myalgia.

  4. P09.03USE OF METHYLPREDNISOLONE IN LATE EFFECTS OF RADIOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Moreno, J.; Gómez, L.; Jiménez de la Peña, M.; Alonso-Torres, A.; Maycas-Cepeda, T.; Barbero-Bordallo, N.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radiation therapy to the brain can cause problems months or years after treatment ends. Side effects can include memory loss, movement disorders, urinary incontinence, trouble thinking, or personality changes. There is no current treatment for this late complication. and it has been proved bevacizumab, steroids, hyperbaric O2 with different results. We present three cases in which the use of methylprednisolone, as in multiple sclerosis relapses, has had a very good response in terms of clinical and radiological evaluation. Case 1: 43 year-old-woman with recurrent vestibular schwannoma received radiation therapy on the tumour site after the second surgery. Six months later she consulted for diplopia, ataxia and worsening of her facial palsy since a few days ago. The neurological exam showed a right internuclear ophtalmoplegia, vertical nistagmus with upward gaze, right limbs dysmetria and ataxia. The MRI showed high-signal intensity lesions with contrast enhancement in the radiation field (bulbopontine region, right pons and cerebellar peduncle). The diagnosis was subacute rhombencephalitis. We started five days of 1 gr of methylprednisolone. The symptomatology and the MRI changes resolved completely one month after therapy. Case 2: A 60 year-old-man with temporal glioblastoma diagnosed in 2010. He was treated with Stupp regimen followed by temozolomide. Six months later the patient was getting worse of his neurological symptons with abulia and apathy. A MRI showed worsening in brain edema with an increase in contrast enhancement, with low relative cerebral blood volume. The diagnosis was late pseudoprogression and he received a cycle of 250 mg of methylprednisolone during five days with resolution of the clinical symptoms and significant improvement in MRI brain edema. Case 3: A 33 year-old-woman diagnosed in 1993 of temporal astrocytoma grade III. It was resected and afterwards radiotherapy. In 2012 started with instability and dizziness. Examination

  5. Late running is not too late against Alzheimer's pathology.

    PubMed

    Herring, Arne; Münster, Yvonne; Metzdorf, Judith; Bolczek, Bastien; Krüssel, Sarah; Krieter, David; Yavuz, Ilkay; Karim, Fro; Roggendorf, Constanze; Stang, Anthony; Wang, Yachao; Hermann, Dirk M; Teuber-Hanselmann, Sarah; Keyvani, Kathy

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade a vast number of animal studies have produced overwhelming evidence that exercise not only compensates for memory loss by increasing brain plasticity and cognitive reserve but also directly counteracts Alzheimer-like pathology when provided before disease onset or in early disease stages. But so far, there is little knowledge about therapeutic effects of training when started in advanced disease stages. In the present study we show that following seven months of sedentary life style five months of wheel running, started four months after disease onset was still able to mitigate at least some aspects of the full-blown Alzheimer's pathology in TgCRND8 mice. Late running had mild but significant effects on structural plasticity by increasing the dendritic complexity. It further reduced beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaque burden and enhanced Aβ clearance across the blood-brain barrier, along with attenuating microgliosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and autophagy deficits, resulting in better memory performance and less agitation. However, unlike early exercise, late running did not affect abnormal amyloid precursor protein metabolism, tau pathology, or angiogenesis. These results allow concluding that it is never too late to counteract Alzheimer's disease with physical training but the earlier the intervention starts, the more pronounced is the therapeutic potential. PMID:27312772

  6. Late running is not too late against Alzheimer's pathology.

    PubMed

    Herring, Arne; Münster, Yvonne; Metzdorf, Judith; Bolczek, Bastien; Krüssel, Sarah; Krieter, David; Yavuz, Ilkay; Karim, Fro; Roggendorf, Constanze; Stang, Anthony; Wang, Yachao; Hermann, Dirk M; Teuber-Hanselmann, Sarah; Keyvani, Kathy

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade a vast number of animal studies have produced overwhelming evidence that exercise not only compensates for memory loss by increasing brain plasticity and cognitive reserve but also directly counteracts Alzheimer-like pathology when provided before disease onset or in early disease stages. But so far, there is little knowledge about therapeutic effects of training when started in advanced disease stages. In the present study we show that following seven months of sedentary life style five months of wheel running, started four months after disease onset was still able to mitigate at least some aspects of the full-blown Alzheimer's pathology in TgCRND8 mice. Late running had mild but significant effects on structural plasticity by increasing the dendritic complexity. It further reduced beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaque burden and enhanced Aβ clearance across the blood-brain barrier, along with attenuating microgliosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and autophagy deficits, resulting in better memory performance and less agitation. However, unlike early exercise, late running did not affect abnormal amyloid precursor protein metabolism, tau pathology, or angiogenesis. These results allow concluding that it is never too late to counteract Alzheimer's disease with physical training but the earlier the intervention starts, the more pronounced is the therapeutic potential.

  7. Chronotype Modulates Language Processing-Related Cerebral Activity during Functional MRI (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Warbrick, Tracy; Shah, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Based on individual daily physiological cycles, humans can be classified as early (EC), late (LC) and intermediate (IC) chronotypes. Recent studies have verified that chronotype-specificity relates to performance on cognitive tasks: participants perform more efficiently when tested in the chronotype-specific optimal time of day than when tested in their non-optimal time. Surprisingly, imaging studies focussing on the underlying neural mechanisms of potential chronotype-specificities are sparse. Moreover, chronotype-specific alterations of language-related semantic processing have been neglected so far. Methods 16 male, healthy ECs, 16 ICs and 16 LCs participated in a fast event-related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) paradigm probing semantic priming. Subjects read two subsequently presented words (prime, target) and were requested to determine whether the target word was an existing word or a non-word. Subjects were tested during their individual evening hours when homeostatic sleep pressure and circadian alertness levels are high to ensure equal entrainment. Results Chronotype-specificity is associated with task-performance and brain activation. First, ECs exhibited slower reaction times than LCs. Second, ECs showed attenuated BOLD responses in several language-related brain areas, e.g. in the left postcentral gyrus, left and right precentral gyrus and in the right superior frontal gyrus. Additionally, increased BOLD responses were revealed for LCs as compared to ICs in task-related areas, e.g. in the right inferior parietal lobule and in the right postcentral gyrus. Conclusions These findings reveal that even basic language processes are associated with chronotype-specific neuronal mechanisms. Consequently, results might change the way we schedule patient evaluations and/or healthy subjects in e.g. experimental research and adding “chronotype” as a statistical covariate. PMID:26397824

  8. An fMRI study of language lateralization in children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Byars, Anna W.

    2005-01-01

    Language lateralization in the brain is dependent on family history of handedness, personal handedness, pathology, and other factors. The influence of age on language lateralization is not completely understood. Increasing left lateralization of language with age has been observed in children while the reverse has been noted in healthy young adults. It is not known whether the trend of decreasing language lateralization with age continues in the late decades of life and at what age the inflection in language lateralization trend as a function of age occurs. In this study, we examined the effect of age on language lateralization in 170 healthy right-handed children and adults ages 5 – 67 using functional MRI (fMRI) and a verb generation task. Our findings indicate that language lateralization to the dominant hemisphere increases between the ages 5 and 20 years, plateaus between 20 and 25 years, and slowly decreases between 25 and 70 years. PMID:16035047

  9. Refsum Disease Presenting with a Late-Onset Leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bompaire, Flavie; Marcaud, Véronique; Trionnaire, Emmanuelle Le; Sedel, Frédéric; Levade, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Adult Refsum disease is an autosomal recessive peroxisomal disorder characterized by phytanic acid storage. Clinical symptoms usually begin in late childhood before the age of 20. Typical clinical presentation includes nyctalopia caused by retinitis pigmentosa, and anosmia. After 10-15 years, deafness, cerebellar ataxia, polyneuropathy, ichthyosis, and cardiac arrhythmia can occur.We report the case of a very late-onset adult Refsum disease presenting with marked cognitive decline and severe leukoencephalopathy, without peripheral nervous system involvement. Brain MRI showed a leukoencephalopathy involving the periventricular white matter, subcortical area, and the brainstem with relative sparing of juxtacortical U fibers. This was associated with severe cortical and subcortical atrophy with ventricle dilatation. MR spectroscopy showed a marked increase in the choline/NAA ratio. Elevated plasma phytanic acid level was found, whereas plasma levels of pristanic and very long chain fatty acids were normal. The patient is homozygous for a previously undescribed PHYH frameshift mutation. Whether the very unusual phenotype is related to this peculiar mutation remains unclear.

  10. Functional Connectivity in Autosomal Dominant and Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jewell B; Brier, Matthew R; Bateman, Randall J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Benzinger, Tammie L; Xiong, Chengjie; Raichle, Marcus; Holtzman, David M; Sperling, Reisa A; Mayeux, Richard; Ghetti, Bernardino; Ringman, John M; Salloway, Stephen; McDade, Eric; Rossor, Martin N; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M; Fox, Nick C; Koeppe, Robert A; Jack, Clifford R; Mathis, Chester A; Oliver, Angela; Blazey, Tyler M; Moulder, Krista; Buckles, Virginia; Hornbeck, Russ; Chhatwal, Jasmeer; Schultz, Aaron P; Goate, Alison M; Fagan, Anne M; Cairns, Nigel J; Marcus, Daniel S; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau M

    2014-01-01

    Importance Autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) is caused by rare genetic mutations in three specific genes, in contrast to late-onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD), which has a more polygenetic risk profile. Design, Setting, and Participants We analyzed functional connectivity in multiple brain resting state networks (RSNs) in a cross-sectional cohort of ADAD (N=79) and LOAD (N=444) human participants using resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) at multiple international academic sites. Main Outcomes and Measures For both types of AD, we quantified and compared functional connectivity changes in RSNs as a function of dementia severity as measured by clinical dementia rating (CDR). In ADAD, we qualitatively investigated functional connectivity changes with respect to estimated years from onset of symptoms within five RSNs. Results Functional connectivity decreases with increasing CDR were similar for both LOAD and ADAD in multiple RSNs. Ordinal logistic regression models constructed in each type of AD accurately predicted CDR stage in the other, further demonstrating similarity of functional connectivity loss in each disease type. Among ADAD participants, functional connectivity in multiple RSNs appeared qualitatively lower in asymptomatic mutation carriers near their anticipated age of symptom onset compared to asymptomatic mutation non-carriers. Conclusions and Relevance rs-fcMRI changes with progressing AD severity are similar between ADAD and LOAD. Rs-fcMRI may be a useful endpoint for LOAD and ADAD therapy trials. ADAD disease process may be an effective model for LOAD disease process. PMID:25069482

  11. Multimodal Assessment Reveals Late-Onset Hemispheric Shift of Language in a Child with Meningocerebral Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Anna; Wilke, Marko; Alber, Michael; Milian, Monika; Bornemann, Antje; Ernemann, Ulrike; Rona, Sabine

    2016-10-01

    We report on a girl with progressive left frontal tissue destruction starting at the age of almost 8 years. She manifested acutely with epileptic seizures accompanied by Broca aphasia as well as transient right hemiparesis. Due to refractory epilepsy developing over the next years, which originated from the left frontal lobe, the decision was made to proceed to epilepsy surgery. By then, her language functions had recovered despite progressive left frontal tissue-destruction, raising the possibility of a hemispheric shift of language. Clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was conducted to localize brain regions involved in language production. A complex pattern of clear right-hemispheric dominance, but with some left-sided contribution was found. However, a Wada test suggested the left hemisphere to be critical, seemingly contradicting fMRI. Invasive electroencephalogram recordings could reconcile these results by identifying the fMRI-detected, residual left-sided activation as being relevant for speech production. Only by combining the localizing information from fMRI with the information obtained by two invasive procedures could the unusual pattern of late-onset language reorganization be uncovered. This allowed for extensive left frontal resection, with histology confirming meningocerebral angiodysplasia. Postoperatively, language functions were preserved and seizure outcome was excellent. The implications of our findings for presurgical assessments in children are discussed. PMID:27462834

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging predictors of treatment response in late-life depression.

    PubMed

    Aizenstein, Howard J; Khalaf, Alexander; Walker, Sarah E; Andreescu, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    In older adults, depression not only results in more years lived with disability than any other disease but it also carries additional risks of suicide, medical comorbidities, and family caregiving burden. Because it can take many months to identify an effective treatment regimen, it is of utmost importance to shorten the window of time and identify early on what medications and dosages will work effectively for individuals having depression. Late-life depression (LLD) has been associated with greater burden of age-related changes (eg, atrophy, white matter ischemic changes, and functional connectivity). Depression in midlife has been shown to alter affective reactivity and regulation, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in LLD have replicated the same abnormalities. Effective treatment can normalize these alterations. This article provides a review of the current literature using structural and functional neuroimaging to identify MRI predictors of treatment response in LLD. The majority of the literature on structural MRI has focused on the vascular depression hypothesis, and studies support the view that loss of brain volume and white matter integrity was associated with poorer treatment outcomes. Studies using fMRI have reported that lower task-based activity in the prefrontal cortex and limbic regions was associated with poorer outcome. These imaging markers may be integrated into clinical decision making to attain better treatment outcomes in the future. PMID:24381231

  13. MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Bent, C L; Sahdev, A; Rockall, A G; Singh, N; Sohaib, S A; Reznek, R H

    2009-04-01

    This review was performed to describe the range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of borderline ovarian tumours. The MRI findings in 26 patients with 31 borderline ovarian tumours (mean age: 40.1 years, range: 14-85 years) were retrospectively reviewed. For each tumour, site, size, MRI characteristics, and enhancement following gadolinium administration were recorded. There were 20 serous and 11 mucinous borderline ovarian subtypes. Nine of 26 patients demonstrated bilateral disease on MRI; synchronous contralateral ovarian disease included three benign, five serous borderline, and one serous invasive tumour. A history of a metachronous mucinous borderline tumour was identified in one patient. MRI appearances were classified into four morphological categories: group 1 (6/31, 19%), unilocular cysts; group 2 (6/31, 19%), minimally septate cysts with papillary projections; group 3 (14/31, 45%), markedly septate lesions with plaque-like excrescences; and group 4 (5/31, 16%), predominantly solid with exophytic papillary projections, all of serous subtype. There was a significant difference in mean volume between serous (841.5 cm(3)) and mucinous (6358.2 cm(3)) subtypes (p=0.009). All tumours demonstrated at least one MRI feature suggestive of malignancy. The present review demonstrates the variable MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours along with imaging features suggestive of tumour subtype. In patients in whom the clinical features are suggestive of a borderline ovarian tumour (young age and normal or minimally elevated CA125), the ability to predict a borderline disease using morphological features observed on MRI would be extremely helpful in surgical planning, with the potential to offer fertility or ovary-preserving surgery. Future studies are required to further this aim.

  14. Cranial MRI in neonatal hypernatraemic dehydration.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, A; Yiğit, S; Firat, M; Oran, O

    2000-05-01

    Severe neonatal hypernatraemia is a life-threatening electrolyte disorder because of its neurological complications. These are brain oedema, intracranial haemorrhages, haemorrhagic infarcts and thromboses. There are few reports concerning the radiological findings in the central nervous system in severe neonatal hypernatraemia. Cranial MRI findings in hypernatraemia have been reported in an older child, but have not been described in newborn infants. We report the cranial MRI findings in a newborn infant with acute renal failure and severe hypernatraemia.

  15. Infantile Refsum disease: serial evaluation with MRI.

    PubMed

    Cakirer, Sinan; Savas, Mahmut R

    2005-02-01

    Refsum disease is a rare metabolic disorder, which is characterized by the accumulation of phytanic acid in the blood and tissues, including the brain. A variant of this condition that occurs in young children is called infantile Refsum disease. The MRI findings of symmetrical signal change involving the corticospinal tracts, cerebellar dentate nuclei, and corpus callosum are characteristic. We report the serial MRI findings of a child with this rare metabolic disorder.

  16. MRI and MRS of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bob L; Hu, Jiani

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain tumors, including the primary applications and basic terminology involved. Readers who wish to know more about this broad subject should seek out the referenced books (1. Tofts (2003) Quantitative MRI of the brain. Measuring changes caused by disease. Wiley; Bradley and Stark (1999) 2. Magnetic resonance imaging, 3rd Edition. Mosby Inc; Brown and Semelka (2003) 3. MRI basic principles and applications, 3rd Edition. Wiley-Liss) or reviews (4. Top Magn Reson Imaging 17:127-36, 2006; 5. JMRI 24:709-724, 2006; 6. Am J Neuroradiol 27:1404-1411, 2006).MRI is the most popular means of diagnosing human brain tumors. The inherent difference in the magnetic resonance (MR) properties of water between normal tissues and tumors results in contrast differences on the image that provide the basis for distinguishing tumors from normal tissues. In contrast to MRI, which provides spatial maps or images using water signals of the tissues, proton MRS detects signals of tissue metabolites. MRS can complement MRI because the observed MRS peaks can be linked to inherent differences in biochemical profiles between normal tissues and tumors.The goal of MRI and MRS is to characterize brain tumors, including tumor core, edge, edema, volume, types, and grade. The commonly used brain tumor MRI protocol includes T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images taken both before and after the injection of a contrast agent (typically gadolinium: Gd). The commonly used MRS technique is either point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM).

  17. What physics does affect the MRI threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgisonis, V. I.; Lakhin, V. P.; Khalzov, I. V.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    2010-06-16

    Several physical effects, which can considerably decrease the magnetorotational instability (MRI) threshold are discussed. First, we show that MRI features are changed significantly in non-uniform magnetic field. Second, the buoyancy effect is shown to can be destabilizing for azimuthal flow of a resistive plasma. Third, we demonstrate that the rotating fluid may be unstable with respect to non-axisymmetric modes at much lower rotation velocities than with respect to usual symmetric modes.

  18. MRI-powered Actuators for Robotic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vartholomeos, Panagiotis; Qin, Lei; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel actuation technology for robotically assisted MRI-guided interventional procedures. Compact and wireless, the actuators are both powered and controlled by the MRI scanner. The design concept and performance limits are described and derived analytically. Simulation and experiments in a clinical MR scanner are used to validate the analysis and to demonstrate the capability of the approach for needle biopsies. The concepts of actuator locking mechanisms and multi-axis control are also introduced. PMID:22287082

  19. Late abortion meeting, Paris / France.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, A

    1989-01-01

    On January 27 and 28, 1989 a workshop and a meeting were organized in Paris by Mouvement Francais pour le Planning Familial (MFPF/France) and the IPPF Europe Region. The workshop was held on the first day. 24 staff and volunteers from Planned Parenthood Associations of 15 countries attended, reviewing abortion laws, the definition of therapeutic abortion, and the incidence and problems of second trimester abortion. Second trimester abortion is available in only a few European countries. Second trimester abortions are rare in France (about 2000 per annum), and in 1986 1717 French women travelled to England in order to seek an abortion. All late abortions are performed for serious reasons. Older women may mistake signs of pregnancy for the onset of the menopause; and women fearful of social or familial punishment, especially teenagers, may be reluctant to consult a doctor. The experiences of Denmark and Sweden, where the problem is partially solved, suggest some strategies: optimize accessibility of contraceptive services, particularly for women at higher risk of late abortion; diminish the taboo surrounding abortion, so that women are less frightened to seek help at an early stage of pregnancy; make abortion services available in all regions of the country; avert time-consuming enforced waiting periods or consent for minors; and stimulate public information campaigns on the importance of seeking help early. On January 28 a meeting involving about 200 participants took place at the Universite Paris Dauphine, Salle Raymond Aron. Speakers at the meeting discussed the issue of late abortion in Europe, the difficulties of obtaining late abortions, counseling, medical problems, the woman's point of view, and possible solutions. At the close of the meeting, the MFPF called on the French government to modify some of the articles in the Penal Code that restrict women's access to safe and legal abortion.

  20. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI reveals brain networks underlying recognition memory ERP old/new effects.

    PubMed

    Hoppstädter, Michael; Baeuchl, Christian; Diener, Carsten; Flor, Herta; Meyer, Patric

    2015-08-01

    The mapping of event-related potentials (ERP) on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data remains difficult as scalp electroencephalography (EEG) is assumed to be largely insensitive to deep brain structures. Simultaneous recordings of EEG and fMRI might be helpful in reconciling surface ERPs with hemodynamic activations in medial temporal lobe structures related to recognition memory. EEG and imaging studies provide evidence for two independent processes underlying recognition memory, namely recollection and familiarity. Recollection reflects the conscious retrieval of contextual information about a specific episode, while familiarity refers to an acontextual feeling of knowing. Both processes were related to two spatiotemporally different ERP effects, namely the early mid-frontal old/new effect (familiarity) and the late parietal old new effect (recollection). We conducted an exploratory simultaneous EEG-fMRI study using a recognition memory paradigm to investigate which brain activations are modulated in relation to the ERP old/new effects. To this end we examined 17 participants in a yes/no recognition task with word stimuli. Single-trial amplitudes of ERP old/new effects were related to the hemodynamic signal in an EEG-informed fMRI analysis for a subset of 12 subjects. FMRI activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the right intraparietal sulcus was associated with the amplitude of the early frontal old/new effect (350-550ms), and activation in the right posterior hippocampus, parahippocampal cortex and retrosplenial cortex was associated with the amplitude of the late parietal old new effect (580-750ms). These results provide the first direct link between electrophysiological and hemodynamic correlates of familiarity and recollection. Moreover, these findings in healthy subjects complement data from intracranial ERP recordings in epilepsy patients and lesion studies in hypoxia patients. PMID:25988228

  1. The late-M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Bessell, M.S. )

    1991-02-01

    Far-red spectra and VRIJHK photometry have been obtained for a sample of late-M dwarfs selected on the basis of large reduced red magnitudes from the LHS Catalog. Half of the stars in the three faintest 1 mag bins are late-M stars, the other red stars are metallic-hydride subdwarfs. Relations between various colors for the late-M dwarfs are investigated. Of all the colors I - K most reliably correlates with spectral type. FeH bands near 9900 A are clearly seen in the spectra of all dwarf stars later than M5. Two stars cooler than VB10, and similar in temperature to LHS2924 have been identified; both have H-alpha in emission and appear variable in magnitude and R - I color; one is a flare star. The other stars are of earlier spectral type and resemble W359 and VB8. The observed MI, I - K main sequence is in good agreement with the IG theoretical main sequence of Stringfellow, and the faintest stars could be about 0.09 solar mass red dwarfs or lower mass brown dwarfs. 65 refs.

  2. Atypical patterns of cardiac involvement in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, J J; Elkholy, K; O'Brien, J; Kiernan, T

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our cardiology service with chest pain, exertional dyspnoea and palpitations on a background of known Fabry disease diagnosed with genetic testing in 1994. ECG showed sinus rhythm, shortened PR interval, widespread t wave inversion, q waves in the lateral leads and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Coronary angiogram showed only mild atheroma. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed anterolateral LVH and reduced left ventricular cavity size in keeping with Fabry cardiomyopathy. Cardiac MRI demonstrated asymmetric hypertrophy with evidence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in the maximally hypertrophied segments from base to apex with late gadolinium enhancement in the anterior and anteroseptal walls. This was quite an atypical appearance for Fabry cardiomyopathy. This case highlights the heterogeneity of patterns of cardiac involvement that may be associated with this rare X-linked lysosomal disorder. PMID:26989114

  3. No cardiomyopathy in X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy.

    PubMed

    Saraste, Antti; Koskenvuo, Juha W; Airaksinen, Juhani; Ramachandran, Nivetha; Munteanu, Iulia; Udd, Bjarne; Huovinen, Sanna; Kalimo, Hannu; Minassian, Berge A

    2015-06-01

    In X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy (XMEA) progressive sarcoplasmic accumulation of autolysosomes filled with undegraded debris leads to atrophy and weakness of skeletal muscles. XMEA is caused by compromised acidification of lysosomes resulting from hypofunction of the proton pump vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), due to hypomorphic mutations in VMA21, whose protein product assembles V-ATPase. To what extent the cardiac muscle is affected is unknown. Therefore we performed a comprehensive cardiac evaluation in four male XMEA patients, and also examined pathology of one deceased patient's cardiac and skeletal muscle. None of the symptomatic men (aged 25-48 years) had history or symptoms of cardiomyopathy. Resting electrocardiograms and echocardiographies were normal. MRI showed normal left ventricle ejection fraction and myocardial mass. Myocardial late-gadolinium enhancement was not detected. The deceased patient's skeletal but not cardiac muscle showed characteristic accumulation of autophagic vacuoles. In conclusion, in classic XMEA the myocardium is structurally, electrically and clinically spared.

  4. The PRESTO technique for fMRI.

    PubMed

    van Gelderen, P; Duyn, J H; Ramsey, N F; Liu, G; Moonen, C T W

    2012-08-15

    In the early days of BOLD fMRI, the acquisition of T(2)(*) weighted data was greatly facilitated by rapid scan techniques such as EPI. The latter, however, was only available on a few MRI systems that were equipped with specialized hardware that allowed rapid switching of the imaging gradients. For this reason, soon after the invention of fMRI, the scan technique PRESTO was developed to make rapid T(2)(*) weighted scanning available on standard clinical scanners. This method combined echo shifting, which allows for echo times longer than the sequence repetition time, with acquisition of multiple k-space lines per excitation. These two concepts were combined in order to achieve a method fast enough for fMRI, while maintaining a sufficiently long echo time for optimal contrast. PRESTO has been primarily used for 3D scanning, which minimized the contribution of large vessels due to inflow effects. Although PRESTO is still being used today, its appeal has lessened somewhat due to increased gradient performance of modern MRI scanners. Compared to 2D EPI, PRESTO may have somewhat reduced temporal stability, which is a disadvantage for fMRI that may not outweigh the advantage of reduced inflow effects provided by 3D scanning. In this overview, the history of the development of the PRESTO is presented, followed by a qualitative comparison with EPI. PMID:22245350

  5. Diffusion MRI and its role in neuropsychology

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Hemmy, Laura; Camchong, Jazmin

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) is a popular method used by neuroscientists to uncover unique information about the structural connections within the brain. dMRI is a non-invasive imaging methodology in which image contrast is based on the diffusion of water molecules in tissue. While applicable to many tissues in the body, this review focuses exclusively on the use of dMRI to examine white matter in the brain. In this review, we begin with a definition of diffusion and how diffusion is measured with MRI. Next we introduce the diffusion tensor model, the predominant model used in dMRI. We then describe acquisition issues related to acquisition parameters and scanner hardware and software. Sources of artifacts are then discussed, followed by a brief review of analysis approaches. We provide an overview of the limitations of the traditional diffusion tensor model, and highlight several more sophisticated non-tensor models that better describe the complex architecture of the brain’s white matter. We then touch on reliability and validity issues of diffusion measurements. Finally, we describe examples of ways in which dMRI has been applied to studies of brain disorders and how identified alterations relate to symptomatology and cognition. PMID:26255305

  6. Diffusion MRI and its Role in Neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Hemmy, Laura; Camchong, Jazmin

    2015-09-01

    Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) is a popular method used by neuroscientists to uncover unique information about the structural connections within the brain. dMRI is a non-invasive imaging methodology in which image contrast is based on the diffusion of water molecules in tissue. While applicable to many tissues in the body, this review focuses exclusively on the use of dMRI to examine white matter in the brain. In this review, we begin with a definition of diffusion and how diffusion is measured with MRI. Next we introduce the diffusion tensor model, the predominant model used in dMRI. We then describe acquisition issues related to acquisition parameters and scanner hardware and software. Sources of artifacts are then discussed, followed by a brief review of analysis approaches. We provide an overview of the limitations of the traditional diffusion tensor model, and highlight several more sophisticated non-tensor models that better describe the complex architecture of the brain's white matter. We then touch on reliability and validity issues of diffusion measurements. Finally, we describe examples of ways in which dMRI has been applied to studies of brain disorders and how identified alterations relate to symptomatology and cognition.

  7. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Markl, M; Schnell, S; Wu, C; Bollache, E; Jarvis, K; Barker, A J; Robinson, J D; Rigsby, C K

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented. PMID:26944696

  8. Pediatric multifocal liver lesions evaluated by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Almotairi, Majed; Oudjhane, Kamaldine; Chavhan, Govind B

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to present our experience with MRI evaluation of multifocal liver lesions in children and describe the MRI characteristics of these lesions. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of consecutive MRI exams performed for the evaluation of multiple liver lesions between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2012 was done to note the number of lesions, the size of the largest lesion, MR signal characteristics, and background liver. Final diagnosis was assigned to each case based on pathology in the available cases and a combination of clinical features, imaging features, and follow-up in the remaining cases. Results: A total of 48 children (22 boys, 26 girls; age between 3 months and 18 years with average age 10.58 years and median age 11 years) were included in the study. Totally 51 lesion diagnoses were seen in 48 children that included 17 focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), 8 hemangiomas, 7 metastases, 6 regenerative nodules, 3 adenomas, 3 abscesses, and one each of angiomyolipoma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, focal fatty infiltration, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic infarction, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and hepatic cyst. Background liver was normal in 33, cirrhotic in 10, fatty in 3, and siderotic in 2 children. Most FNH, hemangiomas, and regenerative nodules showed characteristic MRI features, while metastases were variable in signal pattern. Conclusion: Many commonly seen multifocal liver lesions in children have characteristic MRI features. MRI can help to arrive at reasonable differential diagnoses for multifocal liver lesions in children and guide further investigation and management. PMID:26288526

  9. MRI atlas of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. ); Bydder, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Since most radiologists will start from a basic of familiarity with pathophysiology of disease and a knowledge of cross-sectional imaging (at least in the transaxial plane), they are in a good position to recognize and diagnose many of the abnormalities we can currently see with CT. The appearance of these lesions on MRI is the basis for the majority of the images in this book. Chapters on Tumors, Infarcts and Ischemia, Demyelination and Infection. Hydrocephalus, and Pediatrics feature multiple images displaying the MR appearance of many common lesions with minimal associated text. Instead of focusing on pathophysiology, attention is directed to the variable appearance of these disease states using various MR imaging techniques. Although the MR contrast agent, Gadolinium-DTPA, has similar behavior (physiologically) to meglumine diatrizoate in CT, the MR techniques which result in optimal visualization of enhancing lesions are nonintuitive and are discussed. Similarly, the appearance of flowing blood and CSF and hemorrhage does not follow easily from a pre-existing CT base, therefore additional text has been devoted to these subjects.

  10. Gradient-Modulated PETRA MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Goerke, Ute; Wang, Luning; Ellermann, Jutta; Metzger, Gregory J.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Image blurring due to off-resonance and fast T2* signal decay is a common issue in radial ultrashort echo time MRI sequences. One solution is to use a higher readout bandwidth, but this may be impractical for some techniques like pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), which is a hybrid method of zero echo time and single point imaging techniques. Specifically, PETRA has severe specific absorption rate (SAR) and radiofrequency (RF) pulse peak power limitations when using higher bandwidths in human measurements. In this study, we introduce gradient modulation (GM) to PETRA to reduce image blurring artifacts while keeping SAR and RF peak power low. Tolerance of GM-PETRA to image blurring was evaluated in simulations and experiments by comparing with the conventional PETRA technique. We performed inner ear imaging of a healthy subject at 7T. GM-PETRA showed significantly less image blurring due to off-resonance and fast T2* signal decay compared to PETRA. In in vivo imaging, GM-PETRA nicely captured complex structures of the inner ear such as the cochlea and semicircular canals. Gradient modulation can improve the PETRA image quality and mitigate SAR and RF peak power limitations without special hardware modification in clinical scanners. PMID:26771005

  11. Gadolinium-Enhanced Angiography for Diagnosis and Interventional Treatment of Subclavian Artery Stenosis Prior to Fistula Creation

    SciTech Connect

    Termote, Bruno; Maleux, Geert Heye, Sam; Fourneau, Inge; Claes, Kathleen

    2008-07-15

    We report the use of gadolinium-based contrast agent for both diagnostic and interventional subclavian angiography in two azotemic patients, presenting with an asymptomatic, high-grade stenosis of the left subclavian artery, ipsilateral to the site of choice for native fistula creation. Angiographic imaging performed with diluted gadolinium-based contrast material was clear enough to perform successful subclavian artery stenting, resulting in normalization of the arterial blood pressure in the afferent artery of the dialysis fistula. Clinically, no decrease in residual renal function and no other complication were noted immediately or a longer period after the interventional treatment.

  12. A Novel Approach to Early Detection of Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity using Gadolinium Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in an Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, James C.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Hamilton, Craig A; Jordan, Jennifer; Torti, Frank M.; Kock, Nancy D.; Jordan, James; Workman, Susan; Hundley, W Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Background To determine if cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) measures of gadolinium (Gd) signal intensity (SI) within the left ventricular (LV) myocardium are associated with future changes in LV ejection fraction (LVEF) after receipt of doxorubicin (DOX). Methods and Results Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups scheduled to receive weekly intravenous doses of: normal saline (NS) (n=7), 1.5 mg/kg DOX (n=19), or 2.5 mg/kg DOX (n=14). MR determinations of LVEF and myocardial Gd-SI were performed before and then at 2, 4, 7, and 10 weeks after DOX initiation. During treatment, animals were sacrificed at different time points so that histopathological assessments of the LV myocardium could be obtained. Within group analyses were performed to examine time-dependent relationships between Gd-SI and primary events (a deterioration in LVEF or an unanticipated death). Six of 19 animals receiving 1.5 mg/kg of DOX and 10/14 animals receiving 2.5 mg/kg of DOX experienced a primary event; no NS animals experienced a primary event. In animals with a primary event, histopathological evidence of myocellular vacuolization occurred (p=0.04), and the Gd-SI was elevated relative to baseline at the time of the event (p<0.0001) and during the measurement period prior to the event (p=0.0001). In all animals (including NS) without an event, measures of Gd-SI did not differ from baseline. Conclusions After DOX, low serial measures of Gd-SI predict an absence of a LVEF drop or unanticipated death. An increase in Gd-SI after DOX forecasts a subsequent drop in LVEF as well as histopathologic evidence of intracellular vacuolization consistent with DOX cardiotoxicity. PMID:20622140

  13. "MRI Stealth" robot for prostate interventions.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Song, Danny; Petrisor, Doru; Ursu, Daniel; Mazilu, Dumitru; Muntener, Michael; Mutener, Michael; Schar, Michael; Patriciu, Alexandru

    2007-01-01

    The paper reports an important achievement in MRI instrumentation, a pneumatic, fully actuated robot located within the scanner alongside the patient and operating under remote control based on the images. Previous MRI robots commonly used piezoelectric actuation limiting their compatibility. Pneumatics is an ideal choice for MRI compatibility because it is decoupled from electromagnetism, but pneumatic actuators were hardly controllable. This achievement was possible due to a recent technology breakthrough, the invention of a new type of pneumatic motor, PneuStep 1, designed for the robot reported here with uncompromised MRI compatibility, high-precision, and medical safety. MrBot is one of the "MRI stealth" robots today (the second is described in this issue by Zangos et al.). Both of these systems are also multi-imager compatible, being able to operate with the imager of choice or cross-imaging modalities. For MRI compatibility the robot is exclusively constructed of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, crystals, rubbers and is electricity free. Light-based encoding is used for feedback, so that all electric components are distally located outside the imager's room. MRI robots are modern, digital medical instruments in line with advanced imaging equipment and methods. These allow for accessing patients within closed bore scanners and performing interventions under direct (in scanner) imaging feedback. MRI robots could allow e.g. to biopsy small lesions imaged with cutting edge cancer imaging methods, or precisely deploy localized therapy at cancer foci. Our robot is the first to show the feasibility of fully automated in-scanner interventions. It is customized for the prostate and operates transperineally for needle interventions. It can accommodate various needle drivers for different percutaneous procedures such as biopsy, thermal ablations, or brachytherapy. The first needle driver is customized for fully automated low

  14. "MRI Stealth" robot for prostate interventions.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Song, Danny; Petrisor, Doru; Ursu, Daniel; Mazilu, Dumitru; Muntener, Michael; Mutener, Michael; Schar, Michael; Patriciu, Alexandru

    2007-01-01

    The paper reports an important achievement in MRI instrumentation, a pneumatic, fully actuated robot located within the scanner alongside the patient and operating under remote control based on the images. Previous MRI robots commonly used piezoelectric actuation limiting their compatibility. Pneumatics is an ideal choice for MRI compatibility because it is decoupled from electromagnetism, but pneumatic actuators were hardly controllable. This achievement was possible due to a recent technology breakthrough, the invention of a new type of pneumatic motor, PneuStep 1, designed for the robot reported here with uncompromised MRI compatibility, high-precision, and medical safety. MrBot is one of the "MRI stealth" robots today (the second is described in this issue by Zangos et al.). Both of these systems are also multi-imager compatible, being able to operate with the imager of choice or cross-imaging modalities. For MRI compatibility the robot is exclusively constructed of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, crystals, rubbers and is electricity free. Light-based encoding is used for feedback, so that all electric components are distally located outside the imager's room. MRI robots are modern, digital medical instruments in line with advanced imaging equipment and methods. These allow for accessing patients within closed bore scanners and performing interventions under direct (in scanner) imaging feedback. MRI robots could allow e.g. to biopsy small lesions imaged with cutting edge cancer imaging methods, or precisely deploy localized therapy at cancer foci. Our robot is the first to show the feasibility of fully automated in-scanner interventions. It is customized for the prostate and operates transperineally for needle interventions. It can accommodate various needle drivers for different percutaneous procedures such as biopsy, thermal ablations, or brachytherapy. The first needle driver is customized for fully automated low

  15. Electrical tissue property imaging using MRI at dc and Larmor frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Joonsung; In Kwon, Oh; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Woo, Eung Je

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of conductivity and permittivity distributions inside the human body has been actively investigated in impedance imaging areas such as electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and magnetic induction tomography (MIT). Since the conductivity and permittivity values exhibit frequency-dependent changes, it is worthwhile to perform spectroscopic imaging from almost dc to hundreds of MHz. To probe the human body, we may inject current using surface electrodes or induce current using external coils. In EIT and MIT, measured data are only available on the boundary or exterior of the body unless we invasively place sensors inside the body. Their image reconstruction problems are nonlinear and ill-posed to result in images with a relatively low spatial resolution. Noting that an MRI scanner can noninvasively measure magnetic fields inside the human body, electrical tissue property imaging methods using MRI have lately been proposed. Magnetic resonance EIT (MREIT) performs conductivity imaging at dc or below 1 kHz by externally injecting current into the human body and measuring induced internal magnetic flux density data using an MRI scanner. Magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT) produces both conductivity and permittivity images at the Larmor frequency of an MRI scanner based on B1-mapping techniques. Since internal data are only available in MREIT and MREPT, we may formulate well-posed inverse problems for image reconstructions. To develop related imaging techniques, we should clearly understand the basic principles of MREIT and MREPT, which are based on coupled physics of bioelectromagnetism and MRI as well as associated mathematical methods. In this paper, we describe the physical principles of MREIT and MREPT in a unified way and associate measurable quantities with the conductivity and permittivity. Clarifying the key relations among them, we examine existing image reconstruction algorithms to reveal their capabilities and

  16. Sodium MRI in human heart: a review.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, Paul A

    2016-02-01

    This paper offers a critical review of the properties, methods and potential clinical application of sodium ((23)Na) MRI in human heart. Because the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in heart is about ~40 µmol/g wet weight, and the (23)Na gyromagnetic ratio and sensitivity are respectively about one-quarter and one-11th of that of hydrogen ((1)H), the signal-to-noise ratio of (23)Na MRI in the heart is about one-6000th of that of conventional cardiac (1)H MRI. In addition, as a quadrupolar nucleus, (23)Na exhibits ultra-short and multi-component relaxation behavior (T1 ~ 30 ms; T2 ~ 0.5-4 ms and 12-20 ms), which requires fast, specialized, ultra-short echo-time MRI sequences, especially for quantifying TSC. Cardiac (23)Na MRI studies from 1.5 to 7 T measure a volume-weighted sum of intra- and extra-cellular components present at cytosolic concentrations of 10-15 mM and 135-150 mM in healthy tissue, respectively, at a spatial resolution of about 0.1-1 ml in 10 min or so. Currently, intra- and extra-cellular sodium cannot be unambiguously resolved without the use of potentially toxic shift reagents. Nevertheless, increases in TSC attributable to an influx of intra-cellular sodium and/or increased extra-cellular volume have been demonstrated in human myocardial infarction consistent with prior animal studies, and arguably might also be seen in future studies of ischemia and cardiomyopathies--especially those involving defects in sodium transport. While technical implementation remains a hurdle, a central question for clinical use is whether cardiac (23)Na MRI can deliver useful information unobtainable by other more convenient methods, including (1)H MRI.

  17. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding. PMID:25965548

  18. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  19. Multichannel Compressive Sensing MRI Using Noiselet Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding. PMID:25965548

  20. COMPARISON OF THE COMPLETE FOURIER DIRECT MRI WITH EXISTING DIFFUSION WEIGHTED MRI METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Alpay

    2011-01-01

    The Complete Fourier Direct (CFD) MRI method introduced in earlier work for modeling the diffusion weighted MRI signal is compared with the existing methods. The preservation of Hermitian symmetry in the diffusion weighted MRI signal without affecting its energy is the key point that differentiates CFD–MRI from the existing methods. By keeping the correct Fourier relationship intact, the joint distribution function is represented ‘as it is’, without any constraints, e.g. being symmetric. The necessity to model or assume models for spin motion and try to fit the model to the samples of the Fourier transform as in case of model matching methods is not required because the Discrete Fourier Transform applied to correctly processed signal in CFD–MRI gives more accurate results. PMID:21918715

  1. Soft coincidence in late acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego

    2005-06-15

    We study the coincidence problem of late cosmic acceleration by assuming that the present ratio between dark matter and dark energy is a slowly varying function of the scale factor. As the dark energy component we consider two different candidates, first a quintessence scalar field, and then a tachyon field. In either case analytical solutions for the scale factor, the field, and the potential are derived. Both models show a good fit to the recent magnitude-redshift supernovae data. However, the likelihood contours disfavor the tachyon field model as it seems to prefer a excessively high value for the matter component.

  2. Diagnosis and Management of Late-Onset Spondyloarthritis: Implications of Treat-to-Target Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Toussirot, Éric

    2015-07-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is usually observed in young patients while onset in the elderly is less common. Late-onset forms of SpA may become more common due to longer life expectancy. The clinical spectrum of late-onset SpA is as broad as in young people, with a predominance of peripheral SpA over pure axial disease. The Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) has developed new criteria for axial or peripheral SpA that allow patients aged under 45 years at the time of disease onset to be identified. These criteria are not theoretically adapted for the classification of patients with late-onset disease but they are useful for the diagnosis. Similarly, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now widely used for the early recognition of sacroiliitis or spinal inflammation in SpA, and sacroiliitis as evidenced by MRI is included in the ASAS criteria for axial SpA. Nevertheless, the utility of sacroiliac joint and/or spine inflammation as detected by MRI has mostly been described in young patients with ankylosing spondylitis, SpA, or inflammatory back pain, but not in the elderly. The management of SpA is now more focused on remission or, alternatively, low disease activity, according to the treat-to-target recommendations. Such an optimized approach to therapy is thought to improve patient outcomes and ultimately long-term quality of life. The same principles of treatment should apply in the elderly, but require certain adjustments, especially with biological agents. Tumor necrosis factor-α blocking agents are very effective in SpA, but seem slightly less effective in the elderly and are associated with an increased risk of infection in this population. A careful and rigorous evaluation is thus required before initiating these agents in elderly subjects.

  3. Hyperintense Dentate Nuclei on T1-Weighted MRI: Relation to Repeat Gadolinium Administration

    PubMed Central

    Adin, M.E.; Kleinberg, L.; Vaidya, D.; Zan, E.; Mirbagheri, S.; Yousem, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE A hyperintense appearance of the dentate nucleus on T1-weighted MR images has been related to various clinical conditions, but the etiology remains indeterminate. We aimed to investigate the possible associations between a hyperintense appearance of the dentate nucleus on T1-weighted MR images in patients exposed to radiation and factors including, but not limited to, the cumulative number of contrast-enhanced MR images, amount of gadolinium administration, dosage of ionizing radiation, and patient demographics. MATERIALS AND METHODS The medical records of 706 consecutive patients who were treated with brain irradiation at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions between 1995 and 2010 were blindly reviewed by 2 readers. RESULTS One hundred eighty-four subjects were included for dentate nuclei analysis. Among the 184 subjects who cumulatively underwent 2677 MR imaging studies following intravenous gadolinium administration, 103 patients had hyperintense dentate nuclei on precontrast T1-weighted MR images. The average number of gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging studies performed in the group with normal dentate nuclei was significantly lower than that of the group with hyperintense dentate nuclei. The average follow-up time was 62.5 months. No significant difference was observed between hyperintense and normal dentate nuclei groups in terms of exposed radiation dose, serum creatinine and calcium/phosphate levels, patient demographics, history of chemotherapy, and strength of the scanner. No dentate nuclei abnormalities were found on the corresponding CT scans of patients with hyperintense dentate nuclei (n = 44). No dentate nuclei abnormalities were found in 53 healthy volunteers. CONCLUSIONS Repeat performance of gadolinium-enhanced studies likely contributes to a long-standing hyperintense appearance of dentate nuclei on precontrast T1-weighted-MR images. PMID:26294649

  4. Late Relapse of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Matthew J; Feldman, Darren R; Carver, Brett S; Sheinfeld, Joel

    2015-08-01

    Germ cell tumors of the testis have an overall survival rate greater than 90% as a result of a successful multidisciplinary approach to management. Late relapse affects a subset of patients however, and tends to be chemorefractory and the overall prognosis is poor. Surgery is the mainstay in management of late relapse but salvage chemotherapy can be successful. In this review, the clinical presentation and detection of late relapse, clinical outcomes, and predictors of survival in late relapse and the importance of a multidisciplinary treatment approach for successful management of late relapse are discussed. PMID:26216823

  5. 5 CFR 1605.15 - Reporting and processing late contributions and late loan payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting and processing late contributions and late loan payments. 1605.15 Section 1605.15 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD CORRECTION OF ADMINISTRATIVE ERRORS Employing Agency Errors § 1605.15 Reporting and processing late contributions and late...

  6. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  7. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  8. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  9. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  10. Safety of implanted cardiac devices in an MRI environment.

    PubMed

    Ipek, Esra Gucuk; Nazarian, Saman

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into an essential diagnostic modality for the evaluation of various conditions. In line with the increase in MRI applications, the use of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) is growing and many of the CEID recipients of today may require MRI examinations in the future. Traditionally, MRI examination of CIED recipients has been considered a contraindication. However, recent studies have provided strong evidence that MRI can safely be performed in selected patients with specific precautions. This review highlights the interactions of MRI with CIEDs, summarizes the literature, and outlines the Johns Hopkins Safety Protocol. PMID:26026996

  11. Transition from Collisionless to Collisional MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Prateek Sharma; Gregory W. Hammett; Eliot Quataert

    2003-07-24

    Recent calculations by Quataert et al. (2002) found that the growth rates of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless plasma can differ significantly from those calculated using MHD. This can be important in hot accretion flows around compact objects. In this paper, we study the transition from the collisionless kinetic regime to the collisional MHD regime, mapping out the dependence of the MRI growth rate on collisionality. A kinetic closure scheme for a magnetized plasma is used that includes the effect of collisions via a BGK operator. The transition to MHD occurs as the mean free path becomes short compared to the parallel wavelength 2*/k(sub)||. In the weak magnetic field regime where the Alfven and MRI frequencies w are small compared to the sound wave frequency k(sub)||c(sub)0, the dynamics are still effectively collisionless even if omega << v, so long as the collision frequency v << k(sub)||c(sub)0; for an accretion flow this requires n less than or approximately equal to *(square root of b). The low collisionality regime not only modifies the MRI growth rate, but also introduces collisionless Landau or Barnes damping of long wavelength modes, which may be important for the nonlinear saturation of the MRI.

  12. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-03-29

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250 ∙ 250 ∙ 500 μm(3) was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging.

  13. MRI in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Michael S.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects approximately 1.4 million people in North America and, because of its typical early age of onset and episodic disease course, IBD patients often undergo numerous imaging studies over the course of their lifetimes. CT has become the standard imaging modality for assessment of IBD patients because of its widespread availability, rapid image acquisition, and ability to evaluate intraluminal and extraluminal disease. However, repetitive CT imaging has been associated with a significant ionizing radiation risk to patients, making MRI an appealing alternative IBD imaging modality. Pelvic MRI is currently the imaging gold standard for detecting perianal disease, while recent studies indicate that MRI bowel-directed techniques (enteroclysis, enterography, colonography) can accurately evaluate bowel inflammation in IBD. With recent technical innovations leading to faster and higher resolution body MRI, the role of MRI in IBD evaluation is likely to continue to expand. Future applications include surveillance imaging, detection of mural fibrosis, and early assessment of therapy response. PMID:21512607

  14. Quantitative rotating frame relaxometry methods in MRI.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Irtiza Ali; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-06-01

    Macromolecular degeneration and biochemical changes in tissue can be quantified using rotating frame relaxometry in MRI. It has been shown in several studies that the rotating frame longitudinal relaxation rate constant (R1ρ ) and the rotating frame transverse relaxation rate constant (R2ρ ) are sensitive biomarkers of phenomena at the cellular level. In this comprehensive review, existing MRI methods for probing the biophysical mechanisms that affect the rotating frame relaxation rates of the tissue (i.e. R1ρ and R2ρ ) are presented. Long acquisition times and high radiofrequency (RF) energy deposition into tissue during the process of spin-locking in rotating frame relaxometry are the major barriers to the establishment of these relaxation contrasts at high magnetic fields. Therefore, clinical applications of R1ρ and R2ρ MRI using on- or off-resonance RF excitation methods remain challenging. Accordingly, this review describes the theoretical and experimental approaches to the design of hard RF pulse cluster- and adiabatic RF pulse-based excitation schemes for accurate and precise measurements of R1ρ and R2ρ . The merits and drawbacks of different MRI acquisition strategies for quantitative relaxation rate measurement in the rotating frame regime are reviewed. In addition, this review summarizes current clinical applications of rotating frame MRI sequences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250•250•500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging.

  16. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250∙250∙500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging. PMID:27021387

  17. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Frohwein, Lynn J. Schäfers, Klaus P.; Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  18. Longitudinal study of defense mechanisms: late childhood to late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Phebe

    2007-02-01

    Based on longitudinal data from the Institute of Human Development Intergenerational Study, the use and change in defense mechanisms of more than 150 individuals, as assessed from TAT stories, was studied across ages 11, 12, and 18. The findings of this study, based on an earlier generation, were generally consistent with cross-sectional findings from current samples, showing that the defenses of projection and identification were used more frequently than denial at all three ages and that the use of projection and identification increased from early to late adolescence. However, unlike current findings, the 18-year-olds did not show greater use of identification than of projection, perhaps due to IQ differences between this community sample and the samples of more recent studies.

  19. Blind compressive sensing dynamic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Jacob, Mathews

    2013-01-01

    . Our phase transition experiments demonstrate that the BCS scheme provides much better recovery rates than classical Fourier-based CS schemes, while being only marginally worse than the dictionary aware setting. Since the overhead in additionally estimating the dictionary is low, this method can be very useful in dynamic MRI applications, where the signal is not sparse in known dictionaries. We demonstrate the utility of the BCS scheme in accelerating contrast enhanced dynamic data. We observe superior reconstruction performance with the BCS scheme in comparison to existing low rank and compressed sensing schemes. PMID:23542951

  20. MULTIPARAMETRIC MRI AND CT MODELS OF INFARCT CORE AND FAVORABLE PENUMBRAL IMAGING PATTERNS IN ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Wintermark, Max; De Silva, Deidre A.; Schaewe, Timothy J.; Jahan, Reza; Starkman, Sidney; Jovin, Tudor; Hom, Jason; Jumaa, Mouhammad; Schreier, Jeffrie; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Liebeskind, David S.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Saver, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Objective imaging methods to identify optimal candidates for late recanalization therapies are needed. The study goals were 1) to develop MRI and CT multiparametric, voxel-based predictive models of infarct core and penumbra in acute ischemic stroke patients, and 2) to develop patient-level imaging criteria for favorable penumbral pattern based on good clinical outcome in response to successful recanalization. Methods An analysis of imaging and clinical data was performed on two cohorts of patients (one screened with CT, the other with MRI) who underwent successful treatment for large vessel, anterior circulation stroke. Subjects were divided 2:1 into derivation and validation cohorts. Pretreatment imaging parameters independently predicting final tissue infarct and final clinical outcome were identified. Results The MRI and CT models were developed and validated from 34 and 32 patients, employing 943,320 and 1,236,917 voxels respectively. The derivation MRI and two-branch CT models had an overall accuracy of 74% and 80% respectively, and were independently validated with an accuracy of 71% and 79% respectively. The imaging criteria of 1) predicted infarct core ≤ 90 mL and 2) ratio of predicted infarct tissue within the at-risk region ≤ 70% identified patients as having a favorable penumbral pattern with 78–100% accuracy. Conclusions Multiparametric voxel-based MRI and CT models were developed to predict the extent of infarct core and overall penumbral pattern status in patients with acute ischemic stroke who may be candidates for late recanalization therapies. These models provide an alternative approach to mismatch in predicting ultimate tissue fate. PMID:23233383

  1. Uterine cirsoid aneurysm: MRI and MRA

    SciTech Connect

    Joja, Ikuo; Asakawa, Mari; Motoyama, Kazumi

    1996-03-01

    Uterine cirsoid aneurysm is uncommon. It is important to make a diagnosis of this disease preoperatively, because repeated curettages may induce life-threatening massive genital bleeding. We present a case of a 51-year-old woman with uterine cirsoid aneurysm in whom MRI and MRA were very useful for the preoperative diagnosis. The radiologic appearances on ultrasonography, CT, conventional SE MRI, MRA, dynamic MRI, and pelvic angiography are presented. Conventional SE T1-weighted and T2-weighted images demonstrated multiple flow voids in the uterus and bilateral adnexal regions. MRA demonstrated a cluster of distinct, tortuous, and coiled vascular channels in the pelvis. MRA could obtain images almost equal to angiography and was considered to be an excellent noninvasive imaging technique for the diagnosis of uterine cirsoid aneurysm. 28 refs., 7 figs

  2. Motion correction in MRI of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godenschweger, F.; Kägebein, U.; Stucht, D.; Yarach, U.; Sciarra, A.; Yakupov, R.; Lüsebrink, F.; Schulze, P.; Speck, O.

    2016-03-01

    Subject motion in MRI is a relevant problem in the daily clinical routine as well as in scientific studies. Since the beginning of clinical use of MRI, many research groups have developed methods to suppress or correct motion artefacts. This review focuses on rigid body motion correction of head and brain MRI and its application in diagnosis and research. It explains the sources and types of motion and related artefacts, classifies and describes existing techniques for motion detection, compensation and correction and lists established and experimental approaches. Retrospective motion correction modifies the MR image data during the reconstruction, while prospective motion correction performs an adaptive update of the data acquisition. Differences, benefits and drawbacks of different motion correction methods are discussed.

  3. High-resolution MRI: in vivo histology?

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Holly; Clare, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    For centuries scientists have been fascinated with the question of how the brain works. Investigators have looked at both where different functions are localized and how the anatomical microstructure varies across the brain surface. Here we discuss how advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have allowed in vivo visualization of the fine structure of the brain that was previously only visible in post-mortem brains. We present data showing the correspondence between definitions of the primary visual cortex defined anatomically using very high-resolution MRI and functionally using functional MRI. We consider how this technology can be applied to allow the investigation of brains that differ from normal, and what this ever-evolving technology may be able to reveal about in vivo brain structure in the next few years. PMID:16553313

  4. Alternative diagnoses at paediatric appendicitis MRI.

    PubMed

    Moore, M M; Kulaylat, A N; Brian, J M; Khaku, A; Hulse, M A; Engbrecht, B W; Methratta, S T; Boal, D K B

    2015-08-01

    As the utilization of MRI in the assessment for paediatric appendicitis increases in clinical practice, it is important to recognize alternative diagnoses as the cause of abdominal pain. The purpose of this review is to share our institution's experience using MRI in the evaluation of 510 paediatric patients presenting with suspected appendicitis over a 30 month interval (July 2011 to December 2013). An alternative diagnosis was documented in 98/510 (19.2%) patients; adnexal pathology (6.3%, n = 32), enteritis-colitis (6.3%, n = 32), and mesenteric adenitis (2.2%, n = 11) comprised the majority of cases. These common entities and other less frequent illustrative cases obtained during our overall institutional experience with MRI for suspected appendicitis are reviewed. PMID:26072983

  5. Monkey cortex through fMRI glasses.

    PubMed

    Vanduffel, Wim; Zhu, Qi; Orban, Guy A

    2014-08-01

    In 1998 several groups reported the feasibility of fMRI experiments in monkeys, with the goal to bridge the gap between invasive nonhuman primate studies and human functional imaging. These studies yielded critical insights in the neuronal underpinnings of the BOLD signal. Furthermore, the technology has been successful in guiding electrophysiological recordings and identifying focal perturbation targets. Finally, invaluable information was obtained concerning human brain evolution. We here provide a comprehensive overview of awake monkey fMRI studies mainly confined to the visual system. We review the latest insights about the topographic organization of monkey visual cortex and discuss the spatial relationships between retinotopy and category- and feature-selective clusters. We briefly discuss the functional layout of parietal and frontal cortex and continue with a summary of some fascinating functional and effective connectivity studies. Finally, we review recent comparative fMRI experiments and speculate about the future of nonhuman primate imaging.

  6. Motion correction in MRI of the brain.

    PubMed

    Godenschweger, F; Kägebein, U; Stucht, D; Yarach, U; Sciarra, A; Yakupov, R; Lüsebrink, F; Schulze, P; Speck, O

    2016-03-01

    Subject motion in MRI is a relevant problem in the daily clinical routine as well as in scientific studies. Since the beginning of clinical use of MRI, many research groups have developed methods to suppress or correct motion artefacts. This review focuses on rigid body motion correction of head and brain MRI and its application in diagnosis and research. It explains the sources and types of motion and related artefacts, classifies and describes existing techniques for motion detection, compensation and correction and lists established and experimental approaches. Retrospective motion correction modifies the MR image data during the reconstruction, while prospective motion correction performs an adaptive update of the data acquisition. Differences, benefits and drawbacks of different motion correction methods are discussed.

  7. Alternative diagnoses at paediatric appendicitis MRI.

    PubMed

    Moore, M M; Kulaylat, A N; Brian, J M; Khaku, A; Hulse, M A; Engbrecht, B W; Methratta, S T; Boal, D K B

    2015-08-01

    As the utilization of MRI in the assessment for paediatric appendicitis increases in clinical practice, it is important to recognize alternative diagnoses as the cause of abdominal pain. The purpose of this review is to share our institution's experience using MRI in the evaluation of 510 paediatric patients presenting with suspected appendicitis over a 30 month interval (July 2011 to December 2013). An alternative diagnosis was documented in 98/510 (19.2%) patients; adnexal pathology (6.3%, n = 32), enteritis-colitis (6.3%, n = 32), and mesenteric adenitis (2.2%, n = 11) comprised the majority of cases. These common entities and other less frequent illustrative cases obtained during our overall institutional experience with MRI for suspected appendicitis are reviewed.

  8. Directly detected 55Mn MRI: Application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized 13C MRI development

    PubMed Central

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D.; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 (55Mn) MRI using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized 13C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the 55Mn and 13C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective “13C” MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, 55Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical 13C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large 13C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d= 8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7M) was scanned rapidly by 55Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for 13C, using a balanced SSFP acquisition. The requisite penetration of RF magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for 55Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image SNR of ~60 at 0.5cm3 spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP 13C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  9. An MRI-based attenuation correction method for combined PET/MRI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Baowei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hesheng

    2009-02-01

    We are developing MRI-based attenuation correction methods for PET images. PET has high sensitivity but relatively low resolution and little anatomic details. MRI can provide excellent anatomical structures with high resolution and high soft tissue contrast. MRI can be used to delineate tumor boundaries and to provide an anatomic reference for PET, thereby improving quantitation of PET data. Combined PET/MRI can offer metabolic, functional and anatomic information and thus can provide a powerful tool to study the mechanism of a variety of diseases. Accurate attenuation correction represents an essential component for the reconstruction of artifact-free, quantitative PET images. Unfortunately, the present design of hybrid PET/MRI does not offer measured attenuation correction using a transmission scan. This problem may be solved by deriving attenuation maps from corresponding anatomic MR images. Our approach combines image registration, classification, and attenuation correction in a single scheme. MR images and the preliminary reconstruction of PET data are first registered using our automatic registration method. MRI images are then classified into different tissue types using our multiscale fuzzy C-mean classification method. The voxels of classified tissue types are assigned theoretical tissue-dependent attenuation coefficients to generate attenuation correction factors. Corrected PET emission data are then reconstructed using a threedimensional filtered back projection method and an order subset expectation maximization method. Results from simulated images and phantom data demonstrated that our attenuation correction method can improve PET data quantitation and it can be particularly useful for combined PET/MRI applications.

  10. Pharmacological MRI (phMRI) of the Human Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Lanfermann, H; Schindler, C; Jordan, J; Krug, N; Raab, P

    2015-10-01

    Pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) of the central nervous system (CNS) addresses the increasing demands in the biopharma industry for new methods that can accurately predict, as early as possible, whether novel CNS agents will be effective and safe. Imaging of physiological and molecular-level function can provide a more direct measure of a drug mechanism of action, enabling more predictive measures of drug activity. The availability of phMRI of the nervous system within the professional infrastructure of the Clinical Research Center (CRC) Hannover as proof of concept center ensures that advances in basic science progress swiftly into benefits for patients. Advanced standardized MRI techniques including quantitative MRI, kurtosis determination, functional MRI, and spectroscopic imaging of the entire brain are necessary for phMRI. As a result, MR scanners will evolve into high-precision measuring instruments for assessment of desirable and undesirable effects of drugs as the basic precondition for individually tailored therapy. The CRC's Imaging Unit with high-end large-scale equipment will allow the following unique opportunities: for example, identification of MR-based biomarkers to assess the effect of drugs (surrogate parameters), establishment of normal levels and reference ranges for MRI-based biomarkers, evaluation of the most relevant MRI sequences for drug monitoring in outpatient care. Another very important prerequisite for phMRI is the MHH Core Facility as the scientific and operational study unit of the CRC partner Hannover Medical School. This unit is responsible for the study coordination, conduction, complete study logistics, administration, and application of the quality assurance system based on required industry standards.

  11. Practical MRI atlas of neonatal brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Barkovich, A.J.; Truwit, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is an anatomical reference for cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in neonates and infants. It contains 122 clear, sharp MRI scans and drawings showing changes in the normal appearance of the brain and skull during development. Sections of the atlas depict the major processes of maturation: brain myelination, development of the corpus callosum, development of the cranial bone marrow, and iron deposition in the brain. High-quality scans illustrate how these changes appear on magnetic resonance images during various stages of development.

  12. MRI in congenital duplication of urethra

    PubMed Central

    Bhadury, S; Parashari, Umesh C; Singh, Ragini; Kohli, Neera

    2009-01-01

    Congenital urethral duplication is a rare anomaly, with less than 200 cases described in the literature. The investigations that are usually performed are micturating cystourethrography (MCU) and retrograde urethrography (RGU), which can diagnose the presence of duplication but cannot diagnose the precise relationship of the duplicated urethra with other pelvic structures. MRI, because of the excellent tissue contrast that it provides and its multiplanar ability, can demonstrate with precision, the size, shape and position of the two urethras. We describe below a case where MRI was able to show this exquisitely. PMID:19881093

  13. Hind limb muscle atrophy precedes cerebral neuronal degeneration in G93A-SOD1 mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a longitudinal MRI study.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzo, Stefania; Zucca, Ileana; Mastropietro, Alfonso; de Rosbo, Nicole Kerlero; Cavalcante, Paola; Tartari, Silvia; Bonanno, Silvia; Preite, Lorenzo; Mantegazza, Renato; Bernasconi, Pia

    2011-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, fatal, neurodegenerative disorder caused by the degeneration of motor neurons in the CNS, which results in complete paralysis of skeletal muscles. Recent experimental studies have suggested that the disease could initiate in skeletal muscle, rather than in the motor neurons. To establish the timeframe of motor neuron degeneration in relation to muscle atrophy in motor neuron disease, we have used MRI to monitor changes throughout disease in brain and skeletal muscle of G93A-SOD1 mice, a purported model of ALS. Longitudinal MRI examination of the same animals indicated that muscle volume in the G93A-SOD1 mice was significantly reduced from as early as week 8 of life, 4 weeks prior to clinical onset. Progressive muscle atrophy from week 8 onwards was confirmed by histological analysis. In contrast, brain MRI indicated that neurodegeneration occurs later in G93A-SOD1 mice, with hyperintensity MRI signals detected only at weeks 10-18. Neurodegenerative changes were observed only in the motor nuclei areas of the brainstem; MRI changes indicative of neurodegeneration were not detected in the motor cortex where first motor neurons originate, even at the late disease stage. This longitudinal MRI study establishes unequivocally that, in the experimental murine model of ALS, muscle degeneration occurs before any evidence of neurodegeneration and clinical signs, supporting the postulate that motor neuron disease can initiate from muscle damage and result from retrograde dying-back of the motor neurons. PMID:21620832

  14. Three-dimensional, in vivo MRI with self-gating and image coregistration in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Brian J; Szulc, Kamila U; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2009-05-01

    Motion during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans routinely results in undesirable image artifact or blurring. Since high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the mouse requires long scan times for satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality, motion-related artifacts are likely over much of the body and limit applications of mouse MRI. In this investigation, we explored the use of self-gated imaging methods and image coregistration for improving image quality in the presence of motion. Self-gated signal results from a modified 3D gradient-echo sequence showed detection of periodic respiratory and cardiac motion in the adult mouse-with excellent comparison to traditional measurements, sensitivity to respiration-induced tissue changes in the brain, and even detection of embryonic cardiac motion in utero. Serial image coregistration with rapidly-acquired, low-SNR volumes further enabled detection and correction of bulk changes in embryo location during in utero imaging sessions and subsequent reconstruction of high-quality images. These methods, in combination, are shown to expand the range of applications for 3D mouse MRI, enabling late-stage embryonic heart imaging and introducing the possibility of longitudinal developmental studies from embryonic stages through adulthood.

  15. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric neurosurgery—an update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the advent of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (ioMRI) at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 1994, ioMRI has spread widely and in many different forms. This article traces the developmental history of ioMRI and reviews the relevant literature regarding it’s effectiveness in pediatric neurosurgery. While of considerable expense, current trends in healthcare essentially mandate the use of ioMRI in a growing number of cases. PMID:26835341

  16. Quantitative MRI Measures in SIV-Infected Macaque Brains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Chunxia

    2013-01-01

    Multiple MRI modalities including Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), perfusion MRI, in vivo MR Spectroscopy (MRS), volumetric MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and functional MRI have demonstrated abnormalities of the structural and functional integrity as well as neurochemical alterations of the HIV-infected central nervous system (CNS). MRI has been proposed as a robust imaging approach for the characterization of the stage of progression in HIV infection. However, the interpretation of the MRI findings of HIV patients is complicated by the fact that these clinical studies cannot readily be controlled. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected macaques exhibit neuropathological symptoms similar to those of HIV patients, and are an important model for studying the course of CNS infection, cognitive impairment, and neuropathology of HIV disease as well as treatment efficacy. MRI of non-human primates (NHPs) is of limited benefit on most clinical scanners operating at or below 1.5 Tesla because this low field strength does not produce high-quality images of the relatively small NHP brain. Contemporary high field MRI (3T or more) for clinical use provides impressive sensitivity for magnetic resonance signal detection and is now accessible in many imaging centers and hospitals, facilitating the use of various MRI techniques in NHP studies. In this article, several high field MRI techniques and applications in macaque models of neuroAIDS are reviewed and the relation between quantitative MRI measures and blood T-cell alterations is discussed. PMID:24244892

  17. A sensitive period for language in the visual cortex: Distinct patterns of plasticity in congenitally versus late blind adults

    PubMed Central

    Bedny, Marina; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Dravida, Swethasri; Saxe, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that blindness enables visual circuits to contribute to language processing. We examined whether this dramatic functional plasticity has a sensitive period. BOLD fMRI signal was measured in congenitally blind, late blind (blindness onset 9-years-old or later) and sighted participants while they performed a sentence comprehension task. In a control condition, participants listened to backwards speech and made match/non-match to sample judgments. In both, congenitally and late blind participants BOLD signal increased in bilateral foveal-pericalcarine cortex during response preparation, irrespective of whether the stimulus was a sentence or backwards speech. However, only in congenitally blind people left occipital areas (pericalcarine, extrastriate, fusiform and lateral) responded more to sentences than backwards speech. We conclude that age of blindness onset constrains the non-visual functions of occipital cortex: while plasticity is present in both congenitally and late blind individuals, recruitment of visual circuits for language depends on blindness during childhood. PMID:22154509

  18. Skeletal Muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Lower Limbs in Late-onset Lipid Storage Myopathy with Electron Transfer Flavoprotein Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-Yi; Jin, Ming; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Ni; He, Jun-Jie; Lin, Min-Ting; Fu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lipid storage myopathy (LSM) is a genetically heterogeneous group with variable clinical phenotypes. Late-onset multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) is a rather common form of LSM in China. Diagnosis and clinical management of it remain challenging, especially without robust muscle biopsy result and genetic detection. As the noninvasion and convenience, muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a helpful assistant, diagnostic tool for neuromuscular disorders. However, the disease-specific MRI patterns of muscle involved and its diagnostic value in late-onset MADD have not been systematic analyzed. Methods: We assessed the MRI pattern and fat infiltration degree of the lower limb muscles in 28 late-onset MADD patients, combined with detailed clinical features and gene spectrum. Fat infiltration degree of the thigh muscle was scored while that of gluteus was described as obvious or not. Associated muscular atrophy was defined as obvious muscle bulk reduction. Results: The mean scores were significantly different among the anterior, medial, and posterior thigh muscle groups. The mean of fat infiltration scores on posterior thigh muscle group was significantly higher than either anterior or medial thigh muscle group (P < 0.001). Moreover, the mean score on medial thigh muscle group was significantly higher than that of anterior thigh muscle group (P < 0.01). About half of the patients displayed fat infiltration and atrophy in gluteus muscles. Of 28 patients, 12 exhibited atrophy in medial and/or posterior thigh muscle groups, especially in posterior thigh muscle group. Muscle edema pattern was not found in all the patients. Conclusions: Late-onset MADD patients show a typical muscular imaging pattern of fat infiltration and atrophy on anterior, posterior, and medial thigh muscle groups, with major involvement of posterior thigh muscle group and gluteus muscles and a sparing involvement of anterior thigh compartment. Our findings also

  19. Multispectral MRI-based virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihong; Zhu, Hongbin; Wang, Su; Wei, Xinzhou; Liang, Zhengrong

    2010-08-01

    Bladder cancer is the fifth cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Virtual cystoscopy (VC) can be a screening means for early detection of the cancer using non-invasive imaging and computer graphics technologies. Previous researches have mainly focused on spiral CT (computed tomography), which invasively introduces air into bladder lumen for a contrast against bladder wall via a small catheter. However, the tissue contrast around bladder wall is still limited in CT-based VC. In addition, CT-based technique carries additional radiation. We have investigated a procedure to achieve the screening task by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). It utilizes the unique features of MRI: (1) the urine has distinct T1 and T2 relaxation times as compared to its surrounding tissues, and (2) MRI has the potential to obtain good tissue contrast around bladder wall. The procedure is fully non-invasive and easy in implementation. In this paper, we proposed a MRI-based VC system for computer aided detection (CAD) of bladder tumors. The proposed VC system is an integration of partial volume-based segmentation containing texture information and fast marching-based CAD employing geometrical features for detecting of bladder tumors. The accuracy and efficiency of the integrated VC system are evaluated by testing the diagnoses against a database of patients.

  20. Multiscan MRI-based virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongqing; Li, Bin; Huang, Wei; Liang, Zach

    2000-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) based virtual cystoscopy (VC) has been studied as a potential tool for screening bladder cancer. It is accurate in localizing tumor of size larger than 1 cm and less expensive, as compared to fiberoptic cystoscopy. However, it is invasive and difficult to perform due to using Foley catheter for bladder insufflating with air. In a previous work, we investigated a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based VC scheme with urine as a natural contrast solution, in which a MRI acquisition protocol and an adaptive segmentation method were utilized. Both bladder lumen and wall were successfully delineated. To suppress motion artifact and insight pathological change on the bladder wall images, a multi-scan MRI scheme was presented in this study. One transverse and another coronal acquisitions of T1-weighted that cover the whole bladder were obtained twice, at one time the bladder is full of urine and at another time it is near the empty. Four bladder volumes extracted from those 4 datasets were registered first using a flexible three- dimensional (3D) registration algorithm. Then, associated 4 lumen surfaces were viewed simultaneously with the help of an interactive 3D visualization system. This MRI-based VC was tested on volunteers and demonstrated the feasibility to mass screening for bladder cancer.

  1. MRI Zooms in on Microscopic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    MRI images of water flow through a constricted microfluidic channel with the XZ axis on the left and the YZ axis on the right. Note that fast moving components directly aligned with the constricted region emerge at the detector first, followed by components that are not aligned with the constriction.

  2. Stability of MRI Turbulent Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H. R.; Masada, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We study the stability of geometrically thin accretion disks with non-standard α parameter, which characterizes the efficiency of the angular momentum transport. Following recent results of numerical simulations of the Magnetorotational instability (MRI) driven turbulence, we assume that α increases with the magnetic Prandtl number. By adopting Spitzer's microscopic diffusivities, we obtain local structures of geometrically thin accretion disks consistently including effects of MRI-driven turbulence. Since the magnetic Prandtl number increases with the temperature, the efficiency of the angular momentum transport and thus viscous heating rate are smaller for a larger radius when δ > 0. We find that such disks can be unstable to gravitational, thermal, and secular instabilities. It is most remarkable feature that the thermal and secular instabilities can grow in the middle part of accretion disks even when the radiation pressure is negligible, while the standard Shakura & Sunyaev's accretion disk (constant α) is stable to these instabilities. We conclude that it would be difficult to maintain the steady mass accretion state unless the Pm-dependence of the MRI-driven turbulence is weak. Consideration of Pm dependence of α due to the MRI-driven turbulence may make the phase transition of accretion disks less mysterious.

  3. Challenges for Molecular Neuroimaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lelyveld, Victor S.; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Jasanoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MRI)-based molecular imaging methods are beginning to have impact in neuroscience. A growing number of molecular imaging agents have been synthesized and tested in vitro, but so far relatively few have been validated in the brains of live animals. Here, we discuss key challenges associated with expanding the repertoire of successful molecular neuroimaging approaches. The difficulty of delivering agents past the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a particular obstacle to molecular imaging in the central nervous system. We review established and emerging techniques for trans-BBB delivery, including intracranial infusion, BBB disruption, and transporter-related methods. Improving the sensitivity with which MRI-based molecular agents can be detected is a second major challenge. Better sensitivity would in turn reduce the requirements for delivery and alleviate potential side effects. We discuss recent efforts to enhance relaxivity of conventional longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2) MRI contrast agents, as well as strategies that involve amplifying molecular signals or reducing endogenous background influences. With ongoing refinement of imaging approaches and brain delivery methods, MRI-based techniques for molecular-level neuroscientific investigation will fall increasingly within reach. PMID:20808721

  4. MRI in Taylor-Dean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, Frank; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2004-11-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) can destabilize hydrodynamically stable flows which are characterized by an angular momentum that is increasing with the radius and by an angular velocity that is decreasing with radius. Its astrophysical importance comes from the fact that the Kepler flow with Ω(r) ~ r-3/2 exactly such a behaviour. In order to investigate MRI in a laboratory experiment, the Taylor-Couette flow with Ω(r) = A + Br2 with A > 0 has been proposed as a substitute for the Kepler flow. In this paper we consider the Taylor-Dean flow as another example of a flow profile which can exhibit the necessary radial dependence. Taylor-Dean flows are a combination of the traditional Taylor-Couette flow with an additional flow that is produced by an azimuthal force. Special focus is laid on the case that the Taylor-Couette part of the flow is a rigid body rotation and the magnitude of the Dean flow is adjusted in such a way that in the outer part of the flow the conditions for MRI are fulfilled. Based on the dispersion relation derived by Ji, Kageyama and Goodman, in combination with some preliminary global instability analysis, we give some first estimates for the physical parameters of a Taylor-Dean MRI experiment with liquid sodium.

  5. Diffusion-MRI in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Goveas, Joseph; O'Dwyer, Laurence; Mascalchi, Mario; Cosottini, Mirco; Diciotti, Stefano; De Santis, Silvia; Passamonti, Luca; Tessa, Carlo; Toschi, Nicola; Giannelli, Marco

    2015-09-01

    The ability to image the whole brain through ever more subtle and specific methods/contrasts has come to play a key role in understanding the basis of brain abnormalities in several diseases. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), "diffusion" (i.e. the random, thermally-induced displacements of water molecules over time) represents an extraordinarily sensitive contrast mechanism, and the exquisite structural detail it affords has proven useful in a vast number of clinical as well as research applications. Since diffusion-MRI is a truly quantitative imaging technique, the indices it provides can serve as potential imaging biomarkers which could allow early detection of pathological alterations as well as tracking and possibly predicting subtle changes in follow-up examinations and clinical trials. Accordingly, diffusion-MRI has proven useful in obtaining information to better understand the microstructural changes and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying various neurodegenerative disorders. In this review article, we summarize and explore the main applications, findings, perspectives as well as challenges and future research of diffusion-MRI in various neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease and degenerative ataxias. PMID:25917917

  6. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  7. MRI characteristics of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Friedemann; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A.; Tenembaum, Silvia; Asgari, Nasrin; Palace, Jacqueline; Klawiter, Eric C.; Sato, Douglas K.; de Seze, Jérôme; Wuerfel, Jens; Banwell, Brenda L.; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Kim, Su-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Since its initial reports in the 19th century, neuromyelitis optica (NMO) had been thought to involve only the optic nerves and spinal cord. However, the discovery of highly specific anti–aquaporin-4 antibody diagnostic biomarker for NMO enabled recognition of more diverse clinical spectrum of manifestations. Brain MRI abnormalities in patients seropositive for anti–aquaporin-4 antibody are common and some may be relatively unique by virtue of localization and configuration. Some seropositive patients present with brain involvement during their first attack and/or continue to relapse in the same location without optic nerve and spinal cord involvement. Thus, characteristics of brain abnormalities in such patients have become of increased interest. In this regard, MRI has an increasingly important role in the differential diagnosis of NMO and its spectrum disorder (NMOSD), particularly from multiple sclerosis. Differentiating these conditions is of prime importance because early initiation of effective immunosuppressive therapy is the key to preventing attack-related disability in NMOSD, whereas some disease-modifying drugs for multiple sclerosis may exacerbate the disease. Therefore, identifying the MRI features suggestive of NMOSD has diagnostic and prognostic implications. We herein review the brain, optic nerve, and spinal cord MRI findings of NMOSD. PMID:25695963

  8. MRI Scanners Guide Therapy to Tumors.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    A new study shows that MRI scanners can direct magnetically labeled macrophages bearing an oncolytic virus toward primary and metastatic tumors in mice. Researchers hope this approach, called magnetic resonance targeting, can be scaled for use in humans, to improve the delivery of cell-based cancer therapy. PMID:26370155

  9. [MRI compatibility of deep brain stimulator].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujing

    2013-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy develops rapidly in clinical application. The structures of deep brain stimulator and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment are introduced, the interactions are analyzed, and the two compatible problems of radio frequency (RF) heating and imaging artifact are summarized in this paper.

  10. In Vivo MRI Assessment of Experimental Schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, José Roberto; Mamede, Marcelo; Pereira, Thiago A

    2016-01-01

    A new study using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluated successfully the transverse relaxation time T2 as a non-invasive imaging biomarker for monitoring hepatic fibrogenesis in schistosomiasis. However, there are some drawbacks that need special attention. This preliminary data opens new opportunities to understand and monitor liver fibrosis in schistosomiasis and other fibrogenic diseases.

  11. Anatomical MRI with an atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T

    2013-06-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI is a promising method for inexpensive medical imaging with various additional advantages over conventional instruments such as low weight, low power, portability, absence of artifacts from metals, and high contrast. Anatomical ULF MRI has been successfully implemented with SQUIDs, but SQUIDs have the drawback of a cryogen requirement. Atomic magnetometers have sensitivity comparable to SQUIDs and can be in principle used for ULF MRI to replace SQUIDs. Unfortunately some problems exist due to the sensitivity of atomic magnetometers to a magnetic field and gradients. At low frequency, noise is also substantial and a shielded room is needed for improving sensitivity. In this paper, we show that at 85 kHz, the atomic magnetometer can be used to obtain anatomical images. This is the first demonstration of any use of atomic magnetometers for anatomical MRI. The demonstrated resolution is 1.1 mm×1.4 mm in about 6 min of acquisition with SNR of 10. Some applications of the method are discussed. We discuss several measures to increase the sensitivity to reach a resolution 1 mm×1 mm.

  12. MRI findings in aphasic status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Manuel; Munuera, Josep; Sueiras, Maria; Rovira, Rosa; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Rovira, Alex

    2008-08-01

    Ictal-MRI studies including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and MR-angiography (MRA) in patients with aphasic status epilepticus (ASE) are lacking. In this report, we aim to describe the consequences of the ASE on DWIs and its impact on cerebral circulation. We retrospectively studied eight patients with ASE confirmed by ictal-EEG, who underwent ictal-MRI shortly after well-documented onset (mean time delay 3 h). ASE consisted in fluctuating aphasia, mostly associated with other subtle contralateral neurological signs such as hemiparesia, hemianopia, or slight clonic jerks. In MRI, six patients showed cortical temporoparietal hyperintensity in DWI and four of them had also ipsilateral pulvinar lesions. Five patients showed close spatial hyperperfusion areas matching the DWI lesions and an enhanced blow flow in the middle cerebral artery. Parenchymal lesions and hemodynamic abnormalities were not associated with seizure duration or severity in any case. The resolution of DWI lesions at follow-up MRI depended on the length of the MRIs interval. In patients with ASE, lesions on DWI in the temporo-parietal cortex and pulvinar nucleus combined with local hyperperfusion can be observed, even when they appear distant from the epileptic focus or the language areas. PMID:18522643

  13. Tissue-Point Motion Tracking in the Tongue from Cine-MRI and Tagged-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Suo, Yuanming; Murano, Emi Z.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Accurate tissue motion tracking within the tongue can help to diagnose and treat vocal tract related disorders, evaluate speech quality before and after surgery, and conduct various scientific studies. We have compared tissue tracking results from four widely used deformable registration (DR) methods applied to Cine-MRI with harmonic phase (HARP)-based tracking applied to tagged-MRI. Method Ten subjects repeated the words “a geese” multiple times while sagittal images of the head were collected at 26 Hz, first in a tagged-MRI data set, and then in a Cine-MRI data set. HARP tracked the motion of eight specified tissue points in the tagged data set. Four DR methods including diffeomorphic demons and free-form deformations based on cubic B-spline with three different similarity measures were used to track the same eight points in the Cine-MRI data set. Individual points were tracked and length changes of several muscles were calculated using the DR and HARP based tracking methods. Results Results showed that the DR tracking errors were non-systematic and varied in direction, amount, and timing across speakers and within speakers. Comparison of HARP and DR tracking with manual tracking showed better tracking results for HARP except at the tongue surface, where mistracking caused greater errors in HARP than DR. Conclusions Tissue point tracking using DR tracking methods contain non-systematic tracking errors within and across subjects, making it less successful than tagged-MRI tracking within the tongue. However, HARP sometimes mistracks points at the tongue surface of tagged MRI due to its limited bandpass filter and tag pattern fading, so that DR has better success measuring surface tissue points on Cine-MRI than HARP does. Therefore a hybrid method is being explored. PMID:24686470

  14. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the MRI environment.

    PubMed

    Lafountain, Richard A; da Silveira, Juliana Serafim; Varghese, Juliet; Mihai, Georgeta; Scandling, Debbie; Craft, Jason; Swain, Carmen B; Franco, Veronica; Raman, Subha V; Devor, Steven T; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2016-04-01

    Maximal oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]max) measured by cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) is the gold standard for assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness. Likewise, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is the gold standard for quantification of cardiac function. The combination of CPX and CMR may offer unique insights into cardiopulmonary pathophysiology; however, the MRI-compatible equipment needed to combine these tests has not been available to date. We sought to determine whether CPX testing in the MRI environment, using equipment modified for MRI yields results equivalent to those obtained in standard exercise physiology (EP) lab. Ten recreationally trained subjects completed [Formula: see text]max tests in different locations; an EP laboratory and an MRI laboratory, using site specific equipment. CMR cine images of the heart were acquired before and immediately after maximal exercise to measure cardiac function. Subjects in all tests met criteria indicating that peak exercise was achieved. Despite equipment modifications for the MRI environment, [Formula: see text]max was nearly identical between tests run in the different labs (95% lower confidence limit (LCL)  =  0.8182). The mean difference in [Formula: see text]max was less than 3.40 ml (kg/min)(-1), within the variability expected for tests performed on different days, in different locations, using different metabolic carts. MRI performed at rest and following peak exercise stress indicated cardiac output increased from 5.1  ±  1.0 l min(-1) to 16.4  ±  5.6 l min(-1), LVEF increased from 65.2  ±  3.3% to 78.4  ±  4.8%, while RVEF increased from 52.8  ±  5.3% to 63.4  ±  5.3%. Regression analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between [Formula: see text]max and stroke volume (R  =  0.788, P  =  0.006), while the correlation with cardiac output did not reach statistical significance (R

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/MRI for Lung Cancer Staging.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-07-01

    Tumor, lymph node, and metastasis (TNM) classification of lung cancer is typically performed with the TNM staging system, as recommended by the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). Radiologic examinations for TNM staging of lung cancer patients include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), and FDG-PET combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) and are used for pretherapeutic assessments. Recent technical advances in MR systems, application of fast and parallel imaging and/or introduction of new MR techniques, and utilization of contrast media have markedly improved the diagnostic utility of MRI in this setting. In addition, FDG-PET can be combined or fused with MRI (PET/MRI) for clinical practice. This review article will focus on these recent advances in MRI as well as on PET/MRI for lung cancer staging, in addition to a discussion of their potential and limitations for routine clinical practice in comparison with other modalities such as CT, FDG-PET, and PET/CT.

  16. Distinguishing the Magnetorotational Instability (MRI) from Magnetized Ekman Flows in the PPPL MRI Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Caspary, Kyle; Goodman, Jeremy; Ji, Hantao; Schartman, Ethan; Wei, Xing

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented from initial experiments on the upgraded Magnetorotational Instability (MRI) experiment that uses GaInSn as the working fluid and now operates with conductive end caps to improve the coupling of angular momentum to the fluid to increase the saturation amplitude of the MRI signal. Measurements of the fluid velocity field and perturbed magnetic field over a range of magnetic Reynolds numbers, Rm , and Lundquist numbers, S, are compared with results from the SFEMaNS code in order to separate the effects of MRI on the system from effects such as Ekman flows and Shercliff layer instabilities. The MRI can be identified by observing its growth rate, noting the relative magnitudes and spatial distributions of the perturbed radial flow velocity ur and radial magnetic field Br, and measuring the scaling of ur and Br with Rm . The clear identification of the onset of MRI in the apparatus is complicated by the geometry and boundary conditions creating an imperfect supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. Nevertheless, a stability diagram can be created that shows that MRI is a weak-field instability that occurs only below a certain value of the normalized magnetic field S / Rm but above a threshold where viscous effects damps the growth of the instability.

  17. MRI in evaluation of perianal fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Sofic, Amela; Beslic, Serif; Sehovic, Nedzad; Caluk, Jasmin; Sofic, Damir

    2010-01-01

    Background Fistula is considered to be any abnormal passage which connects two epithelial surfaces. Parks’ fistulae classification demonstrates the biggest practical significance and divides fistulae into: intersphincteric, transsphincteric, suprasphincteric and extrasphincteric. Etiology of perianal fistulae is most commonly linked with the inflammation of anal glands in Crohn’s disease, tuberculosis, pelvic infections, pelvic malignant tumours, and with the radiotherapy. Diagnostic method options are: RTG fistulography, CT fistulography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pelvic organs. Patients and methods We have included 24 patients with perirectal fistulae in the prospective study. X-rays fistulography, CT fistulography, and then MRI of the pelvic cavity have been performed on all patients. Accuracy of each procedure in regards to the patients and the etiologic cause have been statistically determined. Results 29.16% of transphincteric fistulae have been found, followed by 25% of intersphincteric, 25% of recto-vaginal, 12.5% of extrasphincteric, and 8.33% of suprasphincteric. Abscess collections have been found in 16.6% patients. The most frequent etiologic cause of perianal fistulae was Crohn’s disease in 37.5%, where the accuracy of classification of MRI was 100%, CT was 11% and X-rays 0%. Ulcerous colitis was the second cause, with 20.9% where the accuracy of MRI was 100%, while CT was 80% and X-rays was 0%. All other etiologic causes of fistulae were found in 41.6% patients. Conclusions MRI is a reliable diagnostic modality in the classification of perirectal fistulae and can be an excellent diagnostic guide for successful surgical interventions with the aim to reduce the number of recurrences. Its advantage is that fistulae and abscess are visible without the need to apply any contrast medium. PMID:22933919

  18. Microtesla MRI with dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Owens, Tuba; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Savukov, Igor M.; Gomez, John J.; Espy, Michelle A.

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at microtesla fields is a promising imaging method that combines the pre-polarization technique and broadband signal reception by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors to enable in vivo MRI at microtesla-range magnetic fields similar in strength to the Earth magnetic field. Despite significant advances in recent years, the potential of microtesla MRI for biomedical imaging is limited by its insufficient signal-to-noise ratio due to a relatively low sample polarization. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a widely used approach that allows polarization enhancement by 2-4 orders of magnitude without an increase in the polarizing field strength. In this work, the first implementation of microtesla MRI with Overhauser DNP and SQUID signal detection is described. The first measurements of carbon-13 NMR spectra at microtesla fields are also reported. The experiments were performed at the measurement field of 96 μT, corresponding to Larmor frequency of 4 kHz for protons and 1 kHz for carbon-13. The Overhauser DNP was carried out at 3.5-5.7 mT fields using rf irradiation at 120 MHz. Objects for imaging included water phantoms and a cactus plant. Aqueous solutions of metabolically relevant sodium bicarbonate, pyruvate, alanine, and lactate, labeled with carbon-13, were used for NMR studies. All the samples were doped with TEMPO free radicals. The Overhauser DNP enabled nuclear polarization enhancement by factor as large as -95 for protons and as large as -200 for carbon-13, corresponding to thermal polarizations at 0.33 T and 1.1 T fields, respectively. These results demonstrate that SQUID-based microtesla MRI can be naturally combined with Overhauser DNP in one system, and that its signal-to-noise performance is greatly improved in this case. They also suggest that microtesla MRI can become an efficient tool for in vivo imaging of hyperpolarized carbon-13, produced by low-temperature dissolution DNP.

  19. Intra-Hepatic Spillage of Gallstones as a Late Complication of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: MR Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Ragozzino, Alfonso; Puglia, Marta; Romano, Federica; Imbriaco, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Spillage of gallstones in the abdominal cavity may rarely occur during the course of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Dropped gallstones in the peritoneal and extra-peritoneal cavity are usually asymptomatic. However, they may lead to abscess formation with an estimated incidence of about 0.3%. Common locations of the abscess are in the abdominal wall followed by the intra-abdominal cavity, usually in the sub-hepatic or retro-peritoneum inferior to the sub-hepatic space. Case Report We hereby describe an unusual case of infected spilled gallstones in the right sub-phrenic space, prospectively detected on abdominal MRI performed two years after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, in a patient with only a mild right-sided abdominal complaint. Conclusions This case highlights the role of MRI in suggesting the right diagnosis in cases with vague or even absent symptomatology. In our case the patient’s history together with high quality abdomen MRI allowed the correct diagnosis. Radiologists should be aware of this rare and late onset complication, even after many years from surgery as an incidental finding in almost asymptomatic patients. PMID:27471576

  20. MRI of Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, James R.; Chopp, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability using MRI and its application to cerebral ischemia are reviewed. Measurement of BBB permeability using MRI has been employed to evaluate ischemic damage during acute and subacute phases of stroke and to predict hemorrhagic transformation. There is also an emerging interest on the development and use of MRI to monitor vascular structural changes and angiogenesis during stroke recovery. In this review, we describe MRI BBB permeability and susceptibility-weighted MRI measurements and its applications to evaluate ischemic damage during the acute and subacute phases of stroke and vascular remodeling during stroke recovery. PMID:23997835

  1. MRI for patients with cardiac implantable electrical devices.

    PubMed

    Chow, Grant V; Nazarian, Saman

    2014-05-01

    MRI has become an invaluable tool in the evaluation of soft tissue and bony abnormalities. The presence of a cardiac implantable electrical device (CIED) may complicate matters, however, because these devices are considered a contraindication to MRI scanning. When MRI is performed in patients with a CIED, risks include reed switch activation in older devices, lead heating, system malfunction, and significant radiofrequency noise resulting in inappropriate inhibition of demand pacing, tachycardia therapies, or programming changes. This report reviews indications and risk-benefit evaluation of MRI in patients with CIED and provides a clinical algorithm for performing MRI in patients with implanted devices. PMID:24793805

  2. Isolated Unilateral Tongue Atrophy: A Possible Late Complication of Juxta Cephalic Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Saeed A; Agha, Caroline; Rothstein, Ted

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury is extremely rare. It may be caused by radiation therapy targeting neoplasms of the cephalic region. CASE REPORT A 51-year-old man with synovial sarcoma of the left upper arm status post extensive radiation therapy in 1980 presented in late 2014 with gradual onset of speech difficulty and difficulty moving his tongue for a couple of weeks. Neurological examination revealed isolated left-sided unilateral tongue atrophy. Postradiation residual extensive cicatrix with erythema over the whole left upper extremity extending to the neck on the affected side was noticed. On head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after administration of gadolinium, he was found to have asymmetrically fatty striations, atrophy, and fibrosis in the left tongue consistent with radiation toxicity. The patient's tongue weakness persisted without improvement. CONCLUSIONS The diagnosis of unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury is usually difficult. Detailed neurological examinations and thorough investigations including head MRI are very helpful. Previous exposure to radiation therapy is a potential cause of hypoglossal nerve injury. To our knowledge, this is the first case report that presents isolated unilateral tongue atrophy as a late complication of juxta cephalic radiation therapy. PMID:27458010

  3. Isolated Unilateral Tongue Atrophy: A Possible Late Complication of Juxta Cephalic Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Saeed A.; Agha, Caroline; Rothstein, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 51 Final Diagnosis: Radiation therapy induced unilateral tongue atrophy Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: EMG Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury is extremely rare. It may be caused by radiation therapy targeting neoplasms of the cephalic region. Case Report: A 51-year-old man with synovial sarcoma of the left upper arm status post extensive radiation therapy in 1980 presented in late 2014 with gradual onset of speech difficulty and difficulty moving his tongue for a couple of weeks. Neurological examination revealed isolated left-sided unilateral tongue atrophy. Postradiation residual extensive cicatrix with erythema over the whole left upper extremity extending to the neck on the affected side was noticed. On head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after administration of gadolinium, he was found to have asymmetrically fatty striations, atrophy, and fibrosis in the left tongue consistent with radiation toxicity. The patient’s tongue weakness persisted without improvement. Conclusions: The diagnosis of unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury is usually difficult. Detailed neurological examinations and thorough investigations including head MRI are very helpful. Previous exposure to radiation therapy is a potential cause of hypoglossal nerve injury. To our knowledge, this is the first case report that presents isolated unilateral tongue atrophy as a late complication of juxta cephalic radiation therapy. PMID:27458010

  4. MRI simulation: end-to-end testing for prostate radiation therapy using geometric pelvic MRI phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jidi; Dowling, Jason; Pichler, Peter; Menk, Fred; Rivest-Henault, David; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Martin, Jarad; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-04-01

    To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensure an accurate process. The purpose of this study was to design and build a geometric phantom simulating a human male pelvis that is suitable for both CT and MRI scanning and use it to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of MRI simulation including treatment planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. A liquid filled pelvic shaped phantom with simulated pelvic organs was scanned in a 3T MRI simulator with dedicated radiotherapy couch-top, laser bridge and pelvic coil mounts. A second phantom with the same external shape but with an internal distortion grid was used to quantify the distortion of the MR image. Both phantoms were also CT scanned as the gold-standard for both geometry and dosimetry. Deformable image registration was used to quantify the MR distortion. Dose comparison was made using a seven-field IMRT plan developed on the CT scan with the fluences copied to the MR image and recalculated using bulk electron densities. Without correction the maximum distortion of the MR compared with the CT scan was 7.5 mm across the pelvis, while this was reduced to 2.6 and 1.7 mm by the vendor’s 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. Within the locations of the internal organs of interest, the distortion was <1.5 and <1 mm with 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. The dose at the prostate isocentre calculated on CT and MRI images differed by 0.01% (1.1 cGy). Positioning shifts were within 1 mm when setup was performed using MRI generated DRRs compared to setup using CT DRRs. The MRI pelvic phantom allows end-to-end testing of the MRI simulation workflow with comparison to the gold-standard CT based process. MRI simulation was found to be geometrically accurate with organ dimensions, dose distributions and DRR based setup within acceptable limits compared to CT.

  5. Late-onset offending: fact or fiction.

    PubMed

    Wiecko, Filip M

    2014-01-01

    This research focuses on a detailed exploration of late-onset offending. Using the National Youth Survey, this work seeks to answer three questions. First, is late-onset offending a real phenomenon? Second, if late onset does exist, is the evidence for it conditioned by how we define crime and delinquency? Finally, is late-onset offending an artifact of measurement methodology? Most literature evidencing late onset relies on official police contact and arrest data. Propensity or control theories in general posit that late onset should not exist. Propensity, namely self-control, should be instilled early in life and if absent, results in early initiation into crime and delinquency. Research in developmental psychology seems to support this notion. The findings from this study indicate that late-onset offending is almost nonexistent when self-reported measures are used leading one to conclude that contemporary evidence for late-onset is heavily conditioned by how we measure crime and delinquency. A comprehensive discussion includes future directions for research, and implications for theory development and methodology. PMID:23014937

  6. 16 CFR 444.4 - Late charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Late charges. 444.4 Section 444.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES CREDIT PRACTICES § 444.4 Late charges. (a) In... commerce, as commerce is defined in the Federal Trade Commission Act, it is an unfair act or...

  7. 16 CFR 444.4 - Late charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Late charges. 444.4 Section 444.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES CREDIT PRACTICES § 444.4 Late charges. (a) In... commerce, as commerce is defined in the Federal Trade Commission Act, it is an unfair act or...

  8. 16 CFR 444.4 - Late charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Late charges. 444.4 Section 444.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES CREDIT PRACTICES § 444.4 Late charges. (a) In... commerce, as commerce is defined in the Federal Trade Commission Act, it is an unfair act or...

  9. 16 CFR 444.4 - Late charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Late charges. 444.4 Section 444.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES CREDIT PRACTICES § 444.4 Late charges. (a) In... commerce, as commerce is defined in the Federal Trade Commission Act, it is an unfair act or...

  10. 16 CFR 444.4 - Late charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Late charges. 444.4 Section 444.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES CREDIT PRACTICES § 444.4 Late charges. (a) In... commerce, as commerce is defined in the Federal Trade Commission Act, it is an unfair act or...

  11. 12 CFR 160.33 - Late charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... charges. A Federal savings association may include in a home loan contract a provision authorizing the... any loan made after July 31, 1976, on the security of a home occupied or to be occupied by the... savings association may not impose a late charge more than one time for late payment of the...

  12. 37 CFR 385.4 - Late payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 385.4 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RATES AND TERMS... AND DISTRIBUTING OF PHYSICAL AND DIGITAL PHONORECORDS Physical Phonorecord Deliveries, Permanent Digital Downloads and Ringtones § 385.4 Late payments. A Licensee shall pay a late fee of 1.5% per...

  13. 37 CFR 385.4 - Late payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 385.4 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RATES AND TERMS... AND DISTRIBUTING OF PHYSICAL AND DIGITAL PHONORECORDS Physical Phonorecord Deliveries, Permanent Digital Downloads and Ringtones § 385.4 Late payments. A Licensee shall pay a late fee of 1.5% per...

  14. 37 CFR 385.4 - Late payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 385.4 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RATES AND TERMS... AND DISTRIBUTING OF PHYSICAL AND DIGITAL PHONORECORDS Physical Phonorecord Deliveries, Permanent Digital Downloads and Ringtones § 385.4 Late payments. A Licensee shall pay a late fee of 1.5% per...

  15. 37 CFR 385.4 - Late payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 385.4 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RATES AND TERMS... AND DISTRIBUTING OF PHYSICAL AND DIGITAL PHONORECORDS Physical Phonorecord Deliveries, Permanent Digital Downloads and Ringtones § 385.4 Late payments. A Licensee shall pay a late fee of 1.5% per...

  16. 37 CFR 385.4 - Late payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 385.4 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RATES AND TERMS... AND DISTRIBUTING OF PHYSICAL AND DIGITAL PHONORECORDS Physical Phonorecord Deliveries, Permanent Digital Downloads and Ringtones § 385.4 Late payments. A Licensee shall pay a late fee of 1.5% per...

  17. 30 CFR 218.54 - Late payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Late payments. 218.54 Section 218.54 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT COLLECTION OF MONIES AND PROVISION FOR GEOTHERMAL CREDITS AND INCENTIVES Oil and Gas, General § 218.54 Late...

  18. Cycads: fossil evidence of late paleozoic origin.

    PubMed

    Mamay, S H

    1969-04-18

    Plant fossils from Lower Permian strata of the southwestern United States have been interpreted as cycadalean megasporophylls. They are evidently descended from spermopterid elements of the Pennsylvanian Taeniopteris complex; thus the known fossil history of the cycads is extended from the Late Triassic into the late Paleozoic. Possible implications of the Permian fossils toward evolution of the angiosperm carpel are considered.

  19. Cycads: Fossil evidence of late paleozoic origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mamay, S.H.

    1969-01-01

    Plant fossils from Lower Permian strata of the southwestern United States have been interpreted as cycadalean megasporophylls. They are evidently descended from spermopterid elements of the Pennsylvanian Taeniopteris complex; thus the known fossil history of the cycads is extended from the Late Triassic into the late Paleozoic. Possible implications of the Permian fossils toward evolution of the angiosperm carpel are considered.

  20. [Frontotemporal Dementia Presenting as Acute Late Onset Schizophrenia

    PubMed

    Reischle, Ekkehard; Sturm, Kornelia; Schuierer, Gerhard; Ibach, Bernd

    2003-05-01

    The concept of frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a heterogenous group of cortical dementias, including frontotemporal dementia, as the major clinical variant. Because of their highly variable clinical presentation, to establish the diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia could be a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. Here we report a 53 years old caucasian male patient who was admitted for hospitalization due to acute severe schizophrenia-like symptoms. The leading symptomatology comprised acoustic and bizarre optical hallucinations with euphoria and self-overestimation. Remission of the psychotic symptoms demasked the clinical picture of a rapidly progressive frontotemporal dementia with marked apathy, indifference, emotional blunting, loss of insight, change of personality and typical cognitive impairment. The diagnosis was supported by the results of cerebral MRI and FDG-18 PET. This first clinical manifestation of a schizophrenia-like syndrome in the 6 (th) life decade implicates frontotemporal dementia as an important differential diagnosis of schizophrenic disorders in late life. In addition of basically thinking about frontotemporal dementia, a detailed medical history, cognitive testing, neuroimaging and eventually the evaluation of the further disease course are necessary to establish a diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia. PMID:13130343

  1. Inherited eye disease: cause and late effect.

    PubMed

    Manson, Forbes D C; Trump, Dorothy; Read, Andrew P; Black, Graeme C M

    2005-10-01

    Molecular genetics has provided relatively few insights into late-onset eye disorders, but epidemiological data indicate that genetic factors are important in some late-onset eye disorders that cause major health burdens. Much clinical genetic research is based on the belief that developmental and late-onset disorders are not necessarily the result of defects in different genes, but are often caused by different mutations in the same collection of genes. Thus, mutations that either abolish or radically change gene function might cause early-onset disorders, whereas more-subtle changes in gene expression might underlie late-onset diseases. We present arguments and examples that indicate that this principle might be a fruitful guide to investigating the causes of late-onset eye disorders. PMID:16153893

  2. Simultaneous imaging using Si-PM-based PET and MRI for development of an integrated PET/MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Imaizumi, Masao; Kanai, Yasukazu; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photo-detector for PET for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems because it has high gain and is insensitive to static magnetic fields. Recently we developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction PET system for small animals and performed simultaneous measurements by combining the Si-PM-based PET and the 0.15 T permanent MRI to test the interferences between the Si-PM-based PET and an MRI. When the Si-PM was inside the MRI and installed around the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI, significant noise from the RF sequence of the MRI was observed in the analog signals of the PET detectors. However, we did not observe any artifacts in the PET images; fluctuation increased in the count rate of the Si-PM-based PET system. On the MRI side, there was significant degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in the MRI images compared with those without PET. By applying noise reduction procedures, the degradation of the S/N was reduced. With this condition, simultaneous measurements of a rat brain using a Si-PM-based PET and an MRI were made with some degradation in the MRI images. We conclude that simultaneous measurements are possible using Si-PM-based PET and MRI.

  3. MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy in neuro-oncology: a review of its current clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Recinos, Pablo F; Kamian, Kambiz; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Barnett, Gene H

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive treatment modality with recent increasing use to ablate brain tumors. When originally introduced in the late 1980s, the inability to precisely monitor and control the thermal ablation limited the adoption of LITT in neuro-oncology. Popularized as a means of destroying malignant hepatic and renal metastatic lesions percutaneously, its selective thermal tumor destruction and preservation of adjacent normal tissues have since been optimized for use in neuro-oncology. The progress made in real-time thermal imaging with MRI, laser probe design, and computer algorithms predictive of tissue kill has led to the resurgence of interest in LITT as a means to ablate brain tumors. Current LITT systems offer a surgical option for some inoperable brain tumors. We discuss the origins, principles, current indications, and future directions of MRI-guided LITT in neuro-oncology.

  4. Impact of low signal intensity assessed by cine magnetic resonance imaging on detection of poorly viable myocardium in patients with prior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shingo; Tanimoto, Takashi; Orii, Makoto; Hirata, Kumiko; Shiono, Yasutsugu; Shimamura, Kunihiro; Matsuo, Yoshiki; Yamano, Takashi; Ino, Yasushi; Kitabata, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kubo, Takashi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Imanishi, Toshio; Akasaka, Takashi

    2015-05-13

    Late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI) has been established as a modality to detect myocardial infarction (MI). However, the use of gadolinium contrast is limited in patients with advanced renal dysfunction. Although the signal intensity (SI) of infarct area assessed by cine MRI is low in some patients with prior MI, the prevalence and clinical significance of low SI has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate how low SI assessed by cine MRI may relate to the myocardial viability in patients with prior MI. Fifty patients with prior MI underwent both cine MRI and LGE-MRI. The left ventricle was divided into 17 segments. The presence of low SI and the wall motion score (WMS) of each segment were assessed by cine MRI. The transmural extent of infarction was evaluated by LGE-MRI. LGE was detected in 329 of all 850 segments (39%). The low SI assessed by cine MRI was detected in 105 of 329 segments with LGE (32%). All segments with low SI had LGE. Of all 329 segments with LGE, the segments with low SI showed greater transmural extent of infarction (78 [72 - 84] % versus 53 [38 - 72] %, P < 0.01), thinner wall (4.0[3.1 - 4.8] mm versus 6.5 [5.2 - 8.1] mm, P < 0.01), and higher WMS (4.0 [4.0 - 4.0] versus 2.0 [2.0 - 3.0], P < 0.01). The low SI assessed by cine MRI may be effective for detecting poorly viable myocardium in patients with prior MI.

  5. Is the fastest MRI a hologram?

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Michael; Raff, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Real-time MR imaging might exert a profound influence on neuroscience in the future by enabling the direct visualization of neuronal interactions. At this time, however, all practical embodiments of MRI require at least some degree of gradient encoding, and this in turn sets a lower limit of about 100 ms for volume acquisition. A novel formulation of MRI is proposed here which is given the acronym ULTRA (Unlimited Trains of Radio Acquisitions). In the preferred embodiment ULTRA is completely free of gradient reversals, which allows for signal acquisition from the entire object volume simultaneously. This permits a rate of signal acquisition that is increased hundreds of times compared with existing techniques, with full 3-D imaging in as little as one millisecond. The proposed detector now resembles a holographic recording.

  6. MRI of Atherosclerosis: Diagnosis and Monitoring Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Justin D.; Kramer, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Atherosclerosis is a prevalent disease affecting millions of Americans. Despite our advances in diagnosis and treatment, atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in America. High resolution MRI has overcome the limitations of current angiographic techniques and has emerged as a leading noninvasive imaging modality of atherosclerotic disease. Atherosclerosis of the arterial wall of human carotid, aortic, peripheral, and coronary arteries have all been successfully evaluated. In addition, the power of MRI to differentiate the major components of atherosclerotic plaque has been validated. The ability to image the vessel wall and risk stratify atherosclerotic plaque will create management decisions not previously faced and has the potential to change the way atherosclerosis is treated. PMID:17187458

  7. Automatic quality assessment protocol for MRI equipment.

    PubMed

    Bourel, P; Gibon, D; Coste, E; Daanen, V; Rousseau, J

    1999-12-01

    The authors have developed a protocol and software for the quality assessment of MRI equipment with a commercial test object. Automatic image analysis consists of detecting surfaces and objects, defining regions of interest, acquiring reference point coordinates and establishing gray level profiles. Signal-to-noise ratio, image uniformity, geometrical distortion, slice thickness, slice profile, and spatial resolution are checked. The results are periodically analyzed to evaluate possible drifts with time. The measurements are performed weekly on three MRI scanners made by the Siemens Company (VISION 1.5T, EXPERT 1.0T, and OPEN 0.2T). The results obtained for the three scanners over approximately 3.5 years are presented, analyzed, and compared.

  8. Clinical Applications for Diffusion MRI in Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsien, Christina; Cao, Yue; Chenevert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we review the clinical applications of diffusion MR imaging in the radiotherapy treatment of several key clinical sites, including those of the CNS, the head and neck, the prostate and cervix. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is an imaging technique that is rapidly gaining widespread acceptance due to its ease and wide availability. DWI measures the mobility of water within tissue at the cellular level without the need of any exogenous contrast agent. For radiotherapy treatment planning, DWI improves upon conventional imaging techniques, by better characterization of tumor tissue properties required for tumor grading, diagnosis and target volume delineation. Because diffusion weighted MRI is also a sensitive marker for alterations in tumor cellularity, it has potential clinical applications in the early assessment of treatment response following radiation therapy. PMID:24931097

  9. Tissue Tracking: Applications for Brain MRI Classification

    PubMed Central

    Melonakos, John; Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Bayesian classification methods have been extensively used in a variety of image processing applications, including medical image analysis. The basic procedure is to combine data-driven knowledge in the likelihood terms with clinical knowledge in the prior terms to classify an image into a pre-determined number of classes. In many applications, it is difficult to construct meaningful priors and, hence, homogeneous priors are assumed. In this paper, we show how expectation-maximization weights and neighboring posterior probabilities may be combined to make intuitive use of the Bayesian priors. Drawing upon insights from computer vision tracking algorithms, we cast the problem in a tissue tracking framework. We show results of our algorithm on the classification of gray and white matter along with surrounding cerebral spinal fluid in brain MRI scans. We show results of our algorithm on 20 brain MRI datasets along with validation against expert manual segmentations. PMID:24392193

  10. Tissue tracking: applications for brain MRI classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melonakos, John; Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Bayesian classification methods have been extensively used in a variety of image processing applications, including medical image analysis. The basic procedure is to combine data-driven knowledge in the likelihood terms with clinical knowledge in the prior terms to classify an image into a pre-determined number of classes. In many applications, it is difficult to construct meaningful priors and, hence, homogeneous priors are assumed. In this paper, we show how expectation-maximization weights and neighboring posterior probabilities may be combined to make intuitive use of the Bayesian priors. Drawing upon insights from computer vision tracking algorithms, we cast the problem in a tissue tracking framework. We show results of our algorithm on the classification of gray and white matter along with surrounding cerebral spinal fluid in brain MRI scans. We show results of our algorithm on 20 brain MRI datasets along with validation against expert manual segmentations.

  11. Automatic Brachytherapy Seed Placement Under MRI Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Muntener, Michael; Mazilu, Dumitru; Schär, Michael; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a robotic method of performing low dose rate prostate brachytherapy under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The design and operation of a fully automated MR compatible seed injector is presented. This is used with the MrBot robot for transperineal percutaneous prostate access. A new image-registration marker and algorithms are also presented. The system is integrated and tested with a 3T MRI scanner. Tests compare three different registration methods, assess the precision of performing automated seed deployment, and use the seeds to assess the accuracy of needle targeting under image guidance. Under the ideal conditions of the in vitro experiments, results show outstanding image-guided needle and seed placement accuracy. PMID:17694871

  12. Ferrite-enhanced MRI monitoring in hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Reinl, Herbert M; Peller, Michael; Hagmann, Mark; Turner, Paul; Issels, Rolf D; Reiser, Maximilian

    2005-12-01

    In an MRI hyperthermia hybrid system, T1 changes are investigated for monitoring thermal therapy at 0.2 T. The water bolus, which is needed for power transmission and cooling of the skin, limits MR image quality by signal compression and artifacts. Superparamagnetic ferrofluid in different concentration was investigated with MR relaxometry and MRI methods. We found that using ferrofluid in a low concentration of 70-90 ppm magnetite the water signal can be suppressed without susceptibility artifacts. With our method of signal suppression, a significant improvement of spatial and temporal resolution is possible. The ferrofluid is stable and allows RF heating at 100 MHz. This method of signal extinction may also be useful for other experimental setups where suppression of water is necessary. PMID:16376187

  13. Scurvy in an autistic child: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Gongidi, Preetam; Johnson, Craig; Dinan, David

    2013-10-01

    Scurvy results from a deficiency of vitamin C and is rarely seen in the United States. We describe the MRI findings of a case of scurvy in an autistic child with food-avoidant behavior. Advanced imaging is rarely performed in clinically well-understood disease entities such as scurvy. Typical radiographic findings are well described leading to definitive diagnosis, although the findings can be missed or misinterpreted given the rarity of scurvy in daily practice. To our knowledge, MRI features of scurvy in children in the US have been described in only one case report. This case of scurvy in an autistic child with food-avoidant behavior emphasizes that classic nutritional deficiencies, despite their rarity, must be included in the differential diagnosis of at-risk populations. PMID:23604286

  14. Scurvy in an autistic child: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Gongidi, Preetam; Johnson, Craig; Dinan, David

    2013-10-01

    Scurvy results from a deficiency of vitamin C and is rarely seen in the United States. We describe the MRI findings of a case of scurvy in an autistic child with food-avoidant behavior. Advanced imaging is rarely performed in clinically well-understood disease entities such as scurvy. Typical radiographic findings are well described leading to definitive diagnosis, although the findings can be missed or misinterpreted given the rarity of scurvy in daily practice. To our knowledge, MRI features of scurvy in children in the US have been described in only one case report. This case of scurvy in an autistic child with food-avoidant behavior emphasizes that classic nutritional deficiencies, despite their rarity, must be included in the differential diagnosis of at-risk populations.

  15. Acupressure magnets: a possible MRI hazard.

    PubMed

    Otjen, Jeffrey P; Mallon, Kara; Brown, Julie C

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnets as a component of complementary and alternative medicine is increasingly common. Magnet therapy is used to treat a variety of conditions and often involves tiny magnets adhered to the skin. In auriculotherapy, magnets are placed in specific locations of the ear pinnae which represent particular parts of the body. While generally considered safe, these magnets have the potential to cause imaging problems and serious injury during MRI. We report a case of auriculotherapy magnets which escaped detection despite the use of screening forms and a walk-through metal detector. The magnets caused image artifact but no other patient harm. We recommend updating patient screening practices and educating providers placing therapeutic magnets and performing MRIs of this new potential MRI hazard.

  16. Late-Glacial to Late-holocene Shifts in Global Precipitation Delta(sup 18)O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasechko, S.; Lechler, A.; Pausata, F.S.R.; Fawcett, P.J.; Gleeson, T.; Cendon, D.I.; Galewsky, J.; LeGrande, A. N.; Risi, C.; Sharp, Z. D.; Welker, J. M.; Werner, M.; Yoshimura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructions of Quaternary climate are often based on the isotopic content of paleo-precipitation preserved in proxy records. While many paleo-precipitation isotope records are available, few studies have synthesized these dispersed records to explore spatial patterns of late-glacial precipitation delta(sup 18)O. Here we present a synthesis of 86 globally distributed groundwater (n 59), cave calcite (n 15) and ice core (n 12) isotope records spanning the late-glacial (defined as 50,000 to 20,000 years ago) to the late-Holocene (within the past 5000 years). We show that precipitation delta(sup 18)O changes from the late-glacial to the late-Holocene range from -7.1% (delta(sup 18)O(late-Holocene) > delta(sup 18)O(late-glacial) to +1.7% (delta(sup 18)O(late-glacial) > delta(sup 18)O(late-Holocene), with the majority (77) of records having lower late-glacial delta(sup 18)O than late-Holocene delta(sup 18)O values. High-magnitude, negative precipitation delta(sup 18)O shifts are common at high latitudes, high altitudes and continental interiors.

  17. Comparison of population structure in Ohio's late archaic and late prehistoric periods.

    PubMed

    Tatarek, N E; Sciulli, P W

    2000-07-01

    Previous studies of population structure among prehistoric groups in the Ohio valley region have shown that hunting-gathering populations exhibited a different structure than horticultural populations. Among both Late Archaic hunter-gatherers and Late Prehistoric horticulturists, covariance structures for cranial metrics were found to be homogenous within the populations, but the Late Archaic subpopulations showed little differentiation while the Late Prehistoric subpopulations exhibited a marked differentiation. Biodistance based on cranial discrete trait frequency showed similar patterns, but in the Late Archaic discrete trait distance was associated significantly with the geographical distance separating populations. The present investigation is an extension of the previous studies increasing the Late Prehistoric sample (n = 8 samples and n = 341 individuals) and using the Harpending-Ward model, modified for use with multivariate quantitative data, to estimate the effects of differential gene flow and the amount of differentiation within populations. Results of the present analyses indicate that differentiation among subpopulations, measured by minimum F(ST), was greater in the Late Prehistoric compared to the Late Archaic period. However, for both periods the minimum F(ST) is comparable to values found for historic native populations of the northeast woodlands. Analysis of differential gene flow in the Late Archaic period indicates that geographically peripheral populations were affected more by external gene flow than more central populations. Late Prehistoric populations exhibit a very complex pattern of differential gene flow. We discuss the latter pattern in terms of proposed culture change in the Late Prehistoric period of Ohio. PMID:10861353

  18. fMRI in the public eye

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Eric; Bar-Ilan, Ofek; Illes, Judy

    2006-01-01

    The wide dissemination and expanding applications of functional MRI have not escaped the attention of the media or discussion in the wider public arena. From the bench to the bedside, this technology has introduced substantial ethical challenges. Are the boundaries of what it can and cannot achieve being communicated to the public? Are its limitations understood? And given the complexities that are inherent to neuroscience, are current avenues for communication adequate? PMID:15685221

  19. Dynamic MRI of small electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Allen W; Truong, Trong-Kha; Woldorff, Marty

    2009-01-01

    Neuroscience methods entailing in vivo measurements of brain activity have greatly contributed to our understanding of brain function for the past decades, from the invasive early studies in animals using single-cell electrical recordings, to the noninvasive techniques in humans of scalp-recorded electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG), positron emission tomography (PET), and, most recently, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A central objective of these techniques is to measure neuronal activities with high spatial and temporal resolution. Each of these methods, however, has substantial limitations in this regard. Single-cell recording is invasive and only typically records cellular activity in a single location; EEG/MEG cannot generally provide accurate and unambiguous delineations of neuronal activation spatially; and the most sophisticated BOLD-based fMRI methods are still fundamentally limited by their dependence on the very slow hemodynamic responses upon which they are based. Even the latest neuroimaging methodology (e.g., multimodal EEG/fMRI) does not yet unambiguously provide accurate localization of neuronal activation spatially and temporally. There is hence a need to further develop noninvasive imaging methods that can directly image neuroelectric activity and thus truly achieve a high temporal resolution and spatial specificity in humans. Here, we discuss the theory, implementation, and potential utility of an MRI technique termed Lorentz effect imaging (LEI) that can detect spatially incoherent yet temporally synchronized, minute electrical activities in the neural amplitude range (microamperes) when they occur in a strong magnetic field. Moreover, we demonstrate with our preliminary results in phantoms and in vivo, the feasibility of imaging such activities with a temporal resolution on the order of milliseconds.

  20. Mascara and eyelining tattoos: MRI artifacts.

    PubMed

    Weiss, R A; Saint-Louis, L A; Haik, B G; McCord, C D; Taveras, J L

    1989-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is very useful in the evaluation of ocular and orbital disease. Heavy metal particles, used in the pigment base of mascara and eyelining tattoos, have a paramagnetic effect that causes alteration of the local magnetic field in adjacent tissues. These changes in normal signal result in distortion of the globes. In some cases, the distortion may mimic actual ocular disease such as a ciliary body melanoma or cyst.

  1. MRI-Guided Delivery of Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Salegio, Ernesto A; Bringas, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has emerged as a potential avenue of treatment for many neurological disorders. Technological advances in imaging techniques allow for the monitoring of real-time infusions into the brain of rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans. Here, we discuss the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool in the delivery of adeno-associated viral (AAV) particles into brain of nonhuman primates.

  2. Late Cenozoic intraplate faulting in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaahmadi, Abbas; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2014-12-01

    The intensity and tectonic origin of late Cenozoic intraplate deformation in eastern Australia is relatively poorly understood. Here we show that Cenozoic volcanic rocks in southeast Queensland have been deformed by numerous faults. Using gridded aeromagnetic data and field observations, structural investigations were conducted on these faults. Results show that faults have mainly undergone strike-slip movement with a reverse component, displacing Cenozoic volcanic rocks ranging in ages from ˜31 to ˜21 Ma. These ages imply that faulting must have occurred after the late Oligocene. Late Cenozoic deformation has mostly occurred due to the reactivation of major faults, which were active during episodes of basin formation in the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and later during the opening of the Tasman and Coral Seas from the Late Cretaceous to the early Eocene. The wrench reactivation of major faults in the late Cenozoic also gave rise to the occurrence of brittle subsidiary reverse strike-slip faults that affected Cenozoic volcanic rocks. Intraplate transpressional deformation possibly resulted from far-field stresses transmitted from the collisional zones at the northeast and southeast boundaries of the Australian plate during the late Oligocene-early Miocene and from the late Miocene to the Pliocene. These events have resulted in the hitherto unrecognized reactivation of faults in eastern Australia.

  3. Modeling Neuronal Current MRI Signal with Human Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qingfei; Jiang, Xia; Chen, Bin; Zhu, Yi; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Up to date, no consensus has been achieved regarding the possibility of detecting neuronal currents by MRI (ncMRI) in human brain. To evaluate the detectability of ncMRI, an effective way is to simulate ncMRI signal with the realistic neuronal geometry and electrophysiological processes. Unfortunately, previous realistic ncMRI models are based on rat and monkey neurons. The species difference in neuronal morphology and physiology would prevent these models from simulating the ncMRI signal accurately in human subjects. The aim of the present study is to bridge this gap by establishing a realistic ncMRI model specifically for human cerebral cortex. In this model, the ncMRI signal was simulated using anatomically reconstructed human pyramidal neurons and their biophysical properties. The modeling results showed that the amplitude of ncMRI signal significantly depends on the density of synchronously firing neurons and imaging conditions such as position of imaging voxel, direction of main magnetic field (B0) relative to the cortical surface and echo time. The results indicated that physiologically-evoked ncMRI signal is too weak to be detected (magnitude/phase change ≤ -1.4×10−6/0.02°), but the phase signal induced by spontaneous activity may reach a detectable level (up to 0.2°) in favorable conditions. PMID:21254209

  4. Identifying Neural Drivers with Functional MRI: An Electrophysiological Validation

    PubMed Central

    David, Olivier; Guillemain, Isabelle; Saillet, Sandrine; Reyt, Sebastien; Deransart, Colin; Segebarth, Christoph; Depaulis, Antoine

    2008-01-01

    Whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows the identification of neural drivers remains an open question of particular importance to refine physiological and neuropsychological models of the brain, and/or to understand neurophysiopathology. Here, in a rat model of absence epilepsy showing spontaneous spike-and-wave discharges originating from the first somatosensory cortex (S1BF), we performed simultaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) and fMRI measurements, and subsequent intracerebral EEG (iEEG) recordings in regions strongly activated in fMRI (S1BF, thalamus, and striatum). fMRI connectivity was determined from fMRI time series directly and from hidden state variables using a measure of Granger causality and Dynamic Causal Modelling that relates synaptic activity to fMRI. fMRI connectivity was compared to directed functional coupling estimated from iEEG using asymmetry in generalised synchronisation metrics. The neural driver of spike-and-wave discharges was estimated in S1BF from iEEG, and from fMRI only when hemodynamic effects were explicitly removed. Functional connectivity analysis applied directly on fMRI signals failed because hemodynamics varied between regions, rendering temporal precedence irrelevant. This paper provides the first experimental substantiation of the theoretical possibility to improve interregional coupling estimation from hidden neural states of fMRI. As such, it has important implications for future studies on brain connectivity using functional neuroimaging. PMID:19108604

  5. Breast MRI after bilateral mastectomy: is it indicated?

    PubMed

    Vanderwalde, Lindi H; Dang, Catherine M; Tabrizi, Robert; Saouaf, Rola; Phillips, Edward H

    2011-02-01

    Little is known about the use of breast MRI as a diagnostic or surveillance tool in patients after bilateral mastectomy. The objective of this study was to evaluate breast MRI after bilateral mastectomy. Participants consisted of 48 women with prior bilateral mastectomy who underwent breast MRI between 2003 and 2009. Seventy-nine breast MRIs were obtained. The median time between mastectomy and first MRI was 36 months. MRI was ordered most often by a medical oncologist (71%). Median age at bilateral mastectomy was 49 years (range, 33 to 72 years). Reasons for obtaining MRI included surveillance in 60 (76%), mass in eight (10%), lymph nodes in four (5%), pain in three (4%), and abscess in one (1%). Overall, 68 (86%) MRIs showed benign imaging findings only. Within the surveillance group, six patients had MRIs with findings that changed management; four patients had some residual breast tissue, and two patients had findings outside the breast that were better evaluated by CT or bone scan and were ultimately benign. MRI confirmed locoregional recurrence in two patients with highly suspicious physical findings. Overall, postmastectomy breast MRI had limited use, finding no unsuspected recurrences within our study group. Although MRI can be helpful to establish the presence of residual breast tissue after bilateral mastectomy, subsequent routine screening breast MRI should be questioned if no residual breast tissue is identified. PMID:21337876

  6. MRI-Safe Robot for Endorectal Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Sebrecht, Peter; Petrisor, Doru; Coleman, Jonathan; Solomon, Stephen B.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the development of an MRI-Safe robot for direct (interventional) MRI-guided endorectal prostate biopsy. The robot is constructed of nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive materials, and is electricity free, using pneumatic actuation and optical sensors. Targeting biopsy lesions of MRI abnormality presents substantial clinical potential for the management of prostate cancer. The paper describes MRI-Safe requirements, presents the kinematic architecture, design and construction of the robot, and a comprehensive set of preclinical tests for MRI compatibility and needle targeting accuracy. The robot has a compact and simple 3 degree-of-freedom (DoF) structure, two for orienting a needle-guide and one to preset the depth of needle insertion. The actual insertion is performed manually through the guide and up to the preset depth. To reduce the complexity and size of the robot next to the patient, the depth setting DoF is remote. Experimental results show that the robot is safe to use in any MRI environment (MRI-Safe). Comprehensive MRI tests show that the presence and motion of the robot in the MRI scanner cause virtually no image deterioration or signal to noise ratio (SNR) change. Robot’s accuracy in bench test, CT-guided in-vitro, MRI-guided in-vitro and animal tests are 0.37mm, 1.10mm, 2.09mm, and 2.58mm respectively. These values are acceptable for clinical use. PMID:25378897

  7. Stability of MRI-turbulent Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Masada, Youhei

    2011-02-01

    Based on the characteristics of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and the MRI-driven turbulence, we construct a steady model for a geometrically thin disk using "non-standard" α-prescription. The efficiency of the angular momentum transport depends on the magnetic Prandtl number, Pm = ν/η, where ν and η are the microscopic viscous and magnetic diffusivities. In our disk model, Shakura-Sunyaev's α-parameter has a power-law dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number, that is α vprop Pm δ, where δ is the constant power-law index. Adopting Spitzer's microscopic diffusivities, the magnetic Prandtl number becomes a decreasing function of the disk radius when δ>0. The transport efficiency of the angular momentum and the viscous heating rate are thus smaller in the outer part of the disk, while these are impacted by the size of index δ. We find that the disk becomes more unstable to the gravitational instability for a larger value of index δ. The most remarkable feature of our disk model is that the thermal and secular instabilities can grow in its middle part even if the radiation pressure is negligibly small in the condition δ>2/3. In the realistic disk systems, it would be difficult to maintain the steady mass accretion state unless the Pm dependence of MRI-driven turbulence is relatively weak.

  8. Biomimetic phantom for cardiac diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Irvin; Zhou, Feng‐Lei; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L.; Parker, Geoffrey J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to characterize cardiac tissue microstructure, necessitating the use of physiologically relevant phantoms for methods development. Existing phantoms are generally simplistic and mostly simulate diffusion in the brain. Thus, there is a need for phantoms mimicking diffusion in cardiac tissue. Materials and Methods A biomimetic phantom composed of hollow microfibers generated using co‐electrospinning was developed to mimic myocardial diffusion properties and fiber and sheet orientations. Diffusion tensor imaging was carried out at monthly intervals over 4 months at 9.4T. 3D fiber tracking was performed using the phantom and compared with fiber tracking in an ex vivo rat heart. Results The mean apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of the phantom remained stable over the 4‐month period, with mean values of 7.53 ± 0.16 × 10‐4 mm2/s and 0.388 ± 0.007, respectively. Fiber tracking of the 1st and 3rd eigenvectors generated analogous results to the fiber and sheet‐normal direction respectively, found in the left ventricular myocardium. Conclusion A biomimetic phantom simulating diffusion in the heart was designed and built. This could aid development and validation of novel diffusion MRI methods for investigating cardiac microstructure, decrease the number of animals and patients needed for methods development, and improve quality control in longitudinal and multicenter cardiac diffusion MRI studies. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;43:594–600. PMID:26213152

  9. Uterine sarcomas: clinical presentation and MRI features

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Pedro; Cunha, Teresa Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Uterine sarcomas are a rare heterogeneous group of tumors of mesenchymal origin, accounting for approximately 8% of uterine malignancies. They comprise leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma, and adenosarcoma. Compared with the more common endometrial carcinomas, uterine sarcomas behave more aggressively and are associated with a poorer prognosis. Due to their distinct clinical and biological behavior, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics introduced a new staging system for uterine sarcomas in 2009, categorizing uterine carcinosarcoma as a variant of endometrial carcinoma, rather than a pure sarcoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a developing role in the assessment of these malignancies. Features such as tumor localization, irregular or nodular margins, necrosis, rapid growth, intense contrast enhancement, and restriction at diffusion-weighted imaging can suggest the diagnosis and help differentiate from more common leiomyomas and endometrial carcinoma. MRI is therefore extremely useful in preoperative detection and staging and, consequently, in determination of appropriate management. This pictorial review aims to discuss the clinical features of uterine sarcomas, as well as their most common appearances and distinct characteristics in MRI. PMID:25347940

  10. Improving tumour heterogeneity MRI assessment with histograms

    PubMed Central

    Just, N

    2014-01-01

    By definition, tumours are heterogeneous. They are defined by marked differences in cells, microenvironmental factors (oxygenation levels, pH, VEGF, VPF and TGF-α) metabolism, vasculature, structure and function that in turn translate into heterogeneous drug delivery and therapeutic outcome. Ways to estimate quantitatively tumour heterogeneity can improve drug discovery, treatment planning and therapeutic responses. It is therefore of paramount importance to have reliable and reproducible biomarkers of cancerous lesions' heterogeneity. During the past decade, the number of studies using histogram approaches increased drastically with various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques (DCE-MRI, DWI, SWI etc.) although information on tumour heterogeneity remains poorly exploited. This fact can be attributed to a poor knowledge of the available metrics and of their specific meaning as well as to the lack of literature references to standardised histogram methods with which surrogate markers of heterogeneity can be compared. This review highlights the current knowledge and critical advances needed to investigate and quantify tumour heterogeneity. The key role of imaging techniques and in particular the key role of MRI for an accurate investigation of tumour heterogeneity is reviewed with a particular emphasis on histogram approaches and derived methods. PMID:25268373

  11. Measuring glomerular number from kidney MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J.; Natesan Ramamurthy, Karthikeyan; Kanberoglu, Berkay; Frakes, David; Bennett, Kevin; Spanias, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the glomerular number in the entire, intact kidney using non-destructive techniques is of immense importance in studying several renal and systemic diseases. Commonly used approaches either require destruction of the entire kidney or perform extrapolation from measurements obtained from a few isolated sections. A recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, based on the injection of a contrast agent (cationic ferritin), has been used to effectively identify glomerular regions in the kidney. In this work, we propose a robust, accurate, and low-complexity method for estimating the number of glomeruli from such kidney MRI images. The proposed technique has a training phase and a low-complexity testing phase. In the training phase, organ segmentation is performed on a few expert-marked training images, and glomerular and non-glomerular image patches are extracted. Using non-local sparse coding to compute similarity and dissimilarity graphs between the patches, the subspace in which the glomerular regions can be discriminated from the rest are estimated. For novel test images, the image patches extracted after pre-processing are embedded using the discriminative subspace projections. The testing phase is of low computational complexity since it involves only matrix multiplications, clustering, and simple morphological operations. Preliminary results with MRI data obtained from five kidneys of rats show that the proposed non-invasive, low-complexity approach performs comparably to conventional approaches such as acid maceration and stereology.

  12. DT-MRI segmentation using graph cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2007-03-01

    An important problem in medical image analysis is the segmentation of anatomical regions of interest. Once regions of interest are segmented, one can extract shape, appearance, and structural features that can be analyzed for disease diagnosis or treatment evaluation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is a relatively new medical imaging modality that captures unique water diffusion properties and fiber orientation information of the imaged tissues. In this paper, we extend the interactive multidimensional graph cuts segmentation technique to operate on DT-MRI data by utilizing latest advances in tensor calculus and diffusion tensor dissimilarity metrics. The user interactively selects certain tensors as object ("obj") or background ("bkg") to provide hard constraints for the segmentation. Additional soft constraints incorporate information about both regional tissue diffusion as well as boundaries between tissues of different diffusion properties. Graph cuts are used to find globally optimal segmentation of the underlying 3D DT-MR image among all segmentations satisfying the constraints. We develop a graph structure from the underlying DT-MR image with the tensor voxels corresponding to the graph vertices and with graph edge weights computed using either Log-Euclidean or the J-divergence tensor dissimilarity metric. The topology of our segmentation is unrestricted and both obj and bkg segments may consist of several isolated parts. We test our method on synthetic DT data and apply it to real 2D and 3D MRI, providing segmentations of the corpus callosum in the brain and the ventricles of the heart.

  13. Whole-body MRI in paediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Littooij, Annemieke S

    2016-05-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and follow-up of paediatric malignancies. Until recently, computed tomography (CT) has been the imaging technique of choice in children with cancer, but nowadays there is an increasing interest in the use of functional imaging techniques like positron emission tomography and single-photon emission tomography. These later techniques are often combined with CT allowing for simultaneous acquisition of image data on the biological behaviour of tumour, as well as the anatomical localisation and extent of tumour spread. Because of the small but not negligible risk of radiation induced secondary cancers and the significantly improved overall survival rates of children with cancer, there is an increasing interest in the use of alternative imaging techniques that do not use ionising radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging tool that allows for acquiring images with a high spatial resolution and excellent soft tissue contrast throughout the body. Moreover, recent technological advances have resulted in fast diagnostic sequences for whole-body MR imaging (WB-MRI), including functional techniques such as diffusion weighted imaging. In this review, the current status of the technique and major clinical applications of WB-MRI in children with cancer will be discussed.

  14. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers. PMID:23712842

  15. Preoperative and surveillance MR imaging of patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery and heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    MR imaging provides considerable advantages for imaging patients with peritoneal tumor. Its inherently superior contrast resolution compared to CT allows MRI to more accurately depict small peritoneal tumors that are often missed on other imaging tests. Combining different contrast mechanisms including diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI and gadolinium-enhanced MRI provides a powerful tool for preoperative and surveillance imaging in patients being considered for cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). PMID:26941984

  16. Effect of endoscopic third ventriculostomy on neuropsychological outcome in late onset idiopathic aqueduct stenosis: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Burtscher, J; Bartha, L; Twerdy, K; Eisner, W; Benke, T

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To undertake a prospective study of the long term neuropsychological outcome in patients with late onset idiopathic aqueduct stenosis (LIAS) after endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Methods: Six patients with LIAS were evaluated pre- and postoperatively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and standardised psychometric testing procedures. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy was done using standard surgical techniques. The mean long term follow up was 81.2 weeks. Results: Preoperatively, all patients had cognitive impairment, four of them showing deficits in several cognitive domains. After endoscopic third ventriculostomy, all patients improved clinically and had ventricular size reduction on MRI. Postoperative neuropsychological testing showed that five patients achieved normal or near normal cognitive functions, and one improved moderately. Conclusions: Endoscopic third ventriculostomy caused a substantial improvement in the neuropsychological deficit of LIAS patients. This was also true for patients with enlarged ventricles that might be diagnosed radiologically as "arrested hydrocephalus." PMID:12531955

  17. An MRI-Compatible Robotic System With Hybrid Tracking for MRI-Guided Prostate Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Iordachita, Iulian I.; Guion, Peter; Singh, Anurag K.; Kaushal, Aradhana; Ménard, Cynthia; Pinto, Peter A.; Camphausen, Kevin; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the development, evaluation, and first clinical trials of the access to the prostate tissue (APT) II system—a scanner independent system for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transrectal prostate interventions. The system utilizes novel manipulator mechanics employing a steerable needle channel and a novel six degree-of-freedom hybrid tracking method, comprising passive fiducial tracking for initial registration and subsequent incremental motion measurements. Targeting accuracy of the system in prostate phantom experiments and two clinical human-subject procedures is shown to compare favorably with existing systems using passive and active tracking methods. The portable design of the APT II system, using only standard MRI image sequences and minimal custom scanner interfacing, allows the system to be easily used on different MRI scanners. PMID:22009867

  18. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  19. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton

    2014-01-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization’ schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters. PMID:24239701

  20. Neural Network Development in Late Adolescents during Observation of Risk-Taking Action

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Shigekazu; Hida, Akiko; Enomoto, Minori; Umezawa, Jun; Mishima, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Emotional maturity and social awareness are important for adolescents, particularly college students beginning to face the challenges and risks of the adult world. However, there has been relatively little research into personality maturation and psychological development during late adolescence and the neural changes underlying this development. We investigated the correlation between psychological properties (neuroticism, extraversion, anxiety, and depression) and age among late adolescents (n = 25, from 18 years and 1 month to 22 years and 8 months). The results revealed that late adolescents became less neurotic, less anxious, less depressive and more extraverted as they aged. Participants then observed video clips depicting hand movements with and without a risk of harm (risk-taking or safe actions) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The results revealed that risk-taking actions elicited significantly stronger activation in the bilateral inferior parietal lobule, temporal visual regions (superior/middle temporal areas), and parieto-occipital visual areas (cuneus, middle occipital gyri, precuneus). We found positive correlations of age and extraversion with neural activation in the insula, middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and precuneus. We also found a negative correlation of age and anxiety with activation in the angular gyrus, precentral gyrus, and red nucleus/substantia nigra. Moreover, we found that insula activation mediated the relationship between age and extraversion. Overall, our results indicate that late adolescents become less anxious and more extraverted with age, a process involving functional neural changes in brain networks related to social cognition and emotional processing. The possible neural mechanisms of psychological and social maturation during late adolescence are discussed. PMID:22768085

  1. Late Amazonian Glaciations in Utopia Planitia, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Capitan, R. D.; Kerrigan, M.; Barry, N.; Blain, S.

    2012-03-01

    We present evidence from western Utopia Planitia, including lineated valley fill and lobate debris aprons, for widespread glaciations over a large expanse of the northern plains and dichotomy boundary during Late Amazonian times.

  2. SDO Sees Late Phase in Solar Flares

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 5, 2010, shortly after the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) began normal operation, the sun erupted with numerous coronal loops and flares. Many of these showed a previously unseen "late pha...

  3. 24 CFR 242.38 - Late charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOR HOSPITALS Mortgage Requirements § 242.38 Late charge. The mortgage may provide for the collection... dollar of each payment to interest or principal more than 15 days in arrears, to cover the...

  4. A review of 404 'late walkers'.

    PubMed

    Chaplais, J D; Macfarlane, J A

    1984-06-01

    A survey of all known 18 month old Oxfordshire children who had not yet walked unassisted and who were born in the four year period between July 1, 1976 and June 30, 1980 was carried out. A total of 275 children aged 18 months with no previously suspected cause for late walking were referred by health visitors; 257 of these children were assessed neurologically and developmentally by a paediatrician at home. Nine cases of cerebral palsy (3 X 5%) and 6 cases of minor neurological abnormality (2 X 3%) were newly diagnosed. A register of all other 18 month old 'late walkers' (129) who were already known to paediatricians and were either normal (17) or had known causes for late walking (112) was compiled for the same four year period. The total incidence of pathology among all late walkers (404) in these two groups was 32%.

  5. [MRI semiotics features of experimental acute intracerebral hematomas].

    PubMed

    Burenchev, D V; Skvortsova, V I; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Gubskiĭ, L V; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of revealing intracerebral hematomas (ICH), using MRI, within the first hours after onset and to determine their MRI semiotics features. Thirty animals with experimental ICH were studied. A method of two-stage introduction of autologous blood was used to develop ICH as human spontaneous intracranial hematomas. Within 3-5h after blood introduction to the rat brain. The control MRI was performed in the 3rd and 7th days after blood injections. ICH were definitely identified in the first MRI scans. The MRI semiotics features of acute ICH and their transformations were assessed. The high sensitivity of MRI to ICH as well as the uniform manifestations in all animals were shown. In conclusion, the method has high specificity for acute ICH detection.

  6. 19F MRI for quantitative in vivo cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Mangala; Heerschap, Arend; Ahrens, Eric T.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular therapy, including stem cell transplants and dendritic cell vaccines, is typically monitored for dosage optimization, accurate delivery and localization using non-invasive imaging, of which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key modality. 19F MRI retains the advantages of MRI as an imaging modality, while allowing direct detection of labelled cells for unambiguous identification and quantification, unlike typical metal-based contrast agents. Recent developments in 19F MRI-based in vivo cell quantification, the existing clinical use of 19F compounds and current explosive interest in cellular therapeutics have brought 19F imaging technology closer to clinical application. We review the application of 19F MRI to cell tracking, discussing intracellular 19F labels, cell labelling and in vivo quantification, as well as the potential clinical use of 19F MRI. PMID:20427096

  7. Outer atmospheres of late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observational results concerning chromospheres and coronae in late-type stars are described. In particular, it is indicated where in the cool half of the HR diagram chromospheres, transition regions, coronae, and large mass loss occur and what the important parameters determining the energy balance of these layers are. The chromospheric modelling process is summarized and models of the late-type supergiants Beta Dra, Epsilon Gem, and Alpha Ori recently computed by Basri and Linsky (1980) are detailed.

  8. Diffusion MRI Tractography of the Developing Human Fetal Heart

    PubMed Central

    Jackowski, Marcel P.; Kostis, William J.; Dai, Guangping; Sanders, Stephen; Sosnovik, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Human myocardium has a complex and anisotropic 3D fiber pattern. It remains unknown, however, when in fetal life this anisotropic pattern develops and whether the human heart is structurally fully mature at birth. We aimed here to use diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) tractography to characterize the evolution of fiber architecture in the developing human fetal heart. Methods Human fetal hearts (n = 5) between 10–19 weeks of gestation were studied. The heart from a 6-day old neonate and an adult human heart served as controls. The degree of myocardial anisotropy was measured by calculating the fractional anisotropy (FA) index. In addition, fiber tracts were created by numerically integrating the primary eigenvector field in the heart into coherent streamlines. Results At 10–14 weeks the fetal hearts were highly isotropic and few tracts could be resolved. Between 14–19 weeks the anisotropy seen in the adult heart began to develop. Coherent fiber tracts were well resolved by 19 weeks. The 19-week myocardium, however, remained weakly anisotropic with a low FA and no discernable sheet structure. Conclusions The human fetal heart remains highly isotropic until 14–19 weeks, at which time cardiomyocytes self-align into coherent tracts. This process lags 2–3 months behind the onset of cardiac contraction, which may be a prerequisite for cardiomyocyte maturation and alignment. No evidence of a connective tissue scaffold guiding this process could be identified by DTI. Maturation of the heart’s sheet structure occurs late in gestation and evolves further after birth. PMID:23991152

  9. Prostate MRI can reduce overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Taneja, Samir S

    2015-08-01

    The contemporary management of prostate cancer (PCa) has been criticized as fostering overdetection and overtreatment of indolent disease. In particular, the historical inability to identify those men with an elevated PSA who truly warrant biopsy, and, for those needing biopsy, to localize aggressive tumors within the prostate, has contributed to suboptimal diagnosis and treatment strategies. This article describes how modern multi-parametric MRI of the prostate addresses such challenges and reduces both overdiagnosis and overtreatment. The central role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in contributing to MRI's current impact is described. Prostate MRI incorporating DWI achieves higher sensitivity than standard systematic biopsy for intermediate-to-high risk tumor, while having lower sensitivity for low-grade tumors that are unlikely to impact longevity. Particular applications of prostate MRI that are explored include selection of a subset of men with clinical suspicion of PCa to undergo biopsy as well as reliable confirmation of only low-risk disease in active surveillance patients. Various challenges to redefining the standard of care to incorporate solely MRI-targeted cores, without concomitant standard systematic cores, are identified. These include needs for further technical optimization of current systems for performing MRI-targeted biopsies, enhanced education and expertise in prostate MRI among radiologists, greater standardization in prostate MRI reporting across centers, and recognition of the roles of pre-biopsy MRI and MRI-targeted biopsy by payers. Ultimately, it is hoped that the medical community in the United States will embrace prostate MRI and MRI-targeted biopsy, allowing all patients with known or suspected prostate cancer to benefit from this approach.

  10. Cardiac Imaging Techniques for Physicians: Late Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; Arai, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    Late enhancement imaging is used to diagnose and characterize a wide range of ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies, and its use has become ubiquitous in the cardiac MR exam. As the use of late enhancement imaging has matured and the span of applications has widened, the demands on image quality have grown. The characterization of sub-endocardial MI now includes the accurate quantification of scar size, shape, and characterization of borders which have been shown to have prognostic significance. More diverse patterns of late enhancement including patchy, mid-wall, sub-epicardial, or diffuse enhancement are of interest in diagnosing non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. As clinicians are examining late enhancement images for more subtle indication of fibrosis, the demand for lower artifacts has increased. A range of new techniques have emerged to improve the speed and quality of late enhancement imaging including: methods for acquisition during free breathing, and fat water separated imaging for characterizing fibro-fatty infiltration and reduction of artifacts related to the presence of fat. Methods for quantification of T1 and extracellular volume fraction are emerging to tackle the issue of discriminating globally diffuse fibrosis from normal healthy tissue which is challenging using conventional late enhancement methods. The aim of this review will be to describe the current state of the art and to provide a guide to various clinical protocols that are commonly used. PMID:22903654

  11. [New opportunities, MRI biomarkers in the evaluation of gynaecological cancer].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Katalin; Gõdény, Mária

    2015-09-01

    The determination and classification of gynaecological tumour stage which is based on clinical and pathological examinations became more precise due to the development of imaging techniques. Recently new MRI methods are being introduced which serve functional, tissue-specific, molecular information; beyond the excellent anatomical and contrast resolution with the aid of high resolution morphological measurements as well as quantification can also be performed. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is based on the mobility of water molecules and provides information about the cell density of a given tissue and the integrity of cell membranes. Quantification can also be performed using an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DW-MRI is a useful tool in determining myometrium invasion in endometrium carcinomas especially if a tumour has the same signal intensity as the makromomyometrium on the T2-weighted images and the use of contrast agents are contraindicated. The extra-uterine tumour invasion, the peritoneal metastatic foci can be determined by DW-MRI as well. Lymph node status is the most important predictive factor regarding survival. Both CT and MRI have low sensitivity (70-80%) in revealing metastatic lymph nodes. DW-MRI is a promising method with a sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 80% in distinguishing benign and malignant lymph nodes. Dynamic contrastenhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), as a marker of angiogenesis, provides information about vascularisation at the tissue level. In endometrial carcinoma with application of T2-weighted sequence together with DCE-MRI in determining the stage MRI has the accuracy about 90%. DCE-MRI has proven to be useful for distinguishing benign from malignant ovarian tumours, for detecting tumour extension; it can help predict peritoneal carcinomatosis. It is proven by high-level evidence that multiparametric MRI (MP-MRI) is the most precise diagnostic tool in determining the status of cervical carcinoma, its accuracy being above 90%. In

  12. The role of MRI in musculoskeletal practice: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dean Deyle, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This clinical perspective presents an overview of current and potential uses for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in musculoskeletal practice. Clinical practice guidelines and current evidence for improved outcomes will help providers determine the situations when an MRI is indicated. The advanced competency standard of examination used by physical therapists will be helpful to prevent overuse of musculoskeletal imaging, reduce diagnostic errors, and provide the appropriate clinical context to pathology revealed on MRI. Physical therapists are diagnostically accurate and appropriately conservative in their use of MRI consistent with evidence-based principles of diagnosis and screening. PMID:22851878

  13. Current Status of Hybrid PET/MRI in Oncologic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Friedman, Kent; Chandarana, Hersh; Melsaether, Amy; Moy, Linda; Ding, Yu-Shin; Jhaveri, Komal; Beltran, Luis; Jain, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This review article explores recent advancements in PET/MRI for clinical oncologic imaging. CONCLUSION Radiologists should understand the technical considerations that have made PET/MRI feasible within clinical workflows, the role of PET tracers for imaging various molecular targets in oncology, and advantages of hybrid PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. To facilitate this understanding, we discuss clinical examples (including gliomas, breast cancer, bone metastases, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, gynecologic malignancy, and lymphoma) as well as future directions, challenges, and areas for continued technical optimization for PET/MRI. PMID:26491894

  14. Biodegradable Magnetic Particles for Cellular MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkansah, Michael Kwasi

    Cell transplantation has the potential to treat numerous diseases and injuries. While magnetic particle-enabled, MRI-based cell tracking has proven useful for visualizing the location of cell transplants in vivo, current formulations of particles are either too weak to enable single cell detection or have non-degradable polymer matrices that preclude clinical translation. Furthermore, the off-label use of commercial agents like Feridex®, Bangs beads and ferumoxytol for cell tracking significantly stunts progress in the field, rendering it needlessly susceptible to market externalities. The recent phasing out of Feridex from the market, for example, heightens the need for a dedicated agent specifically designed for MRI-based cell tracking. To this end, we engineered clinically viable, biodegradable particles of iron oxide made using poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and demonstrated their utility in two MRI-based cell tracking paradigms in vivo. Both micro- and nanoparticles (2.1±1.1 μm and 105±37 nm in size) were highly magnetic (56.7-83.7 wt% magnetite), and possessed excellent relaxometry (r2* relaxivities as high as 614.1 s-1mM-1 and 659.1 s -1mM-1 at 4.7 T respectively). Magnetic PLGA micropartides enabled the in vivo monitoring of neural progenitor cell migration to the olfactory bulb in rat brains over 2 weeks at 11.7 T with ˜2-fold greater contrast-to-noise ratio and ˜4-fold better sensitivity at detecting migrated cells in the olfactory bulb than Bangs beads. Highly magnetic PLGA nanoparticles enabled MRI detection (at 11.7 T) of up to 10 rat mesenchymal cells transplanted into rat brain at 100-μm resolution. Highly magnetic PLGA particles were also shown to degrade by 80% in mice liver over 12 weeks in vivo. Moreover, no adverse effects were observed on cellular viability and function in vitro after labeling a wide range of cells. Magnetically labeled rat mesenchymal and neural stem cells retained their ability to differentiate into multiple

  15. Polyoma virus early-late switch: regulation of late RNA accumulation by DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Carmichael, G G

    1993-09-15

    Early in infection of permissive mouse cells, messages from the early region of the polyoma virus genome accumulate preferentially over those from the late region. After initiation of DNA replication, the balance between early and late gene expression is reversed in favor of the late products. In previous work from our laboratory, we showed that viral early proteins do not activate the polyoma late promoter in the absence of DNA replication. Here we show that activation of the late genes in replication-incompetent viral genomes can occur if actively replicating genomes are present in the same cell. A low level of DNA replication, however, is insufficient to induce the early-late switch. Furthermore, replication-competent genomes that fail to accumulate late RNA molecules are defective in the transactivation of replication-incompetent genomes. We suggest that titration of an unknown diffusible factor(s) after DNA replication relieves the block to late RNA accumulation seen in the early phase, with most of this titration being attributable to late-strand RNA molecules themselves.

  16. Quantitative MRI techniques of cartilage composition

    PubMed Central

    Matzat, Stephen J.; van Tiel, Jasper; Gold, Garry E.

    2013-01-01

    Due to aging populations and increasing rates of obesity in the developed world, the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) is continually increasing. Decreasing the societal and patient burden of this disease motivates research in prevention, early detection of OA, and novel treatment strategies against OA. One key facet of this effort is the need to track the degradation of tissues within joints, especially cartilage. Currently, conventional imaging techniques provide accurate means to detect morphological deterioration of cartilage in the later stages of OA, but these methods are not sensitive to the subtle biochemical changes during early disease stages. Novel quantitative techniques with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide direct and indirect assessments of cartilage composition, and thus allow for earlier detection and tracking of OA. This review describes the most prominent quantitative MRI techniques to date—dGEMRIC, T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, and sodium imaging. Other, less-validated methods for quantifying cartilage composition are also described—Ultrashort echo time (UTE), gagCEST, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). For each technique, this article discusses the proposed biochemical correlates, as well its advantages and limitations for clinical and research use. The article concludes with a detailed discussion of how the field of quantitative MRI has progressed to provide information regarding two specific patient populations through clinical research—patients with anterior cruciate ligament rupture and patients with impingement in the hip. While quantitative imaging techniques continue to rapidly evolve, specific challenges for each technique as well as challenges to clinical applications remain. PMID:23833729

  17. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregni, M.; Paganelli, C.; Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Baroni, G.; Keall, P. J.; Riboldi, M.

    2016-01-01

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  18. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI.

    PubMed

    Seregni, M; Paganelli, C; Lee, D; Greer, P B; Baroni, G; Keall, P J; Riboldi, M

    2016-01-21

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  19. Brain Morphometry using MRI in Schizophrenia Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanshina, I.; Pirogov, Yu.; Kupriyanov, D.; Orlova, V.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been the focus of intense neuroimaging research. Although its fundamental pathobiology remains elusive, neuroimaging studies provide evidence of abnormalities of cerebral structure and function in patients with schizophrenia. We used morphometry as a quantitative method for estimation of volume of brain structures. Seventy eight right-handed subjects aged 18-45 years were exposed to MRI-examination. Patients were divided into 3 groups: patients with schizophrenia, their relatives and healthy controls. The volumes of interested structures (caudate nucleus, putamen, ventricles, frontal and temporal lobe) were measured using T2-weighted MR-images. Correlations between structural differences and functional deficit were evaluated.

  20. Threats to ultra-high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2009-08-01

    In 2004 the European Commission (EC) adopted a directive restricting occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. This directive (2004/40/CE), which examines the possible health risks of the electromagnetic fields from mobile phones, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and other devices, concluded that upper limits on radiation and applied electromagnetic fields are necessary to prevent workers from suffering any undue acute health effects. But although not initially intended, the biggest impact of the directive could be on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is used in hospitals worldwide to produce images of unrivalled quality of the brain and other soft tissues.

  1. Clinical image: MRI during migraine with aura

    SciTech Connect

    McNeal, A.C.

    1996-03-01

    Migraine refers to severe headaches that are usually unilateral, throbbing, and associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and phonophobia. Migraine with aura (formerly called {open_quotes}classic migraine{close_quotes}) consists of the headache preceded or accompanied by neurological dysfunction. This dysfunction (aura) usually involves visual and sensory symptoms. The patient described herein experienced migraine with aura. MRI during and after the attack showed a reversible abnormality of the right posterior cerebral artery, with no parenchymal lesions. This appears to be the first report of abnormal MR vascular imaging during migraine with aura. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  2. MRI of absent left pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Debatin, J F; Moon, R E; Spritzer, C E; MacFall, J; Sostman, H D

    1992-01-01

    Unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery, more accurately referred to as unilateral proximal interruption of a pulmonary artery, is a rare congenital anomaly that may occur as an isolated lesion or in association with other congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. Diagnosis of associated lesions is imperative as early detection and intervention may significantly improve the patient's prognosis. We present the case of an adult patient who had come to our attention after suffering neurological decompression illness related to scuba diving. The patient's cardiopulmonary anatomy was evaluated using MRI gated spin echo, cine, and breath-held fast spoiled recalled echo sequences.

  3. MRI staging of low rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shihab, Oliver C; Moran, Brendan J; Heald, Richard J; Quirke, Philip; Brown, Gina

    2009-03-01

    Low rectal tumours, especially those treated by abdominoperineal excision (APE), have a high rate of margin involvement when compared with tumours elsewhere in the rectum. Correct surgical management to minimise this rate of margin involvement is reliant on highly accurate imaging, which can be used to plan the planes of excision. In this article we describe the techniques for accurate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment and a novel staging system for low rectal tumours. Using this staging system it is possible for the radiologist to demonstrate accurately tumour-free planes for surgical excision of low rectal tumours. PMID:18810451

  4. TH-A-BRF-11: Image Intensity Non-Uniformities Between MRI Simulation and Diagnostic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MRI simulation for MRI-based radiotherapy demands that patients be setup in treatment position, which frequently involves use of alternative radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations to accommodate immobilized patients. However, alternative RF coil geometries may exacerbate image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) beyond those observed in diagnostic MRI, which may challenge image segmentation and registration accuracy as well as confound studies assessing radiotherapy response when MR simulation images are used as baselines for evaluation. The goal of this work was to determine whether differences in IINU exist between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo sequence (TE/TR:20/500ms, rBW:62.5kHz, TH/skip:5/5mm). MR simulation images were obtained by wrapping two flexible phased-array RF coils around the phantom. Diagnostic MR images were obtained by placing the phantom into a commercial phased-array head coil. Pre-scan normalization was enabled in both cases. Images were transferred offline and corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) were calculated for each slice. Wilcoxon matched-pairs and Mann-Whitney tests compared CV values between original and N3 images and between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Results: Significant differences in CV were detected between original and N3 images in both MRI simulation and diagnostic MRI groups (p=0.010, p=0.010). In addition, significant differences in CV were detected between original MR simulation and original and N3 diagnostic MR images (p=0.0256, p=0.0016). However, no significant differences in CV were detected between N3 MR simulation images and original or N3 diagnostic MR images, demonstrating the importance of correcting MR simulation images beyond pre-scan normalization prior to use in radiotherapy. Conclusions: Alternative RF coil configurations used in MRI simulation can Result in

  5. Functional MRI reveals expert-novice differences during sport-related anticipation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michael J; Bishop, Daniel T; Jackson, Robin C; Abernethy, Bruce

    2010-01-27

    We examined the effect of expertise on cortical activation during sports anticipation using functional MRI. In experiment 1, recreational players predicted badminton stroke direction and the pattern of active clusters was consistent with a proposed perception-of-action network. This pattern was not replicated in a stimulus-matched, action-unrelated control task. In experiment 2, players of three different skill levels anticipated stroke direction from clips occluded either 160 ms before or 80 ms after racquet-shuttle contact. Early-occluded sequences produced more activation than late-occluded sequences overall, in most cortical regions of interest, but experts showed an additional enhancement in medial, dorsolateral and ventrolateral frontal cortex. Anticipation in open-skill sports engages cortical areas integral to observing and understanding others' actions; such activity is enhanced in experts.

  6. fMRI variability and the localization of languages in the bilingual brain.

    PubMed

    Mahendra, Nidhi; Plante, Elena; Magloire, Joël; Milman, Lisa; Trouard, Theodore P

    2003-07-01

    The cerebral localization of multiple languages is a topic of active research. This study presents a method for assessing whether partial overlap of active voxels reflects differential language localization, or simply the variability known to occur with multiple runs of the same task in fMRI studies. Two groups of bilingual subjects (early and later learners of L2) performed word fluency and sentence generation tasks in both languages. The degree of separation for regions of activation did not exceed that associated with run-to-run variability for either task or either group. Early bilinguals, however, showed greater total numbers of active voxels than Late bilinguals for both tasks. This effect occurred despite a lack of a behavioral performance differences by the two groups.

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for prostate cancer localization.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A S N; Reinsberg, S A; Sohaib, S A; Charles-Edwards, E M; Jhavar, S; Christmas, T J; Thompson, A C; Bailey, M J; Corbishley, C M; Fisher, C; Leach, M O; Dearnaley, D P

    2009-02-01

    Radiotherapy dose escalation improves tumour control in prostate cancer but with increased toxicity. Boosting focal tumour only may allow dose escalation with acceptable toxicity. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy can deliver this, but visualization of the tumour remains limiting. CT or conventional MRI techniques are poor at localizing tumour, but dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) may be superior. 18 patients with prostate cancer had T(2) weighted (T2W) and DCE-MRI prior to prostatectomy. The prostate was sectioned meticulously so as to achieve accurate correlation between imaging and pathology. The accuracy of DCE-MRI for cancer detection was calculated by a pixel-by-pixel correlation of quantitative DCE-MRI parameter maps and pathology. In addition, a radiologist interpreted the DCE-MRI and T2W images. The location of tumour on imaging was compared with histology, and the accuracy of DCE-MRI and T2W images was then compared. Pixel-by-pixel comparison of quantitative parameter maps showed a significant difference between the benign peripheral zone and tumour for the parameters K(trans), v(e) and k(ep). Calculation of areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the pharmacokinetic parameters were only "fair" discriminators between cancer and benign gland. Interpretation of DCE-MRI and T2W images by a radiologist showed DCE-MRI to be more sensitive than T2W images for tumour localization (50% vs 21%; p = 0.006) and similarly specific (85% vs 81%; p = 0.593). The superior sensitivity of DCE-MRI compared with T2W images, together with its high specificity, is arguably sufficient for its use in guiding radiotherapy boosts in prostate cancer.

  8. DCE-MRI as a Biomarker for Prediction of Radiation-Induced Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Y.; Tsien, C.I.; Sundgren, P.C.; Nagesh, V.; D.Normolle; Buchtel, H.; Junck, L.; Lawrence, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether early assessment of cerebral microvessel injury can predict late neurocognitive dysfunction after brain radiation therapy (RT). Experimental Design Ten patients who underwent partial brain RT participated in a prospective dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI study. DCE-MRI was acquired prior to, at week 3 and 6 during, and 1 month and 6 months after RT. Neuropsychological tests were performed pre-RT and at the post-RT MRI follow-ups. The correlations between early delayed changes in neurocognitive functions and early changes in vascular parameters during RT were analyzed. Results No patients had tumor progression up to 6 months after RT. Vascular volumes and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability increased significantly in the high dose regions during RT by 11% and 52% (P < .05), respectively, followed by a decrease after RT. Changes in both vascular volume and BBB permeability correlated with the doses accumulated at the time of scans at week 3 and 6 during RT and 1 month after RT (P < .03). Changes in verbal learning scores 6 months after RT were significantly correlated with changes in vascular volumes of left temporal (p<.02) and frontal lobes (P < .03) and changes in BBB permeability of left frontal lobes during RT (P < .007). Similar correlation was found between recall scores and BBB permeability. Conclusion Our data suggest that the early changes in cerebral vasculature may predict delayed alterations in verbal learning and total recall, which are important components of neurocognitive function. Additional studies are required for validation of these findings. PMID:19223506

  9. Generative FDG-PET and MRI model of aging and disease progression in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dukart, Juergen; Kherif, Ferath; Mueller, Karsten; Adaszewski, Stanislaw; Schroeter, Matthias L; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Draganski, Bogdan

    2013-04-01

    The failure of current strategies to provide an explanation for controversial findings on the pattern of pathophysiological changes in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) motivates the necessity to develop new integrative approaches based on multi-modal neuroimaging data that captures various aspects of disease pathology. Previous studies using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) report controversial results about time-line, spatial extent and magnitude of glucose hypometabolism and atrophy in AD that depend on clinical and demographic characteristics of the studied populations. Here, we provide and validate at a group level a generative anatomical model of glucose hypo-metabolism and atrophy progression in AD based on FDG-PET and sMRI data of 80 patients and 79 healthy controls to describe expected age and symptom severity related changes in AD relative to a baseline provided by healthy aging. We demonstrate a high level of anatomical accuracy for both modalities yielding strongly age- and symptom-severity- dependant glucose hypometabolism in temporal, parietal and precuneal regions and a more extensive network of atrophy in hippocampal, temporal, parietal, occipital and posterior caudate regions. The model suggests greater and more consistent changes in FDG-PET compared to sMRI at earlier and the inversion of this pattern at more advanced AD stages. Our model describes, integrates and predicts characteristic patterns of AD related pathology, uncontaminated by normal age effects, derived from multi-modal data. It further provides an integrative explanation for findings suggesting a dissociation between early- and late-onset AD. The generative model offers a basis for further development of individualized biomarkers allowing accurate early diagnosis and treatment evaluation.

  10. Assessment of Liver Fibrosis Using Fast Strain-Encoded (FSENC) MRI Driven by Inherent Cardiac Motion

    PubMed Central

    Harouni, Ahmed A.; Gharib, Ahmed M.; Osman, Nael F.; Morse, Caryn; Heller, Theo; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An external driver-free MRI method for assessment of liver fibrosis offers a promising non-invasive tool for diagnosis and monitoring of liver disease. Lately, the heart’s intrinsic motion and MR tagging have been utilized for the quantification of liver strain. However, MR tagging requires multiple breath-hold acquisitions and substantial post-processing. This work proposes a fast strain-encoded (FSENC) MRI methodology to measure the peak strain (Sp) in the liver’s left lobe, which is in close proximity and caudal to the heart. Additionally, a new method is introduced to measure heart-induced shear wave velocity (SWV) inside the liver. Methods Phantom and in-vivo experiments (11 healthy subjects, and 11 patients with liver fibrosis) were conducted. Reproducibility experiments were performed in seven healthy subjects. Results Peak liver strain Sp significantly decreased in fibrotic liver compared healthy liver (6.46%±2.27% vs. 12.49%±1.76%, P<0.05). Heart-induced SWV significantly increased in patients compared to healthy subjects (0.15±0.04 m/s vs. 0.63±0.32 m/s, P<0.05). Reproducibility analysis yielded no significant difference in Sp (P=0.47) or SWV (P=0.56). Conclusion Accelerated external driver-free noninvasive assessment of left liver lobe strain and shear wave velocity is feasible using strain-encoded MRI. The two measures significantly separate healthy subjects from patients with fibrotic liver. PMID:25081734

  11. RF HEATING OF MRI-ASSISTED CATHETER STEERING COILS FOR INTERVENTIONAL MRI

    PubMed Central

    Settecase, Fabio; Hetts, Steven W.; Martin, Alastair J.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Evans, Lee; Malba, Vincent; Saeed, Maythem; Arenson, Ronald L.; Kucharzyk, Walter; Wilson, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radiofrequency (RF) related heating of conductive wire coils used in magnetically steerable endovascular catheters. MATERIALS AND METHODS A 3-axis microcoil was fabricated onto a 1.8 Fr catheter tip. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MRI system using an agarose gel filled vessel phantom, a transmit/receive body RF coil and a steady state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence, and a fluoroptic thermometry system. Temperature was measured without simulated blood flow at varying distances from magnet isocenter and varying flip angles. Additional experiments were performed with laser-lithographed single-axis microcoil-tipped microcatheters in air and in a saline bath with varied grounding of the microcoil wires. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of RF heating was performed in pigs at 1.5 T with coil-tipped catheters in various positions in the common carotid arteries with SSFP pulse sequence on and off, and under physiologic flow and zero flow conditions. RESULTS In tissue-mimicking agarose gel, RF heating resulted in a maximal temperature increase of 0.35°C after 15 minutes of imaging, 15 cm from magnet isocenter. For a single axis microcoil, maximal temperature increases were 0.73-1.91°C in air and 0.45-0.55°C in saline. In vivo, delayed contrast enhanced MRI revealed no evidence of vascular injury and histopathological sections from the common carotid arteries confirmed the lack of vascular damage. CONCLUSIONS Microcatheter tip microcoils for endovascular catheter steering in MRI experience minimal RF heating under the conditions tested. These data provide the basis for further in vivo testing of this promising technology for endovascular interventional MRI. PMID:21075019

  12. Epigone migraine vertigo (EMV): a late migraine equivalent.

    PubMed

    Pagnini, P; Vannucchi, P; Giannoni, B; Pecci, R

    2014-02-01

    Migrainous headache is determined by pathogenetic mechanisms that are also able to affect the peripheral and/or central vestibular system, so that vestibular symptoms may substitute and/or present with headache. We are convinced that there can be many different manifestations of vestibular disorders in migrainous patients, representing true different clinical entities due to their different characteristics and temporal relashionship with headache. Based on such considerations, we proposed a classification of vertigo and other vestibular disorders related to migraine, and believe that a particular variant of migraine-related vertigo should be introduced, namely "epigone migraine vertigo" (EMV): this could be a kind of late migraine equivalent, i.e. a kind of vertigo, migrainous in origin, starting late in the lifetime that substitutes, as an equivalent, pre-existing migraine headache. To clarify this particular clinical picture, we report three illustrative clinical cases among 28 patients collected during an observation period of 13 years (November 1991 - November 2004). For all patients, we collected complete personal clinical history. All patients underwent standard neurotological examination, looking for spontaneous-positional, gaze-evoked and caloric induced nystagmus, using an infrared video camera. We also performed a head shaking test (HST) and an head thrust test (HTT). Ocular motility was tested looking at saccades and smooth pursuit. To exclude other significant neurological pathologies, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium was performed. During the three months after the first visit, patients were invited to keep a diary noting frequency, intensity and duration of vertigo attacks. After that period, we suggested that they use prophylactic treatment with flunarizine (5 mg per day) and/or acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg per day), or propranolol (40 mg twice a day). All patients were again recommended to note in their diary the frequency

  13. Evolution of late-life fecundity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rauser, C L; Tierney, J J; Gunion, S M; Covarrubias, G M; Mueller, L D; Rose, M R

    2006-01-01

    Late-life fecundity has been shown to plateau at late ages in Drosophila analogously to late-life mortality rates. In this study, we test an evolutionary theory of late life based on the declining force of natural selection that can explain the occurrence of these late-life plateaus in Drosophila. We also examine the viability of eggs laid by late-age females and test a population genetic mechanism that may be involved in the evolution of late-life fecundity: antagonistic pleiotropy. Together these experiments demonstrate that (i) fecundity plateaus at late ages, (ii) plateaus evolve according to the age at which the force of natural selection acting on fecundity reaches zero, (iii) eggs laid by females in late life are viable and (iv) antagonistic pleiotropy is involved in the evolution of late-life fecundity. This study further supports the evolutionary theory of late life based on the age-specific force of natural selection.

  14. Application of micro-PIXE, MRI and light microscopy for research in wood science and dendroecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merela, M.; Pelicon, P.; Vavpetič, P.; Regvar, M.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Serša, I.; Poličnik, H.; Pokorny, B.; Levanič, T.; Oven, P.

    2009-06-01

    Beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) branches were topped and after five months the wound response was analyzed by PIXE, 3D-MRI and light microscopy. From freshly cut and deeply frozen sample 30 μm thick longitudinal-radial tissue sections were prepared for anatomical investigations and micro-PIXE analysis. Light microscopy revealed the structural response to wounding, i.e. occurrence of the reaction zone between the exposed and dehydrated dead tissue and healthy sound wood. The reaction zone was characterized by tylosis in vessels and accumulation of colored deposits in parenchyma cells, fibres and vessels. 3D MRI of a parallel sample showed that the moisture content in the reaction zone was three times higher than in normal healthy wood. Micro-PIXE mapping at margins of compromised wood in beech revealed an increased concentration of potassium in the reaction zone. The increase in the calcium concentration was associated with the dehydrated tissue adjacent to reaction zones. In addition, micro-PIXE was used to determine the elemental distribution in annual tree rings. This may be relevant for retrospective assessment of environmental pollution in wood by measuring yearly increments as a biomonitoring tool. The analysis of European larch ( Larix decidua Mill.) wood revealed a high similarity between optical characteristics (i.e. late versus earlywood) and elemental (e.g. Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Zn) distribution.

  15. Protein MRI contrast agent with unprecedented metal selectivity and sensitivity for liver cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shenghui; Yang, Hua; Qiao, Jingjuan; Pu, Fan; Jiang, Jie; Hubbard, Kendra; Hekmatyar, Khan; Langley, Jason; Salarian, Mani; Long, Robert C; Bryant, Robert G; Hu, Xiaoping Philip; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J

    2015-05-26

    With available MRI techniques, primary and metastatic liver cancers that are associated with high mortality rates and poor treatment responses are only diagnosed at late stages, due to the lack of highly sensitive contrast agents without Gd(3+) toxicity. We have developed a protein contrast agent (ProCA32) that exhibits high stability for Gd(3+) and a 10(11)-fold greater selectivity for Gd(3+) over Zn(2+) compared with existing contrast agents. ProCA32, modified from parvalbumin, possesses high relaxivities (r1/r2: 66.8 mmol(-1)⋅s(-1)/89.2 mmol(-1)⋅s(-1) per particle). Using T1- and T2-weighted, as well as T2/T1 ratio imaging, we have achieved, for the first time (to our knowledge), robust MRI detection of early liver metastases as small as ∼0.24 mm in diameter, much smaller than the current detection limit of 10-20 mm. Furthermore, ProCA32 exhibits appropriate in vivo preference for liver sinusoidal spaces and pharmacokinetics for high-quality imaging. ProCA32 will be invaluable for noninvasive early detection of primary and metastatic liver cancers as well as for monitoring treatment and guiding therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery.

  16. Spatial and temporal analysis of fMRI data on word and sentence reading.

    PubMed

    Haller, Sven; Klarhoefer, Markus; Schwarzbach, Jens; Radue, Ernst W; Indefrey, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Written language comprehension at the word and the sentence level was analysed by the combination of spatial and temporal analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Spatial analysis was performed via general linear modelling (GLM). Concerning the temporal analysis, local differences in neurovascular coupling may confound a direct comparison of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response estimates between regions. To avoid this problem, we parametrically varied linguistic task demands and compared only task-induced within-region BOLD response differences across areas. We reasoned that, in a hierarchical processing system, increasing task demands at lower processing levels induce delayed onset of higher-level processes in corresponding areas. The flow of activation is thus reflected in the size of task-induced delay increases. We estimated BOLD response delay and duration for each voxel and each participant by fitting a model function to the event-related average BOLD response. The GLM showed increasing activations with increasing linguistic demands dominantly in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the left superior temporal gyrus (STG). The combination of spatial and temporal analysis allowed a functional differentiation of IFG subregions involved in written language comprehension. Ventral IFG region (BA 47) and STG subserve earlier processing stages than two dorsal IFG regions (BA 44 and 45). This is in accordance with the assumed early lexical semantic and late syntactic processing of these regions and illustrates the complementary information provided by spatial and temporal fMRI data analysis of the same data set.

  17. Simulation of arthroscopic surgery using MRI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, Geoffrey; Genetti, Jon

    1994-01-01

    With the availability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology in the medical field and the development of powerful graphics engines in the computer world the possibility now exists for the simulation of surgery using data obtained from an actual patient. This paper describes a surgical simulation system which will allow a physician or a medical student to practice surgery on a patient without ever entering an operating room. This could substantially lower the cost of medial training by providing an alternative to the use of cadavers. This project involves the use of volume data acquired by MRI which are converted to polygonal form using a corrected marching cubes algorithm. The data are then colored and a simulation of surface response based on springy structures is performed in real time. Control for the system is obtained through the use of an attached analog-to-digital unit. A remote electronic device is described which simulates an imaginary tool having features in common with both arthroscope and laparoscope.

  18. Prostate contouring in MRI guided biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Vikal, Siddharth; Haker, Steven; Tempany, Clare; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    With MRI possibly becoming a modality of choice for detection and staging of prostate cancer, fast and accurate outlining of the prostate is required in the volume of clinical interest. We present a semi-automatic algorithm that uses a priori knowledge of prostate shape to arrive at the final prostate contour. The contour of one slice is then used as initial estimate in the neighboring slices. Thus we propagate the contour in 3D through steps of refinement in each slice. The algorithm makes only minimum assumptions about the prostate shape. A statistical shape model of prostate contour in polar transform space is employed to narrow search space. Further, shape guidance is implicitly imposed by allowing only plausible edge orientations using template matching. The algorithm does not require region-homogeneity, discriminative edge force, or any particular edge profile. Likewise, it makes no assumption on the imaging coils and pulse sequences used and it is robust to the patient's pose (supine, prone, etc.). The contour method was validated using expert segmentation on clinical MRI data. We recorded a mean absolute distance of 2.0 ± 0.6 mm and dice similarity coefficient of 0.93 ± 0.3 in midsection. The algorithm takes about 1 second per slice. PMID:21132083

  19. Prostate contouring in MRI guided biopsy.

    PubMed

    Vikal, Siddharth; Haker, Steven; Tempany, Clare; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2009-03-27

    With MRI possibly becoming a modality of choice for detection and staging of prostate cancer, fast and accurate outlining of the prostate is required in the volume of clinical interest. We present a semi-automatic algorithm that uses a priori knowledge of prostate shape to arrive at the final prostate contour. The contour of one slice is then used as initial estimate in the neighboring slices. Thus we propagate the contour in 3D through steps of refinement in each slice. The algorithm makes only minimum assumptions about the prostate shape. A statistical shape model of prostate contour in polar transform space is employed to narrow search space. Further, shape guidance is implicitly imposed by allowing only plausible edge orientations using template matching. The algorithm does not require region-homogeneity, discriminative edge force, or any particular edge profile. Likewise, it makes no assumption on the imaging coils and pulse sequences used and it is robust to the patient's pose (supine, prone, etc.). The contour method was validated using expert segmentation on clinical MRI data. We recorded a mean absolute distance of 2.0 ± 0.6 mm and dice similarity coefficient of 0.93 ± 0.3 in midsection. The algorithm takes about 1 second per slice. PMID:21132083

  20. XTC MRI: sensitivity improvement through parameter optimization.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Kai; Mata, Jaime F; Wang, Hsuan-Tsung J; Tobias, William A; Cates, Gordon D; Brookeman, James R; Hagspiel, Klaus D; Mugler, John P

    2007-06-01

    Xenon polarization Transfer Contrast (XTC) MRI pulse sequences permit the gas exchange of hyperpolarized xenon-129 in the lung to be measured quantitatively. However, the pulse sequence parameter values employed in previously published work were determined empirically without considering the now-known gas exchange rates and the underlying lung physiology. By using a theoretical model for the consumption of magnetization during data acquisition, the noise intensity in the computed gas-phase depolarization maps was minimized as a function of the gas-phase depolarization rate. With such optimization the theoretical model predicted an up to threefold improvement in precision. Experiments in rabbits demonstrated that for typical imaging parameter values the optimized XTC pulse sequence yielded a median noise intensity of only about 3% in the depolarization maps. Consequently, the reliable detection of variations in the average alveolar wall thickness of as little as 300 nm can be expected. This improvement in the precision of the XTC MRI technique should lead to a substantial increase in its sensitivity for detecting pathological changes in lung function.

  1. MRI guidance for focused ultrasound surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based monitoring has been shown in recent years to enhance the effectiveness of minimally or noninvasive thermal therapy techniques, such as focused ultrasound surgery. MR imaging's unique soft tissue contrast and ability to image in three dimensions and in any orientation make it extremely useful for treatment planning and for imaging the tissue response to the therapy. The temperature sensitivity of several intrinsic parameters enables MRI to visualize and quantify the progress an ongoing thermal treatment. The most useful temperature-sensitive parameter appears to be the proton resonant frequency, which allows for precise and accurate temperature measurements in water-based tissues. By acquiring a time series of quantitative temperature images, it is possible to monitor the accumulated thermal dose delivered to the target tissue and accurately predict the areas that are thermally ablated, while at the same time ensuring nearby critical structures are not heated. The method is currently used in an FDA approved focused ultrasound device for the treatment of uterine fibroids. Our research and clinical experience with these techniques will be reviewed.

  2. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Eric S.; Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  3. Tracking brain arousal fluctuations with fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Catie; Leopold, David A.; Schölvinck, Marieke Louise; Mandelkow, Hendrik; Picchioni, Dante; Liu, Xiao; Ye, Frank Q.; Turchi, Janita N.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in brain activity accompanying shifts in vigilance and arousal can interfere with the study of other intrinsic and task-evoked characteristics of brain function. However, the difficulty of tracking and modeling the arousal state during functional MRI (fMRI) typically precludes the assessment of arousal-dependent influences on fMRI signals. Here we combine fMRI, electrophysiology, and the monitoring of eyelid behavior to demonstrate an approach for tracking continuous variations in arousal level from fMRI data. We first characterize the spatial distribution of fMRI signal fluctuations that track a measure of behavioral arousal; taking this pattern as a template, and using the local field potential as a simultaneous and independent measure of cortical activity, we observe that the time-varying expression level of this template in fMRI data provides a close approximation of electrophysiological arousal. We discuss the potential benefit of these findings for increasing the sensitivity of fMRI as a cognitive and clinical biomarker. PMID:27051064

  4. Multi-modal image registration: matching MRI with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alic, Lejla; Haeck, Joost C.; Klein, Stefan; Bol, Karin; van Tiel, Sandra T.; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Bijster, Magda; Niessen, Wiro J.; Bernsen, Monique; Veenland, Jifke F.; de Jong, Marion

    2010-03-01

    Spatial correspondence between histology and multi sequence MRI can provide information about the capabilities of non-invasive imaging to characterize cancerous tissue. However, shrinkage and deformation occurring during the excision of the tumor and the histological processing complicate the co registration of MR images with histological sections. This work proposes a methodology to establish a detailed 3D relation between histology sections and in vivo MRI tumor data. The key features of the methodology are a very dense histological sampling (up to 100 histology slices per tumor), mutual information based non-rigid B-spline registration, the utilization of the whole 3D data sets, and the exploitation of an intermediate ex vivo MRI. In this proof of concept paper, the methodology was applied to one tumor. We found that, after registration, the visual alignment of tumor borders and internal structures was fairly accurate. Utilizing the intermediate ex vivo MRI, it was possible to account for changes caused by the excision of the tumor: we observed a tumor expansion of 20%. Also the effects of fixation, dehydration and histological sectioning could be determined: 26% shrinkage of the tumor was found. The annotation of viable tissue, performed in histology and transformed to the in vivo MRI, matched clearly with high intensity regions in MRI. With this methodology, histological annotation can be directly related to the corresponding in vivo MRI. This is a vital step for the evaluation of the feasibility of multi-spectral MRI to depict histological groundtruth.

  5. SQUID-detected ultra-low field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, Michelle; Matlashov, Andrei; Volegov, Petr

    2013-04-01

    MRI remains the premier method for non-invasive imaging of soft-tissue. Since the first demonstration of ULF MRI the trend has been towards ever higher magnetic fields. This is because the signal, and efficiency of Faraday detectors, increases with ever higher magnetic fields and corresponding Larmor frequencies. Nevertheless, there are many compelling reasons to continue to explore MRI at much weaker magnetic fields, the so-called ultra-low field or (ULF) regime. In the past decade many excellent proof-of-concept demonstrations of ULF MRI have been made. These include combined MRI and magnetoencephalography, imaging in the presence of metal, unique tissue contrast, and implementation in situations where a high magnetic field is simply impractical. These demonstrations have routinely used pulsed pre-polarization (at magnetic fields from ∼10 to 100 mT) followed by read-out in a much weaker (1-100 μT) magnetic fields using the ultra-sensitive Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) sensor. Even with pre-polarization and SQUID detection, ULF MRI suffers from many challenges associated with lower magnetization (i.e. signal) and inherently long acquisition times compared to conventional >1 T MRI. These are fundamental limitations imposed by the low measurement and gradient fields used. In this review article we discuss some of the techniques, potential applications, and inherent challenges of ULF MRI.

  6. White Matter Development during Adolescence as Shown by Diffusion MRI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Yuan, Weihong

    2010-01-01

    Previous volumetric developmental MRI studies of the brain have shown white matter development continuing through adolescence and into adulthood. This review presents current findings regarding white matter development and organization from diffusion MRI studies. The general trend during adolescence (age 12-18 years) is towards increasing…

  7. Study Design in fMRI: Basic Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Edson, Jr.; Barker, Gareth J.

    2006-01-01

    There is a wide range of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study designs available for the neuroscientist who wants to investigate cognition. In this manuscript we review some aspects of fMRI study design, including cognitive comparison strategies (factorial, parametric designs), and stimulus presentation possibilities (block,…

  8. Lying about Facial Recognition: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, S.; Mbwana, J.; Adeyemo, A.; Sawyer, A.; Hailu, A.; VanMeter, J.

    2009-01-01

    Novel deception detection techniques have been in creation for centuries. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a neuroscience technology that non-invasively measures brain activity associated with behavior and cognition. A number of investigators have explored the utilization and efficiency of fMRI in deception detection. In this study,…

  9. Precursors and Correlates of Anxiety Trajectories from Late Childhood to Late Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letcher, Primrose; Sanson, Ann; Smart, Diana; Toumbourou, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The present research employed a prospective, multi-informant design to examine precursors and correlates of differing anxiety profiles from late childhood to late adolescence. The sample consisted of 626 boys and 667 girls who are participants in the Australian Temperament Project, a large, longitudinal, community-based study that has followed…

  10. Acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity after radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients: Consequential late damage

    SciTech Connect

    Heemsbergen, Wilma D. . E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl; Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Koper, Peter; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: Late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity after radiotherapy can be partly explained by late effects of acute toxicity (consequential late damage). We studied whether there is a direct relationship between acute and late GI toxicity. Patients and Methods: A total of 553 evaluable patients from the Dutch dose escalation trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. We defined three outcomes for acute reactions: 1) maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity, 2) maximum acute mucous discharge (AMD), and 3) maximum acute proctitis. Within a multivariable model, late endpoints (overall toxicity and five toxicity indicators) were studied as a function of acute toxicity, pretreatment symptoms, and relevant dose parameters. Results: At multivariable analysis, AMD and acute proctitis were strong predictors for overall toxicity, 'intermittent bleeding,' and 'incontinence pads' (p {<=} 0.01). For 'stools {>=}6/day' all three were strong predictors. No significant associations were found for 'severe bleeding' and 'use of steroids.' The predictive power of the dose parameters remained at the same level or became weaker for most late endpoints. Conclusions: Acute GI toxicity is an independent significant predictor of late GI toxicity. This suggests a significant consequential component in the development of late GI toxicity.

  11. Biparametric versus multiparametric MRI in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logager, Vibeke; Baslev, Ingerd; Møller, Jakob M; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2016-01-01

    Background Since multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) of the prostate exceeds 30 min, minimizing the evaluation time of significant (Gleason scores > 6) prostate cancer (PCa) would be beneficial. A reduced protocol might be sufficient for the diagnosis. Purpose To study whether a short unenhanced biparametric MRI (bp-MRI) matches mp-MRI in detecting significant PCa. Material and Methods A total of 204 men (median age, 65 years; mean ± SD, 64.1; range 45–75 years; median serum PSA level, 14 ng/mL; range, 2.2–120 ng/mL; median prostate volume, 60 mL; range, 23–263 mL) fulfilled the criteria for being enrolled. They underwent mp-MRI and prostate biopsy from January through June 2014. Of the included patients, 9.3% underwent prostatectomy, 90.7% had TRUS-bx, and 10.8 had MRI-targeted TRUS-bx. Two radiologists separately assessed the mp-MRI examination (T2-weighted [T2W] imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI], apparent diffusion coefficient map [ADC-map] and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging [DCE]). Two months later, the bp-MRI version (T2W imaging, DWI, and ADC-map) was evaluated. Results Reader 1: Assessing mp-MRI: 0 false negatives, sensitivity of 1, and specificity 0.04. Assessing bp-MRI: four false negatives, sensitivity of 0.94, and specificity 0.15. Reader 2: Assessing mp-MRI: five false negatives, sensitivity of 0.93, and specificity 0.16. Assessing bp-MRI: three false negatives, sensitivity of 0.96, and specificity 0.15. Intra-reader agreement Cohen’s Kappa (κ) was 0.87 for reader 1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83–0.92) and 0.84 for reader 2 (95% CI 0.78–0.89). Conclusion Bp-MRI is as good as mp-MRI at detecting PCa. A large prospective study seems to be strongly warranted. PMID:27583170

  12. Widespread, prolonged late Middle to Late Ordovician upwelling in North America: A proxy record of glaciation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Michael C.; Steffen, Jessica B.

    2003-01-01

    Late Middle to Late Ordovician subtidal ramp carbonates of New Mexico, Texas, and Oklahoma contain abundant spiculitic chert (to 70% chert by volume) and phosphate (1 5 wt%), indicating that these rocks formed in an extensive upwelling zone. Upwelling began in the late Middle Ordovician (ca. 454 Ma) and persisted until the end of the Ordovician. Late Ordovician cherty carbonates also occur along the U.S. Cordilleran margin, in board of organic-rich graptolitic shale and chert. The widespread occurrence of Late Ordovician cherty and phosphatic carbonates on southern and western Laurentia, in addition to phosphate-rich, cool-water carbonates over much of the North American Midcontinent, suggests vigorous thermohaline circulation related to prolonged (10 14 Ma) Gondwana glaciation.

  13. Late diagnosis of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sesso, R; Belasco, A G; Ajzen, H

    1996-11-01

    A comparison was made between patients with a late diagnosis of chronic renal failure (1 month or less before starting dialysis, N = 96) and those with an early diagnosis (6 months or more, N = 45) in terms of the following aspects: referral characteristics during the pre-dialysis phase, demographic details and patient biochemistry prior to maintenance dialysis. Information was obtained by surveying consecutive patients with primary renal disease admitted to a university dialysis unit in São Paulo. Fifty-three percent of all patients surveyed had a late diagnosis. These patients had a lower median duration of symptoms (2 vs 6 months, P < 0.01) and were less likely to be referred for dialysis by a nephrologist (9% vs 51%, P < 0.001) than early diagnosis patients. In the early diagnosis group, 7 patients (16%) had follow-up care for less than 6 months and 11 (24%) did not receive any follow-up; 21 patients (47%) did not follow a low-protein diet. At the start of dialysis, patients with a late diagnosis had higher blood pressure and a higher rate of pulmonary infections (19% vs 4%, P = 0.03). Mean concentrations of BUN, serum creatinine and potassium were significantly higher and mean blood hematocrit was lower for the late diagnosis group. After 3 months of dialysis, the mortality rate was higher in the late than in the early diagnosis group (22.9% vs 6.7%, P = 0.02). Late diagnosis of chronic renal failure and lack of adequate follow-up care, prior to the start of dialysis, are common. Interventions to promote early diagnosis of chronic renal failure and to improve compliance with regular nephrological follow-up can be important to reduce the morbidity and the mortality of patients with chronic renal insufficiency. PMID:9196548

  14. The late early Miocene Sabine River

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, E. )

    1990-09-01

    Work on a new late early Miocene vertebrate fossil site, in a paleochannel deposit of the upper Carnahan Bayou Member of the lower Fleming Formation, has revealed unexpected data on the course and nature of the Sabine River of that time. Screen washing for smaller vertebrate remains at the site, just west of the Sabine River in Newton County, central eastern Texas, has resulted in the recovery of early Permian, Early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian), Paleocene/Eocene, late Eocene, and Oligocene/Miocene fossils, in addition to the main early Miocene fauna. The reworked fossils, as well as distinctive mineral grains, show that the late early Miocene Sabine River was connected to the Texas/Oklahoma/Arkansas boundary section of the Red River, as well as to rivers draining the southern Ouachita Mountains. These rivers must have joined the Texas/Louisiana boundary section of the Sabine River somewhere in northwest Louisiana at that time. This suggests that the Louisiana section of the present Red River pirated the Texas/Oklahoma/Arkansas boundary section of the river some time after the early Miocene. The preservation of recognizable fossils transported hundreds of miles in a large river itself requires explanation. It is speculated here that the late early Miocene Sabine River incorporated a large amount of the then recently deposited volcanic ash from the Trans-Pecos Volcanic Field. Montmorillonite clay from the altered volcanic ash would have made the river very turbid, which could have allowed coarse sand-sized particles to be carried in the suspended load of the river, rather than in its bed load (where they would have been destroyed by the rolling chert gravel). Additional evidence for such long-distance fossil transport in the late early Miocene rivers of the western Gulf Coastal Plain comes from the abundant Cretaceous fossils of the upper Oakville Formation of southeast Texas and the Siphonina davisi zone of the southeast Texas subsurface.

  15. Late Paleozoic orogeny in Alaska's Farewell terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D.C.; Dumoulin, J.; Layer, P.; Sunderlin, D.; Roeske, S.; McClelland, B.; Harris, A.G.; Abbott, G.; Bundtzen, T.; Kusky, T.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence is presented for a previously unrecognized late Paleozoic orogeny in two parts of Alaska's Farewell terrane, an event that has not entered into published scenarios for the assembly of Alaska. The Farewell terrane was long regarded as a piece of the early Paleozoic passive margin of western Canada, but is now thought, instead, to have lain between the Siberian and Laurentian (North American) cratons during the early Paleozoic. Evidence for a late Paleozoic orogeny comes from two belts located 100-200 km apart. In the northern belt, metamorphic rocks dated at 284-285 Ma (three 40Ar/39Ar white-mica plateau ages) provide the main evidence for orogeny. The metamorphic rocks are interpreted as part of the hinterland of a late Paleozoic mountain belt, which we name the Browns Fork orogen. In the southern belt, thick accumulations of Pennsylvanian-Permian conglomerate and sandstone provide the main evidence for orogeny. These strata are interpreted as the eroded and deformed remnants of a late Paleozoic foreland basin, which we name the Dall Basin. We suggest that the Browns Fork orogen and Dall Basin comprise a matched pair formed during collision between the Farewell terrane and rocks to the west. The colliding object is largely buried beneath Late Cretaceous flysch to the west of the Farewell terrane, but may have included parts of the so-called Innoko terrane. The late Paleozoic convergent plate boundary represented by the Browns Fork orogen likely connected with other zones of plate convergence now located in Russia, elsewhere in Alaska, and in western Canada. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. MRI-based brain atrophy rates in ADNI phase 2: acceleration and enrichment considerations for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xue; Ching, Christopher R K; Mezher, Adam; Gutman, Boris A; Hibar, Derrek P; Bhatt, Priya; Leow, Alex D; Jack, Clifford R; Bernstein, Matt A; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to assess statistical power to detect treatment effects in Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived brain biomarkers. We used unbiased tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to analyze n = 5,738 scans, from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2 participants scanned with both accelerated and nonaccelerated T1-weighted MRI at 3T. The study cohort included 198 healthy controls, 111 participants with significant memory complaint, 182 with early mild cognitive impairment (EMCI) and 177 late mild cognitive impairment (LMCI), and 155 AD patients, scanned at screening and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The statistical power to track brain change in TBM-based imaging biomarkers depends on the interscan interval, disease stage, and methods used to extract numerical summaries. To achieve reasonable sample size estimates for potential clinical trials, the minimal scan interval was 6 months for LMCI and AD and 12 months for EMCI. TBM-based imaging biomarkers were not sensitive to MRI scan acceleration, which gave results comparable with nonaccelerated sequences. ApoE status and baseline amyloid-beta positron emission tomography data improved statistical power. Among healthy, EMCI, and LMCI participants, sample size requirements were significantly lower in the amyloid+/ApoE4+ group than for the amyloid-/ApoE4- group. ApoE4 strongly predicted atrophy rates across brain regions most affected by AD, but the remaining 9 of the top 10 AD risk genes offered no added predictive value in this cohort.

  17. Split gradient coils for simultaneous PET-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Michael; Bowtell, Richard; Green, Dan; Pittard, Simon; Lucas, Alun; Hawkes, Rob; Carpenter, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Combining positron emission tomography (PET) and MRI necessarily involves an engineering tradeoff as the equipment needed for the two modalities vies for the space closest to the region where the signals originate. In one recently described scanner configuration for simultaneous positron emission tomography–MRI, the positron emission tomography detection scintillating crystals reside in an 80-mm gap between the 2 halves of a 1-T split-magnet cryostat. A novel set of gradient and shim coils has been specially designed for this split MRI scanner to include an 110-mm gap from which wires are excluded so as not to interfere with positron detection. An inverse boundary element method was necessarily employed to design the three orthogonal, shielded gradient coils and shielded Z0 shim coil. The coils have been constructed and tested in the hybrid positron emission tomography-MRI system and successfully used in simultaneous positron emission tomography-MRI experiments. PMID:19780167

  18. Contrast Enhanced MRI in the Diagnosis of HCC

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Eric; Spilseth, Benjamin; Wang, Xiao; Taylor, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Imaging plays a critical role in HCC screening and diagnosis. Initial screening of patients at risk for HCC is performed with ultrasound. Confirmation of HCC can then be obtained by Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), due to the relatively high specificity of both techniques. This article will focus on reviewing MRI techniques for imaging HCC, felt by many to be the exam of choice for HCC diagnosis. MRI relies heavily upon the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents and while primarily extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents are used, there is an emerging role of hepatobiliary contrast agents in HCC imaging. The use of other non-contrast enhanced MRI techniques for assessing HCC will also be discussed and these MRI strategies will be reviewed in the context of the pathophysiology of HCC to help understand the MR imaging appearance of HCC. PMID:26854161

  19. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed.

  20. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157